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Sample records for encoding putative cell-surface

  1. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Kenworthy, Anne K.; Nichols, Benjamin J.; Remmert, Catha L.; Hendrix, Glenn M.; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (>4 μm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface. PMID:15173190

  2. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, Anne K; Nichols, Benjamin J; Remmert, Catha L; Hendrix, Glenn M; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-07

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (> 4 microm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface.

  3. An ORF from Bacillus licheniformis encodes a putative DNA repressor.

    PubMed

    Naval, J; Aguilar, D; Serra, X; Pérez-Pons, J A; Piñol, J; Lloberas, J; Querol, E

    2000-01-01

    The complete sequence of a reading frame adjacent to the endo-beta-1,3-1,4-D-glucanase gene from Bacillus licheniformis is reported. It encodes a putative 171 amino acid residues protein with either, low significant sequence similarity in data banks or the corresponding orthologue in the recently sequenced Bacillus subtilis genome. Computer analyses predict a canonical Helix-Turn-Helix motif characteristic of bacterial repressors/DNA binding proteins. A maxicells assay shows that the encoded polypeptide is expressed. A DNA-protein binding, assay performed by gel electrophoresis shows that the expressed protein specifically binds to Bacillus licheniformis DNA.

  4. Ssg, a putative glycosyltransferase, functions in lipo- and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and cell surface-related properties in Pseudomonas alkylphenolia.

    PubMed

    Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Lee, Kyoung; Cho, Ah Ra; Cho, Kyungyun; Anderson, Erin M; Lam, Joseph S

    2011-02-01

    In the presence of vaporized p-cresol, Pseudomonas alkylphenolia KL28 forms specialized aerial structures (SAS). A transposon mutant of strain KL28 (C23) incapable of forming mature SAS was isolated. Genetic analysis of the C23 mutant revealed the transposon insertion in a gene (ssg) encoding a putative glycosyltransferase, which is homologous to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 PA5001 gene. Deletion of ssg in KL28 caused the loss of lipopolysaccharide O antigen and altered the composition of the exopolysaccharide. Wild-type KL28 produced a fucose-, glucose- and mannose-rich exopolysaccharide, while the mutant exopolysaccharide completely lacked fucose and mannose, resulting in an exopolysaccharide with glucose as the major component. The mutant strain showed reduced surface spreading, pellicle and biofilm formation, probably due to the cumulative effect of lipopolysaccharide truncation and altered exopolysaccharide composition. Our results show that the ssg gene of KL28 is involved in both lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and thus plays an important role in cell surface properties and cell-cell interactions of P. alkylphenolia.

  5. A Genetically Encoded Alkyne Directs Palladium-Mediated Protein Labeling on Live Mammalian Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  6. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  7. Crystal Structure of a Virus-Encoded Putative Glycosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Baxa, Ulrich; Zhang, Ying; Steven, Alasdair C.; Lewis, Gentry L.; Van Etten, James L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-22

    The chloroviruses (family Phycodnaviridae), unlike most viruses, encode some, if not most, of the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their structural proteins. Annotation of the gene product B736L from chlorovirus NY-2A suggests that it is a glycosyltransferase. The structure of the recombinantly expressed B736L protein was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, and the protein was shown to have two nucleotide-binding folds like other glycosyltransferase type B enzymes. This is the second structure of a chlorovirus-encoded glycosyltransferase and the first structure of a chlorovirus type B enzyme to be determined. B736L is a retaining enzyme and belongs to glycosyltransferase family 4. The donor substrate was identified as GDP-mannose by isothermal titration calorimetry and was shown to bind into the cleft between the two domains in the protein. The active form of the enzyme is probably a dimer in which the active centers are separated by about 40 {angstrom}.

  8. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Nakamura, S; Kawasaki, H; Takada, K; Mizutani, S; Aono, R; Horikoshi, K

    1997-02-01

    The triangular disk-shaped halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 has a glycoprotein on its cell surface. The complete gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) was cloned and sequenced. The gene has an open reading frame of 2586 bp, and a potential archaeal promoter sequence approximately 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The mature CSG is composed of 828 amino acids and is preceded by a signal sequence of 34 amino acid residues. A hydropathy analysis showed a hydrophobic stretch at the C-terminus, that probably serves as a transmembrane domain. The amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG showed 52.1% and 43.2% identities to those from the Halobacterium halobium and Haloferax volcanii CSGs, respectively. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature Ha. japonica CSG, sites that were distinctly different from those in Hb. halobium and Hf. volcanii. The Ha. japonica CSG gene was expressed in Escherichia coli.

  10. Structure and heterologous expression of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein from Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Takada, K; Nakamura, S; Horikoshi, K

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 was cloned and sequenced. The structural gene consisted from an open reading frame of 2,586 bp. A potential promoter sequence was found about 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG revealed that the mature CSG consisted of 828 amino acids. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature sequence. The cloned CSG gene of Ha. japonica was expressed in closely-related halophilic archaea.

  11. Phylogeny of Algal Sequences Encoding Carbohydrate Sulfotransferases, Formylglycine-Dependent Sulfatases, and Putative Sulfatase Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs) while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs). Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs) is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs, and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute toward future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering. PMID:26635861

  12. Alternative promoters regulate transcription of the gene that encodes stem cell surface protein AC133.

    PubMed

    Shmelkov, Sergey V; Jun, Lin; St Clair, Ryan; McGarrigle, Deirdre; Derderian, Christopher A; Usenko, Jaroslav K; Costa, Carla; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Xinzheng; Rafii, Shahin

    2004-03-15

    AC133 is a member of a novel family of cell surface proteins with 5 transmembrane domains. The function of AC133 is unknown. Although AC133 mRNA is detected in different tissues, its expression in the hematopoietic system is restricted to CD34+ stem cells. AC133 is also expressed on stem cells of other tissues, including endothelial progenitor cells. However, despite the potential importance of AC133 to the field of stem cell biology, nothing is known about the transcriptional regulation of AC133 expression. In this report we showed that the human AC133 gene has at least 9 distinctive 5'-untranslated region (UTR) exons, resulting in the formation of at least 7 alternatively spliced 5'-UTR isoforms of AC133 mRNA, which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We found that transcription of these AC133 isoforms is controlled by 5 alternative promoters, and we demonstrated their activity on AC133-expressing cell lines using a luciferase reporter system. We also showed that in vitro methylation of 2 of these AC133 promoters completely suppresses their activity, suggesting that methylation plays a role in their regulation. Identification of tissue-specific AC133 promoters may provide a novel method to isolate tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells.

  13. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  14. CD44 in Differentiated Embryonic Stem Cells: Surface Expression and Transcripts Encoding Multiple Variants

    PubMed Central

    Haegel, Hélène; Dierich, Andrée

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the surface-adhesion molecule CD44 was investigated during the in vitro differentiation of the embryonic stem (ES) cell line D3. By immunofluorescence analysis, totipotent, undifferentiated ES cells did not show surface expression of CD44, although two transcripts of approximately 1.6 and 3.3 kb were detected on Northern blots. Following 1 week of differentiation in either suspension or substrate-attached cultures, CD44 appeared on the surface of some D3 cells, and synthesis of an additional 4.5 kb mRNA species was detected on Northern blots. At this stage, at least three distinct transcripts encoding CD44 variants were induced within the cultures, resulting from alternative splicing of additional exons in the variable domains of CD44. From PCR analysis, they all appeared to contain the variable exon v10, and two of them in addition contained v6. Taken together, these results suggest that CD44 may play a role in cell migration and adhesion in the early development of the mouse embryo. PMID:7542511

  15. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hoc1, a Suppressor of Pkc1, Encodes a Putative Glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, A. M.; Mhaiskar, V.; Manus, V.; Galibert, F.; Dean, N.

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PKC1 encodes a protein kinase C isozyme that regulates cell wall synthesis. Here we describe the characterization of HOC1, a gene identified by its ability to suppress the cell lysis phenotype of pkc1-371 cells. The HOC1 gene (Homologous to OCH1) is predicted to encode a type II integral membrane protein that strongly resembles Och1p, an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase. Immunofluorescence studies localized Hoc1p to the Golgi apparatus. While overexpression of HOC1 rescued the pkc1-371 temperature-sensitive cell lysis phenotype, disruption of HOC1 lowered the restrictive temperature of the pkc1-371 allele. Disruption of HOC1 also resulted in hypersensitivity to Calcofluor White and hygromycin B, phenotypes characteristic of defects in cell wall integrity and protein glycosylation, respectively. The function of HOC1 appears to be distinct from that of OCH1. Taken together, these results suggest that HOC1 encodes a Golgi-localized putative mannosyltransferase required for the proper construction of the cell wall. PMID:9055074

  16. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  17. The Caenorhabditis elegans unc-93 gene encodes a putative transmembrane protein that regulates muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    unc-93 is one of a set of five interacting genes involved in the regulation or coordination of muscle contraction in Caenorhabditis elegans. Rare altered-function alleles of unc-93 result in sluggish movement and a characteristic "rubber band" uncoordinated phenotype. By contrast, null alleles cause no visibly abnormal phenotype, presumably as a consequence of the functional redundancy of unc-93. To understand better the role of unc-93 in regulating muscle contraction, we have cloned and molecularly characterized this gene. We isolated transposon- insertion alleles and used them to identify the region of DNA encoding the unc-93 protein. Two unc-93 proteins differing at their NH2 termini are potentially encoded by transcripts that differ at their 5' ends. The putative unc-93 proteins are 700 and 705 amino acids in length and have two distinct regions: the NH2 terminal portion of 240 or 245 amino acids is extremely hydrophilic, whereas the rest of the protein has multiple potential membrane-spanning domains. The unc-93 transcripts are low in abundance and the unc-93 gene displays weak codon usage bias, suggesting that the unc-93 protein is relatively rare. The unc-93 protein has no sequence similarity to proteins listed in current data- bases. Thus, unc-93 is likely to encode a novel membrane-associated muscle protein. We discuss possible roles for the unc-93 protein either as a component of an ion transport system involved in excitation- contraction coupling in muscle or in coordinating muscle contraction between muscle cells by affecting the functioning of gap junctions. PMID:1313436

  18. The adnAB locus, encoding a putative helicase-nuclease activity, is essential in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingli; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Chipot, Ludovic; Piotrowski, Emilie; Bertrand, Claire; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial mechanism that repairs a wide range of DNA lesions, including the most deleterious ones, double-strand breaks (DSBs). This multistep process is initiated by the resection of the broken DNA ends by a multisubunit helicase-nuclease complex exemplified by Escherichia coli RecBCD, Bacillus subtilis AddAB, and newly discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis AdnAB. Here we show that in Streptomyces, neither recBCD nor addAB homologues could be detected. The only putative helicase-nuclease-encoding genes identified were homologous to M. tuberculosis adnAB genes. These genes are conserved as a single copy in all sequenced genomes of Streptomyces. The disruption of adnAB in Streptomyces ambofaciens and Streptomyces coelicolor could not be achieved unless an ectopic copy was provided, indicating that adnAB is essential for growth. Both adnA and adnB genes were shown to be inducible in response to DNA damage (mitomycin C) and to be independently transcribed. Introduction of S. ambofaciens adnAB genes in an E. coli recB mutant restored viability and resistance to UV light, suggesting that Streptomyces AdnAB could be a functional homologue of RecBCD and be involved in DNA damage resistance.

  19. The Pun1 gene for pungency in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Liu, Kede; Mazourek, Michael; Moore, Shanna L; Yoo, Eun Young; Kim, Byung-Dong; Paran, Ilan; Jahn, Molly M

    2005-06-01

    Pungency in Capsicum fruits is due to the accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs. The biosynthesis of capsaicin is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of an aromatic moiety, vanillylamine, by a branched-chain fatty acid. Many of the enzymes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis are not well characterized and the regulation of the pathway is not fully understood. Based on the current pathway model, candidate genes were identified in public databases and the literature, and genetically mapped. A published EST co-localized with the Pun1 locus which is required for the presence of capsaicinoids. This gene, AT3, has been isolated and its nucleotide sequence has been determined in an array of genotypes within the genus. AT3 showed significant similarity to acyltransferases in the BAHD superfamily. The recessive allele at this locus contains a deletion spanning the promoter and first exon of the predicted coding region in every non-pungent accession tested. Transcript and protein expression of AT3 was tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Virus-induced gene silencing of AT3 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of capsaicinoids, a phenotype consistent with pun1. In conclusion, gene mapping, allele sequence data, expression profile and silencing analysis collectively indicate that the Pun1 locus in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase, and the pun1 allele, used in pepper breeding for nearly 50 000 years, results from a large deletion at this locus.

  20. A novel strategy for obtaining kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter.

    PubMed

    Aufsatz, Werner; Nehlin, Lilian; Voronin, Viktor; Schmidt, Agnes; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2009-02-01

    The use of bacterial antibiotic resistance markers in transgenic plants raises concerns about horizontal gene transfer to soil bacteria. We report here that kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana can be achieved by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter, which presumably imports kanamycin into chloroplasts to interfere with ribosomal RNA. Homologs of the transporter exist in other plant species, suggesting this strategy may be generally useful for selecting transformed plant cells.

  1. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  2. Rice tungro spherical virus polyprotein processing: identification of a virus-encoded protease and mutational analysis of putative cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Thole, V; Hull, R

    1998-07-20

    Rice tungro spherical virus encodes a large polyprotein containing motifs with sequence similarity to viral serine-like proteases and RNA polymerases. Polyclonal antisera raised against domains of the putative protease and polymerase in fusion with glutathione S-transferase detected a protein of about 35 kDa and, in very low amounts, a protein of about 70 kDa, respectively, in extracts from infected plants. In in vitro transcription/translation systems and in Escherichia coli we demonstrated a proteolytic activity in the C-terminal region of the polyprotein. This protease rapidly cleaved its polyprotein precursors in vitro. Mutating a potential cleavage site located N-terminal to the protease domain, Gln2526-Asp2527, diminished processing. The transversion mutation at the putative C-terminal cleavage site of the protease, at Gln2852-Ala2853, led to a delayed and partial processing.

  3. Molecular analysis of region 1 of the Escherichia coli K5 antigen gene cluster: a region encoding proteins involved in cell surface expression of capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Pazzani, C; Rosenow, C; Boulnois, G J; Bronner, D; Jann, K; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of region 1 of the K5 antigen gene cluster of Escherichia coli was determined. This region is postulated to encode functions which, at least in part, participate in translocation of polysaccharide across the periplasmic space and onto the cell surface. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed five genes that encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 75.7, 60.5, 44, 43, and 27 kDa. The 27-kDa protein was 70.7% homologous to the CMP-2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid synthetase enzyme encoded by the E. coli kdsB gene, indicating the presence of a structural gene for a similar enzyme within the region 1 operon. The 43-kDa protein was homologous to both the Ctrb and BexC proteins encoded by the Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae capsule gene clusters, respectively, indicating common stages in the expression of capsules in these gram-negative bacteria. However, no homology was detected between the 75.7, 60.5-, and 44-kDa proteins and any of the proteins so far described for the H. influenzae and N. meningitidis capsule gene clusters. Images PMID:8397187

  4. Global negative regulation of Streptomyces coelicolor antibiotic synthesis mediated by an absA-encoded putative signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, P; Riggle, P J; Santos, R A; Champness, W C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomycete antibiotic synthesis is coupled to morphological differentiation such that antibiotics are produced as a colony sporulates. Streptomyces coelicolor produces several structurally and genetically distinct antibiotics. The S. coelicolor absA locus was defined by four UV-induced mutations that globally blocked antibiotic biosynthesis without blocking morphological differentiation. We show that the absA locus encodes a putative eubacterial two-component sensor kinase-response regulator system. All four mutations lie within a single open reading frame, designated absA1, which is predicted to encode a sensor histidine kinase. A second gene downstream of absA1, absA2, is predicted to encode the cognate response regulator. In marked contrast to the antibiotic-deficient phenotype of the previously described absA mutants, the phenotype caused by disruption mutations in the absA locus is precocious hyperproduction of the antibiotics actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. Precocious hyperproduction of these antibiotics is correlated with premature expression of XylE activity in a transcriptional fusion to an actinorhodin biosynthetic gene. We propose that the absA locus encodes a signal transduction mechanism that negatively regulates synthesis of the multiple antibiotics produced by S. coelicolor. PMID:8655502

  5. Large Putative PEST-like Sequence Motif at the Carboxyl Tail of Human Calcium Receptor Directs Lysosomal Degradation and Regulates Cell Surface Receptor Level*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Northup, John K.; Ray, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A deletion between amino acid residues Ser895 and Val1075 in the carboxyl terminus of the human calcium receptor (hCaR), which causes autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, showed enhanced signaling activity and increased cell surface expression in HEK293 cells (Lienhardt, A., Garabédian, M. G., Bai, M., Sinding, C., Zhang, Z., Lagarde, J. P., Boulesteix, J., Rigaud, M., Brown, E. M., and Kottler, M. L. (2000) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 85, 1695–1702). To identify the underlying mechanism(s) for these increases, we investigated the effects of carboxyl tail truncation and deletion in hCaR mutants using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging approaches to define motifs that participate in regulating cell surface numbers of this G protein-coupled receptor. Our data indicate a rapid constitutive receptor internalization of the cell surface hCaR, accumulating in early (Rab7 positive) and late endosomal (LAMP1 positive) sorting compartments, before targeting to lysosomes for degradation. Recycling of hCaR back to the cell surface was also evident. Truncation and deletion mapping defined a 51-amino acid sequence between residues 920 and 970 that is required for targeting to lysosomes and degradation but not for internalization or recycling of the receptor. No singular sequence motif was identified, instead the required sequence elements seem to distribute throughout this entire interval. This interval includes a high proportion of acidic and hydroxylated amino acid residues, suggesting a similarity to PEST-like degradation motif (PESTfind score of +10) and several glutamine repeats. The results define a novel large PEST-like sequence that participates in the sorting of internalized hCaR routed to the lysosomal/degradation pathway that regulates cell surface receptor numbers. PMID:22158862

  6. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  7. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  8. Analysis of cDNA encoding the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) of Schistosoma mansoni; a putative target for chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, S P; McKerrow, J H; Newport, G R; Wang, C C

    1988-01-01

    Because of the lack of de novo purine biosynthesis, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) is a critical enzyme in the purine metabolic pathway of the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni. Using a cDNA clone encoding mouse HGPRTase and subsequently a synthetic oligonucleotide derived from sequencing a clone of genomic DNA, two clones were isolated from an adult schistosome cDNA library. One clone is 1.374 Kilobases (Kb) long and has an open reading frame of 693 bases. The deduced 231 amino acid sequence has 47.9% identity in a 217 amino acid overlap with human HGPRTase. Northern blot analysis indicates that the full length of mRNA for the S. mansoni HGPRTase is 1.45-1.6 Kb. Analysis of the primary structures of the putative active site for human and parasite enzymes reveal specific differences which may eventually be exploitable in the design of drugs for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Images PMID:3136439

  9. Cloning and expression of a gene from Streptomyces scabies encoding a putative pathogenicity factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bukhalid, R A; Loria, R

    1997-01-01

    We cloned a 9.4-kb DNA fragment from Streptomyces scabies ATCC 41973 that allows the nonpathogen Streptomyces lividans 66 TK24 to necrotize and colonize potato tuber slices and produce scab-like symptoms on potato minitubers. Deletion analysis demonstrated that activity was conferred by a 1.6-kb DNA region. Sequence analysis of a 2.4-kb DNA fragment spanning the DNA region necessary for activity revealed three open reading frames (ORFs). The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF1, designated ORFtnp, showed high levels of identity with the first 233 amino acids of the putative transposases of the IS1164 elements from Rhodococcus rhodochrous (71%) and Mycobacterium bovis (68%), members of the Staphylococcus aureus IS256 family of transposases. No significant homologies to ORF2 and ORF3 were found in the nucleic acid and protein databases. ORFtnp is located 5' of ORF3. ORF2 is incomplete and is located 3' of ORF3. Subcloning of the individual ORFs demonstrated that ORF3, designated nec1, is sufficient for necrotizing activity in S. lividans 66 TK24. S. lividans 66 TK24 expressing nec1 does not produce thaxtomin A but produces an unidentified extracellular water-soluble compound that causes necrosis on potato tuber discs. The G+C content of nec1 suggests that it has moved horizontally from another genus. Southern analysis of ORFtnp and nec1 demonstrate that these genes are physically linked in Streptomyces strains, including S. scabies and Streptomyces acidiscabies strains, that are pathogenic on potato and that produce the phytotoxin thaxtomin A. These data suggest that nec1 may have been mobilized into S. scabies through a transposition event mediated by ORFtnp. PMID:9401037

  10. The floral organ number4 gene encoding a putative ortholog of Arabidopsis CLAVATA3 regulates apical meristem size in rice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huangwei; Qian, Qian; Liang, Wanqi; Yin, Changsong; Tan, Hexin; Yao, Xuan; Yuan, Zheng; Yang, Jun; Huang, Hai; Luo, Da; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-11-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism regulating meristem development in the monocot rice (Oryza sativa), we describe here the isolation and characterization of three floral organ number4 (fon4) alleles and the cloning of the FON4 gene. The fon4 mutants showed abnormal enlargement of the embryonic and vegetative shoot apical meristems (SAMs) and the inflorescence and floral meristems. Likely due to enlarged SAMs, fon4 mutants produced thick culms (stems) and increased numbers of both primary rachis branches and floral organs. We identified FON4 using a map-based cloning approach and found it encodes a small putatively secreted protein, which is the putative ortholog of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA3 (CLV3) gene. FON4 transcripts mainly accumulated in the small group of cells at the apex of the SAMs, whereas the rice ortholog of CLV1 (FON1) is expressed throughout the SAMs, suggesting that the putative FON4 ligand might be sequestered as a possible mechanism for rice meristem regulation. Exogenous application of the peptides FON4p and CLV3p corresponding to the CLV3/ESR-related (CLE) motifs of FON4 and CLV3, respectively, resulted in termination of SAMs in rice, and treatment with CLV3p caused consumption of both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLV pathway in limiting meristem size is conserved in both rice and Arabidopsis. However, exogenous FON4p did not have an obvious effect on limiting both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLE motifs of Arabidopsis CLV3 and FON4 are potentially functionally divergent.

  11. CaPrx, a Coffea arabica gene encoding a putative class III peroxidase induced by root-knot nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Severino, Fábio E; Brandalise, Marcos; Costa, Carolina S; Wilcken, Sílvia R S; Maluf, Mirian P; Gonçalves, Wallace; Maia, Ivan G

    2012-08-01

    Class III peroxidases (Prxs) are enzymes involved in a multitude of physiological and stress-related processes in plants. Here, we report on the characterization of a putative peroxidase-encoding gene from Coffea arabica (CaPrx) that is expressed in early stages of root-knot nematode (RKN) infection. CaPrx showed enhanced expression in coffee roots inoculated with RKN (at 12 h post-inoculation), but no significant difference in expression was observed between susceptible and resistant plants. Assays using transgenic tobacco plants harboring a promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion revealed that the CaPrx promoter was exclusively active in the galls induced by RKN. In cross sections of galls, GUS staining was predominantly localized in giant cells. Up-regulation of GUS expression in roots of transgenic plants following RKN inoculation was observed within 16 h. Moreover, no increase in GUS expression after treatment with jasmonic acid was detected. Altogether, these results point to a putative role of this peroxidase in the general coffee response to RKN infection.

  12. Identification of a gene sequence encoding a putative pyruvate oxidoreductase in Serpulina pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Rayment, S J; Lee, B J; Hampson, D J; Livesley, M A

    1998-09-01

    Serpulina pilosicoli is a recently described species of intestinal spirochaete which can be identified using a species-specific monoclonal antibody BJL/AC1 reactive with a 29-kDa protein located in the cell envelope. A genomic library of the type strain of S. pilosicoli P43/6/78T was created in lambda zap express and screened using BJL/AC1. Single positive clones were isolated and excised into the phagemid vector pBK-CMV. Phagemid DNA was purified and a single clone was selected for sequencing. The size of spirochaetal DNA insert was determined by digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI and PstI as being approximately 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the protein with which the antibody reacted was determined by cycle sequencing. The insert contained an open reading frame of 285 nucleotides. Translation of the nucleotide sequence into amino acid (aa) residues showed a sequence of 275 aa. Comparison of this sequence with databases revealed homology to pyruvate oxidoreductases from various organisms found in the gastroinestinal tract. These included the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) alpha submit of Helicobacter pylori (38.8% identity in 250 aa), pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase of Escherichia coli (28.7% identify in 258 aa) and Giardia intestinalis (25.1% identity in 251 aa). A significant level of homology was also observed with hyperthermophilic bacteria such as the POR of Thermatoga maritima (38.6% in 254 aa) and the 2-ketovalerate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of Pyrococcus furiosus (34% in 262 aa).

  13. Characterization and Expression of DNA Sequences Encoding Putative Type-II Metallothioneins in the Seagrass Posidonia oceanica1

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Tommaso; Natali, Lucia; Maserti, Bianca Elena; Taddei, Sonia; Cavallini, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is a marine phanerogam, largely widespread in the Mediterranean sea, representing an important food substrate for many marine organisms. A progressive reduction of P. oceanica meadows has been reported, due to anthropogenic coastal activity. Studying mechanisms by which this species responds to environmental stresses, three DNA sequences putatively encoding metallothioneins (MTs) have been isolated, by PCR. Two sequences, Pomt2a (accession no. AJ249603) and Pomt2b (accession no. AJ249602), show high similarities with genes encoding type-II MTs and are interrupted by two and one intron, respectively. The third sequence, Pomt2c (accession no. AJ249604), is supposed to be a pseudogene, originated by retrotranscription of the Pomt2b mRNA. These sequences belong to a multigene family with at least five members. Northern hybridizations indicated that MT transcripts accumulation is constitutive and seasonally regulated. MT encoding RNAs increase after rhyzome harvesting and (at a lesser extent) after 15 d of cultivation in an aquarium. As for animal MTs, transcripts accumulation is observed also after exposure to trace metals such as copper and cadmium. In the case of copper, the effect depends on concentration. Finally, taking into consideration the great interest in studying the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the Mediterranean basin and since P. oceanica is commonly considered a bioindicator of this metal, the effect of mercury treatments on the accumulation of MT transcripts has been analyzed: in only a few experiments a small increase in the level of transcripts was recorded, suggesting that MTs are not key elements in the mercury accumulation by this species. PMID:10938373

  14. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding equine infectious anemia virus tat and putative Rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R M; Derse, D; Rice, N R

    1990-01-01

    We isolated and characterized six cDNA clones from an equine infectious anemia virus-infected cell line that displays a Rev-defective phenotype. With the exception of one splice site in one of the clones, all six cDNAs exhibited the same splicing pattern and consisted of four exons. Exon 1 contained the 5' end of the genome; exon 2 contained the tat gene from mid-genome; exon 3 consisted of a small section of env, near the 5' end of the env gene; and exon 4 contained the putative rev open reading frame from the 3' end of the genome. The structures of the cDNAs predict a bicistronic message in which Tat is encoded by exons 1 and 2 and the presumptive Rev protein is encoded by exons 3 and 4. tat translation appears to be initiated at a non-AUG codon within the first 15 codons of exon 1. Equine infectious anemia virus-specific tat activity was expressed in transient transfections with cDNA expression plasmids. The predicted wild-type Rev protein contains 30 env-derived amino acids and 135 rev open reading frame residues. All of the cDNAs had a frameshift in exon 4, leading to a truncated protein and thus providing a plausible explanation for the Rev-defective phenotype of the original cells. We used peptide antisera to detect the faulty protein, thus confirming the cDNA sequence, and to detect the normal protein in productively infected cells. Images PMID:2164593

  15. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, encoding a putative N-acetylglucosamine transferase, is involved in cell wall architecture and virulence.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity.

  16. The choC gene encoding a putative phospholipid methyltransferase is essential for growth and development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Gao, Na; Chen, Sanfeng; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) are a class of major cell membrane phospholipids that participate in many physiological processes. Three genes, choA, choB and choC, have been proposed to function in the endogenous biosynthesis of PC in Aspergillus nidulans. In this study, we characterize the choC gene encoding a putative highly conserved phospholipid methyltransferase. The previously reported choC3 mutant allele results from a mutation leading to the E177K amino acid substitution. The transcript of choC accumulates at high levels during vegetative growth and early asexual developmental phases. The deletion of choC causes severe impairment of vegetative growth, swelling of hyphal tips and the lack of both asexual and sexual development, suggesting the requirement of ChoC and PC in growth and development. Noticeably, supplementation of the mutant with the penultimate precursor of PC N, N-dimethylaminoethanol leads to full recovery of vegetative growth, but incomplete progression of asexual and sexual development, implying differential roles of PC and its intermediates in fungal growth and development. Importantly, while the choC deletion mutant shows reduced vegetative growth and precocious cell death until day 4, it regains hyphal proliferation and cell viability from day 5, indicating the presence of an alternative route for cellular membrane function in A. nidulans.

  17. Functional characterization of three genes encoding putative oxidoreductases required for cercosporin toxin biosynthesis in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Qin; Lee, Miin-Huey; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-08-01

    Cercosporin is a non-host-selective, photoactivated polyketide toxin produced by many phytopathogenic Cercospora species, which plays a crucial role during pathogenesis on host plants. Upon illumination, cercosporin converts oxygen molecules to toxic superoxide and singlet oxygen that damage various cellular components and induce lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage. Three genes (CTB5, CTB6 and CTB7) encoding putative FAD/FMN- or NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases in the cercosporin toxin biosynthetic pathway of C. nicotianae were functionally analysed. Replacement of each gene via double recombination was utilized to create null mutant strains that were completely impaired in cercosporin production as a consequence of specific interruption at the CTB5, CTB6 or CTB7 locus. Expression of CTB1, CTB5, CTB6, CTB7 and CTB8 was drastically reduced or nearly abolished when CTB5, CTB6 or CTB7 was disrupted. Production of cercosporin was revived when a functional gene cassette was introduced into the respective mutants. All ctb5, ctb6 and ctb7 null mutants retained wild-type levels of resistance against toxicity of cercosporin or singlet-oxygen-generating compounds, indicating that none of the genes plays a role in self-protection.

  18. Isolation and promoter analysis of anther-specific genes encoding putative arabinogalactan proteins in Malus x domestica.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Sunggil; Yoon, Gi-Bo; Kim, Hyojeong; Lee, Young-Pyo; Yu, Gyung-Hee; Hyung, Nam-In; Sung, Soon-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we searched for anther-specific genes involved in male gametophyte development in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh. cv. Fuji) by differential display-PCR. Three full-length cDNAs were isolated, and the corresponding genomic sequences were determined by genome walking. The identified genes showed intronless 228- to 264-bp open reading frames and shared 82-90% nucleotide sequence. Sequence analysis identified that they encoded a putative arabinogalactan protein (AGP) and were designated MdAGP1, MdAGP2, and MdAGP3, respectively. RT (reverse transcriptase)-PCR revealed that the MdAGP genes were selectively expressed in the stamen. Promoter analysis confirmed that the MdAGP3 promoter was capable of directing anther- or pollen-specific expression of the GUS reporter in tobacco and apple. Furthermore, expression of ribosome-inactivating protein under the control of the MdAGP3 promoter induced complete sporophytic male sterility as we had expected.

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of cDNAs putatively encoding carboxylesterases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1), representing three different clades (A, D and E), were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin) increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species.

  20. A Putatively Functional Haplotype in the Gene Encoding Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Markus A.; Brockmoeller, Juergen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Virsik, Patricia; Wilken, Barbara; Kuehnle, Elna; Campean, Radu; Hoffmann, Arne O.; Mueller, Katarina; Goetze, Robert G.; Neumann, Michael; Janke, Joerg H.; Nasser, Fatima; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Hille, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether genetic variability in TGFB1 is related to circulating transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) plasma concentrations after radiotherapy and to radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells. Patients and Methods: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 plasma concentrations (n = 79) were measured in patients 1 year after radiotherapy and chromosomal aberrations (n = 71) ex vivo before therapy start. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 secretion and apoptosis were measured in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 55 healthy volunteers. These phenotypes were analyzed in relation to five germline polymorphisms in the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene. Because of high linkage disequilibrium, these five polymorphisms reflect frequent genetic variation in this region. A presumed impact of TGF-{beta}1 on DNA damage or repair was measured as micronucleus formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results: We identified a hypofunctional genetic haplotype termed H3 tagging the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene encoding TGF-{beta}1. H3 was associated with lower TGF-{beta}1 plasma concentrations in patients (p = 0.01) and reduced TGF-{beta}1 secretion in irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p = 0.003). Furthermore, cells with H3 were less prone to induction of chromosomal aberrations (p = 0.001) and apoptosis (p = 0.003) by irradiation. The hypothesis that high TGF-{beta}1 could sensitize cells to DNA damage was further supported by increased micronuclei formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines when preincubated with TGF-{beta}1 before irradiation (p = 0.04). Conclusions: On the basis of TGF-{beta}1 plasma levels and radiation sensitivity of lymphoid cells, this study revealed a putatively hypofunctional TGFB1 haplotype. The significance of this haplotype and the suggested link between TGF-{beta}1 function and DNA integrity should be further explored in other cell types, as well as other experimental and clinical conditions.

  1. Alternative splicing produces two transcripts encoding putative female-biased odorant receptors in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect odorant receptors are key sensors of environmental odors, and members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily are thought to play important roles in mate finding, and oviposition site location. Much research has been done to identify putative pheromone receptors in lepidopteran male...

  2. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor.

  3. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-09-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor.

  4. Tn5563, a transposon encoding putative mercuric ion transport proteins located on plasmid pRA2 of Pseudomonas alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C C; Tham, J M; Kwong, S M; Yiin, S; Poh, C L

    1998-08-15

    Sequence analysis of pRA2, an endogenous 33-kb plasmid from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 (strain P25X), revealed the presence of a 6256-bp transposon of the Tn3 family, designated Tn5563. Tn5563, which is flanked by two 39-bp inverted repeats, encodes a transposase, a resolvase, and two open reading frames which share amino acid sequence similarities with the mercuric ion transport proteins MerT and MerP encoded by several mer operons. However, no other mer operon genes were found on Tn5563. Sequencing of a RP4::XIn hybrid plasmid indicates possible interactions between pRA2 and the P25X chromosome mediated by Tn5563.

  5. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  6. Gene ercA, Encoding a Putative Iron-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Is Involved in Regulation of Ethanol Utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Niels; Görisch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Several two-component regulatory systems are known to be involved in the signal transduction pathway of the ethanol oxidation system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 17933. These sensor kinases and response regulators are organized in a hierarchical manner. In addition, a cytoplasmic putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (Fe-ADH) encoded by ercA (PA1991) has been identified to play an essential role in this regulatory network. The gene ercA (PA1991) is located next to ercS, which encodes a sensor kinase. Inactivation of ercA (PA1991) by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette created mutant NH1. NH1 showed poor growth on various alcohols. On ethanol, NH1 grew only with an extremely extended lag phase. During the induction period on ethanol, transcription of structural genes exa and pqqABCDEH, encoding components of initial ethanol oxidation in P. aeruginosa, was drastically reduced in NH1, which indicates the regulatory function of ercA (PA1991). However, transcription in the extremely delayed logarithmic growth phase was comparable to that in the wild type. To date, the involvement of an Fe-ADH in signal transduction processes has not been reported. PMID:23813731

  7. Gene ercA, encoding a putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase, is involved in regulation of ethanol utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Niels; Görisch, Helmut; Mern, Demissew S

    2013-09-01

    Several two-component regulatory systems are known to be involved in the signal transduction pathway of the ethanol oxidation system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 17933. These sensor kinases and response regulators are organized in a hierarchical manner. In addition, a cytoplasmic putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (Fe-ADH) encoded by ercA (PA1991) has been identified to play an essential role in this regulatory network. The gene ercA (PA1991) is located next to ercS, which encodes a sensor kinase. Inactivation of ercA (PA1991) by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette created mutant NH1. NH1 showed poor growth on various alcohols. On ethanol, NH1 grew only with an extremely extended lag phase. During the induction period on ethanol, transcription of structural genes exa and pqqABCDEH, encoding components of initial ethanol oxidation in P. aeruginosa, was drastically reduced in NH1, which indicates the regulatory function of ercA (PA1991). However, transcription in the extremely delayed logarithmic growth phase was comparable to that in the wild type. To date, the involvement of an Fe-ADH in signal transduction processes has not been reported.

  8. Distribution of genes encoding putative virulence factors and fragment length polymorphisms in the vrrA gene among Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Viviane; Cabral, Diana Aparecida; Régua-Mangia, Adriana Hamond; Rabinovitch, Leon; Moreau, Gaétan; McIntosh, Douglas

    2005-12-01

    One hundred twenty-one strains of the Bacillus cereus complex, of which 80 were isolated from a variety of sources in Brazil, were screened by PCR for the presence of sequences (bceT, hblA, nheBC, plc, sph, and vip3A) encoding putative virulence factors and for polymorphisms in variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR), using a variable region of the vrrA open reading frame as the target. Amplicons were generated from isolates of B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis for each of the sequences encoding factors suggested to play a role in infections of mammals. Intriguingly, the majority of these sequences were detected more frequently in Bacillus thuringiensis than in B. cereus. The vip3A sequence, which encodes an insecticidal toxin, was detected exclusively in B. thuringiensis. VNTR analysis demonstrated the presence of five different fragment length categories in both species, with two of these being widely distributed throughout both taxa. In common with data generated from previous studies examining European, Asian, or North American populations, our investigation of Brazilian isolates supports the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered to represent a single species.

  9. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  10. Evolution of Pleopsidium (lichenized Ascomycota) S943 group I introns and the phylogeography of an intron-encoded putative homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Valérie; Haugen, Peik; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lutzoni, François

    2007-03-01

    The sporadic distribution of nuclear group I introns among different fungal lineages can be explained by vertical inheritance of the introns followed by successive losses, or horizontal transfers from one lineage to another through intron homing or reverse splicing. Homing is mediated by an intron-encoded homing endonuclease (HE) and recent studies suggest that the introns and their associated HE gene (HEG) follow a recurrent cyclical model of invasion, degeneration, loss, and reinvasion. The purpose of this study was to compare this model to the evolution of HEGs found in the group I intron at position S943 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA of the lichen-forming fungus Pleopsidium. Forty-eight S943 introns were found in the 64 Pleopsidium samples from a worldwide screen, 22 of which contained a full-length HEG that encodes a putative 256-amino acid HE, and 2 contained HE pseudogenes. The HEGs are divided into two closely related types (as are the introns that encode them) that differ by 22.6% in their nucleotide sequences. The evolution of the Pleopsidium intron-HEG element shows strong evidence for a cyclical model of evolution. The intron was likely acquired twice in the genus and then transmitted via two or three interspecific horizontal transfers. Close geographical proximity plays an important role in intron-HEG horizontal transfer because most of these mobile elements were found in Europe. Once acquired in a lineage, the intron-HEG element was also vertically transmitted, and occasionally degenerated or was lost.

  11. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted.

  12. A new superfamily of putative NTP-binding domains encoded by genomes of small DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Gorbalenya, A E; Koonin, E V; Wolf, Y I

    1990-03-12

    Statistically significant similarity was revealed between amino acid sequences of NTP-binding pattern-containing domains which are among the most conserved protein segments in dissimilar groups of ss and dsDNA viruses (papova-, parvo-, geminiviruses and P4 bacteriophage), and RNA viruses (picorna-, como- and nepoviruses) with small genomes. Within the aligned domains of 100-120 amino acid residues, three highly conserved sequence segments have been identified, i.e. 'A' and 'B' motifs of the NTP-binding pattern, and a third, C-terminal motif 'C', not described previously. The sequence of the 'B' motif in the proteins of the new superfamily is unusually variable, with substitutions, in some of the members, of the Asp residue conserved in other NTP-binding proteins. The 'C' motif is characterized by an invariant Asn residue preceded by a stretch of hydrophobic residues. As the new superfamily included a well studied DNA and RNA helicase, T antigen of SV40, helicase function could be tentatively assigned also to the other related viral putative NTP-binding proteins. On the other hand, the possibility of different and/or multiple functions for some of these proteins is discussed.

  13. The yrpAB operon of Yersinia ruckeri encoding two putative U32 peptidases is involved in virulence and induced under microaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Navais, Roberto; Méndez, Jessica; Pérez-Pascual, David; Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to dissect the virulence mechanisms of Yersinia ruckeri two adjacent genes, yrpA and yrpB, encoding putative peptidases belonging to the U32 family, were analyzed. Similar genes, with the same genetic organization were identified in genomic analysis of human-pathogenic yersiniae. RT-PCR studies indicated that these genes form an operon in Y. ruckeri. Transcriptional studies using an yrpB::lacZY fusion showed high levels of expression of these genes in the presence of peptone in the culture medium, as well as under oxygen-limited conditions. These two factors had a synergic effect on gene induction when both were present simultaneously during bacterial incubation, which indicates the important role that environmental conditions in the fish gut can play in the regulation of specific genes. LD50 experiments using an yrpA insertional mutant strain demonstrated the participation of this gene in the virulence of Y. ruckeri. PMID:24865652

  14. Putative recombination events and evolutionary history of five economically important viruses of fruit trees based on coat protein-encoding gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Boulila, Moncef

    2010-06-01

    To enhance the knowledge of recombination as an evolutionary process, 267 accessions retrieved from GenBank were investigated, all belonging to five economically important viruses infecting fruit crops (Plum pox, Apple chlorotic leaf spot, Apple mosaic, Prune dwarf, and Prunus necrotic ringspot viruses). Putative recombinational events were detected in the coat protein (CP)-encoding gene using RECCO and RDP version 3.31beta algorithms. Based on RECCO results, all five viruses were shown to contain potential recombination signals in the CP gene. Reconstructed trees with modified topologies were proposed. Furthermore, RECCO performed better than the RDP package in detecting recombination events and exhibiting their evolution rate along the sequences of the five viruses. RDP, however, provided the possible major and minor parents of the recombinants. Thus, the two methods should be considered complementary.

  15. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose. Cloning and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene family, UXS, encoding soluble and putative membrane-bound UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harper, April D; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2002-12-01

    UDP-xylose (Xyl) is an important sugar donor for the synthesis of glycoproteins, polysaccharides, various metabolites, and oligosaccharides in animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. UDP-Xyl also feedback inhibits upstream enzymes (UDP-glucose [Glc] dehydrogenase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-GlcA decarboxylase) and is involved in its own synthesis and the synthesis of UDP-arabinose. In plants, biosynthesis of UDP-Xyl is catalyzed by different membrane-bound and soluble UDP-GlcA decarboxylase (UDP-GlcA-DC) isozymes, all of which convert UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Because synthesis of UDP-Xyl occurs both in the cytosol and in membranes, it is not known which source of UDP-Xyl the different Golgi-localized xylosyltransferases are utilizing. Here, we describe the identification of several distinct Arabidopsis genes (named AtUXS for UDP-Xyl synthase) that encode functional UDP-GlcA-DC isoforms. The Arabidopsis genome contains five UXS genes and their protein products can be subdivided into three isozyme classes (A-C), one soluble and two distinct putative membrane bound. AtUxs from each class, when expressed in Escherichia coli, generate active UDP-GlcA-DC that converts UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Members of this gene family have a large conserved C-terminal catalytic domain (approximately 300 amino acids long) and an N-terminal variable domain differing in sequence and size (30-120 amino acids long). Isoforms of class A and B appear to encode putative type II membrane proteins with their catalytic domains facing the lumen (like Golgi-glycosyltransferases) and their N-terminal variable domain facing the cytosol. Uxs class C is likely a cytosolic isoform. The characteristics of the plant Uxs support the hypothesis that unique UDP-GlcA-DCs with distinct subcellular localizations are required for specific xylosylation events.

  16. An mRNA encoding a putative GABA-gated chloride channel is expressed in the human cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Bascles, L; Boue-Grabot, E; Sartor, P; Charron, G; Bloch, B; Margolskee, R F

    1997-04-01

    GABA-gated chloride channels are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS. Conserved domains among members of previously described GABAA receptor subunits were used to design degenerate sense and antisense oligonucleotides. A PCR product from this amplification was used to isolate a full-length cDNA. The predicted protein has many of the features shared by other members of the ligand-gated ion channel family. This channel subunit has significant amino acid identity (25-40%) with members of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits and thus may represent a new subfamily of the GABA receptor channel. Although we cannot rule out that this clone encodes a receptor for an unidentified ligand, it was termed GABA chi. This gene is mainly expressed in placenta and in heart; however, placenta appears to express only an unspliced mRNA. In situ hybridization reveals that the GABA chi subunit mRNA is present in the electrical conduction system of the human heart. Our results suggest that novel GABA receptors expressed outside of the CNS may regulate cardiac function.

  17. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  18. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatibility complex class II region.

    PubMed Central

    Bahram, S; Arnold, D; Bresnahan, M; Strominger, J L; Spies, T

    1991-01-01

    The class II region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class I molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class I molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class II DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by gamma interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class I molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out. Images PMID:1946428

  19. Dwarf and short grain 1, encoding a putative U-box protein regulates cell division and elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Xing, Yadi; Lou, Qijin; Feng, Ping; Liu, Song; Zhu, Meidan; Yin, Wuzhong; Fang, Shunran; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Tianquan; Sang, Xianchun; He, Guanghua

    2017-02-01

    Plant hormones coordinate a plant's responses to environmental stimuli and the endogenous developmental programs for cell division and elongation. Brassinosteroids are among the most important of these hormones in plant development. Recently, the ubiquitin-26S-proteasome system was identified to play a key role in hormone biology. In this study, we analyzed the function of a rice (Oryza sativa) gene, DSG1, which encodes a U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase. In the dsg1 mutant (an allelic mutant of tud1), the lengths of the roots, internodes, panicles, and seeds were shorter than that in the wild-type, which was due to defects in cell division and elongation. In addition, the leaves of the dsg1 mutant were wider and curled. The DSG1 protein is nuclear- and cytoplasm-localized and does not show tissue specificity in terms of its expression, which occurs in roots, culms, leaves, sheaths, and spikelets. The dsg1 mutant is less sensitive to brassinosteroid treatment than the wild-type, and DSG1 expression is negatively regulated by brassinosteroids, ethylene, auxin, and salicylic acid. These results demonstrate that DSG1 positively regulates cell division and elongation and may be involved in multiple hormone pathways.

  20. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  1. Organization of a Clostridium thermocellum gene cluster encoding the cellulosomal scaffolding protein CipA and a protein possibly involved in attachment of the cellulosome to the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, T; Béguin, P; Aubert, J P

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a 9.4-kb region of Clostridium thermocellum DNA extending from the 3' end of the gene (now termed cipA), encoding the S1/SL component of the cellulosome. Three open reading frames (ORFs) belonging to two operons were detected. They encoded polypeptides of 1,664, 688, and 447 residues, termed ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p, respectively. The COOH-terminal regions of the three polypeptides were highly similar and contained three reiterated segments of 60 to 70 residues each. Similar segments have been found at the NH2 terminus of the S-layer proteins of Bacillus brevis and Acetogenium kivui, suggesting that ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p might also be located on the cell surface. Otherwise, the sequence of ORF1p and ORF2p gave little clue concerning their potential function. However, the NH2-terminal region of ORF3p was similar to the reiterated domains previously identified in CipA as receptors involved in binding the duplicated segment of 22 amino acids present in catalytic subunits of the cellulosome. Indeed, it was found previously that ORF3p binds 125I-labeled endoglucanase CelD containing the duplicated segment (T. Fujino, P. Béguin, and J.-P. Aubert, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 94:165-170, 1992). These findings suggest that ORF3p might serve as an anchoring factor for the cellulosome on the cell surface by binding the duplicated segment that is present at the COOH end of CipA. Images PMID:8458832

  2. Arabidopsis ACA7, encoding a putative auto-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase, is required for normal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Noel; León, Gabriel

    2012-04-01

    Microgametogenesis is a complex process that involves numerous well-coordinated cell activities, ending with the production of pollen grains. Pollen development has been studied at the cytological level in Arabidopsis and other plant species, where its temporal time course has been defined. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is still unclear, since a relative small number of genes and/or processes have been identified as essential for pollen development. We have designed a methodology to select candidate genes for functional analysis, based on transcriptomic data obtained from different stages of pollen development. From our analyses, we selected At2g22950 as a candidate gene; this gene encodes a protein belonging to the auto-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase family, ACA7. Microarray data indicate that ACA7 is expressed exclusively in developing pollen grains, with the highest level of mRNA at the time of the second pollen mitosis. Our RT-PCR experiments showed that ACA7 mRNA is detected exclusively in developing flowers. Confocal microscopy experiments showed a plasma membrane localization for the recombinant GFP:ACA7 protein. We identified two different insertional mutant lines, aca7-1 and aca7-2; plants from both mutant lines displayed a normal vegetative development but showed large amounts of dead pollen grains in mature flowers assayed by Alexander's staining. Histological analysis indicated that abnormalities are detected after the first pollen mitosis and we found a strong correlation between ACA7 mRNA accumulation and the severity of the phenotype. Our results indicate that ACA7 is a plasma membrane protein that has an important role during pollen development, possibly through regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  3. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  4. Sequence and expression of GLN3, a positive nitrogen regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoding a protein with a putative zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Minehart, P L; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    The GLN3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the activation of transcription of a number of genes in response to the replacement of glutamine by glutamate as source of nitrogen. We cloned the GLN3 gene and constructed null alleles by gene disruption. GLN3 is not essential for growth, but increased copies of GLN3 lead to a drastic decrease in growth rate. The complete nucleotide sequence of the GLN3 gene was determined, revealing one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 730 amino acids, with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000. The GLN3 protein contains a single putative Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger which has homology to the Neurospora crassa NIT2 protein, the Aspergillus nidulans AREA protein, and the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the GLN3 protein binds the nitrogen upstream activation sequence of GLN1, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase. Neither control of transcription nor control of initiation of translation of GLN3 is important for regulation in response to glutamine availability. Images PMID:1682800

  5. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Xin, Zeyu; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2008-01-02

    The balance between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N), the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90) and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1) are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Asparagine tDNAs Are Integration Hotspots for Different Genomic Islands Encoding Microcin E492 Production Determinants and Other Putative Virulence Factors Present in Hypervirulent Strains.

    PubMed

    Marcoleta, Andrés E; Berríos-Pastén, Camilo; Nuñez, Gonzalo; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Due to the developing of multi-resistant and invasive hypervirulent strains, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most urgent bacterial pathogen threats in the last years. Genomic comparison of a growing number of sequenced isolates has allowed the identification of putative virulence factors, proposed to be acquirable mainly through horizontal gene transfer. In particular, those related with synthesizing the antibacterial peptide microcin E492 (MccE492) and salmochelin siderophores were found to be highly prevalent among hypervirulent strains. The determinants for the production of both molecules were first reported as part of a 13-kbp segment of K. pneumoniae RYC492 chromosome, and were cloned and characterized in E. coli. However, the genomic context of this segment in K. pneumoniae remained uncharacterized. In this work, we provided experimental and bioinformatics evidence indicating that the MccE492 cluster is part of a highly conserved 23-kbp genomic island (GI) named GIE492, that was integrated in a specific asparagine-tRNA gene (asn-tDNA) and was found in a high proportion of isolates from liver abscesses sampled around the world. This element resulted to be unstable and its excision frequency increased after treating bacteria with mitomycin C and upon the overexpression of the island-encoded integrase. Besides the MccE492 genetic cluster, it invariably included an integrase-coding gene, at least seven protein-coding genes of unknown function, and a putative transfer origin that possibly allows this GI to be mobilized through conjugation. In addition, we analyzed the asn-tDNA loci of all the available K. pneumoniae assembled chromosomes to evaluate them as GI-integration sites. Remarkably, 73% of the strains harbored at least one GI integrated in one of the four asn-tDNA present in this species, confirming them as integration hotspots. Each of these tDNAs was occupied with different frequencies, although they were 100% identical. Also, we identified

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae Asparagine tDNAs Are Integration Hotspots for Different Genomic Islands Encoding Microcin E492 Production Determinants and Other Putative Virulence Factors Present in Hypervirulent Strains

    PubMed Central

    Marcoleta, Andrés E.; Berríos-Pastén, Camilo; Nuñez, Gonzalo; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Due to the developing of multi-resistant and invasive hypervirulent strains, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most urgent bacterial pathogen threats in the last years. Genomic comparison of a growing number of sequenced isolates has allowed the identification of putative virulence factors, proposed to be acquirable mainly through horizontal gene transfer. In particular, those related with synthesizing the antibacterial peptide microcin E492 (MccE492) and salmochelin siderophores were found to be highly prevalent among hypervirulent strains. The determinants for the production of both molecules were first reported as part of a 13-kbp segment of K. pneumoniae RYC492 chromosome, and were cloned and characterized in E. coli. However, the genomic context of this segment in K. pneumoniae remained uncharacterized. In this work, we provided experimental and bioinformatics evidence indicating that the MccE492 cluster is part of a highly conserved 23-kbp genomic island (GI) named GIE492, that was integrated in a specific asparagine-tRNA gene (asn-tDNA) and was found in a high proportion of isolates from liver abscesses sampled around the world. This element resulted to be unstable and its excision frequency increased after treating bacteria with mitomycin C and upon the overexpression of the island-encoded integrase. Besides the MccE492 genetic cluster, it invariably included an integrase-coding gene, at least seven protein-coding genes of unknown function, and a putative transfer origin that possibly allows this GI to be mobilized through conjugation. In addition, we analyzed the asn-tDNA loci of all the available K. pneumoniae assembled chromosomes to evaluate them as GI-integration sites. Remarkably, 73% of the strains harbored at least one GI integrated in one of the four asn-tDNA present in this species, confirming them as integration hotspots. Each of these tDNAs was occupied with different frequencies, although they were 100% identical. Also, we identified

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding a putative stress-induced heat-shock protein from Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Elrobh, Mohamed S; Alanazi, Mohammad S; Khan, Wajahatullah; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous, induced under a number of environmental and metabolic stresses, with highly conserved DNA sequences among mammalian species. Camelus dromedaries (the Arabian camel) domesticated under semi-desert environments, is well adapted to tolerate and survive against severe drought and high temperatures for extended periods. This is the first report of molecular cloning and characterization of full length cDNA of encoding a putative stress-induced heat shock HSPA6 protein (also called HSP70B') from Arabian camel. A full-length cDNA (2417 bp) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and cloned in pET-b expression vector. The sequence analysis of HSPA6 gene showed 1932 bp-long open reading frame encoding 643 amino acids. The complete cDNA sequence of the Arabian camel HSPA6 gene was submitted to NCBI GeneBank (accession number HQ214118.1). The BLAST analysis indicated that C. dromedaries HSPA6 gene nucleotides shared high similarity (77-91%) with heat shock gene nucleotide of other mammals. The deduced 643 amino acid sequences (accession number ADO12067.1) showed that the predicted protein has an estimated molecular weight of 70.5 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.0. The comparative analyses of camel HSPA6 protein sequences with other mammalian heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed high identity (80-94%). Predicted camel HSPA6 protein structure using Protein 3D structural analysis high similarities with human and mouse HSPs. Taken together, this study indicates that the cDNA sequences of HSPA6 gene and its amino acid and protein structure from the Arabian camel are highly conserved and have similarities with other mammalian species.

  9. Cotton GalT1 Encoding a Putative Glycosyltransferase Is Involved in Regulation of Cell Wall Pectin Biosynthesis during Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development. PMID:23527103

  10. Cotton GalT1 encoding a putative glycosyltransferase is involved in regulation of cell wall pectin biosynthesis during plant development.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development.

  11. Overexpression of a cotton gene that encodes a putative transcription factor of AP2/EREBP family in Arabidopsis affects growth and development of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xia, Hui; Li, Xiao-Jie; Hu, Rong; Chen, Yun; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    In the study, a gene encoding a putative ethylene response factor of AP2/EREBP family was isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhERF12. Sequence alignment showed that GhERF12 protein contains a central AP2/ERF domain (58 amino acids) with two functional conserved amino acid residues (ala14 and asp19). Transactivation assay indicated that GhERF12 displayed strong transcription activation activity in yeast cells, suggesting that this protein may be a transcriptional activator in cotton. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that GhERF12 expression in cotton was induced by ACC and IAA. Overexpression of GhERF12 in Arabidopsis affected seedling growth and development. The GhERF12 transgenic plants grew slowly, and displayed a dwarf phenotype. The mean bolting time of the transgenic plants was delayed for about 10 days, compared with that of wild type. Further study revealed that some ethylene-related and auxin-related genes were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic plants, compared with those of wild type. Collectively, we speculated that GhERF12, as a transcription factor, may be involved in regulation of plant growth and development by activating the constitutive ethylene response likely related to auxin biosynthesis and/or signaling.

  12. A putative role for the plasma membrane potential in the control of the expression of the gene encoding the tomato high-affinity potassium transporter HAK5.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Miller, Anthony J; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    A chimeric CaHAK1-LeHAK5 transporter with only 15 amino acids of CaHAK1 in the N-terminus mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in yeast cells. Kinetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that LeHAK5 mediates a significant proportion of the high-affinity K(+) uptake shown by K(+)-starved tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. The development of high-affinity K(+) uptake, putatively mediated by LeHAK5, was correlated with increased LeHAK5 mRNA levels and a more negative electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane of root epidermal and cortical cells. However, this increase in high-affinity K(+) uptake was not correlated with the root K(+) content. Thus, (i) growth conditions that result in a hyperpolarized root plasma membrane potential, such as K(+) starvation or growth in the presence of NH(4) (+), but which do not decrease the K(+) content, lead to increased LeHAK5 expression; (ii) the presence of NaCl in the growth solution, which prevents the hyperpolarization induced by K(+) starvation, also prevents LeHAK5 expression. Moreover, once the gene is induced, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential then produces a decrease in the LeHAK5 mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that the plant membrane electrical potential plays a role in the regulation of the expression of this gene encoding a high-affinity K(+) transporter.

  13. A dominant truncation allele identifies a gene, STE20, that encodes a putative protein kinase necessary for mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ramer, S W; Davis, R W

    1993-01-01

    This work reports the identification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of STE20, a newly discovered gene involved in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating response pathway, to date one of the best understood signal transduction pathways. STE20 encodes a putative serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with a predicted molecular mass of 102 kDa. Its expression pattern is similar to that of several other protein kinases in the mating response pathway. Deletion of the kinase domain of STE20 causes sterility in both haploid mating types. This sterility can be partially suppressed by high-level production of STE12 but is not suppressible by high levels of STE4 or a dominant STE11 truncation allele. A truncation allele of STE20 was isolated that can activate the mating response pathway in the absence of exogenous mating pheromone. This allele causes dominant growth arrest that cannot be suppressed by deletions of STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. The allele is able to suppress the mating defect of a strain in which the STE20 kinase domain has been deleted, but not the mating defects of strains carrying mutations in STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. Images PMID:8421676

  14. Pear ACO genes encoding putative 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homologs are functionally expressed during fruit ripening and involved in response to salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2012-10-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final reaction of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway, converting ACC into ethylene. Past studies have shown a possible link between ACC oxidase and salicylic acid during fruit ripening in pear, but the relationship has received no more than modest study at the gene expression level. In this study, two cDNA clones encoding putative ACC oxidase, PpACO1 and PpACO2, were isolated from a cDNA library constructed by our own laboratory and produced using mRNA from mesocarp of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai. cv.Whangkeumbae). One cDNA clone, designated PpACO1 (GenBank accession No. JN807390), comprised an open reading frame of 945 bp encoding a protein of 314 amino acids. The other cDNA, designated PpACO2 (GenBank accession No. JN807392), encodes a protein with 322 amino acids that shares high similarity with the known plant ACOs. Using PCR amplification techniques, two genomic clones corresponding to PpACO1 and PpACO2 were isolated and shown to contain independently three introns with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. The PpACO1 gene product shared 99 % identity with an ACC oxidase from pear (Pyrus × bretschneideri Rehd.cv.Yali), and phylogenetic analyses clearly placed the gene product in the ACC oxidase cluster of the pear 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily tree. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the two PpACO genes are differentially expressed in pear tissues. PpACO1 and PpACO2 were predominantly expressed in fruit. The transcripts of PpACO1 were accumulated at relatively low levels in early fruit, but strongly high levels in fruit ripening and senescence stages, while the transcripts of PpACO2 were accumulated at higher levels in early fruit and much lower levels with further fruit cell development than the transcripts of PpACO1. In addition, PpACO1 gene was down-regulated in fruit by salicylic acid (SA). Nevertheless, PpACO2 gene was dramatically up-regulated in

  15. The Maize Viviparous8 Locus, Encoding a Putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-Like Peptidase, Regulates Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Coordinates Embryo and Endosperm Development1[W

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A. Mark; Koch, Karen E.; Hannah, L. Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8′oxA1a ABA 8′-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds. PMID:18203869

  16. The Maize Viviparous8 locus, encoding a putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-like peptidase, regulates abscisic acid accumulation and coordinates embryo and endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A Mark; Koch, Karen E; Hannah, L Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R

    2008-03-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8'oxA1a ABA 8'-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds.

  17. Identification of a cDNA encoding a second putative prohormone convertase related to PC2 in AtT20 cells and islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Smeekens, S P; Avruch, A S; LaMendola, J; Chan, S J; Steiner, D F

    1991-01-01

    PC2 and furin are two recently identified members of a class of mammalian proteins homologous to the yeast precursor processing protease kex2 and the bacterial subtillisins. We have used the polymerase chain reaction to identify and clone a cDNA (PC3) from the mouse AtT20 anterior pituitary cell line that represents an additional member of this growing family of mammalian proteases. PC3 encodes a 753-residue protein that begins with a signal peptide and contains a 292-residue domain closely related to the catalytic modules of PC2, furin, and kex2. Within this region 58%, 65%, and 50% of the amino acids of PC3 are identical to those of the aligned PC2, furin, and kex2 sequences, respectively, and the catalytically important Asp, His, and Ser residues are all conserved. On Northern blots, PC3 hybridizes to two transcripts of 3 and 5 kilobases. Tissue distribution studies indicate that both PC2 and PC3 are expressed in a variety of neuroendocrine tissues, including pancreatic islets and brain, but are not expressed in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and spleen. The high degree of similarity of PC3, PC2, and furin suggests that they are all members of a superfamily of mammalian proteases that are involved in the processing of prohormones and/or other protein precursors. In contrast to furin, PC3, like PC2, lacks a hydrophobic transmembrane anchor, but it has a potential C-terminal amphipathic helical segment similar to the putative membrane anchor of carboxypeptidase H. These and other differences suggest that these proteins carry out compartmentalized proteolysis within cells, such as processing within regulated versus constitutive secretory pathways. Images PMID:1988934

  18. Molecular characterisation of the STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY of genes encoding putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboglu, Banu; Pfister, Karen; Haberer, Georg; Chevalier, David; Fuchs, Angelika; Mayer, Klaus FX; Schneitz, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Background Receptor-like kinases are a prominent class of surface receptors that regulate many aspects of the plant life cycle. Despite recent advances the function of most receptor-like kinases remains elusive. Therefore, it is paramount to investigate these receptors. The task is complicated by the fact that receptor-like kinases belong to a large monophyletic family with many sub-clades. In general, functional analysis of gene family members by reverse genetics is often obscured by several issues, such as redundancy, subtle or difficult to detect phenotypes in mutants, or by decision problems regarding suitable biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, in many cases additional strategies have to be employed to allow inference of hypotheses regarding gene function. Results We approached the function of genes encoding the nine-member STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY (SRF) class of putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. Sequence comparisons show overall conservation but also divergence in predicted functional domains among SRF proteins. Interestingly, SRF1 undergoes differential splicing. As a result, SRF1 is predicted to exist in a standard receptor configuration and in a membrane-anchored receptor-like version that lacks most of the intracellular domain. Furthermore, SRF1 is characterised by a high degree of polymorphism between the Ler and Col accessions. Two independent T-DNA-based srf4 mutants showed smaller leaves while 35S::SRF4 plants displayed enlarged leaves. This is in addition to the strubbelig phenotype which has been described before. Additional single and several key double mutant combinations did not reveal obvious mutant phenotypes. Ectopic expression of several SRF genes, using the 35S promoter, resulted in male sterility. To gain possible insights into SRF gene function we employed a computational analysis of publicly available microarray data. We performed global expression profiling, coexpression analysis, and an analysis of the

  19. The putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces sp. DSM4137 is adjacent to genes encoding adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and to genes for synthesis of cobalamin.

    PubMed

    Haydock, Stephen F; Mironenko, Tatiana; Ghoorahoo, Haroun I; Leadlay, Peter F

    2004-09-30

    A type I PKS gene probe obtained from RAPB of the rapamycin producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus, strongly hybridised to 92 out of 1120 cosmids from a genomic library of the elaiophylin-producing strain Streptomyces sp. DSM4137. Partial cosmid sequencing suggested the presence of 10 separate sequences encoding type I PKS genes. One entire DNA sequence was obtained and found exactly to match the gene organisation expected for the biosynthesis of the unusual macrodiolide polyketide elaiophylin. The putative elaiophylin gene cluster contains five large open-reading frames encoding typical modular polyketide synthases, which together catalyse the synthesis of the octaketide monomer of elaiophylin. Other genes were identified that would be required for provision of the ethylmalonate extender unit, for the synthesis and attachment of 2-deoxy-L-fucose and in regulation, or in export of the product. Immediately adjacent to the putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster is a 30-kbp region containing the gene for adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and also genes involved in the biosynthesis of the cobalamin cofactor. Analysis of the latter gene set confirms the view that cbiD of the anaerobic pathway and cobF in the aerobic pathway catalyse the same methylation of precorrin-5. The proximity of these genes to the putative elaiophylin gene cluster can best be rationalised if in this organism succinyl-CoA is a significant source of the methylmalonate units for complex polyketide biosynthesis.

  20. A mutation in the Cc.arp9 gene encoding a putative actin-related protein causes defects in fruiting initiation and asexual development in the agaricomycete Coprinopsis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Ando, Yuki; Hata, Takeshi; Nakahori, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Agaricomycetes exhibit a remarkable morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelia to huge fruiting bodies. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the fruiting body development, we have isolated and characterized many Coprinopsis cinerea mutant strains defective in fruiting initiation to date. Dikaryon formation in agaricomycetes, which is followed by fruiting development, is governed by the mating type loci, A and B. Recently, mutations in the Cc.snf5 gene, which encodes a putative component of the chromatin remodeling complex switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), were shown to cause defects in A-regulated clamp cell morphogenesis, as well as in fruiting initiation. Here, we demonstrate that Cc.arp9, which encodes a putative actin-related protein associated with two chromatin remodeling complexes, SWI/SNF and remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC), is also essential for fruiting initiation. In contrast to Cc.snf5 mutants, Cc.arp9 mutants were not defective in clamp cell formation. The effects of mutations in Cc.arp9 and Cc.snf5 on oidia production and the transcriptional expression levels of clp1 and pcc1, which are under the control of the A gene, were also examined. These indicated that Cc.Snf5 is involved in A-regulated pathways, whereas Cc.Arp9 is not apparently. Cc.arp9/Cc.snf5 double-gene disruptants were generated and their phenotypes were analyzed, which suggested a complicated developmental regulation mechanism mediated by chromatin remodeling.

  1. Photoreceptors in the dark: A functional white collar-like complex and other putative light-sensing components encoded by the genome of the subterranean fungus Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Raffaele; Montanini, Barbara; Proietto, Marco; Levati, Elisabetta; De Luca, Cristina; Brenna, Andrea; Filetici, Patrizia; Kohler, Annegret; Ottonello, Simone; Ballario, Paola

    2017-03-01

    Light is perceived and transduced by fungi, where it modulates processes as diverse as growth and morphogenesis, sexual development and secondary metabolism. A special case in point is that of fungi with a subterranean, light-shielded habitat such as Tuber spp. Using as reference the genome sequence of the black truffle Tuber melanosporum, we used bioinformatic prediction tools and expression data to gain insight on the photoreceptor systems of this hypogeous ectomycorrhizal fungus. These include a chromophore-less opsin, a putative red-light-sensing phytochrome not expressed at detectable levels in any of the examined lifecycle stages, and a nearly canonical two-component (WC-1/WC-2) photoreceptor system similar to the Neurospora white collar complex (WCC). Multiple evidence, including expression at relatively high levels in all lifecycle stages except for fruiting-bodies and the results of heterologous functional complementation experiments conducted in Neurospora, suggests that the Tuber WCC is likely functional and capable of responding to blue-light. The other putative T. melanosporum photoreceptor components, especially the chromophore-less opsin and the likely non-functional phytochrome, may instead represent signatures of adaptation to a hypogeous (light-shielded) lifestyle.

  2. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  3. The C. elegans ceh-36 gene encodes a putative homemodomain transcription factor involved in chemosensory functions of ASE and AWC neurons.

    PubMed

    Koga, Makoto; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2004-02-20

    Chemotaxis to water-soluble chemicals such as sodium ion is an important behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans for seeking food, and ASE chemosensory neurons have a major role in this behavior. We isolated mutants defective in chemotaxis to sodium acetate. We show here that among them ks86 had a mutation in the ceh-36 gene. ceh-36 :: gfp reporter constructs were expressed in ASE and AWC neurons. In a mutant of the che-1 gene, which encodes another transcription factor and is required for specification of ASE neurons, expression of the ceh-36 :: gfp reporter in ASE is lost. This indicates that the ceh-36 gene functions downstream of the che-1 gene in ASE. In the ceh-36(ks86) mutant, expression of the tax-2 gene encoding a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel was reduced in ASE and AWC. This affords an explanation for defects of the ceh-36 mutant in the chemotaxis mediated by ASE and AWC. When a ceh-36 cDNA was expressed in an adult ceh-36 mutant by a heat shock promoter, chemotaxis to sodium acetate was recovered. These results suggest that ceh-36 is required for functions, and not for development, of ASE.

  4. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of Ocp2, a gene encoding a putative transcription-associated factor predominantly expressed in the auditory organs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Thalmann, I.; Thalmann, R.

    1995-06-10

    We report the cloning of the Ocp2 gene encoding OCP-II from a guinea pig organ-of-Corti cDNA library. The predicted open reading frame encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 18.6 kDa. A homology search revealed that Ocp2 shares significant sequence similarity with p15, a sub-unit of transcription factor SIII that regulates the activity of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex. The Ocp2 messenger RNA is expressed abundantly in the cochlea while not significantly in any other tissues examined, including brain, eye, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, thigh muscle, and testis, demonstrating that the expression of this gene may be restricted to auditory organs. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the N-terminal region of OCP-II. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded sections of the cochlea showed that OCP-II is localized abundantly in nonsensory cells in the organ of Corti; in addition, it was also detected, at a lower concentration, in vestibular sensory organs, as well as auditory and vestibular brain stem nuclei. The Ocp2 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 4 as well as 11. Our results suggest that OCP-II may be involved in transcription regulation for the development or maintenance of specialized functions of the inner ear. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Molecular characterization of the Jatropha curcas JcR1MYB1 gene encoding a putative R1-MYB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Liang; Guo, Dong; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the R1-MYB transcription factor, designated as JcR1MYB1, was isolated from Jatropha curcas using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. JcR1MYB1 contains a 951 bp open reading frame that encodes 316 amino acids. The deduced JcR1MYB1 protein was predicted to possess the conserved, 56-amino acid-long DNA-binding domain, which consists of a single helix-turn-helix module and usually occurs in R1-MYBs. JcR1MYB1 is a member of the R1-MYB transcription factor subfamily. A subcellular localization study confirmed the nuclear localization of JcR1MYB1. Expression analysis showed that JcR1MYB1 transcripts accumulated in various examined tissues, with high expression levels in the root and low levels in the stem. JcR1MYB1 transcription was up-regulated by polyethylene glycol, NaCl, and cold treatments, as well as by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene treatment. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing JcR1MYB1 indicates an inportant function for this gene in salt stress. PMID:25249778

  6. Decreased cellulase and xylanase production in the fungus Talaromyces cellulolyticus by disruption of tacA and tctA genes, encoding putative zinc finger transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) is one of the important strains for industrial cellulase production. An understanding of the control of cellulase gene expression in T. cellulolyticus is insufficient because only a few transcriptional factors related to cellulase gene expression have been identified. In the present study, we disrupted seven putative transcription regulator genes that showed similarity with cellulase or hemicellulase regulator genes in other filamentous fungi and investigated whether these genes are related to cellulase and xylanase production. Among the seven genes, five (tclA, tbgA, tlaA, tmcA, tclB2) had a smaller effect on cellulase and xylanase activities when culturing with cellulose. On the other hand, disruption of tacA and tctA, which are respectively homologues of ace1 (repressor of cellulase) and ctf1 (inducer of cutinase), led to a decrease in cellulase and hemicellulase production due to effects at both the enzymatic and transcriptional levels, indicating that tacA and tctA have positive roles in cellulase and xylanase production in T. cellulolyticus. These results suggest that cellulase and xylanase gene regulation in T. cellulolyticus differs from that in other filamentous fungi and imply that unknown transcriptional mechanisms function in T. cellulolyticus.

  7. Identification and developmental expression of mRNAs encoding putative insect cuticle hardening hormone, bursicon in the green shore crab Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Wilcockson, David C; Webster, Simon G

    2008-03-01

    Bursicon is the ultimate hormone in insect ecdysis, which is involved in cuticle hardening. Here we show that mRNAs encoding the heterodimeric cystine knot protein bursicon (Burs alpha, beta), are present in crustaceans, suggesting ubiquity of this hormone in arthropods. We firstly report the cloning, sequencing of mRNAs encoding subunits from the water flea, Daphnia arenata and the CNS of the crab, Carcinus maenas, in comparison with insect bursicon subunits. Expression patterns of alpha and beta burs mRNAs were examined by in-situ hybridisation (ISH) and quantitative RT-PCR. In the thoracic ganglion, burs alpha and beta mRNAs were completely colocalised in neurones expressing crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP). However, in the brain and eyestalk, bursicon transcripts were never observed, despite a complex expression pattern of CCAP interneurones. Patterns of expression of burs alpha and beta mRNAs were constitutive during the moult cycle of adult crabs, in stark contrast to the situation in insects. Whilst copy numbers of burs beta transcripts closely matched those of CCAP, those of burs alpha mRNA were around 3-fold higher than burs beta. This pattern was apparent during embryogenesis, where bursicon transcripts were first observed at around 50% development-the same time as first expression of CCAP mRNA. Transcript ratios (burs alpha: beta) increased during development. Our studies have shown, for the first time, that bursicon mRNAs are expressed in identified neurones in the nervous system of crustaceans. These findings will now promote further investigation into the functions of bursicon during the moult cycle and development of crustaceans.

  8. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of genes encoding putative fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.).

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xiaoming, Wu

    2012-12-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs), a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), have both predicted AGP-like glycosylated regions and putative fasciclin (FAS) domains, which may function in cell adhesion and communication. Previous studies have identified 21, 27, and 34 FLAs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), respectively. In this study, we identified 33 FLAs in the annotated genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis line Chiifu-401-42). Sequence analysis indicated that FAS domains each contain two highly conserved regions, named H1 and H2, and that 17 FLAs from B. rapa (BrFLAs) possess both of these regions. Prediction of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites suggested that 15 BrFLAs were GPI-anchored to the plasma membrane. Additionally, 25 BrFLAs may have been duplicated during the processes that shaped the triplicated genome of the mesopolyploid B. rapa. Expression analyses indicated that BrFLA1, BrFLA11, BrFLA13, BrFLA28 and BrFLA32 were specifically expressed in inflorescence. Meanwhile, BrFLA9 (homologous to AtFLA12) is specifically expressed in stem, and BrFLA6/22 (homologous to AtFLA11) is also highly expressed in stem, suggesting BrFLA6/9/22 may have the same functions as AtFLA11/12 in A. thaliana. Taken together, the identification and bioinformatic analysis of FLAs in B. rapa will open the way for studying their biological functions in plant growth and development as well as evolutionary history of this gene family from A. thaliana to B. rapa.

  9. Cell-Based Selection Expands the Utility of DNA-Encoded Small-Molecule Library Technology to Cell Surface Drug Targets: Identification of Novel Antagonists of the NK3 Tachykinin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zining; Graybill, Todd L; Zeng, Xin; Platchek, Michael; Zhang, Jean; Bodmer, Vera Q; Wisnoski, David D; Deng, Jianghe; Coppo, Frank T; Yao, Gang; Tamburino, Alex; Scavello, Genaro; Franklin, G Joseph; Mataruse, Sibongile; Bedard, Katie L; Ding, Yun; Chai, Jing; Summerfield, Jennifer; Centrella, Paolo A; Messer, Jeffrey A; Pope, Andrew J; Israel, David I

    2015-12-14

    DNA-encoded small-molecule library technology has recently emerged as a new paradigm for identifying ligands against drug targets. To date, this technology has been used with soluble protein targets that are produced and used in a purified state. Here, we describe a cell-based method for identifying small-molecule ligands from DNA-encoded libraries against integral membrane protein targets. We use this method to identify novel, potent, and specific inhibitors of NK3, a member of the tachykinin family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The method is simple and broadly applicable to other GPCRs and integral membrane proteins. We have extended the application of DNA-encoded library technology to membrane-associated targets and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting DNA-tagged, small-molecule ligands from complex combinatorial libraries against targets in a heterogeneous milieu, such as the surface of a cell.

  10. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  11. The Maize Zmsmu2 Gene Encodes a Putative RNA-Splicing Factor That Affects Protein Synthesis and RNA Processing during Endosperm Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taijoon; Kim, Cheol Soo; Nguyen, Hong N.; Meeley, Robert B.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    We characterized two maize (Zea mays) mutants, zmsmu2-1 and zmsmu2-3, that result from insertion of a Mutator (Mu) transposable element in the first exon of a gene homologous to the nematode gene, smu-2, which is involved in RNA splicing. In addition to having a starchy endosperm with reduced levels of zein storage proteins, homozygous zmsmu2-1 mutants manifest a number of phenotypes, including defective meristem development. The zmsmu2 mutants have poor seedling viability and surviving plants are sterile. The gene encoding ZmSMU2 is expressed in the endosperm, embryo, and shoot apex, which explains the pleiotropic nature of the mutation. We found that proper expression of Zmsmu2 is required for efficient ribosomal RNA processing, ribosome biogenesis, and protein synthesis in developing endosperm. Based on the pleiotropic nature of the mutations and the known function of animal Zmsmu2 homologs, we propose a possible role for ZmSMU2 in the development of maize endosperm, as well as a mechanism by which misregulation of zmsmu2 causes the mutant phenotypes. PMID:17384163

  12. Bioassaying Putative RNA-Binding Motifs in a Protein Encoded by a Gene That Influences Courtship and Visually Mediated Behavior in Drosophila: In Vitro Mutagenesis of Nona

    PubMed Central

    Stanewsky, R.; Fry, T. A.; Reim, I.; Saumweber, H.; Hall, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The no-on-transient-A (nonA) gene of Drosophila melanogaster influences vision, courtship song, and viability. The nonA-encoded polypeptide is inferred to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Although sequence-analysis of NONA implies that it belongs to a special interspecific family of this protein type, it does contain two classical RNA recognition motifs (RRM). Their behavioral significance was assayed by generating transgenic strains that were singly or multiply mutated within the relatively N-terminal motif (RRM1) or within RRM2. Neither class of mutation affected NONA binding to polytene chromosomes. The former mutations led to extremely low viability, accompanied by diminished adult longevities that were much worse than for a nonA-null mutant, implying that faulty interpolypeptide interactions might accompany the effects of the amino-acid substitutions within RRM1. All in vitro-mutated types caused optomotor blindness and an absence of transient spikes in the electroretinogram. Courtship analysis discriminated between the effects of the mutations: the RRM2-mutated type generated song pulses and trains that tended to be mildly mutant. These phenotypic abnormalities reinforce the notion that nonA's ubiquitous expression has its most important consequences in the optic lobes, the thoracic ganglia, or both, depending in part on the nonA allele. PMID:8722780

  13. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam2 gene encodes a putative pheromone receptor which has a significant homology with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, K; Shimoda, C

    1991-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has two mating-types, h+ (P) and h- (M). The mam2 mutant exhibits an h(-)-specific sterile phenotype. Nucleotide sequencing of the mam2 gene isolated from an S. pombe genomic library revealed an open reading frame composed of 348 amino acids. The deduced mam2 product is a hydrophobic protein of 39 kDa that has significant sequence similarity (26.3% for identical amino acids) with the transmembrane domains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE2 product, the alpha-pheromone receptor. Hydropathicity analysis suggests that the Mam2 protein contains seven possible membrane-spanning domains and a carboxy-terminal hydrophilic region. The mam2 gene was disrupted and found to be non-essential for growth. An h- haploid strain harbouring this disrupted null allele failed to respond to the pheromone of h+ cells, P-factor. These observations imply that the mam2 gene encodes a receptor for P-factor. Transcription of mam2 was induced only when strains containing functional mat1-M allele were cultured under conditions of nitrogen starvation. The mam2 gene was also transcribed in h+/h- diploid strains. The fact that the map1/mam2 homozygous diploid cells are incapable of sporulation implies that the pheromone signalling system is necessary for sporulation in diploid cells. Images PMID:1657593

  14. Bioelectrochemistry of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolowy, Krzysztof

    This paper deals with processes and phenomena of cell surface bioelectrochemistry in which charges do not move across the cell membrane. First, electrochemical properties of the cell membrane and the cell medium interface are described, and different electric potentials present in biological systems are defined. Methods of cell electrophoresis are then discussed. It is shown that none of the simple electrochemical models of the cell membrane can explain the dependence of cell electrophoretic mobility upon ionic strength and other electrochemical properties of the cell membrane, such as the difference in cell membrane charge as determined electrochemically and biochemically, or the effect of neuraminidase, pH, or membrane potential change on cell electrophoretic mobility. Thus, it is apparent that conclusions drawn from electrophoretic mobility data on the basis of simple models are false. The more complex multilayer-electrochemical model of the cell membrane is then described and shown to explain most electrochemical properties of the cell membrane. Next, different electrochemical techniques that were applied to study cell surfaces are described. It is shown that colloid titration, isoelectric focusing, and partition of cells between two immiscible phases is dependent not only on electrical properties of the cell membrane, but also on the energy of adsorption at cell surfaces of organic molecules used in these methods. Powder electrodes, cell polarography, conductometric titration, and Donnan potential methods are described and it is shown that these methods also produce results of doubtful value and are also often misinterpreted. The contact potential difference method produces results difficult to interpret and only electro-osmotic measurements and potential sensitive molecules are valuable methods. The colloid particle interaction theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) as applied to cell interactions is discussed. It is shown that the

  15. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Liu, Chonghuai; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession “Baihe-35-1,” which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw.), a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084), increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine. PMID:26697041

  16. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  17. Three cDNAs encoding vitellogenin homologs from Antarctic copepod, Tigriopus kingsejongensis: Cloning and transcriptional analysis in different maturation stages, temperatures, and putative reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Rin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Ah Ran; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Hyun; Baek, Hea Ja; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Three full-length cDNAs encoding lipoprotein homologs were identified in Tigriopus kingsejongensis, a newly identified copepod from Antarctica. Structural and transcriptional analyses revealed homology with two vitellogenin-like proteins, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2, which were 1855 and 1795 amino acids in length, respectively, along with a third protein, Tik-MEP, which produced a 1517-residue protein with similarity to a melanin engaging protein (MEP) in insects Phylogenetic analysis showed that Vgs in Maxillopods including two Tik-Vgs belong to the arthropod vitellogenin-like clade, which includes clottable proteins (CPs) in decapod crustaceans and vitellogenins in insects. Tik-MEP clustered together with insect MEPs, which appear to have evolved before the apoB-like and arthropod Vg-like clades. Interestingly, no genes orthologous to those found in the apoB clade were identified in Maxillopoda, suggesting that functions of large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) in reproduction and lipid metabolism may be different from those in insect and decapod crustaceans. As suggested by phylogenetic analyses, the two Tik-Vgs belonging to the arthropod Vg-like clade appear to play major roles in oocyte maturation, while Vgs belonging to the apoB clade function primarily in the reproduction of decapod crustaceans. Transcriptional analysis of Tik-Vg expression revealed a 24-fold increase in mature and ovigerous females compared with immature female, whereas expression of Tik-MEP remained low through all reproductive stages. Acute temperature changes did not affect the transcription of Tik-Vg genes, whereas Tik-MEP appeared to be affected by temperature change. Among the three hormones thought to be involved in molting and reproduction in arthropods, only farnesoic acid (FA) induced transcription of the two Tik-Vg genes. Regardless of developmental stage and hormone treatment, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2 exhibited a strong positive correlation in expression, suggesting that expression of these

  18. Distribution of genes encoding putative transmissibility factors among epidemic and nonepidemic strains of Burkholderia cepacia from cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Clode, F E; Kaufmann, M E; Malnick, H; Pitt, T L

    2000-05-01

    In the last 15 years, Burkholderia cepacia has emerged as a significant pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, mainly due to the severity of infection observed in a subset of patients and the fear of transmission of the organism to noncolonized patients. Although patients who deteriorate rapidly cannot be predicted by microbiological characteristics, three genetic markers have been described for strains that spread between patients. These are the cblA gene, encoding giant cable pili; a hybrid of two insertion sequences, IS1356 and IS402; and a 1.4-kb open reading frame known as the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM). The latter two are of unknown function. An epidemic strain lineage was previously identified among CF patients in the United Kingdom that apparently had spread from North America and that was characterized by a specific random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) pattern. We searched for the described genetic markers using specific PCR assays with 117 patient isolates of B. cepacia from 40 United Kingdom hospitals. Isolates were grouped according to genomovar and epidemic strain lineage RAPD pattern with a 10-base primer, P272. A total of 41 isolates from patients in 12 hospitals were classified as the epidemic strain, and 40 of these were distributed in genomovars IIIa (11 isolates), IIIb (1 isolate), and IIIc (28 isolates). All isolates of the epidemic strain were positive for the cblA gene and BCESM, but two lacked the insertion sequence hybrid. None of the 76 sporadic isolates contained cblA or the insertion sequence hybrid, but 11 of them were positive for BCESM. Nonepidemic isolates were distributed among genomovars I or IV (9), II (49), IIIa (11), IIIb (3), and IIIc (4). There were three clusters of cross-infection (one involving two patients and two involving three patients) with isolates of genomovar II. We conclude that in the United Kingdom, a single clonal lineage has spread between and within some hospitals providing care for CF

  19. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  20. Molecular evidence for the coordination of nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, revealed by a study on the transcriptional regulation of the agl3EFG operon that encodes a putative carbohydrate transporter in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Cen, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-18

    In the agl3EFGXYZ operon (SCO7167-SCO7162, abbreviated as agl3 operon) of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, agl3EFG genes encode a putative ABC-type carbohydrate transporter. The transcription of this operon has been proved to be repressed by Agl3R (SCO7168), a neighboring GntR-family regulator, and this repression can be released by growth on poor carbon sources. Here in this study, we prove that the transcription of agl3 operon is also directly repressed by GlnR, a central regulator governing the nitrogen metabolism in S. coelicolor. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) employing the agl3 promoter and mixtures of purified recombinant GlnR and Agl3R indicates that GlnR and Agl3R bind to different DNA sequences within the promoter region of agl3 operon, which is further confirmed by the DNase I footprinting assay. As Agl3R and GlnR have been demonstrated to sense the extracellular carbon and nitrogen supplies, respectively, it is hypothesized that the transcription of agl3 operon is stringently governed by the availabilities of extracellular carbon and nitrogen sources. Consistent with the hypothesis, the agl3 operon is further found to be derepressed only under the condition of poor carbon and rich nitrogen supplies, when both regulators are inactivated. It is believed that activation of the expression of agl3 operon may facilitate the absorption of extracellular carbohydrates to balance the ratio of intracellular carbon to nitrogen.

  1. Expression of PIN and AUX1 genes encoding putative carrier proteins for auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls [correction of epicotyles] under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-10-01

    Etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat showed automorphosis-like growth and development similar to that observed in true microgravity conditions in space. Application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis-like growth on 1 g conditions, suggesting that automorophosis is closely related to auxin polar transport. Strenuous efforts to know the relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in pea seedlings at molecular bases resulted in successful identification of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carrier protein, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 genes in etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were substantially affected, but that of PsPIN2 was not. Roles of these genes in auxin polar transport and automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings are also described.

  2. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  3. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge.

  4. Efficient cell surface display of Lip2 lipase using C-domains of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall proteins of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Laptev, Ivan A; Konstantinova, Tatiana K; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2011-08-01

    The cell surface display of enzymes is of great interest because of its simplified purification stage and the possibility for recycling in industrial processes. In this study, we have focused on the cell wall immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lip2 protein--an enzyme that has a wide technological application. By genome analysis of Y. lipolytica in addition to already characterized Ylcwp1, we identified five putative open reading frames encoding glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. Lip2 translation fusion with the carboxyl termini of these proteins revealed that all proteins were capable of immobilizing lipase in active form on the cell surface. The highest level of cell-bound lipase activity was achieved using C-domains encoded by YlCWP1, YlCWP3 (YALI0D27214g) and YlCWP6 (YALI0F18282g) comprising 16,173 ± 1,800, 18,785 ± 1,130 and 17,700 ± 2,101 U/g dry cells, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, these results significantly exceed the highest cell-bound lipase activity previously reported for engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris strains. Furthermore, the lyophilized biomass retained the activity and was robust to collecting/resuspending procedures. Nevertheless, in most cases, a substantial amount of lipase activity was also found in the growth medium. Further work will be necessary to better understand the nature of this phenomenon.

  5. Characterization of two new putative adhesins of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Jupciana M; Siqueira, Gabriela H; de Souza, Gisele O; Heinemann, Marcos B; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Chapola, Erica G B; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2017-01-01

    We here report the characterization of two novel proteins encoded by the genes LIC11122 and LIC12287, identified in the genome sequences of Leptospira interrogans, annotated, respectively, as a putative sigma factor and a hypothetical protein. The CDSs LIC11122 and LIC12287 have signal peptide SPII and SPI and are predicted to be located mainly at the cytoplasmic membrane of the bacteria. The genes were cloned and the proteins expressed using Escherichia coli. Proteinase K digestion showed that both proteins are surface exposed. Evaluation of interaction of recombinant proteins with extracellular matrix components revealed that they are laminin binding and they were called Lsa19 (LIC11122) and Lsa14 (LIC12287), for Leptospiral-surface adhesin of 19 and 14 kDa, respectively. The bindings were dose-dependent on protein concentration, reaching saturation, fulfilling the ligand-binding criteria. Reactivity of the recombinant proteins with leptospirosis human sera has shown that Lsa19 and, to a lesser extent, Lsa14, are recognized by antibodies, suggesting that, most probably, Lsa19 is expressed during infection. The proteins interact with plasminogen and generate plasmin in the presence of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Plasmin generation in Leptospira has been associated with tissue penetration and immune evasion strategies. The presence of a sigma factor on the cell surface playing a secondary role, probably mediating host -pathogen interaction, suggests that LIC11122 is a moonlighting protein candidate. Although the biological significance of these putative adhesins will require the generation of mutants, our data suggest that Lsa19 is a potential candidate for future evaluation of its role in adhesion/colonization activities during L. interrogans infection.

  6. Furrowing in altered cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, R

    1976-02-01

    Understanding the process which established the cell division mechanism requires analysis of the role of the responding surface as well as that of stimulatory subsurface structures. Cell surface was altered by the expansion which occurs during exovate formation. Exovates appear on the surface of fertilized Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Echinarachnius parma eggs in response to extreme flattening. They result from cytoplasmic outflow initiated in a very restricted portion of the egg surface. Observations of the formation process in pigmented A. lixula eggs revealed that the original surface may be expanded about 100 fold as the exovate swells. When exovates formed 15-30 minutes after fertilization contain the mitotic apparatus, they divide synchronously with flattened controls. If nucleated exovates are established after the beginning of first cleavage, furrows appear in ten minutes. Exovates established after the beginning of second cleavage develop furrows four minutes after the entrance of the the mitsotic apparatus. Cytoplasm beneath damaged exovate surfaces sometimes develops partial constrictions independently of the surface in the plane the furrow would have occupied. These results suggest that normal surface structure is unnecessary for furrow establishment and function.

  7. Differential Labeling of Cell-surface and Internalized Proteins after Antibody Feeding of Live Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the cell-surface localization of a putative transmembrane receptor in cultured neurons, we labeled the protein on the surface of live neurons with a specific primary antibody raised against an extracellular portion of the protein. Given that receptors are trafficked to and from the surface, if cells are permeabilized after fixation then both cell-surface and internal protein will be detected by the same labeled secondary antibody. Here, we adapted a method used to study protein trafficking (“antibody feeding”) to differentially label protein that had been internalized by endocytosis during the antibody incubation step and protein that either remained on the cell surface or was trafficked to the surface during this period. The ability to distinguish these two pools of protein was made possible through the incorporation of an overnight blocking step with highly-concentrated unlabeled secondary antibody after an initial incubation of unpermeabilized neurons with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody. After the blocking step, permeabilization of the neurons allowed detection of the internalized pool with a fluorescent secondary antibody labeled with a different fluorophore. Using this technique we were able to obtain important information about the subcellular location of this putative receptor, revealing that it was, indeed, trafficked to the cell-surface in neurons. This technique is broadly applicable to a range of cell types and cell-surface proteins, providing a suitable antibody to an extracellular epitope is available. PMID:24561550

  8. Trichinella spiralis mtDNA: a nematode mitochondrial genome that encodes a putative ATP8 and normally structured tRNAS and has a gene arrangement relatable to those of coelomate metazoans.

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, D V; Brown, W M

    2001-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the nematode Trichinella spiralis has been amplified in four overlapping fragments and 16,656 bp of its sequence has been determined. This sequence contains the 37 genes typical of metazoan mtDNAs, including a putative atp8, which is absent from all other nematode mtDNAs examined. The genes are transcribed from both mtDNA strands and have an arrangement relatable to those of coelomate metazoans, but not to those of secernentean nematodes. All protein genes appear to initiate with ATN codons, typical for metazoans. Neither TTG nor GTT start codons, inferred for several genes of other nematodes, were found. The 22 T. spiralis tRNA genes fall into three categories: (i) those with the potential to form conventional "cloverleaf" secondary structures, (ii) those with TPsiC arm + variable arm replacement loops, and (iii) those with DHU-arm replacement loops. Mt-tRNA(R) has a 5'-UCG-3' anticodon, as in most other metazoans, instead of the very unusual 5'-ACG-3' present in the secernentean nematodes. The sequence also contains a large repeat region that is polymorphic in size at the population and/or individual level. PMID:11156984

  9. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  10. Introducing point mutations into the ATGs of the putative open reading frames of the HSV-1 gene encoding the latency associated transcript (LAT) reduces its anti-apoptosis activity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Henderson, Gail; Hsiang, Chinhui; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2008-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) gene has anti-apoptosis activity that directly or indirectly enhances the virus's reactivation phenotype in small animal models. The first 1.5 kb of the primary 8.3 kb LAT is sufficient and some or all of it is necessary for LAT's anti-apoptosis in transient transfection assays and for LAT's ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. Based on LAT's genomic sequence, the first 1.5 kb contains eight potential open reading frames (ORFs) defined as an ATG followed by an in frame termination codon. In this study, point mutations were introduced into the ATGs of ORFs present in the 1.5 kb fragment of LAT. Mutagenesis of all eight ATGs in LAT ORFs consistently reduced the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT in transiently transfected mouse neuroblastoma cells regardless of whether apoptosis was induced by caspase 8 or caspase 9. Mutation of the six ATGs located in the stable intron sequences within the 1.5 kb LAT had a dramatic effect on caspase 9, but not caspase 8, induced apoptosis. For both caspase 8 and caspase 9 induced apoptosis, mutating the two ATGs in the exon of the LAT 1.5 kb fragment reduced, but did not eliminate the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT. These studies suggest that altering the fine structure of regulatory RNA or expression of a putative LAT ORF regulates the anti-apoptosis activity of LAT. These studies also indicate that more than one function is present in the 1.5 kb LAT fragment.

  11. C20orf9-003 (ACI-1), a gene localized on chromosome 20q13.12 encoding for a 49 kD cytoplasmic protein with a putative nucleotide binding site.

    PubMed

    Scott, Boyd B; Zaratin, Paola F; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Barnes, Michael R; Murdock, Paul R; Lynch, Frank J; Duckworth, Malcolm

    2004-02-01

    Murine NGD5 is a gene identified from NG108-15 cells which is postulated to be involved in opioid receptor function. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a cDNA C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) encoding the human orthologue of the mouse NGD5. Analysis of the genomic structure revealed that C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) contains 13 exons and 12 introns, spanning 52.5kb of genomic DNA and is a variant of C20orf9. Chromosomal localization of human C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) assigned this gene to chromosome 20q13.12. Genes at this locus have been associated with the progression and possibly the development of various cancers. In addition several linkage studies support the possibility that one or more genes affecting obesity are located in 20q13. No function can be clearly assigned to C20orf9-003 (ACI-1), however, the protein has a cytoplasmic subcellular location and the secondary structure contains a Rossman fold like feature which is found in many nucleotide binding proteins.

  12. Amyloid-beta oligomers increase the localization of prion protein at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Beraldo, Flavio H; Hajj, Glaucia N M; Guimaraes, Andre L; Jürgensen, Sofia; Wasilewska-Sampaio, Ana Paula; Hirata, Pedro H F; Souza, Ivana; Machado, Cleiton F; Wong, Daisy Y-L; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T; Prado, Vania F; Rylett, R Jane; Martins, Vilma R; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-05-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) interacts with distinct proteins at the cell surface to interfere with synaptic communication. Recent data have implicated the prion protein (PrP(C)) as a putative receptor for Aβ. We show here that Aβ oligomers signal in cells in a PrP(C)-dependent manner, as might be expected if Aβ oligomers use PrP(C) as a receptor. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and cell surface protein biotinylation experiments indicated that treatment with Aβ oligomers, but not monomers, increased the localization of PrP(C) at the cell surface in cell lines. These results were reproduced in hippocampal neuronal cultures by labeling cell surface PrP(C). In order to understand possible mechanisms involved with this effect of Aβ oligomers, we used live cell confocal and total internal reflection microscopy in cell lines. Aβ oligomers inhibited the constitutive endocytosis of PrP(C), but we also found that after Aβ oligomer-treatment PrP(C) formed more clusters at the cell surface, suggesting the possibility of multiple effects of Aβ oligomers. Our experiments show for the first time that Aβ oligomers signal in a PrP(C)-dependent way and that they can affect PrP(C) trafficking, increasing its localization at the cell surface.

  13. bldA-dependent expression of the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase gene (lipA) is mediated by the product of a contiguous gene, lipR, encoding a putative transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Servín-González, L; Castro, C; Pérez, C; Rubio, M; Valdez, F

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular lipase synthesis by Streptomyces lividans 66 carrying the cloned lipase gene (lipA) from Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 was found to be growth phase dependent, since lipase was secreted into the medium mainly during the stationary phase; S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed abundant lipA transcripts in RNA preparations obtained during the stationary phase but not in those obtained during exponential growth. Transcription from the lipA promoter was dependent on the presence of lipR, a contiguous downstream gene with a very high guanine-plus-cytosine content (80.2%). The deduced lipR product consists of a protein of 934 amino acids that shows similarity to known transcriptional activators and has a strong helix-turn-helix motif at its C terminus; this motif is part of a domain homologous to DNA-binding domains of bacterial regulators of the UhpA/LuxR superfamily. The lipR sequence revealed the presence of a leucine residue, encoded by the rare TTA codon, which caused bldA dependence of lipA transcription in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2); replacement of the TTA codon by the alternate CTC leucine codon alleviated bidA dependence but not the apparent growth phase-dependent regulation of lipA transcription. When lipR expression was induced in a controlled fashion during the exponential growth phase, by placing it under the inducible tipA promoter, lipase synthesis was shifted to the exponential growth phase, indicating that the timing of lipR expression, and not its bldA dependence, is the main cause for stationary-phase transcription of lipA. PMID:9401043

  14. Constitutive heterologous overexpression of a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR gene encoding a putative disease resistance protein from wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata in Arabidopsis and tobacco enhances resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Singer, Stacy D; Muhammad, Hanif; Li, Zhi; Wang, Xiping

    2017-03-01

    Plants use resistance (R) proteins to detect pathogen effector proteins and activate their innate immune response against the pathogen. The majority of these proteins contain an NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain along with a leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and some also bear a toll interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR R protein (VpTNL1) (GenBank accession number KX649890) from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession "Baihe-35-1", which was identified previously from a transcriptomic analysis of leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (PM; Erysiphe necator (Schw.)). The VpTNL1 transcript was found to be highly induced in V. pseudoreticulata following inoculation with E. necator, as well as treatment with salicylic acid (SA). Sequence analysis demonstrated that the deduced amino acid sequence contained a TIR domain at the N-terminus, along with an NB-ARC and four LRRs domains within the C-terminus. Constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type or dwarf phenotype. Intriguingly, the phenotypically normal transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to Arabidopsis PM, Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Similarly, constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Nicotiana tabacum was found to confer enhanced resistance to tobacco PM, Erysiphe cichoacearum DC. Subsequent isolation of the VpTNL1 promoter and deletion analysis indicated that TC-rich repeats and TCA elements likely play an important role in its response to E. necator and SA treatment, respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that VpTNL1 contributes to PM resistance in grapevine and provide an interesting gene target for the future amelioration of grape via breeding and/or biotechnology.

  15. ZmRFP1, the putative ortholog of SDIR1, encodes a RING-H2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent manner in maize.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Liu, Quanjun; Wu, Jianyu; Ding, Junqiang

    2012-03-10

    Drought is one of the most important limiting factors in crop production. To identify genes required for the drought stress response in the cereal crop maize, a gene coding for RING-finger protein (ZmRFP1), which is highly responsive to PEG-induced drought stress, was isolated by mRNA differential display and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The ZmRFP1 encodes a protein of 280 amino acids and contains a single C(3)H(2)C(3)-type RING motif in its C-terminal region. ZmRFP1 is an ortholog of Arabidopsis SDIR1 (salt- and drought-induced RING finger 1) (66% identity to AtSDIR1).The recombinant ZmRFP1 protein purified from Escherichia coli exhibited an in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that the transcript levels of ZmRFP1 were higher in aerial tissues including stems, leaves, tassels and immature ears, and were markedly up-regulated by drought stress, and exogenous ABA, but not by salt, heat and cold stresses. Transient expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ZmRFP1 fusion protein in onion cells revealed a plasma membrane localization of the protein. Further analysis of ZmRFP1 transcripts between an ABA-deficient transposon mutant viviparous14 (vp14) and its isogenic wild-type line W22 showed that ZmRFP1 transcript levels were induced significantly in the wild-type line under drought stress, but not in the mutant line VP14. These results indicate that ZmRFP1 responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent way and is likely to function in the ubiquitin conjunction pathway. The ZmRFP1 might serve as a candidate gene in genetic improvement for drought tolerance engineering in cereal crop plants.

  16. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  17. Detection of Cell Surface Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, cells surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact. PMID:23296774

  18. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  19. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  20. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change. PMID:24844289

  1. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  2. Phenotypic and functional changes in peripheral blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Effects of soluble immune complexes, cytokines, subcellular particulates from apoptotic cells, and HIV-1-encoded proteins on monocytes phagocytic function, oxidative burst, transendothelial migration, and cell surface phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Trial, J; Birdsall, H H; Hallum, J A; Crane, M L; Rodriguez-Barradas, M C; de Jong, A L; Krishnan, B; Lacke, C E; Figdor, C G; Rossen, R D

    1995-01-01

    We postulated that changes in the cell surface display of molecules that facilitate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions may reflect the changing immunosurveillance capacity of blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In Centers for Disease Control (CDC) stage A patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and generate reactive oxygen intermediates is often increased, the frequency of monocytes expressing CD49d, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and an activation epitope of CD11a/CD18 was increased and monocyte transendothelial migration was unimpaired. In CDC stage B/C patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and migrate across confluent endothelial monolayers was diminished, surface expression of CD49e and CD62L and the percentage of monocytes expressing CD18, CD11a, CD29, CD49e, CD54, CD58, CD31, and HLA-I were significantly decreased. Incubating normal donor monocytes with immune complexes in vitro reproduced the phenotypic and functional abnormalities seen in stage B/C patients. By contrast, in vitro stimulation with subcellular particulates released by apoptotic lymphocytes reproduced changes seen in stage A patients' monocytes. Although circulating monocytes appear to be activated at all stages, these data suggest that the high levels of circulating immune complexes, found predominantly in the later stages of HIV infection, may be particularly instrumental in reducing the monocyte's capacity to maintain surveillance against infection. Images PMID:7706478

  3. Plasmonic Encoding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0291 PLASMONIC ENCODING Chad Mirkin NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Final Report 10/06/2014 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...2014 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE PLASMONIC ENCODING 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0294 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6.  AUTHOR(S) Chad...called Nanoflares. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS plasmonic , encoding 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  4. Detection of cell surface dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact.

  5. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-08-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose.

  6. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  7. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  8. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  9. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  10. Architecture of the Bacteroides cellulosolvens Cellulosome: Description of a Cell Surface-Anchoring Scaffoldin and a Family 48 Cellulase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Bayer, Edward A.; Goldman, Milana; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael

    2004-01-01

    A large gene downstream of the primary Bacteroides cellulosolvens cellulosomal scaffoldin (cipBc, now renamed scaA) was sequenced. The gene, termed scaB, contained an N-terminal leader peptide followed by 10 type I cohesins, an “X” domain of unknown structure and function, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) surface-anchoring module. In addition, a previously identified gene in a different part of the genome, encoding for a dockerin-borne family 48 cellulosomal glycoside hydrolase (Cel48), was sequenced completely, and a putative cellulosome-related family 9 glycosyl hydrolase was detected. Recombinant fusion proteins, comprising dockerins derived from either the ScaA scaffoldin or Cel48, were overexpressed. Their interaction with ScaA and ScaB cohesins was examined by immunoassay. The results indicated that the ScaB type I cohesin of the new anchoring protein binds selectively to the ScaA dockerin, whereas the Cel48 dockerin binds specifically to the type II ScaA cohesin 5. Thus, by virtue of the 11 type II ScaA cohesins and the 10 type I ScaB cohesins, the relatively simple two-component cellulosome-integrating complex would potentially incorporate 110 enzyme molecules onto the cell surface via the ScaB SLH module. Compared to previously described cellulosome systems, the apparent roles of the B. cellulosolvens cohesins are reversed, in that the type II cohesins are located on the enzyme-binding primary scaffoldin, whereas the type I cohesins are located on the anchoring scaffoldin. The results underscore the extensive diversity in the supramolecular architecture of cellulosome systems in nature. PMID:14761991

  11. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  12. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes.

  13. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  14. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  15. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  16. TgaA, a VirB1-Like Component Belonging to a Putative Type IV Secretion System of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region. PMID:24951779

  17. TgaA, a VirB1-like component belonging to a putative type IV secretion system of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region.

  18. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    cell surface, increases the relaxation time of cytoskeleton fluctuations, and increases the phagocytosis time. Our results suggest that the methods developed in this work can be of utility to assess the importance of cytoskeleton motility in the dynamics of cellular processes such as phagocytosis exhibited by macrophages.

  19. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  20. Human Corin Isoforms with Different Cytoplasmic Tails That Alter Cell Surface Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaofei; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Mingqing; Wu, Qingyu

    2011-01-01

    Corin is a cardiac serine protease that activates natriuretic peptides. It consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a transmembrane domain, and an extracellular region with a C-terminal trypsin-like protease domain. The transmembrane domain anchors corin on the surface of cardiomyocytes. To date, the function of the corin cytoplasmic tail remains unknown. By examining the difference between human and mouse corin cytoplasmic tails, analyzing their gene sequences, and verifying mRNA expression in hearts, we show that both human and mouse corin genes have alternative exons encoding different cytoplasmic tails. Human corin isoforms E1 and E1a have 45 and 15 amino acids, respectively, in their cytoplasmic tails. In transfected HEK 293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, corin isoforms E1 and E1a were expressed at similar levels. Compared with isoform E1a, however, isoform E1 was more active in processing natriuretic peptides. By cell surface labeling, glycosidase digestion, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, we found that corin isoform E1 was activated more readily as a result of more efficient cell surface targeting. By mutagenesis, we identified a DDNN motif in the cytoplasmic tail of isoform E1 (which is absent in isoform E1a) that promotes corin surface targeting in both HEK 293 and HL-1 cells. Our data indicate that the sequence in the cytoplasmic tail plays an important role in corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. PMID:21518754

  1. Engineering chemical reactivity on cell surfaces through oligosaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, L.K.; Yareme, K.J.; Bertozzi, C.R.

    1997-05-16

    Cell surface oligosaccharide can be engineered to display unusual functional groups for the selective chemical remodeling of cell surfaces. An unnatural derivative of N-acetyl-mannosamine, which has a ketone group, was converted to the corresponding sialic acid and incorporated into cell surface oligosaccharide metabolically, resulting in the cell surface display of ketone groups. The ketone group on the cell surface can then be covalently ligated under physiological conditions with molecules carrying a complementary reactive functional group such as the hydrazide. Cell surface reactions of this kind should prove useful in the introduction of new recognition epitopes, such as peptides, oligosaccharide, or small organic molecules, onto cell surfaces and in the subsequent modulation of cell-cell or cell-small molecule binding events. The versatility of this technology was demonstrated by an example of selective drug delivery. Cells were decorated with biotin through selective conjugation to ketone groups, and selectively killed in the presence of a ricin A chain-avidin conjugate. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  3. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M; Fox, Douglas M; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-03-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology.

  4. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  5. Cell surface expression of v-fms-coded glycoproteins is required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Rettenmier, C W; Look, A T; Sherr, C J

    1984-01-01

    The viral oncogene v-fms encodes a transforming glycoprotein with in vitro tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity. Although most v-fms-coded molecules remain internally sequestered in transformed cells, a minor population of molecules is transported to the cell surface. An engineered deletion mutant lacking 348 base pairs of the 3.0-kilobase-pair v-fms gene encoded a polypeptide that was 15 kilodaltons smaller than the wild-type v-fms gene product. The in-frame deletion of 116 amino acids was adjacent to the transmembrane anchor peptide located near the middle of the predicted protein sequence and 432 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. The mutant polypeptide acquired N-linked oligosaccharide chains, was proteolytically processed in a manner similar to the wild-type glycoprotein, and exhibited an associated tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity in vitro. However, the N-linked oligosaccharides of the mutant glycoprotein were not processed to complex carbohydrate chains, and the glycoprotein was not detected at the cell surface. Cells expressing high levels of the mutant glycoprotein did not undergo morphological transformation and did not form colonies in semisolid medium. The transforming activity of the v-fms gene product therefore appears to be mediated through target molecules on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:6390182

  6. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  7. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  8. Cell surface localization and release of the candidate tumor suppressor Ecrg4 from polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes activate macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul; Dang, Xitong; Lopez, Nicole; Lee, Jisook; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Winfield, Robert; Potenza, Bruce; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    We identified fresh human leukocytes as an abundant source of the candidate epithelial tumor suppressor gene, Ecrg4, an epigenetically regulated gene, which unlike other tumor suppressor genes, encodes an orphan-secreted, ligand-like protein. In human cell lines, Ecrg4 gene expression was low, Ecrg4 protein undetectable, and Ecrg4 promoter hypermethylation high (45–90%) and reversible by the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC. In contrast, Ecrg4 gene expression in fresh, normal human PBMCs and PMNs was 600–800 times higher than in cultured cell lines, methylation of the Ecrg4 promoter was low (<3%), and protein levels were readily detectable in lysates and on the cell surface. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, and cell surface biotinylation established that full-length, 14-kDa Ecrg4 was localized on PMN and monocyte cell surfaces, establishing that Ecrg4 is a membrane-anchored protein. LPS treatment induced processing and release of Ecrg4, as detected by flow and immunoblotting, whereas an effect of fMLF treatment on Ecrg4 on the PMN cell surface was detected on the polarized R2 subpopulation of cells. This loss of cell surface Ecrg4 was associated with the detection of intact and processed Ecrg4 in the conditioned media of fresh leukocytes and was shown to be associated with the inflammatory response that follows severe, cutaneous burn injury. Furthermore, incubation of macrophages with a soluble Ecrg4-derived peptide increased the P-p65, suggesting that processing of an intact sentinel Ecrg4 on quiescent circulating leukocytes leads to processing from the cell surface following injury and macrophage activation. PMID:22396620

  9. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  10. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  11. Endocytosis of wheat germ agglutinin binding sites from the cell surface into a tubular endosomal network.

    PubMed

    Raub, T J; Koroly, M J; Roberts, R M

    1990-04-01

    late trans-Golgi compartment. In conclusion, a portion of cell surface glycoproteins are routed to a complex arrangement of tubular and vesicular compartments following endocytosis that includes a putative post-endosomal, tubular reticulum that appears to be separate from the trans-most Golgi saccule.

  12. Cell surface display system for Lactococcus lactis: a novel development for oral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Raha, A R; Varma, N R S; Yusoff, K; Ross, E; Foo, H L

    2005-07-01

    The food-grade Lactococcus lactis is a potential vector to be used as a live vehicle for the delivery of heterologous proteins for vaccine and pharmaceutical purposes. We constructed a plasmid vector pSVac that harbors a 255-bp single-repeat sequence of the cell wall-binding protein region of the AcmA protein. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli and expression of the gene fragment was driven by the T7 promoter of the plasmid. SDS-PAGE showed the presence of the putative AcmA' fragment and this was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The protein was isolated and purified using a His-tag affinity column. When mixed with a culture of L. lactis MG1363, ELISA and immunofluorescence assays showed that the cell wall-binding fragment was anchored onto the outer surface of the bacteria. This indicated that the AcmA' repeat unit retained the active site for binding onto the cell wall surface of the L. lactis cells. Stability assays showed that the fusion proteins (AcmA/A1, AcmA/A3) were stably docked onto the surface for at least 5 days. The AcmA' fragment was also shown to be able to strongly bind onto the cell surface of naturally occurring lactococcal strains and Lactobacillus and, with less strength, the cell surface of Bacillus sphericus. The new system designed for cell surface display of recombinant proteins on L. lactis was evaluated for the expression and display of A1 and A3 regions of the VP1 protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71). The A1 and A3 regions of the VP1 protein of EV71 were cloned upstream to the cell wall-binding domains of AcmA protein and successfully expressed as AcmA/A1 and AcmA/A3. Whole-cell ELISA showed the successful display of VP1 protein epitopes of EV71 on the surface of L. lactis. The success of the anchoring system developed in this study for docking the A1 and A3 epitopes of VP1 onto the surface of L. lactis cells opens up the possibilities of peptide and protein display for not only Lactococcus but also for other gram

  13. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  14. Enhancement of Biological Reactions on Cell Surfaces via Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Chapanian, Rafi; Kwan, David H.; Constantinescu, Iren; Shaikh, Fathima A.; Rossi, Nicholas A.A.; Withers, Stephen G.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of macromolecules such as enzymes and antibodies with cell surfaces is often an inefficient process, requiring large amounts of expensive reagent. Here we report a general method based on macromolecular crowding with a range of neutral polymers to enhance such reactions, using red blood cells (RBCs) as a model system. Rates of conversion of Type A and B red blood cells to universal O type by removal of antigenic carbohydrates with selective glycosidases are increased up to 400-fold in the presence of crowders. Similar enhancements are seen for antibody binding. We further explore the factors underlying these enhancements using confocal microscopy and fluorescent recovery after bleaching (FRAP) techniques with various fluorescent protein fusion partners. Increased cell-surface concentration due to volume exclusion, along with two-dimensionally confined diffusion of enzymes close to the cell surface, appear to be the major contributing factors. PMID:25140641

  15. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed.

  16. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  17. Atomic force and super-resolution microscopy support a role for LapA as a cell-surface biofilm adhesin of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan E.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Newell, Peter D.; Schwartz, Mary E.; Turnbull, Lynne; Johnson, Michael S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; O’Toole, George A.; Camesano, Terri A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescence Pf0-1 requires the large repeat protein LapA for stable surface attachment. This study presents direct evidence that LapA is a cell-surface-localized adhesin. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a significant twofold reduction in adhesion force for mutants lacking the LapA protein on the cell surface compared to the wild-type strain. Deletion of lapG, a gene encoding a periplasmic cysteine protease that functions to release LapA from the cell surface, resulted in a twofold increase in the force of adhesion. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) revealed the presence of the LapA protein on the cell surface, consistent with its role as an adhesin. The protein is only visualized in the cytoplasm for a mutant of the ABC transporter responsible for translocating LapA to the cell surface. Together, these data highlight the power of combining the use of AFM and 3D-SIM with genetic studies to demonstrate that LapA, a member of a large group of RTX-like repeat proteins, is a cell-surface adhesin. PMID:23064158

  18. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  19. HIV-1 Vpu targets cell surface markers CD4 and BST-2 through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy; Strebel, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Vpu is a small integral membrane protein encoded by HIV-1 and some SIV isolates. The protein is known to induce degradation of the viral receptor molecule CD4 and to enhance the release of newly formed virions from the cell surface. Vpu accomplishes these two functions through two distinct mechanisms. In the case of CD4, Vpu acts as a molecular adaptor to connect CD4 to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex resulting in CD4 degradation by cellular proteasomes. This requires signals located in Vpu's cytoplasmic domain. Enhancement of virus release on the other hand involves the neutralization of a cellular host factor, BST-2 (also known as CD317, HM1.24, or tetherin) and requires Vpu's TM domain. The current review discusses recent advances on the role of Vpu in controlling degradation of CD4 and in regulating virus release. PMID:20858517

  20. Wnt family proteins are secreted and associated with the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Smolich, B D; McMahon, J A; McMahon, A P; Papkoff, J

    1993-01-01

    Members of the Wnt gene family are proposed to function in both normal development and differentiation as well as in mammary tumorigenesis. To understand the function of Wnt proteins in these two processes, we present here a biochemical characterization of seven Wnt family members. For these studies, AtT-20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line previously shown to efficiently process and secrete Wnt-1, was transfected with expression vectors encoding Wnt family members. All of the newly characterized Wnt proteins are glycosylated, secreted proteins that are tightly associated with the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We have also identified native Wnt proteins in retinoic acid-treated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, and they exhibit the same biochemical characteristics as the recombinant proteins. These data suggest that Wnt family members function in cell to cell signaling in a fashion similar to Wnt-1. Images PMID:8167409

  1. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  2. Roles for E-cadherin cell surface regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Yuliya I.; Schecterson, Leslayann; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression in association with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, metastases often retain E-cadherin expression, an EMT is not required for metastasis, and metastases can arise from clusters of tumor cells. We demonstrate that the regulation of the adhesive activity of E-cadherin present at the cell surface by an inside-out signaling mechanism is important in cancer. First, we find that the metastasis of an E-cadherin–expressing mammary cell line from the mammary gland to the lung depends on reduced E-cadherin adhesive function. An activating monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin that induces a high adhesive state significantly reduced the number of cells metastasized to the lung without affecting the growth in size of the primary tumor in the mammary gland. Second, we find that many cancer-associated germline missense mutations in the E-cadherin gene in patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer selectively affect the mechanism of inside-out cell surface regulation without inhibiting basic E-cadherin adhesion function. This suggests that genetic deficits in E-cadherin cell surface regulation contribute to cancer progression. Analysis of these mutations also provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin regulation at the cell surface. PMID:27582386

  3. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  4. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  5. Dominant negative mutation in cell surface beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase inhibits cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In addition to its traditional location within the Golgi complex, beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) is also present on the cell surface, where it is thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule by binding to extracellular oligosaccharide ligands. Recent studies suggest that cells contain two forms of GalTase with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The longer form of GalTase contains a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic extension and is preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, relative to the shorter GalTase protein that is confined primarily to the Golgi compartment. In this study, we created a dominant negative mutation that interferes with the function of cell surface GalTase by transfecting into cells cDNAs encoding truncated versions of the long form of GalTase containing the complete cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but devoid of the catalytic domain. In both F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, overexpressing the truncated long GalTase (TLGT) protein displaced the endogenous cell surface GalTase from its association with the cytoskeleton, resulting in a loss of intercellular adhesion and cell spreading specifically on matrices that use GalTase as a cell surface receptor. In contrast, overexpressing the analogous truncated short GalTase (TSGT) protein did not affect cell morphology or GalTase activity. In control assays, inducing the TLGT protein had no effect on cell interactions with fibronectin (which is independent of GalTase), or on the cytoskeleton attachment of another matrix receptor (beta 1 integrin), or on overall glycoprotein synthesis, thus eliminating nonspecific effects of the TLGT protein on cellular adhesion and metabolism. These results represent the first molecular manipulation of cell surface GalTase expression and confirm its function as a cell adhesion molecule. These studies further suggest that the cytoskeleton contains a defined, saturable number of binding sites for GalTase, which enables it to function as

  6. Cell Surface Glycoside Hydrolases of Streptococcus gordonii Promote Growth in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Luxia; Shah, Nehal; Palmer, Robert J.; Cisar, John O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growth of the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii in saliva may depend on a number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), including three cell wall-anchored proteins that are homologs of pneumococcal β-galactosidase (BgaA), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (StrH), and endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase D (EndoD). In the present study, we introduced unmarked in-frame deletions into the corresponding genes of S. gordonii DL1, verified the presence (or absence) of the encoded proteins on the resulting mutant strains, and compared these strains with wild-type strain DL1 for growth and glycan foraging in saliva. The overnight growth of wild-type DL1 was reduced 3- to 10-fold by the deletion of any one or two genes and approximately 20-fold by the deletion of all three genes. The only notable change in the salivary proteome associated with this reduction of growth was a downward shift in the apparent molecular masses of basic proline-rich glycoproteins (PRG), which was accompanied by the loss of lectin binding sites for galactose-specific Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) and mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The binding of ECA to PRG was also abolished in saliva cultures of mutants that expressed cell surface BgaA alone or together with either StrH or EndoD. However, the subsequent loss of GNA binding was seen only in saliva cocultures of different mutants that together expressed all three cell surface GHs. The findings indicate that the growth of S. gordonii DL1 in saliva depends to a significant extent on the sequential actions of first BgaA and then StrH and EndoD on N-linked glycans of PRG. IMPORTANCE The ability of oral bacteria to grow on salivary glycoproteins is critical for dental plaque biofilm development. Little is known, however, about how specific salivary components are attacked and utilized by different members of the biofilm community, such as Streptococcus gordonii. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 has three cell wall

  7. Complete genome sequences of a putative new alphapartitivirus detected in Rosa spp.

    PubMed

    Phelan, James; James, Delano

    2016-09-01

    A putative new alphapartitivirus was detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in Rosa spp. and identified as rose partitivirus isolate Phyllis Bide (RoPV-PB). The virus is bipartite with a dsRNA1 fragment (1937 bp) encoding a putative RdRp and a dsRNA2 fragment (1811 bp) encoding the putative CP subunit of the virus. dsRNA1 of RoPV-BP is closely related to Vicia faba partitivirus 1, with identities of 67 % and 72 % for the nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences, respectively. In NGS analysis of RoPV-BP, coverage was uneven across both dsRNA fragments, with GC/AT content appearing to be a major determinant of depth of coverage.

  8. CD44 is the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Stamenkovic, I; Melnick, M; Underhill, C B; Seed, B

    1990-06-29

    CD44 is a broadly distributed cell surface protein thought to mediate cell attachment to extracelular matrix components or specific cell surface ligands. We have created soluble CD44-immunoglobulin fusion proteins and characterized their reactivity with tissue sections and lymph node high endothelial cells in primary culture. The CD44 target on high endothelial cells is sensitive to enzymes that degrade hyaluronate, and binding of soluble CD44 is blocked by low concentrations of hyaluronate or high concentrations of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates. A mouse anti-hamster hyaluonate receptor antibody reacts with COS cells expressing hamster CD44 cDNA. In sections of all tissues examined, including lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, predigestion with hyaluronidase eliminated CD44 binding.

  9. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  10. Synthetically functionalized retroviruses produced from the bioorthogonally engineered cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shirley; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-02-16

    Conjugation of desired molecules onto retroviral surfaces through the ease of the bioorthogonal functionalization method was demonstrated. Oxidation of surface sialic acids using periodate and further p-anisidine-catalyzed conjugation with aminooxy-bearing molecules were used to directly label retroviral envelope with a fluorescent dye. The retroviral particles that were produced from a bioorthogonally functionalized virus producing cell surface and further tethered with magnetic nanoparticles were efficiently purified by simple magnetic column separation and capable of magnet-directed transduction.

  11. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  12. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  13. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  14. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique.

  15. Cell Surface Vimentin Is an Attachment Receptor for Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ning; Cong, Haolong; Tian, Hongchao; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Wenliang; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a highly transmissible pathogenic agent that causes severe central nervous system diseases in infected infants and young children. Here, we reported that EV71 VP1 protein could bind to vimentin intermediate filaments expressed on the host cell surface. Soluble vimentin or an antibody against vimentin could inhibit the binding of EV71 to host cells. Accompanied with the reduction of vimentin expression on the cell surface, the binding of EV71 to cells was remarkably decreased. Further evidence showed that the N terminus of vimentin is responsible for the interaction between EV71 and vimentin. These results indicated that vimentin on the host cell surface may serve as an attachment site that mediated the initial binding and subsequently increased the infectivity of EV71. IMPORTANCE This study delivers important findings on the roles of vimentin filaments in relation to EV71 infection and provides information that not only improves our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis but also presents us with potentially new strategies for the treatment of diseases caused by EV71 infections. PMID:24623428

  16. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  17. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  18. Diverse specificity of cellulosome attachment to the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Pinheiro, Benedita A.; Cameron, Kate; Cuskin, Fiona; Viegas, Aldino; Najmudin, Shabir; Bule, Pedro; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Romão, Maria João; Bayer, Edward A.; Spencer, Holly L.; Smith, Steven; Gilbert, Harry J.; Alves, Victor D.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, the cellulosome, one of Nature’s most intricate multi-enzyme complexes, has been continuously fine-tuned to efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant carbohydrates. To facilitate the uptake of released sugars, anaerobic bacteria use highly ordered protein-protein interactions to recruit these nanomachines to the cell surface. Dockerin modules located within a non-catalytic macromolecular scaffold, whose primary role is to assemble cellulosomal enzymatic subunits, bind cohesin modules of cell envelope proteins, thereby anchoring the cellulosome onto the bacterial cell. Here we have elucidated the unique molecular mechanisms used by anaerobic bacteria for cellulosome cellular attachment. The structure and biochemical analysis of five cohesin-dockerin complexes revealed that cell surface dockerins contain two cohesin-binding interfaces, which can present different or identical specificities. In contrast to the current static model, we propose that dockerins utilize multivalent modes of cohesin recognition to recruit cellulosomes to the cell surface, a mechanism that maximises substrate access while facilitating complex assembly. PMID:27924829

  19. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  20. The Glycophosphatidylinositol Anchor of the MCMV Evasin, m157, Facilitates Optimal Cell Surface Expression and Ly49 Receptor Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Lindsey E.; Guseva, Natalya V.; Shey, Michael R.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus-encoded protein m157 is a cognate ligand for both inhibitory and activating receptors expressed by natural killer cells. Additionally, m157 is expressed on the surface of infected cells by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Although endogenous GPI-anchored proteins are known to be ligands for the NK cell receptor, NKG2D, the contribution of the GPI anchor for viral m157 ligand function is unknown. To determine whether the GPI anchor for m157 is dispensable for m157 function, we generated m157 variants expressed as transmembrane fusion proteins and tested cells expressing transmembrane m157 for the capacity to activate cognate Ly49 receptors. We found that the GPI anchor is required for high-level cell surface expression of m157, and that the transmembrane m157 ligand retains the capacity to activate reporter cells and NK cells expressing Ly49H, as well as Ly49I129 reporter cells, but with reduced potency. Importantly, target cells expressing the transmembrane form of m157 were killed less efficiently and failed to mediate Ly49H receptor downregulation on fresh NK cells compared to targets expressing GPI-anchored m157. Taken together, these results show that the GPI anchor for m157 facilitates robust cell surface expression, and that NK cells are sensitive to the altered cell surface expression of this potent viral evasin. PMID:23840655

  1. Cell-surface expression of PrPC and the presence of scrapie prions in the blood of goats.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Schneider, David A; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Truscott, Thomas C; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-05-01

    Although host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)) expression in ovine PBMCs and prion infectivity in scrapie-infected sheep blood have been demonstrated, such studies have not been reported in goats. Therefore, this study characterized cell-surface expression of PrP(C) on PBMC subsets derived from normal goats and sheep, by flow cytometry, and determined prion infectivity in blood from a scrapie-infected goat using a transfusion bioassay in goat kids. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression was detected on all subsets of goat PBMCs. The highest PrP(C) cell-surface expression was found in CD2(+) T lymphocytes in goats. Transmission of infection was detected in all three recipients who received whole blood from a goat with classical scrapie. It was concluded that caprine PBMCs express PrP(C) similarly to sheep but with relative differences among PBMCs subsets, and that blood-borne infectious prions can be detected in scrapie-infected goats. Thus, similar to sheep, goat blood may be a suitable diagnostic target for the detection of scrapie infection.

  2. Maps of context-dependent putative regulatory regions and genomic signal interactions.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Klev; Umer, Husen M; Kruczyk, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J; Cavalli, Marco; Wadelius, Claes; Komorowski, Jan

    2016-11-02

    Gene transcription is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs). ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics provide global binding profiles of TFs, which can be used to identify regulatory regions. To this end we implemented a method to systematically construct cell-type and species-specific maps of regulatory regions and TF-TF interactions. We illustrated the approach by developing maps for five human cell-lines and two other species. We detected ∼144k putative regulatory regions among the human cell-lines, with the majority of them being ∼300 bp. We found ∼20k putative regulatory elements in the ENCODE heterochromatic domains suggesting a large regulatory potential in the regions presumed transcriptionally silent. Among the most significant TF interactions identified in the heterochromatic regions were CTCF and the cohesin complex, which is in agreement with previous reports. Finally, we investigated the enrichment of the obtained putative regulatory regions in the 3D chromatin domains. More than 90% of the regions were discovered in the 3D contacting domains. We found a significant enrichment of GWAS SNPs in the putative regulatory regions. These significant enrichments provide evidence that the regulatory regions play a crucial role in the genomic structural stability. Additionally, we generated maps of putative regulatory regions for prostate and colorectal cancer human cell-lines.

  3. Analysis of Cell Surface Proteome Changes via Label-free, Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Ralph; Mueller, Lukas N.; Schmidt, Alexander; Mueller, Markus; Wollscheid, Bernd; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2009-01-01

    We present a mass spectrometry-based strategy for the specific detection and quantification of cell surface proteome changes. The method is based on the label-free quantification of peptide patterns acquired by high mass accuracy mass spectrometry using new software tools and the cell surface capturing technology that selectively enriches glycopeptides exposed to the cell exterior. The method was applied to monitor dynamic protein changes in the cell surface glycoproteome of Drosophila melanogaster cells. The results led to the construction of a cell surface glycoprotein atlas consisting of 202 cell surface glycoproteins of D. melanogaster Kc167 cells and indicated relative quantitative changes of cell surface glycoproteins in four different cellular states. Furthermore we specifically investigated cell surface proteome changes upon prolonged insulin stimulation. The data revealed insulin-dependent cell surface glycoprotein dynamics, including insulin receptor internalization, and linked these changes to intracellular signaling networks. PMID:19036722

  4. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  5. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-11-15

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs.

  6. Cell Surface Nucleolin Facilitates Enterovirus 71 Binding and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Wang, Ya-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Lo, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Lai, Ming-Der

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the pathogenesis of enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains mostly ambiguous, identifying the factors that mediate viral binding and entry to host cells is indispensable to ultimately uncover the mechanisms that underlie virus infection and pathogenesis. Despite the identification of several receptors/attachment molecules for EV71, the binding, entry, and infection mechanisms of EV71 remain unclear. Herein, we employed glycoproteomic approaches to identify human nucleolin as a novel binding receptor for EV71. Glycoproteins purified by lectin chromatography from the membrane extraction of human cells were treated with sialidase, followed by immunoprecipitation with EV71 particles. Among the 16 proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis, cell surface nucleolin attracted our attention. We found that EV71 interacted directly with nucleolin via the VP1 capsid protein and that an antinucleolin antibody reduced the binding of EV71 to human cells. In addition, the knockdown of cell surface nucleolin decreased EV71 binding, infection, and production in human cells. Furthermore, the expression of human nucleolin on the cell surface of a mouse cell line increased EV71 binding and conferred EV71 infection and production in the cells. These results strongly indicate that human nucleolin can mediate EV71 binding to and infection of cells. Our findings also demonstrate that the use of glycoproteomic approaches is a reliable methodology to discover novel receptors for pathogens. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in Asia-Pacific countries and have caused thousands of deaths in young children during the last 2 decades. The discovery of new EV71-interacting molecules to understand the infection mechanism has become an emergent issue. Hence, this study uses glycoproteomic approaches to comprehensively investigate the EV71-interacting glycoproteins. Several EV71-interacting glycoproteins are identified, and the role of cell surface nucleolin in

  7. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...molecular imaging 7 cdrescher@fhcrc.org Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Page 3...Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Charles W Drescher, MD, Principle Investigator

  8. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  9. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  10. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  11. Cell Surface Measurements in Hydrocarbon and Carbohydrate Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, R. J.; Zajic, J. E.; Gerson, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was grown in 11-liter batch fermentations with hexadecane or sodium citrate as the sole source of carbon. Surface and interfacial tension measurements of the microbial broth indicated that surface-active compounds were being produced only during growth on the hydrocarbon substrate. Contact angle measurements of an aqueous drop on a smooth lawn of cells in a hexadecane bath indicated a highly hydrophobic surface of the cells in the initial stages of the hydrocarbon fermentation (120° contact angle). At this stage, the entire cell population was bound to the hydrocarbon-aqueous interface. The contact angle dropped rapidly to approximately 45° after 14 h into the fermentation. This coincided with a shift of the cell population to the aqueous phase. Thus, the cells demonstrated more hydrophilic characteristics in the later stages of the fermentation. Contact angles on cells grown on sodium citrate ranged from 18 to 24° throughout the fermentation. The cells appear to be highly hydrophilic during growth on a soluble substrate. From the contact angle and aqueous-hydrocarbon interfacial tension, the surface free energy of the cells was calculated along with the cell-aqueous and cell-hydrocarbon interfacial tension. The results of these measurements were useful in quantitatively evaluating the hydrophobic nature of the cell surface during growth on hydrocarbons and comparing it with the hydrophilic nature of the cell surface during growth on a soluble substrate. PMID:16345526

  12. Neutrophil cell surface receptors and their intracellular signal transduction pathways☆

    PubMed Central

    Futosi, Krisztina; Fodor, Szabina; Mócsai, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but their inappropriate activation also contributes to tissue damage during autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils express a large number of cell surface receptors for the recognition of pathogen invasion and the inflammatory environment. Those include G-protein-coupled chemokine and chemoattractant receptors, Fc-receptors, adhesion receptors such as selectins/selectin ligands and integrins, various cytokine receptors, as well as innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins. The various cell surface receptors trigger very diverse signal transduction pathways including activation of heterotrimeric and monomeric G-proteins, receptor-induced and store-operated Ca2 + signals, protein and lipid kinases, adapter proteins and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here we provide an overview of the receptors involved in neutrophil activation and the intracellular signal transduction processes they trigger. This knowledge is crucial for understanding how neutrophils participate in antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory tissue damage and may also point to possible future targets of the pharmacological therapy of neutrophil-mediated autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23994464

  13. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER.

  14. Characterization of a Putative Ancestor of Coxsackievirus B5 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Jonsson, Nina; Mulders, Mick N.; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Van Ranst, Marc; Lemey, Philippe; Hafenstein, Susan; Lindberg, A. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Like other RNA viruses, coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) exists as circulating heterogeneous populations of genetic variants. In this study, we present the reconstruction and characterization of a probable ancestral virion of CVB5. Phylogenetic analyses based on capsid protein-encoding regions (the VP1 gene of 41 clinical isolates and the entire P1 region of eight clinical isolates) of CVB5 revealed two major cocirculating lineages. Ancestral capsid sequences were inferred from sequences of these contemporary CVB5 isolates by using maximum likelihood methods. By using Bayesian phylodynamic analysis, the inferred VP1 ancestral sequence dated back to 1854 (1807 to 1898). In order to study the properties of the putative ancestral capsid, the entire ancestral P1 sequence was synthesized de novo and inserted into the replicative backbone of an infectious CVB5 cDNA clone. Characterization of the recombinant virus in cell culture showed that fully functional infectious virus particles were assembled and that these viruses displayed properties similar to those of modern isolates in terms of receptor preferences, plaque phenotypes, growth characteristics, and cell tropism. This is the first report describing the resurrection and characterization of a picornavirus with a putative ancestral capsid. Our approach, including a phylogenetics-based reconstruction of viral predecessors, could serve as a starting point for experimental studies of viral evolution and might also provide an alternative strategy for the development of vaccines. PMID:20631132

  15. Autonomous Molecular Cascades for Evaluation of Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs1–4. Previously studied nucleic acid-based-automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata3,5) and finite-state automata for analysis of nucleic acids6 with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells7,8. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement9,10 cascades directed by antibodies that can analyze cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  16. Only scratching the cell surface: extracellular signals in cerebrum development.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Jean M

    2013-08-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type's competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development.

  17. Mechanotransduction across the cell surface and through the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Butler, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin beta 1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  18. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  19. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  20. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-09

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  1. Thrombomucin, a Novel Cell Surface Protein that Defines Thrombocytes and Multipotent Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McNagny, Kelly M.; Pettersson, Inger; Rossi, Fabio; Flamme, Ingo; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Graf, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    MEP21 is an avian antigen specifically expressed on the surface of Myb-Ets–transformed multipotent hematopoietic precursors (MEPs) and of normal thrombocytes. Using nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we have sequenced and subsequently cloned the MEP21 cDNA and named the gene thrombomucin as it encodes a 571–amino acid protein with an extracellular domain typical of the mucin family of proteoglycans. Thrombomucin is distantly related to CD34, the best characterized and most used human hematopoietic stem cell marker. It is also highly homologous in its transmembrane/intracellular domain to podocalyxinlike protein–1, a rabbit cell surface glycoprotein of kidney podocytes. Single cell analysis of yolk sac cells from 3-d-old chick embryos revealed that thrombomucin is expressed on the surface of both lineage-restricted and multipotent progenitors. In the bone marrow, thrombomucin is also expressed on mono- and multipotent progenitors, showing an overlapping but distinct expression pattern from that of the receptor-type stem cell marker c-kit. These observations strengthen the notion that the Myb-Ets oncoprotein can induce the proliferation of thrombomucin-positive hematopoietic progenitors that have retained the capacity to differentiate along multiple lineages. They also suggest that thrombomucin and CD34 form a family of stem cell–specific proteins with possibly overlapping functions in early hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:9298993

  2. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  3. A Putative PP2C-Encoding Gene Negatively Regulates ABA Signaling in Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuan; Zhang, Dongzhi; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Tian, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    A PP2C homolog gene was cloned from the drought-treated cDNA library of Populus euphratica. Multiple sequence alignment analysis suggested that the gene is a potential ortholog of HAB1. The expression of this HAB1 ortholog (PeHAB1) was markedly induced by drought and moderately induced by ABA. To characterize its function in ABA signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing this gene. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced responses to exogenous ABA and reduced tolerance to drought compared to wide-type lines. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PeHAB1 could interact with the ABA receptor PYL4 in an ABA-independent manner. Taken together; these results indicated that PeHAB1 is a new negative regulator of ABA responses in poplar.

  4. The cell surface protein Ag43 facilitates phage infection of Escherichia coli in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gabig, Magdalena; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Los, Marcin; Thomas, Mark S; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2002-05-01

    It was found that infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage lambda is inhibited in the presence of certain bile salts and carbohydrates when cells are in the "OFF" state for production of the phase-variable cell surface protein antigen 43 (Ag43). The inhibition of phage growth was found to be due to a significant impairment in the process of phage adsorption. Expression of the gene encoding Ag43 (agn43) from a plasmid or inactivation of the oxyR gene (encoding an activator of genes important for defence against oxidative stress) suppressed this inhibition. A mutation, rpoA341, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase also facilitated phage adsorption in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates. The rpoA341 mutation promoted efficient production of Ag43 in a genetic background that would otherwise be in the "OFF" phase for expression of the agn43 gene. Analysis of a reporter gene fusion demonstrated that the promoter for the agn43 gene was more active in the rpoA341 mutant than in the otherwise isogenic rpoA(+) strain. The combined inhibitory action of bile salts and carbohydrates on phage adsorption and the abolition of this inhibition by production of Ag43 was not restricted to lambda, as a similar phenomenon was observed for the coliphages P1 and T4.

  5. Heterogeneous distribution of Candida albicans cell-surface antigens demonstrated with an Als1-specific monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David A.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an abundance of data describing expression of genes in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) gene family, little is known about the production of Als proteins on individual cells, their spatial localization or stability. Als proteins are most commonly discussed with respect to function in adhesion of C. albicans to host and abiotic surfaces. Development of a mAb specific for Als1, one of the eight large glycoproteins encoded by the ALS family, provided the opportunity to detect Als1 during growth of yeast and hyphae, both in vitro and in vivo, and to demonstrate the utility of the mAb in blocking C. albicans adhesion to host cells. Although most C. albicans yeast cells in a saturated culture are Als1-negative by indirect immunofluorescence, Als1 is detected on the surface of nearly all cells shortly after transfer into fresh growth medium. Als1 covers the yeast cell surface, with the exception of bud scars. Daughters of the inoculum cells, and sometimes granddaughters, also have detectable Als1, but Als1 is not detectable on cells from subsequent generations. On germ tubes and hyphae, most Als1 is localized proximal to the mother yeast. Once deposited on yeasts or hyphae, Als1 persists long after the culture has reached saturation. Growth stage-dependent production of Als1, coupled with its persistence on the cell surface, results in a heterogeneous population of cells within a C. albicans culture. Anti-Als1 immunolabelling patterns vary depending on the source of the C. albicans cells, with obvious differences between cells recovered from culture and those from a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Results from this work highlight the temporal parallels for ALS1 expression and Als1 production in yeasts and germ tubes, the specialized spatial localization and persistence of Als1 on the C. albicans cell surface, and the differences in Als1 localization that occur in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20705663

  6. Isolation of cell surface-specific human monoclonal antibodies using phage display and magnetically-activated cell sorting: applications in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Chang, T Y; Russell, S L; Bunya, V Y

    1997-08-07

    A method is described for the isolation of filamentous phage-displayed human monoclonal antibodies directed at unpurifiable cell surface-expressed molecules. To optimize the capture of antigen-specific phage and minimize the binding of irrelevant phage antibodies, a simultaneous positive and negative selection strategy is employed. Cells bearing the antigen of interest are pre-coated with magnetic beads and diluted into an excess of unmodified antigen-negative cells. Following incubation of the cell admixture with a Fab/phage library, the antigen-positive cell population is retrieved using magnetically-activated cell sorting and antigen-specific Fab/phage are eluted and propagated in bacterial culture. Utilizing this protocol with magnetically-labeled Rh(D)-positive and excess unlabeled Rh(D)-negative human red blood cells and a Fab/phage library constructed from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, dozens of unique clinically-useful gamma 1 kappa and gamma 1 lambda anti-Rh(D) antibodies were isolated from a single alloimmunized individual. This cell-surface selection method is readily adaptable for use in other systems, such as for the identification of putative tumor-specific antigens and provides a rapid (< 1 month), high-yield approach for isolating self-replicative antibody reagents directed at novel or conformationally-dependent cell-surface epitopes.

  7. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    PubMed

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Summary The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery on cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, were also evaluated for effects on mutacin production and genetic competence. PMID:26386361

  9. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  10. Glycoprotein C of equine herpesvirus 4 plays a role in viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Azab, Walid; Tsujimura, Koji; Maeda, Ken; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Mohamed, Yassir Mahgoub; Kato, Kentaro; Matsumura, Tomio; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2010-07-01

    Heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for several herpesviruses. For herpes simplex virus 1, pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1, glycoprotein C (gC) homologues have been shown to mediate the binding to cell surface heparan sulfate. However, the role of gC in equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) infection has not yet been analyzed. Using pull-down assay, we first determined that EHV-4 gC as well as gB are heparin-binding glycoproteins. To study the role of gC in EHV-4 infection, we constructed a gC-deletion mutant, WA79DeltagC, where the kanamycin resistant gene was inserted instead of the open reading frame encoding gC. We found that soluble heparin was capable of blocking both wild-type EHV-4 and WA79DeltagC infection of fetal horse kidney. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with heparinase reduces considerably the ability of both viruses to adsorb to these cells and to form plaques. Similar results were obtained when cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis was inhibited by chlorate treatment. In addition, we did find that gC protects EHV-4 from complement-mediated neutralization. These results suggest that, like other herpesviruses, EHV-4 gC plays a role in the interaction of the virus with cellular heparan sulfate. Moreover, gC can protect the virus from complement-mediated neutralization.

  11. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  12. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    SciTech Connect

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  13. Domain deletion in the extracellular portion of the EGF-receptor reduces ligand binding and impairs cell surface expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lax, I; Bellot, F; Honegger, A M; Schmidt, A; Ullrich, A; Givol, D; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    Cultured NIH-3T3 cells were transfected with cDNA constructs encoding human epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)* and two deletion mutants in the extracellular portion of the receptor molecule. One mutant is devoid of 124 amino-terminal amino acids, and the other lacks 76 residues. Mutant receptors were not delivered to the cell surface unless the transfected cells contained also endogenous EGF-Rs, suggesting that receptor interaction complements the mutation and allows surface display of mutant receptors. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association between mutant and endogenous EGF-Rs when both proteins were expressed in the same cell. Hence, receptor-oligomers may exist in the plane of the membrane even in the absence of ligand binding, and oligomerization may play a role in normal trafficking of EGF-Rs to the cell surface. Mutant receptors retained partial ligand binding activity as 125I-labeled EGF was covalently cross-linked to both mutant receptors, and EGF stimulated, albeit weakly, their protein tyrosine kinase activity. Both mutant EGF-Rs bind EGF with a 10-fold lower affinity than that of the solubilized wild type EGF-R. These results provide further evidence that the region flanked by the two cysteine-rich domains plays a crucial role in defining ligand-binding specificity of EGF-R. Images PMID:2100196

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  15. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  16. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  17. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  18. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  19. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  20. Encephalitis and antibodies to synaptic and neuronal cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The identification of encephalitis associated with antibodies against cell surface and synaptic proteins, although recent, has already had a substantial impact in clinical neurology and neuroscience. The target antigens are receptors and proteins that have critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity, including the NMDA receptor, the AMPA receptor, the GABAB receptor, and the glycine receptor. Other autoantigens, such as leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2, form part of trans-synaptic complexes and neuronal cell adhesion molecules involved in fine-tuning synaptic transmission and nerve excitability. Syndromes resulting from these immune responses resemble those of pharmacologic or genetic models in which the antigens are disrupted. For some immune responses, there is evidence that the antibodies alter the structure and function of the antigen, suggesting a direct pathogenic effect. These disorders are important because they can affect children and young adults, are severe and protracted, occur with or without tumor association, and respond to treatment but may relapse. This review provides an update on these syndromes and autoantigens with special emphasis on clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21747075

  1. Cells under siege: Viral glycoprotein interactions at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2011-01-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses are required to enter and replicate within their host, a process which employs many of their proteins to hijack natural cellular processes. High resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis has proven to be an ideal method to visualize the mechanisms by which such virus-host interactions occur and has revealed the innovative capacity of viruses to adapt efficiently to their hosts. In this review, we draw upon recently elucidated paramyxovirus-, arenavirus-, and poxvirus-host protein complex crystal structures to reveal both the capacity of viruses to appropriate one component of a physiological protein–protein binding event (often modifying it to out-compete the host-protein), and the ability to utilize novel binding sites on host cell surface receptors. The structures discussed shed light on a number of biological processes ranging from viral entry to virulence and host antagonism. Drawn together they reveal the common strategies which viruses have evolved to interact with their natural host. The structures also support molecular level rationales for how viruses can be transmitted to unrelated organisms and thus pose severe health risks. PMID:21440638

  2. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  3. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  4. Development of a novel mammalian cell surface antibody display platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Cai, Ling; Chen, Qing; Shen, Weyen David

    2010-01-01

    Antibody display systems have been successfully applied to screen, select and characterize antibody fragments. These systems typically use prokaryotic organisms such as phage and bacteria or lower eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast. These organisms possess either no or different post-translational modification functions from mammalian cells and prefer to display small antibody fragments instead of full-length IgGs. We report here a novel mammalian cell-based antibody display platform that displays full-length functional antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. Through recombinase-mediated DNA integration, each host cell contains one copy of the gene of interest in the genome. Utilizing a hot-spot integration site, the expression levels of the gene of interest are high and comparable between clones, ensuring a high signal to noise ratio. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology, our platform is high throughput and can distinguish antibodies with very high antigen binding affinities directly on the cell surface. Single-round FACS can enrich high affinity antibodies by more than 500 fold. Antibodies with significantly improved neutralizing activity have been identified from a randomly mutagenized library, demonstrating the power of this platform in screening and selecting antibody therapeutics.

  5. Diffusion-limited reactions on the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Tauber, Uwe; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) stimulates proliferation of many cell types, and are crucial in such processes as eg. wound healing. Cells have specific receptor (R) protein molecules on their surface which bind FGF for this purpose. FGF is also bound by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) molecules which are present on the cell surface. In isolation, both these complexes are unstable, with half-life of the order of 10-20 minutes, wheras in intact cells, the half-life of FGF-R complex is nearly 5 hours! To account for this increased stability, it has been proposed that R-FGF complex combines with HSPG via surface diffusion and forms the triad R-FGF-HSPG. We examine the feasibility of this reaction using the well-known Smoluchowski theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results support the triad formation theory, and are in qualitative agreement with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of slowing down of surface diffusion of these molecules by such factors as eg. the cytosekeletal network and anchored proteins.

  6. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  7. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  8. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  9. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  10. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  11. Genetically-encoded Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacoff, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    One of the principle goals of neuroscience has been to understand the cellular basis of information processing and the plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Efforts in this area have mainly relied on electrical recording and optical imaging with chemical dyes. Over the last few years we and others have begun to develop genetically-encoded optical reporter "dyes" which should provide several important advantages over the classical methods for monitoring signal transmission in the nervous system. The advantages are that genetically-encoded reporters can be molecularly targeted a) to specific cell types via cell-specific promoters, and b) to specific subcellular compartments by peptides that are recognized by the protein sorting machinery of the cell. This makes it possible, in principle, to exclude signals from non-neuronal cells and to visualize selectively, in a brain region that contains many cell types with numerous kinds of synaptic connections, the activity of specific types of neurons (e.g. GABAergic interneurons) and specific synaptic elements (e.g. nerve terminals or dendrites), something that has hitherto not been possible. An additional advantage is that protein reporters may be rationally and irrationally "tuned" with mutations in functional domains known to control their dynamic range of operation. The general idea behind genetically-encoded reporters of cell signaling is to encode a protein that is either intrinsically fluorescent, or that can be labeled orthogonally with a fluorescent probe, and where the physiological signal changes fluorescence emission. I will describe recent progress employing both kinds of approaches.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Putative Integron-Like Elements of the Heavy-Metal-Hypertolerant Strains of Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Ciok, Anna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Bartosik, Dariusz; Dziewit, Lukasz

    2016-11-28

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from the heavily contaminated Lubin copper mine and Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir in Poland were screened for the presence of integrons. This analysis revealed that two strains carried homologous DNA regions composed of a gene encoding a DNA_BRE_C domain-containing tyrosine recombinase (with no significant sequence similarity to other integrases of integrons) plus a three-component array of putative integron gene cassettes. The predicted gene cassettes encode three putative polypeptides with homology to (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) GCN5 family acetyltransferases, and (iii) hypothetical proteins of unknown function (homologous proteins are encoded by the gene cassettes of several class 1 integrons). Comparative sequence analyses identified three structural variants of these novel integron-like elements within the sequenced bacterial genomes. Analysis of their distribution revealed that they are found exclusively in strains of the genus Pseudomonas.

  13. An efficient delivery of DAMPs on the cell surface by the unconventional secretion pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Dongmei; Min, Zhihui; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Min; Gu, Jianxin

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Hsp60 transported to cell surface through the classical secretory pathway was modified with N-glycosylation. {yields} HSAPB-N18 could efficiently deliver Hsp60 to the cell surface via the unconventional secretory pathway. {yields} Cell surface Hsp60 delivered by HASPB-N18 has a proper conformation. {yields} HASPB-N18 is an efficient delivery signal for other DAMP molecules such as Hsp70 and HMGB1. -- Abstract: Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are signals released from dying cells evoking the immune system response in several inflammatory disorders. In normal situations, many of DAMPs are nuclear or cytosolic proteins with defined intracellular function, but they could be found on the cell surface following tissue injury. The biological function of the translocated DAMPs is still not well known and an efficient delivery of these molecules on the cell surface is required to clarify their biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated that an unclassical secretory signal peptide, N-terminal 18 amino acids of HASPB (HASPB-N18), could efficiently deliver Hsp60, Hsp70, and HMGB1 on the cell surface. Furthermore, the delivery of these molecules on the cell surface by HASPB-N18 is not limited to a special cell line because several cell lines could use this delivery signal to deliver these molecules on the cell surface. Moreover, we demonstrated that Hsp60 on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 could be recognized by a soluble form of LOX-1, which implies that DAMPs on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 have a proper conformation during transport. Therefore, delivery of DAMPs by HASPB-N18 is a reliable model to further understand the biological significance of DAMPs on the cell surface.

  14. Atypical cohesin-dockerin complex responsible for cell surface attachment of cellulosomal components: binding fidelity, promiscuity, and structural buttresses.

    PubMed

    Salama-Alber, Orly; Jobby, Maroor K; Chitayat, Seth; Smith, Steven P; White, Bryan A; Shimon, Linda J W; Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix; Bayer, Edward A

    2013-06-07

    The rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens produces a highly organized multienzyme cellulosome complex that plays a key role in the degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, notably cellulose. The R. flavefaciens cellulosomal system is anchored to the bacterial cell wall through a relatively small ScaE scaffoldin subunit, which bears a single type IIIe cohesin responsible for the attachment of two major dockerin-containing scaffoldin proteins, ScaB and the cellulose-binding protein CttA. Although ScaB recruits the catalytic machinery onto the complex, CttA mediates attachment of the bacterial substrate via its two putative carbohydrate-binding modules. In an effort to understand the structural basis for assembly and cell surface attachment of the cellulosome in R. flavefaciens, we determined the crystal structure of the high affinity complex (Kd = 20.83 nM) between the cohesin module of ScaE (CohE) and its cognate X-dockerin (XDoc) modular dyad from CttA at 1.97-Å resolution. The structure reveals an atypical calcium-binding loop containing a 13-residue insert. The results further pinpoint two charged specificity-related residues on the surface of the cohesin module that are responsible for specific versus promiscuous cross-strain binding of the dockerin module. In addition, a combined functional role for the three enigmatic dockerin inserts was established whereby these extraneous segments serve as structural buttresses that reinforce the stalklike conformation of the X-module, thus segregating its tethered complement of cellulosomal components from the cell surface. The novel structure of the RfCohE-XDoc complex sheds light on divergent dockerin structure and function and provides insight into the specificity features of the type IIIe cohesin-dockerin interaction.

  15. Quantification of macrophage cell surface molecules in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hessian, P A; Highton, J; Palmer, D G

    1989-01-01

    The response of macrophages to stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in vitro is characterized by an increase in the cell surface expression of MHC class II HLA-DR antigen (HLA-DR) and the high-affinity Fc-receptor for immunoglobulin G (FcRI) while the expression of the C3b-receptor (CR1) is reduced. Based on these observations, we have examined further the possibility that IFN-gamma may modulate the activation of mononuclear phagocytes (Mph) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As reported by others, we found low levels of IFN-gamma in the synovial fluid of these patients (less than 0.3 IU/ml using radioimmunoassay). As an alternative means of establishing whether Mph are influenced by levels of IFN-gamma too low to measure directly, we have quantified the expression of membrane associated HLA-DR, FcRI and CR1 on cell populations isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood. The expression of these molecules by Mph is known to be influenced by IFN-gamma. We found that Mph isolated from the synovial fluid of patients with RA showed a significantly increased HLA-DR expression. Significantly less CR1 was associated with the synovial fluid Mph than with peripheral blood monocytes. However the expression of the FcRI by the synovial fluid Mph and peripheral blood monocyte populations was similar. The quantitative changes in HLA-DR and CR1 expression by synovial fluid Mph (but not those of FcRI) were consistent with those seen following IFN-gamma activation of monocytes in vitro. While these results indicate that IFN-gamma may have a role in activating the Mph present in synovial fluid, the apparent independent regulation of FcRI observed suggests other mediators may also be involved. PMID:2527651

  16. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  17. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  18. Influence of carbon source on cell surface topology of Thermomonospora curvata.

    PubMed Central

    Hostalka, F; Moultrie, A; Stutzenberger, F

    1992-01-01

    The appearance of cell surface protuberances in Thermomonospora curvata correlated with cell-bound exoenzymes which could be removed by brief sonication. Mycelia grown on cellulose or xylan had numerous protuberances and retained 20 to 25% of endoglucanase and endoxylanase at cell surfaces, while those grown on pectin or starch had few protuberances and negligible bound pectinase or amylase. Images PMID:1400256

  19. Evidence for cell surface control of macronuclear DNA synthesis in Stentor.

    PubMed

    de Terra, N

    1975-11-27

    In cell grafts, Stentor macronuclei associated with separate regions of cell surface can be made asynchronous with regard to morphology and DNA synthesis even though they demonstrably share a common endoplasm. These results suggest a mechanism for nuclear differentiation within a single cytoplasmic compartment, based on cell surface differences.

  20. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  1. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates.

  2. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  3. Murine Immunoprotective Activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae Cell Surface Preparations: Comparative Study with Ribosomal Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jean-Michel; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Jouin, Hélène

    1981-01-01

    Cell surface preparations and ribosomal preparations were extracted from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Agar gel diffusion with antisera to cell surface preparations or ribosomal preparations indicated common antigenic components among the preparations. Lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide were identified in the cell surface preparations. These results and the previous identification of lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide in ribosomal preparations suggest that these antigens are responsible for the immunochemical cross-reactivity observed among these two bacterial extracts. Active protection could be induced in mice by these two preparations. On a dry-weight basis, cell surface preparations provided better immunoprotective activity than did ribosomal preparations. However, the 50% protective dose of both preparations is practically the same on the basis of their capsular polysaccharide content. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the immunoprotective moiety of ribosomal preparations is the contaminating cell surface antigens. Furthermore, the low level of nucleotidic components detected in purified cell surface preparations led us to infer that the immunoprotective activity of capsular polysaccharide may not be dependent on the adjuvant activity of ribonucleic acid. The involvement of capsular polysaccharide in the immunoprotective capacity of cell surface preparations is demonstrated either by using a degradation of this antigen by K. pneumoniae bacteriophage K2-associated glycanase or by using a preparation extracted from a noncapsulated mutant of K. pneumoniae. Nevertheless, the low protective ability of purified capsular polysaccharides is in contrast to its greater activity when induced in bacterial cell surface preparations. The protective activity of K. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide may be dependent on its association with other surface antigenic components present in cell surface preparations or may be dependent on its

  4. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi.

  5. A new putative alphapartitivirus recovered from the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe palczewskii.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guihong; Qiu, Ping; Li, Cong; Chen, Zhuo; Islam, Saif Ul; Fang, Shouguo; Wu, Zujian; Zhang, Songbai; Du, Zhenguo

    2017-02-27

    Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) likely representing the genome of a novel alphapartitivirus which we provisionally named Erysiphe palczewskii alphapartitivirus 1 (EpV1) were recovered from the powdery mildew fungus E. palczewskii infecting Sophora japonica in Jingzhou, Hubei province of China. The two dsRNAs, 1955 (dsRNA1) and 1917 (dsRNA2) bp in size, respectively, each contains a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 585- and 528-aa protein, respectively. The 585-aa protein contains a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain and shows significant homology to RdRps of approved or putative partitiviruses, particularly those belonging to the genus Alphapartitivirus. However, it shares an aa sequence identity lower than 80% with its closest relative, the RdRp of the putative alphapartitivirus Grapevine partitivirus, and lower than 60% with the RdRps of other partitiviruses. In a phylogenetic tree constructed with RdRp aa sequences of selected partitiviruses, the putative virus EpV1 clustered with Grapevine partitivirus and formed a well-supported monophyletic clade with known or putative alphapartitiviruses.

  6. A Novel Cytoplasmic Tail Motif Regulates Mouse Corin Expression on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lina; Dong, Ningzheng; Qi, Xiaofei; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are important in many biological processes. Cell surface expression is critical for TTSP activation and function. To date, the mechanism underlying TTSP cell surface expression is poorly understood. Corin is a TTSP and acts as the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide convertase that is essential for sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure. In this study, we investigated how cytoplasmic tail sequences may regulate corin expression and activation on the cell surface. By site-directed mutagenesis, we made mouse corin proteins with truncations or point-mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. We expressed the mutants in transfected HEK293 cells and analyzed corin cell surface expression and activation by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We found that corin truncation mutants lacking a Lys-Phe-Gln sequence at residues 71–73 had higher levels of cell surface expression and activation compared with that in wild-type corin. When Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 residues were mutated together, but not individually, in corin with the full-length cytoplasmic tail, increased levels of cell surface expression and zymogen activation were also observed. These results indicate that residues Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 serve as a novel retention motif in the intracellular pathway to regulate corin cell surface expression and activation. PMID:26241673

  7. Putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Decher, Niels; Netter, Michael F; Streit, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all organisms use RNA editing as a powerful post-transcriptional mechanism to recode genomic information and to increase functional protein diversity. The enzymatic editing of pre-mRNA by ADARs and CDARs is known to change the functional properties of neuronal receptors and ion channels regulating cellular excitability. However, RNA editing is also an important mechanism for genes expressed outside the brain. The fact that RNA editing breaks the 'one gene encodes one protein' hypothesis is daunting for scientists and a probable drawback for drug development, as scientists might search for drugs targeting the 'wrong' protein. This possible difficulty for drug discovery and development became more evident from recent publications, describing that RNA editing events have profound impact on the pharmacology of some common drug targets. These recent studies highlight that RNA editing can cause massive discrepancies between the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology. Here, we review the putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery, as RNA editing has to be considered before using high-throughput screens, rational drug design or choosing the right model organism for target validation.

  8. Large-scale identification of putative exported proteins in Candida albicans by genetic selection.

    PubMed

    Monteoliva, L; Matas, M López; Gil, C; Nombela, C; Pla, J

    2002-08-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism.

  9. Large-Scale Identification of Putative Exported Proteins in Candida albicans by Genetic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, L.; López Matas, M.; Gil, C.; Nombela, C.; Pla, J.

    2002-01-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:12456000

  10. Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Cell Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abdolahi, Mohammad; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Laurent, Sophie; Sermeus, Corine; Gruettner, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface antigens as biomarkers offer tremendous potential for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response in a variety of diseases such as cancers. In this research, a simple, rapid, accurate, inexpensive, and easily available in vitro assay based on magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic cell separation principle was applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the cell surface antigen expression in the case of prostate cancer cells. Comparing the capability of the assay with flow cytometry as a gold standard method showed similar results. The results showed that the antigen-specific magnetic cell separation with antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles has high potential for quantitative cell surface antigen detection and analysis. PMID:23484112

  11. Interactions of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Human and Simian Retroviral Transmembrane Proteins with Components of the Clathrin Adaptor Complexes Modulate Intracellular and Cell Surface Expression of Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Erdtmann, Lars; Delamarre, Lelia; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Sonigo, Pierre; Dokhelar, Marie Christine; Benarous, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of the transmembrane (TM) envelope proteins (TM-CDs) of most retroviruses have a Tyr-based motif, YXXØ, in their membrane-proximal regions. This signal is involved in the trafficking and endocytosis of membrane receptors via clathrin-associated AP-1 and AP-2 adaptor complexes. We have used CD8-TM-CD chimeras to investigate the role of the Tyr-based motif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM-CDs in the cell surface expression of the envelope glycoprotein. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies showed that this motif is a major determinant of the cell surface expression of the CD8-HTLV chimera. The YXXØ motif also plays a key role in subcellular distribution of the envelope of lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, these viruses, which encode TM proteins with a long cytoplasmic domain, have additional determinants distal to the YXXØ motif that participate in regulating cell surface expression. We have also used the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro binding assays to demonstrate that all three retroviral YXXØ motifs interact with the μ1 and μ2 subunits of AP complexes and that the C-terminal regions of HIV-1 and SIV TM proteins interact with the β2 adaptin subunit. The TM-CDs of HTLV-1, HIV-1, and SIV also interact with the whole AP complexes. These results clearly demonstrate that the cell surface expression of retroviral envelope glycoproteins is governed by interactions with adaptor complexes. The YXXØ-based signal is the major determinant of this interaction for the HTLV-1 TM, which contains a short cytoplasmic domain, whereas the lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV have additional determinants distal to this signal that are also involved. PMID:9882340

  12. Cell surface-engineered yeast displaying a histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) has enhanced adsorption of and tolerance to heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, K; Shibasaki, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    2001-12-01

    A histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) with the ability to chelate divalent heavy metal ions was displayed on the yeast cell surface for the purpose of enhanced adsorption of heavy metal ions. We genetically fused a hexa-His-encoding gene with the gene encoding the C-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin that includes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment signal sequence and attached the hexa-His peptide on the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This surface-engineered yeast adsorbed three to eight times more copper ions than the parent strain and was more resistant to copper (4 mM) than the parent (below 1 mM at pH 7.8). It was possible to recover about a half of the copper ions adsorbed by whole cells with EDTA treatment without disintegrating the cells. Thus, we succeeded in constructing a novel yeast cell with both tolerance to toxic contaminants and enhanced adsorption of metal ions onto the cell surface.

  13. Altered cell surface expression of human MC1R variant receptor alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Newton, Richard A; Smit, Darren J; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2005-08-01

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily expressed on melanocytes, where it plays a key role in pigmentation regulation. Variant alleles are associated with red hair colour and fair skin, known as the RHC phenotype, as well as skin cancer risk. The R151C, R160W and D294H alleles, designated 'R', are strongly associated with the RHC phenotype and have been proposed to result in loss of function receptors due to impaired G-protein coupling. We recently provided evidence that the R151C and R160W variants can efficiently couple to G-proteins in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The possibility that altered cellular localization of the R151C and R160W variant receptors could underlie their association with RHC was therefore considered. Using immunofluorescence and ligand binding studies, we found that melanocytic cells exogenously or endogenously expressing MC1R show strong surface localization of the wild-type and D294H alleles but markedly reduced cell surface expression of the R151C and R160W receptors. In additional exogenous expression studies, the R variant D84E and the rare I155T variant, also demonstrated a significant reduction in plasma membrane receptor numbers. The V60L, V92M and R163Q weakly associated RHC alleles, designated 'r', were expressed with normal or intermediate cell surface receptor levels. These results indicate that reduced receptor coupling activity may not be the only contributing factor to the genetic association between the MC1R variants and the RHC phenotype, with MC1R polymorphisms now linked to a change in receptor localization.

  14. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  15. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  16. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  17. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  18. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates.

  19. Isolation of cell surface proteins for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Elschenbroich, Sarah; Kim, Yunee; Medin, Jeffrey A; Kislinger, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Defining the cell surface proteome has profound importance for understanding cell differentiation and cell-cell interactions, as well as numerous pathogenic abnormalities. Owing to their hydrophobic nature, plasma membrane proteins that reside on the cell surface pose analytical challenges and, despite efforts to overcome difficulties, remain under-represented in proteomic studies. Limitations in the classically employed ultracentrifugation-based approaches have led to the invention of more elaborate techniques for the purification of cell surface proteins. Three of these methods--cell surface coating with cationic colloidal silica beads, biotinylation and chemical capture of surface glycoproteins--allow for marked enrichment of this subcellular proteome, with each approach offering unique advantages and characteristics for different experiments. In this article, we introduce the principles of each purification method and discuss applications from the recent literature.

  20. Mechanical guidance through cell-cell and cell-surface contact during multicellular streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Driscoll, Meghan; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    During collective cell migration, mechanical forces arise from the extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface contact and from other cells through cell-cell contact. These forces regulate the motion of migrating cell groups. To determine how these mechanical interactions balance during cell migration, we measured the shape dynamics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells at the multicellular streaming stage. We found that cells can coordinate their motion by synchronizing protrusion waves that travel along their membranes when they form proper cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion. In addition, our experiments on live actin labeled cells show that intracellular actin polymerization actively responds to the change of cell-cell/surface adhesion and helps to stabilize multicellular migration streams. Our finding suggests that the coordination of motion between neighboring cells in collective migration requires a balance between cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion, and that the cell cytoskeleton plays an important role in this balance.

  1. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  2. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  3. Cell surface markers of cancer stem cells: diagnostic macromolecules and targets for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Timothy E; Wang, Dan; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-04-01

    The recognition that the persistence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in patients following chemotherapy can result in disease relapse underscores the necessity to develop therapeutics against those cells. CSCs display a unique repertoire of cell surface macromolecules, which have proven essential for their characterization and isolation. Additionally, CSC-specific cell surface macromolecules or markers provide targets for the development of specific agents to destroy them. In this review, we compiled those cell surface molecules that have been validated as CSC markers for many common blood and solid tumors. We describe the unique chemical and structural features of the most common cell surface markers, as well as recent efforts to deliver chemotherapeutic agents into CSCs by targeting those macromolecules.

  4. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  5. Cell/surface interactions and adhesion on bioactive glass 45S5.

    PubMed

    Levy, S; Van Dalen, M; Agonafer, S; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of surface texture (smooth versus rough) on cell/surface interactions on the bioactive glass, 45S5. The cell surface interactions associated with cell spreading are studied using cell culture experiments. Subsequent energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is also used to reveal the distributions of calcium, phosphorous, sodium and oxygen on the surfaces of the bioactive glasses. The implications of the results are then discussed for the applications of textured bioactive glasses in medicine.

  6. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    inhibit sphere growth of GRP78-sorted prostate cancer cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16...domains of cell surface GRP78 on Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. RESULTS/DISCUSSION: We are delayed in performing the experiments because of our delay in...addressing Task 6 (originally scheduled for year 1, moved to year 2; see above). Task 7: OBJECTIVE: Using Snail -1 shRNAs, assess the

  7. Enhanced cell surface polymer grafting in concentrated and nonreactive aqueous polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicholas A A; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2010-03-17

    Macromolecular cell surface modification techniques have shown tremendous utility in various biomedical applications. However, a major drawback concerns inefficient cell surface modification caused by the poor association of hydrophilic macromolecules with cell surfaces. Here, a novel, highly efficient, and universal strategy in which nonreactive "additive" macromolecules are used to modulate the grafting efficiency of cell surface reactive, hydrophilic macromolecules is described. Unprecedented enhanced cell surface modifications by up to 10-fold were observed when various concentrations of a suitable "additive" polymer was present with a constant and low concentration of a "reactive" macromolecule. The importance of this increased efficiency and the possible mechanisms involved are discussed. The cell compatible technique is demonstrated in the case of four different cell types--red blood cells (RBC), leukocytes, platelets, and Jurkat cells. A practical application of grafting macromolecules to cell surfaces in concentrated polymer solutions is demonstrated by the enhanced camouflage of RBC surface antigens for the development of RhD null RBC. In principle, the technique can be adapted to various macromolecular systems and cell types, with significant potential for biomedical applications such as live cell based technologies.

  8. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25476450

  9. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    PubMed

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  11. Role of N-glycosylation in cell surface expression and protection against proteolysis of the intestinal anion exchanger SLC26A3.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Yukari

    2012-03-01

    SLC26A3 is a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger that plays a major role in Cl(-) absorption from the intestine. Its mutation causes congenital chloride-losing diarrhea. It has been shown that SLC26A3 are glycosylated, with the attached carbohydrate being extracellular and perhaps modulating function. However, the role of glycosylation has yet to be clearly determined. We used the approaches of biochemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to prevent glycosylation. Deglycosylation experiments with glycosidases indicated that the mature glycosylated form of SLC26A3 exists at the plasma membrane, and a putative large second extracellular loop contains all of the N-linked carbohydrates. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes depression of transport activity compared with wild-type, although robust intracellular pH changes were still observed, suggesting that N-glycosylation is not absolutely necessary for transport activity. To localize glycosylation sites, we mutated the five consensus sites by replacing asparagine (N) with glutamine. Immnoblotting suggests that SLC26A3 is glycosylated at N153, N161, and N165. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes a defect in cell surface processing with decreased cell surface expression. We also assessed whether SLC26A3 is protected from tryptic digestion. While the mature glycosylated SLC26A3 showed little breakdown after treatment with trypsin, deglycosylated SLC26A3 exhibited increased susceptibility to trypsin, suggesting that the oligosaccharides protect SLC26A3 from tryptic digestion. In conclusion, our data indicate that N-glycosylation of SLC26A3 is important for cell surface expression and for protection from proteolytic degradation that may contribute to the understanding of pathogenesis of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  12. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  13. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  14. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  15. Alteration in cell surface properties of Burkholderia spp. during surfactant-aided biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Mukherji, Suparna

    2012-04-01

    Chemical surfactants may impact microbial cell surface properties, i.e., cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and cell surface charge, and may thus affect the uptake of components from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). This work explored the impact of Triton X-100, Igepal CA 630, and Tween 80 (at twice the critical micelle concentration, CMC) on the cell surface characteristics of Burkholderia cultures, Burkholderia cepacia (ES1, aliphatic degrader) and Burkholderia multivorans (NG1, aromatic degrader), when grown on a six-component model NAPL. In the presence of Triton X-100, NAPL biodegradation was enhanced from 21% to 60% in B. cepacia and from 18% to 53% in B. multivorans. CSH based on water contact angle (50-52°) was in the same range for both strains while zeta potential at neutral pH was -38 and -31 mV for B. cepacia and B. multivorans, respectively. In the presence of Triton X-100, their CSH increased to greater than 75° and the zeta potential decreased. This induced a change in the mode of uptake and initiated aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation by B. multivorans and increased the rate of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation in B. cepacia. Igepal CA 630 and Tween 80 also altered the cell surface properties. For B. cepacia grown in the presence of Triton X-100 at two and five times its CMC, CSH increased significantly in the log growth phase. Growth in the presence of the chemical surfactants also affected the abundance of chemical functional groups on the cell surface. Cell surface changes had maximum impact on NAPL degradation in the presence of emulsifying surfactants, Triton X-100 and Igepal CA630.

  16. The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a putative ABC transporter permease is inversely correlated during biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes 4b G

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the molecular basis of biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the deletion mutant of lm.G_1771 gene, which encodes for a putative ABC_transporter permease, is highly expressed in biofilm. In this study, the sod gene deletion mutant delta ...

  17. Identification and Analysis of Putative Homologues of Mechanosensitive Channels in Pathogenic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels play important roles in the physiology of many organisms, and their dysfunction can affect cell survival. This suggests that they might be therapeutic targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, dysentery, leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels. Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Trichomonas vaginalis have genes encoding homologues of Piezo channels, while most pathogenic protozoa have genes encoding homologues of mechanosensitive small-conductance (MscS) and K+-dependent (MscK) channels. In contrast, all parasites examined lack genes encoding mechanosensitive large-conductance (MscL), mini-conductance (MscM) and degenerin/epithelial Na+ (DEG/ENaC) channels. Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily distant protozoan, amoeban, plant, insect and vertebrate Piezo channel subunits define an absolutely conserved motif that may be involved in channel conductance or gating. MscS channels are not present in humans, and the sequences of protozoan and human homologues of Piezo channels differ substantially. This suggests the possibility for specific targeting of mechanosensitive channels of pathogens by therapeutic drugs. PMID:23785469

  18. Identification and analysis of putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels in pathogenic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Prole, David L; Taylor, Colin W

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels play important roles in the physiology of many organisms, and their dysfunction can affect cell survival. This suggests that they might be therapeutic targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, dysentery, leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels. Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Trichomonas vaginalis have genes encoding homologues of Piezo channels, while most pathogenic protozoa have genes encoding homologues of mechanosensitive small-conductance (MscS) and K(+)-dependent (MscK) channels. In contrast, all parasites examined lack genes encoding mechanosensitive large-conductance (MscL), mini-conductance (MscM) and degenerin/epithelial Na(+) (DEG/ENaC) channels. Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily distant protozoan, amoeban, plant, insect and vertebrate Piezo channel subunits define an absolutely conserved motif that may be involved in channel conductance or gating. MscS channels are not present in humans, and the sequences of protozoan and human homologues of Piezo channels differ substantially. This suggests the possibility for specific targeting of mechanosensitive channels of pathogens by therapeutic drugs.

  19. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  20. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  1. Cloning, expression, and cell surface localization of Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 xylanase 5, a multidomain xylanase.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuko; Tomita, Toshio; Roy, Narayan; Nakano, Akito; Sugawara-Tomita, Noriko; Watanabe, Seiji; Okai, Naoko; Abe, Naoki; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2003-12-01

    We have shown that a xylan-degrading bacterium, W-61, excretes multiple xylanases, including xylanase 5 with a molecular mass of 140 kDa. Here, we emend the previously used classification of the bacterium (i.e., Aeromonas caviae W-61) to Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene, and we clone and express the xyn5 gene encoding xylanase 5 (Xyn5) in Escherichia coli and study the subcellular localization of Xyn5. xyn5 encodes 1,326 amino acid residues, including a 27-amino-acid signal sequence. Sequence analysis indicated that Xyn5 comprises two family 22 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM), a family 10 catalytic domain of glycosyl hydrolases, a family 9 CBM, a domain similar to the lysine-rich region of Clostridium thermocellum SdbA, and three S-layer-homologous (SLH) domains. Recombinant Xyn5 bound to a crystalline cellulose, Avicel PH-101, while an N-terminal 90-kDa fragment of Xyn5, which lacks the C-terminal half of the family 9 CBM, did not bind to Avicel PH-101. Xyn5 was cell bound, and the cell-bound protein was digested by exogenous trypsin to produce immunoreactive and xylanolytic fragments with molecular masses of 80 and 60 kDa. Xyn5 was exclusively distributed in the cell envelope fraction consisting of a peptidoglycan-containing layer and an associated S layer. Thus, Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 Xyn5 is a cell surface-anchored modular xylanase possessing a functional cellulose-binding module and SLH domains. Possible cooperative action of multiple xylanases produced by strain W-61 is discussed on the basis of the modular structure of Xyn5.

  2. Identification of Enteroviruses by Using Monoclonal Antibodies against a Putative Common Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Youn; Kim, Ki-Soon; Lee, Yoon-Sung; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Park, Kwi-Sung; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Moon, Youngjoon; Choi, Jee-Hye; Cho, Hang-Eui; Min, Na-Young; Son, Jin-Sook; Park, Young-Hoon; Jee, Youngmee; Yoon, Jae-Deuk; Song, Chul-Yong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2003-01-01

    A common epitope region of enteroviruses was identified by sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA), followed by immunoscreening of 11 cDNA libraries from two Korean enterovirus isolates (echoviruses 7 and 30) and a coxsackievirus B3 (ATCC-VR 30). The putative common epitope region was localized in the N terminus of VP1 when the displayed recombinant proteins from the phages were chased by the convalescent-phase sera. The genomic region encoding the common epitope region was amplified and then expressed by using the vector pGEX-5X-1. The antigenicity of the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blotting with guinea pig antisera for six different serotypes of enteroviruses. After successive immunization of mice with the recombinant common epitope protein, splenocytes were extracted and hybridized with P3X63-Ag8-653 cells. A total of 24 hybridomas that produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses were selected. Four of these were immunoglobulin G1 isotypes with a kappa light chain. These MAbs recognized 15 Korean endemic serotypes and prototypes of enteroviruses in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that the expressed protein might be a useful antigen for producing group common antibodies and that the use of the MAbs against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses might be a valuable diagnostic tool for rapidly identifying a broad range of enteroviruses. PMID:12843038

  3. In silico identification of a putative new paramyxovirus related to the Henipavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2004-12-05

    A database search for genes encoding paramyxoviral proteins revealed sequences that were designated as human but presented strong evidence of being of viral origin. The two cDNA-derived sequences designated AngRem104 and AngRem52 were originally described as human gene products that were upregulated by angiotensin II in primary mesangial kidney cells. However, their high degree of sequence relatedness to known viral proteins suggests that they represent the P/C/V, M, and F genes of a putative new member of family Paramyxoviridae. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences and nucleotide motifs suggests that this putative virus is a divergent relative of the Hendra and Nipah viruses; hence, we suggest henipa-like virus or HNLV as a provisional name. Compared to Nipah virus, the percentage of identical (similar) amino acids varied from 19% (42%) for the C protein to 51% (75%) for the M protein. The presence and conservation of presumptive viral transcription start and stop signals and an apparent P editing motif also indicate a relationship of this putative virus to the henipaviruses. Given the highly pathogenic nature of the henipaviruses, the origin of these sequences is enigmatic, and attempts to identify and isolate HNLV are warranted.

  4. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  5. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. )

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  6. Cell surface of sea urchin micromeres and primary mesenchyme. [Arbacia punctulata; Strongylocentrotus drobachiensis; Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    SciTech Connect

    DeSimone, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) of the sea urchin embryo were studied during the early morphogenetic events involved in the differentiation of the micromere cell lineage. Sixteen-cell and early cleavage stage blastomeres were isolated and the protein composition of their cell surfaces examined by /sup 125/I-labelling followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Micromere-specific cell surface proteins are reported for Arbacia punctulata, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Cell surface glycoproteins were characterized on the basis of lectin binding specificity with a novel lectin affinity transfer technique. Using this procedure, cell-type specific surface proteins, which are also lectin-binding specific, can be detected. In addition, fluorescein conjugated lectins were microinjected into the blastocoels of living S. drobachiensis and Lytechinus pictus embryos and the patterns of lectin bindings observed by fluorescence microscopy. The evidence presented in this thesis suggests that the differentiation of the primary mesenchyme cells is correlated with changes in the molecular composition of the cell-surface and the ECM.

  7. Investigating biomolecular recognition at the cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-05-01

    Probing the interaction forces that drive biomolecular recognition on cell surfaces is essential for understanding diverse biological processes. Force spectroscopy has been a widely used dynamic analytical technique, allowing measurement of such interactions at the molecular and cellular level. The capabilities of working under near physiological environments, combined with excellent force and lateral resolution make atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy a powerful approach to measure biomolecular interaction forces not only on non-biological substrates, but also on soft, dynamic cell surfaces. Over the last few years, AFM-based force spectroscopy has provided biophysical insight into how biomolecules on cell surfaces interact with each other and induce relevant biological processes. In this review, we focus on describing the technique of force spectroscopy using the AFM, specifically in the context of probing cell surfaces. We summarize recent progress in understanding the recognition and interactions between macromolecules that may be found at cell surfaces from a force spectroscopy perspective. We further discuss the challenges and future prospects of the application of this versatile technique.

  8. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  9. Hedgehog-regulated ubiquitination controls smoothened trafficking and cell surface expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Yongbin; Shi, Qing; Yue, Tao; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog transduces signal by promoting cell surface expression of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) in Drosophila, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that Smo is downregulated by ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degradation, and that Hh increases Smo cell surface expression by inhibiting its ubiquitination. We find that Smo is ubiquitinated at multiple Lysine residues including those in its autoinhibitory domain (SAID), leading to endocytosis and degradation of Smo by both lysosome- and proteasome-dependent mechanisms. Hh inhibits Smo ubiquitination via PKA/CK1-mediated phosphorylation of SAID, leading to Smo cell surface accumulation. Inactivation of the ubiquitin activating enzyme Uba1 or perturbation of multiple components of the endocytic machinery leads to Smo accumulation and Hh pathway activation. In addition, we find that the non-visual β-arrestin Kurtz (Krz) interacts with Smo and acts in parallel with ubiquitination to downregulate Smo. Finally, we show that Smo ubiquitination is counteracted by the deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY/USP8. Gain and loss of UBPY lead to reciprocal changes in Smo cell surface expression. Taken together, our results suggest that ubiquitination plays a key role in the downregulation of Smo to keep Hh pathway activity off in the absence of the ligand, and that Hh-induced phosphorylation promotes Smo cell surface accumulation by inhibiting its ubiquitination, which contributes to Hh pathway activation.

  10. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  11. SCAMP 37, a new marker within the general cell surface recycling system.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S H; Castle, J D

    1993-01-01

    Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are widely distributed as components of post-Golgi membranes that function as recycling carriers to the cell surface. In fibroblasts, SCAMPs are concentrated in compartments involved in the endocytosis and recycling of cell surface receptors while in neurons and other cell types having regulated transport pathways, SCAMPs are also components of regulated carriers (synaptic vesicles, secretion granules and transporter vesicles). Their presence in multiple pathways distinguishes them from proteins (e.g. recycling cell surface receptors and synaptic vesicle proteins) which are concentrated in selected pathways. The SCAMPs also do not appear to reside beyond the boundaries of these pathways. This distribution suggests that SCAMPs are general markers of membranes that function in cell surface recycling. The primary sequence of SCAMP 37 reveals a novel polypeptide containing a series of structural motifs, including a calcium binding domain, a leucine zipper and two zinc fingers. The very broad tissue distribution, subcellular localization and sequence analysis all predict that SCAMPs play a fundamental role in cell surface recycling. Images PMID:8404846

  12. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  13. Characterization of the gene encoding mouse serum amyloid P component. Comparison with genes encoding other pentraxins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, A S; Rits, M

    1989-01-01

    A CBA/J-strain mouse serum amyloid P component (SAP) genomic clone was isolated and analysed. The clone contains the entire SAP gene and specifies a primary transcript of 1065 nucleotide residues. This comprises a first exon of 206 nucleotide residues containing the mRNA 5'-untranslated region and sequence encoding the pre-SAP leader peptide and the first two amino acid residues of mature SAP separated by a single 110-base intron from a 749-nucleotide-residue second exon containing sequence encoding the bulk of the mature SAP and specifying the mRNA 3'-untranslated region. The overall organization is similar to that of the human SAP gene, and the coding region and intron sequences are highly conserved. The SAP RNA cap site was defined by primer extension analysis of polyadenylated acute-phase liver RNA. The 5'-region of the mouse SAP gene contains modified CAAT and TATA promoter elements preceded by a putative hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-1-recognition site; these structures are in a region that is highly homologous to the corresponding region of the human SAP gene. Comparisons of the mouse SAP gene structure and derived amino acid sequence with those of other mammalian pentraxins were made. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2481440

  14. Improving the performance of industrial ethanol-producing yeast by expressing the aspartyl protease on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhong-yang; Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2010-12-01

    The yeasts used in fuel ethanol manufacture are unable to metabolize soluble proteins. The PEP4 gene, encoding a vacuolar aspartyl protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was either secretively or cell-surface anchored expressed in industrial ethanol-producing S. cerevisiae. The obtained recombinant strains APA (expressing the protease secretively) and APB (expressing the protease on the cell wall) were studied under ethanol fermentation conditions in feed barley cultures. The effects of expression of the protease on product formation, growth and cell protein content were measured. The biomass yield of the wild-type was clearly lower than that of the recombinant strains (0.578 ± 0.12 g biomass/g glucose for APA and 0.582 ± 0.08 g biomass/g glucose for APB). In addition, nearly 98-99% of the theoretical maximum level of ethanol yield was achieved (relative to the amount of substrate consumed) for the recombinant strains, while limiting the nitrogen source resulted in dissatisfactory fermentation for the wild-type and more than 30 g/l residual sugar was detected at the end of fermentation. In addition, higher growth rate, viability and lower yields of byproducts such as glycerol and pyruvic acid for recombinant strains were observed. Expressing acid protease can be expected to lead to a significant increase in ethanol productivity.

  15. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  16. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  17. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  18. Biogenic Origin for Earth's Oldest Putative Microfossils

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, B.; Sharp, T; Flynn, G; Wirick, S; Hervig, R

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous microbe-like features preserved within a local chert unit of the 3.5 Ga old Apex Basalt in Western Australia may represent some of the oldest evidence of life on Earth. However, the biogenicity of these putative microfossils has been called into question, primarily because the sample collection locality is a black, carbon-rich, brecciated chert dike representing an Archean submarine hydrothermal spring, suggesting a formation via an abiotic organic synthesis mechanism. Here we describe the macromolecular hydrocarbon structure, carbon bonding, functional group chemistry, and biotic element abundance of carbonaceous matter associated with these filamentous features. These characteristics are similar to those of biogenic kerogen from the ca. 1.9 Ga old Gunflint Formation. Although an abiotic origin cannot be entirely ruled out, it is unlikely that known abiotic synthesis mechanisms could recreate both the structural and compositional complexity of this ancient carbonaceous matter. Thus, we find that a biogenic origin for this material is more likely, implying that the Apex microbe-like features represent authentic biogenic organic matter.

  19. Mechanosensory neurons, cutaneous mechanoreceptors, and putative mechanoproteins.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, M E; Cobo, T; Cobo, J L; Vega, J A

    2012-08-01

    The mammalian skin has developed sensory structures (mechanoreceptors) that are responsible for different modalities of mechanosensitivity like touch, vibration, and pressure sensation. These specialized sensory organs are anatomically and functionally connected to a special subset of sensory neurons called mechanosensory neurons, which electrophysiologically correspond with Aβ fibers. Although mechanosensory neurons and cutaneous mechanoreceptors are rather well known, the biology of the sense of touch still remains poorly understood. Basically, the process of mechanosensitivity requires the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal through the activation of ion channels that gate in response to mechanical stimuli. These ion channels belong primarily to the family of the degenerin/epithelium sodium channels, especially the subfamily acid-sensing ion channels, and to the family of transient receptor potential channels. This review compiles the current knowledge on the occurrence of putative mechanoproteins in mechanosensory neurons and mechanoreceptors, as well as the involvement of these proteins on the biology of touch. Furthermore, we include a section about what the knock-out mice for mechanoproteins are teaching us. Finally, the possibilities for mechanotransduction in mechanoreceptors, and the common involvement of the ion channels, extracellular membrane, and cytoskeleton, are revisited.

  20. Putative Bronchopulmonary Flagellated Protozoa in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Çelik, Pınar; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be “flagellated protozoa” have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells. PMID:24804259

  1. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; O'Connor, Timothy K; Bryant, Jessica A; Charkoudian, Louise K; Docherty, Kathryn M; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics.

  2. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  3. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework proceeds from a general (e.g., not chemical specific) molecular mode of action, designated as a MIE, through stepwise changes in biological status, defined as key events (KEs), to a final AO that can be used in risk assessment. Because aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals are widely used to treat breast cancer patients, we explored the unintended consequences that might occur in fish exposed to these chemicals through wastewater discharge into the aquatic environment. Unlike mammals, fish have two isoforms of aromatase, one that predominates in the ovary (cyp19a1a) and a second (cyp19a1b) that prevails in the brain. Aromatase activity in fish brain can be 100 to 1000 times that in mammals and is associated with reproduction. We have developed a putative AOP for inhibition of brain aromatase in fish leading to reproductive dysfunction based on review of relevant literature and reproductive experiments with the marine fish cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) exposed to aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals in the laboratory. The first KE in this AOP is a decrease in brain aromatase activity due to exposure to an aromatase inhibitor. KEs then progress through subsequent steps including decreas

  4. Identification and characterization of a putative baculoviral transcriptional factor IE-1 from Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus.

    PubMed

    Rashidan, Kianoush Khajeh; Nassoury, Nasha; Merzouki, Abderrazzak; Guertin, Claude

    2002-11-30

    A gene that encodes a protein homologue to baculoviral IE-1 was identified and sequenced in the genome of the Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus (ChfuGV). The gene has an 1278 nucleotide (nt) open-reading frame (ORF) that encodes 426 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 50.33 kDa. At the nucleotide level, several cis-acting regulatory elements were detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV along with other studied granuloviruses (GVs). Two putative CCAAT elements were detected within the noncoding leader region of this gene; one was located on the opposite strand at -92 and the other at -420 nt from the putative start triplet. Two baculoviral late promoter motifs (TAAG) were also detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV. A single polyadenylation signal, AATAAA, was located 18nt downstream of the putative translational stop codon of ie-1 from ChfuGV. At the protein level, the amino acid sequence data that was derived from the nucleotide sequence in ChfuGV IE-1 was compared to those of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV), Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus (XcGV) and Plutella xylostella granulovirus (PxGV). The C-terminal regions of the granuloviral IE-1 sequences appeared to be more conserved when compared to the N-terminal regions. A domain, similar to the basic helix-loop-helix like (bHLH-like) domain in NPVs, was detected at the C-terminal region of IE-1 from ChfuGV (residues 387 to 414). A phylogenetic tree for baculoviral IE-1 was constructed using a maximum parsimony analysis. A phylogenetic estimation demonstrates that ChfuGV IE-1 is most closely related to that of CpGV.

  5. Identification of putative rhamnogalacturonan-II specific glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis using a combination of bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie; Breton, Christelle; Lerouge, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates.

  6. Identification of Putative Rhamnogalacturonan-II Specific Glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis Using a Combination of Bioinformatics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates. PMID:23272088

  7. Isolation and characterization of two mitoviruses and a putative alphapartitivirus from Fusarium spp.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Hideki; Sasaki, Atsuko; Nomiyama, Koji; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Keisuke; Takehara, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Fusarium spp. includes several important plant pathogens. We attempted to reveal presence of double-stranded (ds) RNAs in the genus. Thirty-seven Fusarium spp. at the MAFF collection were analyzed. In the strains of Fusarium coeruleum, Fusarium globosum and Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, single dsRNA bands were detected. The strains of F. coeruleum and F. solani f. sp. pisi cause potato dry rot and mulberry twig blight, respectively. Sequence analyses revealed that dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum consisted of 2423 and 2414 bp, respectively. Using the fungal mitochondrial translation table, the positive strands of these cDNAs were found to contain single open reading frames with the potential to encode a protein of putative 757 and 717 amino acids (molecular mass 88.5 and 84.0 kDa, respectively), similar to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of members of the genus Mitovirus. These dsRNAs in F. coeruleum and F. globosum were assigned to the genus Mitovirus (family Narnaviridae), and these two mitoviruses were designated as Fusarium coeruleum mitovirus 1 and Fusarium globosum mitovirus 1. On the other hand, a positive strand of cDNA (1950 bp) from dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi contained an ORF potentially encoding a putative RdRp of 608 amino acids (72.0 kDa). The putative RdRp was shown to be related to those of members of the genus of Alphapartitivirus (family Partitiviridae). We coined the name Fusarium solani partitivirus 2 for dsRNA in F. solani f. sp. pisi.

  8. Chemical remodeling of cell-surface sialic acids through a palladium-triggered bioorthogonal elimination reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cheng, Bo; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Hong, Weiyao; Chen, Xing; Chen, Peng R

    2015-04-27

    We herein report a chemical decaging strategy for the in situ generation of neuramic acid (Neu), a unique type of sialic acid, on live cells by the use of a palladium-mediated bioorthogonal elimination reaction. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were found to be a highly efficient and biocompatible depropargylation catalyst for the direct conversion of metabolically incorporated N-(propargyloxycarbonyl)neuramic acid (Neu5Proc) into Neu on cell-surface glycans. This conversion chemically mimics the enzymatic de-N-acetylation of N-acetylneuramic acid (Neu5Ac), a proposed mechanism for the natural occurrence of Neu on cell-surface glycans. The bioorthogonal elimination was also exploited for the manipulation of cell-surface charge by unmasking the free amine at C5 to neutralize the negatively charged carboxyl group at C1 of sialic acids.

  9. Pharmacological induction of cell surface GRP78 contributes to apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer tumor with triple-negative receptors (estrogen, progesterone and Her 2, receptors) is the most aggressive and deadly subtype, with high rates of disease recurrence and poor survival. Here, we show that induction in cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin was associated with CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and increase in apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer tumor cells. GRP78 is a major regulator of the stress induced unfolded protein response pathway and CHOP/GADD153 is a pro-apoptotic transcription factor associated exclusively with stress induced apoptosis. The blocking of cell surface GRP78 by anti-GRP78 antibody prevented apoptosis, suggesting that induction of cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin is required for apoptosis. A better understanding of stress induction of apoptotic signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25360516

  10. Cellular membrane enrichment of self-assembling D-peptides for cell surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Wang, Youzhi; Han, Aitian; Cai, Yanbin; Xiao, Nannan; Wang, Ling; Ding, Dan; Yang, Zhimou

    2014-06-25

    We occasionally found that several self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids would be preferentially enriched in cellular membranes at self-assembled stages while distributed evenly in the cytoplasma of cells at unassembled stages. Self-assembling peptides containing only Lamino acids distributed evenly in cytoplasma of cells at both self-assembled and unassembled stages. The self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids could therefore be applied for engineering cell surface with peptides. More importantly, by integrating a protein binding peptide (a PDZ domain binding hexapeptide of WRESAI) with the self-assembling peptide containing D-amino acids, protein could also be introduced to the cell surface. This study not only provided a novel approach to engineer cell surface, but also highlighted the unusual properties and potential applications of self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  11. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  12. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  13. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  14. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Zilkens, C.; Zanger, K.; Krauspe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically. PMID:18274618

  15. Massively Parallel Rogue Cell Detection Using Serial Time-Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High-Throughput Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    TITLE: Massively Parallel Rogue Cell Detection Using Serial Time- Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High- Throughput Flow ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High-Throughput Flow 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0519...for blur flee imaging of breast cancer cells and blood cells in flow with and without microparticle labels to EpCAM on the cell surfaces. 2

  16. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change.

  17. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  18. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem-like...investigate the hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem...investigate these signaling pathways in year 2. Task 4: Investigate the relative expression of Snail -1, a GSK-3 target, in adherent prostate cancer cells

  19. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  20. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  1. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  2. Pro-apoptotic effect of a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae putative type I signal peptidase on PK(15) swine cells.

    PubMed

    Paes, Jéssica A; Virginio, Veridiana G; Cancela, Martín; Leal, Fernanda M A; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Schrank, Irene S; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2017-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is an economically significant swine pathogen that causes porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP). Important processes for swine infection by M. hyopneumoniae depend on cell surface proteins, many of which are secreted by secretion pathways not completely elucidated so far. A putative type I signal peptidase (SPase I), a possible component of a putative Sec-dependent pathway, was annotated as a product of the sipS gene in the pathogenic M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome. This M. hyopneumoniae putative SPase I (MhSPase I) displays only 14% and 23% of sequence identity/similarity to Escherichia coli bona fide SPase I, and, in complementation assays performed with a conditional E. coli SPase I mutant, only a partial restoration of growth was achieved with the heterologous expression of a recombinant MhSPase I (rMhSPase I). Considering the putative surface location of MhSPase I and its previously demonstrated capacity to induce a strong humoral response, we then assessed its potential to elicit a cellular and possible immunomodulatory response. In assays for immunogenicity assessment, rMhSPase I unexpectedly showed a cytotoxic effect on murine splenocytes. This cytotoxic effect was further confirmed using the swine epithelial PK(15) cell line in MTT and annexin V-flow cytometry assays, which showed that rMhSPase I induces apoptosis in a dose dependent-way. It was also demonstrated that this pro-apoptotic effect of rMhSPase I involves activation of a caspase-3 cascade. The potential relevance of the rMhSPase I pro-apoptotic effect for M. hyopneumoniae-host interactions in the context of PEP is discussed.

  3. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    den Dekker, Els; Grefte, Sander; Huijs, Tonnie; ten Dam, Gerdy B; Versteeg, Elly M M; van den Berk, Lieke C J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2008-03-15

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression of DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), CD80, CD206, and CD1a. Monocytes stained positive with Abs against heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) B (CSB; dermatan sulfate), but not with Abs that recognize CSA, CSC, and CSE. Inhibition of sulfation of monocyte/DC cell surface GAGs by sodium chlorate reduced the reactivity of sulfate-recognizing single-chain Abs. This correlated with hampered IL-4-induced DC differentiation as evidenced by lower expression of DC-SIGN and CD1a and a decreased DC-induced PBL proliferation, suggesting that sulfated monocyte cell surface GAGs support IL-4 activity. Furthermore, removal of cell surface chondroitin sulfates by chondroitinase ABC strongly impaired IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation, whereas removal of HS by heparinase III had only a weak inhibitory effect. IL-4 bound to heparin and CSB, but not to HS, CSA, CSC, CSD, and CSE. Binding of IL-4 required iduronic acid, an N-sulfate group (heparin) and specific O sulfates (CSB and heparin). Together, these data demonstrate that monocyte cell surface chondroitin sulfates play an important role in the IL-4-driven differentiation of monocytes into DCs.

  4. Glucocorticoids and the cell surface of human glioma cells: relationship to cytostasis.

    PubMed

    Mackie, A E; Freshney, R I; Akturk, F; Hunt, G

    1988-12-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones methyl prednisolone and dexamethasone were shown to be cytostatic, but not cytotoxic, at high cell densities for early passage and continuous cell lines from human glioma at 0.25 microM and above, in the presence or absence of serum. In the absence of serum both steroids at 2.5 nM increased the saturation density close to the level reached in serum. Examination of the iodinated glycoproteins of the cell surface by gel electrophoresis did not reveal any consistent change. However, gel exclusion chromatography of protease digests of the cell surface and of material released into the medium showed an increase in incorporation of 3H-glucosamine in pronase digests after treatment with methyl prednisolone. Ion exchange chromatography showed that sulphated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulphate, increased and hyaluronic acid decreased in response to steroids, and there was increased retention of GAGs on the cell surface relative to the released fraction. It was concluded that glucocorticoid hormones modify the cell surface of human glioma cells and that this may contribute to enhanced cell intraction and lead to increased density limitation of cell proliferation.

  5. Glucocorticoids and the cell surface of human glioma cells: relationship to cytostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, A. E.; Freshney, R. I.; Akturk, F.; Hunt, G.

    1988-01-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones methyl prednisolone and dexamethasone were shown to be cytostatic, but not cytotoxic, at high cell densities for early passage and continuous cell lines from human glioma at 0.25 microM and above, in the presence or absence of serum. In the absence of serum both steroids at 2.5 nM increased the saturation density close to the level reached in serum. Examination of the iodinated glycoproteins of the cell surface by gel electrophoresis did not reveal any consistent change. However, gel exclusion chromatography of protease digests of the cell surface and of material released into the medium showed an increase in incorporation of 3H-glucosamine in pronase digests after treatment with methyl prednisolone. Ion exchange chromatography showed that sulphated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulphate, increased and hyaluronic acid decreased in response to steroids, and there was increased retention of GAGs on the cell surface relative to the released fraction. It was concluded that glucocorticoid hormones modify the cell surface of human glioma cells and that this may contribute to enhanced cell intraction and lead to increased density limitation of cell proliferation. PMID:3254724

  6. Amyloid Precursor Protein Enhances Nav1.6 Sodium Channel Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Tan, Francis Chee Kuan; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dawe, Gavin S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease, but its physiological function remains unknown. Nav1.6 is a key determinant of neuronal excitability in vivo. Because mouse models of gain of function and loss of function of APP and Nav1.6 share some similar phenotypes, we hypothesized that APP might be a candidate molecule for sodium channel modulation. Here we report that APP colocalized and interacted with Nav1.6 in mouse cortical neurons. Knocking down APP decreased Nav1.6 sodium channel currents and cell surface expression. APP-induced increases in Nav1.6 cell surface expression were Go protein-dependent, enhanced by a constitutively active Go protein mutant, and blocked by a dominant negative Go protein mutant. APP also regulated JNK activity in a Go protein-dependent manner. JNK inhibition attenuated increases in cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels induced by overexpression of APP. JNK, in turn, phosphorylated APP. Nav1.6 sodium channel surface expression was increased by T668E and decreased by T668A, mutations of APP695 mimicking and preventing Thr-668 phosphorylation, respectively. Phosphorylation of APP695 at Thr-668 enhanced its interaction with Nav1.6. Therefore, we show that APP enhances Nav1.6 sodium channel cell surface expression through a Go-coupled JNK pathway. PMID:25767117

  7. Adherence of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis to epithelial cells correlates with fungal cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Oliveira, Patrícia C; Neves, Rejane P

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have described the adherence of Candida albicans to epithelial cells but little is known about Candida parapsilosis adhesion and its role in host cell surface recognition. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between the adherence of 20 C. albicans and 12 C. parapsilosis strains to human buccal epithelial cells and the expression of fungal cell surface carbohydrates using lectin histochemistry. Adherence assays were carried out by incubating epithelial cells in yeast suspensions (10(7) cells ml(-1) ) and peroxidase conjugated lectins (Con A, WGA, UEA I and PNA at 25 μg ml(-1) ) were used for lectin histochemistry. The results showed that adherence was overall greater for C. albicans than for C. parapsilosis (P < 0.01) and that the individual strain differences correlated with a high content of cell surface α-l-fucose residues as indicated by the UEA I staining pattern. Based on the saccharide specificity of the lectins used, these results suggest that l-fucose residues on cell surface glycoconjugates may represent recognition molecules for interactions between the yeast strain studied and the host (r = 0.6985, P = 0.0045). In addition, our results indicated the presence of α-d-glucose/α-d-mannose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine/N-acetylneuraminic acid and D-galactose/N-acetyl-D-galactosamine in fungal cell wall.

  8. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric i-motif sensor for extracellular pH detection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Le; Xie, Nuli; Yang, Yanjing; Yang, Xiaohai; Zhou, Qifeng; Yin, Bincheng; Huang, Jin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-14

    A FRET-based sensor is anchored on the cell surface through streptavidin-biotin interactions. Due to the excellent properties of the pH-sensitive i-motif structure, the sensor can detect extracellular pH with high sensitivity and excellent reversibility.

  9. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-04

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process.

  10. Highly Sensitive Detection of Target Biomolecules on Cell Surface Using Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated with Aptamer Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    A method of gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling with backscattered electron (BE) imaging of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was applied for specific detection of target biomolecules on a cell surface. A single-stranded DNA aptamer, which specifically binds to the target molecule on a human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell, was conjugated with a 20 nm Au NP and used as a probe to label its target molecule on the cell. The Au NP probe was incubated with the cell, and the interaction was confirmed using BE imaging of FE-SEM through direct counting of the number of Au NPs attached on the target cell surface. Specific Au NP-aptamer probes were observed on a single cell surface and their spatial distributions including submicron-order localizations were also clearly visualized, whereas the nonspecific aptamer probes were not observed on it. The aptamer probe can be potentially dislodged from the cell surface with treatment of nucleases, indicating that Au NP-conjugated aptamer probes can be used as sensitive and reversible probes to label target biomolecules on cells.

  11. New Monoclonal Antibodies to Defined Cell Surface Proteins on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Carmel M; Chy, Hun S; Zhou, Qi; Blumenfeld, Shiri; Lambshead, Jack W; Liu, Xiaodong; Kie, Joshua; Capaldo, Bianca D; Chung, Tung-Liang; Adams, Timothy E; Phan, Tram; Bentley, John D; McKinstry, William J; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Rossello, Fernando J; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Chen, Di; Jarde, Thierry; Clark, Amander T; Abud, Helen E; Visvader, Jane E; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M; Loring, Jeanne F; Laslett, Andrew L

    2017-03-01

    The study and application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) will be enhanced by the availability of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) detecting cell-surface epitopes. Here, we report generation of seven new mAbs that detect cell surface proteins present on live and fixed human ES cells (hESCs) and human iPS cells (hiPSCs), confirming our previous prediction that these proteins were present on the cell surface of hPSCs. The mAbs all show a high correlation with POU5F1 (OCT4) expression and other hPSC surface markers (TRA-160 and SSEA-4) in hPSC cultures and detect rare OCT4 positive cells in differentiated cell cultures. These mAbs are immunoreactive to cell surface protein epitopes on both primed and naive state hPSCs, providing useful research tools to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying human pluripotency and states of cellular reprogramming. In addition, we report that subsets of the seven new mAbs are also immunoreactive to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), normal human breast subsets and both normal and tumorigenic colorectal cell populations. The mAbs reported here should accelerate the investigation of the nature of pluripotency, and enable development of robust cell separation and tracing technologies to enrich or deplete for hPSCs and other human stem and somatic cell types. Stem Cells 2017;35:626-640.

  12. Identification of Putative Receptors for the Novel Adipokine CTRP3 Using Ligand-Receptor Capture Technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Ozment, Tammy; Wright, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3) is a member of a family of secreted proteins that exert a multitude of biological effects. Our initial work identified CTRP3’s promise as an effective treatment for Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Specifically, we demonstrated that mice fed a high fat diet failed to develop NAFLD when treated with CTRP3. The purpose of this current project is to identify putative receptors which mediate the hepatic actions of CTRP3. Methods We used Ligand-receptor glycocapture technology with TriCEPS™-based ligand-receptor capture (LRC-TriCEPS; Dualsystems Biotech AG). The LRC-TriCEPS experiment with CTRP3-FLAG protein as ligand and insulin as a control ligand was performed on the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line. Results Initial analysis demonstrated efficient coupling of TriCEPS to CTRP3. Further, flow cytometry analysis (FACS) demonstrated successful oxidation and crosslinking of CTRP3-TriCEPS and Insulin-TriCEPS complexes to cell surface glycans. Demonstrating the utility of TriCEPS under these conditions, the insulin receptor was identified in the control dataset. In the CTRP3 treated cells a total enrichment of 261 peptides was observed. From these experiments 5 putative receptors for CTRP3 were identified with two reaching statistically significance: Lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) and Lysosome membrane protein 2 (LIMP II). Follow-up Co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the association between LAMP1 and CTRP3 and further testing using a polyclonal antibody to block potential binding sites of LAMP1 prevented CTRP3 binding to the cells. Conclusion The LRC-TriCEPS methodology was successful in identifying potential novel receptors for CTRP3. Relevance The identification of the receptors for CTRP3 are important prerequisites for the development of small molecule drug candidates, of which none currently exist, for the treatment NAFLD. PMID:27727322

  13. Identification of a Putative Coreceptor on Vero Cells That Participates in Dengue 4 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barragán, José de Jesús; del Angel, Rosa M.

    2001-01-01

    Dengue virus infects target cells by attaching to a cell surface receptor through the envelope (E) glycoprotein, located on the surface of the viral membrane. On Vero and BHK cells, heparan sulfate (HS) moieties of proteoglycans are the receptors for dengue virus; however, additional proteins have also been described as putative dengue virus receptors on C6/36, HL60, and BM cells. HS can also act as a receptor for other types of viruses or as an attachment molecule for viruses that require additional host cell molecules to allow viral penetration. In this study we searched for molecules other than HS that could participate in dengue virus infection of Vero cells. Labeled dengue 4 virus bound with high affinity to two molecules of 74 and 44 kDa. Binding of dengue virus to the 74-kDa molecule was susceptible to protease and sodium periodate treatment and resistant to heparinase treatments. Lectins such as concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin prevented dengue virus binding to both the 74- and the 44-kDa protein in overlay assays, while phytohemagglutinin P did not affect binding, suggesting that carbohydrate residues (α-mannose or N-acetylglucosamine) are important in virus binding to host cells. Protease susceptibility, biotin labeling, and immunofluorescence with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 74-kDa protein consistently identified the protein on the surfaces of Vero cells. Moreover, the antibody against the 74-kDa protein was able to inhibit dengue virus infection. These data suggest that HS might serve as a primary receptor, probably concentrating virus particles on the surfaces of Vero cells, and then other molecules, such as the 74-kDa protein, might participate as coreceptors in viral penetration. The 74-kDa protein possibly constitutes part of a putative receptor complex for dengue virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:11483725

  14. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  15. A novel putative enterococcal pathogenicity island linked to the esp virulence gene of Enterococcus faecium and associated with epidemicity.

    PubMed

    Leavis, Helen; Top, Janetta; Shankar, Nathan; Borgen, Katrine; Bonten, Marc; van Embden, Jan; Willems, Rob J L

    2004-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis harbors a virulence-associated surface protein encoded by the esp gene. This gene has been shown to be part of a 150-kb putative pathogenicity island. A gene similar to esp has recently been found in Enterococcus faecium isolates recovered from hospitalized patients. In the present study we analyzed the polymorphism in the esp gene of E. faecium, and we investigated the association of esp with neighboring chromosomal genes. The esp gene showed considerable sequence heterogeneity in the regions encoding the nonrepeat N- and C-terminal domains of the Esp protein as well as differences in the number of repeats. DNA sequencing of chromosomal regions flanking the esp gene of E. faecium revealed seven open reading frames, representing putative genes implicated in virulence, regulation of transcription, and antibiotic resistance. These flanking regions were invariably associated with the presence or absence of the esp gene in E. faecium, indicating that esp in E. faecium is part of a distinct genetic element. Because of the presence of virulence genes in this gene cluster, the lower G+C content relative to that of the genome, and the presence of esp in E. faecium isolates associated with nosocomial outbreaks and clinically documented infections, we conclude that this genetic element constitutes a putative pathogenicity island, the first one described in E. faecium. Except for the presence of esp and araC, this pathogenicity island is completely different from the esp-containing pathogenicity island previously disclosed in E. faecalis.

  16. Glucose transport and cell surface GLUT-4 protein in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Etgen, G J; Wilson, C M; Jensen, J; Cushman, S W; Ivy, J L

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport and 2-N-4-(1-azi-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-benzoyl-1, 3-bis-(D-mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA)-labeled cell surface GLUT-4 protein was assessed in fast-twitch (epitrochlearis) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles of lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats. In the absence of insulin, glucose transport as well as cell surface GLUT-4 protein was similar in both epitrochlearis and soleus muscles of lean and obese rats. In contrast, insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates were significantly higher for lean than obese rats in both soleus (0.74 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) and epitrochlearis (0.51 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) muscles. The ability of insulin to enhance glucose transport in fast- and slow-twitch muscles from both lean and obese rats corresponded directly with changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Muscle contraction elicited similar increases in glucose transport in lean and obese rats, with the effect being more pronounced in fast-twitch (0.70 +/- 0.07 and 0.77 +/- 0.04 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively) than in slow-twitch muscle (0.36 +/- 0.03 and 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively). The contraction-induced changes in glucose transport directly corresponded with the observed changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Thus the reduced glucose transport response to insulin in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat appears to result directly from an inability to effectively enhance cell surface GLUT-4 protein.

  17. Selective labelling of cell-surface proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes.

    PubMed

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-11-26

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods.

  18. ProtEx: a novel technology to display exogenous proteins on the cell surface for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra P; Yolcu, Esma S; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2005-11-01

    Gene therapy as an immunomodulatory approach has the potential to treat various inherited and acquired immune-based human diseases. However, its clinical application has several challenges, varying from the efficiency of gene transfer, control of gene expression, cell and tissue targeting, and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA into cells/tissues. Gene therapy is also a time- and labor-intensive procedure. As an alternative, we recently developed a novel technology, ProtEx, that allows for rapid, efficient, and durable display of exogenous proteins on the surface of cells, tissues, and organs without detectable toxicity. This technology exploits the strong binding affinity (Kd = 10(-15) M) of streptavidin with biotin and involves generation of chimeric molecules composed of the extracellular portions of immunological proteins of interest and a modified form of streptavidin, biotinylation of biological surfaces, and decoration of the modified surface with chimeric proteins. Biotin persists on the cell surface for weeks both in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing a platform to display exogenous proteins with extended cell surface kinetics. Two chimeric proteins, rat FasL (SA-FasL) and human CD80 (CD80-SA), were generated and tested for cell surface display and immunomodulatory functions. SA-FasL and CD80-SA molecules persisted on the surface of various cell types for extended periods, varying from days to weeks in vitro and in vivo. The cell surface kinetics, however, were protein and cell type dependent. SA-FasL showed potent apoptotic activity against Fas+ cells as a soluble protein or displayed on the cell surface and effectively blocked alloreactive responses. The display of CD80-SA on the surface of tumor cells, however, converted them into antigen-presenting cells for effective stimulation of autologous and allogeneic T-cell responses. ProtEx technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA

  19. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  20. Characteristic Changes in Cell Surface Glycosylation Accompany Intestinal Epithelial Cell (IEC) Differentiation: High Mannose Structures Dominate the Cell Surface Glycome of Undifferentiated Enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Dayoung; Brune, Kristin A; Mitra, Anupam; Marusina, Alina I; Maverakis, Emanual; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-11-01

    Changes in cell surface glycosylation occur during the development and differentiation of cells and have been widely correlated with the progression of several diseases. Because of their structural diversity and sensitivity to intra- and extracellular conditions, glycans are an indispensable tool for analyzing cellular transformations. Glycans present on the surface of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) mediate interactions with billions of native microorganisms, which continuously populate the mammalian gut. A distinct feature of IECs is that they differentiate as they migrate upwards from the crypt base to the villus tip. In this study, nano-LC/ESI QTOF MS profiling was used to characterize the changes in glycosylation that correspond to Caco-2 cell differentiation. As Caco-2 cells differentiate to form a brush border membrane, a decrease in high mannose type glycans and a concurrent increase in fucosylated and sialylated complex/hybrid type glycans were observed. At day 21, when cells appear to be completely differentiated, remodeling of the cell surface glycome ceases. Differential expression of glycans during IEC maturation appears to play a key functional role in regulating the membrane-associated hydrolases and contributes to the mucosal surface innate defense mechanisms. Developing methodologies to rapidly identify changes in IEC surface glycans may lead to a rapid screening approach for a variety of disease states affecting the GI tract.

  1. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    PubMed

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  2. Functional characterization of putative cilia genes by high-content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cary K.; Gupta, Nidhi; Wen, Xiaohui; Rangell, Linda; Chih, Ben; Peterson, Andrew S.; Bazan, J. Fernando; Li, Li; Scales, Suzie J.

    2011-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based protrusions from the cell surface that are involved in a number of essential signaling pathways, yet little is known about many of the proteins that regulate their structure and function. A number of putative cilia genes have been identified by proteomics and comparative sequence analyses, but functional data are lacking for the vast majority. We therefore monitored the effects in three cell lines of small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of 40 of these genes by high-content analysis. We assayed cilia number, length, and transport of two different cargoes (membranous serotonin receptor 6-green fluorescent protein [HTR6-GFP] and the endogenous Hedgehog [Hh] pathway transcription factor Gli3) by immunofluorescence microscopy; and cilia function using a Gli-luciferase Hh signaling assay. Hh signaling was most sensitive to perturbations, with or without visible structural cilia defects. Validated hits include Ssa2 and mC21orf2 with ciliation defects; Ift46 with short cilia; Ptpdc1 and Iqub with elongated cilia; and Arl3, Nme7, and Ssna1 with distinct ciliary transport but not length defects. Our data confirm various ciliary roles for several ciliome proteins and show it is possible to uncouple ciliary cargo transport from cilia formation in vertebrates. PMID:21289087

  3. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  4. Analysis of the alcABC operon encoding alcaligin biosynthesis enzymes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1997-07-18

    We previously cloned a B. bronchiseptica (Bb) genomic DNA fragment that complements a Bb alcaligin biosynthesis mutant, and reported the identification of a gene, alcA, with predicted protein sequence similarity to siderophore biosynthesis enzymes from other organisms. In the present study we show that further nt sequencing of this region revealed two open reading frames (ORFs) 3' to alcA that encode putative proteins AlcB and AlcC, with significant sequence similarity to the aerobactin biosynthesis enzymes IucB and IucC, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the three ORFs are encoded on a single transcript, and that this operon is repressed at the transcriptional level by Fe. Primer extension analysis placed the transcriptional start point (tsp) 35 nt from the 5' end of the Fur consensus sequence and 188 nt from the putative start of translation of AlcA.

  5. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  6. Nanoscale analysis of caspofungin-induced cell surface remodelling in Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Jackson, Desmond N.; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such a novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3-d-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodelling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the cells, which correlate with a decrease of the cell wall mechanical strength. Moreover, we find that the drug induces the massive exposure of the cell adhesion protein Als1 on the cell surface and leads to increased cell surface hydrophobicity, two features that trigger cell aggregation. This behaviour is not observed in yeast species lacking Als1, demonstrating the key role that the protein plays in determining the aggregation phenotype of C. albicans. The results show that AFM opens up new avenues for understanding the molecular bases of microbe-drug interactions and for developing new therapeutic agents.The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such a novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3-d-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodelling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the

  7. Cloning and functional characterization of a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit gene from the house fly (Musca domestica).

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Smith, T J; Ingles, P J; Soderlund, D M

    2000-06-01

    The functional expression of cloned Drosophila melanogaster and house fly (Musca domestica) voltage-sensitive sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes is enhanced, and the inactivation kinetics of the expressed channels are accelerated, by coexpression with the tipE protein, a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit encoded by the tipE gene of D. melanogaster. These results predict the existence of a tipE ortholog in the house fly. Using a PCR-based homology probing approach, we isolated cDNA clones encoding an ortholog of tipE (designated Vssc beta) from adult house fly heads. Clones comprising 3444 bp of cDNA sequence contained a 1317 bp open-reading frame encoding a 438 amino acid protein. The predicted Vssc beta protein exhibited 72% amino acid sequence identity to the entire D. melanogaster tipE protein sequence and 97% identity within the two hydrophobic segments identified as probable transmembrane domains. Coexpression of Vssc beta with the house fly sodium channel alpha subunit (Vssc1) in oocytes enhanced the level of sodium current expression five-fold and accelerated the rate of sodium current inactivation 2.2-fold. Both of these effects were significantly larger in magnitude than the corresponding effects of the D. melanogaster tipE protein on the expression and kinetics of Vssc1 sodium channels. These results identify a second example of a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit from an insect having functional but not structural homology to vertebrate sodium channel beta subunits.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of a putative Escherichia coli [NiFe] hydrogenase-1 operon containing six open reading frames.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, N K; Robbins, J; Peck, H D; Chatelus, C Y; Choi, E S; Przybyla, A E

    1990-01-01

    DNA encompassing the structural genes of an Escherichia coli [NiFe] hydrogenase has been cloned and sequenced. The genes were identified as those encoding the large and small subunits of hydrogenase isozyme 1 based on NH2-terminal sequences of purified subunits (kindly provided by K. Francis and K. T. Shanmugam). The structural genes formed part of a putative operon that contained four additional open reading frames. We have designated the operon hya and the six open reading frames hyaA through F. hyaA and hyaB encode the small and large structural subunits, respectively. The nucleotide-derived amino acid sequence of hyaC has a calculated molecular mass of 27.6 kilodaltons, contains 20% aromatic residues, and has four potential membrane-spanning regions. Open reading frames hyaD through F could encode polypeptides of 21.5, 14.9, and 31.5 kilodaltons, respectively. These putative peptides have no homology to other reported protein sequences, and their functions are unknown. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:2180913

  9. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  10. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  11. Molecular cloning of plant transcripts encoding protein kinase homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, M A; Yamamoto, R T; Hanks, S K; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    Oligonucleotides, corresponding to conserved regions of animal protein-serine/threonine kinases, were used to isolate cDNAs encoding plant homologs in the dicot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and the monocot rice (Oryzae sativa L.). The C-terminal regions of the deduced polypeptides encoded by the bean (PVPK-1) and rice (G11A) cDNAs, prepared from mRNAs of suspension cultures and leaves, respectively, contain features characteristic of the catalytic domains of eukaryotic protein-serine/threonine kinases, indicating that these cDNAs encode plant protein kinases. The putative catalytic domains are most closely related to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases and the protein kinase C family, suggesting the plant homologs may likewise transduce extracellular signals. However, outside these domains, PVPK-1 and G11A exhibit no homology either to each other or to regulatory domains of other protein kinases, indicating the plant homologs are modulated by other signals. PVPK-1 corresponds to a 2.4-kb transcript in suspension cultured bean cells. Southern blots of genomic DNA indicate that PVPK-1 and G11A correspond to single copy genes that form part of a family of related plant sequences. Images PMID:2541432

  12. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  13. Optimum design of amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic groups for both cell surface ligand presentation and intercellular cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Masafumi; Li, Cuicui; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Hatanaka, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic alkyl groups are expected to be applicable for both ligand presentation on the cell surface and intercellular crosslinking. To explore the optimum design for each application, we synthesized eight different acyl-modified dextrans with varying molecular weight, alkyl length, and alkyl modification degree. We found that the behenate-modified polymers retained on the cell surface longer than the palmitate-modified ones. Since the polymers were also modified with biotin, streptavidin can be presented on the cell surface through biotin-streptavidin recognition. The duration of streptavidin on the cell surface is longer in the behenate-modified polymer than the palmitate-modified one. As for the intercellular crosslinking, the palmitate-modified polymers were more efficient than the behenate-modified polymers. The findings in this research will be helpful to design the acyl-modified polymers for the cell surface engineering.

  14. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  15. A phytochrome from the fern Adiantum with features of the putative photoreceptor NPH1

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Kazunari; Kanegae, Takeshi; Imaizumi, Takato; Fukuda, Shunsuke; Okamoto, Haruko; Yeh, Kuo-Chen; Lagarias, J. Clark; Wada, Masamitsu

    1998-01-01

    In plant photomorphogenesis, it is well accepted that the perception of red/far-red and blue light is mediated by distinct photoreceptor families, i.e., the phytochromes and blue-light photoreceptors, respectively. Here we describe the discovery of a photoreceptor gene from the fern Adiantum that encodes a protein with features of both phytochrome and NPH1, the putative blue-light receptor for second-positive phototropism in seed plants. The fusion of a functional photosensory domain of phytochrome with a nearly full-length NPH1 homolog suggests that this polypeptide could mediate both red/far-red and blue-light responses in Adiantum normally ascribed to distinct photoreceptors. PMID:9861055

  16. SLC24A5, a putative cation exchanger, affects pigmentation in zebrafish and humans.

    PubMed

    Lamason, Rebecca L; Mohideen, Manzoor-Ali P K; Mest, Jason R; Wong, Andrew C; Norton, Heather L; Aros, Michele C; Jurynec, Michael J; Mao, Xianyun; Humphreville, Vanessa R; Humbert, Jasper E; Sinha, Soniya; Moore, Jessica L; Jagadeeswaran, Pudur; Zhao, Wei; Ning, Gang; Makalowska, Izabela; McKeigue, Paul M; O'donnell, David; Kittles, Rick; Parra, Esteban J; Mangini, Nancy J; Grunwald, David J; Shriver, Mark D; Canfield, Victor A; Cheng, Keith C

    2005-12-16

    Lighter variations of pigmentation in humans are associated with diminished number, size, and density of melanosomes, the pigmented organelles of melanocytes. Here we show that zebrafish golden mutants share these melanosomal changes and that golden encodes a putative cation exchanger slc24a5 (nckx5) that localizes to an intracellular membrane, likely the melanosome or its precursor. The human ortholog is highly similar in sequence and functional in zebrafish. The evolutionarily conserved ancestral allele of a human coding polymorphism predominates in African and East Asian populations. In contrast, the variant allele is nearly fixed in European populations, is associated with a substantial reduction in regional heterozygosity, and correlates with lighter skin pigmentation in admixed populations, suggesting a key role for the SLC24A5 gene in human pigmentation.

  17. Identification of calcium-transporting ATPases of Entamoeba histolytica and cellular localization of the putative SERCA.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Higuera, Aarón; Salas-Casas, Andrés; Calixto-Gálvez, Mercedes; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Pérez-Ishiwara, D Guillermo; Ximénez, Cecilia; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2013-09-01

    Calcium has an important role on signaling of different cellular processes in the protozoa parasite Entamoeba histolytica, including development and pathogenesis. However, the systems that control calcium responses in this parasite are incompletely understood. Calcium-ATPases (Ca(2+)-ATPases) are proteins that play an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing the active efflux of this ion from cytoplasm and are essential to the correct functioning of the cell machinery. Here, we reported the identification of five E. histolytica genes encoding putative Ca(2+)-ATPases, three related to PMCA, and two related to organellar ATPases. RT-PCR assays showed that all those genes are expressed in trophozoites and specific antibodies against the SERCA-like member located this protein in a continuous cytoplasmic network, supporting the hypothesis that it corresponds to the Ca(2+)-ATPase responsible to sequester calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of this parasite.

  18. Identification of a putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueying; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2008-08-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleotides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporophyte-specific gene.

  19. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  20. Functional mapping of cell surface proteins with localized stimulation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingyun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the development of using individual micro and nano meter-sized vesicles as delivery vessels to functionally map the distribution of cell surface proteins at the level of single cells. The formation of different sizes of vesicles from tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in diameter that contain the desired molecules is addressed. An optical trap is used to manipulate the loaded vesicle to specific cell morphology of interest, and a pulsed UV laser is used to photo-release the stimuli onto the cell membrane. Carbachol activated cellular calcium flux, upon binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is studied by this method, and the potential of using this method for the functional mapping of localized proteins on the cell surface membrane is discussed.

  1. The plasma membrane flattens out to fuel cell surface growth during Drosophila cellularization

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Xu, Heng; Garcia, Hernan G.; Golding, Ido; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cell shape change demands cell surface growth, but how growth is fueled and choreographed is still debated. Here, we use cellularization, the first complete cytokinetic event in Drosophila embryos, to show that cleavage furrow ingression is kinetically coupled to the loss of surface microvilli. We modulate furrow kinetics with RNAi against the Rho1-GTPase regulator slam, and show that furrow ingression controls the rate of microvillar depletion. Finally, we directly track microvillar membrane and see it move along the cell surface and into ingressing furrows, independent of endocytosis. Together, our results demonstrate that the kinetics of the ingressing furrow regulate the utilization of a microvillar membrane reservoir. Since the membrane of the furrow and microvilli are contiguous, we suggest that ingression drives unfolding of the microvilli and incorporation of microvillar membrane into the furrow. We conclude that plasma membrane folding/unfolding can contribute to the cell shape changes that promote embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:24316147

  2. Manipulating Neuronal Circuits with Endogenous and Recombinant Cell-Surface Tethered Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Holford, Mandë; Auer, Sebastian; Laqua, Martin; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal circuits depend on the precise regulation of cell-surface receptors and ion channels. An ongoing challenge in neuroscience research is deciphering the functional contribution of specific receptors and ion channels using engineered modulators. A novel strategy, termed “tethered toxins”, was recently developed to characterize neuronal circuits using the evolutionary derived selectivity of venom peptide toxins and endogenous peptide ligands, such as lynx1 prototoxins. Herein, the discovery and engineering of cell-surface tethered peptides is reviewed, with particular attention given to their cell-autonomy, modular composition, and genetic targeting in different model organisms. The relative ease with which tethered peptides can be engineered, coupled with the increasing number of neuroactive venom toxins and ligand peptides being discovered, imply a multitude of potentially innovative applications for manipulating neuronal circuits and tissue-specific cell networks, including treatment of disorders caused by malfunction of receptors and ion channels. PMID:19915728

  3. Cell surface receptors for herpes simplex virus are heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of cell surface heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using CHO cell mutants defective in various aspects of glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Binding of radiolabeled virus to the cells and infection were assessed in mutant and wild-type cells. Virus bound efficiently to wild-type cells and initiated an abortive infection in which immediate-early or alpha viral genes were expressed, despite limited production of late viral proteins and progeny virus. Binding of virus to heparan sulfate-deficient mutant cells was severely impaired and mutant cells were resistant to HSV infection. Intermediate levels of binding and infection were observed for a CHO cell mutant that produced undersulfated heparan sulfate. These results show that heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for HSV. PMID:1310996

  4. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging.

  5. Polyamino acid display on cell surfaces enhances salt and alcohol tolerance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2015-02-01

    Microbes employ cell membranes for reducing exogenous stresses. Polyamino acid display on microbial cell surfaces and their effects on microbial chemical stress tolerance were examined. Growth analysis revealed that displays of polyarginine, polyaspartate and polytryptophan substantially enhanced tolerance of Escherichia coli to NaCl. A titration assay indicated that polyarginine and polyaspartate altered cell surface charges, implying tolerance enhancement via ion atmosphere and/or ionic bond network formations for electrostatic ion repulsion. The enhancement by polytryptophan may have arisen from surface hydrophobicity increase for hydrophobic ion exclusion, because of a strong correlation between hydrophobic characters of amino acids and their effects on tolerance enhancement. The display also enhanced tolerance to other salts and/or alcohols in E. coli and to NaCl in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus polyamino acid display has the potential as an approach for conferring chemical stress tolerance on various microbes.

  6. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  7. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  8. How Infants Encode Spatial Extent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Sean; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Levine, Susan; Duffy, Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how infants encode an object's spatial extent. We habituated 6.5-month-old infants to a dowel inside a container and then tested whether they dishabituate to a change in absolute size when the relation between dowel and container is held constant (by altering the size of both container and dowel) and when the relation changes…

  9. Encoding Knowledge of Commonsense Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Encoding Knowledge of Commonsense Psychology Jerry R. Hobbs Andrew S. Gordon Information Sciences Institute Institute for Creative Technologies...time. Thirty of the representational areas, involving 635 concepts, were concerned with commonsense psychology ; among these are memory, knowledge...management, planning, and so on. This result by itself demonstrates the very great importance of commonsense psychology in the construction of intelligent

  10. Spectrally-encoded color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a technique for ultraminiature endoscopy that encodes each spatial location on the sample with a different wavelength. One limitation of previous incarnations of SEE is that it inherently creates monochromatic images, since the spectral bandwidth is expended in the spatial encoding process. Here we present a spectrally-encoded imaging system that has color imaging capability. The new imaging system utilizes three distinct red, green, and blue spectral bands that are configured to illuminate the grating at different incident angles. By careful selection of the incident angles, the three spectral bands can be made to overlap on the sample. To demonstrate the method, a bench-top system was built, comprising a 2400-lpmm grating illuminated by three 525-μm-diameter beams with three different spectral bands. Each spectral band had a bandwidth of 75 nm, producing 189 resolvable points. A resolution target, color phantoms, and excised swine small intestine were imaged to validate the system's performance. The color SEE system showed qualitatively and quantitatively similar color imaging performance to that of a conventional digital camera. PMID:19688002

  11. Encoding Ownership Types in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Nicholas; Noble, James

    Ownership types systems organise the heap into a hierarchy which can be used to support encapsulation properties, effects, and invariants. Ownership types have many applications including parallelisation, concurrency, memory management, and security. In this paper, we show that several flavours and extensions of ownership types can be entirely encoded using the standard Java type system.

  12. Mutations in TRIOBP, Which Encodes a Putative Cytoskeletal-Organizing Protein, Are Associated with Nonsyndromic Recessive Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, Saima; Khan, Shaheen N.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Ghosh, Manju; Caution, Kyle; Nazli, Sabiha; Kabra, Madhulika; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Chen, Kevin; Naz, Sadaf; Antonellis, Anthony; Pavan, William J.; Green, Eric D.; Wilcox, Edward R.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Morell, Robert J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    In seven families, six different mutant alleles of TRIOBP on chromosome 22q13 cosegregate with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness. These alleles include four nonsense (Q297X, R788X, R1068X, and R1117X) and two frameshift (D1069fsX1082 and R1078fsX1083) mutations, all located in exon 6 of TRIOBP. There are several alternative splice isoforms of this gene, the longest of which, TRIOBP-6, comprises 23 exons. The linkage interval for the deafness segregating in these families includes DFNB28. Genetic heterogeneity at this locus is suggested by three additional families that show significant evidence of linkage of deafness to markers on chromosome 22q13 but that apparently have no mutations in the TRIOBP gene. PMID:16385457

  13. Cloning and expression pattern of SsHKT1 encoding a putative cation transporter from halophyte Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qun; Zhao, Chang; Han, Ning; Wang, Bao-shan

    2008-04-01

    Potassium is an essential element for plant, and high-affinity K+ uptake system plays a crucial role in potassium absorption and transportation. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a HKT1 homolog from C3 halophyte Suaeda salsa (L.) (SsHKT1), particularly under low K+ treatment. The SsHKT1 cDNA was 2033 nucleotides long including 1650 bp ORF for a 550 amino acids peptide and a predicted molecular mass of 63.0 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of SsHKT1 was 39-64% identical to other plant HKT-like sequences. A SsHKT1-specific antibody was prepared and reacted with a 63.0 kDa protein from S. salsa plasma membrane. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that SsHKT1 was mainly expressed in leaf tissues and to a lesser extent, in root tissues. Amounts of SsHKT1 transcript were developmentally controlled and significantly up-regulated by K+ deprivation and NaCl treatment. The results suggested that SsHKT1 might play an important role in ion homeostasis and salt tolerance of S. salsa.

  14. The preliminary solution structure of human p8MTCP1, a protein encoded by the putative MTCP1 oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, P.; Guignard, L.; Yang, Y.-S.; Chiche, L.; Strub, M.-P.; Hoh, F.; Stern, M.-H.; Roumestand, C.

    1998-02-01

    The NMR solution structure of the cystein-rich human p8 protein coded by the oncogene MTCP1 reveals an original scaffold consisting of three α-helices, two of them tightly held together by two disulphide bridges in an antiparallel α-hairpin. MTCP1 was found to be expressed in mature prolymphocytic leukemias. La structure RMN de la protéine humaine p8 en solution présente un repliement original en trois hélices α, deux d'entre elles étant étroitement maintenues dans une orientation antiparallèle par deux ponts disulfures. Cette protéine riche en cystéine est codée par l'oncogène MTCP1 qui est exprimé dans des leucémies prolymphocytaires de phénotype mature.

  15. RT-qPCR Analysis of 15 Genes Encoding Putative Surface Proteins Involved in Adherence of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, Hung King; Muriana, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    L. monocytogenes adherence to food-associated abiotic surfaces and the development of biofilms as one of the underlying reasons for the contamination of ready-to-eat products is well known. The over-expression of internalins that improves adherence has been noted in cells growing as attached cells or at elevated incubation temperatures. However, the role of other internalin-independent surface proteins as adhesins has been uncharacterized to date. Using two strains each of weakly- and strongly-adherent L. monocytogenes as platforms for temperature-dependent adherence assays and targeted mRNA analyses, these observations (i.e., sessile- and/or temperature-dependent gene expression) were further investigated. Microplate fluorescence assays of both surface-adherent strains exhibited significant (P < 0.05) adherence at higher incubation temperature (42 °C). Of the 15 genes selected for RT-qPCR, at least ten gene transcripts recovered from cells (weakly-adherent strain CW35, strongly-adherent strain 99-38) subject to various growth conditions were over expressed [planktonic/30 °C (10), sessile/30 °C (12), planktonic/42 °C (10)] compared to their internal control (16SrRNA transcripts). Of four genes overexpressed in all three conditions tested, three and one were implicated as virulence factors and unknown function, respectively. PCR analysis of six unexpressed genes revealed that CW35 possessed an altered genome. The results suggest the presence of other internalin-independent adhesins (induced by growth temperature and/or substratum) and that a group of suspect protein members are worthy of further analysis for their potential role as surface adhesins. Analysis of the molecular basis of adherence properties of isolates of L. monocytogenes from food-associated facilities may help identify sanitation regimens to prevent cell attachment and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces that could play a role in reducing foodborne illness resulting from Listeria biofilms. PMID:27706070

  16. Characterization of a putative S-locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The major results of our research effort include the determination of the S-Receptor Kinase (SRK) gene structure, the demonstration of S-haplotype-associated SRK polymorphisms and possible co-evolution of SRK and SLG, the characterization of the temporal and spatial expression patterns of SRK, and the demonstration that SRK has intrinsic serine/threonine kinase activity. Our results have indicated that SLG originated from an SRK-like gene by a gene duplication event and suggested a possible molecular basis for leaky S haplotypes. The data have allowed us to develop a model of self-incompatibility based on the interaction of SRK and SLG and the activation of SRK in response to self-pollination. More generally, the information that we have obtained is potentially relevant to understanding mechanisms of signalling inplants. Thus, the interaction of membrane-based receptor protein kinases with secreted forms of their extracellular domains may represent a generalized mechanism by which receptors signal across the plant cell wall.

  17. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK[sub 6] cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys[sup 524] codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with [sup 32]P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified [sup 32]p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  18. Three redundant brassinosteroid early response genes encode putative bHLH transcription factors required for normal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Muramitsu, Takamichi; Maloof, Julin N; Alonso, José; Ecker, Joseph R; Furuya, Masaki; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of polyhydroxylated steroids that are important regulators of plant growth and development. We have identified three closely related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3, as products of early response genes required for full BR response. Comparison of the phenotypes of plants that overexpress BEE1 with bee1 bee2 bee3 triple-knockout mutant plants suggests that BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 are functionally redundant positive regulators of BR signaling. Expression of BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 is also regulated by other hormones, notably abscisic acid (ABA), a known antagonist of BR signaling. Reduced ABA response in plants overexpressing BEE1 suggests that BEE proteins may function as signaling intermediates in multiple pathways. PMID:12454087

  19. Characterization of Rhodobacter capsulatus genes encoding a molybdenum transport system and putative molybdenum-pterin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Angermüller, S; Klipp, W

    1993-01-01

    The alternative, heterometal-free nitrogenase of Rhodobacter capsulatus is repressed by traces of molybdenum in the medium. Strains carrying mutations located downstream of nifB copy II were able to express the alternative nitrogenase even in the presence of high molybdate concentrations. DNA sequence analysis of a 5.5-kb fragment of this region revealed six open reading frames, designated modABCD, mopA, and mopB. The gene products of modB and modC are homologous to ChlJ and ChlD of Escherichia coli and represent an integral membrane protein and an ATP-binding protein typical of high-affinity transport systems, respectively. ModA and ModD exhibited no homology to known proteins, but a leader peptide characteristic of proteins cleaved during export to the periplasm is present in ModA, indicating that ModA might be a periplasmic molybdate-binding protein. The MopA and MopB proteins showed a high degree of amino acid sequence homology to each other. Both proteins contained a tandem repeat of a domain encompassing 70 amino acid residues, which had significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight molybdenum-pterin-binding proteins from Clostridium pasteurianum. Compared with that for the parental nifHDK deletion strain, the molybdenum concentrations necessary to repress the alternative nitrogenase were increased 4-fold in a modD mutant and 500-fold in modA, modB, and modC mutants. No significant inhibition of the heterometal-free nitrogenase by molybdate was observed for mopA mopB double mutants. The uptake of molybdenum by mod and mop mutants was estimated by measuring the activity of the conventional molybdenum-containing nitrogenase. Molybdenum transport was not affected in a mopA mopB double mutant, whereas strains carrying lesions in the binding-protein-dependent transport system were impaired in molybdenum uptake. PMID:8491722

  20. Organic Nitrogen Utilization by Phytoplankton: The Role of Cell-Surface Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    inhibited by cell-impermeable protein Marler 1966: Zika 1984). This highly re- modification reagents. A cell-surface redox en- active species may have a...from wet and dry deposition ( Zika sured in cultures of I. carterae could be et al. 1982; Thompson and Zafiriou 1983), generalized, marine phytoplankton...would be an is generated in photochemical reactions important sourceofthe hydrogen peroxide found (Cooper and Zika 1983), and can also be in the manne

  1. Adhesion of phospholipid vesicles to Chinese hamster fibroblasts: Role of cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, RE; Takeichi, M

    1977-01-01

    The adhesion of artificially generated lipid membrane vesicles to Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts in suspension was used as a model system for studying membrane interactions. Below their gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, vesicles comprised of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) or dimyristoyl lecithin (DML) absorbed to the surfaces of EDTA- dissociated cells. These adherent vesicles could not be removed by repeated washings of the treated cells but could be released into the medium by treatment with trypsin. EM autoradiographic studies of cells treated with[(3)H]DML or [(3)H]DPL vesicles showed that most of the radioactive lipids were confined to the cell periphery. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy further confirmed the presence of adherent vesicles at the cell surface. Adhesion of DML or DPL vesicles to EDTA-dissociated cells modified the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination pattern of the cell surface proteins; the inhibition of labeling of two proteins with an approximately 60,000- dalton mol wt was particularly evident. Incubation of cells wit h (3)H-lipid vesicles followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that some of the (3)H-lipid migrated preferentially with these approximately 60,000-mol wt proteins. Studies of the temperature dependence of vesicle uptake and subsequent release by trypsin showed that DML or DPL vesicle adhesion to EDTA- dissociated cells increased with decreasing temperatures. In contrast, cells trypsinized before incubation with vesicles showed practically no temperature dependence of vesicle uptake. These results suggest two pathways for adhesion of lipid vesicles to the cell surface-a temperature-sensitive one involving cell surface proteins, and a temperature-independent one. These findings are discussed in terms of current models for cell-cell interactions. PMID:407233

  2. Modeling the Excess Cell Surface Stored in a Complex Morphology of Bleb-Like Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Timothy; Yang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Alex; Roach, Nathan; Elston, Timothy C.; Wang, Qi; Jacobson, Ken; Forest, M. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Cells transition from spread to rounded morphologies in diverse physiological contexts including mitosis and mesenchymal-to-amoeboid transitions. When these drastic shape changes occur rapidly, cell volume and surface area are approximately conserved. Consequently, the rounded cells are suddenly presented with a several-fold excess of cell surface whose area far exceeds that of a smooth sphere enclosing the cell volume. This excess is stored in a population of bleb-like protrusions (BLiPs), whose size distribution is shown by electron micrographs to be skewed. We introduce three complementary models of rounded cell morphologies with a prescribed excess surface area. A 2D Hamiltonian model provides a mechanistic description of how discrete attachment points between the cell surface and cortex together with surface bending energy can generate a morphology that satisfies a prescribed excess area and BLiP number density. A 3D random seed-and-growth model simulates efficient packing of BLiPs over a primary rounded shape, demonstrating a pathway for skewed BLiP size distributions that recapitulate 3D morphologies. Finally, a phase field model (2D and 3D) posits energy-based constitutive laws for the cell membrane, nematic F-actin cortex, interior cytosol, and external aqueous medium. The cell surface is equipped with a spontaneous curvature function, a proxy for the cell surface-cortex couple, that is a priori unknown, which the model “learns” from the thin section transmission electron micrograph image (2D) or the “seed and growth” model image (3D). Converged phase field simulations predict self-consistent amplitudes and spatial localization of pressure and stress throughout the cell for any posited stationary morphology target and cell compartment constitutive properties. The models form a general framework for future studies of cell morphological dynamics in a variety of biological contexts. PMID:27015526

  3. Conformational variation between allelic variants of cell-surface ovine prion protein.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Yang, Sujeong; Wong, Edmond; Fitzmaurice, Tim J; Morgan-Warren, Robert J; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2004-07-01

    The distribution of prion infectivity and PrPSc between peripheral lymphoid tissues suggests their possible haematogenic spread during the progression of natural scrapie in susceptible sheep. Since ovine PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) express PrPC, they have the potential to carry or harbour disease-associated forms of PrP. To detect the possible presence of disease-associated PrP on the surface of blood cells, an understanding is required of the conformations that normal ovine cell-surface PrPC may adopt. In the present study, we have used monoclonal antibodies that recognize epitopes in either the N- or C-terminal portions of PrP to probe the conformations of PrPC on ovine PBMCs by flow cytometry. Although PBMCs from scrapie-susceptible and -resistant genotypes of sheep expressed similar levels of cell-surface PrPC, as judged by their reactivity with N-terminal-specific anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies, there was considerable genotypic heterogeneity in the region between helix-1 and residue 171. Cells from PrP-VRQ (V136R154Q171) sheep showed uniform reactivity with monoclonal antibodies that bound to epitopes around helix-1, whereas cells from PrP-ARQ (A136R154Q171) and PrP-ARR (A136R154R171) sheep showed variable binding. The region between b-strand-2 and residue 171, which includes a YYR motif, was buried or obscured in cell-surface PrPC on PBMCs from scrapie-susceptible and -resistant sheep. However, an epitope of PrPC that is influenced by residue 171 was more exposed on PBMCs from PrP-VRQ sheep than on PBMCs from the PrP-ARQ genotype. Our results highlight conformational variation between scrapie-susceptible and -resistant forms of cell-surface PrPC and also between allelic variants of susceptible genotypes.

  4. Association of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin with nucleic acids on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Kurihara, H; Murayama, Y; Kato, K

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontopathic gram-negative bacterium, produces a leukotoxin that is a member of the RTX cytotoxin family. Although genes may function in toxin secretion, the leukotoxin is not secreted extracellularly but remains associated with the bacterial cell surface. We report here that this toxin-cell surface association is mediated by nucleic acids and directly demonstrate that the extracellular secretion of toxin occurs in growing cultures with increased ionic strength of medium. All examinations were performed with freshly harvested A. actinomycetemcomitans 301-b from anaerobic fructose-limited chemostat cultures. The occurrence of cell surface-localized DNA was shown by directly digesting whole cells with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI or HindIII, which yielded many DNA fragments. The cell surface DNA constituted about 20% of the total cellular DNA. The leukotoxin was released from the whole cells by digestion with DNase I as well as restriction endonucleases. Because the leukotoxin binds ionically to DNA, it is dependent on the ionic strength of buffers or media. Accordingly, the toxin was released from cells suspended in saline at pH 7.5 in the presence of increasing amounts of MgCl2 (0 to 10 mM) or NaCl (0 to 50 mM). Moreover, a considerable quantity of leukotoxin was detected in the culture supernatant of fructose-limited chemostat cultures when sodium succinate solution was pumped into the steady state as an additional salt (30 and then 50 mM). This toxin-DNA association was also found in well-characterized strains including not only the leukotoxin-producing ATCC 29522 but also the toxin production-variable ATCC 29523 and the non-leukotoxin-producing ATCC 33384 when these strains were grown in the chemostat culture. Images PMID:8406888

  5. Behavior of two Tannerella forsythia strains and cell surface mutants in multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Susanne; Thurnheer, Thomas; Murakami, Yukitaka; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-04-05

    As a member of subgingival multispecies biofilms, Tannerella forsythia is commonly associated with periodontitis. The bacterium has a characteristic cell surface (S-) layer modified with a unique O-glycan. Both the S-layer and the O-glycan were analyzed in this study for their role in biofilm formation by employing an in vitro multispecies biofilm model mimicking the situation in the oral cavity. Different T. forsythia strains and mutants with characterized defects in cell surface composition were incorporated into the model, together with nine species of select oral bacteria. The influence of the T. forsythia S-layer and attached glycan on the bacterial composition of the biofilms was analyzed quantitatively using colony forming unit counts and quantitative real-time PCR, as well as qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This revealed that changes of the T. forsythia cell surface did not affect the quantitative composition of the multispecies consortium, with the exception of Campylobacter rectus cell numbers. The localization of T. forsythia within the bacterial agglomeration varied depending on changes in the S-layer glycan, and this also affected its aggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis. This suggests a selective role for the glycosylated T. forsythia S-layer in the positioning of this species within the biofilm, its co-localization with P. gingivalis, and the prevalence of C. rectus. These findings might translate into a potential role of T. forsythia cell surface structures in the virulence of this species when interacting with host tissues and immune system, from within or beyond the biofilm. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  7. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in specificities of the monoclonal antibodies was demonstrated by Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests with solubilized antigens and by variabilities in the reactivity of the agglutinins among yeast strains. The antigenic determinants were isolated by specific immunoprecipitation and protease digestion and characterized by methods including high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and mass spectroscopy with both chemical and electron ionization. These determinants both contain mannose and glucose. In the case of antigen H9, an additional carbohydrate was detected with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The location of antigens on individual cells was determined by indirect labeling of the determinants, first reacting cells with H9 or C6 followed by goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with 20-nm colloidal gold particles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine cells. The antigens that were reactive with the monoclonal antibodies were associated with a flocculent surface layer. Expression of this layer and expression of the antigens is a dynamic process which is growth phase and strain dependent. The antigens were not expressed on very young cells and disappeared from the cell surface of most C. albicans strains with age. The use of monoclonal antibody to cell surface determinants may allow characterization of cell surface antigens of C. albicans and be helpful in establishing receptors which mediate adherence. Images PMID:3510174

  8. Isolation of pigmented and nonpigmented mutants of Serratia marcescens with reduced cell surface hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.

    1984-10-01

    Enrichment for nonhydrophobic mutants of Serratia marcescens yielded two types: (i) a nonpigmented mutant which exhibited partial hydrophobic characteristics compared with the wild type, as determined by adherence to hexadecane and polystyrene; and (ii) a pigmented, nonhydrophobic mutant whose colonies were translucent with respect to those of the wild type. The data suggest that the pronounced cell surface hydrophobicity of the wild type is mediated by a combination of several surface f

  9. Hydrogen-bonded LbL Shells for Living Cell Surface Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-21

    phospholipids into the lipid bilayer membrane, and cell decoration with/inclusion into biodegradable gel microparti- cles.7–11 However, for these strategies...polymer membrane. The poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(styrene sulfonate) ( PAH /PSS) coating is the mostly explored poly- electrolyte pair used to...this approach for cell surface engineering.42,43 As suggested, overall toxicity of the PAH /PSS LbL shells originates from the positive charge of

  10. Crystal Structure of a Putative HTH-Type Transcriptional Regulator yxaF from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharaman,J.; Kumaran, D.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    The New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC) has selected the protein coded by yxaF gene from Bacillus subtilis as a target for structure determination. The yxaF protein has 191 residues with a molecular mass of 21 kDa and had no sequence homology to any structure in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) at the time of target selection. We aimed to elucidate the three-dimensional structure for the putative protein yxaF to better understand the relationship between protein sequence, structure, and function. This protein is annotated as a putative helix-turn-helix (HTH) type transcriptional regulator. Many transcriptional regulators like TetR and QacR use a structurally well-defined DNA-binding HTH motif to recognize the target DNA sequences. DNA-HTH motif interactions have been extensively studied. As the HTH motif is structurally conserved in many regulatory proteins, these DNA-protein complexes show some similarity in DNA recognition patterns. Many such regulatory proteins have a ligand-binding domain in addition to the DNA-binding domain. Structural studies on ligand-binding regulatory proteins provide a wealth of information on ligand-, and possibly drug-, binding mechanisms. Understanding the ligand-binding mechanism may help overcome problems with drug resistance, which represent increasing challenges in medicine. The protein encoded by yxaF, hereafter called T1414, shows fold similar to QacR repressor and TetR/CamR repressor and possesses putative DNA and ligand-binding domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of T1414 and compare it with structurally similar drug and DNA-binding proteins.

  11. Active subtilisin-like protease from a hyperthermophilic archaeon in a form with a putative prosequence.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Y; Koga, Y; Inoue, Y; Haruki, M; Takagi, M; Imanaka, T; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S

    2001-06-01

    The gene encoding subtilisin-like protease T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was cloned from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin is a member of the subtilisin family and composed of 422 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 43,783. It consists of a putative presequence, prosequence, and catalytic domain. Like bacterial subtilisins, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was overproduced in Escherichia coli in a form with a putative prosequence in inclusion bodies, solubilized in the presence of 8 M urea, and refolded and converted to an active molecule. However, unlike bacterial subtilisins, in which the prosequence was removed from the catalytic domain by autoprocessing upon refolding, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was refolded in a form with a putative prosequence. This refolded protein of recombinant T. kodakaraensis subtilisin which is composed of 398 amino acid residues (Gly(-82) to Gly(316)), was purified to give a single band on a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel and characterized for biochemical and enzymatic properties. The good agreement of the molecular weights estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (44,000) and gel filtration (40,000) suggests that T. kodakaraensis subtilisin exists in a monomeric form. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide only in the presence of the Ca(2+) ion with an optimal pH and temperature of pH 9.5 and 80 degrees C. Like bacterial subtilisins, it showed a broad substrate specificity, with a preference for aromatic or large nonpolar P1 substrate residues. However, it was much more stable than bacterial subtilisins against heat inactivation and lost activity with half-lives of >60 min at 80 degrees C, 20 min at 90 degrees C, and 7 min at 100 degrees C.

  12. Cell surface sialylation affects binding of enterovirus 71 to rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and infection of EV71 to central nerve system (CNS) may result in a high mortality in children less than 2 years old. Although there are two highly glycosylated membrane proteins, SCARB2 and PSGL-1, which have been identified as the cellular and functional receptors of EV71, the role of glycosylation in EV71 infection is still unclear. Results We demonstrated that the attachment of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells was diminished after the removal of cell surface sialic acids by neuraminidase. Sialic acid specific lectins, Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus Nigra (SNA), could compete with EV71 and restrained the binding of EV71 significantly. Preincubation of RD cells with fetuin also reduced the binding of EV71. In addition, we found that SCARB2 was a sialylated glycoprotein and interaction between SCARB2 and EV71 was retarded after desialylation. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that cell surface sialic acids assist in the attachment of EV71 to host cells. Cell surface sialylation should be a key regulator that facilitates the binding and infection of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells. PMID:22853823

  13. Nanoscale analysis of caspofungin-induced cell surface remodelling in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Jackson, Desmond N.; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3 D-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodeling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the cells, which correlate with a decrease of the cell wall mechanical strength. Moreover, we find that the drug induces the massive exposure of the cell adhesion protein Als1 on the cell surface and leads to increased cell surface hydrophobicity, two features that trigger cell aggregation. This behaviour is not observed in yeast species lacking Als1, demonstrating the key role that the protein plays in determining the aggregation phenotype of C. albicans. The results show that AFM opens up new avenues for understanding the molecular bases of microbe-drug interactions and for developing new therapeutic agents. PMID:23262781

  14. Separation and reformation of cell surface dopamine receptor oligomers visualized in cells.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Brian F; Ji, Xiaodong; Alijaniaram, Mohammad; Nguyen, Tuan; George, Susan R

    2011-05-11

    We previously showed that dopamine receptors existed as homo- and heterooligomers, in cells and in brain tissue. We developed a method designed to study the formation and regulation of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomers in cells, using a GPCR into which a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) had been inserted. Unlike wildtype GPCRs, in the presence of agonist/antagonist ligands the GPCR-NLS is retained at the cell surface, and following ligand removal, the GPCR-NLS translocated from the cell surface. The D(1) dopamine receptor expressed with either D(2)-NLS or D(1-)NLS receptors translocated to the nucleus, indicating hetero- or homo-oligomerization with the NLS-containing receptor. Using these tools, we now demonstrate that D(1)-D(2) dopamine heterooligomers can be disrupted and the component receptors separated by dopamine and selective agonists that occupied one or both binding pockets. Subsequent agonist removal allowed the reformation of the heterooligomer. D(1) receptor homooligomers could also be disrupted by agonist, but at higher concentrations than that required for the disruption of the D(1)-D(2) heteromer. Dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptor antagonists had no effect on the integrity of the homo- or heterooligomer. We have also determined that the D(1)-D(2) heterooligomer contains D(1) homooligomers. These studies indicate that the populations of dopamine receptor oligomers at the cell surface are subject to conformational changes following agonist occupancy and are likely dynamically regulated following agonist activation.

  15. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties.

  16. Detection of CXCR4 receptors on cell surface using a fluorescent metal nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence cell imaging can be used for disease diagnosis and cellular signal transduction. Using a metal nanoshell as molecular imaging agent, we develop a cellular model system to detect CXCR4 chemokine receptor on T-lymphatic cell surface. These metal nanoshells are observed to express enhanced emission intensity and shortened lifetimes due to the near-field interactions. They are covalently bound with anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies for immunoreactions with the target sites of the CXCR4 receptors on the CEM-SS cells. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime cell images are recorded with a time-resolved confocal microscopy. As expected, the emission signals from the metal nanoshells are clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence due to strong intensities and distinctive lifetimes. The number of emission spots on the single cell image is estimated by direct count to the emission signals. Analyzing a pool of cell images, a maximal count number is obtained in a range of 200+/-50. Because there is an average of ~6000 binding sites on the cell surface, we estimate that one emission spot from the metal nanoshell may represent ~30 CXCR5 receptors. In addition, the CXCR4 receptors are estimated to distribute on ~70% area of the cell surface.

  17. Sustained neurotensin exposure promotes cell surface recruitment of NTS2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Perron, Amelie; Sharif, Nadder; Gendron, Louis; Lavallee, Mariette; Stroh, Thomas; Mazella, Jean; Beaudet, Alain . E-mail: abeaudet@frsq.gouv.qc.ca

    2006-05-12

    In this study, we investigated whether persistent agonist stimulation of NTS2 receptors gives rise to down-regulation, in light of reports that their activation induced long-lasting effects. To address this issue, we incubated COS-7 cells expressing the rat NTS2 with neurotensin (NT) for up to 24 h and measured resultant cell surface [{sup 125}I]-NT binding. We found that NTS2-expressing cells retained the same surface receptor density despite efficient internalization mechanisms. This preservation was neither due to NTS2 neosynthesis nor recycling since it was not blocked by cycloheximide or monensin. However, it appeared to involve translocation of spare receptors from internal stores, as NT induced NTS2 migration from trans-Golgi network to endosome-like structures. This stimulation-induced regulation of cell surface NTS2 receptors was even more striking in rat spinal cord neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that sustained NTS2 activation promotes recruitment of intracellular receptors to the cell surface, thereby preventing functional desensitization.

  18. Impact of Alkyl Polyglucosides Surfactant Lutensol GD 70 on Modification of Bacterial Cell Surface Properties.

    PubMed

    Smułek, Wojciech; Kaczorek, Ewa; Zgoła-Grzeskowiak, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Zefiryn

    Alkyl polyglucosides, due to their low toxicity and environmental compatibility, could be used in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds. In this study, the influence of Lutensol GD 70 on the cell hydrophobicity and zeta potential was measured. The particle size distribution and surfactant biodegradation were also investigated. Microbacterium sp. strain E19, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain 9, and the same strain cultivated in stress conditions were used in studies. Adding surfactant to the diesel oil system resulted in an increase of the cell surface hydrophobicity and the formation of cell aggregates (a high polydispersity index). The correlation between cell hydrophobicity and zeta potential in examined samples was not found. The results showed a significant influence of Lutensol GD 70 on the changes in cell surface properties. Moreover, a high biodegradation of a surfactant (over 50 %) by tested strains was observed. The biodegradation of Lutensol GD 70 depends on the length of both polar and nonpolar chains. A long-term contact with diesel oil of stressed strain modifies not only cell surface properties but also its ability to a surfactant biodegradation.

  19. Display of Fibrobacter succinogenes β-glucanase on the cell surface of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Jung; Chen, Ming-Ju; Yueh, Pei-Ying; Yu, Bi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Je-Ruei

    2011-03-09

    The aim of this study was to display a rumen bacterial β-glucanase on the cell surface of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain. The β-glucan degrading ability and the adhesion capability of the genetically modified strain were evaluated. The β-glucanase (Glu) from Fibrobacter succinogenes was fused to the C-terminus of collagen-binding protein (Cnb) from L. reuteri and then expressed by L. reuteri Pg4 as a recombinant Cnb-Glu-His(6) fusion protein. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis of the transformed strain L. reuteri pNZ-cnb/glu demonstrated that Cnb-Glu-His(6) fusion protein was displayed on its cell surface. In addition, L. reuteri pNZ-cnb/glu acquired the capacity to break down barley β-glucan and showed higher adhesion capability, in comparison with the parental strain L. reuteri Pg4. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of successful display of fibrolytic enzymes on the cell surface of intestinal lactobacilli.

  20. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  1. S-Nitrosothiols increases cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression and maturation in the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Khalequz; Bennett, Deric; Fraser-Butler, Maya; Greenberg, Zivi; Getsy, Paulina; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Sun, Fei; Hunt, John; Lewis, Stephen J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2014-01-24

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are endogenous signaling molecules with a broad spectrum of beneficial airway effects. SNOs are normally present in the airway, but levels tend to be low in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We and others have demonstrated that S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increases the expression, maturation, and function of wild-type and mutant F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in human bronchial airway epithelial (HBAE) cells. We hypothesized that membrane permeable SNOs, such as S-nitrosoglutathione diethyl ester (GNODE) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine (SNOAC) may be more efficient in increasing the maturation of CFTR. HBAE cells expressing F508del CFTR were exposed to GNODE and SNOAC. The effects of these SNOs on the expression and maturation of F508del CFTR were determined by cell surface biotinylation and Western blot analysis. We also found for the first time that GNODE and SNOAC were effective at increasing CFTR maturation at the cell surface. Furthermore, we found that cells maintained at low temperature increased cell surface stability of F508del CFTR whereas the combination of low temperature and SNO treatment significantly extended the half-life of CFTR. Finally, we showed that SNO decreased the internalization rate of F508del CFTR in HBAE cells. We anticipate identifying the novel mechanisms, optimal SNOs, and lowest effective doses which could benefit cystic fibrosis patients.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  3. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Amanda L.; Smith, Katherine E.; Feau, Nicolas; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hamelin, Richard; Nelson, C. Dana; Burleigh, J. Gordon; Davis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world's most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host's cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of 16 diverse fungal species, which include 15 basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: (i) arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or (ii) contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity. PMID:25018762

  4. An assemblage of divergent variants of a novel putative closterovirus from American persimmon.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takao; Sato, Akihiko; Suzaki, Koichi

    2015-08-01

    Deep-sequencing analysis of nucleic acids extracted from leaf tissue of an American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana L.) and subsequent-sequencing analyses uncovered at least four distinct closterovirus-like molecules. Two complete genomes of 18,569 and 18,030 nucleotides (nt) and partial genomes of 4,899 and 9,019 nt were determined. The two complete genomes encoded 11 potential open reading frames and the characteristic organization of closteroviruses. Among the four genomes, the putative heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h), RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and coat protein showed 82-85, 72-91, and 84-87 % amino acid sequence identities, respectively. These results suggested that the four identified viruses could be divergent variants in a single host plant. The phylogenetic tree based on HSP70h showed that their closest relative, although distant, is Olive leaf yellowing-associated virus, a putative unassigned member of the family Closteroviridae. The name Persimmon virus B was proposed for this new virus, representing another unassigned member of the family.

  5. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  6. Unprecedented diversity of catalytic domains in the first four modules of the putative pederin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn; Wen, Gaiping; Platzer, Matthias; Hui, Dequan

    2004-01-03

    Polyketides of the pederin group are highly potent antitumor compounds found in terrestrial beetles and marine sponges. Pederin is used by beetles of the genera Paederus and Paederidus as a chemical defense. We have recently identified a group of putative pederin biosynthesis genes and localized them to the genome of an as yet unculturable Pseudomonas sp. symbiont, the likely true pederin producer. However, this polyketide synthase cluster lacks several genes expected for pederin production. Here we report an additional polyketide synthase encoded on a separate region of the symbiont genome. It contains at least three novel catalytic domains that are predicted to be involved in pederin chain initiation and the formation of an unusual exomethylene bond. The region is bordered by mobility pseudogenes; this suggests that gene transposition led to the disjointed cluster organization. With this work, all putative pederin genes have been identified. Their heterologous expression in a culturable bacterium will provide important insights into how sustainable sources of invertebrate-derived drug candidates can be created.

  7. Identification and functional analysis of Penicillium digitatum genes putatively involved in virulence towards citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The fungus Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould rot, is the most destructive post-harvest pathogen of citrus fruit in Mediterranean regions. In order to identify P. digitatum genes up-regulated during the infection of oranges that may constitute putative virulence factors, we followed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA macroarray hybridization approach. The origin of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was determined by comparison against the available genome sequences of both organisms. Genes coding for fungal proteases and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes represent the largest categories in the subtracted cDNA library. Northern blot analysis of a selection of P. digitatum genes, including those coding for proteases, cell wall-related enzymes, redox homoeostasis and detoxification processes, confirmed their up-regulation at varying time points during the infection process. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was used to generate knockout mutants for two genes encoding a pectin lyase (Pnl1) and a naphthalene dioxygenase (Ndo1). Two independent P. digitatum Δndo1 mutants were as virulent as the wild-type. However, the two Δpnl1 mutants analysed were less virulent than the parental strain or an ectopic transformant. Together, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the putative determinants of the virulence mechanisms of P. digitatum.

  8. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Putative Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Xanthanolides in Xanthium strumarium L.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanjun; Gou, Junbo; Chen, Fangfang; Li, Changfu; Zhang, Yansheng

    2016-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. is a traditional Chinese herb belonging to the Asteraceae family. The major bioactive components of this plant are sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), which include the xanthanolides. To date, the biogenesis of xanthanolides, especially their downstream pathway, remains largely unknown. In X. strumarium, xanthanolides primarily accumulate in its glandular trichomes. To identify putative gene candidates involved in the biosynthesis of xanthanolides, three X. strumarium transcriptomes, which were derived from the young leaves of two different cultivars and the purified glandular trichomes from one of the cultivars, were constructed in this study. In total, 157 million clean reads were generated and assembled into 91,861 unigenes, of which 59,858 unigenes were successfully annotated. All the genes coding for known enzymes in the upstream pathway to the biosynthesis of xanthanolides were present in the X. strumarium transcriptomes. From a comparative analysis of the X. strumarium transcriptomes, this study identified a number of gene candidates that are putatively involved in the downstream pathway to the synthesis of xanthanolides, such as four unigenes encoding CYP71 P450s, 50 unigenes for dehydrogenases, and 27 genes for acetyltransferases. The possible functions of these four CYP71 candidates are extensively discussed. In addition, 116 transcription factors that are highly expressed in X. strumarium glandular trichomes were also identified. Their possible regulatory roles in the biosynthesis of STLs are discussed. The global transcriptomic data for X. strumarium should provide a valuable resource for further research into the biosynthesis of xanthanolides. PMID:27625674

  10. Structural characterization of Dictyostelium discoideum prespore-specific gene D19 and of its product, cell surface glycoprotein PsA.

    PubMed Central

    Early, A E; Williams, J G; Meyer, H E; Por, S B; Smith, E; Williams, K L; Gooley, A A

    1988-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum cell surface antigen PsA is a glycoprotein which first appears in the multicellular stage soon after tip formation and is selectively expressed on prespore cells. The D19 gene encodes an mRNA sequence which is highly enriched in prespore over prestalk cells in the slug stage. We have determined 81 amino acid residues of N-terminal sequence from immunoaffinity-purified PsA protein and shown this sequence to be identical to the predicted sequence of the D19 gene. There are several short repeat elements close to the C terminus, and unequal crossing-over within these is proposed to account for the size polymorphism observed in PsA protein isolated from different D. discoideum strains. The repeats are proline rich and show similarity to the C-terminal region of the D. discoideum cell adhesion molecule, contact sites A. The extreme C terminus, which is also homologous to contact sites A, is characteristic of proteins attached to the plasma membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol link. We have marked the PsA gene by insertion of an oligonucleotide encoding an epitope of the human c-myc protein. A construct containing this gene and 990 base pairs of 5'-flanking region directed correct temporal and spatial mRNA accumulation. We found the marked PsA protein, detected with the human c-myc antibody, to be correctly localized on the surface of cells. Images PMID:2850494

  11. Nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted EFL in chlorarachniophytes.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are cercozoan amoeboflagellates that acquired photosynthesis by enslaving a green alga, which has retained a highly reduced nucleus called a nucleomorph. The nucleomorph lacks many genes necessary for its own maintenance and expression, suggesting that some genes have been moved to the host nucleus and their products are now targeted back to the periplastid compartment (PPC), the reduced eukaryotic cytoplasm of the endosymbiont. Protein trafficking in chlorarachniophytes is therefore complex, including nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, nucleomorph-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, and nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted proteins. A major gap in our understanding of this system is the PPC-targeted proteins because none have been described in any chlorarachniophytes. Here we describe the first such protein, the GTPase EFL. EFL was characterized from 7 chlorarachniophytes, and 2 distinct types were found. One is related to foraminiferan EFL and lacks an amino-terminal extension. The second, distantly related, type encodes an amino-terminal extension consisting of a signal peptide followed by sequence sharing many characteristics with transit peptides from nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins and which we conclude is most likely PPC targeted. Western blotting with antibodies specific to putative host and PPC-targeted EFL from the chlorarachniophytes Bigelowiella natans and Gymnochlora stellata is consistent with posttranslational cleavage of the leaders from PPC-targeted proteins. Immunolocalization of both proteins in B. natans confirmed the cytosolic location of the leaderless EFL and a distinct localization pattern for the PPC-targeted protein but could not rule out a plastid location (albeit very unlikely). We sought other proteins with a similar leader and identified a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1 encoding a bipartite extension with the same properties. Transit peptide sequences were characterized from all 3

  12. The Neurospora crassa DCC-1 Protein, a Putative Histidine Kinase, Is Required for Normal Sexual and Asexual Development and Carotenogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Lledías, Fernando; Georgellis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Two-component signaling pathways based on phosphoryl group transfer between histidine kinase and response regulator proteins regulate environmental responses in bacteria, archaea, plants, slime molds, and fungi. Here we characterize a mutant form of DCC-1, a putative histidine kinase encoded by the NCU00939 gene of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that this protein participates in the regulation of processes such as conidiation, perithecial development, and, to a certain degree, carotenogenesis. Furthermore, DCC-1 is suggested to exert its effect by promoting cyclic AMP production, thereby placing this protein within the context of a signaling pathway. PMID:22058142

  13. Single-molecule imaging of cell surfaces using near-field nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hinterdorfer, Peter; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2012-03-20

    Living cells use surface molecules such as receptors and sensors to acquire information about and to respond to their environments. The cell surface machinery regulates many essential cellular processes, including cell adhesion, tissue development, cellular communication, inflammation, tumor metastasis, and microbial infection. These events often involve multimolecular interactions occurring on a nanometer scale and at very high molecular concentrations. Therefore, understanding how single-molecules localize, assemble, and interact on the surface of living cells is an important challenge and a difficult one to address because of the lack of high-resolution single-molecule imaging techniques. In this Account, we show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) provide unprecedented possibilities for mapping the distribution of single molecules on the surfaces of cells with nanometer spatial resolution, thereby shedding new light on their highly sophisticated functions. For single-molecule recognition imaging by AFM, researchers label the tip with specific antibodies or ligands and detect molecular recognition signals on the cell surface using either adhesion force or dynamic recognition force mapping. In single-molecule NSOM, the tip is replaced by an optical fiber with a nanoscale aperture. As a result, topographic and optical images are simultaneously generated, revealing the spatial distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules. Recently, researchers have made remarkable progress in the application of near-field nanoscopy to image the distribution of cell surface molecules. Those results have led to key breakthroughs: deciphering the nanoscale architecture of bacterial cell walls; understanding how cells assemble surface receptors into nanodomains and modulate their functional state; and understanding how different components of the cell membrane (lipids, proteins) assemble and communicate to confer efficient functional

  14. Cell Surface Glycan Alterations in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Process of Huh7 Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaonan; Sun, Chun; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Li; Lu, Yu; Sui, Jingzhe; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Due to recurrence and metastasis, the mortality of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is high. It is well known that the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and glycan of cell surface glycoproteins play pivotal roles in tumor metastasis. The goal of this study was to identify HCC metastasis related differential glycan pattern and their enzymatic basis using a HGF induced EMT model. Methodology HGF was used to induce HCC EMT model. Lectin microarray was used to detect the expression of cell surface glycan and the difference was validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of glycotransferases were determined by qRT-PCR. Results After HGF treatment, the Huh7 cell lost epithelial characteristics and obtained mesenchymal markers. These changes demonstrated that HGF could induce a typical cell model of EMT. Lectin microarray analysis identified a decreased affinity in seven lectins ACL, BPL, JAC, MPL, PHA-E, SNA, and SBA to the glycan of cell surface glycoproteins. This implied that glycan containing T/Tn-antigen, NA2 and bisecting GlcNAc, Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc, terminal α or βGalNAc structures were reduced. The binding ability of thirteen lectins, AAL, LCA, LTL, ConA, NML, NPL, DBA, HAL, PTL II, WFL, ECL, GSL II and PHA-L to glycan were elevated, and a definite indication that glycan containing terminal αFuc and ± Sia-Le, core fucose, α-man, gal-β(α) GalNAc, β1,6 GlcNAc branching and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides structures were increased. These results were further validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of Mgat3 decreased while that of Mgat5, FucT8 and β3GalT5 increased. Therefore, cell surface glycan alterations in the EMT process may coincide with the expression of glycosyltransferase. Conclusions The findings of this study systematically clarify the alterations of cell surface glycan in cancer EMT, and

  15. Gene Cluster Encoding Cholate Catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbrink, Maarten H.; Casabon, Israël; Stewart, Gordon R.; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as well as on its conjugates, taurocholate and glycocholate. The transcriptome of RHA1 growing on cholate revealed 39 genes upregulated on cholate, occurring in a single gene cluster. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed that selected genes in the cluster were upregulated 10-fold on cholate versus on cholesterol. One of these genes, kshA3, encoding a putative 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase, was deleted and found essential for growth on cholate. Two coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases encoded in the cluster, CasG and CasI, were heterologously expressed. CasG was shown to transform cholate to cholyl-CoA, thus initiating side chain degradation. CasI was shown to form CoA derivatives of steroids with isopropanoyl side chains, likely occurring as degradation intermediates. Orthologous gene clusters were identified in all available Rhodococcus genomes, as well as that of Thermomonospora curvata. Moreover, Rhodococcus equi 103S, Rhodococcus ruber Chol-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 each grew on cholate. In contrast, several mycolic acid bacteria lacking the gene cluster were unable to grow on cholate. Our results demonstrate that the above-mentioned gene cluster encodes cholate catabolism and is distinct from a more widely occurring gene cluster encoding cholesterol catabolism. PMID:23024343

  16. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  17. A putative hybrid swarm within Oonopsis foliosa (Asteraceae: Astereae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.F.; Brown, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Oo??nopsis foliosa var. foliosa and var. monocephala are endemic to short-grass steppe of southeastern Colorado and until recently were considered geographically disjunct. The only known qualitative feature separating these 2 varieties is floral head type; var. foliosa has radiate heads, whereas var. monocephala heads are discoid. Sympatry between these varieties is restricted to a small area in which a range of parental types and intermediate head morphologies is observed. We used distribution mapping, morphometric analyses, chromosome cytology, and pollen stainability to characterize the sympatric zone. Morphometrics confirms that the only discrete difference between var. foliosa and var. monocephala is radiate versus discoid heads, respectively. The outer florets of putative hybrid individuals ranged from conspicuously elongated yet radially symmetric disc-floret corollas, to elongated radially asymmetric bilabiate- or deeply cleft corollas, to stunted ray florets with appendages remnant of corolla lobes. Chromosome cytology of pollen mother cells from both putative parental varieties and a series of intermediate morphological types collected at the sympatric zone reveal evidence of translocation heterozygosity. Pollen stainability shows no significant differences in viability between the parental varieties and putative hybrids. The restricted distribution of putative hybrids to a narrow zone of sympatry between the parental types and the presence of meiotic chromosome-pairing anomalies in these intermediate plants are consistent with a hybrid origin. The high stainability of putative-hybrid pollen adds to a growing body of evidence that hybrids are not universally unfit.

  18. Di-acidic Motifs in the Membrane-distal C Termini Modulate the Transport of Angiotensin II Receptors from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Dong, Chunmin; Wu, Qiong J.; Balch, William E.; Wu, Guangyu

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export and cell surface transport of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have just begun to be revealed and previous studies have shown that hydrophobic motifs in the putative amphipathic 8th α-helical region within the membrane-proximal C termini play an important role. In this study, we demonstrate that di-acidic motifs in the membrane-distal, nonstructural C-terminal portions are required for the exit from the ER and transport to the plasma membrane of angiotensin II receptors, but not adrenergic receptors. More interestingly, distinct di-acidic motifs dictate optimal export trafficking of different angiotensin II receptors and export ability of each acidic residue in the di-acidic motifs cannot be fully substituted by other acidic residue. Moreover, the function of the di-acidic motifs is likely mediated through facilitating the recruitment of the receptors onto the ER-derived COPII transport vesicles. Therefore, the di-acidic motifs located in the membrane-distal C termini may represent the first linear motifs which recruit selective GPCRs onto the COPII vesicles to control their export from the ER. PMID:21507945

  19. The putative oligosaccharide translocase SypK connects biofilm formation with quorum signaling in Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Miyashiro, Tim; Oehlert, Dane; Ray, Valerie A; Visick, Karen L; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Quorum signaling (QS) describes how bacteria can use small signaling molecules (autoinducers) to coordinate group-level behaviors. In Vibrio fischeri, QS is achieved through a complex regulatory network that ultimately controls bioluminescence, motility, and host colonization. We conducted a genetic screen focused on qrr1, which encodes a small regulatory RNA that is necessary for the core quorum-signaling cascade to transduce autoinducer information into cellular responses. We isolated unique mutants with a transposon inserted into one of two genes within the syp locus, which is involved in biofilm formation. We found that overexpression of sypK, which encodes a putative oligosaccharide translocase, is sufficient to activate qrr1, and, in addition, this effect appears to depend on the kinase activity of the sensor LuxQ. Consistent with the established model for QS in V. fischeri, enhanced expression of qrr1 by the overexpression of sypK resulted in reduced bioluminescence and increased motility. Finally, we found that induction of the syp locus by overexpression of sypG was sufficient to activate qrr1 levels. Together, our results show how conditions that promote biofilm formation impact the quorum-signaling network in V. fischeri, and further highlight the integrated nature of the regulatory circuits involved in complex bacterial behaviors. PMID:25257018

  20. Molecular cloning and properties of a full-length putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Yen, P M; Misiti, S; Cardona, G R; Liu, Y; Chin, W W

    1996-08-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate target gene transcription. The conserved carboxy-terminal region of the ligand-binding domain (AF-2) has been thought to play a critical role in mediating ligand-dependent transactivation by the interaction with coactivator(s). Using bacterially-expressed TR as a probe, far-Western-based expression cDNA library screening identified cDNAs that encode, in part, the recently reported partial steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) sequence. Additional work, including 5' RACE, has characterized a full-length cDNA that encodes a approximately 160 kD protein as a putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator (F-SRC-1). In vitro binding studies show that F-SRC-1 binds to a variety of nuclear hormone receptors in a ligand-dependent manner, along with TBP and TFIIB, suggesting that F-SRC-1 may play a role as a bridging molecule between nuclear hormone receptors and general transcription factors. Interestingly, AF-2 mutants also retain ligand-dependent interaction with F-SRC-1. Although F-SRC-1 recognizes the ligand-induced conformational changes of nuclear hormone receptors, our observations suggest that F-SRC-1 may bind directly with subregion(s) in nuclear hormone receptors other than the AF-2 region.

  1. Attachment of MAL32-encoded maltase on the outside of yeast cells improves maltotriose utilization.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, J; Blieck, L; Brandt, R; Van Dijck, P; Steensma, H Y

    2007-01-01

    The fermentation of maltotriose, the second most abundant fermentable sugar in wort, is often incomplete during high-gravity brewing. Poor maltotriose consumption is due to environmental stress conditions during high-gravity fermentation and especially to a low uptake of this sugar by some industrial strains. In this study we investigated whether the use of strains with an alpha-glucosidase attached to the outside of the cell might be a possible way to reduce residual maltotriose. To this end, the N-terminal leader sequence of Kre1 and the carboxy-terminal anchoring domain of either Cwp2 or Flo1 were used to target maltase encoded by MAL32 to the cell surface. We showed that Mal32 displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains was capable of hydrolysis of alpha-1,4-linkages, and that it increased the ability of a strain lacking a functional maltose permease to grow on maltotriose. Moreover, the enzyme was also expressed and found to be active in an industrial strain. These data show that expressing a suitable maltase on the cell surface might provide a means of modifying yeast for more complete maltotriose utilization in brewing and other fermentation applications.

  2. Transcript Analysis of Multiple Copies of amo (Encoding Ammonia Monooxygenase) and hao (Encoding Hydroxylamine Oxidoreductase) in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Norman G.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The genes encoding ammonia monooxygenase (amoCAB), hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao), and the c-type cytochrome c-554 (hcy) are present in multiple copies in the genome of Nitrosomonas europaea. The upstream regions of the two copies of amoC, the three copies of hao, and one copy of hcy were cloned and sequenced. Primer extension reactions were done to identify transcription start sites for these genes, as well as for amoA. Putative ς70 promoter sequences were found associated with all but one of the mapped transcription start sites. Primer extensions were done with amoC primers using RNA harvested from cells incubated with and without ammonium. The experiments suggested that N. europaea cells may be able to use different promoters in the presence and absence of ammonium. PMID:11208810

  3. Flavobacterium johnsoniae GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA Are Required for Secretion of the Cell Surface Gliding Motility Adhesins SprB and RemA

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Johnston, Joseph J.; van Baaren, Jessica M.

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae cells move rapidly over surfaces by gliding motility. Gliding results from the movement of adhesins such as SprB and RemA along the cell surface. These adhesins are delivered to the cell surface by a Bacteroidetes-specific secretion system referred to as the type IX secretion system (T9SS). GldN, SprE, SprF, and SprT are involved in secretion by this system. Here we demonstrate that GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA are each also involved in secretion. Nonpolar deletions of gldK, gldL, or gldM resulted in the absence of gliding motility and in T9SS defects. The mutant cells produced SprB and RemA proteins but failed to secrete them to the cell surface. The mutants were resistant to phages that use SprB or RemA as a receptor, and they failed to attach to glass, presumably because of the absence of cell surface adhesins. Deletion of sprA resulted in similar but slightly less dramatic phenotypes. sprA mutant cells failed to secrete SprB and RemA, but cells remained susceptible to some phages and retained some limited ability to glide. The phenotype of the sprA mutant was similar to those previously described for sprE and sprT mutants. SprA, SprE, and SprT are needed for secretion of SprB and RemA but may not be needed for secretion of other proteins targeted to the T9SS. Genetic and molecular experiments demonstrate that gldK, gldL, gldM, and gldN form an operon and suggest that the proteins encoded by these genes may interact to form part of the F. johnsoniae T9SS. PMID:23667240

  4. Cell-surface area codes: mobile-element related gene switches generate precise and heritable cell-surface displays of address molecules that are used for constructing embryos.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, W J; Roman-Dreyer, J

    1999-01-01

    We present an updated area code hypothesis supporting the proposal that cell surface display of seven-transmembrane olfactory receptors, protocadherins and other cell surface receptors provide codes that enable cells to find their correct partners as they sculpture embryos. The genetic mechanisms that program the expression of such displays have been largely unknown until very recently. However, increasing evidence now suggests that precise developmental control of the expression of these genes during embryogenesis is achieved in part by permanent and heritable changes in DNA. Using the developing immune system as a model, we discuss two different types of developmentally programmed genetic switches, each of which relies on recombination mechanisms related to mobile elements. We review new evidence suggesting the involvement of mobile element related switch mechanisms in the generation of protocadherin molecules, and their possible involvement in the control of expressions of olfactory receptors. As both recombinase and reverse transcriptase mechanisms play a role in the switching of the immunoglobulin genes, we searched the databases of expressed sequence tags (dbEST) for expression of related genes in other tissues. We present data revealing that transposases and reverse transcriptases are widely expressed in most tissues. We also searched these databases for expression of env (envelope) gene products, stimulated by provocative results suggesting that these molecules might function as cellular address receptors. We found that env genes are also expressed in large numbers in normal human tissues. One must assume that these three different types of mobile-element-related messenger RNA molecules (transposases, reverse transcriptases, and env proteins) are expressed for use in functions of value in the various tissues and have been preserved in the genome because of their selective advantages. We conclude that it is possible that many specific cell lineage decisions

  5. Ex-vivo tissue classification of cell surface receptor concentrations using kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Liu, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges in the complete resection of cancer is the difficulty of distinctly classifying tumor and healthy tissue. This paper investigates the capability of competing kinetic modeling approaches for identifying different tissue types based on differential cell-surface receptor expressions. These approaches require fresh resected tissues to be stained with a mixture of two probes: one targeted to a cancer specific cell-surface receptor, and another left "untargeted" to account for nonspecific retention of the targeted agent, with subsequent repeated rinsing and imaging of the probe concentrations. Analysis of the results were carried out in simulations and in animal experiments for the cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell surface receptor overexpressed by many cancers. In the animal experiments, subcutaneous xenografts of human glioma (U251; moderate EGFR) and human epidermoid (A431; high EGFR) tumors, grown in six athymic mice, were excised and stained with an EGFR targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticle (SERS NP) and untargeted SERS NP pair. The salient finding in this study was that significant non-specific retention was observed for the EGFR targeted probe [anti-EGFR antibody labeled with a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle], but could be corrected for by the equivalent non-specific retention of the untargeted probe (isotype control antibody labeled with a different SERS nanoparticle). Once this non-specific binding was accounted for, the kinetic model was able to predict the expected differences in EGFR concentration among different tissue types: healthy, U251, and A431 in accordance with an ex vivo flow cytometry analysis, successfully classifying different tissue types.

  6. Expression of Hypoxia-Inducible Cell-Surface Transmembrane Carbonic Anhydrases in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Sergey; Liao, Shu-Yuan; Ivanova, Alla; Danilkovitch-Miagkova, Alla; Tarasova, Nadezhda; Weirich, Gregor; Merrill, Marsha J.; Proescholdt, Martin A.; Oldfield, Edward H.; Lee, Joshua; Zavada, Jan; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William; Lerman, Michael I.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    An acidic extracellular pH is a fundamental property of the malignant phenotype. In von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-defective tumors the cell surface transmembrane carbonic anhydrase (CA) CA9 and CA12 genes are overexpressed because of the absence of pVHL. We hypothesized that these enzymes might be involved in maintaining the extracellular acidic pH in tumors, thereby providing a conducive environment for tumor growth and spread. Using Northern blot analysis and immunostaining with specific antibodies we analyzed the expression of CA9 and CA12 genes and their products in a large sample of cancer cell lines, fresh and archival tumor specimens, and normal human tissues. Expression was also analyzed in cultured cells under hypoxic conditions. Expression of CA IX and CA XII in normal adult tissues was detected only in highly specialized cells and for most tissues their expression did not overlap. Analysis of RNA samples isolated from 87 cancer cell lines and 18 tumors revealed high-to-moderate levels of expression of CA9 and CA12 in multiple cancers. Immunohistochemistry revealed high-to-moderate expression of these enzymes in various normal tissues and multiple common epithelial tumor types. The immunostaining was seen predominantly on the cell surface membrane. The expression of both genes was markedly induced under hypoxic conditions in tumors and cultured tumor cells. We conclude that the cell surface trans-membrane carbonic anhydrases CA IX and CA XII are overexpressed in many tumors suggesting that this is a common feature of cancer cells that may be required for tumor progression. These enzymes may contribute to the tumor microenvironment by maintaining extracellular acidic pH and helping cancer cells grow and metastasize. Our studies show an important causal link between hypoxia, extracellular acidification, and induction or enhanced expression of these enzymes in human tumors. PMID:11238039

  7. Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 cell surface structures and supernatant increase paracellular permeability through different pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Anderson, Rachel C; Altermann, Eric; McNabb, Warren C; Ganesh, Siva; Armstrong, Kelly M; Moughan, Paul J; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is commonly found in food products, and some strains are known to have beneficial effects on human health. However, our previous research indicated that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases in vitro intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that cell surface structures of AGR1487 are responsible for the observed in vitro effect. AGR1487 was compared to another human oral L. fermentum strain, AGR1485, which does not cause the same effect. The examination of phenotypic traits associated with the composition of cell surface structures showed that compared to AGR1485, AGR1487 had a smaller genome, utilized different sugars, and had greater tolerance to acid and bile. The effect of the two strains on intestinal barrier integrity was determined using two independent measures of paracellular permeability of the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay specifically measures ion permeability, whereas the mannitol flux assay measures the passage of uncharged molecules. Both live and UV-inactivated AGR1487 decreased TEER across Caco-2 cells implicating the cell surfaces structures in the effect. However, only live AGR1487, and not UV-inactivated AGR1487, increased the rate of passage of mannitol, implying that a secreted component(s) is responsible for this effect. These differences in barrier integrity results are likely due to the TEER and mannitol flux assays measuring different characteristics of the epithelial barrier, and therefore imply that there are multiple mechanisms involved in the effect of AGR1487 on barrier integrity. PMID:25943073

  8. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  9. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  10. Enterovirus 71 Uses Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Glycosaminoglycan as an Attachment Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee Wah; Poh, Chit Laa; Sam, I-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) infections are usually associated with mild hand, foot, and mouth disease in young children but have been reported to cause severe neurological complications with high mortality rates. To date, four EV-71 receptors have been identified, but inhibition of these receptors by antagonists did not completely abolish EV-71 infection, implying that there is an as yet undiscovered receptor(s). Since EV-71 has a wide range of tissue tropisms, we hypothesize that EV-71 infections may be facilitated by using receptors that are widely expressed in all cell types, such as heparan sulfate. In this study, heparin, polysulfated dextran sulfate, and suramin were found to significantly prevent EV-71 infection. Heparin inhibited infection by all the EV-71 strains tested, including those with a single-passage history. Neutralization of the cell surface anionic charge by polycationic poly-d-lysine and blockage of heparan sulfate by an anti-heparan sulfate peptide also inhibited EV-71 infection. Interference with heparan sulfate biosynthesis either by sodium chlorate treatment or through transient knockdown of N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 and exostosin-1 expression reduced EV-71 infection in RD cells. Enzymatic removal of cell surface heparan sulfate by heparinase I/II/III inhibited EV-71 infection. Furthermore, the level of EV-71 attachment to CHO cell lines that are variably deficient in cell surface glycosaminoglycans was significantly lower than that to wild-type CHO cells. Direct binding of EV-71 particles to heparin-Sepharose columns under physiological salt conditions was demonstrated. We conclude that EV-71 infection requires initial binding to heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor. PMID:23097443

  11. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  12. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  13. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  14. Epigenetics, chromatin and genome organization: recent advances from the ENCODE project.

    PubMed

    Siggens, L; Ekwall, K

    2014-09-01

    The organization of the genome into functional units, such as enhancers and active or repressed promoters, is associated with distinct patterns of DNA and histone modifications. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has advanced our understanding of the principles of genome, epigenome and chromatin organization, identifying hundreds of thousands of potential regulatory regions and transcription factor binding sites. Part of the ENCODE consortium, GENCODE, has annotated the human genome with novel transcripts including new noncoding RNAs and pseudogenes, highlighting transcriptional complexity. Many disease variants identified in genome-wide association studies are located within putative enhancer regions defined by the ENCODE project. Understanding the principles of chromatin and epigenome organization will help to identify new disease mechanisms, biomarkers and drug targets, particularly as ongoing epigenome mapping projects generate data for primary human cell types that play important roles in disease.

  15. Cell surface alteration in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells from patients with extreme insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Gorden, D.L.; Robert, A.; Moncada, V.Y.; Taylor, S.I.; Muehlhauser, J.C.; Carpentier, J.L. )

    1990-08-01

    An abnormality was detected in the morphology of the cell surface of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes of patients with genetic forms of insulin resistance. In cells from two patients with leprechaunism and two patients with type A extreme insulin resistance, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a decrease in the percentage of the cell surface occupied by microvilli in cells from the patients with leprechaunism and type A insulin resistance compared with control cells. When cells from a healthy control subject and one of the patients with leprechaunism (Lep/Ark-1) were incubated with {sup 125}I-labeled insulin, there was a decrease in the percentage of {sup 125}I-insulin associated with microvilli on the cell surface. Thus, the decreased localization of insulin receptors with the microvillous region of the cell surface was in proportion to the decrease in microvilli.

  16. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  17. Hierarchical Assembly of Model Cell Surfaces: Synthesis of Mucin Mimetic Polymers and their Display on Supported Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rabuka, David; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Lee, Goo Soo; Chen, Xing; Groves, Jay T.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular level analysis of cell surface phenomena could benefit from model systems comprising structurally-defined components. Here we present the first step toward bottom-up assembly of model cell surfaces – the synthesis of mucin mimetics and their incorporation into artificial membranes. Natural mucins are densely glycosylated O-linked glycoproteins that serve numerous functions on cell surfaces. Their large size and extensive glycosylation makes the synthesis of these biopolymers impractical. We designed synthetically tractable glycosylated polymers that possess rod-like extended conformations similar to natural mucins. The glycosylated polymers were end-functionalized with lipid groups and embedded into supported lipid bilayers where they interact with protein receptors in a structure-dependent manner. Furthermore, their dynamic behavior in synthetic membranes mirrored that of natural biomolecules. This system provides a unique framework with which to study the behavior of mucin-like macromolecules in a controlled, cell surface-mimetic environment. PMID:17425309

  18. A new class of carriers that transport selective cargo from the trans Golgi network to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Wakana, Yuichi; van Galen, Josse; Meissner, Felix; Scarpa, Margherita; Polishchuk, Roman S; Mann, Matthias; Malhotra, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    We have isolated a membrane fraction enriched in a class of transport carriers that form at the trans Golgi network (TGN) and are destined for the cell surface in HeLa cells. Protein kinase D (PKD) is required for the biogenesis of these carriers that contain myosin II, Rab6a, Rab8a, and synaptotagmin II, as well as a number of secretory and plasma membrane-specific cargoes. Our findings reveal a requirement for myosin II in the migration of these transport carriers but not in their biogenesis per se. Based on the cargo secreted by these carriers we have named them CARTS for CARriers of the TGN to the cell Surface. Surprisingly, CARTS are distinct from the carriers that transport vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein and collagen I from the TGN to the cell surface. Altogether, the identification of CARTS provides a valuable means to understand TGN to cell surface traffic. PMID:22909819

  19. Glycoprotein mucin molecular brush on cancer cell surface acting as mechanical barrier against drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shah, Aalok A.; Campbell, Robert B.; Wan, Kai-tak

    2010-12-01

    Uptake of cytotoxic drugs by typical tumor cells is limited by the dense dendritic network of oligosaccharide mucin chains that forms a mechanical barrier. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the force needed to pierce the mucin layer to reach the cell surface. Measurements are analyzed by de Gennes' steric reptation theory. Multidrug resistant ovarian tumor cells shows significantly larger penetration load compared to the wide type. A pool of pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and breast cells are also characterized. The chemotherapeutic agent, benzyl-α-GalNac, for inhibiting glycosylation is shown to be effective in reducing the mechanical barrier.

  20. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  1. Fibrillar organization of fibronectin is expressed coordinately with cell surface gangliosides in a variant murine fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    NCTC 2071A cells, a line of transformed murine fibroblasts, grow in serum-free medium, are deficient in gangliosides, synthesize fibronectin, but do not retain and organize it on the cell surface. When the cells are exposed to exogenous gangliosides, fibrillar strands of fibronectin become attached to the cell surface. A morphologically distinct variant of NCTC 2071A cells was observed to both retain cell surface fibronectin and organize it into a fibrillar network when the cells were stained with anti-fibronectin antibodies and a fluorescent second antibody. A revertant cell type appeared to resemble the parental NCTC 2071A cells in terms of morphology and fibronectin organization. All three cell types were subjected to mild NaIO4 oxidation and reduction with KB3H4 of very high specific radioactivity in order to label the sialic acid residues of surface gangliosides. The variant had much more surface gangliosides than the parental, particularly more complex gangliosides corresponding to GM1 and GD1a. The surface gangliosides of the revertant were intermediate between the parental and the variant. By using sialidase, which hydrolyzes GD1a to GM1, and 125I-labeled cholera toxin, which binds specifically to GM1, the identity and levels of these gangliosides were confirmed in the three cell types. When variant cells were exposed to sialidase for 2 d, there appeared to be little change in fibronectin organization. Concomitant treatment of the cells with the B subunit of cholera toxin, which bound to all the surface GM1 including that generated by the sialidase, however, eliminated the fibrillar network of fibronectin. In addition, exposure of the variant cells to a 70,000-mol-wt fragment of fibronectin, which lacks the cell attachment domain but contains a matrix assembly domain, inhibited the formation of fibers. Finally, all three cell types were assayed for their ability to attach to and spread on fibronectin-coated surfaces; no significant differences were found

  2. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  3. Inhibition of experimental ascending urinary tract infection by an epithelial cell-surface receptor analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, C. Svanborg; Freter, R.; Hagberg, L.; Hull, R.; Hull, S.; Leffler, H.; Schoolnik, G.

    1982-08-01

    It has been shown that the establishment of urinary tract infection by Escherichia coli is dependent on attachment of the bacteria to epithelial cells1-4. The attachment involves specific epithelial cell receptors, which have been characterized as glycolipids5-10. Reversible binding to cell-surface mannosides may also be important4,11-13. This suggests an approach to the treatment of infections-that of blocking bacterial attachment with cell membrane receptor analogues. Using E. coli mutants lacking one or other of the two binding specificities (glycolipid and mannose), we show here that glycolipid analogues can block in vitro adhesion and in vivo urinary tract infection.

  4. Modification of cell surface properties of Pseudomonas alcaligenes S22 during hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Moszyńska, Sylwia; Olszanowski, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    Biodegradation of water insoluble hydrocarbons can be significantly increased by the addition of natural surfactants one. Very promising option is the use of saponins. The obtained results indicated that in this system, after 21 days, 92% biodegradation of diesel oil could be achieved using Pseudomonas alcaligenes. No positive effect on the biodegradation process was observed using synthetic surfactant Triton X-100. The kind of carbon source influences the cell surface properties of microorganisms. Modification of the surface cell could be observed by control of the sedimentation profile. This analytical method is a new approach in microbiological analysis.

  5. Evidence that cell surface heparan sulfate is involved in the high affinity thrombin binding to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, K; Ozawa, T

    1985-01-01

    It has been postulated that thrombin binds to endothelial cells through, at least in part, cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate, which could serve as antithrombin cofactor on the endothelium. In the present study, we have directly evaluated the binding of 125I-labeled bovine thrombin to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells. The thrombin binding to the cell surface was rapid, reversible, and displaced by enzymatically inactive diisopropylphosphoryl-thrombin. The concentration of thrombin at half-maximal binding was approximately 20 nM. Both specific and nonspecific binding of 125I-thrombin to the endothelial cell surface was partially inhibited in the presence of protamine sulfate, after the removal of cell surface heparan sulfate by the treatment of cells with crude Flavobacterium heparinum enzyme or purified heparitinase. The binding as a function of the concentration of thrombin revealed that the maximal amount of specific binding was reduced by approximately 50% with little alteration in binding affinity by these enzymatic treatments. The reversibility and active-site independence as well as the rate of the binding did not change after heparitinase treatment. Whereas removal of chondroitin sulfates by chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of cells did not affect the binding, identical enzymatic treatments of [35S]sulfate-labeled cells showed that either heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate was selectively and completely removed from the cell surface by heparitinase or chondroitin ABC lyase treatment, respectively. Furthermore, proteolysis of cell surface proteins by the purified glycosaminoglycan lyases was excluded by the identical enzymatic treatments of [3H]leucine-labeled or cell surface radioiodinated cells. Our results provide the first direct evidence that heparan sulfate on the cell surface is involved in the high-affinity, active site-independent thrombin binding by endothelial cells, and also suggest the presence of thrombin

  6. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  7. Exopolysaccharide Production and Ropy Phenotype Are Determined by Two Gene Clusters in Putative Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11

    PubMed Central

    Zivkovic, Milica; Miljkovic, Marija; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Strahinic, Ivana; Tolinacki, Maja; Golic, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11, a putative probiotic strain isolated from a soft, white, artisanal cheese, produces a high-molecular-weight heteropolysaccharide, exopolysaccharide (EPS)-CG11, responsible for the ropy phenotype and immunomodulatory activity of the strain. In this study, a 26.4-kb region originating from the pCG1 plasmid, previously shown to be responsible for the production of EPS-CG11 and a ropy phenotype, was cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. In this region 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs), encoding enzymes for the production of EPS-CG11, were organized in specific loci involved in the biosynthesis of the repeat unit, polymerization, export, regulation, and chain length determination. Interestingly, downstream of the eps gene cluster, a putative transposase gene was identified, followed by an additional rfb gene cluster containing the rfbACBD genes, the ones most probably responsible for dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis. The functional analysis showed that the production of the high-molecular-weight fraction of EPS-CG11 was absent in two knockout mutants, one in the eps and the other in the rfb gene cluster, as confirmed by size exclusion chromatography analysis. Therefore, both eps and rfb genes clusters are prerequisites for the production of high-molecular-weight EPS-CG11 and for the ropy phenotype of strain L. paraplantarum BGCG11. PMID:25527533

  8. Reinforcing Lipid A Acylation on the Cell Surface of Acinetobacter baumannii Promotes Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Desiccation Survival

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Joseph M.; Tucker, Ashley T.; Klein, Dustin R.; Beltran, Alexander M.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Davies, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging Gram-negative pathogen found in hospitals and intensive care units. In order to persist in hospital environments, A. baumannii withstands desiccative conditions and can rapidly develop multidrug resistance to conventional antibiotics. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) have served as therapeutic alternatives because they target the conserved lipid A component of the Gram-negative outer membrane to lyse the bacterial cell. However, many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including A. baumannii, fortify their outer membrane with hepta-acylated lipid A to protect the cell from CAMP-dependent cell lysis. Whereas in Escherichia coli and Salmonella, increased production of the outer membrane acyltransferase PagP results in formation of protective hepta-acylated lipid A, which reinforces the lipopolysaccharide portion of the outer membrane barrier, A. baumannii does not carry a gene that encodes a PagP homolog. Instead, A. baumannii has evolved a PagP-independent mechanism to synthesize protective hepta-acylated lipid A. Taking advantage of a recently adapted A. baumannii genetic recombineering system, we characterized two putative acyltransferases in A. baumannii designated LpxLAb (A. baumannii LpxL) and LpxMAb (A. baumannii LpxM), which transfer one and two lauroyl (C12:0) acyl chains, respectively, during lipid A biosynthesis. Hepta-acylation of A. baumannii lipid A promoted resistance to vertebrate and polymyxin CAMPs, which are prescribed as last-resort treatment options. Intriguingly, our analysis also showed that LpxMAb-dependent acylation of lipid A is essential for A. baumannii desiccation survival, a key resistance mechanism for survival in hospital environments. Compounds that inhibit LpxMAb-dependent hepta-acylation of lipid A could act synergistically with CAMPs to provide innovative transmission prevention strategies and treat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:25991684

  9. Biodegradation and surfactant-mediated biodegradation of diesel fuel by 218 microbial consortia are not correlated to cell surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Szulc, Alicja; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Cyplik, Paweł; Bogacki, Mariusz; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we elucidated the role of cell surface hydrophobicity (microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons method, MATH) and the effect of anionic rhamnolipids and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants on biodegradation of diesel fuel employing 218 microbial consortia isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils. Applied enrichment procedure with floating diesel fuel as a sole carbon source in liquid cultures resulted in consortia of varying biodegradation potential and diametrically different cell surface properties, suggesting that cell surface hydrophobicity is a conserved parameter. Surprisingly, no correlations between cell surface hydrophobicity and biodegradation of diesel fuel were found. Nevertheless, both surfactants altered cell surface hydrophobicity of the consortia in similar manner: increased for the hydrophilic and decreased for the hydrophobic cultures. In addition to this, the surfactants exhibited similar influence on diesel fuel biodegradation: Increase was observed for initially slow-degrading cultures and the opposite for fast degraders. This indicates that in the surfactant-mediated biodegradation, effectiveness of surfactants depends on the specification of microorganisms and not on the type of surfactant. In contrary to what was previously reported for pure strains, cell surface hydrophobicity, as determined by MATH, is not a good descriptor of biodegrading potential for mixed cultures.

  10. CD133 protein N-glycosylation processing contributes to cell surface recognition of the primitive cell marker AC133 epitope.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anthony B; Blakely, Kim M; Williams, Rashida A; Penttilä, Pier-Andrée; Shukalyuk, Andrey I; Osman, Khan T; Kasimer, Dahlia; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason

    2011-11-25

    The AC133 epitope expressed on the CD133 glycoprotein has been widely used as a cell surface marker of numerous stem cell and cancer stem cell types. It has been recently proposed that posttranslational modification and regulation of CD133 may govern cell surface AC133 recognition. Therefore, we performed a large scale pooled RNA interference (RNAi) screen to identify genes involved in cell surface AC133 expression. Gene hits could be validated at a rate of 70.5% in a secondary assay using an orthogonal RNAi system, demonstrating that our primary RNAi screen served as a powerful genetic screening approach. Within the list of hits from the primary screen, genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis were significantly enriched as determined by Ingenuity Canonical Pathway analyses. Indeed, inhibiting biosynthesis of the N-glycan precursor using the small molecule tunicamycin or inhibiting its transfer to CD133 by generating N-glycan-deficient CD133 mutants resulted in undetectable cell surface AC133. Among the screen hits involved in N-glycosylation were genes involved in complex N-glycan processing, including the poorly characterized MGAT4C, which we demonstrate to be a positive regulator of cell surface AC133 expression. Our study identifies a set of genes involved in CD133 N-glycosylation as a direct contributing factor to cell surface AC133 recognition and provides biochemical evidence for the function and structure of CD133 N-glycans.

  11. A putative mobile genetic element carrying a novel type IIF restriction-modification system (PluTI)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Feroz; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Mikihiko; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Ishikawa, Ken; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-01-01

    Genome comparison and genome context analysis were used to find a putative mobile element in the genome of Photorhabdus luminescens, an entomopathogenic bacterium. The element is composed of 16-bp direct repeats in the terminal regions, which are identical to a part of insertion sequences (ISs), a DNA methyltransferase gene homolog, two genes of unknown functions and an open reading frame (ORF) (plu0599) encoding a protein with no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein. The ORF (plu0599) product showed DNA endonuclease activity, when expressed in a cell-free expression system. Subsequently, the protein, named R.PluTI, was expressed in vivo, purified and found to be a novel type IIF restriction enzyme that recognizes 5′-GGCGC/C-3′ (/ indicates position of cleavage). R.PluTI cleaves a two-site supercoiled substrate at both the sites faster than a one-site supercoiled substrate. The modification enzyme homolog encoded by plu0600, named M.PluTI, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to protect DNA from R.PluTI cleavage in vitro, and to suppress the lethal effects of R.PluTI expression in vivo. These results suggested that they constitute a restriction–modification system, present on the putative mobile element. Our approach thus allowed detection of a previously uncharacterized family of DNA-interacting proteins. PMID:20071747

  12. Characterization of a spontaneous nonmagnetic mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense reveals a large deletion comprising a putative magnetosome island.

    PubMed

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria.

  13. Characterization of a Spontaneous Nonmagnetic Mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense Reveals a Large Deletion Comprising a Putative Magnetosome Island

    PubMed Central

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H.; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:13129949

  14. Characterization of Genes Encoding for Acquired Bacitracin Resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jalbert, Louis-Alexandre; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Archambault, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC90 (>256 µg/ml) was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml) than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml). Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml) and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens. PMID:22970221

  15. Spectral Evidence of Aqueous Activity in Two Putative Martian Paleolakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Fonti, Sergio; Orofino, Vincenzo; Blanco, Armando

    2010-01-01

    CRISM observations of putative paleolakes in Cankuzo and Luqa craters exhibit spectral features consistent with the activity of water. The spatial distributions suggest different formation scenarios for each site. In Cankuzo the distribution suggests postimpact alteration whereas in Luqa there are hints of possible formation of a layer of phyllosilicate materials.

  16. Sulfur Isotope Composition of Putative Primary Troilite in Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Huss, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur isotope compositions of putative primary troilites in chondrules from Bishunpur were measured by ion probe. These primary troilites have the same S isotope compositions as matrix troilites and thus appear to be isotopically unfractionated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Bartonella henselae AS A PUTATIVE CAUSE OF CONGENITAL CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    VELHO, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; BELLOMO-BRANDÃO, Maria Ângela; DRUMMOND, Marina Rovani; MAGALHÃES, Renata Ferreira; HESSEL, Gabriel; BARJAS-CASTRO, Maria de Lourdes; ESCANHOELA, Cecília Amélia Fazzio; NEGRO, Gilda Maria Barbaro DEL; OKAY, Thelma Suely

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Severe anemia and cholestatic hepatitis are associated with bartonella infections. A putative vertical Bartonella henselae infection was defined on the basis of ultrastructural and molecular analyses in a three-year-old child with anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly since birth. Physicians should consider bartonellosis in patients with anemia and hepatitis of unknown origin. PMID:27410916

  18. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  19. Schematic driven layout of Reed Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arave, Kari; Canaris, John; Miles, Lowell; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    Two Reed Solomon error correcting encoders are presented. Schematic driven layout tools were used to create the encoder layouts. Special consideration had to be given to the architecture and logic to provide scalability of the encoder designs. Knowledge gained from these projects was used to create a more flexible schematic driven layout system.

  20. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L.; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca2+ pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca2+ pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca2+ pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca2+ pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a 32P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca2+, thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca2+-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  1. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus.

  2. Cell Surface-Specific N-Glycan Profiling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuanfei; Maitikabili, Alaiyi; Qu, Youpeng; Shi, Shuliang; Chen, Cuiying; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant changes in specific glycans have been shown to be associated with immunosurveillance, tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, the N-glycan profiling of membrane proteins from human breast cancer cell lines and tissues was detected using modified DNA sequencer-assisted fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (DSA-FACE). The N-glycan profiles of membrane proteins were analyzed from 7 breast cancer cell lines and MCF 10A, as well as from 100 pairs of breast cancer and corresponding adjacent tissues. The results showed that, compared with the matched adjacent normal tissue samples, two biantennary N-glycans (NA2 and NA2FB) were significantly decreased (p <0.0001) in the breast cancer tissue samples, while the triantennary glycan (NA3FB) and a high-mannose glycan (M8) were dramatically increased (p = 0.001 and p <0.0001, respectively). Moreover, the alterations in these specific N-glycans occurred through the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. These results suggested that the modified method based on DSA-FACE is a high-throughput detection technology that is suited for analyzing cell surface N-glycans. These cell surface-specific N-glycans may be helpful in recognizing the mechanisms of tumor cell immunologic escape and could be potential targets for new breast cancer drugs. PMID:24009699

  3. Structural insights into alginate binding by bacterial cell-surface protein.

    PubMed

    Temtrirath, Kanate; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-02

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 inducibly forms a mouth-like pit on the cell surface in the presence of alginate and directly incorporates polymers into the cytoplasm via the pit and ABC transporter. Among the bacterial proteins involved in import of alginate, a cell-surface EfeO-like Algp7 shows an ability to bind alginate, suggesting its contribution to accumulate alginate in the pit. Here, we show identification of its positively charged cluster involved in alginate binding using X-ray crystallography, docking simulation, and site-directed mutagenesis. The tertiary structure of Algp7 was determined at a high resolution (1.99Å) by molecular replacement, although no alginates were included in the structure. Thus, an in silico model of Algp7/oligoalginate was constructed by docking simulation using atomic coordinates of Algp7 and alginate oligosaccharides, where some charged residues were found to be potential candidates for alginate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and five purified mutants K68A, K69A, E194A, N221A, and K68A/K69A were subjected to a binding assay. UV absorption difference spectroscopy along with differential scanning fluorimetry analysis indicated that K68A/K69A exhibited a significant reduction in binding affinity with alginate than wild-type Algp7. Based on these data, Lys68/Lys69 residues of Algp7 probably play an important role in binding alginate.

  4. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  5. Cell surface glycoproteins of CHO cells. I. Internalization and rapid recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Raub, T.J.; Denny, J.B.; Roberts, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The major cell surface proteins of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have been investigated after reacting cells at 4/sup 0/C with the membrane-impermeant reagent, trinitrobenzenesulfonate (TNBS). Immunoprecipitation and subsequent two-dimensional, sodiumdodecyl sulfate, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of proteins from derivatized cells that had been labelled previously with (/sup 3/H)D-glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)L-leucine showed that TNBS reacted with most of the high molecular weight (HMW) acidic glycoproteins that became labelled with iodine by the lactoperoxidase technique and that bind the lectin, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). After warming the cells to allow endocytosis to proceed, molecule haptenized with trinitrophenol (TNP) groups were followed radio-chemically by means of (/sup 125/I)anti-DNP antibodies. Within 15 min at 37/sup 0/C, a steady-state between surface and cytoplasmic label was reached, with about 65% of the hapten located internally. Recycling of internalized TNP groups back to the cell surface also occurred rapidly (t/sub 1/2/ approx. 5 min). Our results are consistent with the view that the majority of plasma membrane glycoproteins are continuously being internalized and recycled at a high rate.

  6. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Wei; Zou, Yuan; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Xuemeng; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-09-10

    Accurate sensing of the extracellular pH is a very important yet challenging task in biological and clinical applications. This paper describes the development of an amphiphilic lipid-DNA molecule as a simple yet useful cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing. The lipid-DNA probe, which consists of a hydrophobic diacyllipid tail and a hydrophilic DNA strand, is modified with two fluorescent dyes; one is pH-sensitive as pH indicator and the other is pH-insensitive as an internal reference. The lipid-DNA probe showed sensitive and reversible response to pH change in the range of 6.0-8.0, which is suitable for most extracellular studies. In addition, based on simple hydrophobic interactions with the cell membrane, the lipid-DNA probe can be easily anchored on the cell surface with negligible cytotoxicity, excellent stability, and unique ratiometric readout, thus ensuring its accurate sensing of extracellular pH. Finally, this lipid-DNA-based ratiometric pH indicator was successfully used for extracellular pH sensing of cells in 3D culture environment, demonstrating the potential applications of the sensor in biological and medical studies.

  7. BHK21 fibroblast aggregation inhibited by glycopeptides from the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G

    1976-06-01

    Glycopeptides were removed by trypsinization from the surface of baby hamster kidney cells (line BHK21-C13), digested by pronase and separated into 2 fractions by exclusion chromatography. The addition of small amounts of either glycopeptide fraction to shaken suspensions of lightly trypsinzied cells inhibited their rapid aggregation, but one fraction was more active than the other and in higher concentrations it was able to inhibit aggregation completely. After this fraction was purified by high-voltage electrophoresis one subfraction also inhibited aggregation. The effect of the glycopeptides increased following their pretreatment with neuraminidase, but preincubation with periodiate or galactose oxidase destroyed all activity. Galactose oxidase also inhibited cell aggregation directly. Similar glycopeptides from virus-transformed BHK21 cells, oligosaccharides and intact and desialysed human urinary glycoproteins had comparatively little or no effect on BHK21 cell aggregation. The results suggest terminal beta-galactosides and possible alpha-galactosides, and to some extent a particular substructure of cell surface heteroglycans are necessary for their inhibitory activity. The parent, plasma membrane of glycoproteins might serve as adhesive binding sites in cell cohesion, but some evidence indicates cell surface sialyl- and galactosyltransferases may not ordinarily act as their complementary binding receptors.

  8. Murine Polyomavirus Cell Surface Receptors Activate Distinct Signaling Pathways Required for Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Samantha D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus binding to the cell surface triggers an array of host responses, including activation of specific signaling pathways that facilitate steps in virus entry. Using mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV), we identified host signaling pathways activated upon virus binding to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Pathways activated by MuPyV included the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), FAK/SRC, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Gangliosides and α4-integrin are required receptors for MuPyV infection. MuPyV binding to both gangliosides and the α4-integrin receptors was required for activation of the PI3K pathway; however, either receptor interaction alone was sufficient for activation of the MAPK pathway. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we confirmed that the PI3K and FAK/SRC pathways were required for MuPyV infection, while the MAPK pathway was dispensable. Mechanistically, the PI3K pathway was required for MuPyV endocytosis, while the FAK/SRC pathway enabled trafficking of MuPyV along microtubules. Thus, MuPyV interactions with specific cell surface receptors facilitate activation of signaling pathways required for virus entry and trafficking. Understanding how different viruses manipulate cell signaling pathways through interactions with host receptors could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:27803182

  9. Label-fracture: a method for high resolution labeling of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinto da Silva, P; Kan, F W

    1984-09-01

    We introduce here a technique, "label-fracture," that allows the observation of the distribution of a cytochemical label on a cell surface. Cell surfaces labeled with an electron-dense marker (colloidal gold) are freeze-fractured and the fracture faces are replicated by plantinum/carbon evaporation. The exoplasmic halves of the membrane, apparently stabilized by the deposition of the Pt/C replica, are washed in distilled water. The new method reveals the surface distribution of the label coincident with the Pt/C replica of the exoplasmic fracture face. Initial applications indicate high resolution (less than or equal to 15 nm) and exceedingly low background. "Label-fracture" provides extensive views of the distribution of the label on membrane surfaces while preserving cell shape and relating to the freeze-fracture morphology of exoplasmic fracture faces. The regionalization of wheat germ agglutinin receptors on the plasma membranes of boar sperm cells is illustrated. The method and the interpretation of its results are straightforward. Label-fracture is appropriate for routine use as a surface labeling technique.

  10. A dual phosphorylation switch controls 14-3-3-dependent cell surface expression of TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Kilisch, Markus; Lytovchenko, Olga; Arakel, Eric C.; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transport of the K+ channels TASK-1 and TASK-3 (also known as KCNK3 and KCNK9, respectively) to the cell surface is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to a trafficking control region at the extreme C-terminus of the channels. The current model proposes that phosphorylation-dependent binding of 14-3-3 sterically masks a COPI-binding motif. However, the direct effects of phosphorylation on COPI binding and on the binding parameters of 14-3-3 isoforms are still unknown. We find that phosphorylation of the trafficking control region prevents COPI binding even in the absence of 14-3-3, and we present a quantitative analysis of the binding of all human 14-3-3 isoforms to the trafficking control regions of TASK-1 and TASK-3. Surprisingly, the affinities of 14-3-3 proteins for TASK-1 are two orders of magnitude lower than for TASK-3. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of a second serine residue in the C-terminus of TASK-1 inhibits 14-3-3 binding. Thus, phosphorylation of the trafficking control region can stimulate or inhibit transport of TASK-1 to the cell surface depending on the target serine residue. Our findings indicate that control of TASK-1 trafficking by COPI, kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins is highly dynamic. PMID:26743085

  11. Involvement of Cell Surface Structures in Size-Independent Grazing Resistance of Freshwater Actinobacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tarao, Mitsunori; Jezbera, Jan; Hahn, Martin W.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the influences of grazing by the bacterivorous nanoflagellate Poterioochromonas sp. strain DS on ultramicrobacterial Actinobacteria affiliated with the Luna-2 cluster and ultramicrobacterial Betaproteobacteria of the species Polynucleobacter cosmopolitanus. These bacteria were almost identical in size (<0.1 μm3) and shape. Predation on a Polynucleobacter strain resulted in a reduction of >86% relative to the initial bacterial cell numbers within 20 days, while in comparable predation experiments with nine actinobacterial strains, no significant decrease of cell numbers by predation was observed over the period of ≥39 days. The differences in predation mortality between the actinobacterial strains and the Polynucleobacter strain clearly demonstrated size-independent grazing resistance for the investigated Actinobacteria. Importantly, this size-independent grazing resistance is shared by all nine investigated Luna-2 strains and thus represents a group-specific trait. We investigated if an S-layer, previously observed in an ultrastructure study, was responsible for the grazing resistance of these strains. Experiments aiming for removal of the S-layer or modification of cell surface proteins of one of the grazing-resistant strains by treatment with lithium chloride, EDTA, or formaldehyde resulted in 4.2- to 5.2-fold higher grazing rates in comparison to the levels for untreated cells. These results indicate the protective role of a proteinaceous cell surface structure in the size-independent grazing resistance of the actinobacterial Luna-2 strains, which can be regarded as a group-specific trait. PMID:19502450

  12. Characterization of cell-surface receptors for monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T. )

    1990-10-15

    Monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF) is a lymphokine derived from murine T cell hybridoma. The target tissues are both LPS-stimulated B cells and Con A-stimulated T cells. Since the action of MNSF may be mediated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, we characterized the mode of this binding. The purified MNSF was labeled with {sup 125}I, using the Bolton-Hunter reagent. The labeled MNSF bound specifically to a single class of receptor (300 receptors per cell) on mitogen-stimulated murine B cells or T cells with an affinity of 16 pM at 24{degrees}C, in the presence of sodium azide. Competitive experiments showed that MNSF bound to the specific receptor and that the binding was not shared with IL2, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Various cell types were surveyed for the capacity to specifically bind {sup 125}I-MNSF. {sup 125}I-MNSF bound to MOPC-31C (a murine plasmacytoma line) and to EL4 (a murine T lymphoma line). The presence of specific binding correlates with the capacity of the cells to respond to MNSF. These data support the view that like other polypeptide hormones, the action of MNSF is mediated by specific cell surface membrane receptor protein. Identification of these receptors will provide insight into the apparently diverse activities of MNSF.

  13. Regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis by cell-surface expression of kinase dead DDR2.

    PubMed

    Blissett, Angela R; Garbellini, Derek; Calomeni, Edward P; Mihai, Cosmin; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2009-01-23

    The assembly of collagen fibers, the major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), governs a variety of physiological processes. Collagen fibrillogenesis is a tightly controlled process in which several factors, including collagen binding proteins, have a crucial role. Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are receptor tyrosine kinases that bind to and are phosphorylated upon collagen binding. The phosphorylation of DDRs is known to activate matrix metalloproteases, which in turn cleave the ECM. In our earlier studies, we established a novel mechanism of collagen regulation by DDRs; that is, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2, when used as a purified, soluble protein, inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis in-vitro. To extend this novel observation, the current study investigates how the DDR2-ECD, when expressed as a membrane-anchored, cell-surface protein, affects collagen fibrillogenesis by cells. We generated a mouse osteoblast cell line that stably expresses a kinase-deficient form of DDR2, termed DDR2/-KD, on its cell surface. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and hydroxyproline assays demonstrated that the expression of DDR2/-KD reduced the rate and abundance of collagen deposition and induced significant morphological changes in the resulting fibers. Taken together, our observations extend the functional roles that DDR2 and possibly other membrane-anchored, collagen-binding proteins can play in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

  14. GABAB receptor cell surface export is controlled by an endoplasmic reticulum gatekeeper

    PubMed Central

    Doly, Stéphane; Shirvani, Hamasseh; Gäta, Gabriel; Meye, Frank; Emerit, Michel-Boris; Enslen, Hervé; Achour, Lamia; Pardo-Lopez, Liliana; Kwon, Yang Seung; Armand, Vincent; Gardette, Robert; Giros, Bruno; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Mameli, Manuel; Darmon, Michèle; Marullo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) release and cell surface export of many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), are tightly regulated. For GABAB receptors of GABA, the major mammalian inhibitory neurotransmitter, the ligand-binding GB1 subunit is maintained in the ER by unknown mechanisms in the absence of hetero-dimerization with the GB2 subunit. We report that GB1 retention is regulated by a specific gatekeeper, PRAF2. This ER resident transmembrane protein binds to GB1, preventing its progression in the biosynthetic pathway. GB1 release occurs upon competitive displacement from PRAF2 by GB2. PRAF2 concentration, relative to that of GB1 and GB2, tightly controls cell surface receptor density and controls GABAB function in neurons. Experimental perturbation of PRAF2 levels in vivo caused marked hyperactivity disorders in mice. These data reveal an unanticipated major impact of specific ER gate-keepers on GPCR function and identify PRAF2 as a new molecular target with therapeutic potential for psychiatric and neurological diseases involving GABAB function. PMID:26033241

  15. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses