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Sample records for encoding putative cell-surface

  1. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Kenworthy, Anne K.; Nichols, Benjamin J.; Remmert, Catha L.; Hendrix, Glenn M.; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (>4 μm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface. PMID:15173190

  2. Dynamics of putative raft-associated proteins at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, Anne K; Nichols, Benjamin J; Remmert, Catha L; Hendrix, Glenn M; Kumar, Mukesh; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2004-06-07

    Lipid rafts are conceptualized as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid that serve as platforms for protein segregation and signaling. The properties of these domains in vivo are unclear. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to test if raft association affects a protein's ability to laterally diffuse large distances across the cell surface. The diffusion coefficients (D) of several types of putative raft and nonraft proteins were systematically measured under steady-state conditions and in response to raft perturbations. Raft proteins diffused freely over large distances (> 4 microm), exhibiting Ds that varied 10-fold. This finding indicates that raft proteins do not undergo long-range diffusion as part of discrete, stable raft domains. Perturbations reported to affect lipid rafts in model membrane systems or by biochemical fractionation (cholesterol depletion, decreased temperature, and cholesterol loading) had similar effects on the diffusional mobility of raft and nonraft proteins. Thus, raft association is not the dominant factor in determining long-range protein mobility at the cell surface.

  3. An ORF from Bacillus licheniformis encodes a putative DNA repressor.

    PubMed

    Naval, J; Aguilar, D; Serra, X; Pérez-Pons, J A; Piñol, J; Lloberas, J; Querol, E

    2000-01-01

    The complete sequence of a reading frame adjacent to the endo-beta-1,3-1,4-D-glucanase gene from Bacillus licheniformis is reported. It encodes a putative 171 amino acid residues protein with either, low significant sequence similarity in data banks or the corresponding orthologue in the recently sequenced Bacillus subtilis genome. Computer analyses predict a canonical Helix-Turn-Helix motif characteristic of bacterial repressors/DNA binding proteins. A maxicells assay shows that the encoded polypeptide is expressed. A DNA-protein binding, assay performed by gel electrophoresis shows that the expressed protein specifically binds to Bacillus licheniformis DNA.

  4. Ssg, a putative glycosyltransferase, functions in lipo- and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and cell surface-related properties in Pseudomonas alkylphenolia.

    PubMed

    Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Lee, Kyoung; Cho, Ah Ra; Cho, Kyungyun; Anderson, Erin M; Lam, Joseph S

    2011-02-01

    In the presence of vaporized p-cresol, Pseudomonas alkylphenolia KL28 forms specialized aerial structures (SAS). A transposon mutant of strain KL28 (C23) incapable of forming mature SAS was isolated. Genetic analysis of the C23 mutant revealed the transposon insertion in a gene (ssg) encoding a putative glycosyltransferase, which is homologous to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 PA5001 gene. Deletion of ssg in KL28 caused the loss of lipopolysaccharide O antigen and altered the composition of the exopolysaccharide. Wild-type KL28 produced a fucose-, glucose- and mannose-rich exopolysaccharide, while the mutant exopolysaccharide completely lacked fucose and mannose, resulting in an exopolysaccharide with glucose as the major component. The mutant strain showed reduced surface spreading, pellicle and biofilm formation, probably due to the cumulative effect of lipopolysaccharide truncation and altered exopolysaccharide composition. Our results show that the ssg gene of KL28 is involved in both lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and thus plays an important role in cell surface properties and cell-cell interactions of P. alkylphenolia.

  5. Deletion of Lipoteichoic Acid Synthase Impacts Expression of Genes Encoding Cell Surface Proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Selle, Kurt; Goh, Yong J; Johnson, Brant R; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Andersen, Joakim M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a well-characterized probiotic microorganism, supported by a decade of genomic and functional phenotypic investigations. L. acidophilus deficient in lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a major immunostimulant in Gram-positive bacteria, has been shown to shift immune system responses in animal disease models. However, the pleiotropic effects of removing LTA from the cell surface in lactobacilli are unknown. In this study, we surveyed the global transcriptional and extracellular protein profiles of two strains of L. acidophilus deficient in LTA. Twenty-four differentially expressed genes specific to the LTA-deficient strains were identified, including a predicted heavy metal resistance operon and several putative peptidoglycan hydrolases. Cell morphology and manganese sensitivity phenotypes were assessed in relation to the putative functions of differentially expressed genes. LTA-deficient L. acidophilus exhibited elongated cellular morphology and their growth was severely inhibited by elevated manganese concentrations. Exoproteomic surveys revealed distinct changes in the composition and relative abundances of several extracellular proteins and showed a bias of intracellular proteins in LTA-deficient strains of L. acidophilus. Taken together, these results elucidate the impact of ltaS deletion on the transcriptome and extracellular proteins of L. acidophilus, suggesting roles of LTA in cell morphology and ion homeostasis as a structural component of the Gram positive cell wall.

  6. Deletion of Lipoteichoic Acid Synthase Impacts Expression of Genes Encoding Cell Surface Proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Kurt; Goh, Yong J.; Johnson, Brant R.; O’Flaherty, Sarah; Andersen, Joakim M.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a well-characterized probiotic microorganism, supported by a decade of genomic and functional phenotypic investigations. L. acidophilus deficient in lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a major immunostimulant in Gram-positive bacteria, has been shown to shift immune system responses in animal disease models. However, the pleiotropic effects of removing LTA from the cell surface in lactobacilli are unknown. In this study, we surveyed the global transcriptional and extracellular protein profiles of two strains of L. acidophilus deficient in LTA. Twenty-four differentially expressed genes specific to the LTA-deficient strains were identified, including a predicted heavy metal resistance operon and several putative peptidoglycan hydrolases. Cell morphology and manganese sensitivity phenotypes were assessed in relation to the putative functions of differentially expressed genes. LTA-deficient L. acidophilus exhibited elongated cellular morphology and their growth was severely inhibited by elevated manganese concentrations. Exoproteomic surveys revealed distinct changes in the composition and relative abundances of several extracellular proteins and showed a bias of intracellular proteins in LTA-deficient strains of L. acidophilus. Taken together, these results elucidate the impact of ltaS deletion on the transcriptome and extracellular proteins of L. acidophilus, suggesting roles of LTA in cell morphology and ion homeostasis as a structural component of the Gram positive cell wall. PMID:28443071

  7. A Genetically Encoded Alkyne Directs Palladium-Mediated Protein Labeling on Live Mammalian Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  8. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  9. Tomato Ve disease resistance genes encode cell surface-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kawchuk, Lawrence M.; Hachey, John; Lynch, Dermot R.; Kulcsar, Frank; van Rooijen, Gijs; Waterer, Doug R.; Robertson, Albert; Kokko, Eric; Byers, Robert; Howard, Ronald J.; Fischer, Rainer; Prüfer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In tomato, Ve is implicated in race-specific resistance to infection by Verticillium species causing crop disease. Characterization of the Ve locus involved positional cloning and isolation of two closely linked inverted genes. Expression of individual Ve genes in susceptible potato plants conferred resistance to an aggressive race 1 isolate of Verticillium albo-atrum. The deduced primary structure of Ve1 and Ve2 included a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide, leucine-rich repeats containing 28 or 35 potential glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain, and a C-terminal domain with the mammalian E/DXXXLφ or YXXφ endocytosis signals (φ is an amino acid with a hydrophobic side chain). A leucine zipper-like sequence occurs in the hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide of Ve1 and a Pro-Glu-Ser-Thr (PEST)-like sequence resides in the C-terminal domain of Ve2. These structures suggest that the Ve genes encode a class of cell-surface glycoproteins with receptor-mediated endocytosis-like signals and leucine zipper or PEST sequences. PMID:11331751

  10. Crystal Structure of a Virus-Encoded Putative Glycosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Baxa, Ulrich; Zhang, Ying; Steven, Alasdair C.; Lewis, Gentry L.; Van Etten, James L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-22

    The chloroviruses (family Phycodnaviridae), unlike most viruses, encode some, if not most, of the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their structural proteins. Annotation of the gene product B736L from chlorovirus NY-2A suggests that it is a glycosyltransferase. The structure of the recombinantly expressed B736L protein was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, and the protein was shown to have two nucleotide-binding folds like other glycosyltransferase type B enzymes. This is the second structure of a chlorovirus-encoded glycosyltransferase and the first structure of a chlorovirus type B enzyme to be determined. B736L is a retaining enzyme and belongs to glycosyltransferase family 4. The donor substrate was identified as GDP-mannose by isothermal titration calorimetry and was shown to bind into the cleft between the two domains in the protein. The active form of the enzyme is probably a dimer in which the active centers are separated by about 40 {angstrom}.

  11. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Nakamura, S; Kawasaki, H; Takada, K; Mizutani, S; Aono, R; Horikoshi, K

    1997-02-01

    The triangular disk-shaped halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 has a glycoprotein on its cell surface. The complete gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) was cloned and sequenced. The gene has an open reading frame of 2586 bp, and a potential archaeal promoter sequence approximately 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The mature CSG is composed of 828 amino acids and is preceded by a signal sequence of 34 amino acid residues. A hydropathy analysis showed a hydrophobic stretch at the C-terminus, that probably serves as a transmembrane domain. The amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG showed 52.1% and 43.2% identities to those from the Halobacterium halobium and Haloferax volcanii CSGs, respectively. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature Ha. japonica CSG, sites that were distinctly different from those in Hb. halobium and Hf. volcanii. The Ha. japonica CSG gene was expressed in Escherichia coli.

  13. Structure and heterologous expression of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein from Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Takada, K; Nakamura, S; Horikoshi, K

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 was cloned and sequenced. The structural gene consisted from an open reading frame of 2,586 bp. A potential promoter sequence was found about 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG revealed that the mature CSG consisted of 828 amino acids. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature sequence. The cloned CSG gene of Ha. japonica was expressed in closely-related halophilic archaea.

  14. Novel Repressor of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Motility Encoded in the Putative Fimbrial Cluster OI-1

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Sarah E.; Silphaduang, Uma; Mascarenhas, Mariola; Konczy, Paulina; Quan, Quyen; Karmali, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a gastrointestinal pathogen that has become a serious public health concern, as it is associated with outbreaks and severe diseases such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The molecular basis of its greater virulence than that of other serotypes is not completely known. OI-1 is a putative fimbria-encoding genomic island that is found almost exclusively in O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and may be associated with the enhanced pathogenesis of these strains. In this study, we identified and characterized a novel repressor of flagellar synthesis encoded by OI-1. We showed that deletion of Z0021 increased the motility of E. coli O157:H7, which correlated with an increase in flagellin production and enhanced assembly of flagella on the cell surface. In contrast, overexpression of Z0021 inhibited motility. We demonstrated that Z0021 exerted its regulatory effects downstream of the transcription and translation of flhDC but prior to the activation of class II/III promoters. Furthermore, the master regulator of flagellar synthesis, FlhD4C2, was shown to be a high-copy suppressor of the nonmotile phenotype associated with elevated levels of Z0021—a finding consistent with Z0021-FlhD4C2 being a potential regulatory complex. This work provides insight into the mechanism by which Z0021, which we have named fmrA, represses flagellar synthesis and is the first report of a fimbrial-operon-encoded inhibitor of motility in E. coli O157:H7. PMID:22843849

  15. Alternative promoters regulate transcription of the gene that encodes stem cell surface protein AC133.

    PubMed

    Shmelkov, Sergey V; Jun, Lin; St Clair, Ryan; McGarrigle, Deirdre; Derderian, Christopher A; Usenko, Jaroslav K; Costa, Carla; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Xinzheng; Rafii, Shahin

    2004-03-15

    AC133 is a member of a novel family of cell surface proteins with 5 transmembrane domains. The function of AC133 is unknown. Although AC133 mRNA is detected in different tissues, its expression in the hematopoietic system is restricted to CD34+ stem cells. AC133 is also expressed on stem cells of other tissues, including endothelial progenitor cells. However, despite the potential importance of AC133 to the field of stem cell biology, nothing is known about the transcriptional regulation of AC133 expression. In this report we showed that the human AC133 gene has at least 9 distinctive 5'-untranslated region (UTR) exons, resulting in the formation of at least 7 alternatively spliced 5'-UTR isoforms of AC133 mRNA, which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We found that transcription of these AC133 isoforms is controlled by 5 alternative promoters, and we demonstrated their activity on AC133-expressing cell lines using a luciferase reporter system. We also showed that in vitro methylation of 2 of these AC133 promoters completely suppresses their activity, suggesting that methylation plays a role in their regulation. Identification of tissue-specific AC133 promoters may provide a novel method to isolate tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells.

  16. Mutations in the putative HCV-E2 CD81 binding regions and correlation with cell surface CD81 expression.

    PubMed

    Kronenberger, B; Sarrazin, C; Hofmann, W P; von Wagner, M; Herrmann, E; Welsch, C; Elez, R; Rüster, B; Piiper, A; Zeuzem, S

    2004-07-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope (E)2 protein interacts with the cellular receptor CD81 leading to modulation of B and T cell function. Recently, a higher binding affinity of subtype 1a in comparison with 1b derived E2 proteins for CD81 in vitro was described. The importance of mutations within the putative CD81 binding regions of different HCV geno-/subtypes in correlation with CD81 expression is unknown. In the present study, CD81 expression on blood lymphocytes of patients with chronic hepatitis C infected with different HCV geno-/subtypes were analysed by fluorescence activated cell sorter analyses. In addition, the putative CD81 binding regions on the E2 gene comprising the hypervariable region (HVR)2 were analysed by direct sequencing. CD81 expression on CD8(+) T-lymphocytes from patients infected with subtype 1a (n = 6) was significantly higher in comparison with subtype 1b (n = 12) and 3 (n = 5) infected patients before and during antiviral therapy (P = 0.006; P = 0.021, respectively). Sequencing of the putative CD81 binding regions in the E2 protein comprising the HVR2 (codon 474-495 and 522-552 according to the HCV-1a prototype HCV-H) showed a highly conserved motif within HVR2 for subtype 1a isolates and an overall low number of mutations within the putative CD81 binding regions, whereas numerous mutations were detected for subtype 1b isolates (12.0 vs 23.6%). HCV-3 isolates showed an intermediate number of mutations within the putative binding sites (19.2%; P = 0.022). In conclusion, the highly conserved sequence within HVR2 and putative CD81 binding sites of subtype 1a isolates previously associated with a high CD81 binding affinity in vitro is correlated with high CD81 expression on CD8(+) T-lymphocytes in vivo.

  17. Phylogeny of Algal Sequences Encoding Carbohydrate Sulfotransferases, Formylglycine-Dependent Sulfatases, and Putative Sulfatase Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs) while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs). Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs) is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs, and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute toward future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering. PMID:26635861

  18. Identification and characterization of two putative microRNAs encoded by Bombyx mori cypovirus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong-Hua; Wu, Ping; Gao, Kun; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Qin, Guang-Xing; Geng, Tao; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2017-04-02

    Viral microRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to play important roles in virus-host interactions. Some RNA virus-encoded miRNAs have been reported to promote viral replication and may be used as potential drug targets. Bombyx mori cypovirus (BmCPV), an important pathogen of silkworm, is a double-stranded RNA virus frequently causing serious damages in sericulture. Research on miRNA encoded by BmCPV may be useful to elucidate the BmCPV-host interaction and to develop new anti-viral methods. In our previous study, small RNA libraries of the midgut of BmCPV-infected silkworm have been generated by deep sequencing and several BmCPV-encoded putative miRNAs were predicted. In this study, two putative miRNAs encoded by BmCPV were identified and then validated by stem-loop qRT-PCR and northern blot. They are BmCPV-miR-3 encoded by the third genomic RNA segment of BmCPV (478-497bp) and BmCPV-miR-5 encoded by the fifth genomic RNA segment (2481-2500bp), both are 20bp and encoded by ORF regions. miRNA expression could be detected as early as 5h after BmCPV infection, and the expression level of BmCPV-miR-3 is much higher than that of BmCPV-miR-5 in the course of infection. Three potential target genes were predicted in the host genome, two for BmCPV-miR-3 and one for BmCPV-miR-5, but just one in the virus genome for BmCPV-miR-3 only, with the binding sites all in coding regions. Dual luciferase assay and qRT-PCR indicated that BmCPV-miR-3 could down-regulate the expression of both its two target genes, but no regulatory effect by BmCPV-miR-5 on its target gene was detected. In contrast, BmCPV-miR-3 could up-regulate the viral target. This is the first report that an insect double stranded RNA virus may generate miRNAs and the results obtained will benefit the future study of the functions of BmCPV-encoded miRNAs on viral replication and virus-host interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CD44 in Differentiated Embryonic Stem Cells: Surface Expression and Transcripts Encoding Multiple Variants

    PubMed Central

    Haegel, Hélène; Dierich, Andrée

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the surface-adhesion molecule CD44 was investigated during the in vitro differentiation of the embryonic stem (ES) cell line D3. By immunofluorescence analysis, totipotent, undifferentiated ES cells did not show surface expression of CD44, although two transcripts of approximately 1.6 and 3.3 kb were detected on Northern blots. Following 1 week of differentiation in either suspension or substrate-attached cultures, CD44 appeared on the surface of some D3 cells, and synthesis of an additional 4.5 kb mRNA species was detected on Northern blots. At this stage, at least three distinct transcripts encoding CD44 variants were induced within the cultures, resulting from alternative splicing of additional exons in the variable domains of CD44. From PCR analysis, they all appeared to contain the variable exon v10, and two of them in addition contained v6. Taken together, these results suggest that CD44 may play a role in cell migration and adhesion in the early development of the mouse embryo. PMID:7542511

  20. Striking Diversity of vmp1, a Variable Gene Encoding a Putative Membrane Protein of the Stolbur Phytoplasma▿

    PubMed Central

    Cimerman, Agnès; Pacifico, Davide; Salar, Pascal; Marzachì, Cristina; Foissac, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Studies of phytoplasma-insect vector interactions and epidemiological surveys of plant yellows associated with the stolbur phytoplasma (StolP) require the identification of relevant candidate genes and typing markers. A recent StolP genome survey identified a partial coding sequence, SR01H10, having no homologue in the “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris” genome but sharing low similarity with a variable surface protein of animal mycoplasmas. The complete coding sequence and its genetic environment have been fully characterized by chromosome walking. The vmp1 gene encodes a protein of 557 amino acids predicted to possess a putative signal peptide and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The mature 57.8-kDa VMP1 protein is likely to be anchored in the phytoplasma membrane with a large N-terminal hydrophilic part exposed to the phytoplasma cell surface. Southern blotting experiments detected multiple sequences homologous to vmp1 in the genomes of nine StolP isolates. vmp1 is variable in size, and eight different vmp1 RsaI restriction fragment length polymorphism types could be distinguished among 12 StolP isolates. Comparison of vmp1 sequences revealed that insertions in largest forms of the gene encode an additional copy of a repeated domain of 81 amino acids, while variations in 11-bp repeats led to gene disruption in two StolP isolates. vmp1 appeared to be much more variable than three housekeeping genes involved in protein translation, maturation, and secretion and may therefore be involved in phytoplasma-host interactions. PMID:19270150

  1. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  2. A Novel Cell Surface-Anchored Cellulose-Binding Protein Encoded by the sca Gene Cluster of Ruminococcus flavefaciens▿

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Marco T.; Cepeljnik, Tadej; Martin, Jennifer C.; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Flint, Harry J.

    2007-01-01

    Ruminococcus flavefaciens produces a cellulosomal enzyme complex, based on the structural proteins ScaA, -B, and -C, that was recently shown to attach to the bacterial cell surface via the wall-anchored protein ScaE. ScaA, -B, -C, and -E are all cohesin-bearing proteins encoded by linked genes in the sca cluster. The product of an unknown open reading frame within the sca cluster, herein designated CttA, is similar in sequence at its C terminus to the corresponding region of ScaB, which contains an X module together with a dockerin sequence. The ScaB-XDoc dyad was shown previously to interact tenaciously with the cohesin of ScaE. Likewise, avid binding was confirmed between purified recombinant fragments of the CttA-XDoc dyad and the ScaE cohesin. In addition, the N-terminal regions of CttA were shown to bind to cellulose, thus suggesting that CttA is a cell wall-anchored, cellulose-binding protein. Proteomic analysis showed that the native CttA protein (∼130 kDa) corresponds to one of the three most abundant polypeptides binding tightly to insoluble cellulose in cellulose-grown R. flavefaciens 17 cultures. Interestingly, this protein was also detected among cellulose-bound proteins in the related strain R. flavefaciens 007C but not in a mutant derivative, 007S, that was previously shown to have lost the ability to grow on dewaxed cotton fibers. In R. flavefaciens, the presence of CttA on the cell surface is likely to provide an important mechanism for substrate binding, perhaps compensating for the absence of an identified cellulose-binding module in the major cellulosomal scaffolding proteins of this species. PMID:17468247

  3. A 38-Kilobase Pathogenicity Island Specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Encodes Cell Surface Proteins Expressed in the Host

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Janin; Strommenger, Birgit; Goethe, Ralph; Dohmann, Karen; Gerlach, Gerald-F.; Stevenson, Karen; Li, Ling-ling; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Bull, Tim J.

    2004-01-01

    We have used representational difference analysis to identify a novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific ABC transporter operon (mpt), which comprises six open reading frames designated mptA to -F and is immediately preceded by two putative Fur boxes. Functional genomics revealed that the mpt operon is flanked on one end by a fep cluster encoding proteins involved in the uptake of Fe3+ and on the other end by a sid cluster encoding non-ribosome-dependent heterocyclic siderophore synthases. Together these genes form a 38-kb M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific locus flanked by an insertion sequence similar to IS1110. Expression studies using Western blot analyses showed that MptC is present in the envelope fraction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The MptD protein was shown to be surface exposed, using a specific phage (fMptD) isolated from a phage-peptide library, by differential screening of Mycobacterium smegmatis transformants. The phage fMptD-derived peptide could be used in a peptide-mediated capture PCR with milk from infected dairy herds, thereby showing surface-exposed expression of the MptD protein in the host. Together, these data suggest that the 38-kb locus constitutes an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenicity island. PMID:14977927

  4. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hoc1, a Suppressor of Pkc1, Encodes a Putative Glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, A. M.; Mhaiskar, V.; Manus, V.; Galibert, F.; Dean, N.

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PKC1 encodes a protein kinase C isozyme that regulates cell wall synthesis. Here we describe the characterization of HOC1, a gene identified by its ability to suppress the cell lysis phenotype of pkc1-371 cells. The HOC1 gene (Homologous to OCH1) is predicted to encode a type II integral membrane protein that strongly resembles Och1p, an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase. Immunofluorescence studies localized Hoc1p to the Golgi apparatus. While overexpression of HOC1 rescued the pkc1-371 temperature-sensitive cell lysis phenotype, disruption of HOC1 lowered the restrictive temperature of the pkc1-371 allele. Disruption of HOC1 also resulted in hypersensitivity to Calcofluor White and hygromycin B, phenotypes characteristic of defects in cell wall integrity and protein glycosylation, respectively. The function of HOC1 appears to be distinct from that of OCH1. Taken together, these results suggest that HOC1 encodes a Golgi-localized putative mannosyltransferase required for the proper construction of the cell wall. PMID:9055074

  5. Identification by targeted differential display of an immediate early gene encoding a putative serine/threonine kinase.

    PubMed

    Donohue, P J; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Winkles, J A

    1995-04-28

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 mitogenic signal transduction is mediated in part by gene products that are specifically expressed in response to cell surface receptor binding and activation. We have used a targeted differential display method to identify FGF-1-inducible genes in murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Here we report that one of these genes is predicted to encode a novel serine/threonine-specific protein kinase. This putative kinase has been named Fnk, for FGF-inducible kinase. The deduced Fnk amino acid sequence has 49, 36, 33, 32, and 22% overall identity to mouse serum-inducible kinase (Snk), mouse polo-like kinase (Plk), Drosophila polo, Saccharomyces Cdc5, and mouse Snk/Plk-akin kinase (Sak), respectively. These proteins are all members of the polo subfamily of structurally related serine/threonine kinases. The Plk, polo, Cdc5, and Sak kinases are required for cell division. FGF-1 induction of Fnk mRNA expression is first detected at 30 min after mitogen addition, reflects transcriptional activation, and does not require de novo protein synthesis. FGF-2, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, calf serum, or phorbol myristate acetate treatment of quiescent cells also induces fnk gene expression. Fnk mRNA is expressed in vivo in a tissue-specific manner, with relatively high levels detected in newborn and adult mouse skin. These results indicate that Fnk may be a transiently expressed protein kinase involved in the early signaling events required for growth factor-stimulated cell cycle progression.

  6. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans unc-93 gene encodes a putative transmembrane protein that regulates muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    unc-93 is one of a set of five interacting genes involved in the regulation or coordination of muscle contraction in Caenorhabditis elegans. Rare altered-function alleles of unc-93 result in sluggish movement and a characteristic "rubber band" uncoordinated phenotype. By contrast, null alleles cause no visibly abnormal phenotype, presumably as a consequence of the functional redundancy of unc-93. To understand better the role of unc-93 in regulating muscle contraction, we have cloned and molecularly characterized this gene. We isolated transposon- insertion alleles and used them to identify the region of DNA encoding the unc-93 protein. Two unc-93 proteins differing at their NH2 termini are potentially encoded by transcripts that differ at their 5' ends. The putative unc-93 proteins are 700 and 705 amino acids in length and have two distinct regions: the NH2 terminal portion of 240 or 245 amino acids is extremely hydrophilic, whereas the rest of the protein has multiple potential membrane-spanning domains. The unc-93 transcripts are low in abundance and the unc-93 gene displays weak codon usage bias, suggesting that the unc-93 protein is relatively rare. The unc-93 protein has no sequence similarity to proteins listed in current data- bases. Thus, unc-93 is likely to encode a novel membrane-associated muscle protein. We discuss possible roles for the unc-93 protein either as a component of an ion transport system involved in excitation- contraction coupling in muscle or in coordinating muscle contraction between muscle cells by affecting the functioning of gap junctions. PMID:1313436

  8. The Pun1 gene for pungency in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Liu, Kede; Mazourek, Michael; Moore, Shanna L; Yoo, Eun Young; Kim, Byung-Dong; Paran, Ilan; Jahn, Molly M

    2005-06-01

    Pungency in Capsicum fruits is due to the accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs. The biosynthesis of capsaicin is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of an aromatic moiety, vanillylamine, by a branched-chain fatty acid. Many of the enzymes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis are not well characterized and the regulation of the pathway is not fully understood. Based on the current pathway model, candidate genes were identified in public databases and the literature, and genetically mapped. A published EST co-localized with the Pun1 locus which is required for the presence of capsaicinoids. This gene, AT3, has been isolated and its nucleotide sequence has been determined in an array of genotypes within the genus. AT3 showed significant similarity to acyltransferases in the BAHD superfamily. The recessive allele at this locus contains a deletion spanning the promoter and first exon of the predicted coding region in every non-pungent accession tested. Transcript and protein expression of AT3 was tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Virus-induced gene silencing of AT3 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of capsaicinoids, a phenotype consistent with pun1. In conclusion, gene mapping, allele sequence data, expression profile and silencing analysis collectively indicate that the Pun1 locus in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase, and the pun1 allele, used in pepper breeding for nearly 50 000 years, results from a large deletion at this locus.

  9. The adnAB locus, encoding a putative helicase-nuclease activity, is essential in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingli; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Chipot, Ludovic; Piotrowski, Emilie; Bertrand, Claire; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial mechanism that repairs a wide range of DNA lesions, including the most deleterious ones, double-strand breaks (DSBs). This multistep process is initiated by the resection of the broken DNA ends by a multisubunit helicase-nuclease complex exemplified by Escherichia coli RecBCD, Bacillus subtilis AddAB, and newly discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis AdnAB. Here we show that in Streptomyces, neither recBCD nor addAB homologues could be detected. The only putative helicase-nuclease-encoding genes identified were homologous to M. tuberculosis adnAB genes. These genes are conserved as a single copy in all sequenced genomes of Streptomyces. The disruption of adnAB in Streptomyces ambofaciens and Streptomyces coelicolor could not be achieved unless an ectopic copy was provided, indicating that adnAB is essential for growth. Both adnA and adnB genes were shown to be inducible in response to DNA damage (mitomycin C) and to be independently transcribed. Introduction of S. ambofaciens adnAB genes in an E. coli recB mutant restored viability and resistance to UV light, suggesting that Streptomyces AdnAB could be a functional homologue of RecBCD and be involved in DNA damage resistance.

  10. The adnAB Locus, Encoding a Putative Helicase-Nuclease Activity, Is Essential in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingli; Nguyen, Hoang Chuong; Chipot, Ludovic; Piotrowski, Emilie; Bertrand, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a crucial mechanism that repairs a wide range of DNA lesions, including the most deleterious ones, double-strand breaks (DSBs). This multistep process is initiated by the resection of the broken DNA ends by a multisubunit helicase-nuclease complex exemplified by Escherichia coli RecBCD, Bacillus subtilis AddAB, and newly discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis AdnAB. Here we show that in Streptomyces, neither recBCD nor addAB homologues could be detected. The only putative helicase-nuclease-encoding genes identified were homologous to M. tuberculosis adnAB genes. These genes are conserved as a single copy in all sequenced genomes of Streptomyces. The disruption of adnAB in Streptomyces ambofaciens and Streptomyces coelicolor could not be achieved unless an ectopic copy was provided, indicating that adnAB is essential for growth. Both adnA and adnB genes were shown to be inducible in response to DNA damage (mitomycin C) and to be independently transcribed. Introduction of S. ambofaciens adnAB genes in an E. coli recB mutant restored viability and resistance to UV light, suggesting that Streptomyces AdnAB could be a functional homologue of RecBCD and be involved in DNA damage resistance. PMID:24837284

  11. A novel strategy for obtaining kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter.

    PubMed

    Aufsatz, Werner; Nehlin, Lilian; Voronin, Viktor; Schmidt, Agnes; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2009-02-01

    The use of bacterial antibiotic resistance markers in transgenic plants raises concerns about horizontal gene transfer to soil bacteria. We report here that kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana can be achieved by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter, which presumably imports kanamycin into chloroplasts to interfere with ribosomal RNA. Homologs of the transporter exist in other plant species, suggesting this strategy may be generally useful for selecting transformed plant cells.

  12. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  13. Molecular analysis of region 1 of the Escherichia coli K5 antigen gene cluster: a region encoding proteins involved in cell surface expression of capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Pazzani, C; Rosenow, C; Boulnois, G J; Bronner, D; Jann, K; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of region 1 of the K5 antigen gene cluster of Escherichia coli was determined. This region is postulated to encode functions which, at least in part, participate in translocation of polysaccharide across the periplasmic space and onto the cell surface. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed five genes that encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 75.7, 60.5, 44, 43, and 27 kDa. The 27-kDa protein was 70.7% homologous to the CMP-2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid synthetase enzyme encoded by the E. coli kdsB gene, indicating the presence of a structural gene for a similar enzyme within the region 1 operon. The 43-kDa protein was homologous to both the Ctrb and BexC proteins encoded by the Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae capsule gene clusters, respectively, indicating common stages in the expression of capsules in these gram-negative bacteria. However, no homology was detected between the 75.7, 60.5-, and 44-kDa proteins and any of the proteins so far described for the H. influenzae and N. meningitidis capsule gene clusters. Images PMID:8397187

  14. Rice tungro spherical virus polyprotein processing: identification of a virus-encoded protease and mutational analysis of putative cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Thole, V; Hull, R

    1998-07-20

    Rice tungro spherical virus encodes a large polyprotein containing motifs with sequence similarity to viral serine-like proteases and RNA polymerases. Polyclonal antisera raised against domains of the putative protease and polymerase in fusion with glutathione S-transferase detected a protein of about 35 kDa and, in very low amounts, a protein of about 70 kDa, respectively, in extracts from infected plants. In in vitro transcription/translation systems and in Escherichia coli we demonstrated a proteolytic activity in the C-terminal region of the polyprotein. This protease rapidly cleaved its polyprotein precursors in vitro. Mutating a potential cleavage site located N-terminal to the protease domain, Gln2526-Asp2527, diminished processing. The transversion mutation at the putative C-terminal cleavage site of the protease, at Gln2852-Ala2853, led to a delayed and partial processing.

  15. Global negative regulation of Streptomyces coelicolor antibiotic synthesis mediated by an absA-encoded putative signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, P; Riggle, P J; Santos, R A; Champness, W C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomycete antibiotic synthesis is coupled to morphological differentiation such that antibiotics are produced as a colony sporulates. Streptomyces coelicolor produces several structurally and genetically distinct antibiotics. The S. coelicolor absA locus was defined by four UV-induced mutations that globally blocked antibiotic biosynthesis without blocking morphological differentiation. We show that the absA locus encodes a putative eubacterial two-component sensor kinase-response regulator system. All four mutations lie within a single open reading frame, designated absA1, which is predicted to encode a sensor histidine kinase. A second gene downstream of absA1, absA2, is predicted to encode the cognate response regulator. In marked contrast to the antibiotic-deficient phenotype of the previously described absA mutants, the phenotype caused by disruption mutations in the absA locus is precocious hyperproduction of the antibiotics actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. Precocious hyperproduction of these antibiotics is correlated with premature expression of XylE activity in a transcriptional fusion to an actinorhodin biosynthetic gene. We propose that the absA locus encodes a signal transduction mechanism that negatively regulates synthesis of the multiple antibiotics produced by S. coelicolor. PMID:8655502

  16. Large Putative PEST-like Sequence Motif at the Carboxyl Tail of Human Calcium Receptor Directs Lysosomal Degradation and Regulates Cell Surface Receptor Level*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Northup, John K.; Ray, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A deletion between amino acid residues Ser895 and Val1075 in the carboxyl terminus of the human calcium receptor (hCaR), which causes autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, showed enhanced signaling activity and increased cell surface expression in HEK293 cells (Lienhardt, A., Garabédian, M. G., Bai, M., Sinding, C., Zhang, Z., Lagarde, J. P., Boulesteix, J., Rigaud, M., Brown, E. M., and Kottler, M. L. (2000) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 85, 1695–1702). To identify the underlying mechanism(s) for these increases, we investigated the effects of carboxyl tail truncation and deletion in hCaR mutants using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging approaches to define motifs that participate in regulating cell surface numbers of this G protein-coupled receptor. Our data indicate a rapid constitutive receptor internalization of the cell surface hCaR, accumulating in early (Rab7 positive) and late endosomal (LAMP1 positive) sorting compartments, before targeting to lysosomes for degradation. Recycling of hCaR back to the cell surface was also evident. Truncation and deletion mapping defined a 51-amino acid sequence between residues 920 and 970 that is required for targeting to lysosomes and degradation but not for internalization or recycling of the receptor. No singular sequence motif was identified, instead the required sequence elements seem to distribute throughout this entire interval. This interval includes a high proportion of acidic and hydroxylated amino acid residues, suggesting a similarity to PEST-like degradation motif (PESTfind score of +10) and several glutamine repeats. The results define a novel large PEST-like sequence that participates in the sorting of internalized hCaR routed to the lysosomal/degradation pathway that regulates cell surface receptor numbers. PMID:22158862

  17. The genome of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus encodes putative homologs of RXR/Usp and EcR.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Manish; Minton, Russell L; Flowers, Sharita; Holloway, Anna; Morehead, Benjamin E; Paille, Julianne; Gissendanner, Chris R

    2010-05-15

    Ecdysteroid signaling is an important regulator of arthropod development and reproduction. However, the role of ecdysteroid signaling in another Ecdysozoan animal, the nematode, remains unclear. We report here the identification, cloning, and temporal expression of genes encoding putative homologs of the two nuclear receptor components of the ecdysone receptor, RXR/Usp (NR2B) and EcR (NR1H), in the nematode Pristionchus pacificus. The P. pacificus genes Ppa-pnhr-1 and Ppa-pnhr-2 encode nuclear receptors with strong sequence similarity to RXR/Usp and EcR, respectively. Maximum likelihood analysis incorporating both DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains places the two proteins in the NR2B and NR1H groups with strong bootstrap support. RT-PCR analysis reveals that both Ppa-pnhr-1 and Ppa-pnhr-2 are expressed during larval development and that Ppa-pnhr-1 expression oscillates with the molting cycle. The identification of a putative ecdysone receptor in a nematode amenable to genetic analysis provides a powerful system to investigate the function and evolution of ecdysone receptor signaling in the Nematoda.

  18. Albino midrib 1, encoding a putative potassium efflux antiporter, affects chloroplast development and drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Peike; Tan, Junjie; Jin, Mingna; Wu, Fuqing; Zhou, Kunneng; Ma, Weiwei; Heng, Yueqin; Wang, Jiulin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Zhijun; Liu, Linglong; Wang, Chunming; Liu, Xuanming; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-09-01

    Mutation of the AM1 gene causes an albino midrib phenotype and enhances tolerance to drought in rice K(+) efflux antiporter (KEA) genes encode putative potassium efflux antiporters that are mainly located in plastid-containing organisms, ranging from lower green algae to higher flowering plants. However, little genetic evidence has been provided on the functions of KEA in chloroplast development. In this study, we isolated a rice mutant, albino midrib 1 (am1), with green- and white-variegation in the first few leaves, and albino midrib phenotype in older tissues. We found that AM1 encoded a putative KEA in chloroplast. AM1 was highly expressed in leaves, while lowly in roots. Chloroplast gene expression and proteins accumulation were affected during chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis in am1 mutants. Interestingly, AM1 was induced by salt and PEG, and am1 showed enhanced sensitivity to salinity in seed germination and increased tolerance to drought. Taken together, we concluded that KEAs were involved in chloroplast development and played important roles in drought tolerance.

  19. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  20. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  1. Analysis of cDNA encoding the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) of Schistosoma mansoni; a putative target for chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, S P; McKerrow, J H; Newport, G R; Wang, C C

    1988-01-01

    Because of the lack of de novo purine biosynthesis, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) is a critical enzyme in the purine metabolic pathway of the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni. Using a cDNA clone encoding mouse HGPRTase and subsequently a synthetic oligonucleotide derived from sequencing a clone of genomic DNA, two clones were isolated from an adult schistosome cDNA library. One clone is 1.374 Kilobases (Kb) long and has an open reading frame of 693 bases. The deduced 231 amino acid sequence has 47.9% identity in a 217 amino acid overlap with human HGPRTase. Northern blot analysis indicates that the full length of mRNA for the S. mansoni HGPRTase is 1.45-1.6 Kb. Analysis of the primary structures of the putative active site for human and parasite enzymes reveal specific differences which may eventually be exploitable in the design of drugs for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Images PMID:3136439

  2. Cloning and expression of a gene from Streptomyces scabies encoding a putative pathogenicity factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bukhalid, R A; Loria, R

    1997-01-01

    We cloned a 9.4-kb DNA fragment from Streptomyces scabies ATCC 41973 that allows the nonpathogen Streptomyces lividans 66 TK24 to necrotize and colonize potato tuber slices and produce scab-like symptoms on potato minitubers. Deletion analysis demonstrated that activity was conferred by a 1.6-kb DNA region. Sequence analysis of a 2.4-kb DNA fragment spanning the DNA region necessary for activity revealed three open reading frames (ORFs). The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF1, designated ORFtnp, showed high levels of identity with the first 233 amino acids of the putative transposases of the IS1164 elements from Rhodococcus rhodochrous (71%) and Mycobacterium bovis (68%), members of the Staphylococcus aureus IS256 family of transposases. No significant homologies to ORF2 and ORF3 were found in the nucleic acid and protein databases. ORFtnp is located 5' of ORF3. ORF2 is incomplete and is located 3' of ORF3. Subcloning of the individual ORFs demonstrated that ORF3, designated nec1, is sufficient for necrotizing activity in S. lividans 66 TK24. S. lividans 66 TK24 expressing nec1 does not produce thaxtomin A but produces an unidentified extracellular water-soluble compound that causes necrosis on potato tuber discs. The G+C content of nec1 suggests that it has moved horizontally from another genus. Southern analysis of ORFtnp and nec1 demonstrate that these genes are physically linked in Streptomyces strains, including S. scabies and Streptomyces acidiscabies strains, that are pathogenic on potato and that produce the phytotoxin thaxtomin A. These data suggest that nec1 may have been mobilized into S. scabies through a transposition event mediated by ORFtnp. PMID:9401037

  3. The floral organ number4 gene encoding a putative ortholog of Arabidopsis CLAVATA3 regulates apical meristem size in rice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huangwei; Qian, Qian; Liang, Wanqi; Yin, Changsong; Tan, Hexin; Yao, Xuan; Yuan, Zheng; Yang, Jun; Huang, Hai; Luo, Da; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-11-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism regulating meristem development in the monocot rice (Oryza sativa), we describe here the isolation and characterization of three floral organ number4 (fon4) alleles and the cloning of the FON4 gene. The fon4 mutants showed abnormal enlargement of the embryonic and vegetative shoot apical meristems (SAMs) and the inflorescence and floral meristems. Likely due to enlarged SAMs, fon4 mutants produced thick culms (stems) and increased numbers of both primary rachis branches and floral organs. We identified FON4 using a map-based cloning approach and found it encodes a small putatively secreted protein, which is the putative ortholog of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA3 (CLV3) gene. FON4 transcripts mainly accumulated in the small group of cells at the apex of the SAMs, whereas the rice ortholog of CLV1 (FON1) is expressed throughout the SAMs, suggesting that the putative FON4 ligand might be sequestered as a possible mechanism for rice meristem regulation. Exogenous application of the peptides FON4p and CLV3p corresponding to the CLV3/ESR-related (CLE) motifs of FON4 and CLV3, respectively, resulted in termination of SAMs in rice, and treatment with CLV3p caused consumption of both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLV pathway in limiting meristem size is conserved in both rice and Arabidopsis. However, exogenous FON4p did not have an obvious effect on limiting both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLE motifs of Arabidopsis CLV3 and FON4 are potentially functionally divergent.

  4. A Friend virus mutant that overcomes Fv-2rr host resistance encodes a small glycoprotein that dimerizes, is processed to cell surfaces, and specifically activates erythropoietin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Hoatlin, M E; Ferro, F E; Majumdar, M K; Geib, R W; Fox, M T; Kabat, D

    1993-01-01

    The env gene of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) encodes a membrane glycoprotein (gp55) that is inefficiently (3 to 5%) processed from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to form a larger dimeric plasma membrane derivative (gp55p). Moreover, the SFFV env glycoprotein associates with erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to cause proliferation of infected erythroblasts [J.-P. Li, A. D. D'Andrea, H. F. Lodish, and D. Baltimore, Nature (London) 343:762-764, 1990]. Interestingly, the mitogenic effect of SFFV is blocked in mice homozygous for the Fv-2r resistance gene, but mutant SFFVs can overcome this resistance. Recent evidence suggested that these mutants contain partial env deletions that truncate the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of the encoded glycoproteins (M. H. Majumdar, C.-L. Cho, M. T. Fox, K. L. Eckner, S. Kozak, D. Kabat, and R. W. Geib, J. Virol. 66:3652-3660, 1992). Mutant BB6, which encodes a gp42 glycoprotein that has a large deletion in this domain, causes erythroblastosis in DBA/2 (Fv-2s) as well as in congenic D2.R (Fv-2r) mice. Analogous to gp55, gp42 is processed inefficiently as a disulfide-bonded dimer to form cell surface gp42p. Retroviral vectors with SFFV and BB6 env genes have no effect on interleukin 3-dependent BaF3 hematopoietic cells, but they cause growth factor independency of BaF3/EpoR cells, a derivative that contains recombinant EpoR. After binding 125I-Epo to surface EpoR on these factor-independent cells and adding the covalent cross-linking reagent disuccinimidyl suberate, complexes that had immunological properties and sizes demonstrating that they consisted of 125I-Epo-gp55p and 125I-Epo-gp42p were isolated from cell lysates. Contrary to a previous report, SFFV or BB6 env glycoproteins did not promiscuously activate other members of the EpoR superfamily. Although the related env glycoproteins encoded by dualtropic murine leukemia viruses formed detectable complexes with EpoR, strong mitogenic signalling did not ensue

  5. CaPrx, a Coffea arabica gene encoding a putative class III peroxidase induced by root-knot nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Severino, Fábio E; Brandalise, Marcos; Costa, Carolina S; Wilcken, Sílvia R S; Maluf, Mirian P; Gonçalves, Wallace; Maia, Ivan G

    2012-08-01

    Class III peroxidases (Prxs) are enzymes involved in a multitude of physiological and stress-related processes in plants. Here, we report on the characterization of a putative peroxidase-encoding gene from Coffea arabica (CaPrx) that is expressed in early stages of root-knot nematode (RKN) infection. CaPrx showed enhanced expression in coffee roots inoculated with RKN (at 12 h post-inoculation), but no significant difference in expression was observed between susceptible and resistant plants. Assays using transgenic tobacco plants harboring a promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion revealed that the CaPrx promoter was exclusively active in the galls induced by RKN. In cross sections of galls, GUS staining was predominantly localized in giant cells. Up-regulation of GUS expression in roots of transgenic plants following RKN inoculation was observed within 16 h. Moreover, no increase in GUS expression after treatment with jasmonic acid was detected. Altogether, these results point to a putative role of this peroxidase in the general coffee response to RKN infection.

  6. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding a Putative Lysophosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase from Seeds of Paeonia rockii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Niu, Li-Xin; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Bai, Zhang-Zhen; Duan, Ke; Gao, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yan-Long

    2017-06-01

    Tree peony (Paeonia section Moutan DC.) is an excellent woody oil crop, and the cloning and functional analysis of genes related to fatty acid (FA) metabolism from this organism has not been reported. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to phosphatidic acid (PA), catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. This project reports a putative lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase gene PrLPAAT1 isolated from Paeonia rockii. Our data indicated that PrLPAAT1 has 1047 nucleotides and encodes a putative 38.8 kDa protein with 348 amino acid residues. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that PrLPAAT1 contains two transmembrane domains (TMDs). Subcellular localization analysis confirmed that PrLPAAT1 is a plasma membrane protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PrLPAAT1 shared 74.3 and 65.5% amino acid sequence identities with the LPAAT1 sequences from columbine and grape, respectively. PrLPAAT1 belongs to AGPAT family, and may have acyltransferase activity. PrLPAAT1 was ubiquitously expressed in diverse tissues, and PrLPAAT1 expression was higher in the flower and developing seed. PrLPAAT1 is probably an important component in the FA accumulation process, especially during the early stages of seed development. PrLPAAT1 overexpression using a seed-specific promoter increased total FA content and the main FA accumulation in Arabidopsis transgenic plants.

  7. Molecular characterization of the PEL1 gene encoding a putative phosphatidylserine synthase.

    PubMed

    Janitor, M; Jarosch, E; Schweyen, R J; Subík, J

    1995-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the PEL1 gene is essential for the viability of rho-/rhoo petite mutants, and its mutation in respiring cells results in a pleiotropic phenotype. Results of complementation analysis with different subclones of chromosomal DNA and re-sequencing of the YCL4w-YCL3w segment of chromsome III demonstrate that the coding region of the PEL1 gene corresponds to 1467 bp. The size of the PEL1 transcript in Northern blot analysis was estimated to be approximately 1.5 kb. Transcription initiation in wild-type cells was found to occur at the position -9 relative to the ATG. The PEL1 gene was moderately expressed irrespective of the state of the mitochondrial genome and the nature of the carbon sources. Disruption of the PEL1 gene was not lethal and resulted in the same phenotype as observed with the pel1 mutant, i.e. the cells were not able to survive ethidium bromide mutagenesis, were thermosensitive for growth on glucose at 37 degrees C and failed to grow on minimal glycerol medium. Although the Pel1 protein exhibits significant similarity to a family of phosphatidylserine synthases, the disrupted PEL1 gene was not complemented by the multicopy plasmid-borne CHO1 gene encoding an essential yeast phosphatidylserine synthase.

  8. The Novel Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Gene MFSD8 Encodes a Putative Lysosomal Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Siintola, Eija ; Topcu, Meral ; Aula, Nina ; Lohi, Hannes ; Minassian, Berge A. ; Paterson, Andrew D. ; Liu, Xiao-Qing ; Wilson, Callum ; Lahtinen, Ulla ; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa ; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina 

    2007-01-01

    The late-infantile–onset forms are the most genetically heterogeneous group among the autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorders, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The Turkish variant was initially considered to be a distinct genetic entity, with clinical presentation similar to that of other forms of late-infantile–onset NCL (LINCL), including age at onset from 2 to 7 years, epileptic seizures, psychomotor deterioration, myoclonus, loss of vision, and premature death. However, Turkish variant LINCL was recently found to be genetically heterogeneous, because mutations in two genes, CLN6 and CLN8, were identified to underlie the disease phenotype in a subset of patients. After a genomewide scan with single-nucleotide–polymorphism markers and homozygosity mapping in nine Turkish families and one Indian family, not linked to any of the known NCL loci, we mapped a novel variant LINCL locus to chromosome 4q28.1-q28.2 in five families. We identified six different mutations in the MFSD8 gene (previously denoted “MGC33302”), which encodes a novel polytopic 518–amino acid membrane protein that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of transporter proteins. MFSD8 is expressed ubiquitously, with several alternatively spliced variants. Like the majority of the previously identified NCL proteins, MFSD8 localizes mainly to the lysosomal compartment. However, the function of MFSD8 remains to be elucidated. Analysis of the genome-scan data suggests the existence of at least three more genes in the remaining five families, further corroborating the great genetic heterogeneity of LINCLs. PMID:17564970

  9. Identification of a gene sequence encoding a putative pyruvate oxidoreductase in Serpulina pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Rayment, S J; Lee, B J; Hampson, D J; Livesley, M A

    1998-09-01

    Serpulina pilosicoli is a recently described species of intestinal spirochaete which can be identified using a species-specific monoclonal antibody BJL/AC1 reactive with a 29-kDa protein located in the cell envelope. A genomic library of the type strain of S. pilosicoli P43/6/78T was created in lambda zap express and screened using BJL/AC1. Single positive clones were isolated and excised into the phagemid vector pBK-CMV. Phagemid DNA was purified and a single clone was selected for sequencing. The size of spirochaetal DNA insert was determined by digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI and PstI as being approximately 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the protein with which the antibody reacted was determined by cycle sequencing. The insert contained an open reading frame of 285 nucleotides. Translation of the nucleotide sequence into amino acid (aa) residues showed a sequence of 275 aa. Comparison of this sequence with databases revealed homology to pyruvate oxidoreductases from various organisms found in the gastroinestinal tract. These included the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) alpha submit of Helicobacter pylori (38.8% identity in 250 aa), pyruvate-flavodoxin oxidoreductase of Escherichia coli (28.7% identify in 258 aa) and Giardia intestinalis (25.1% identity in 251 aa). A significant level of homology was also observed with hyperthermophilic bacteria such as the POR of Thermatoga maritima (38.6% in 254 aa) and the 2-ketovalerate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of Pyrococcus furiosus (34% in 262 aa).

  10. Molecular cloning of a putative gene encoding isopentenyltransferase from pingyitiancha (Malus hupehensis) and characterization of its response to nitrate.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Peng, Futian; Zhu, Chunfu; Wei, Shaochong

    2008-06-01

    A putative isopentenyltransferase (IPT) encoding gene was identified from a pingyitiancha (Malus hupehensis Rehd.) expressed sequence tag database, and the full-length gene was cloned by RACE. Based on expression profile and sequence alignment, the nucleotide sequence of the clone, named MhIPT3, was most similar to AtIPT3, an IPT gene in Arabidopsis. The full-length cDNA contained a 963-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 321 amino acids with a molecular mass of 37.3 kDa. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA revealed the absence of introns in the frame. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that the gene was expressed in roots, stems and leaves. Application of nitrate to roots of nitrogen-deprived seedlings strongly induced expression of MhIPT3 and was accompanied by the accumulation of cytokinins, whereas MhIPT3 expression was little affected by ammonium application to roots of nitrogen-deprived seedlings. Application of nitrate to leaves also up-regulated the expression of MhIPT3 and corresponded closely with the accumulation of isopentyladenine and isopentyladenosine in leaves.

  11. Characterization and Expression of DNA Sequences Encoding Putative Type-II Metallothioneins in the Seagrass Posidonia oceanica1

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Tommaso; Natali, Lucia; Maserti, Bianca Elena; Taddei, Sonia; Cavallini, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is a marine phanerogam, largely widespread in the Mediterranean sea, representing an important food substrate for many marine organisms. A progressive reduction of P. oceanica meadows has been reported, due to anthropogenic coastal activity. Studying mechanisms by which this species responds to environmental stresses, three DNA sequences putatively encoding metallothioneins (MTs) have been isolated, by PCR. Two sequences, Pomt2a (accession no. AJ249603) and Pomt2b (accession no. AJ249602), show high similarities with genes encoding type-II MTs and are interrupted by two and one intron, respectively. The third sequence, Pomt2c (accession no. AJ249604), is supposed to be a pseudogene, originated by retrotranscription of the Pomt2b mRNA. These sequences belong to a multigene family with at least five members. Northern hybridizations indicated that MT transcripts accumulation is constitutive and seasonally regulated. MT encoding RNAs increase after rhyzome harvesting and (at a lesser extent) after 15 d of cultivation in an aquarium. As for animal MTs, transcripts accumulation is observed also after exposure to trace metals such as copper and cadmium. In the case of copper, the effect depends on concentration. Finally, taking into consideration the great interest in studying the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the Mediterranean basin and since P. oceanica is commonly considered a bioindicator of this metal, the effect of mercury treatments on the accumulation of MT transcripts has been analyzed: in only a few experiments a small increase in the level of transcripts was recorded, suggesting that MTs are not key elements in the mercury accumulation by this species. PMID:10938373

  12. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding equine infectious anemia virus tat and putative Rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R M; Derse, D; Rice, N R

    1990-01-01

    We isolated and characterized six cDNA clones from an equine infectious anemia virus-infected cell line that displays a Rev-defective phenotype. With the exception of one splice site in one of the clones, all six cDNAs exhibited the same splicing pattern and consisted of four exons. Exon 1 contained the 5' end of the genome; exon 2 contained the tat gene from mid-genome; exon 3 consisted of a small section of env, near the 5' end of the env gene; and exon 4 contained the putative rev open reading frame from the 3' end of the genome. The structures of the cDNAs predict a bicistronic message in which Tat is encoded by exons 1 and 2 and the presumptive Rev protein is encoded by exons 3 and 4. tat translation appears to be initiated at a non-AUG codon within the first 15 codons of exon 1. Equine infectious anemia virus-specific tat activity was expressed in transient transfections with cDNA expression plasmids. The predicted wild-type Rev protein contains 30 env-derived amino acids and 135 rev open reading frame residues. All of the cDNAs had a frameshift in exon 4, leading to a truncated protein and thus providing a plausible explanation for the Rev-defective phenotype of the original cells. We used peptide antisera to detect the faulty protein, thus confirming the cDNA sequence, and to detect the normal protein in productively infected cells. Images PMID:2164593

  13. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, encoding a putative N-acetylglucosamine transferase, is involved in cell wall architecture and virulence.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity.

  14. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, Encoding a Putative N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase, Is Involved in Cell Wall Architecture and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M. Isabel G.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity. PMID:24416097

  15. Cloning of the Gene Encoding a 22-Kilodalton Cell Surface Antigen of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Analysis of Its Potential for DNA Vaccination against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Philippe; Denis, Olivier; De Wit, Lucas; Tanghe, Audrey; Vandenbussche, Paul; Content, Jean; Huygen, Kris

    2000-01-01

    Using spleen cells from mice vaccinated with live Mycobacterium bovis BCG, we previously generated three monoclonal antibodies reactive against a 22-kDa protein present in mycobacterial culture filtrate (CF) (K. Huygen et al., Infect. Immun. 61:2687–2693, 1993). These monoclonal antibodies were used to screen an M. bovis BCG genomic library made in phage λgt11. The gene encoding a 233-amino-acid (aa) protein, including a putative 26-aa signal sequence, was isolated, and sequence analysis indicated that the protein was 98% identical with the M. tuberculosis Lppx protein and that it contained a sequence 94% identical with the M. leprae 38-mer polypeptide 13B3 recognized by T cells from killed M. leprae-immunized subjects. Flow cytometry and cell fractionation demonstrated that the 22-kDa CF protein is also highly expressed in the bacterial cell wall and membrane compartment but not in the cytosol. C57BL/6, C3H, and BALB/c mice were vaccinated with plasmid DNA encoding the 22-kDa protein and analyzed for immune response and protection against intravenous M. tuberculosis challenge. Whereas DNA vaccination induced elevated antibody responses in C57BL/6 and particularly in C3H mice, Th1-type cytokine response, as measured by interleukin-2 and gamma interferon secretion, was only modest, and no protection against intravenous M. tuberculosis challenge was observed in any of the three mouse strains tested. Therefore, the 22-kDa antigen seems to have little potential for a DNA vaccine against tuberculosis, but it may be a good candidate for a mycobacterial antigen detection test. PMID:10678905

  16. Functional characterization of three genes encoding putative oxidoreductases required for cercosporin toxin biosynthesis in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Qin; Lee, Miin-Huey; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-08-01

    Cercosporin is a non-host-selective, photoactivated polyketide toxin produced by many phytopathogenic Cercospora species, which plays a crucial role during pathogenesis on host plants. Upon illumination, cercosporin converts oxygen molecules to toxic superoxide and singlet oxygen that damage various cellular components and induce lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage. Three genes (CTB5, CTB6 and CTB7) encoding putative FAD/FMN- or NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases in the cercosporin toxin biosynthetic pathway of C. nicotianae were functionally analysed. Replacement of each gene via double recombination was utilized to create null mutant strains that were completely impaired in cercosporin production as a consequence of specific interruption at the CTB5, CTB6 or CTB7 locus. Expression of CTB1, CTB5, CTB6, CTB7 and CTB8 was drastically reduced or nearly abolished when CTB5, CTB6 or CTB7 was disrupted. Production of cercosporin was revived when a functional gene cassette was introduced into the respective mutants. All ctb5, ctb6 and ctb7 null mutants retained wild-type levels of resistance against toxicity of cercosporin or singlet-oxygen-generating compounds, indicating that none of the genes plays a role in self-protection.

  17. Characterization of CsSEF1 gene encoding putative CCCH-type zinc finger protein expressed during cucumber somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Agnieszka; Wisniewska, Anita; Tagashira, Norikazu; Malepszy, Stefan; Filipecki, Marcin

    2009-02-15

    Somatic embryos obtained in vitro are a form of vegetative reproduction that can be used in artificial seed technology, as well as a model to study the principles of plant development. In order to isolate the genes involved in somatic embryogenesis of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), we utilized the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). One of the obtained sequences was the CsSEF1 clone (Cucumis sativus Somatic Embryogenesis Zinc Finger 1), with a level of expression that sharply increased with the induction of embryogenesis. The full length cDNA of CsSEF1 encodes the putative 307 amino acid long protein containing three zinc finger motifs, two with CCCH and one with the atypical CHCH pattern. The CsSEF1 protein shows significant similarity to other proteins from plants, in which the zinc fingers arrangement and patterns are very similar. Transcripts of CsSEF1 were localized in the apical part of somatic embryos, starting as early as the polarity was visible and in later developmental stages marking the cotyledon primordia and procambium tissues. As a result of transferring an antisense fragment of CsSEF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana abnormalities in zygotic embryos and also in cotyledons and root development were observed.

  18. Isolation and promoter analysis of anther-specific genes encoding putative arabinogalactan proteins in Malus x domestica.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Sunggil; Yoon, Gi-Bo; Kim, Hyojeong; Lee, Young-Pyo; Yu, Gyung-Hee; Hyung, Nam-In; Sung, Soon-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we searched for anther-specific genes involved in male gametophyte development in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh. cv. Fuji) by differential display-PCR. Three full-length cDNAs were isolated, and the corresponding genomic sequences were determined by genome walking. The identified genes showed intronless 228- to 264-bp open reading frames and shared 82-90% nucleotide sequence. Sequence analysis identified that they encoded a putative arabinogalactan protein (AGP) and were designated MdAGP1, MdAGP2, and MdAGP3, respectively. RT (reverse transcriptase)-PCR revealed that the MdAGP genes were selectively expressed in the stamen. Promoter analysis confirmed that the MdAGP3 promoter was capable of directing anther- or pollen-specific expression of the GUS reporter in tobacco and apple. Furthermore, expression of ribosome-inactivating protein under the control of the MdAGP3 promoter induced complete sporophytic male sterility as we had expected.

  19. The choC gene encoding a putative phospholipid methyltransferase is essential for growth and development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Gao, Na; Chen, Sanfeng; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) are a class of major cell membrane phospholipids that participate in many physiological processes. Three genes, choA, choB and choC, have been proposed to function in the endogenous biosynthesis of PC in Aspergillus nidulans. In this study, we characterize the choC gene encoding a putative highly conserved phospholipid methyltransferase. The previously reported choC3 mutant allele results from a mutation leading to the E177K amino acid substitution. The transcript of choC accumulates at high levels during vegetative growth and early asexual developmental phases. The deletion of choC causes severe impairment of vegetative growth, swelling of hyphal tips and the lack of both asexual and sexual development, suggesting the requirement of ChoC and PC in growth and development. Noticeably, supplementation of the mutant with the penultimate precursor of PC N, N-dimethylaminoethanol leads to full recovery of vegetative growth, but incomplete progression of asexual and sexual development, implying differential roles of PC and its intermediates in fungal growth and development. Importantly, while the choC deletion mutant shows reduced vegetative growth and precocious cell death until day 4, it regains hyphal proliferation and cell viability from day 5, indicating the presence of an alternative route for cellular membrane function in A. nidulans.

  20. Molecular and functional characterization of cDNAs putatively encoding carboxylesterases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1), representing three different clades (A, D and E), were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin) increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species.

  1. A Putatively Functional Haplotype in the Gene Encoding Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Markus A.; Brockmoeller, Juergen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Virsik, Patricia; Wilken, Barbara; Kuehnle, Elna; Campean, Radu; Hoffmann, Arne O.; Mueller, Katarina; Goetze, Robert G.; Neumann, Michael; Janke, Joerg H.; Nasser, Fatima; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Hille, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether genetic variability in TGFB1 is related to circulating transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) plasma concentrations after radiotherapy and to radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells. Patients and Methods: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 plasma concentrations (n = 79) were measured in patients 1 year after radiotherapy and chromosomal aberrations (n = 71) ex vivo before therapy start. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 secretion and apoptosis were measured in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 55 healthy volunteers. These phenotypes were analyzed in relation to five germline polymorphisms in the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene. Because of high linkage disequilibrium, these five polymorphisms reflect frequent genetic variation in this region. A presumed impact of TGF-{beta}1 on DNA damage or repair was measured as micronucleus formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results: We identified a hypofunctional genetic haplotype termed H3 tagging the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene encoding TGF-{beta}1. H3 was associated with lower TGF-{beta}1 plasma concentrations in patients (p = 0.01) and reduced TGF-{beta}1 secretion in irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p = 0.003). Furthermore, cells with H3 were less prone to induction of chromosomal aberrations (p = 0.001) and apoptosis (p = 0.003) by irradiation. The hypothesis that high TGF-{beta}1 could sensitize cells to DNA damage was further supported by increased micronuclei formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines when preincubated with TGF-{beta}1 before irradiation (p = 0.04). Conclusions: On the basis of TGF-{beta}1 plasma levels and radiation sensitivity of lymphoid cells, this study revealed a putatively hypofunctional TGFB1 haplotype. The significance of this haplotype and the suggested link between TGF-{beta}1 function and DNA integrity should be further explored in other cell types, as well as other experimental and clinical conditions.

  2. Alternative splicing produces two transcripts encoding putative female-biased odorant receptors in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect odorant receptors are key sensors of environmental odors, and members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily are thought to play important roles in mate finding, and oviposition site location. Much research has been done to identify putative pheromone receptors in lepidopteran male...

  3. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor.

  4. Trehalose synthesis genes are controlled by the putative sigma factor encoded by rpoS and are involved in stationary-phase thermotolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge-Aronis, R; Klein, W; Lange, R; Rimmele, M; Boos, W

    1991-01-01

    The rpoS (katF) gene of Escherichia coli encodes a putative sigma factor (sigma S) required for the expression of a variety of stationary phase-induced genes, for the development of stationary-phase stress resistance, and for long-term starvation survival (R. Lange and R. Hengge-Aronis, Mol. Microbiol. 5:49-59, 1991). Here we show that the genes otsA, otsB, treA, and osmB, previously known to be osmotically regulated, are also induced during transition into stationary phase in a sigma S-dependent manner. otsA and otsB, which encode trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, respectively, are involved in sigma S-dependent stationary-phase thermotolerance. Neither sigma S nor trehalose, however, is required for the development of adaptive thermotolerance in growing cells, which might be controlled by sigma E. PMID:1744047

  5. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-09-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor. PMID:26092458

  7. Tn5563, a transposon encoding putative mercuric ion transport proteins located on plasmid pRA2 of Pseudomonas alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C C; Tham, J M; Kwong, S M; Yiin, S; Poh, C L

    1998-08-15

    Sequence analysis of pRA2, an endogenous 33-kb plasmid from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 (strain P25X), revealed the presence of a 6256-bp transposon of the Tn3 family, designated Tn5563. Tn5563, which is flanked by two 39-bp inverted repeats, encodes a transposase, a resolvase, and two open reading frames which share amino acid sequence similarities with the mercuric ion transport proteins MerT and MerP encoded by several mer operons. However, no other mer operon genes were found on Tn5563. Sequencing of a RP4::XIn hybrid plasmid indicates possible interactions between pRA2 and the P25X chromosome mediated by Tn5563.

  8. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  9. BcMF8, a putative arabinogalactan protein-encoding gene, contributes to pollen wall development, aperture formation and pollen tube growth in Brassica campestris

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sue; Dong, Heng; Zhang, Fang; Qiu, Lin; Wang, Fangzhan; Cao, Jiashu; Huang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The arabinogalactan protein (AGP) gene family is involved in plant reproduction. However, little is known about the function of individual AGP genes in pollen development and pollen tube growth. In this study, Brassica campestris male fertility 8 (BcMF8), a putative AGP-encoding gene previously found to be pollen specific in Chinese cabbage (B. campestris ssp. chinensis), was investigated. Methods Real-time reverse transcription–PCR and in situ hybridization were used to analyse the expression pattern of BcMF8 in pistils. Prokaryotic expression and western blots were used to ensure that BcMF8 could encode a protein. Antisense RNA technology was applied to silence gene expression, and morphological and cytological approaches (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) were used to reveal abnormal phenotypes caused by gene silencing. Key Results The BcMF8 gene encoded a putative AGP protein that was located in the cell wall, and was expressed in pollen grains and pollen tubes. The functional interruption of BcMF8 by antisense RNA technology resulted in slipper-shaped and bilaterally sunken pollen with abnormal intine development and aperture formation. The inhibition of BcMF8 led to a decrease in the percentage of in vitro pollen germination. In pollen that did germinate, the pollen tubes were unstable, abnormally shaped and burst more frequently relative to controls, which corresponded to an in vivo arrest of pollen germination at the stigma surface and retarded pollen tube growth in the stylar transmitting tissues. Conclusions The phenotypic defects of antisense BcMF8 RNA lines (bcmf8) suggest a crucial function of BcMF8 in modulating the physical nature of the pollen wall and in helping in maintaining the integrity of the pollen tube wall matrix. PMID:24489019

  10. BcMF8, a putative arabinogalactan protein-encoding gene, contributes to pollen wall development, aperture formation and pollen tube growth in Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sue; Dong, Heng; Zhang, Fang; Qiu, Lin; Wang, Fangzhan; Cao, Jiashu; Huang, Li

    2014-04-01

    The arabinogalactan protein (AGP) gene family is involved in plant reproduction. However, little is known about the function of individual AGP genes in pollen development and pollen tube growth. In this study, Brassica campestris male fertility 8 (BcMF8), a putative AGP-encoding gene previously found to be pollen specific in Chinese cabbage (B. campestris ssp. chinensis), was investigated. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization were used to analyse the expression pattern of BcMF8 in pistils. Prokaryotic expression and western blots were used to ensure that BcMF8 could encode a protein. Antisense RNA technology was applied to silence gene expression, and morphological and cytological approaches (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) were used to reveal abnormal phenotypes caused by gene silencing. The BcMF8 gene encoded a putative AGP protein that was located in the cell wall, and was expressed in pollen grains and pollen tubes. The functional interruption of BcMF8 by antisense RNA technology resulted in slipper-shaped and bilaterally sunken pollen with abnormal intine development and aperture formation. The inhibition of BcMF8 led to a decrease in the percentage of in vitro pollen germination. In pollen that did germinate, the pollen tubes were unstable, abnormally shaped and burst more frequently relative to controls, which corresponded to an in vivo arrest of pollen germination at the stigma surface and retarded pollen tube growth in the stylar transmitting tissues. The phenotypic defects of antisense BcMF8 RNA lines (bcmf8) suggest a crucial function of BcMF8 in modulating the physical nature of the pollen wall and in helping in maintaining the integrity of the pollen tube wall matrix.

  11. Distribution of genes encoding putative virulence factors and fragment length polymorphisms in the vrrA gene among Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Viviane; Cabral, Diana Aparecida; Régua-Mangia, Adriana Hamond; Rabinovitch, Leon; Moreau, Gaétan; McIntosh, Douglas

    2005-12-01

    One hundred twenty-one strains of the Bacillus cereus complex, of which 80 were isolated from a variety of sources in Brazil, were screened by PCR for the presence of sequences (bceT, hblA, nheBC, plc, sph, and vip3A) encoding putative virulence factors and for polymorphisms in variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR), using a variable region of the vrrA open reading frame as the target. Amplicons were generated from isolates of B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis for each of the sequences encoding factors suggested to play a role in infections of mammals. Intriguingly, the majority of these sequences were detected more frequently in Bacillus thuringiensis than in B. cereus. The vip3A sequence, which encodes an insecticidal toxin, was detected exclusively in B. thuringiensis. VNTR analysis demonstrated the presence of five different fragment length categories in both species, with two of these being widely distributed throughout both taxa. In common with data generated from previous studies examining European, Asian, or North American populations, our investigation of Brazilian isolates supports the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered to represent a single species.

  12. Evolution of Pleopsidium (lichenized Ascomycota) S943 group I introns and the phylogeography of an intron-encoded putative homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Valérie; Haugen, Peik; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lutzoni, François

    2007-03-01

    The sporadic distribution of nuclear group I introns among different fungal lineages can be explained by vertical inheritance of the introns followed by successive losses, or horizontal transfers from one lineage to another through intron homing or reverse splicing. Homing is mediated by an intron-encoded homing endonuclease (HE) and recent studies suggest that the introns and their associated HE gene (HEG) follow a recurrent cyclical model of invasion, degeneration, loss, and reinvasion. The purpose of this study was to compare this model to the evolution of HEGs found in the group I intron at position S943 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA of the lichen-forming fungus Pleopsidium. Forty-eight S943 introns were found in the 64 Pleopsidium samples from a worldwide screen, 22 of which contained a full-length HEG that encodes a putative 256-amino acid HE, and 2 contained HE pseudogenes. The HEGs are divided into two closely related types (as are the introns that encode them) that differ by 22.6% in their nucleotide sequences. The evolution of the Pleopsidium intron-HEG element shows strong evidence for a cyclical model of evolution. The intron was likely acquired twice in the genus and then transmitted via two or three interspecific horizontal transfers. Close geographical proximity plays an important role in intron-HEG horizontal transfer because most of these mobile elements were found in Europe. Once acquired in a lineage, the intron-HEG element was also vertically transmitted, and occasionally degenerated or was lost.

  13. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  14. Gene ercA, encoding a putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase, is involved in regulation of ethanol utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Niels; Görisch, Helmut; Mern, Demissew S

    2013-09-01

    Several two-component regulatory systems are known to be involved in the signal transduction pathway of the ethanol oxidation system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 17933. These sensor kinases and response regulators are organized in a hierarchical manner. In addition, a cytoplasmic putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (Fe-ADH) encoded by ercA (PA1991) has been identified to play an essential role in this regulatory network. The gene ercA (PA1991) is located next to ercS, which encodes a sensor kinase. Inactivation of ercA (PA1991) by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette created mutant NH1. NH1 showed poor growth on various alcohols. On ethanol, NH1 grew only with an extremely extended lag phase. During the induction period on ethanol, transcription of structural genes exa and pqqABCDEH, encoding components of initial ethanol oxidation in P. aeruginosa, was drastically reduced in NH1, which indicates the regulatory function of ercA (PA1991). However, transcription in the extremely delayed logarithmic growth phase was comparable to that in the wild type. To date, the involvement of an Fe-ADH in signal transduction processes has not been reported.

  15. The putative ABC transporter encoded by the orf19.4531 plays a role in the sensitivity of Candida albicans cells to azole antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linghuo; Xu, Dayong; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Yongbing; Gao, Pinghui; Jiang, Yuanying

    2016-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a large superfamily of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, there are 28 genes encoding ABC transporters and many of them have not been characterized so far. The orf19.4531 (also known as IPF7530) encodes a putative ABC transporter. In this study, we have demonstrated that disruption of orf19.4531 causes C. albicans cells to become tolerant to azoles, but not to polyene antifungals and terbinafine. Therefore, the protein encoded by orf19.4531 is involved in azole sensitivity and we name it as ROA1, the regulator of azole sensitivity 1 gene. Consistently, we show that the expression of ROA1 is responsive to treatment of either fluconazole or ketoconazole inC. albicans In addition, through a GFP tagging approach, Roa1 is localized in a small punctuate compartment adjacent to the vacuolar membrane. However, ROA1 is not essential for the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans cells. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Gene ercA, Encoding a Putative Iron-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Is Involved in Regulation of Ethanol Utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Niels; Görisch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Several two-component regulatory systems are known to be involved in the signal transduction pathway of the ethanol oxidation system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 17933. These sensor kinases and response regulators are organized in a hierarchical manner. In addition, a cytoplasmic putative iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (Fe-ADH) encoded by ercA (PA1991) has been identified to play an essential role in this regulatory network. The gene ercA (PA1991) is located next to ercS, which encodes a sensor kinase. Inactivation of ercA (PA1991) by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette created mutant NH1. NH1 showed poor growth on various alcohols. On ethanol, NH1 grew only with an extremely extended lag phase. During the induction period on ethanol, transcription of structural genes exa and pqqABCDEH, encoding components of initial ethanol oxidation in P. aeruginosa, was drastically reduced in NH1, which indicates the regulatory function of ercA (PA1991). However, transcription in the extremely delayed logarithmic growth phase was comparable to that in the wild type. To date, the involvement of an Fe-ADH in signal transduction processes has not been reported. PMID:23813731

  17. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted.

  18. A new superfamily of putative NTP-binding domains encoded by genomes of small DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Gorbalenya, A E; Koonin, E V; Wolf, Y I

    1990-03-12

    Statistically significant similarity was revealed between amino acid sequences of NTP-binding pattern-containing domains which are among the most conserved protein segments in dissimilar groups of ss and dsDNA viruses (papova-, parvo-, geminiviruses and P4 bacteriophage), and RNA viruses (picorna-, como- and nepoviruses) with small genomes. Within the aligned domains of 100-120 amino acid residues, three highly conserved sequence segments have been identified, i.e. 'A' and 'B' motifs of the NTP-binding pattern, and a third, C-terminal motif 'C', not described previously. The sequence of the 'B' motif in the proteins of the new superfamily is unusually variable, with substitutions, in some of the members, of the Asp residue conserved in other NTP-binding proteins. The 'C' motif is characterized by an invariant Asn residue preceded by a stretch of hydrophobic residues. As the new superfamily included a well studied DNA and RNA helicase, T antigen of SV40, helicase function could be tentatively assigned also to the other related viral putative NTP-binding proteins. On the other hand, the possibility of different and/or multiple functions for some of these proteins is discussed.

  19. The yrpAB operon of Yersinia ruckeri encoding two putative U32 peptidases is involved in virulence and induced under microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Navais, Roberto; Méndez, Jessica; Pérez-Pascual, David; Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to dissect the virulence mechanisms of Yersinia ruckeri two adjacent genes, yrpA and yrpB, encoding putative peptidases belonging to the U32 family, were analyzed. Similar genes, with the same genetic organization were identified in genomic analysis of human-pathogenic yersiniae. RT-PCR studies indicated that these genes form an operon in Y. ruckeri. Transcriptional studies using an yrpB::lacZY fusion showed high levels of expression of these genes in the presence of peptone in the culture medium, as well as under oxygen-limited conditions. These two factors had a synergic effect on gene induction when both were present simultaneously during bacterial incubation, which indicates the important role that environmental conditions in the fish gut can play in the regulation of specific genes. LD 50 experiments using an yrpA insertional mutant strain demonstrated the participation of this gene in the virulence of Y. ruckeri.

  20. The yrpAB operon of Yersinia ruckeri encoding two putative U32 peptidases is involved in virulence and induced under microaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Navais, Roberto; Méndez, Jessica; Pérez-Pascual, David; Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to dissect the virulence mechanisms of Yersinia ruckeri two adjacent genes, yrpA and yrpB, encoding putative peptidases belonging to the U32 family, were analyzed. Similar genes, with the same genetic organization were identified in genomic analysis of human-pathogenic yersiniae. RT-PCR studies indicated that these genes form an operon in Y. ruckeri. Transcriptional studies using an yrpB::lacZY fusion showed high levels of expression of these genes in the presence of peptone in the culture medium, as well as under oxygen-limited conditions. These two factors had a synergic effect on gene induction when both were present simultaneously during bacterial incubation, which indicates the important role that environmental conditions in the fish gut can play in the regulation of specific genes. LD50 experiments using an yrpA insertional mutant strain demonstrated the participation of this gene in the virulence of Y. ruckeri. PMID:24865652

  1. The VirR/VirS regulatory cascade affects transcription of plasmid-encoded putative virulence genes in Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kaori; Kawsar, Hameem I; Okumura, Kayo; Hayashi, Hideo; Shimizu, Tohru

    2003-05-16

    We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the putative virulence genes encoded on the plasmid pCP13 from Clostridium perfringens strain 13. The transcription of the beta2-toxin (cpb2) and possible collagen adhesin (cna) genes were regulated in both a positive and negative manner, respectively, by the two-component VirR/VirS system. The secondary regulator of the VirR/VirS system, VR-RNA, also affects the expression of both of these genes in the same fashion as the VirR/VirS system. This indicates that the global regulatory cascade of the VirR/VirS system controls the expression of virulence genes located on the plasmid, as well as those found chromosomally in C. perfringens strain 13.

  2. Putative recombination events and evolutionary history of five economically important viruses of fruit trees based on coat protein-encoding gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Boulila, Moncef

    2010-06-01

    To enhance the knowledge of recombination as an evolutionary process, 267 accessions retrieved from GenBank were investigated, all belonging to five economically important viruses infecting fruit crops (Plum pox, Apple chlorotic leaf spot, Apple mosaic, Prune dwarf, and Prunus necrotic ringspot viruses). Putative recombinational events were detected in the coat protein (CP)-encoding gene using RECCO and RDP version 3.31beta algorithms. Based on RECCO results, all five viruses were shown to contain potential recombination signals in the CP gene. Reconstructed trees with modified topologies were proposed. Furthermore, RECCO performed better than the RDP package in detecting recombination events and exhibiting their evolution rate along the sequences of the five viruses. RDP, however, provided the possible major and minor parents of the recombinants. Thus, the two methods should be considered complementary.

  3. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae YDL112w ORF encodes the putative 2'-O-ribose methyltransferase catalyzing the formation of Gm18 in tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Cavaillé, J; Chetouani, F; Bachellerie, J P

    1999-01-01

    The protein sequences of three known RNA 2'-O-ribose methylases were used as probes for detecting putative homologs through iterative searches of genomic databases. We have identified 45 new positive Open Reading Frames (ORFs), mostly in prokaryotic genomes. Five complete eukaryotic ORFs were also detected, among which was a single ORF (YDL112w) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. After genetic depletion of YDL112w, we observed a specific defect in tRNA ribose methylation, with the complete disappearance of Gm18 in all tRNAs that naturally contain this modification, whereas other tRNA ribose methylations and the complex pattern of rRNA ribose methylations were not affected. The tRNA G18 methylation defect was suppressed by transformation of the disrupted strain with a plasmid allowing expression of YDL112wp. The formation of Gm18 on an in vitro transcript of a yeast tRNASer naturally containing this methylation, which was efficiently catalyzed by cell-free extracts from the wild-type yeast strain, did not occur with extracts from the disrupted strain. The protein encoded by the YDL112w ORF, termed Trm3 (tRNA methylation), is therefore likely to be the tRNA (Gm18) ribose methylase. In in vitro assays, its activity is strongly dependent on tRNA architecture. Trm3p, the first putative tRNA ribose methylase identified in an eukaryotic organism, is considerably larger than its Escherichia coli functional homolog spoU (1,436 amino acids vs. 229 amino acids), or any known or putative prokaryotic RNA ribose methyltransferase. Homologs found in human (TRP-185 protein), Caenorhabditis elegans and Arabidopsis thaliana also exhibit a very long N-terminal extension not related to any protein sequence in databases.

  4. The FLORAL ORGAN NUMBER4 Gene Encoding a Putative Ortholog of Arabidopsis CLAVATA3 Regulates Apical Meristem Size in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Huangwei; Qian, Qian; Liang, Wanqi; Yin, Changsong; Tan, Hexin; Yao, Xuan; Yuan, Zheng; Yang, Jun; Huang, Hai; Luo, Da; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism regulating meristem development in the monocot rice (Oryza sativa), we describe here the isolation and characterization of three floral organ number4 (fon4) alleles and the cloning of the FON4 gene. The fon4 mutants showed abnormal enlargement of the embryonic and vegetative shoot apical meristems (SAMs) and the inflorescence and floral meristems. Likely due to enlarged SAMs, fon4 mutants produced thick culms (stems) and increased numbers of both primary rachis branches and floral organs. We identified FON4 using a map-based cloning approach and found it encodes a small putatively secreted protein, which is the putative ortholog of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA3 (CLV3) gene. FON4 transcripts mainly accumulated in the small group of cells at the apex of the SAMs, whereas the rice ortholog of CLV1 (FON1) is expressed throughout the SAMs, suggesting that the putative FON4 ligand might be sequestered as a possible mechanism for rice meristem regulation. Exogenous application of the peptides FON4p and CLV3p corresponding to the CLV3/ESR-related (CLE) motifs of FON4 and CLV3, respectively, resulted in termination of SAMs in rice, and treatment with CLV3p caused consumption of both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLV pathway in limiting meristem size is conserved in both rice and Arabidopsis. However, exogenous FON4p did not have an obvious effect on limiting both rice and Arabidopsis root meristems, suggesting that the CLE motifs of Arabidopsis CLV3 and FON4 are potentially functionally divergent. PMID:17012407

  5. Organization of a Clostridium thermocellum gene cluster encoding the cellulosomal scaffolding protein CipA and a protein possibly involved in attachment of the cellulosome to the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, T; Béguin, P; Aubert, J P

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a 9.4-kb region of Clostridium thermocellum DNA extending from the 3' end of the gene (now termed cipA), encoding the S1/SL component of the cellulosome. Three open reading frames (ORFs) belonging to two operons were detected. They encoded polypeptides of 1,664, 688, and 447 residues, termed ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p, respectively. The COOH-terminal regions of the three polypeptides were highly similar and contained three reiterated segments of 60 to 70 residues each. Similar segments have been found at the NH2 terminus of the S-layer proteins of Bacillus brevis and Acetogenium kivui, suggesting that ORF1p, ORF2p, and ORF3p might also be located on the cell surface. Otherwise, the sequence of ORF1p and ORF2p gave little clue concerning their potential function. However, the NH2-terminal region of ORF3p was similar to the reiterated domains previously identified in CipA as receptors involved in binding the duplicated segment of 22 amino acids present in catalytic subunits of the cellulosome. Indeed, it was found previously that ORF3p binds 125I-labeled endoglucanase CelD containing the duplicated segment (T. Fujino, P. Béguin, and J.-P. Aubert, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 94:165-170, 1992). These findings suggest that ORF3p might serve as an anchoring factor for the cellulosome on the cell surface by binding the duplicated segment that is present at the COOH end of CipA. Images PMID:8458832

  6. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose. Cloning and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene family, UXS, encoding soluble and putative membrane-bound UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harper, April D; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2002-12-01

    UDP-xylose (Xyl) is an important sugar donor for the synthesis of glycoproteins, polysaccharides, various metabolites, and oligosaccharides in animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. UDP-Xyl also feedback inhibits upstream enzymes (UDP-glucose [Glc] dehydrogenase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-GlcA decarboxylase) and is involved in its own synthesis and the synthesis of UDP-arabinose. In plants, biosynthesis of UDP-Xyl is catalyzed by different membrane-bound and soluble UDP-GlcA decarboxylase (UDP-GlcA-DC) isozymes, all of which convert UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Because synthesis of UDP-Xyl occurs both in the cytosol and in membranes, it is not known which source of UDP-Xyl the different Golgi-localized xylosyltransferases are utilizing. Here, we describe the identification of several distinct Arabidopsis genes (named AtUXS for UDP-Xyl synthase) that encode functional UDP-GlcA-DC isoforms. The Arabidopsis genome contains five UXS genes and their protein products can be subdivided into three isozyme classes (A-C), one soluble and two distinct putative membrane bound. AtUxs from each class, when expressed in Escherichia coli, generate active UDP-GlcA-DC that converts UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Members of this gene family have a large conserved C-terminal catalytic domain (approximately 300 amino acids long) and an N-terminal variable domain differing in sequence and size (30-120 amino acids long). Isoforms of class A and B appear to encode putative type II membrane proteins with their catalytic domains facing the lumen (like Golgi-glycosyltransferases) and their N-terminal variable domain facing the cytosol. Uxs class C is likely a cytosolic isoform. The characteristics of the plant Uxs support the hypothesis that unique UDP-GlcA-DCs with distinct subcellular localizations are required for specific xylosylation events.

  7. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatibility complex class II region.

    PubMed Central

    Bahram, S; Arnold, D; Bresnahan, M; Strominger, J L; Spies, T

    1991-01-01

    The class II region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class I molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class I molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class II DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by gamma interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class I molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out. Images PMID:1946428

  8. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  9. An mRNA encoding a putative GABA-gated chloride channel is expressed in the human cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Bascles, L; Boue-Grabot, E; Sartor, P; Charron, G; Bloch, B; Margolskee, R F

    1997-04-01

    GABA-gated chloride channels are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS. Conserved domains among members of previously described GABAA receptor subunits were used to design degenerate sense and antisense oligonucleotides. A PCR product from this amplification was used to isolate a full-length cDNA. The predicted protein has many of the features shared by other members of the ligand-gated ion channel family. This channel subunit has significant amino acid identity (25-40%) with members of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits and thus may represent a new subfamily of the GABA receptor channel. Although we cannot rule out that this clone encodes a receptor for an unidentified ligand, it was termed GABA chi. This gene is mainly expressed in placenta and in heart; however, placenta appears to express only an unspliced mRNA. In situ hybridization reveals that the GABA chi subunit mRNA is present in the electrical conduction system of the human heart. Our results suggest that novel GABA receptors expressed outside of the CNS may regulate cardiac function.

  10. CPR1: a gene encoding a putative signal peptidase that functions in pathogenicity of Colletotrichum graminicola to maize.

    PubMed

    Thon, M R; Nuckles, E M; Takach, J E; Vaillancourt, L J

    2002-02-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola causes anthracnose leaf blight and stalk rot of maize. We used restriction-enzyme mediated insertional (REMI) mutagenesis to identify a gene in this fungus that is required for pathogenicity to both stalks and leaves. The predicted polypeptide encoded by this gene, which we have named CPR1, is similar to a family of proteins that comprise one subunit of the eukaryotic microsomal signal peptidase. The nonpathogenic CPR1 REMI mutant contains a plasmid integration in the 3' untranslated region of the gene, 19 bp downstream from the stop codon. The result is a significant reduction in transcript levels in comparison to the wild type, perhaps as a result of increased transcript instability. We were unable to knock out the CPR1 gene, and it may be essential for viability. Microscopic examination of the REMI mutant on maize leaves revealed that it is fully capable of penetrating and colonizing host cells during the initial, biotrophic phases of the disease interaction but, unlike the wild type, it appears to be unable to switch to a necrotrophic mode of growth. We suggest that the CPR1 REMI mutant may be unable to secrete sufficient quantities of degradative enzymes to support that transition. The CPR1 REMI mutant provides us with a useful tool for future studies of the role of fungal protein transport in this important stalk rot disease of maize.

  11. Dwarf and short grain 1, encoding a putative U-box protein regulates cell division and elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Xing, Yadi; Lou, Qijin; Feng, Ping; Liu, Song; Zhu, Meidan; Yin, Wuzhong; Fang, Shunran; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Tianquan; Sang, Xianchun; He, Guanghua

    2017-02-01

    Plant hormones coordinate a plant's responses to environmental stimuli and the endogenous developmental programs for cell division and elongation. Brassinosteroids are among the most important of these hormones in plant development. Recently, the ubiquitin-26S-proteasome system was identified to play a key role in hormone biology. In this study, we analyzed the function of a rice (Oryza sativa) gene, DSG1, which encodes a U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase. In the dsg1 mutant (an allelic mutant of tud1), the lengths of the roots, internodes, panicles, and seeds were shorter than that in the wild-type, which was due to defects in cell division and elongation. In addition, the leaves of the dsg1 mutant were wider and curled. The DSG1 protein is nuclear- and cytoplasm-localized and does not show tissue specificity in terms of its expression, which occurs in roots, culms, leaves, sheaths, and spikelets. The dsg1 mutant is less sensitive to brassinosteroid treatment than the wild-type, and DSG1 expression is negatively regulated by brassinosteroids, ethylene, auxin, and salicylic acid. These results demonstrate that DSG1 positively regulates cell division and elongation and may be involved in multiple hormone pathways.

  12. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  13. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a dehydration-inducible cDNA encoding a putative 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase in Arachis hygogaea L.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaorong; Li, Ling

    2005-06-01

    A rate-limiting step in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis in plants is catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). Here we present the cloning, characterization of a cDNA from dehydrated peanut (Arachis hygogaea L.) leaves that encodes a putative NCED. The 2486-bp full-length cDNA (designated as AhNCED1), obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), has an open reading frame of 601 amino acid residues and encodes a protein with a calculated molecular weight of 66.86 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.39. Sequence analysis shows that the deduced amino acid sequence of AhNCED1 shares high identity with the reported NCED protein sequences. There is a 30-amino-acid chloroplast-targeting peptide at the N-terminus of the AhNCED1 protein predicted by iPSORT algorithm. Semi-quantification by duplex RT-PCR reveals that the expression of AhNCED1 is up-regulated by dehydration and that rehydration represses its expression. The organ specific expression pattern of AhNCED1 has been examined, which indicates its dominant expression in leaves and stems. Molecular analysis of the drought-inducible gene of peanut may be useful to investigate the response of agricultural crops to drought stress.

  15. Sequence and expression of GLN3, a positive nitrogen regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoding a protein with a putative zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Minehart, P L; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    The GLN3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the activation of transcription of a number of genes in response to the replacement of glutamine by glutamate as source of nitrogen. We cloned the GLN3 gene and constructed null alleles by gene disruption. GLN3 is not essential for growth, but increased copies of GLN3 lead to a drastic decrease in growth rate. The complete nucleotide sequence of the GLN3 gene was determined, revealing one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 730 amino acids, with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000. The GLN3 protein contains a single putative Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger which has homology to the Neurospora crassa NIT2 protein, the Aspergillus nidulans AREA protein, and the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the GLN3 protein binds the nitrogen upstream activation sequence of GLN1, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase. Neither control of transcription nor control of initiation of translation of GLN3 is important for regulation in response to glutamine availability. Images PMID:1682800

  16. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Xin, Zeyu; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2008-01-02

    The balance between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N), the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90) and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1) are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  17. Abundance of novel and diverse tfdA-like genes, encoding putative phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicide-degrading dioxygenases, in soil.

    PubMed

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Liu, Ya-Jun; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Drake, Harold L; Horn, Marcus A

    2010-01-01

    Phenoxyalkanoic acid (PAA) herbicides are widely used in agriculture. Biotic degradation of such herbicides occurs in soils and is initiated by alpha-ketoglutarate- and Fe2+-dependent dioxygenases encoded by tfdA-like genes (i.e., tfdA and tfdAalpha). Novel primers and quantitative kinetic PCR (qPCR) assays were developed to analyze the diversity and abundance of tfdA-like genes in soil. Five primer sets targeting tfdA-like genes were designed and evaluated. Primer sets 3 to 5 specifically amplified tfdA-like genes from soil, and a total of 437 sequences were retrieved. Coverages of gene libraries were 62 to 100%, up to 122 genotypes were detected, and up to 389 genotypes were predicted to occur in the gene libraries as indicated by the richness estimator Chao1. Phylogenetic analysis of in silico-translated tfdA-like genes indicated that soil tfdA-like genes were related to those of group 2 and 3 Bradyrhizobium spp., Sphingomonas spp., and uncultured soil bacteria. Soil-derived tfdA-like genes were assigned to 11 clusters, 4 of which were composed of novel sequences from this study, indicating that soil harbors novel and diverse tfdA-like genes. Correlation analysis of 16S rRNA and tfdA-like gene similarity indicated that any two bacteria with D>20% of group 2 tfdA-like gene-derived protein sequences belong to different species. Thus, data indicate that the soil analyzed harbors at least 48 novel bacterial species containing group 2 tfdA-like genes. Novel qPCR assays were established to quantify such new tfdA-like genes. Copy numbers of tfdA-like genes were 1.0x10(6) to 65x10(6) per gram (dry weight) soil in four different soils, indicating that hitherto-unknown, diverse tfdA-like genes are abundant in soils.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae Asparagine tDNAs Are Integration Hotspots for Different Genomic Islands Encoding Microcin E492 Production Determinants and Other Putative Virulence Factors Present in Hypervirulent Strains

    PubMed Central

    Marcoleta, Andrés E.; Berríos-Pastén, Camilo; Nuñez, Gonzalo; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Due to the developing of multi-resistant and invasive hypervirulent strains, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most urgent bacterial pathogen threats in the last years. Genomic comparison of a growing number of sequenced isolates has allowed the identification of putative virulence factors, proposed to be acquirable mainly through horizontal gene transfer. In particular, those related with synthesizing the antibacterial peptide microcin E492 (MccE492) and salmochelin siderophores were found to be highly prevalent among hypervirulent strains. The determinants for the production of both molecules were first reported as part of a 13-kbp segment of K. pneumoniae RYC492 chromosome, and were cloned and characterized in E. coli. However, the genomic context of this segment in K. pneumoniae remained uncharacterized. In this work, we provided experimental and bioinformatics evidence indicating that the MccE492 cluster is part of a highly conserved 23-kbp genomic island (GI) named GIE492, that was integrated in a specific asparagine-tRNA gene (asn-tDNA) and was found in a high proportion of isolates from liver abscesses sampled around the world. This element resulted to be unstable and its excision frequency increased after treating bacteria with mitomycin C and upon the overexpression of the island-encoded integrase. Besides the MccE492 genetic cluster, it invariably included an integrase-coding gene, at least seven protein-coding genes of unknown function, and a putative transfer origin that possibly allows this GI to be mobilized through conjugation. In addition, we analyzed the asn-tDNA loci of all the available K. pneumoniae assembled chromosomes to evaluate them as GI-integration sites. Remarkably, 73% of the strains harbored at least one GI integrated in one of the four asn-tDNA present in this species, confirming them as integration hotspots. Each of these tDNAs was occupied with different frequencies, although they were 100% identical. Also, we identified

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae Asparagine tDNAs Are Integration Hotspots for Different Genomic Islands Encoding Microcin E492 Production Determinants and Other Putative Virulence Factors Present in Hypervirulent Strains.

    PubMed

    Marcoleta, Andrés E; Berríos-Pastén, Camilo; Nuñez, Gonzalo; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Due to the developing of multi-resistant and invasive hypervirulent strains, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most urgent bacterial pathogen threats in the last years. Genomic comparison of a growing number of sequenced isolates has allowed the identification of putative virulence factors, proposed to be acquirable mainly through horizontal gene transfer. In particular, those related with synthesizing the antibacterial peptide microcin E492 (MccE492) and salmochelin siderophores were found to be highly prevalent among hypervirulent strains. The determinants for the production of both molecules were first reported as part of a 13-kbp segment of K. pneumoniae RYC492 chromosome, and were cloned and characterized in E. coli. However, the genomic context of this segment in K. pneumoniae remained uncharacterized. In this work, we provided experimental and bioinformatics evidence indicating that the MccE492 cluster is part of a highly conserved 23-kbp genomic island (GI) named GIE492, that was integrated in a specific asparagine-tRNA gene (asn-tDNA) and was found in a high proportion of isolates from liver abscesses sampled around the world. This element resulted to be unstable and its excision frequency increased after treating bacteria with mitomycin C and upon the overexpression of the island-encoded integrase. Besides the MccE492 genetic cluster, it invariably included an integrase-coding gene, at least seven protein-coding genes of unknown function, and a putative transfer origin that possibly allows this GI to be mobilized through conjugation. In addition, we analyzed the asn-tDNA loci of all the available K. pneumoniae assembled chromosomes to evaluate them as GI-integration sites. Remarkably, 73% of the strains harbored at least one GI integrated in one of the four asn-tDNA present in this species, confirming them as integration hotspots. Each of these tDNAs was occupied with different frequencies, although they were 100% identical. Also, we identified

  20. SEMI-ROLLED LEAF1 Encodes a Putative Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Protein and Modulates Rice Leaf Rolling by Regulating the Formation of Bulliform Cells1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guang-Heng; Qian, Qian; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Leaf rolling is an important agronomic trait in rice (Oryza sativa) breeding and moderate leaf rolling maintains the erectness of leaves and minimizes shadowing between leaves, leading to improved photosynthetic efficiency and grain yields. Although a few rolled-leaf mutants have been identified and some genes controlling leaf rolling have been isolated, the molecular mechanisms of leaf rolling still need to be elucidated. Here we report the isolation and characterization of SEMI-ROLLED LEAF1 (SRL1), a gene involved in the regulation of leaf rolling. Mutants srl1-1 (point mutation) and srl1-2 (transferred DNA insertion) exhibit adaxially rolled leaves due to the increased numbers of bulliform cells at the adaxial cell layers, which could be rescued by complementary expression of SRL1. SRL1 is expressed in various tissues and is expressed at low levels in bulliform cells. SRL1 protein is located at the plasma membrane and predicted to be a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. Moreover, analysis of the gene expression profile of cells that will become epidermal cells in wild type but probably bulliform cells in srl1-1 by laser-captured microdissection revealed that the expression of genes encoding vacuolar H+-ATPase (subunits A, B, C, and D) and H+-pyrophosphatase, which are increased during the formation of bulliform cells, were up-regulated in srl1-1. These results provide the transcript profile of rice leaf cells that will become bulliform cells and demonstrate that SRL1 regulates leaf rolling through inhibiting the formation of bulliform cells by negatively regulating the expression of genes encoding vacuolar H+-ATPase subunits and H+-pyrophosphatase, which will help to understand the mechanism regulating leaf rolling. PMID:22715111

  1. Molecular cloning of a novel pathogen-inducible cDNA encoding a putative acyl-CoA synthetase from Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; Suh, M C; Kim, S; Kwon, J K; Kim, M; Paek, K H; Choi, D; Kim, B D

    2001-08-01

    By means of differential display, a pool of salicylic acid (SA)-induced mRNAs were identified and subsequently their cDNAs were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from SA-induced leaf tissues of hot pepper. One of these cDNA clones, designated CaSIG4, was 1900 bp and contained an open reading frame encoding 523 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 56.3 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of CaSIG4 showed high sequence similarity to the AMP-binding protein family of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic acyl-CoA synthetases. CaSIG4 transcripts accumulated rapidly after SA treatment and in response to both incompatible and compatible interactions with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria race 1. To investigate the cis-acting elements mediating CaSIG4 expression, the CaSIG4 5'-flanking region was isolated by inverse PCR. Database searches indicated that a potential cis-regulatory element is almost identical to the consensus core sequences ACC(A/T)ACC(A/C) which are conserved among promoters of other phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes. The subcellular localization of the CaSIG4 protein was studied by using a soluble modified GFP gene fusion delivered into epidermal cells of onion by biolistic bombardment. The CaSIG4-smGFP fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Taken together, CaSIG4 encoding a putative acyl-CoA synthetase could function as a plasma membrane-bound protein with a role in signaling in plant defense.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding a putative stress-induced heat-shock protein from Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Elrobh, Mohamed S; Alanazi, Mohammad S; Khan, Wajahatullah; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous, induced under a number of environmental and metabolic stresses, with highly conserved DNA sequences among mammalian species. Camelus dromedaries (the Arabian camel) domesticated under semi-desert environments, is well adapted to tolerate and survive against severe drought and high temperatures for extended periods. This is the first report of molecular cloning and characterization of full length cDNA of encoding a putative stress-induced heat shock HSPA6 protein (also called HSP70B') from Arabian camel. A full-length cDNA (2417 bp) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and cloned in pET-b expression vector. The sequence analysis of HSPA6 gene showed 1932 bp-long open reading frame encoding 643 amino acids. The complete cDNA sequence of the Arabian camel HSPA6 gene was submitted to NCBI GeneBank (accession number HQ214118.1). The BLAST analysis indicated that C. dromedaries HSPA6 gene nucleotides shared high similarity (77-91%) with heat shock gene nucleotide of other mammals. The deduced 643 amino acid sequences (accession number ADO12067.1) showed that the predicted protein has an estimated molecular weight of 70.5 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.0. The comparative analyses of camel HSPA6 protein sequences with other mammalian heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed high identity (80-94%). Predicted camel HSPA6 protein structure using Protein 3D structural analysis high similarities with human and mouse HSPs. Taken together, this study indicates that the cDNA sequences of HSPA6 gene and its amino acid and protein structure from the Arabian camel are highly conserved and have similarities with other mammalian species.

  3. A dominant truncation allele identifies a gene, STE20, that encodes a putative protein kinase necessary for mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ramer, S W; Davis, R W

    1993-01-01

    This work reports the identification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of STE20, a newly discovered gene involved in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating response pathway, to date one of the best understood signal transduction pathways. STE20 encodes a putative serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with a predicted molecular mass of 102 kDa. Its expression pattern is similar to that of several other protein kinases in the mating response pathway. Deletion of the kinase domain of STE20 causes sterility in both haploid mating types. This sterility can be partially suppressed by high-level production of STE12 but is not suppressible by high levels of STE4 or a dominant STE11 truncation allele. A truncation allele of STE20 was isolated that can activate the mating response pathway in the absence of exogenous mating pheromone. This allele causes dominant growth arrest that cannot be suppressed by deletions of STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. The allele is able to suppress the mating defect of a strain in which the STE20 kinase domain has been deleted, but not the mating defects of strains carrying mutations in STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. Images PMID:8421676

  4. Mutation of a Gene Encoding a Putative Glycoprotease Leads to Reduced Salt Tolerance, Altered Pigmentation, and Cyanophycin Accumulation in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Zuther, Ellen; Schubert, Hendrik; Hagemann, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The salt-sensitive mutant 549 of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was genetically and physiologically characterized. The mutated site and corresponding wild-type site were cloned and partially sequenced. The genetic analysis revealed that during the mutation about 1.8 kb was deleted from the chromosome of mutant 549. This deletion affected four open reading frames: a gcp gene homolog, the psaFJ genes, and an unknown gene. After construction of mutants with single mutations, only the gcp mutant showed a reduction in salt tolerance comparable to that of the initial mutant, indicating that the deletion of this gene was responsible for the salt sensitivity and that the other genes were of minor importance. Besides the reduced salt tolerance, a remarkable change in pigmentation was observed that became more pronounced in salt-stressed cells. The phycobilipigment content decreased, and that of carotenoids increased. Investigations of changes in the ultrastructure revealed an increase in the amount of characteristic inclusion bodies containing the high-molecular-weight nitrogen storage polymer cyanophycin (polyaspartate and arginine). The salt-induced accumulation of cyanophycin was confirmed by chemical estimations. The putative glycoprotease encoded by the gcp gene might be responsible for the degradation of cyanophycin in Synechocystis. Mutation of this gene leads to nitrogen starvation of the cells, accompanied by characteristic changes in pigmentation, ultrastructure, and salt tolerance level. PMID:9537367

  5. Cotton GalT1 Encoding a Putative Glycosyltransferase Is Involved in Regulation of Cell Wall Pectin Biosynthesis during Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development. PMID:23527103

  6. Expression of CsSEF1 gene encoding putative CCCH zinc finger protein is induced by defoliation and prolonged darkness in cucumber fruit.

    PubMed

    Tazuke, Akio; Asayama, Munehiko

    2013-03-01

    To find a marker gene for photoassimilate limitation in cucumber fruit, genes induced in young fruit by total defoliation were cloned using the subtraction method. Almost every clone matched perfectly to a member of cucumber unigene ver. 3 of the Cucurbit Genomics Database. From the clones obtained, six genes were selected and the effect of defoliation on their expression was analyzed. In particular, expression of a gene that is highly homologous to the cucumber gene CsSEF1 (CAI30889) encoding putative CCCH zinc finger protein, which is reported to be induced at somatic embryogenesis in suspension culture, was enhanced by the treatment by about 50 times. The sequencing of the full-length cDNA and BLAST search in the Cucurbit Genomics Database indicated that our cloned gene is identical to CsSEF1. In control fruit, the expression of CsSEF1 did not change markedly in terms of development. By contrast, the expression of CsSEF1 was enhanced by prolonged darkness at the transcript level. This increase in the expression of CsSEF1 was temporally correlated with the decline in the fruit respiration rate. In mature leaves under prolonged darkness, enhanced expression was observed in the asparagine synthetase gene, but not in CsSEF1. These results suggest that the asparagine synthetase gene can be a good marker for sugar starvation and that CsSEF1 might be involved in the signal transduction pathway from photoassimilate limitation to growth cessation in cucumber fruit.

  7. Species-specific sequence in the repeat 3 region of the gene encoding a putative Loa loa allergen: a diagnostic tool for occult loiasis.

    PubMed

    Toure, F S; Egwang, T G; Wahl, G; Millet, P; Bain, O; Georges, A J

    1997-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method to detect Loa loa DNA in the blood lysate of infected individuals is described. A set of primers was designed to amplify the repeat 3 sequence (15r3) of the gene encoding a putative L. loa allergen. The qualitative PCR was carried out using blood lysates from subjects from an L. loaendemic area of Gabon where loiasis exists sympatrically with Mansonella perstans, and from individuals from a loiasis-free area in Togo infected concomitantly with M. perstans and Onchocerca volvulus. No specific amplification was observed after ethidium bromide staining of a gel containing M. perstans and O. volvulus control samples. In contrast, a 396-basepair (bp) DNA was detected in all L. loa microfilaremic individuals and in seven of the 20 L. loa amicrofilaremic subjects diagnosed by leukoconcentration. Qualitative Southern blots carried out at high stringency (65 degrees C) using 15r3 oligonucleotide probe revealed hybridization only with L. loa samples (5 of 5 microfilaremic individuals and 15 of 20 amicrofilaremic individuals), confirming the results obtained with ethidium bromide staining of PCR products. We conclude that this 396-bp sequence could be used as a species-specific diagnostic tool for occult loiasis in an endemic area with concurrent filarial infections.

  8. A putative role for the plasma membrane potential in the control of the expression of the gene encoding the tomato high-affinity potassium transporter HAK5.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Miller, Anthony J; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    A chimeric CaHAK1-LeHAK5 transporter with only 15 amino acids of CaHAK1 in the N-terminus mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in yeast cells. Kinetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that LeHAK5 mediates a significant proportion of the high-affinity K(+) uptake shown by K(+)-starved tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. The development of high-affinity K(+) uptake, putatively mediated by LeHAK5, was correlated with increased LeHAK5 mRNA levels and a more negative electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane of root epidermal and cortical cells. However, this increase in high-affinity K(+) uptake was not correlated with the root K(+) content. Thus, (i) growth conditions that result in a hyperpolarized root plasma membrane potential, such as K(+) starvation or growth in the presence of NH(4) (+), but which do not decrease the K(+) content, lead to increased LeHAK5 expression; (ii) the presence of NaCl in the growth solution, which prevents the hyperpolarization induced by K(+) starvation, also prevents LeHAK5 expression. Moreover, once the gene is induced, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential then produces a decrease in the LeHAK5 mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that the plant membrane electrical potential plays a role in the regulation of the expression of this gene encoding a high-affinity K(+) transporter.

  9. Cotton GalT1 encoding a putative glycosyltransferase is involved in regulation of cell wall pectin biosynthesis during plant development.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li-Xia; Rao, Yue; Li, Long; Huang, Jun-Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), are a group of highly glycosylated proteins that are found throughout the plant kingdom. To date, glycosyltransferases that glycosylate AGP backbone have remained largely unknown. In this study, a gene (GhGalT1) encoding a putative β-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) was identified in cotton. GhGalT1, belonging to CAZy GT31 family, is the type II membrane protein that contains an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal galactosyltransferase functional domain. A subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhGalT1 was localized in the Golgi apparatus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhGalT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in hypocotyls, roots, fibers and ovules. Overexpression of GhGalT1 in Arabidopsis promoted plant growth and metabolism. The transgenic seedlings had much longer primary roots, higher chlorophyll content, higher photosynthetic efficiency, the increased biomass, and the enhanced tolerance to exogenous D-arabinose and D-galactose. In addition, gas chromatography (GC) analysis of monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions showed that pectin was changed in the transgenic plants, compared with that of wild type. Three genes (GAUT8, GAUT9 and xgd1) involved in pectin biosynthesis were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic lines. These data suggested that GhGalT1 may be involved in regulation of pectin biosynthesis required for plant development.

  10. Overexpression of a cotton gene that encodes a putative transcription factor of AP2/EREBP family in Arabidopsis affects growth and development of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xia, Hui; Li, Xiao-Jie; Hu, Rong; Chen, Yun; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    In the study, a gene encoding a putative ethylene response factor of AP2/EREBP family was isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhERF12. Sequence alignment showed that GhERF12 protein contains a central AP2/ERF domain (58 amino acids) with two functional conserved amino acid residues (ala14 and asp19). Transactivation assay indicated that GhERF12 displayed strong transcription activation activity in yeast cells, suggesting that this protein may be a transcriptional activator in cotton. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that GhERF12 expression in cotton was induced by ACC and IAA. Overexpression of GhERF12 in Arabidopsis affected seedling growth and development. The GhERF12 transgenic plants grew slowly, and displayed a dwarf phenotype. The mean bolting time of the transgenic plants was delayed for about 10 days, compared with that of wild type. Further study revealed that some ethylene-related and auxin-related genes were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic plants, compared with those of wild type. Collectively, we speculated that GhERF12, as a transcription factor, may be involved in regulation of plant growth and development by activating the constitutive ethylene response likely related to auxin biosynthesis and/or signaling.

  11. MUCILAGE-MODIFIED4 Encodes a Putative Pectin Biosynthetic Enzyme Developmentally Regulated by APETALA2, TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, and GLABRA2 in the Arabidopsis Seed Coat1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Young, Diana S.; Dean, Gillian H.; Tan, Wei Ling; Samuels, A. Lacey; Haughn, George W.

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis undergoes a complex process of differentiation that includes the biosynthesis and secretion of large quantities of pectinaceous mucilage, cytoplasmic rearrangement, and secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Mutations in MUM4 (MUCILAGE-MODIFIED4) lead to a decrease in seed coat mucilage and incomplete cytoplasmic rearrangement. We show that MUM4 encodes a putative NDP-l-rhamnose synthase, an enzyme required for the synthesis of the pectin rhamnogalacturonan I, the major component of Arabidopsis mucilage. This result suggests that the synthesis of monosaccharide substrates is a limiting factor in the biosynthesis of pectinaceous seed coat mucilage. In addition, the reduced cytoplasmic rearrangement observed in the absence of a key enzyme in pectin biosynthesis in mum4 mutants establishes a causal link between mucilage production and cellular morphogenesis. The cellular phenotype seen in mum4 mutants is similar to that of several transcription factors (AP2 [APETALA2], TTG1 [TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1], TTG2 MYB61, and GL2 [GLABRA2]). Expression studies suggest that MUM4 is developmentally regulated in the seed coat by AP2, TTG1, and GL2, whereas TTG2 and MYB61 appear to be regulating mucilage production through alternate pathway(s). Our results provide a framework for the regulation of mucilage production and secretory cell differentiation. PMID:14701918

  12. Pear ACO genes encoding putative 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homologs are functionally expressed during fruit ripening and involved in response to salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2012-10-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final reaction of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway, converting ACC into ethylene. Past studies have shown a possible link between ACC oxidase and salicylic acid during fruit ripening in pear, but the relationship has received no more than modest study at the gene expression level. In this study, two cDNA clones encoding putative ACC oxidase, PpACO1 and PpACO2, were isolated from a cDNA library constructed by our own laboratory and produced using mRNA from mesocarp of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai. cv.Whangkeumbae). One cDNA clone, designated PpACO1 (GenBank accession No. JN807390), comprised an open reading frame of 945 bp encoding a protein of 314 amino acids. The other cDNA, designated PpACO2 (GenBank accession No. JN807392), encodes a protein with 322 amino acids that shares high similarity with the known plant ACOs. Using PCR amplification techniques, two genomic clones corresponding to PpACO1 and PpACO2 were isolated and shown to contain independently three introns with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. The PpACO1 gene product shared 99 % identity with an ACC oxidase from pear (Pyrus × bretschneideri Rehd.cv.Yali), and phylogenetic analyses clearly placed the gene product in the ACC oxidase cluster of the pear 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily tree. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the two PpACO genes are differentially expressed in pear tissues. PpACO1 and PpACO2 were predominantly expressed in fruit. The transcripts of PpACO1 were accumulated at relatively low levels in early fruit, but strongly high levels in fruit ripening and senescence stages, while the transcripts of PpACO2 were accumulated at higher levels in early fruit and much lower levels with further fruit cell development than the transcripts of PpACO1. In addition, PpACO1 gene was down-regulated in fruit by salicylic acid (SA). Nevertheless, PpACO2 gene was dramatically up-regulated in

  13. Identification of a cDNA encoding a second putative prohormone convertase related to PC2 in AtT20 cells and islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Smeekens, S P; Avruch, A S; LaMendola, J; Chan, S J; Steiner, D F

    1991-01-01

    PC2 and furin are two recently identified members of a class of mammalian proteins homologous to the yeast precursor processing protease kex2 and the bacterial subtillisins. We have used the polymerase chain reaction to identify and clone a cDNA (PC3) from the mouse AtT20 anterior pituitary cell line that represents an additional member of this growing family of mammalian proteases. PC3 encodes a 753-residue protein that begins with a signal peptide and contains a 292-residue domain closely related to the catalytic modules of PC2, furin, and kex2. Within this region 58%, 65%, and 50% of the amino acids of PC3 are identical to those of the aligned PC2, furin, and kex2 sequences, respectively, and the catalytically important Asp, His, and Ser residues are all conserved. On Northern blots, PC3 hybridizes to two transcripts of 3 and 5 kilobases. Tissue distribution studies indicate that both PC2 and PC3 are expressed in a variety of neuroendocrine tissues, including pancreatic islets and brain, but are not expressed in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and spleen. The high degree of similarity of PC3, PC2, and furin suggests that they are all members of a superfamily of mammalian proteases that are involved in the processing of prohormones and/or other protein precursors. In contrast to furin, PC3, like PC2, lacks a hydrophobic transmembrane anchor, but it has a potential C-terminal amphipathic helical segment similar to the putative membrane anchor of carboxypeptidase H. These and other differences suggest that these proteins carry out compartmentalized proteolysis within cells, such as processing within regulated versus constitutive secretory pathways. Images PMID:1988934

  14. The Maize Viviparous8 Locus, Encoding a Putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-Like Peptidase, Regulates Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Coordinates Embryo and Endosperm Development1[W

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A. Mark; Koch, Karen E.; Hannah, L. Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8′oxA1a ABA 8′-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds. PMID:18203869

  15. The Maize Viviparous8 locus, encoding a putative ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1-like peptidase, regulates abscisic acid accumulation and coordinates embryo and endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Latshaw, Susan; Sato, Yutaka; Settles, A Mark; Koch, Karen E; Hannah, L Curtis; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; McCarty, Donald R

    2008-03-01

    We describe a mutant of Zea mays isolated from a W22 inbred transposon population, widow's peak mutant1 (wpk1), with an altered pattern of anthocyanin synthesis and aleurone cell differentiation in endosperm. In addition, a failure of the developing mutant embryo to form leaf initials is associated with decreased expression of a subset of meristem regulatory genes that includes Abphyl1 and Td1. We show that the viviparous8 (vp8) mutant has a similar pleiotropic phenotype in the W22 inbred background in contrast to the viviparous embryo phenotype exhibited in the standard genetic background, and we confirmed that wpk1 is allelic to vp8. Further genetic analysis revealed that the standard vp8 stock contains an unlinked, partially dominant suppressor of the vp8 mutation that is not present in W22. Consistent with the early-onset viviparous phenotype of vp8, expression of several embryonic regulators, including LEC1/B3 domain transcription factors, was reduced in the mutant embryo. Moreover, reduced abscisic acid (ABA) content of vp8/wpk1 embryos was correlated with altered regulation of ABA biosynthesis, as well as ABA catabolic pathways. The ABA biosynthetic gene Vp14 was down-regulated in the nonsuppressed background, whereas the ZmABA8'oxA1a ABA 8'-hydroxylase gene was strongly up-regulated in both genetic backgrounds. Molecular analysis revealed that Vp8 encodes a putative peptidase closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1. Because the Vp8 regulates meristem development as well as seed maturation processes, including ABA accumulation, we propose that VP8 is required for synthesis of an unidentified signal that integrates meristem and embryo formation in seeds.

  16. Molecular characterisation of the STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY of genes encoding putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboglu, Banu; Pfister, Karen; Haberer, Georg; Chevalier, David; Fuchs, Angelika; Mayer, Klaus FX; Schneitz, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Background Receptor-like kinases are a prominent class of surface receptors that regulate many aspects of the plant life cycle. Despite recent advances the function of most receptor-like kinases remains elusive. Therefore, it is paramount to investigate these receptors. The task is complicated by the fact that receptor-like kinases belong to a large monophyletic family with many sub-clades. In general, functional analysis of gene family members by reverse genetics is often obscured by several issues, such as redundancy, subtle or difficult to detect phenotypes in mutants, or by decision problems regarding suitable biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, in many cases additional strategies have to be employed to allow inference of hypotheses regarding gene function. Results We approached the function of genes encoding the nine-member STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY (SRF) class of putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. Sequence comparisons show overall conservation but also divergence in predicted functional domains among SRF proteins. Interestingly, SRF1 undergoes differential splicing. As a result, SRF1 is predicted to exist in a standard receptor configuration and in a membrane-anchored receptor-like version that lacks most of the intracellular domain. Furthermore, SRF1 is characterised by a high degree of polymorphism between the Ler and Col accessions. Two independent T-DNA-based srf4 mutants showed smaller leaves while 35S::SRF4 plants displayed enlarged leaves. This is in addition to the strubbelig phenotype which has been described before. Additional single and several key double mutant combinations did not reveal obvious mutant phenotypes. Ectopic expression of several SRF genes, using the 35S promoter, resulted in male sterility. To gain possible insights into SRF gene function we employed a computational analysis of publicly available microarray data. We performed global expression profiling, coexpression analysis, and an analysis of the

  17. Hemolytic capability and expression of a putative haem oxygenase-encoding gene by blood isolates of Candida tropicalis are influenced by iron deprivation and the presence of hemoglobin and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    França, Emanuele Julio Galvão; Furlaneto-Maia, Luciana; Furlaneto, Márcia Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Although hemolytic activity is known to be a putative virulence factor contributing to candidal pathogenesis, its production by Candida tropicalis, a species closely related to Candida albicans, is poor understood. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the hemolytic activity and the expression level of a putative haem oxygenase encoding gene by blood isolates of C. tropicalis following growth in iron deprivation, and in the presence of hemoglobin and erythrocytes. The lowest values of hemolytic activity were observed in cell-free culture supernatants of isolates growing in iron-restricted medium (RPMI medium and RPMI medium supplemented with iron chelator bathophenanthrolindisulphonic acid). Hemolysis was increased in the presence of either hemoglobin or erythrocytes. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the putative haem oxygenase encoding gene (CtHMX1), potentially related with iron uptake, was up-regulated (p < 0.001) following growth in iron deprivation and in the presence of hemoglobin; CtHMX1 was repressed in the presence of human erythrocytes (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that hemoglobin had positive effect in the production of hemolytic factor and gene expression related to iron uptake in C. tropicalis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces sp. DSM4137 is adjacent to genes encoding adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and to genes for synthesis of cobalamin.

    PubMed

    Haydock, Stephen F; Mironenko, Tatiana; Ghoorahoo, Haroun I; Leadlay, Peter F

    2004-09-30

    A type I PKS gene probe obtained from RAPB of the rapamycin producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus, strongly hybridised to 92 out of 1120 cosmids from a genomic library of the elaiophylin-producing strain Streptomyces sp. DSM4137. Partial cosmid sequencing suggested the presence of 10 separate sequences encoding type I PKS genes. One entire DNA sequence was obtained and found exactly to match the gene organisation expected for the biosynthesis of the unusual macrodiolide polyketide elaiophylin. The putative elaiophylin gene cluster contains five large open-reading frames encoding typical modular polyketide synthases, which together catalyse the synthesis of the octaketide monomer of elaiophylin. Other genes were identified that would be required for provision of the ethylmalonate extender unit, for the synthesis and attachment of 2-deoxy-L-fucose and in regulation, or in export of the product. Immediately adjacent to the putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster is a 30-kbp region containing the gene for adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and also genes involved in the biosynthesis of the cobalamin cofactor. Analysis of the latter gene set confirms the view that cbiD of the anaerobic pathway and cobF in the aerobic pathway catalyse the same methylation of precorrin-5. The proximity of these genes to the putative elaiophylin gene cluster can best be rationalised if in this organism succinyl-CoA is a significant source of the methylmalonate units for complex polyketide biosynthesis.

  19. A mutation in the Cc.arp9 gene encoding a putative actin-related protein causes defects in fruiting initiation and asexual development in the agaricomycete Coprinopsis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Ando, Yuki; Hata, Takeshi; Nakahori, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Agaricomycetes exhibit a remarkable morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelia to huge fruiting bodies. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the fruiting body development, we have isolated and characterized many Coprinopsis cinerea mutant strains defective in fruiting initiation to date. Dikaryon formation in agaricomycetes, which is followed by fruiting development, is governed by the mating type loci, A and B. Recently, mutations in the Cc.snf5 gene, which encodes a putative component of the chromatin remodeling complex switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), were shown to cause defects in A-regulated clamp cell morphogenesis, as well as in fruiting initiation. Here, we demonstrate that Cc.arp9, which encodes a putative actin-related protein associated with two chromatin remodeling complexes, SWI/SNF and remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC), is also essential for fruiting initiation. In contrast to Cc.snf5 mutants, Cc.arp9 mutants were not defective in clamp cell formation. The effects of mutations in Cc.arp9 and Cc.snf5 on oidia production and the transcriptional expression levels of clp1 and pcc1, which are under the control of the A gene, were also examined. These indicated that Cc.Snf5 is involved in A-regulated pathways, whereas Cc.Arp9 is not apparently. Cc.arp9/Cc.snf5 double-gene disruptants were generated and their phenotypes were analyzed, which suggested a complicated developmental regulation mechanism mediated by chromatin remodeling.

  20. Photoreceptors in the dark: A functional white collar-like complex and other putative light-sensing components encoded by the genome of the subterranean fungus Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Raffaele; Montanini, Barbara; Proietto, Marco; Levati, Elisabetta; De Luca, Cristina; Brenna, Andrea; Filetici, Patrizia; Kohler, Annegret; Ottonello, Simone; Ballario, Paola

    2017-03-01

    Light is perceived and transduced by fungi, where it modulates processes as diverse as growth and morphogenesis, sexual development and secondary metabolism. A special case in point is that of fungi with a subterranean, light-shielded habitat such as Tuber spp. Using as reference the genome sequence of the black truffle Tuber melanosporum, we used bioinformatic prediction tools and expression data to gain insight on the photoreceptor systems of this hypogeous ectomycorrhizal fungus. These include a chromophore-less opsin, a putative red-light-sensing phytochrome not expressed at detectable levels in any of the examined lifecycle stages, and a nearly canonical two-component (WC-1/WC-2) photoreceptor system similar to the Neurospora white collar complex (WCC). Multiple evidence, including expression at relatively high levels in all lifecycle stages except for fruiting-bodies and the results of heterologous functional complementation experiments conducted in Neurospora, suggests that the Tuber WCC is likely functional and capable of responding to blue-light. The other putative T. melanosporum photoreceptor components, especially the chromophore-less opsin and the likely non-functional phytochrome, may instead represent signatures of adaptation to a hypogeous (light-shielded) lifestyle.

  1. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  2. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of Ocp2, a gene encoding a putative transcription-associated factor predominantly expressed in the auditory organs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Thalmann, I.; Thalmann, R.

    1995-06-10

    We report the cloning of the Ocp2 gene encoding OCP-II from a guinea pig organ-of-Corti cDNA library. The predicted open reading frame encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 18.6 kDa. A homology search revealed that Ocp2 shares significant sequence similarity with p15, a sub-unit of transcription factor SIII that regulates the activity of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex. The Ocp2 messenger RNA is expressed abundantly in the cochlea while not significantly in any other tissues examined, including brain, eye, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, thigh muscle, and testis, demonstrating that the expression of this gene may be restricted to auditory organs. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the N-terminal region of OCP-II. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded sections of the cochlea showed that OCP-II is localized abundantly in nonsensory cells in the organ of Corti; in addition, it was also detected, at a lower concentration, in vestibular sensory organs, as well as auditory and vestibular brain stem nuclei. The Ocp2 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 4 as well as 11. Our results suggest that OCP-II may be involved in transcription regulation for the development or maintenance of specialized functions of the inner ear. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  3. The C. elegans ceh-36 gene encodes a putative homemodomain transcription factor involved in chemosensory functions of ASE and AWC neurons.

    PubMed

    Koga, Makoto; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2004-02-20

    Chemotaxis to water-soluble chemicals such as sodium ion is an important behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans for seeking food, and ASE chemosensory neurons have a major role in this behavior. We isolated mutants defective in chemotaxis to sodium acetate. We show here that among them ks86 had a mutation in the ceh-36 gene. ceh-36 :: gfp reporter constructs were expressed in ASE and AWC neurons. In a mutant of the che-1 gene, which encodes another transcription factor and is required for specification of ASE neurons, expression of the ceh-36 :: gfp reporter in ASE is lost. This indicates that the ceh-36 gene functions downstream of the che-1 gene in ASE. In the ceh-36(ks86) mutant, expression of the tax-2 gene encoding a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel was reduced in ASE and AWC. This affords an explanation for defects of the ceh-36 mutant in the chemotaxis mediated by ASE and AWC. When a ceh-36 cDNA was expressed in an adult ceh-36 mutant by a heat shock promoter, chemotaxis to sodium acetate was recovered. These results suggest that ceh-36 is required for functions, and not for development, of ASE.

  4. Molecular characterization of the Jatropha curcas JcR1MYB1 gene encoding a putative R1-MYB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Liang; Guo, Dong; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the R1-MYB transcription factor, designated as JcR1MYB1, was isolated from Jatropha curcas using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. JcR1MYB1 contains a 951 bp open reading frame that encodes 316 amino acids. The deduced JcR1MYB1 protein was predicted to possess the conserved, 56-amino acid-long DNA-binding domain, which consists of a single helix-turn-helix module and usually occurs in R1-MYBs. JcR1MYB1 is a member of the R1-MYB transcription factor subfamily. A subcellular localization study confirmed the nuclear localization of JcR1MYB1. Expression analysis showed that JcR1MYB1 transcripts accumulated in various examined tissues, with high expression levels in the root and low levels in the stem. JcR1MYB1 transcription was up-regulated by polyethylene glycol, NaCl, and cold treatments, as well as by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene treatment. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing JcR1MYB1 indicates an inportant function for this gene in salt stress. PMID:25249778

  5. Analysis of the transcriptional unit encoding the genes for rubredoxin (rub) and a putative rubredoxin oxidoreductase (rbo) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, M J; Voordouw, G

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 2.0-kilobase-pair EcoRI restriction fragment upstream from the gene (rub, 162 base pairs) encoding rubredoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough indicates that it is part of a larger transcriptional unit, containing an additional 378-base-pair open reading frame which terminates 16 nucleotides from the translational start of the rub gene and could encode a polypeptide of 14 kilodaltons (kDa). Northern (RNA) blotting of RNA isolated from both D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Escherichia coli TG2 transformed with plasmid pJK29, which contains both genes on a 1.1-kilobase-pair SalI insert, confirms that the genes for this 14-kDa polypeptide and rubredoxin are present on a single transcript of 680 nucleotides. Strong evidence that the 14-kDa polypeptide is also a redox protein is provided by the fact that its NH2 terminus is homologous to desulforedoxin, which has been isolated from D. gigas as a small dimeric redox protein (36 amino acids per monomer), coordinating two iron atoms. Since rubredoxin is a potential redox partner for the 14-kDa protein, it has been tentatively named rubredoxin oxidoreductase, produced by the rbo gene. Southern blotting indicates that the rbo-rub operon is present in several species and strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Images PMID:2549009

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Heme-Associated Cell Surface Protein Made by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Benfang; Smoot, Laura M.; Menning, Heather M.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Kala, Subbarao V.; Deleo, Frank R.; Reid, Sean D.; Musser, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the genome sequence of a serotype M1 group A Streptococcus (GAS) strain identified a gene encoding a previously undescribed putative cell surface protein. The gene was cloned from a serotype M1 strain, and the recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was associated with heme in a 1:1 stoichiometry. This streptococcal heme-associated protein, designated Shp, was produced in vitro by GAS, located on the bacterial cell surface, and accessible to specific antibody raised against the purified recombinant protein. Mice inoculated subcutaneously with GAS and humans with invasive infections and pharyngitis caused by GAS seroconverted to Shp, indicating that Shp was produced in vivo. The blood of mice actively immunized with Shp had significantly higher bactericidal activity than the blood of unimmunized mice. The shp gene was cotranscribed with eight contiguous genes, including homologues of an ABC transporter involved in iron uptake in gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that Shp is a novel cell surface heme-associated protein. PMID:12117961

  7. Decreased cellulase and xylanase production in the fungus Talaromyces cellulolyticus by disruption of tacA and tctA genes, encoding putative zinc finger transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) is one of the important strains for industrial cellulase production. An understanding of the control of cellulase gene expression in T. cellulolyticus is insufficient because only a few transcriptional factors related to cellulase gene expression have been identified. In the present study, we disrupted seven putative transcription regulator genes that showed similarity with cellulase or hemicellulase regulator genes in other filamentous fungi and investigated whether these genes are related to cellulase and xylanase production. Among the seven genes, five (tclA, tbgA, tlaA, tmcA, tclB2) had a smaller effect on cellulase and xylanase activities when culturing with cellulose. On the other hand, disruption of tacA and tctA, which are respectively homologues of ace1 (repressor of cellulase) and ctf1 (inducer of cutinase), led to a decrease in cellulase and hemicellulase production due to effects at both the enzymatic and transcriptional levels, indicating that tacA and tctA have positive roles in cellulase and xylanase production in T. cellulolyticus. These results suggest that cellulase and xylanase gene regulation in T. cellulolyticus differs from that in other filamentous fungi and imply that unknown transcriptional mechanisms function in T. cellulolyticus.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a putative cDNA encoding endoglucanase IV from Trichoderma viride and its expression in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Peng; Liang, Shuang; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Mei-Xian; Bhaskar, Roy; Malik, Firdose Ahmad; Niu, Yan-Shan; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2012-01-01

    The development of cellulase production technology has greatly contributed to the successful use of cellulosic materials as renewable carbon sources. In this study, a putative endoglucanase IV (EG IV) complementary DNA was cloned from the mycelium of a strain of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma viride using a PCR-based exon-splicing method and expressed in both a silkworm BmN cell line and in silkworm larvae. Western blot analysis detected a band of 42 kDa in BmN cells after infection with a recombinant mBacmid/BmNPV/EG IV baculovirus. Sequence alignment analysis of the T. viride EG IV gene showed two domains that were highly conserved with glycosyl hydrolases and a funga-type cellulose-binding domain. Analysis of variance showed that silkworms infected with recombinant baculoviruses exhibited significantly higher enzyme activity that was 48.84% higher than silkworms infected with blank baculoviruses and 46.61% higher than normal silkworms. The expressed bioactive EG IV was also stable at the pH range from 5.0 to 10.0. The availability of large quantities of bioactive EG IV in silkworm provided a possibility to produce cellulase transgenic silkworm, which express bioactive cellulase specially in its digestive tract and improve its metabolism efficiency of mulberry leaves. Its application in the sericulture industry may be very promising.

  9. Cell-Based Selection Expands the Utility of DNA-Encoded Small-Molecule Library Technology to Cell Surface Drug Targets: Identification of Novel Antagonists of the NK3 Tachykinin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zining; Graybill, Todd L; Zeng, Xin; Platchek, Michael; Zhang, Jean; Bodmer, Vera Q; Wisnoski, David D; Deng, Jianghe; Coppo, Frank T; Yao, Gang; Tamburino, Alex; Scavello, Genaro; Franklin, G Joseph; Mataruse, Sibongile; Bedard, Katie L; Ding, Yun; Chai, Jing; Summerfield, Jennifer; Centrella, Paolo A; Messer, Jeffrey A; Pope, Andrew J; Israel, David I

    2015-12-14

    DNA-encoded small-molecule library technology has recently emerged as a new paradigm for identifying ligands against drug targets. To date, this technology has been used with soluble protein targets that are produced and used in a purified state. Here, we describe a cell-based method for identifying small-molecule ligands from DNA-encoded libraries against integral membrane protein targets. We use this method to identify novel, potent, and specific inhibitors of NK3, a member of the tachykinin family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The method is simple and broadly applicable to other GPCRs and integral membrane proteins. We have extended the application of DNA-encoded library technology to membrane-associated targets and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting DNA-tagged, small-molecule ligands from complex combinatorial libraries against targets in a heterogeneous milieu, such as the surface of a cell.

  10. Bioelectrochemistry of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolowy, Krzysztof

    This paper deals with processes and phenomena of cell surface bioelectrochemistry in which charges do not move across the cell membrane. First, electrochemical properties of the cell membrane and the cell medium interface are described, and different electric potentials present in biological systems are defined. Methods of cell electrophoresis are then discussed. It is shown that none of the simple electrochemical models of the cell membrane can explain the dependence of cell electrophoretic mobility upon ionic strength and other electrochemical properties of the cell membrane, such as the difference in cell membrane charge as determined electrochemically and biochemically, or the effect of neuraminidase, pH, or membrane potential change on cell electrophoretic mobility. Thus, it is apparent that conclusions drawn from electrophoretic mobility data on the basis of simple models are false. The more complex multilayer-electrochemical model of the cell membrane is then described and shown to explain most electrochemical properties of the cell membrane. Next, different electrochemical techniques that were applied to study cell surfaces are described. It is shown that colloid titration, isoelectric focusing, and partition of cells between two immiscible phases is dependent not only on electrical properties of the cell membrane, but also on the energy of adsorption at cell surfaces of organic molecules used in these methods. Powder electrodes, cell polarography, conductometric titration, and Donnan potential methods are described and it is shown that these methods also produce results of doubtful value and are also often misinterpreted. The contact potential difference method produces results difficult to interpret and only electro-osmotic measurements and potential sensitive molecules are valuable methods. The colloid particle interaction theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) as applied to cell interactions is discussed. It is shown that the

  11. Identification and developmental expression of mRNAs encoding putative insect cuticle hardening hormone, bursicon in the green shore crab Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Wilcockson, David C; Webster, Simon G

    2008-03-01

    Bursicon is the ultimate hormone in insect ecdysis, which is involved in cuticle hardening. Here we show that mRNAs encoding the heterodimeric cystine knot protein bursicon (Burs alpha, beta), are present in crustaceans, suggesting ubiquity of this hormone in arthropods. We firstly report the cloning, sequencing of mRNAs encoding subunits from the water flea, Daphnia arenata and the CNS of the crab, Carcinus maenas, in comparison with insect bursicon subunits. Expression patterns of alpha and beta burs mRNAs were examined by in-situ hybridisation (ISH) and quantitative RT-PCR. In the thoracic ganglion, burs alpha and beta mRNAs were completely colocalised in neurones expressing crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP). However, in the brain and eyestalk, bursicon transcripts were never observed, despite a complex expression pattern of CCAP interneurones. Patterns of expression of burs alpha and beta mRNAs were constitutive during the moult cycle of adult crabs, in stark contrast to the situation in insects. Whilst copy numbers of burs beta transcripts closely matched those of CCAP, those of burs alpha mRNA were around 3-fold higher than burs beta. This pattern was apparent during embryogenesis, where bursicon transcripts were first observed at around 50% development-the same time as first expression of CCAP mRNA. Transcript ratios (burs alpha: beta) increased during development. Our studies have shown, for the first time, that bursicon mRNAs are expressed in identified neurones in the nervous system of crustaceans. These findings will now promote further investigation into the functions of bursicon during the moult cycle and development of crustaceans.

  12. Cloning and mapping of a human RBP56 gene encoding a putative RNA binding protein similar to FUS/TLS and EWS proteins.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, F; Arai, K; Takahashi, E I; Tanigami, A; Ohki, M

    1996-11-15

    The EWS gene was found at the chromosome breakpoints in Ewing sarcoma, and the FUS/TLS gene was found at the breakpoints of myxoid liposarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia. These genes encode proteins that carry a highly homologous RNA binding domain. Fusion proteins made of the N-terminal half of EWS or FUS/TLS and transcriptional regulatory proteins, also derived from genes located at breakpoints, have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of tumors. By PCR amplification of human Namalwa cell cDNA using degenerate primers made from the conserved amino acid sequences in the RNA binding domain of EWS and FUS/TLS, we obtained a cDNA fragment (RBP56 cDNA), the predicted amino acid sequences of which were similar but not identical to those of EWS and FUS/TLS. Using this fragment as a probe, we obtained two isoforms of cDNAs consisting of 2144 and 2153 bp, respectively, which encode proteins consisting of 589 and 592 amino acid residues, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequences of RBP56 protein have a serine-, tyrosine-, glutamine-, and glycine-rich region in the N-terminal region, an RNA binding domain and a C2C2 finger motif in the central region, and degenerate repeats of DR(S)GG(G)-YGG sequences in the C-terminal region. The expression of RBP56 mRNA was observed in all of the human fetal and adult tissues examined, as was the expression of EWS and FUS/TLS mRNAs. The RBP56 gene was mapped to chromosome 17q11.2 to q12.

  13. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of genes encoding putative fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.).

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xiaoming, Wu

    2012-12-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs), a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), have both predicted AGP-like glycosylated regions and putative fasciclin (FAS) domains, which may function in cell adhesion and communication. Previous studies have identified 21, 27, and 34 FLAs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), respectively. In this study, we identified 33 FLAs in the annotated genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis line Chiifu-401-42). Sequence analysis indicated that FAS domains each contain two highly conserved regions, named H1 and H2, and that 17 FLAs from B. rapa (BrFLAs) possess both of these regions. Prediction of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites suggested that 15 BrFLAs were GPI-anchored to the plasma membrane. Additionally, 25 BrFLAs may have been duplicated during the processes that shaped the triplicated genome of the mesopolyploid B. rapa. Expression analyses indicated that BrFLA1, BrFLA11, BrFLA13, BrFLA28 and BrFLA32 were specifically expressed in inflorescence. Meanwhile, BrFLA9 (homologous to AtFLA12) is specifically expressed in stem, and BrFLA6/22 (homologous to AtFLA11) is also highly expressed in stem, suggesting BrFLA6/9/22 may have the same functions as AtFLA11/12 in A. thaliana. Taken together, the identification and bioinformatic analysis of FLAs in B. rapa will open the way for studying their biological functions in plant growth and development as well as evolutionary history of this gene family from A. thaliana to B. rapa.

  14. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N.; Vissing, H.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krueppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Tommerup, N; Vissing, H

    1995-05-20

    We have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krüppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes.

  16. SMC1: an essential yeast gene encoding a putative head-rod-tail protein is required for nuclear division and defines a new ubiquitous protein family

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The smc1-1 mutant was identified initially as a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that had an elevated rate of minichromosome nondisjunction. We have cloned the wild-type SMC1 gene. The sequence of the SMC1 gene predicts that its product (Smc1p) is a 141-kD protein, and antibodies against Smc1 protein detect a protein with mobility of 165 kD. Analysis of the primary and putative secondary structure of Smc1p suggests that it contains two central coiled-coil regions flanked by an amino- terminal nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding head and a conserved carboxy-terminal tail. These analyses also indicate that Smc1p is an evolutionary conserved protein and is a member of a new family of proteins ubiquitous among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The SMC1 gene is essential for viability. Several phenotypic characteristics of the mutant alleles of smc1 gene indicate that its product is involved in some aspects of nuclear metabolism, most likely in chromosome segregation. The smc1-1 and smc1-2 mutants have a dramatic increase in mitotic loss of a chromosome fragment and chromosome III, respectively, but have no increase in mitotic recombination. Depletion of SMC1 function in the ts mutant, smc1-2, causes a dramatic mitosis-related lethality. Smc1p-depleted cells have a defect in nuclear division as evidenced by the absence of anaphase cells. This phenotype of the smc1- 2 mutant is not RAD9 dependent. Based upon the facts that Smc1p is a member of a ubiquitous family, and it is essential for yeast nuclear division, we propose that Smc1p and Smc1p-like proteins function in a fundamental aspect of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell division. PMID:8276886

  17. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  18. Differential Screening Indicates a Dramatic Change in mRNA Profiles during Grape Berry Ripening. Cloning and Characterization of cDNAs Encoding Putative Cell Wall and Stress Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Christopher; Robinson, Simon P.

    2000-01-01

    We used differential screening to isolate ripening-associated cDNAs from a Shiraz grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berry cDNA library. A rapid increase in the mRNA levels of a number of cDNAs not present in unripe fruit occurred in grape berries at the onset of ripening. The putative translation products of some of these clones had homologs in other species that are involved in cell wall structure. These included four proline-rich proteins, a small protein that is similar to the non-catalytic, N-terminal domain of some pectin methylesterases, and two other glutamate-rich proteins. The remainder of the clones encoded putative stress response proteins. These included two thaumatin-like proteins, a metallothionein, a transcription factor, a cytochrome P450 enzyme, and proteins induced by water, sugar, and/or cold stress in other species. Many of the homologs of the grape cDNAs thought to be involved in cell wall structure or stress-related responses also accumulate in a developmental manner in other plants. This may indicate that the grape mRNAs accumulate in response to stresses such as the storage of high concentrations of sugars and rapid cell expansion, or they may accumulate as part of the ripening developmental program. PMID:10712544

  19. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam2 gene encodes a putative pheromone receptor which has a significant homology with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, K; Shimoda, C

    1991-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has two mating-types, h+ (P) and h- (M). The mam2 mutant exhibits an h(-)-specific sterile phenotype. Nucleotide sequencing of the mam2 gene isolated from an S. pombe genomic library revealed an open reading frame composed of 348 amino acids. The deduced mam2 product is a hydrophobic protein of 39 kDa that has significant sequence similarity (26.3% for identical amino acids) with the transmembrane domains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE2 product, the alpha-pheromone receptor. Hydropathicity analysis suggests that the Mam2 protein contains seven possible membrane-spanning domains and a carboxy-terminal hydrophilic region. The mam2 gene was disrupted and found to be non-essential for growth. An h- haploid strain harbouring this disrupted null allele failed to respond to the pheromone of h+ cells, P-factor. These observations imply that the mam2 gene encodes a receptor for P-factor. Transcription of mam2 was induced only when strains containing functional mat1-M allele were cultured under conditions of nitrogen starvation. The mam2 gene was also transcribed in h+/h- diploid strains. The fact that the map1/mam2 homozygous diploid cells are incapable of sporulation implies that the pheromone signalling system is necessary for sporulation in diploid cells. Images PMID:1657593

  20. The Putative GTPase Encoded by MTG3 Functions in a Novel Pathway for Regulating Assembly of the Small Subunit of Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M.; Barros, Mario H.; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5′ extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor. PMID:22621929

  1. The maize zmsmu2 gene encodes a putative RNA-splicing factor that affects protein synthesis and RNA processing during endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Taijoon; Kim, Cheol Soo; Nguyen, Hong N; Meeley, Robert B; Larkins, Brian A

    2007-06-01

    We characterized two maize (Zea mays) mutants, zmsmu2-1 and zmsmu2-3, that result from insertion of a Mutator (Mu) transposable element in the first exon of a gene homologous to the nematode gene, smu-2, which is involved in RNA splicing. In addition to having a starchy endosperm with reduced levels of zein storage proteins, homozygous zmsmu2-1 mutants manifest a number of phenotypes, including defective meristem development. The zmsmu2 mutants have poor seedling viability and surviving plants are sterile. The gene encoding ZmSMU2 is expressed in the endosperm, embryo, and shoot apex, which explains the pleiotropic nature of the mutation. We found that proper expression of Zmsmu2 is required for efficient ribosomal RNA processing, ribosome biogenesis, and protein synthesis in developing endosperm. Based on the pleiotropic nature of the mutations and the known function of animal Zmsmu2 homologs, we propose a possible role for ZmSMU2 in the development of maize endosperm, as well as a mechanism by which misregulation of zmsmu2 causes the mutant phenotypes.

  2. Bioassaying Putative RNA-Binding Motifs in a Protein Encoded by a Gene That Influences Courtship and Visually Mediated Behavior in Drosophila: In Vitro Mutagenesis of Nona

    PubMed Central

    Stanewsky, R.; Fry, T. A.; Reim, I.; Saumweber, H.; Hall, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The no-on-transient-A (nonA) gene of Drosophila melanogaster influences vision, courtship song, and viability. The nonA-encoded polypeptide is inferred to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Although sequence-analysis of NONA implies that it belongs to a special interspecific family of this protein type, it does contain two classical RNA recognition motifs (RRM). Their behavioral significance was assayed by generating transgenic strains that were singly or multiply mutated within the relatively N-terminal motif (RRM1) or within RRM2. Neither class of mutation affected NONA binding to polytene chromosomes. The former mutations led to extremely low viability, accompanied by diminished adult longevities that were much worse than for a nonA-null mutant, implying that faulty interpolypeptide interactions might accompany the effects of the amino-acid substitutions within RRM1. All in vitro-mutated types caused optomotor blindness and an absence of transient spikes in the electroretinogram. Courtship analysis discriminated between the effects of the mutations: the RRM2-mutated type generated song pulses and trains that tended to be mildly mutant. These phenotypic abnormalities reinforce the notion that nonA's ubiquitous expression has its most important consequences in the optic lobes, the thoracic ganglia, or both, depending in part on the nonA allele. PMID:8722780

  3. The putative GTPase encoded by MTG3 functions in a novel pathway for regulating assembly of the small subunit of yeast mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Marie-Françoise; Alushin, Gregory M; Barros, Mario H; Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2012-07-13

    Very little is known about biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. The GTPases encoded by the nuclear MTG1 and MTG2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported to play a role in assembly of the ribosomal 54 S subunit. In the present study biochemical screens of a collection of respiratory deficient yeast mutants have enabled us to identify a third gene essential for expression of mitochondrial ribosomes. This gene codes for a member of the YqeH family of GTPases, which we have named MTG3 in keeping with the earlier convention. Mutations in MTG3 cause the accumulation of the 15 S rRNA precursor, previously shown to have an 80-nucleotide 5' extension. Sucrose gradient sedimentation of mitochondrial ribosomes from temperature-sensitive mtg3 mutants grown at the permissive and restrictive temperatures, combined with immunobloting with subunit-specific antibodies, indicate that Mtg3p is required for assembly of the 30 S but not 54 S ribosomal subunit. The respiratory deficient growth phenotype of an mtg3 null mutant is partially rescued by overexpression of the Mrpl4p constituent located at the peptide exit site of the 54 S subunit. The rescue is accompanied by an increase in processed 15 S rRNA. This suggests that Mtg3p and Mrpl4p jointly regulate assembly of the small subunit by modulating processing of the 15 S rRNA precursor.

  4. The maize (Zea mays L.) roothairless3 gene encodes a putative GPI-anchored, monocot-specific, COBRA-like protein that significantly affects grain yield

    PubMed Central

    Hochholdinger, Frank; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Zimmermann, Roman; Chimot-Marolle, Patricia; da Costa e Silva, Oswaldo; Bruce, Wesley; Lamkey, Kendall R; Wienand, Udo; Schnable, Patrick S

    2008-01-01

    Summary The rth3 (roothairless 3) mutant is specifically affected in root hair elongation. We report here the cloning of the rth3 gene via a PCR-based strategy (amplification of insertion mutagenized sites) and demonstrate that it encodes a COBRA-like protein that displays all the structural features of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Genes of the COBRA family are involved in various types of cell expansion and cell wall biosynthesis. The rth3 gene belongs to a monocot-specific clade of the COBRA gene family comprising two maize and two rice genes. While the rice (Oryza sativa) gene OsBC1L1 appears to be orthologous to rth3 based on sequence similarity (86% identity at the protein level) and maize/rice synteny, the maize (Zea mays L.) rth3-like gene does not appear to be a functional homolog of rth3 based on their distinct expression profiles. Massively parallel signature sequencing analysis detected rth3 expression in all analyzed tissues, but at relatively low levels, with the most abundant expression in primary roots where the root hair phenotype is manifested. In situ hybridization experiments confine rth3 expression to root hair-forming epidermal cells and lateral root primordia. Remarkably, in replicated field trials involving near-isogenic lines, the rth3 mutant conferred significant losses in grain yield. PMID:18298667

  5. The Maize Zmsmu2 Gene Encodes a Putative RNA-Splicing Factor That Affects Protein Synthesis and RNA Processing during Endosperm Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taijoon; Kim, Cheol Soo; Nguyen, Hong N.; Meeley, Robert B.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    We characterized two maize (Zea mays) mutants, zmsmu2-1 and zmsmu2-3, that result from insertion of a Mutator (Mu) transposable element in the first exon of a gene homologous to the nematode gene, smu-2, which is involved in RNA splicing. In addition to having a starchy endosperm with reduced levels of zein storage proteins, homozygous zmsmu2-1 mutants manifest a number of phenotypes, including defective meristem development. The zmsmu2 mutants have poor seedling viability and surviving plants are sterile. The gene encoding ZmSMU2 is expressed in the endosperm, embryo, and shoot apex, which explains the pleiotropic nature of the mutation. We found that proper expression of Zmsmu2 is required for efficient ribosomal RNA processing, ribosome biogenesis, and protein synthesis in developing endosperm. Based on the pleiotropic nature of the mutations and the known function of animal Zmsmu2 homologs, we propose a possible role for ZmSMU2 in the development of maize endosperm, as well as a mechanism by which misregulation of zmsmu2 causes the mutant phenotypes. PMID:17384163

  6. Functional characterization of the gene FoOCH1 encoding a putative α-1,6-mannosyltransferase in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Hui; Xie, Xiao-Ling; Lin, Xian-Feng; Shi, Jin-Xiu; Ding, Zhao-Jian; Ling, Jin-Feng; Xi, Ping-Gen; Zhou, Jia-Nuan; Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin; Jiang, Zi-De

    2014-04-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) is the causal agent of banana Fusarium wilt and has become one of the most destructive pathogens threatening the banana production worldwide. However, few genes related to morphogenesis and pathogenicity of this fungal pathogen have been functionally characterized. In this study, we identified and characterized the disrupted gene in a T-DNA insertional mutant (L953) of FOC with significantly reduced virulence on banana plants. The gene disrupted by T-DNA insertion in L953 harbors an open reading frame, which encodes a protein with homology to α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) in fungi. The deletion mutants (ΔFoOCH1) of the OCH1 orthologue (FoOCH1) in FOC were impaired in fungal growth, exhibited brighter staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Concanavalin A, had less cell wall proteins and secreted more proteins into liquid media than the wild type. Furthermore, the mutation or deletion of FoOCH1 led to loss of ability to penetrate cellophane membrane and decline in hyphal attachment and colonization as well as virulence to the banana host. The mutant phenotypes were fully restored by complementation with the wild type FoOCH1 gene. Our data provide a first evidence for the critical role of FoOCH1 in maintenance of cell wall integrity and virulence of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Colletotrichum acutatum gene encoding a putative pH-responsive transcription regulator is a key virulence determinant during fungal pathogenesis on citrus.

    PubMed

    You, Bang-Jau; Choquer, Mathias; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-09-01

    Postbloom fruit drop of citrus and Key lime anthracnose (KLA) are caused by different pathotypes of Colletotrichum acutatum. Both pathotypes are pathogenic to citrus flowers, resulting in blossom blight and induction of young fruit abscission. Two fungal mutants defective in pathogenicity were recovered from a KLA pathotype after Agrobacterium-mediated mutagenesis. A PacC(KLAP2) gene encoding a polypeptide that resembles many pH-responsive PacC/ Rim101 transcription regulators in fungi was identified from one of the mutants, and functionally characterized to play a crucial role in pathogenesis to both Key lime leaves and citrus flowers. Gene disruption at the Pac(KLAP2) locus created fungal mutants that were hypersensitive to alkaline pH, altered in conidium and appressorium production and germination, and concomitant with reduced virulence to both tissues. The pacC(KLAP2) null mutants had lower alkaline phosphatase and protease activities, but increased pectolytic and lipolytic activities. The mutants initiated penetration and incited lesion formation on Key lime, indistinguishable from the wild type, when a functional copy of PacC(KLAP2) was reintroduced or the leaves were wounded prior to inoculation. The null mutants were blocked at the penetration stage and, thus, failed to initiate the necrotrophic phase. The PacC(KLAP2) transcript was barely detectable when the fungus was grown on medium buffered to pH 3 or 4, yet accumulated to high levels at a pH between 5 and 7. The Pac(KLAP2) transcript was detected 2 days postinoculation on Key lime leaves, correlating with the time of lesion formation. We conclude that PacC(KLAP2) is essential for C. acutatum pathogenesis by regulating multiple physiological and developmental processes.

  8. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Liu, Chonghuai; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession “Baihe-35-1,” which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw.), a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084), increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine. PMID:26697041

  9. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  10. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  11. Distribution of genes encoding putative transmissibility factors among epidemic and nonepidemic strains of Burkholderia cepacia from cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Clode, F E; Kaufmann, M E; Malnick, H; Pitt, T L

    2000-05-01

    In the last 15 years, Burkholderia cepacia has emerged as a significant pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, mainly due to the severity of infection observed in a subset of patients and the fear of transmission of the organism to noncolonized patients. Although patients who deteriorate rapidly cannot be predicted by microbiological characteristics, three genetic markers have been described for strains that spread between patients. These are the cblA gene, encoding giant cable pili; a hybrid of two insertion sequences, IS1356 and IS402; and a 1.4-kb open reading frame known as the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM). The latter two are of unknown function. An epidemic strain lineage was previously identified among CF patients in the United Kingdom that apparently had spread from North America and that was characterized by a specific random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) pattern. We searched for the described genetic markers using specific PCR assays with 117 patient isolates of B. cepacia from 40 United Kingdom hospitals. Isolates were grouped according to genomovar and epidemic strain lineage RAPD pattern with a 10-base primer, P272. A total of 41 isolates from patients in 12 hospitals were classified as the epidemic strain, and 40 of these were distributed in genomovars IIIa (11 isolates), IIIb (1 isolate), and IIIc (28 isolates). All isolates of the epidemic strain were positive for the cblA gene and BCESM, but two lacked the insertion sequence hybrid. None of the 76 sporadic isolates contained cblA or the insertion sequence hybrid, but 11 of them were positive for BCESM. Nonepidemic isolates were distributed among genomovars I or IV (9), II (49), IIIa (11), IIIb (3), and IIIc (4). There were three clusters of cross-infection (one involving two patients and two involving three patients) with isolates of genomovar II. We conclude that in the United Kingdom, a single clonal lineage has spread between and within some hospitals providing care for CF

  12. Three cDNAs encoding vitellogenin homologs from Antarctic copepod, Tigriopus kingsejongensis: Cloning and transcriptional analysis in different maturation stages, temperatures, and putative reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Rin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Ah Ran; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Hyun; Baek, Hea Ja; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Three full-length cDNAs encoding lipoprotein homologs were identified in Tigriopus kingsejongensis, a newly identified copepod from Antarctica. Structural and transcriptional analyses revealed homology with two vitellogenin-like proteins, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2, which were 1855 and 1795 amino acids in length, respectively, along with a third protein, Tik-MEP, which produced a 1517-residue protein with similarity to a melanin engaging protein (MEP) in insects Phylogenetic analysis showed that Vgs in Maxillopods including two Tik-Vgs belong to the arthropod vitellogenin-like clade, which includes clottable proteins (CPs) in decapod crustaceans and vitellogenins in insects. Tik-MEP clustered together with insect MEPs, which appear to have evolved before the apoB-like and arthropod Vg-like clades. Interestingly, no genes orthologous to those found in the apoB clade were identified in Maxillopoda, suggesting that functions of large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) in reproduction and lipid metabolism may be different from those in insect and decapod crustaceans. As suggested by phylogenetic analyses, the two Tik-Vgs belonging to the arthropod Vg-like clade appear to play major roles in oocyte maturation, while Vgs belonging to the apoB clade function primarily in the reproduction of decapod crustaceans. Transcriptional analysis of Tik-Vg expression revealed a 24-fold increase in mature and ovigerous females compared with immature female, whereas expression of Tik-MEP remained low through all reproductive stages. Acute temperature changes did not affect the transcription of Tik-Vg genes, whereas Tik-MEP appeared to be affected by temperature change. Among the three hormones thought to be involved in molting and reproduction in arthropods, only farnesoic acid (FA) induced transcription of the two Tik-Vg genes. Regardless of developmental stage and hormone treatment, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2 exhibited a strong positive correlation in expression, suggesting that expression of these

  13. Molecular evidence for the coordination of nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, revealed by a study on the transcriptional regulation of the agl3EFG operon that encodes a putative carbohydrate transporter in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Cen, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-18

    In the agl3EFGXYZ operon (SCO7167-SCO7162, abbreviated as agl3 operon) of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, agl3EFG genes encode a putative ABC-type carbohydrate transporter. The transcription of this operon has been proved to be repressed by Agl3R (SCO7168), a neighboring GntR-family regulator, and this repression can be released by growth on poor carbon sources. Here in this study, we prove that the transcription of agl3 operon is also directly repressed by GlnR, a central regulator governing the nitrogen metabolism in S. coelicolor. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) employing the agl3 promoter and mixtures of purified recombinant GlnR and Agl3R indicates that GlnR and Agl3R bind to different DNA sequences within the promoter region of agl3 operon, which is further confirmed by the DNase I footprinting assay. As Agl3R and GlnR have been demonstrated to sense the extracellular carbon and nitrogen supplies, respectively, it is hypothesized that the transcription of agl3 operon is stringently governed by the availabilities of extracellular carbon and nitrogen sources. Consistent with the hypothesis, the agl3 operon is further found to be derepressed only under the condition of poor carbon and rich nitrogen supplies, when both regulators are inactivated. It is believed that activation of the expression of agl3 operon may facilitate the absorption of extracellular carbohydrates to balance the ratio of intracellular carbon to nitrogen.

  14. The SUD1 Gene Encodes a Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase and Is a Positive Regulator of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Doblas, Verónica G.; Amorim-Silva, Vítor; Posé, David; Rosado, Abel; Esteban, Alicia; Arró, Montserrat; Azevedo, Herlander; Bombarely, Aureliano; Borsani, Omar; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Ferrer, Albert; Tavares, Rui M.; Botella, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme catalyzes the major rate-limiting step of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway from which sterols and other isoprenoids are synthesized. In contrast with our extensive knowledge of the regulation of HMGR in yeast and animals, little is known about this process in plants. To identify regulatory components of the MVA pathway in plants, we performed a genetic screen for second-site suppressor mutations of the Arabidopsis thaliana highly drought-sensitive drought hypersensitive2 (dry2) mutant that shows decreased squalene epoxidase activity. We show that mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF DRY2 DEFECTS1 (SUD1) gene recover most developmental defects in dry2 through changes in HMGR activity. SUD1 encodes a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows sequence and structural similarity to yeast Degradation of α factor (Doα10) and human TEB4, components of the endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation C (ERAD-C) pathway. While in yeast and animals, the alternative ERAD-L/ERAD-M pathway regulates HMGR activity by controlling protein stability, SUD1 regulates HMGR activity without apparent changes in protein content. These results highlight similarities, as well as important mechanistic differences, among the components involved in HMGR regulation in plants, yeast, and animals. PMID:23404890

  15. Progeny of germ line knockouts of ASI2, a gene encoding a putative signal transduction receptor in Tetrahymena thermophila, fail to make the transition from sexual reproduction to vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuqiang; Yin, Lihui; Cole, Eric S; Udani, Rupa A; Karrer, Kathleen M

    2006-07-15

    The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena has two nuclei: a germ line micronucleus and a somatic macronucleus. The transcriptionally active macronucleus has about 50 copies of each chromosome. At sexual reproduction (conjugation), the parental macronucleus is degraded and new macronucleus develops from a mitotic product of the zygotic micronucleus. Development of the macronucleus involves massive genome remodeling, including deletion of about 6000 specific internal eliminated sequences (IES) and multiple rounds of DNA replication. A gene encoding a putative signal transduction receptor, ASI2, (anlagen stage induced 2) is up-regulated during development of the new macronuclei (anlagen). Macronuclear ASI2 is nonessential for vegetative growth. Homozygous ASI2 germ line knockout cells with wild type parental macronuclei proceed through mating but arrest at late macronuclear anlagen development and die before the first post-conjugation fission. IES elimination occurs in these cells. Two rounds of postzygotic DNA replication occur normally in progeny of ASI2 germ line knockouts, but endoreduplication of the macronuclear genome is arrested. The germ line ASI2 null phenotype is rescued in a mating of a knockout strain with wild type cells.

  16. Expression of PIN and AUX1 genes encoding putative carrier proteins for auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls [correction of epicotyles] under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-10-01

    Etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat showed automorphosis-like growth and development similar to that observed in true microgravity conditions in space. Application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis-like growth on 1 g conditions, suggesting that automorophosis is closely related to auxin polar transport. Strenuous efforts to know the relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in pea seedlings at molecular bases resulted in successful identification of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carrier protein, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 genes in etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were substantially affected, but that of PsPIN2 was not. Roles of these genes in auxin polar transport and automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings are also described.

  17. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  18. ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF CELL SURFACES

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tadao; Hämmerling, Ulrich; de Harven, Etienne; Boyse, Edward A.; Old, Lloyd J.

    1969-01-01

    The representation of mouse alloantigens belonging to three systems, H-2, θ and TL, on the surface of cells from thymus, spleen, lymph nodes, and peritoneal cavity, was studied by electron microscopy with ferritin-labeled antibody. As expected from earlier serological data, TL was confined to thymocytes, θ was found on thymocytes and lymphocytes, and H-2 occurred to some extent on all cell types observed. On reticular cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils, the majority of the cell surface was occupied by H-2; thymocytes had considerably less H-2, and erythrocytes and peritoneal macrophages least of all. In every instance the representation of antigen was discontinuous, the fraction of the cell surface covered being characteristic both of the antigen and of the type of cell. H-2 and θ provide a striking example of this; H-2 is present in far higher amounts on lymphocytes than on thymocytes, whereas the converse is true of θ. Within areas positive for H-2 or θ, protuberances of the surface membrane were often antigen-negative. A better definition of cell surface structure, gained from studies such as this, is necessary for further inquiry into how the cell surface is assembled, and into selective gene action in relation to cellular differentiation. PMID:5347699

  19. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge.

  20. Efficient cell surface display of Lip2 lipase using C-domains of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall proteins of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Laptev, Ivan A; Konstantinova, Tatiana K; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2011-08-01

    The cell surface display of enzymes is of great interest because of its simplified purification stage and the possibility for recycling in industrial processes. In this study, we have focused on the cell wall immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lip2 protein--an enzyme that has a wide technological application. By genome analysis of Y. lipolytica in addition to already characterized Ylcwp1, we identified five putative open reading frames encoding glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. Lip2 translation fusion with the carboxyl termini of these proteins revealed that all proteins were capable of immobilizing lipase in active form on the cell surface. The highest level of cell-bound lipase activity was achieved using C-domains encoded by YlCWP1, YlCWP3 (YALI0D27214g) and YlCWP6 (YALI0F18282g) comprising 16,173 ± 1,800, 18,785 ± 1,130 and 17,700 ± 2,101 U/g dry cells, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, these results significantly exceed the highest cell-bound lipase activity previously reported for engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris strains. Furthermore, the lyophilized biomass retained the activity and was robust to collecting/resuspending procedures. Nevertheless, in most cases, a substantial amount of lipase activity was also found in the growth medium. Further work will be necessary to better understand the nature of this phenomenon.

  1. Furrowing in altered cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, R

    1976-02-01

    Understanding the process which established the cell division mechanism requires analysis of the role of the responding surface as well as that of stimulatory subsurface structures. Cell surface was altered by the expansion which occurs during exovate formation. Exovates appear on the surface of fertilized Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Echinarachnius parma eggs in response to extreme flattening. They result from cytoplasmic outflow initiated in a very restricted portion of the egg surface. Observations of the formation process in pigmented A. lixula eggs revealed that the original surface may be expanded about 100 fold as the exovate swells. When exovates formed 15-30 minutes after fertilization contain the mitotic apparatus, they divide synchronously with flattened controls. If nucleated exovates are established after the beginning of first cleavage, furrows appear in ten minutes. Exovates established after the beginning of second cleavage develop furrows four minutes after the entrance of the the mitsotic apparatus. Cytoplasm beneath damaged exovate surfaces sometimes develops partial constrictions independently of the surface in the plane the furrow would have occupied. These results suggest that normal surface structure is unnecessary for furrow establishment and function.

  2. Differential Labeling of Cell-surface and Internalized Proteins after Antibody Feeding of Live Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the cell-surface localization of a putative transmembrane receptor in cultured neurons, we labeled the protein on the surface of live neurons with a specific primary antibody raised against an extracellular portion of the protein. Given that receptors are trafficked to and from the surface, if cells are permeabilized after fixation then both cell-surface and internal protein will be detected by the same labeled secondary antibody. Here, we adapted a method used to study protein trafficking (“antibody feeding”) to differentially label protein that had been internalized by endocytosis during the antibody incubation step and protein that either remained on the cell surface or was trafficked to the surface during this period. The ability to distinguish these two pools of protein was made possible through the incorporation of an overnight blocking step with highly-concentrated unlabeled secondary antibody after an initial incubation of unpermeabilized neurons with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody. After the blocking step, permeabilization of the neurons allowed detection of the internalized pool with a fluorescent secondary antibody labeled with a different fluorophore. Using this technique we were able to obtain important information about the subcellular location of this putative receptor, revealing that it was, indeed, trafficked to the cell-surface in neurons. This technique is broadly applicable to a range of cell types and cell-surface proteins, providing a suitable antibody to an extracellular epitope is available. PMID:24561550

  3. Molecular cloning and tissue expression of FAT, the human homologue of the Drosophila fat gene that is located on chromosome 4q34-q35 and encodes a putative adhesion molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P. Owen, M.J.; Hanby, A.M.; Poulsom, R.

    1995-11-20

    FAT, a new member of the human cadherin super-family, has been isolated from the T-leukemia cell line J6. The predicted protein closely resembles the Drosophila tumor suppressor fat, which is essential for controlling cell proliferation during Drosophila development. The gene has the potential to encode a large transmembrane protein of nearly 4600 residues with 34 tandem cadherin repeats, five EGF-like repeats, and a laminin A-G domain. The cytoplasmic sequence contains two domains with distant homology to the cadherin catenin-binding region. Northern blotting analysis of J6 mRNA demonstrated full-length, approximately 15-kb, FAT message in addition to several 5{prime}-truncated transcripts. In addition to its presence in J6 cells, in situ hybridization revealed FAT mRNA expression in epithelia and in some mesenchymal compartments. Furthermore, higher levels of expression were observed in fetal, as opposed to adult, tissue, suggesting that its expression may be developmentally regulated in these tissues. FAT shows homologies with a number of proteins important in developmental decisions and cell:cell communication and is the first fat-like protein reported in vertebrates. The gene encoding FAT was located by in situ hybridization on chromosome 4q34-q35. We propose that this family of molecules is likely to be important in mammalian developmental processes and cell communication. 80 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Trichinella spiralis mtDNA: a nematode mitochondrial genome that encodes a putative ATP8 and normally structured tRNAS and has a gene arrangement relatable to those of coelomate metazoans.

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, D V; Brown, W M

    2001-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the nematode Trichinella spiralis has been amplified in four overlapping fragments and 16,656 bp of its sequence has been determined. This sequence contains the 37 genes typical of metazoan mtDNAs, including a putative atp8, which is absent from all other nematode mtDNAs examined. The genes are transcribed from both mtDNA strands and have an arrangement relatable to those of coelomate metazoans, but not to those of secernentean nematodes. All protein genes appear to initiate with ATN codons, typical for metazoans. Neither TTG nor GTT start codons, inferred for several genes of other nematodes, were found. The 22 T. spiralis tRNA genes fall into three categories: (i) those with the potential to form conventional "cloverleaf" secondary structures, (ii) those with TPsiC arm + variable arm replacement loops, and (iii) those with DHU-arm replacement loops. Mt-tRNA(R) has a 5'-UCG-3' anticodon, as in most other metazoans, instead of the very unusual 5'-ACG-3' present in the secernentean nematodes. The sequence also contains a large repeat region that is polymorphic in size at the population and/or individual level. PMID:11156984

  5. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  6. Introducing point mutations into the ATGs of the putative open reading frames of the HSV-1 gene encoding the latency associated transcript (LAT) reduces its anti-apoptosis activity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Henderson, Gail; Hsiang, Chinhui; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2008-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) gene has anti-apoptosis activity that directly or indirectly enhances the virus's reactivation phenotype in small animal models. The first 1.5 kb of the primary 8.3 kb LAT is sufficient and some or all of it is necessary for LAT's anti-apoptosis in transient transfection assays and for LAT's ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. Based on LAT's genomic sequence, the first 1.5 kb contains eight potential open reading frames (ORFs) defined as an ATG followed by an in frame termination codon. In this study, point mutations were introduced into the ATGs of ORFs present in the 1.5 kb fragment of LAT. Mutagenesis of all eight ATGs in LAT ORFs consistently reduced the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT in transiently transfected mouse neuroblastoma cells regardless of whether apoptosis was induced by caspase 8 or caspase 9. Mutation of the six ATGs located in the stable intron sequences within the 1.5 kb LAT had a dramatic effect on caspase 9, but not caspase 8, induced apoptosis. For both caspase 8 and caspase 9 induced apoptosis, mutating the two ATGs in the exon of the LAT 1.5 kb fragment reduced, but did not eliminate the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT. These studies suggest that altering the fine structure of regulatory RNA or expression of a putative LAT ORF regulates the anti-apoptosis activity of LAT. These studies also indicate that more than one function is present in the 1.5 kb LAT fragment.

  7. Amyloid-beta oligomers increase the localization of prion protein at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Beraldo, Flavio H; Hajj, Glaucia N M; Guimaraes, Andre L; Jürgensen, Sofia; Wasilewska-Sampaio, Ana Paula; Hirata, Pedro H F; Souza, Ivana; Machado, Cleiton F; Wong, Daisy Y-L; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T; Prado, Vania F; Rylett, R Jane; Martins, Vilma R; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-05-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) interacts with distinct proteins at the cell surface to interfere with synaptic communication. Recent data have implicated the prion protein (PrP(C)) as a putative receptor for Aβ. We show here that Aβ oligomers signal in cells in a PrP(C)-dependent manner, as might be expected if Aβ oligomers use PrP(C) as a receptor. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and cell surface protein biotinylation experiments indicated that treatment with Aβ oligomers, but not monomers, increased the localization of PrP(C) at the cell surface in cell lines. These results were reproduced in hippocampal neuronal cultures by labeling cell surface PrP(C). In order to understand possible mechanisms involved with this effect of Aβ oligomers, we used live cell confocal and total internal reflection microscopy in cell lines. Aβ oligomers inhibited the constitutive endocytosis of PrP(C), but we also found that after Aβ oligomer-treatment PrP(C) formed more clusters at the cell surface, suggesting the possibility of multiple effects of Aβ oligomers. Our experiments show for the first time that Aβ oligomers signal in a PrP(C)-dependent way and that they can affect PrP(C) trafficking, increasing its localization at the cell surface.

  8. huASH1 protein, a putative transcription factor encoded by a human homologue of the Drosophila ash1 gene, localizes to both nuclei and cell-cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Blechman, J; Tada, S; Rozovskaia, T; Itoyama, T; Bullrich, F; Mazo, A; Croce, C M; Geiger, B; Canaani, E

    2000-06-20

    During animal development, regions of the embryo become committed to position-specific identities, which are determined by spatially restricted expression of Hox/homeotic genes. This expression pattern is initially established by the activity of the segmentation genes and is subsequently maintained during the proliferative stage through the action of transcription factors encoded by the trithorax (trx) and Polycomb (Pc) groups of genes. trithorax (trx)and ash1 (absent, small, or homeotic 1) are members of the Drosophila trx group. Their products are associated with chromosomes and are believed to activate transcription of target genes through chromatin remodeling. Recently, we reported molecular studies indicating that TRX and ASH1 proteins act in concert to bind simultaneously to response elements located at close proximity within the same set of target genes. Extension of these and other studies to mammalian systems required identification and cloning of the mammalian homologue of ash1 (the mammalian homologue of trx, ALL-1, was previously cloned). We have identified a human expressed sequence tag (EST) clone with similarity to the SET domain of Drosophila ASH1, and used it to clone the human gene. huASH1 resides at chromosomal band 1q21. The gene is expressed in multiple tissues as an approximately 10.5-kb transcript and encodes a protein of 2962 residues. The protein contains a SET domain, a PHD finger, four AT hooks, and a region with homology to the bromodomain. The last region is not present in Drosophila ASH1, and as such might confer to the human protein a unique additional function. Using several anti-huASH1 Ab for immunostaining of cultured cells, we found that the protein is distributed in intranuclear speckles, and unexpectedly also in intercellular junctions. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of huASH1 and several junctional proteins localized the huASH1 protein into tight junctions. The significance of huASH1 dual location is discussed. In

  9. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D.; Hong Cho, Kyu; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor. PMID:26764094

  10. C20orf9-003 (ACI-1), a gene localized on chromosome 20q13.12 encoding for a 49 kD cytoplasmic protein with a putative nucleotide binding site.

    PubMed

    Scott, Boyd B; Zaratin, Paola F; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Barnes, Michael R; Murdock, Paul R; Lynch, Frank J; Duckworth, Malcolm

    2004-02-01

    Murine NGD5 is a gene identified from NG108-15 cells which is postulated to be involved in opioid receptor function. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a cDNA C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) encoding the human orthologue of the mouse NGD5. Analysis of the genomic structure revealed that C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) contains 13 exons and 12 introns, spanning 52.5kb of genomic DNA and is a variant of C20orf9. Chromosomal localization of human C20orf9-003 (ACI-1) assigned this gene to chromosome 20q13.12. Genes at this locus have been associated with the progression and possibly the development of various cancers. In addition several linkage studies support the possibility that one or more genes affecting obesity are located in 20q13. No function can be clearly assigned to C20orf9-003 (ACI-1), however, the protein has a cytoplasmic subcellular location and the secondary structure contains a Rossman fold like feature which is found in many nucleotide binding proteins.

  11. bldA-dependent expression of the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase gene (lipA) is mediated by the product of a contiguous gene, lipR, encoding a putative transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Servín-González, L; Castro, C; Pérez, C; Rubio, M; Valdez, F

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular lipase synthesis by Streptomyces lividans 66 carrying the cloned lipase gene (lipA) from Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 was found to be growth phase dependent, since lipase was secreted into the medium mainly during the stationary phase; S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed abundant lipA transcripts in RNA preparations obtained during the stationary phase but not in those obtained during exponential growth. Transcription from the lipA promoter was dependent on the presence of lipR, a contiguous downstream gene with a very high guanine-plus-cytosine content (80.2%). The deduced lipR product consists of a protein of 934 amino acids that shows similarity to known transcriptional activators and has a strong helix-turn-helix motif at its C terminus; this motif is part of a domain homologous to DNA-binding domains of bacterial regulators of the UhpA/LuxR superfamily. The lipR sequence revealed the presence of a leucine residue, encoded by the rare TTA codon, which caused bldA dependence of lipA transcription in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2); replacement of the TTA codon by the alternate CTC leucine codon alleviated bidA dependence but not the apparent growth phase-dependent regulation of lipA transcription. When lipR expression was induced in a controlled fashion during the exponential growth phase, by placing it under the inducible tipA promoter, lipase synthesis was shifted to the exponential growth phase, indicating that the timing of lipR expression, and not its bldA dependence, is the main cause for stationary-phase transcription of lipA. PMID:9401043

  12. ZmRFP1, the putative ortholog of SDIR1, encodes a RING-H2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent manner in maize.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Liu, Quanjun; Wu, Jianyu; Ding, Junqiang

    2012-03-10

    Drought is one of the most important limiting factors in crop production. To identify genes required for the drought stress response in the cereal crop maize, a gene coding for RING-finger protein (ZmRFP1), which is highly responsive to PEG-induced drought stress, was isolated by mRNA differential display and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The ZmRFP1 encodes a protein of 280 amino acids and contains a single C(3)H(2)C(3)-type RING motif in its C-terminal region. ZmRFP1 is an ortholog of Arabidopsis SDIR1 (salt- and drought-induced RING finger 1) (66% identity to AtSDIR1).The recombinant ZmRFP1 protein purified from Escherichia coli exhibited an in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that the transcript levels of ZmRFP1 were higher in aerial tissues including stems, leaves, tassels and immature ears, and were markedly up-regulated by drought stress, and exogenous ABA, but not by salt, heat and cold stresses. Transient expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ZmRFP1 fusion protein in onion cells revealed a plasma membrane localization of the protein. Further analysis of ZmRFP1 transcripts between an ABA-deficient transposon mutant viviparous14 (vp14) and its isogenic wild-type line W22 showed that ZmRFP1 transcript levels were induced significantly in the wild-type line under drought stress, but not in the mutant line VP14. These results indicate that ZmRFP1 responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent way and is likely to function in the ubiquitin conjunction pathway. The ZmRFP1 might serve as a candidate gene in genetic improvement for drought tolerance engineering in cereal crop plants.

  13. Constitutive heterologous overexpression of a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR gene encoding a putative disease resistance protein from wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata in Arabidopsis and tobacco enhances resistance to phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Singer, Stacy D; Muhammad, Hanif; Li, Zhi; Wang, Xiping

    2017-03-01

    Plants use resistance (R) proteins to detect pathogen effector proteins and activate their innate immune response against the pathogen. The majority of these proteins contain an NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain along with a leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and some also bear a toll interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a TIR-NB-ARC-LRR R protein (VpTNL1) (GenBank accession number KX649890) from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession "Baihe-35-1", which was identified previously from a transcriptomic analysis of leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (PM; Erysiphe necator (Schw.)). The VpTNL1 transcript was found to be highly induced in V. pseudoreticulata following inoculation with E. necator, as well as treatment with salicylic acid (SA). Sequence analysis demonstrated that the deduced amino acid sequence contained a TIR domain at the N-terminus, along with an NB-ARC and four LRRs domains within the C-terminus. Constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type or dwarf phenotype. Intriguingly, the phenotypically normal transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to Arabidopsis PM, Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Similarly, constitutive expression of VpTNL1 in Nicotiana tabacum was found to confer enhanced resistance to tobacco PM, Erysiphe cichoacearum DC. Subsequent isolation of the VpTNL1 promoter and deletion analysis indicated that TC-rich repeats and TCA elements likely play an important role in its response to E. necator and SA treatment, respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that VpTNL1 contributes to PM resistance in grapevine and provide an interesting gene target for the future amelioration of grape via breeding and/or biotechnology.

  14. Enhancing the stability of xylanase from Cellulomonas fimi by cell-surface display on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-P; Hwang, I-E; Lin, C-J; Wang, H-J; Tseng, C-P

    2012-03-01

    The cell-surface display of Cex, which encodes xylanase and exoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, was constructed on Escherichia coli using PgsA as the anchor protein. Characterization of the cell-surface display of Cex was performed. PgsA was fused to the N-terminus of Cex and six histidines were utilized as spacers between the targeting and anchor proteins. Successful cell-surface display of Cex was demonstrated by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses on E. coli C41 (DE3). According to the time-course analysis, the xylanase activity of Cex was achieved at 49Ug(-1) dry cell weight after 12 h culture at 37°C. The optimal temperature and pH ranges of the cell-surface displayed protein with whole-cell were broader than the corresponding ranges of the purified form. Further determination of thermostability indicated that the half-life of cell-surface displayed Cex was 1·6 times longer than that of purified Cex at 60°C. We have successfully developed the cell-surface display of xylanase on E. coli. The cell-surface display can enhance the stability of xylanase against changes in temperature and has the potential of becoming a whole-cell biocatalyst for industrial applications, such as biobleaching of paper and production of renewable energy. The results demonstrated that the cell-surface display of xylanase embedded in the cell membrane is more stable than that of the purified enzyme. Thus, to improve the stability of heterologous proteins production, cell-surface display using the PgsA anchor protein as a tool can be considered in E. coli. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  16. Detection of Cell Surface Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, cells surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact. PMID:23296774

  17. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  18. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change. PMID:24844289

  19. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  20. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  1. Characterization of the ebpfm pilus-encoding operon of Enterococcus faecium and its role in biofilm formation and virulence in a murine model of urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Singh, Kavindra V.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Fothergill, Timothy; Ton-That, Hung; Murray, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    We recently identified 15 genes encoding putative surface proteins with features of MSCRAMMs and/or pili in the Enterococcus faecium TX16 (DO) genome, including four predicted pilus-encoding gene clusters; we also demonstrated that one of these, ebpABCfm, is transcribed as an operon, that its putative major pilus subunit, EbpCfm (also called PilB), is polymerized into high molecular weight complexes, and that it is enriched among clinical E. faecium isolates. Here, we created a deletion of the ebpABCfm operon in an endocarditis-derived E. faecium strain (TX82) and showed, by a combination of whole-cell ELISA, flow cytometry, immunoblot and immunogold electron microscopy, that this deletion abolished EbpCfm expression and eliminated EbpCfm-containing pili from the cell surface. However, transcription of the downstream sortase, bpsfm, was not affected. Importantly, the ebpABCfm deletion resulted in significantly reduced biofilm formation (p < 0.0001) and initial adherence (p < 0.0001) versus the wild-type; both were restored by complementing ebpABCfm in trans, which also restored cell surface expression of EbpCfm and pilus production. Furthermore, the deletion mutant was significantly attenuated in two independent mixed infection mouse urinary tract experiments, i.e., outnumbered by the wild-type in kidneys (p = 0.0003 and < 0.0001, respectively) and urinary bladders (p = 0.0003 and = 0.002). In conclusion, we have shown that the ebpABCfm locus encodes pili on the E. faecium TX82 cell surface and provide the first evidence that pili of this emerging pathogen are important for its ability to form biofilm and to cause infection in an ascending UTI model. PMID:20676385

  2. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-08-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose.

  3. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  4. Detection of cell surface dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact.

  5. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  6. BACE1 activity regulates cell surface contactin-2 levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although BACE1 is a major therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), potential side effects of BACE1 inhibition are not well characterized. BACE1 cleaves over 60 putative substrates, however the majority of these cleavages have not been characterized. Here we investigated BACE1-mediated cleavage of human contactin-2, a GPI-anchored cell adhesion molecule. Results Our initial protein sequence analysis showed that contactin-2 harbors a strong putative BACE1 cleavage site close to its GPI membrane linker domain. When we overexpressed BACE1 in CHO cells stably transfected with human contactin-2, we found increased release of soluble contactin-2 in the conditioned media. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of BACE1 in CHO cells expressing human contactin-2 and mouse primary neurons decreased soluble contactin-2 secretion. The BACE1 cleavage site mutation 1008MM/AA dramatically impaired soluble contactin-2 release. We then asked whether contactin-2 release induced by BACE1 expression would concomitantly decrease cell surface levels of contactin-2. Using immunofluorescence and surface-biotinylation assays, we showed that BACE1 activity tightly regulates contactin-2 surface levels in CHO cells as well as in mouse primary neurons. Finally, contactin-2 levels were decreased in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples correlating inversely with elevated BACE1 levels in the same samples. Conclusion Our results clearly demonstrate that mouse and human contactin-2 are physiological substrates for BACE1. BACE1-mediated contactin-2 cleavage tightly regulates the surface expression of contactin-2 in neuronal cells. Given the role of contactin-2 in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, our data suggest that BACE1 may play an important role in these physiological processes by regulating contactin-2 surface levels. PMID:24405708

  7. Plasminogen activation on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, Colin

    2002-01-01

    The plasminogen activation system appears to be widely involved in many biological processes in health and disease, but the regulation of plasmin generation or the mechanisms of stimulation by cell surface receptors are not well understood. Cell surface plasminogen activation requires binding sites for plasminogen substrate and activator enzyme before enhancement of plasmin generation rate is observed. The cell surface moieties involved in binding these reactants appear to be a mixed group of proteins and other molecules, many of which have been extensively investigated. The binding of plasminogen in particular is characterized by heterogeneous receptor molecules, present in high number but generally with low affinity for plasminogen. The low affinity of the interaction, with Kd values around 10(-6) M, presents considerable technical difficulties when studying and quantitating plasminogen binding to cells or isolated receptors. Studying plasminogen activation kinetics in the presence of cells also presents technical difficulties and raises difficult questions on interpretation of results. However, approaches developed to study enzyme activation systems in other areas of hemostasis may also be applied to the problems associated with pericellular proteolysis. Models should be developed that match In vitro experimental data and help us understand the meaning of kinetic constants derived from these systems. In this way it should be possible to better understand the regulation of plasminogen activation around the cell under normal conditions and in a variety of disease states where cell-associated plasminogen activation is believed to be up-regulated. Ultimately, a sound understanding of theses regulatory mechanisms will enable us to devise strategies for modulating proteolytic activity, test these approaches in well designed In vitro systems and relate these results to the in vivo situation.

  8. Antibodies reactive with cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sela, B A; Wang, J L; Edelman, G M

    1975-01-01

    Normal and immune sera from various animal species were fractionated on columns of Sepharose covalently coupled with the glycoprotein fetuin. Elution of the material bound to fetuin yielded low but reproducible amounts of protein, ranging from 0.02 to 0.2% of the protein mass of the input sera. This material has been identified by immunoelectrophoresis in agar and by zone electrophoresis on cellulose acetate as immunoglobulin. The Ig fractions bound and agglutinated erythrocytes of various species, and also bound to cells from various mouse tissues including heart, kidney, thymus, and spleen. In all cases, the binding was inhibited by glycoproteins such as fetuin and thyroglobulin, by a glycopeptide isolated from fetuin, and by some bacterial lipopolysaccharides. When the binding of these Ig fractions to mouse splenocytes was tested in the presence of 17 saccharides, no inhibition of binding was observed except by sialic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and D-mannose, all of which showed partial inhibition. Inasmuch as these four saccharides are present on the carbohydrate moiety of fetuin, the results suggest that the isolated material is a carbohydrate-specific Ig (CS-Ig) fraction of serum capable of binding to the carbohydrate portion of cell surface receptors and glycoproteins. When bound to lymphocytes, these CS-Ig molecules induced redistribution (patching and capping) of cell surface receptors. Moreover, the CS-Ig fractions from chicken and rabbit sera were weakly mitogenic for mouse splenic lymphocytes. CS-Ig fractions are useful new reagents for studying glycoproteins and the interactions and activities of cell surface carbohydrates. Images PMID:48249

  9. Cell surface engineering of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Zhao, Weian; Gupta, Ashish; Loh, Wei Li; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging the capacity to promote regeneration, stem cell therapies offer enormous hope for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, a significant barrier to the effective implementation of cell therapies is the inability to target a large quantity of viable cells with high efficiency to tissues of interest. Systemic infusion is desired as it minimizes the invasiveness of cell therapy, and maximizes practical aspects of repeated doses. However, cell types such as mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a poor homing capability or lose their capacity to home following culture expansion (i.e. FASEB J 21:3197-3207, 2007; Circulation 108:863-868, 2003; Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation 32:1005-1011; Blood 104:3581-3587, 2004). To address this challenge, we have developed a simple platform technology to chemically attach cell adhesion molecules to the cell surface to improve the homing efficiency to specific tissues. This chemical approach involves a stepwise process including (1) treatment of cells with sulfonated biotinyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide to introduce biotin groups on the cell surface, (2) addition of streptavidin that binds to the biotin on the cell surface and presents unoccupied binding sites, and (3) attachment of biotinylated targeting ligands that promote adhesive interactions with vascular endothelium. Specifically, in our model system, a biotinylated cell rolling ligand, sialyl Lewisx (SLeX), found on the surface of leukocytes (i.e., the active site of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1)), is conjugated on MSC surface. The SLeX engineered MSCs exhibit a rolling response on a P-selectin coated substrate under shear stress conditions. This indicates that this approach can be used to potentially target P-selectin expressing endothelium in the more marrow or at sites of inflammation. Importantly, the surface modification has no adverse impact on MSCs' native phenotype including their multilineage

  10. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  11. Paired Expression Analysis of Tumor Cell Surface Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Sindiri, Sivasish; Duris, Christine; Wen, Xinyu; He, Jianbin; Wei, Jun S.; Jarzembowski, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antibody-based therapy or with T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is useful to the extent that the cell surface membrane protein being targeted is not expressed on normal tissues. The most successful CAR-based (anti-CD19) or antibody-based therapy (anti-CD20) in hematologic malignancies has the side effect of eliminating the normal B cell compartment. Targeting solid tumors may not provide a similar expendable marker. Beyond antibody to Her2/NEU and EGFR, very few antibody-based and no CAR-based therapies have seen broad clinical application for solid tumors. To expand the way in which the surfaceome of solid tumors can be analyzed, we created an algorithm that defines the pairwise relative overexpression of surface antigens. This enables the development of specific immunotherapies that require the expression of two discrete antigens on the surface of the tumor target. This dyad analysis was facilitated by employing the Hotelling’s T-squared test (Hotelling–Lawley multivariate analysis of variance) for two independent variables in comparison to a third constant entity (i.e., gene expression levels in normal tissues). We also present a unique consensus scoring mechanism for identifying transcripts that encode cell surface proteins. The unique application of our bioinformatics processing pipeline and statistical tools allowed us to compare the expression of two membrane protein targets as a pair, and to propose a new strategy based on implementing immunotherapies that require both antigens to be expressed on the tumor cell surface to trigger therapeutic effector mechanisms. Specifically, we found that, for MYCN amplified neuroblastoma, pairwise expression of ACVR2B or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with GFRA3, GFRA2, Cadherin 24, or with one another provided the strongest hits. For MYCN, non-amplified stage 4 neuroblastoma, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1, or ALK paired with GFRA2, GFRA3, SSK1, GPR173, or

  12. Enrichment of putative prostate cancer stem cells after androgen deprivation: upregulation of pluripotency transactivators concurs with resistance to androgen deprivation in LNCaP cell lines.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Daniel; Zheng, Junying; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Shunyou; Yamashiro, Joyce; Reiter, Robert E; Huang, Jiaoti; Zeng, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Prostate cancer stem cells (PCSC) offer theoretical explanations to many clinical and biological behaviors of the disease in human. In contrast to approaches of using side populations and cell-surface markers to isolate and characterize the putative PCSC, we hypothesize that androgen deprivation leads to functional enrichment of putative PCSC. Human prostate cancer lines LNCaP, LAPC4 and LAPC9 were depleted of androgen in cell cultures and in castrated SCID mice. The resultant androgen deprivation-resistant or castration-resistant populations, in particular in LNCaP and its derivative cell lines, displayed increased expression of pluripotency transactivators and significantly higher tumorigenicity. Individual tumor cell clones were isolated from castration-resistant bulk cultures of LNCaP (CR-LNCaP) and tested for tumorigenicity in male SCID mice under limiting dilution conditions. As few as 200 cells were able to form spheres in vitro, and generate tumors with similar growth kinetics as 10(6) LNCaP or 10(4) CR-LNCaP cells in vivo. These putative PCSC were CD44(+) /CD24(-) and lack the expression of prostate lineage proteins. When transplanted into the prostate of an intact male SCID mouse, these putative PCSC seemed to show limited differentiation into Ck5(+) , Ck8(+) , Ck5(+) /Ck8(+) , and AR(+) cells. On the other hand, stable transduction of LNCaP with retrovirus encoding Sox2 led to androgen-deprivation resistant growth and down-regulation of major prostate lineage gene products in vitro. Concurrence of overexpression of pluripotency transactivators and resistance to androgen deprivation supported the role of putative PCSC in the emergence of prostate cancer resistant to androgen deprivation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  14. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor. © 2016 Roy, Hashmi, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Architecture of the Bacteroides cellulosolvens Cellulosome: Description of a Cell Surface-Anchoring Scaffoldin and a Family 48 Cellulase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Bayer, Edward A.; Goldman, Milana; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael

    2004-01-01

    A large gene downstream of the primary Bacteroides cellulosolvens cellulosomal scaffoldin (cipBc, now renamed scaA) was sequenced. The gene, termed scaB, contained an N-terminal leader peptide followed by 10 type I cohesins, an “X” domain of unknown structure and function, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) surface-anchoring module. In addition, a previously identified gene in a different part of the genome, encoding for a dockerin-borne family 48 cellulosomal glycoside hydrolase (Cel48), was sequenced completely, and a putative cellulosome-related family 9 glycosyl hydrolase was detected. Recombinant fusion proteins, comprising dockerins derived from either the ScaA scaffoldin or Cel48, were overexpressed. Their interaction with ScaA and ScaB cohesins was examined by immunoassay. The results indicated that the ScaB type I cohesin of the new anchoring protein binds selectively to the ScaA dockerin, whereas the Cel48 dockerin binds specifically to the type II ScaA cohesin 5. Thus, by virtue of the 11 type II ScaA cohesins and the 10 type I ScaB cohesins, the relatively simple two-component cellulosome-integrating complex would potentially incorporate 110 enzyme molecules onto the cell surface via the ScaB SLH module. Compared to previously described cellulosome systems, the apparent roles of the B. cellulosolvens cohesins are reversed, in that the type II cohesins are located on the enzyme-binding primary scaffoldin, whereas the type I cohesins are located on the anchoring scaffoldin. The results underscore the extensive diversity in the supramolecular architecture of cellulosome systems in nature. PMID:14761991

  16. Actin cortex architecture regulates cell surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Priyamvada; Clark, Andrew G; Smith, Matthew B; Cassani, Davide A D; Dierkes, Kai; Ragab, Anan; Roux, Philippe P; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2017-06-01

    Animal cell shape is largely determined by the cortex, a thin actin network underlying the plasma membrane in which myosin-driven stresses generate contractile tension. Tension gradients result in local contractions and drive cell deformations. Previous cortical tension regulation studies have focused on myosin motors. Here, we show that cortical actin network architecture is equally important. First, we observe that actin cortex thickness and tension are inversely correlated during cell-cycle progression. We then show that the actin filament length regulators CFL1, CAPZB and DIAPH1 regulate mitotic cortex thickness and find that both increasing and decreasing thickness decreases tension in mitosis. This suggests that the mitotic cortex is poised close to a tension maximum. Finally, using a computational model, we identify a physical mechanism by which maximum tension is achieved at intermediate actin filament lengths. Our results indicate that actin network architecture, alongside myosin activity, is key to cell surface tension regulation.

  17. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Tanner

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of ultrathin conformal coatings that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Significantly, this work provides novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Encapsulation of cells and tissue offers a rational approach for attenuating deleterious host responses towards transplanted cells, but a need exists to develop cell encapsulation strategies that minimize transplant volume. Towards this end, we endeavored to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties on the extracellular surface of individual pancreatic islets through a process of layer-by-layer (LbL) self assembly. We first describe the formation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich conformal coatings on islets via LbL self assembly of poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG(biotin) and streptavidin. Multilayer thin films conformed to the geometrically and chemically heterogeneous islet surface, and could be assembled without loss of islet viability or function. Significantly, coated islets performed comparably to untreated controls in a murine model of allogenic intraportal islet transplantation, and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells or cell aggregates. Based on these findings, we next postulated that structurally similar PLL-g-PEG copolymers comprised of shorter PEG grafts might be used to initiate and propagate the assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on pancreatic islets, while simultaneously preserving islet viability. Through control of PLL

  18. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  19. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes.

  20. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  1. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  2. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  3. Endocytosis and Vacuolar Degradation of the Yeast Cell Surface Glucose Sensors Rgt2 and Snf3*

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Adhiraj; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Sensing and signaling the presence of extracellular glucose is crucial for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of its fermentative metabolism, characterized by high glucose flux through glycolysis. The yeast senses glucose through the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3, which serve as glucose receptors that generate the signal for induction of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism. Rgt2 and Snf3 detect high and low glucose concentrations, respectively, perhaps because of their different affinities for glucose. Here, we provide evidence that cell surface levels of glucose sensors are regulated by ubiquitination and degradation. The glucose sensors are removed from the plasma membrane through endocytosis and targeted to the vacuole for degradation upon glucose depletion. The turnover of the glucose sensors is inhibited in endocytosis defective mutants, and the sensor proteins with a mutation at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to degradation. Of note, the low affinity glucose sensor Rgt2 remains stable only in high glucose grown cells, and the high affinity glucose sensor Snf3 is stable only in cells grown in low glucose. In addition, constitutively active, signaling forms of glucose sensors do not undergo endocytosis, whereas signaling defective sensors are constitutively targeted for degradation, suggesting that the stability of the glucose sensors may be associated with their ability to sense glucose. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that the amount of glucose available dictates the cell surface levels of the glucose sensors and that the regulation of glucose sensors by glucose concentration may enable yeast cells to maintain glucose sensing activity at the cell surface over a wide range of glucose concentrations. PMID:24451370

  4. TgaA, a VirB1-Like Component Belonging to a Putative Type IV Secretion System of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region. PMID:24951779

  5. TgaA, a VirB1-like component belonging to a putative type IV secretion system of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region.

  6. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    cell surface, increases the relaxation time of cytoskeleton fluctuations, and increases the phagocytosis time. Our results suggest that the methods developed in this work can be of utility to assess the importance of cytoskeleton motility in the dynamics of cellular processes such as phagocytosis exhibited by macrophages.

  7. Human Corin Isoforms with Different Cytoplasmic Tails That Alter Cell Surface Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaofei; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Mingqing; Wu, Qingyu

    2011-01-01

    Corin is a cardiac serine protease that activates natriuretic peptides. It consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a transmembrane domain, and an extracellular region with a C-terminal trypsin-like protease domain. The transmembrane domain anchors corin on the surface of cardiomyocytes. To date, the function of the corin cytoplasmic tail remains unknown. By examining the difference between human and mouse corin cytoplasmic tails, analyzing their gene sequences, and verifying mRNA expression in hearts, we show that both human and mouse corin genes have alternative exons encoding different cytoplasmic tails. Human corin isoforms E1 and E1a have 45 and 15 amino acids, respectively, in their cytoplasmic tails. In transfected HEK 293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, corin isoforms E1 and E1a were expressed at similar levels. Compared with isoform E1a, however, isoform E1 was more active in processing natriuretic peptides. By cell surface labeling, glycosidase digestion, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, we found that corin isoform E1 was activated more readily as a result of more efficient cell surface targeting. By mutagenesis, we identified a DDNN motif in the cytoplasmic tail of isoform E1 (which is absent in isoform E1a) that promotes corin surface targeting in both HEK 293 and HL-1 cells. Our data indicate that the sequence in the cytoplasmic tail plays an important role in corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. PMID:21518754

  8. Rare TREM2 variants associated with Alzheimer's disease display reduced cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sirkis, Daniel W; Bonham, Luke W; Aparicio, Renan E; Geier, Ethan G; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Wang, Qing; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-09-02

    Rare variation in TREM2 has been associated with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 encodes a cell surface receptor expressed on microglia and related cells, and the R47H variant associated with AD appears to affect the ability of TREM2 to bind extracellular ligands. In addition, other rare TREM2 mutations causing early-onset neurodegeneration are thought to impair cell surface expression. Using a sequence kernel association (SKAT) analysis in two independent AD cohorts, we found significant enrichment of rare TREM2 variants not previously characterized at the protein level. Heterologous expression of the identified variants showed that novel variants S31F and R47C displayed significantly reduced cell surface expression. In addition, we identified rare variant R136Q in a patient with language-predominant AD that also showed impaired surface expression. The results suggest rare TREM2 variants enriched in AD may be associated with altered TREM2 function and that AD risk may be conferred, in part, from altered TREM2 surface expression.

  9. The putative drug efflux systems of the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Vörös, Aniko; Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Simm, Roger; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Finke, Sarah; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes seven closely related species, three of which, B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, are pathogens of humans, animals and/or insects. Preliminary investigations into the transport capabilities of different bacterial lineages suggested that genes encoding putative efflux systems were unusually abundant in the B. cereus group compared to other bacteria. To explore the drug efflux potential of the B. cereus group all putative efflux systems were identified in the genomes of prototypical strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis using our Transporter Automated Annotation Pipeline. More than 90 putative drug efflux systems were found within each of these strains, accounting for up to 2.7% of their protein coding potential. Comparative analyses demonstrated that the efflux systems are highly conserved between these species; 70–80% of the putative efflux pumps were shared between all three strains studied. Furthermore, 82% of the putative efflux system proteins encoded by the prototypical B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 (type strain) were found to be conserved in at least 80% of 169 B. cereus group strains that have high quality genome sequences available. However, only a handful of these efflux pumps have been functionally characterized. Deletion of individual efflux pump genes from B. cereus typically had little impact to drug resistance phenotypes or the general fitness of the strains, possibly because of the large numbers of alternative efflux systems that may have overlapping substrate specificities. Therefore, to gain insight into the possible transport functions of efflux systems in B. cereus, we undertook large-scale qRT-PCR analyses of efflux pump gene expression following drug shocks and other stress treatments. Clustering of gene expression changes identified several groups of similarly regulated systems that may have overlapping drug resistance functions. In this article we review current

  10. The putative drug efflux systems of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Fagerlund, Annette; Elbourne, Liam D H; Vörös, Aniko; Kroeger, Jasmin K; Simm, Roger; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Finke, Sarah; Henderson, Peter J F; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes seven closely related species, three of which, B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, are pathogens of humans, animals and/or insects. Preliminary investigations into the transport capabilities of different bacterial lineages suggested that genes encoding putative efflux systems were unusually abundant in the B. cereus group compared to other bacteria. To explore the drug efflux potential of the B. cereus group all putative efflux systems were identified in the genomes of prototypical strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis using our Transporter Automated Annotation Pipeline. More than 90 putative drug efflux systems were found within each of these strains, accounting for up to 2.7% of their protein coding potential. Comparative analyses demonstrated that the efflux systems are highly conserved between these species; 70-80% of the putative efflux pumps were shared between all three strains studied. Furthermore, 82% of the putative efflux system proteins encoded by the prototypical B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 (type strain) were found to be conserved in at least 80% of 169 B. cereus group strains that have high quality genome sequences available. However, only a handful of these efflux pumps have been functionally characterized. Deletion of individual efflux pump genes from B. cereus typically had little impact to drug resistance phenotypes or the general fitness of the strains, possibly because of the large numbers of alternative efflux systems that may have overlapping substrate specificities. Therefore, to gain insight into the possible transport functions of efflux systems in B. cereus, we undertook large-scale qRT-PCR analyses of efflux pump gene expression following drug shocks and other stress treatments. Clustering of gene expression changes identified several groups of similarly regulated systems that may have overlapping drug resistance functions. In this article we review current

  11. Engineering chemical reactivity on cell surfaces through oligosaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, L.K.; Yareme, K.J.; Bertozzi, C.R.

    1997-05-16

    Cell surface oligosaccharide can be engineered to display unusual functional groups for the selective chemical remodeling of cell surfaces. An unnatural derivative of N-acetyl-mannosamine, which has a ketone group, was converted to the corresponding sialic acid and incorporated into cell surface oligosaccharide metabolically, resulting in the cell surface display of ketone groups. The ketone group on the cell surface can then be covalently ligated under physiological conditions with molecules carrying a complementary reactive functional group such as the hydrazide. Cell surface reactions of this kind should prove useful in the introduction of new recognition epitopes, such as peptides, oligosaccharide, or small organic molecules, onto cell surfaces and in the subsequent modulation of cell-cell or cell-small molecule binding events. The versatility of this technology was demonstrated by an example of selective drug delivery. Cells were decorated with biotin through selective conjugation to ketone groups, and selectively killed in the presence of a ricin A chain-avidin conjugate. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M; Fox, Douglas M; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-03-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology.

  13. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  14. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  15. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  16. Cell surface expression of v-fms-coded glycoproteins is required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Rettenmier, C W; Look, A T; Sherr, C J

    1984-01-01

    The viral oncogene v-fms encodes a transforming glycoprotein with in vitro tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity. Although most v-fms-coded molecules remain internally sequestered in transformed cells, a minor population of molecules is transported to the cell surface. An engineered deletion mutant lacking 348 base pairs of the 3.0-kilobase-pair v-fms gene encoded a polypeptide that was 15 kilodaltons smaller than the wild-type v-fms gene product. The in-frame deletion of 116 amino acids was adjacent to the transmembrane anchor peptide located near the middle of the predicted protein sequence and 432 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. The mutant polypeptide acquired N-linked oligosaccharide chains, was proteolytically processed in a manner similar to the wild-type glycoprotein, and exhibited an associated tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity in vitro. However, the N-linked oligosaccharides of the mutant glycoprotein were not processed to complex carbohydrate chains, and the glycoprotein was not detected at the cell surface. Cells expressing high levels of the mutant glycoprotein did not undergo morphological transformation and did not form colonies in semisolid medium. The transforming activity of the v-fms gene product therefore appears to be mediated through target molecules on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:6390182

  17. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  18. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments.

  19. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  20. New Cell Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus parasanguinis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaobo; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Ruiz, Teresa; Wu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilm formation is critical for maintaining the healthy microbial ecology of the oral cavity. Streptococci are predominant bacterial species in the oral cavity and play important roles in the initiation of plaque formation. In this study, we identified a new cell surface protein, BapA1, from Streptococcus parasanguinis FW213 and determined that BapA1 is critical for biofilm formation. Sequence analysis revealed that BapA1 possesses a typical cell wall-sorting signal for cell surface-anchored proteins from Gram-positive bacteria. No functional orthologue was reported in other streptococci. BapA1 possesses nine putative pilin isopeptide linker domains which are crucial for pilus assembly in a number of Gram-positive bacteria. Deletion of the 3′ portion of bapA1 generated a mutant that lacks surface-anchored BapA1 and abolishes formation of short fibrils on the cell surface. The mutant failed to form biofilms and exhibited reduced adherence to an in vitro tooth model. The BapA1 deficiency also inhibited bacterial autoaggregation. The N-terminal muramidase-released-protein-like domain mediated BapA1-BapA1 interactions, suggesting that BapA1-mediated cell-cell interactions are important for bacterial autoaggregation and biofilm formation. Furthermore, the BapA1-mediated bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are independent of a fimbria-associated serine-rich repeat adhesin, Fap1, demonstrating that BapA1 is a new streptococcal adhesin. PMID:21576336

  1. Cell surface localization and release of the candidate tumor suppressor Ecrg4 from polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes activate macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul; Dang, Xitong; Lopez, Nicole; Lee, Jisook; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Winfield, Robert; Potenza, Bruce; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    We identified fresh human leukocytes as an abundant source of the candidate epithelial tumor suppressor gene, Ecrg4, an epigenetically regulated gene, which unlike other tumor suppressor genes, encodes an orphan-secreted, ligand-like protein. In human cell lines, Ecrg4 gene expression was low, Ecrg4 protein undetectable, and Ecrg4 promoter hypermethylation high (45–90%) and reversible by the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC. In contrast, Ecrg4 gene expression in fresh, normal human PBMCs and PMNs was 600–800 times higher than in cultured cell lines, methylation of the Ecrg4 promoter was low (<3%), and protein levels were readily detectable in lysates and on the cell surface. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, and cell surface biotinylation established that full-length, 14-kDa Ecrg4 was localized on PMN and monocyte cell surfaces, establishing that Ecrg4 is a membrane-anchored protein. LPS treatment induced processing and release of Ecrg4, as detected by flow and immunoblotting, whereas an effect of fMLF treatment on Ecrg4 on the PMN cell surface was detected on the polarized R2 subpopulation of cells. This loss of cell surface Ecrg4 was associated with the detection of intact and processed Ecrg4 in the conditioned media of fresh leukocytes and was shown to be associated with the inflammatory response that follows severe, cutaneous burn injury. Furthermore, incubation of macrophages with a soluble Ecrg4-derived peptide increased the P-p65, suggesting that processing of an intact sentinel Ecrg4 on quiescent circulating leukocytes leads to processing from the cell surface following injury and macrophage activation. PMID:22396620

  2. Biotinylation and characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Foster, A J; Bird, R A; Smith, S N

    2007-08-01

    To develop a novel procedure for isolating and characterizing cryptococcal cell-surface proteins using biotinylation, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-streptavidin, flow cytometry and associated ligand-receptor analysis, confocal microscopy and electrophoretic separation. Cell proteins of both acapsulate and encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans cells were labelled using sulfo-NHS-biotin which, in turn, was complexed with FITC-streptavidin. Resulting cell population fluorescence supported visualization of cell-surface protein distribution by confocal microscopy, as well as evaluation of protein exposure by flow cytometry and the calculation of the ligand-binding determinants EC(50), F(max) and H(n). Biotinylation of cell-surface proteins also supported their isolation by affinity chromatography and characterization by SDS/PAGE. Ligand-binding determinants, such as EC(50) values, indicated that acapsulate and stationary phase cells have greatest affinity for biotin. F(max) values demonstrated greatest protein exposure among stationary phase cells; in turn, encapsulated cells expose more protein than acapsulate counterparts. H(n) values of below unity potentially confirm the complex multi-receptor nature of biotin binding to cryptococcal cell surfaces under investigation. Fluorescence visualization showed marked but localized fluorescence indicative of protein exposure around sites of cell division. In turn, biotinylation of cell-surface proteins and their release under reducing conditions demonstrated at least two noncovalently linked proteinaceous entities, of 43 and 57 kDa, exposed on acapsulate cryptococcal cell walls. A novel method for identifying, in situ, cell-surface proteins exposed by C. neoformans was established. This novel technique was successfully implemented using both acapsulate and encapsulated C. neoformans cells, both were found to have dynamic and markedly localized protein distribution around sites of cell division and associated cell wall

  3. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  4. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  5. Endocytosis of wheat germ agglutinin binding sites from the cell surface into a tubular endosomal network.

    PubMed

    Raub, T J; Koroly, M J; Roberts, R M

    1990-04-01

    late trans-Golgi compartment. In conclusion, a portion of cell surface glycoproteins are routed to a complex arrangement of tubular and vesicular compartments following endocytosis that includes a putative post-endosomal, tubular reticulum that appears to be separate from the trans-most Golgi saccule.

  6. Cell surface display system for Lactococcus lactis: a novel development for oral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Raha, A R; Varma, N R S; Yusoff, K; Ross, E; Foo, H L

    2005-07-01

    The food-grade Lactococcus lactis is a potential vector to be used as a live vehicle for the delivery of heterologous proteins for vaccine and pharmaceutical purposes. We constructed a plasmid vector pSVac that harbors a 255-bp single-repeat sequence of the cell wall-binding protein region of the AcmA protein. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli and expression of the gene fragment was driven by the T7 promoter of the plasmid. SDS-PAGE showed the presence of the putative AcmA' fragment and this was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The protein was isolated and purified using a His-tag affinity column. When mixed with a culture of L. lactis MG1363, ELISA and immunofluorescence assays showed that the cell wall-binding fragment was anchored onto the outer surface of the bacteria. This indicated that the AcmA' repeat unit retained the active site for binding onto the cell wall surface of the L. lactis cells. Stability assays showed that the fusion proteins (AcmA/A1, AcmA/A3) were stably docked onto the surface for at least 5 days. The AcmA' fragment was also shown to be able to strongly bind onto the cell surface of naturally occurring lactococcal strains and Lactobacillus and, with less strength, the cell surface of Bacillus sphericus. The new system designed for cell surface display of recombinant proteins on L. lactis was evaluated for the expression and display of A1 and A3 regions of the VP1 protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71). The A1 and A3 regions of the VP1 protein of EV71 were cloned upstream to the cell wall-binding domains of AcmA protein and successfully expressed as AcmA/A1 and AcmA/A3. Whole-cell ELISA showed the successful display of VP1 protein epitopes of EV71 on the surface of L. lactis. The success of the anchoring system developed in this study for docking the A1 and A3 epitopes of VP1 onto the surface of L. lactis cells opens up the possibilities of peptide and protein display for not only Lactococcus but also for other gram

  7. Three cysteine residues of SLC52A1, a receptor for the porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), play a critical role in cell surface expression and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Colon-Moran, Winston; Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A

    2017-07-01

    Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), a gammaretrovirus, infects human cells in vitro, thus raising the potential risk of cross-species transmission in xenotransplantation. Two members of the solute carrier family 52 (SLC52A1 and SLC52A2) are PERV-A receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA encoding SLC52A1 identified that only one of two putative glycosylation signals is occupied by glycans. In addition, we showed that glycosylation of SLC52A1 is not necessary for PERV-A receptor function. We also identified that at a minimum, three cysteine residues are sufficient for SLC52A1 cell surface expression. Mutation of cysteine at position 365 and either of the two cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail at positions 442 or 446 reduced SLC52A1 surface expression and PERV-A infection suggesting that these residues may contribute to overall structural stability and receptor function. Understanding interactions between PERV-A and its cellular receptor may provide novel strategies to prevent zoonotic infection in the setting of xenotransplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of Biological Reactions on Cell Surfaces via Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Chapanian, Rafi; Kwan, David H.; Constantinescu, Iren; Shaikh, Fathima A.; Rossi, Nicholas A.A.; Withers, Stephen G.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of macromolecules such as enzymes and antibodies with cell surfaces is often an inefficient process, requiring large amounts of expensive reagent. Here we report a general method based on macromolecular crowding with a range of neutral polymers to enhance such reactions, using red blood cells (RBCs) as a model system. Rates of conversion of Type A and B red blood cells to universal O type by removal of antigenic carbohydrates with selective glycosidases are increased up to 400-fold in the presence of crowders. Similar enhancements are seen for antibody binding. We further explore the factors underlying these enhancements using confocal microscopy and fluorescent recovery after bleaching (FRAP) techniques with various fluorescent protein fusion partners. Increased cell-surface concentration due to volume exclusion, along with two-dimensionally confined diffusion of enzymes close to the cell surface, appear to be the major contributing factors. PMID:25140641

  10. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  11. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weian; Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Kumar, Namit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1) targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2) programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3) bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4) manipulating cell biology. PMID:21857791

  12. Atomic force and super-resolution microscopy support a role for LapA as a cell-surface biofilm adhesin of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan E.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Newell, Peter D.; Schwartz, Mary E.; Turnbull, Lynne; Johnson, Michael S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; O’Toole, George A.; Camesano, Terri A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescence Pf0-1 requires the large repeat protein LapA for stable surface attachment. This study presents direct evidence that LapA is a cell-surface-localized adhesin. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a significant twofold reduction in adhesion force for mutants lacking the LapA protein on the cell surface compared to the wild-type strain. Deletion of lapG, a gene encoding a periplasmic cysteine protease that functions to release LapA from the cell surface, resulted in a twofold increase in the force of adhesion. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) revealed the presence of the LapA protein on the cell surface, consistent with its role as an adhesin. The protein is only visualized in the cytoplasm for a mutant of the ABC transporter responsible for translocating LapA to the cell surface. Together, these data highlight the power of combining the use of AFM and 3D-SIM with genetic studies to demonstrate that LapA, a member of a large group of RTX-like repeat proteins, is a cell-surface adhesin. PMID:23064158

  13. Gene expression profiling based identification of cell surface targets for developing multimeric ligands in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Morse, David L.; Hostetter, Galen; Shanmugam, Vijayalakshmi; Stafford, Phillip; Shack, Sonsoles; Pearson, John; Trissal, Maria; Demeure, Michael J.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.; Hruby, Victor J.; Gillies, Robert J.; Han, Haiyong

    2008-01-01

    Multimeric ligands are ligands that contain multiple binding domains that simultaneously target multiple cell surface proteins. Due to cooperative binding, multimeric ligands can have high avidity for cells (tumor) expressing all targeting proteins and only show minimal binding to cells (normal tissues) expressing none or only some of the targets. Identifying combinations of targets that concurrently express in tumor cells, but not in normal cells is a challenging task. Here, we describe a novel approach for identifying such combinations using genome-wide gene expression profiling followed by immunohistochemistry. We first generated a database of mRNA gene expression profiles for 28 pancreatic cancer specimens and 103 normal tissue samples representing 28 unique tissue/cell types using DNA microarrays. The expression data for genes that encode proteins with cell surface epitopes were then extracted from the database and analyzed using a novel multivariate rule-based computational approach to identify gene combinations that are expressed at an efficient binding level in tumors, but not in normal tissues. These combinations were further ranked according to the proportion of tumor samples that expressed the sets at efficient levels. Protein expression of the genes contained in the top ranked combinations was confirmed using immunohistochemistry on a pancreatic tumor tissue and normal tissue microarrays. Co-expression of targets was further validated by their combined expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines using immunocytochemistry. These validated gene combinations thus encompass a list of cell surface targets that can be used to develop multimeric ligands for the imaging and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18765825

  14. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  15. Investigating the Link between Molecular Subtypes of Glioblastoma, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and CD133 Cell Surface Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zarkoob, Hadi; Taube, Joseph H.; Singh, Sheila K.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Kohandel, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, we use genetic data to provide a three-faceted analysis on the links between molecular subclasses of glioblastoma, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and CD133 cell surface protein. The contribution of this paper is three-fold: First, we use a newly identified signature for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human mammary epithelial cells, and demonstrate that genes in this signature have significant overlap with genes differentially expressed in all known GBM subtypes. However, the overlap between genes up regulated in the mesenchymal subtype of GBM and in the EMT signature was more significant than other GBM subtypes. Second, we provide evidence that there is a negative correlation between the genetic signature of EMT and that of CD133 cell surface protein, a putative marker for neural stem cells. Third, we study the correlation between GBM molecular subtypes and the genetic signature of CD133 cell surface protein. We demonstrate that the mesenchymal and neural subtypes of GBM have the strongest correlations with the CD133 genetic signature. While the mesenchymal subtype of GBM displays similarity with the signatures of both EMT and CD133, it also exhibits some differences with each of these signatures that are partly due to the fact that the signatures of EMT and CD133 are inversely related to each other. Taken together these data shed light on the role of the mesenchymal transition and neural stem cells, and their mutual interaction, in molecular subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:23734191

  16. Cell surface engineering of α-l-rhamnosidase for naringin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min

    2012-11-01

    An α-l-rhamnosidase gene (rhaL1) containing an open reading frame of 2046-bp encoding a 681-amino acid protein (RhaL1) was cloned from Alternaria sp. L1 for naringin hydrolysis on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY-100. RhaL1 anchored to the yeast cell surface showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 6.0-6.5 and 70°C and was stable at pH 2.5-12.0 below 60°C. When the yeast cells were employed to hydrolyze naringin in grapefruit juice, about 85% naringin was hydrolyzed at 60°C in 10min. The yeast cells were harvested and recycled for the next batch. The hydrolysis rate of the naringin was maintained at over 80% for 10 batches. These results demonstrate the stability of the RhaL1-expressing yeast cells and effective in hydrolysis of naringin in juice. Thus, the system could have promise for industrial bitterness reduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  18. [Cell surface RNA--a possible molecular receptor of adaptogens].

    PubMed

    Malenkov, A G; Kolotygina, I M

    1984-01-01

    When RNA of the cell surface is destroyed with RNAase, the effect of adaptogenes is removed. Such effect is produced by introduction of actinomycin D 30 minutes before intake of adaptogene. Destruction of surface RNA stimulates protein synthesis. Comparison of these facts permits a hypothesis to be advanced saying that surface RNA is a receptor of adaptogenes obtained from plants of Aralia family.

  19. Ceramides modulate cell-surface acetylcholine receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, C E; Pediconi, M F; Barrantes, F J

    2008-04-01

    The effects of ceramides (Cer) on the trafficking of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) to the plasma membrane were studied in CHO-K1/A5 cells, a clonal cell line that heterologously expresses the adult murine form of the receptor. When cells were incubated with short- (C6-Cer) or long- (brain-Cer) chain Cer at low concentrations, an increase in the number of cell-surface AChRs was observed concomitant with a decrease in intracellular receptor levels. The alteration in AChR distribution by low Cer treatment does not appear to be a general mechanism since the surface expression of the green fluorescent protein derivative of the vesicular stomatitis virus protein (VSVG-GFP) was not affected. High Cer concentrations caused the opposite effects, decreasing the number of cell-surface AChRs, which exhibited higher affinity for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin, and increasing the intracellular pool, which colocalized with trans-Golgi/TGN specific markers. The generation of endogenous Cer by sphingomyelinase treatment also decreased cell-surface AChR levels. These effects do not involve protein kinase C zeta or protein phosphatase 2A activation. Taken together, the results indicate that Cer modulate trafficking of AChRs to and stability at the cell surface.

  20. Roles for E-cadherin cell surface regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Yuliya I.; Schecterson, Leslayann; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression in association with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, metastases often retain E-cadherin expression, an EMT is not required for metastasis, and metastases can arise from clusters of tumor cells. We demonstrate that the regulation of the adhesive activity of E-cadherin present at the cell surface by an inside-out signaling mechanism is important in cancer. First, we find that the metastasis of an E-cadherin–expressing mammary cell line from the mammary gland to the lung depends on reduced E-cadherin adhesive function. An activating monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin that induces a high adhesive state significantly reduced the number of cells metastasized to the lung without affecting the growth in size of the primary tumor in the mammary gland. Second, we find that many cancer-associated germline missense mutations in the E-cadherin gene in patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer selectively affect the mechanism of inside-out cell surface regulation without inhibiting basic E-cadherin adhesion function. This suggests that genetic deficits in E-cadherin cell surface regulation contribute to cancer progression. Analysis of these mutations also provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin regulation at the cell surface. PMID:27582386

  1. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  2. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  3. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  4. Wnt family proteins are secreted and associated with the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Smolich, B D; McMahon, J A; McMahon, A P; Papkoff, J

    1993-01-01

    Members of the Wnt gene family are proposed to function in both normal development and differentiation as well as in mammary tumorigenesis. To understand the function of Wnt proteins in these two processes, we present here a biochemical characterization of seven Wnt family members. For these studies, AtT-20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line previously shown to efficiently process and secrete Wnt-1, was transfected with expression vectors encoding Wnt family members. All of the newly characterized Wnt proteins are glycosylated, secreted proteins that are tightly associated with the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We have also identified native Wnt proteins in retinoic acid-treated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, and they exhibit the same biochemical characteristics as the recombinant proteins. These data suggest that Wnt family members function in cell to cell signaling in a fashion similar to Wnt-1. Images PMID:8167409

  5. HIV-1 Vpu targets cell surface markers CD4 and BST-2 through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy; Strebel, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Vpu is a small integral membrane protein encoded by HIV-1 and some SIV isolates. The protein is known to induce degradation of the viral receptor molecule CD4 and to enhance the release of newly formed virions from the cell surface. Vpu accomplishes these two functions through two distinct mechanisms. In the case of CD4, Vpu acts as a molecular adaptor to connect CD4 to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex resulting in CD4 degradation by cellular proteasomes. This requires signals located in Vpu's cytoplasmic domain. Enhancement of virus release on the other hand involves the neutralization of a cellular host factor, BST-2 (also known as CD317, HM1.24, or tetherin) and requires Vpu's TM domain. The current review discusses recent advances on the role of Vpu in controlling degradation of CD4 and in regulating virus release. PMID:20858517

  6. Dominant negative mutation in cell surface beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase inhibits cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In addition to its traditional location within the Golgi complex, beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) is also present on the cell surface, where it is thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule by binding to extracellular oligosaccharide ligands. Recent studies suggest that cells contain two forms of GalTase with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The longer form of GalTase contains a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic extension and is preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, relative to the shorter GalTase protein that is confined primarily to the Golgi compartment. In this study, we created a dominant negative mutation that interferes with the function of cell surface GalTase by transfecting into cells cDNAs encoding truncated versions of the long form of GalTase containing the complete cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but devoid of the catalytic domain. In both F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, overexpressing the truncated long GalTase (TLGT) protein displaced the endogenous cell surface GalTase from its association with the cytoskeleton, resulting in a loss of intercellular adhesion and cell spreading specifically on matrices that use GalTase as a cell surface receptor. In contrast, overexpressing the analogous truncated short GalTase (TSGT) protein did not affect cell morphology or GalTase activity. In control assays, inducing the TLGT protein had no effect on cell interactions with fibronectin (which is independent of GalTase), or on the cytoskeleton attachment of another matrix receptor (beta 1 integrin), or on overall glycoprotein synthesis, thus eliminating nonspecific effects of the TLGT protein on cellular adhesion and metabolism. These results represent the first molecular manipulation of cell surface GalTase expression and confirm its function as a cell adhesion molecule. These studies further suggest that the cytoskeleton contains a defined, saturable number of binding sites for GalTase, which enables it to function as

  7. Sap6, a secreted aspartyl proteinase, participates in maintenance the cell surface integrity of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The polymorphic species Candida albicans is the major cause of candidiasis in humans. The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of C. albicans, encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, have been investigated as the virulent factors during candidiasis. However, the biological functions of most Sap proteins are still uncertain. In this study, we applied co-culture system of C. albicans and THP-1 human monocytes to explore the pathogenic roles and biological functions of Sap proteinases. Results After 1 hr of co-culture of C. albicans strains and THP-1 human monocytes at 37°C, more than 60% of the THP-1-engulfed wild type and Δsap5 Candida cells were developing long hyphae. However, about 50% of THP-1-engulfed Δsap6 Candida cells were generating short hyphae, and more dead Candida cells were found in Δsap6 strain that was ingested by THP-1 cells (about 15% in Δsap6 strain vs. 2 ~ 2.5% in SC5314 and Δsap5 strains). The immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the Sap6 is the major hyphal tip located Sap protein under THP-1 phagocytosis. The sap6-deleted strains (Δsap6, Δsap4/6, and Δsap5/6) appeared slower growth on Congo red containing solid medium at 25°C, and the growth defect was exacerbated when cultured at 37°C in Congo red or SDS containing medium. In addition, more proteins were secreted from Δsap6 strain and the β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) extractable surface proteins from Δsap6 mutant were more abundant than that of extracted from wild type strain, which included the plasma membrane protein (Pma1p), the ER-chaperone protein (Kar2p), the protein transport-related protein (Arf1p), the cytoskeleton protein (Act1), and the mitochondrial outer membrane protein (porin 1). Moreover, the cell surface accessibility was increased in sap6-deleted strains. Conclusion From these results, we speculated that the cell surface constitution of C. albicans Δsap6 strain was defect. This may cause the more accessible of β-ME to disulfide-bridged cell

  8. Sap6, a secreted aspartyl proteinase, participates in maintenance the cell surface integrity of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Buu, Leh-Miauh; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2013-12-30

    The polymorphic species Candida albicans is the major cause of candidiasis in humans. The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of C. albicans, encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, have been investigated as the virulent factors during candidiasis. However, the biological functions of most Sap proteins are still uncertain. In this study, we applied co-culture system of C. albicans and THP-1 human monocytes to explore the pathogenic roles and biological functions of Sap proteinases. After 1 hr of co-culture of C. albicans strains and THP-1 human monocytes at 37°C, more than 60% of the THP-1-engulfed wild type and Δsap5 Candida cells were developing long hyphae. However, about 50% of THP-1-engulfed Δsap6 Candida cells were generating short hyphae, and more dead Candida cells were found in Δsap6 strain that was ingested by THP-1 cells (about 15% in Δsap6 strain vs. 2 ~ 2.5% in SC5314 and Δsap5 strains). The immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the Sap6 is the major hyphal tip located Sap protein under THP-1 phagocytosis. The sap6-deleted strains (Δsap6, Δsap4/6, and Δsap5/6) appeared slower growth on Congo red containing solid medium at 25°C, and the growth defect was exacerbated when cultured at 37°C in Congo red or SDS containing medium. In addition, more proteins were secreted from Δsap6 strain and the β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) extractable surface proteins from Δsap6 mutant were more abundant than that of extracted from wild type strain, which included the plasma membrane protein (Pma1p), the ER-chaperone protein (Kar2p), the protein transport-related protein (Arf1p), the cytoskeleton protein (Act1), and the mitochondrial outer membrane protein (porin 1). Moreover, the cell surface accessibility was increased in sap6-deleted strains. From these results, we speculated that the cell surface constitution of C. albicans Δsap6 strain was defect. This may cause the more accessible of β-ME to disulfide-bridged cell surface components and may

  9. Cell Surface Glycoside Hydrolases of Streptococcus gordonii Promote Growth in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Luxia; Shah, Nehal; Palmer, Robert J.; Cisar, John O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growth of the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii in saliva may depend on a number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), including three cell wall-anchored proteins that are homologs of pneumococcal β-galactosidase (BgaA), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (StrH), and endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase D (EndoD). In the present study, we introduced unmarked in-frame deletions into the corresponding genes of S. gordonii DL1, verified the presence (or absence) of the encoded proteins on the resulting mutant strains, and compared these strains with wild-type strain DL1 for growth and glycan foraging in saliva. The overnight growth of wild-type DL1 was reduced 3- to 10-fold by the deletion of any one or two genes and approximately 20-fold by the deletion of all three genes. The only notable change in the salivary proteome associated with this reduction of growth was a downward shift in the apparent molecular masses of basic proline-rich glycoproteins (PRG), which was accompanied by the loss of lectin binding sites for galactose-specific Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) and mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The binding of ECA to PRG was also abolished in saliva cultures of mutants that expressed cell surface BgaA alone or together with either StrH or EndoD. However, the subsequent loss of GNA binding was seen only in saliva cocultures of different mutants that together expressed all three cell surface GHs. The findings indicate that the growth of S. gordonii DL1 in saliva depends to a significant extent on the sequential actions of first BgaA and then StrH and EndoD on N-linked glycans of PRG. IMPORTANCE The ability of oral bacteria to grow on salivary glycoproteins is critical for dental plaque biofilm development. Little is known, however, about how specific salivary components are attacked and utilized by different members of the biofilm community, such as Streptococcus gordonii. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 has three cell wall

  10. Atypical Cohesin-Dockerin Complex Responsible for Cell Surface Attachment of Cellulosomal Components

    PubMed Central

    Salama-Alber, Orly; Jobby, Maroor K.; Chitayat, Seth; Smith, Steven P.; White, Bryan A.; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix; Bayer, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens produces a highly organized multienzyme cellulosome complex that plays a key role in the degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, notably cellulose. The R. flavefaciens cellulosomal system is anchored to the bacterial cell wall through a relatively small ScaE scaffoldin subunit, which bears a single type IIIe cohesin responsible for the attachment of two major dockerin-containing scaffoldin proteins, ScaB and the cellulose-binding protein CttA. Although ScaB recruits the catalytic machinery onto the complex, CttA mediates attachment of the bacterial substrate via its two putative carbohydrate-binding modules. In an effort to understand the structural basis for assembly and cell surface attachment of the cellulosome in R. flavefaciens, we determined the crystal structure of the high affinity complex (Kd = 20.83 nm) between the cohesin module of ScaE (CohE) and its cognate X-dockerin (XDoc) modular dyad from CttA at 1.97-Å resolution. The structure reveals an atypical calcium-binding loop containing a 13-residue insert. The results further pinpoint two charged specificity-related residues on the surface of the cohesin module that are responsible for specific versus promiscuous cross-strain binding of the dockerin module. In addition, a combined functional role for the three enigmatic dockerin inserts was established whereby these extraneous segments serve as structural buttresses that reinforce the stalklike conformation of the X-module, thus segregating its tethered complement of cellulosomal components from the cell surface. The novel structure of the RfCohE-XDoc complex sheds light on divergent dockerin structure and function and provides insight into the specificity features of the type IIIe cohesin-dockerin interaction. PMID:23580648

  11. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Giroglou, Tzenan; Florin, Luise; Schäfer, Frank; Streeck, Rolf E.; Sapp, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Using pseudoinfection of cell lines, we demonstrate that cell surface heparan sulfate is required for infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-33 pseudovirions. Pseudoinfection was inhibited by heparin but not dermatan or chondroitin sulfate, reduced by reducing the level of surface sulfation, and abolished by heparinase treatment. Carboxy-terminally deleted HPV-33 virus-like particles still bound efficiently to heparin. The kinetics of postattachment neutralization by antiserum or heparin indicated that pseudovirions were shifted on the cell surface from a heparin-sensitive into a heparin-resistant mode of binding, possibly involving a secondary receptor. Alpha-6 integrin is not a receptor for HPV-33 pseudoinfection. PMID:11152531

  13. CD44 is the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Stamenkovic, I; Melnick, M; Underhill, C B; Seed, B

    1990-06-29

    CD44 is a broadly distributed cell surface protein thought to mediate cell attachment to extracelular matrix components or specific cell surface ligands. We have created soluble CD44-immunoglobulin fusion proteins and characterized their reactivity with tissue sections and lymph node high endothelial cells in primary culture. The CD44 target on high endothelial cells is sensitive to enzymes that degrade hyaluronate, and binding of soluble CD44 is blocked by low concentrations of hyaluronate or high concentrations of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates. A mouse anti-hamster hyaluonate receptor antibody reacts with COS cells expressing hamster CD44 cDNA. In sections of all tissues examined, including lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, predigestion with hyaluronidase eliminated CD44 binding.

  14. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  15. Synthetically functionalized retroviruses produced from the bioorthogonally engineered cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shirley; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-02-16

    Conjugation of desired molecules onto retroviral surfaces through the ease of the bioorthogonal functionalization method was demonstrated. Oxidation of surface sialic acids using periodate and further p-anisidine-catalyzed conjugation with aminooxy-bearing molecules were used to directly label retroviral envelope with a fluorescent dye. The retroviral particles that were produced from a bioorthogonally functionalized virus producing cell surface and further tethered with magnetic nanoparticles were efficiently purified by simple magnetic column separation and capable of magnet-directed transduction.

  16. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  17. Complete genome sequences of a putative new alphapartitivirus detected in Rosa spp.

    PubMed

    Phelan, James; James, Delano

    2016-09-01

    A putative new alphapartitivirus was detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in Rosa spp. and identified as rose partitivirus isolate Phyllis Bide (RoPV-PB). The virus is bipartite with a dsRNA1 fragment (1937 bp) encoding a putative RdRp and a dsRNA2 fragment (1811 bp) encoding the putative CP subunit of the virus. dsRNA1 of RoPV-BP is closely related to Vicia faba partitivirus 1, with identities of 67 % and 72 % for the nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences, respectively. In NGS analysis of RoPV-BP, coverage was uneven across both dsRNA fragments, with GC/AT content appearing to be a major determinant of depth of coverage.

  18. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  19. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  20. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique.

  1. Diverse specificity of cellulosome attachment to the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Pinheiro, Benedita A.; Cameron, Kate; Cuskin, Fiona; Viegas, Aldino; Najmudin, Shabir; Bule, Pedro; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Romão, Maria João; Bayer, Edward A.; Spencer, Holly L.; Smith, Steven; Gilbert, Harry J.; Alves, Victor D.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, the cellulosome, one of Nature’s most intricate multi-enzyme complexes, has been continuously fine-tuned to efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant carbohydrates. To facilitate the uptake of released sugars, anaerobic bacteria use highly ordered protein-protein interactions to recruit these nanomachines to the cell surface. Dockerin modules located within a non-catalytic macromolecular scaffold, whose primary role is to assemble cellulosomal enzymatic subunits, bind cohesin modules of cell envelope proteins, thereby anchoring the cellulosome onto the bacterial cell. Here we have elucidated the unique molecular mechanisms used by anaerobic bacteria for cellulosome cellular attachment. The structure and biochemical analysis of five cohesin-dockerin complexes revealed that cell surface dockerins contain two cohesin-binding interfaces, which can present different or identical specificities. In contrast to the current static model, we propose that dockerins utilize multivalent modes of cohesin recognition to recruit cellulosomes to the cell surface, a mechanism that maximises substrate access while facilitating complex assembly. PMID:27924829

  2. Engineered Aptamers to Probe Molecular Interactions on the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Batool, Sana; Bhandari, Sanam; George, Shanell; Okeoma, Precious; Van, Nabeela; Zümrüt, Hazan E; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika

    2017-08-29

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of molecular interactions on the cell membrane. To decipher such interactions, molecular scaffolds can be engineered as a tool to modulate these events as they occur on the cell membrane. To guarantee reliability, scaffolds that function as modulators of cell membrane events must be coupled to a targeting moiety with superior chemical versatility. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers are a suitable class of targeting moieties. Aptamers are inherently chemical in nature, allowing extensive site-specific chemical modification to engineer sensing molecules. Aptamers can be easily selected using a simple laboratory-based in vitro evolution method enabling the design and development of aptamer-based functional molecular scaffolds against wide range of cell surface molecules. This article reviews the application of aptamers as monitors and modulators of molecular interactions on the mammalian cell surface with the aim of increasing our understanding of cell-surface receptor response to external stimuli. The information gained from these types of studies could eventually prove useful in engineering improved medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  3. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  4. Cell Surface Vimentin Is an Attachment Receptor for Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ning; Cong, Haolong; Tian, Hongchao; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Wenliang; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a highly transmissible pathogenic agent that causes severe central nervous system diseases in infected infants and young children. Here, we reported that EV71 VP1 protein could bind to vimentin intermediate filaments expressed on the host cell surface. Soluble vimentin or an antibody against vimentin could inhibit the binding of EV71 to host cells. Accompanied with the reduction of vimentin expression on the cell surface, the binding of EV71 to cells was remarkably decreased. Further evidence showed that the N terminus of vimentin is responsible for the interaction between EV71 and vimentin. These results indicated that vimentin on the host cell surface may serve as an attachment site that mediated the initial binding and subsequently increased the infectivity of EV71. IMPORTANCE This study delivers important findings on the roles of vimentin filaments in relation to EV71 infection and provides information that not only improves our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis but also presents us with potentially new strategies for the treatment of diseases caused by EV71 infections. PMID:24623428

  5. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus J.; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F.; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along “nanowire” appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface. PMID:21606337

  6. Radioiodination of cell-surface glycoproteins by carbohydrate modification

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, K.A.

    1986-05-01

    Mild oxidation of cell-surface sialic acid residues followed by reduction with sodium /sup 3/H-borohydride is a common method of radiolabeling glycoproteins. In many cases it is desirable to incorporate into glycoproteins a label of higher specific activity such as /sup 125/I. Incorporation of modified amino compounds into oxidized, isolated glycoproteins by reductive amination has been demonstrated by several investigators. They have determined the conditions for the application of this approach to radioiodination of intact cells. Cells are oxidized by exposure to 1 mM sodium periodate. Tyrosine or a tyrosine derivative, radiolabeled to high specific activity with Iodogen and carrier-free Na/sup 125/I, is added, followed by 1 mM sodium cyanoborohydride. Labeled cell-surface proteins are analyzed by SDS-gel electrophoresis of cell lysates. The addition of excess carrier glycoprotein, such as fetuin, is necessary to prevent degradation of the labeled product in the cell lysate. The incorporation of radiolabel can approach that of direct iodination of cell-surface tyrosyl residues, about 100 dpm/cell. The labeling procedure has been applied to the analysis of murine lymphocyte glycoproteins.

  7. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  8. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  9. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  10. Comparative analyses of a putative Francisella conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Petersen, Jeannine M; Pillai, Segaran; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-03-01

    A large circular plasmid detected in Francisella novicida-like strain PA10-7858, designated pFNPA10, was sequenced completely and analyzed. This 41,013-bp plasmid showed no homology to any of the previously sequenced Francisella plasmids and was 8-10 times larger in size than them. A total of 57 ORFs were identified within pFNPA10 and at least 9 of them encoded putative proteins with homology to different conjugal transfer proteins. The presence of iteron-like direct repeats and an ORF encoding a putative replication protein within pFNPA10 suggested that it replicated by the theta mode. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that pFNPA10 had no near neighbors in the databases and that it may have originated within an environmental Francisella lineage. Based on its features, pFNPA10 appears to be a novel extra-chromosomal genetic element within the genus Francisella. The suitability of pFNPA10 as a vector for transformation of species of Francisella by conjugation remains to be explored.

  11. A genome-wide CRISPR screen reconciles the role of N-linked glycosylation in galectin-3 transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Menzies, Sam A; Popa, Stephanie J; Savinykh, Natalia; Petrunkina Harrison, Anna; Lehner, Paul J; Moreau, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Galectins are a family of lectin binding proteins expressed both intracellularly and extracellularly. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, also known as LGALS3) is expressed at the cell surface; however, Gal-3 lacks a signal sequence, and the mechanism of Gal-3 transport to the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, using a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 forward genetic screen for regulators of Gal-3 cell surface localization, we identified genes encoding glycoproteins, enzymes involved in N-linked glycosylation, regulators of ER-Golgi trafficking and proteins involved in immunity. The results of this screening approach led us to address the controversial role of N-linked glycosylation in the transport of Gal-3 to the cell surface. We find that N-linked glycoprotein maturation is not required for Gal-3 transport from the cytosol to the extracellular space, but is important for cell surface binding. Additionally, secreted Gal-3 is predominantly free and not packaged into extracellular vesicles. These data support a secretion pathway independent of N-linked glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Cell-surface expression of PrPC and the presence of scrapie prions in the blood of goats.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Schneider, David A; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Truscott, Thomas C; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-05-01

    Although host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)) expression in ovine PBMCs and prion infectivity in scrapie-infected sheep blood have been demonstrated, such studies have not been reported in goats. Therefore, this study characterized cell-surface expression of PrP(C) on PBMC subsets derived from normal goats and sheep, by flow cytometry, and determined prion infectivity in blood from a scrapie-infected goat using a transfusion bioassay in goat kids. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression was detected on all subsets of goat PBMCs. The highest PrP(C) cell-surface expression was found in CD2(+) T lymphocytes in goats. Transmission of infection was detected in all three recipients who received whole blood from a goat with classical scrapie. It was concluded that caprine PBMCs express PrP(C) similarly to sheep but with relative differences among PBMCs subsets, and that blood-borne infectious prions can be detected in scrapie-infected goats. Thus, similar to sheep, goat blood may be a suitable diagnostic target for the detection of scrapie infection.

  13. The Glycophosphatidylinositol Anchor of the MCMV Evasin, m157, Facilitates Optimal Cell Surface Expression and Ly49 Receptor Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Lindsey E.; Guseva, Natalya V.; Shey, Michael R.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus-encoded protein m157 is a cognate ligand for both inhibitory and activating receptors expressed by natural killer cells. Additionally, m157 is expressed on the surface of infected cells by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Although endogenous GPI-anchored proteins are known to be ligands for the NK cell receptor, NKG2D, the contribution of the GPI anchor for viral m157 ligand function is unknown. To determine whether the GPI anchor for m157 is dispensable for m157 function, we generated m157 variants expressed as transmembrane fusion proteins and tested cells expressing transmembrane m157 for the capacity to activate cognate Ly49 receptors. We found that the GPI anchor is required for high-level cell surface expression of m157, and that the transmembrane m157 ligand retains the capacity to activate reporter cells and NK cells expressing Ly49H, as well as Ly49I129 reporter cells, but with reduced potency. Importantly, target cells expressing the transmembrane form of m157 were killed less efficiently and failed to mediate Ly49H receptor downregulation on fresh NK cells compared to targets expressing GPI-anchored m157. Taken together, these results show that the GPI anchor for m157 facilitates robust cell surface expression, and that NK cells are sensitive to the altered cell surface expression of this potent viral evasin. PMID:23840655

  14. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  15. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  16. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-01-01

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs. PMID:12186633

  17. Vav Family Proteins Couple to Diverse Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Sheri L.; Selfors, Laura M.; Fredericks, Jessica; Breit, Timo; Fujikawa, Keiko; Alt, Frederick W.; Brugge, Joan S.; Swat, Wojciech

    2000-01-01

    Vav proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family GTPases which activate pathways leading to actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and transcriptional alterations. Vav proteins contain several protein binding domains which can link cell surface receptors to downstream signaling proteins. Vav1 is expressed exclusively in hematopoietic cells and tyrosine phosphorylated in response to activation of multiple cell surface receptors. However, it is not known whether the recently identified isoforms Vav2 and Vav3, which are broadly expressed, can couple with similar classes of receptors, nor is it known whether all Vav isoforms possess identical functional activities. We expressed Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3 at equivalent levels to directly compare the responses of the Vav proteins to receptor activation. Although each Vav isoform was tyrosine phosphorylated upon activation of representative receptor tyrosine kinases, integrin, and lymphocyte antigen receptors, we found unique aspects of Vav protein coupling in each receptor pathway. Each Vav protein coprecipitated with activated epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors, and multiple phosphorylated tyrosine residues on the PDGF receptor were able to mediate Vav2 tyrosine phosphorylation. Integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav proteins was not detected in nonhematopoietic cells unless the protein tyrosine kinase Syk was also expressed, suggesting that integrin activation of Vav proteins may be restricted to cell types that express particular tyrosine kinases. In addition, we found that Vav1, but not Vav2 or Vav3, can efficiently cooperate with T-cell receptor signaling to enhance NFAT-dependent transcription, while Vav1 and Vav3, but not Vav2, can enhance NFκB-dependent transcription. Thus, although each Vav isoform can respond to similar cell surface receptors, there are isoform-specific differences in their activation of downstream signaling pathways. PMID:10938113

  18. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-11-15

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs.

  19. Neuropilin Functions as an Essential Cell Surface Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hou-Fu; Vander Kooi, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    The Neuropilins (Nrps) are a family of essential cell surface receptors involved in multiple fundamental cellular signaling cascades. Nrp family members have key functions in VEGF-dependent angiogenesis and semaphorin-dependent axon guidance, controlling signaling and cross-talk between these fundamental physiological processes. More recently, Nrp function has been found in diverse signaling and adhesive functions, emphasizing their role as pleiotropic co-receptors. Pathological Nrp function has been shown to be important in aberrant activation of both canonical and alternative pathways. Here we review key recent insights into Nrp function in human health and disease. PMID:26451046

  20. Cell Surface Nucleolin Facilitates Enterovirus 71 Binding and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Wang, Ya-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Lo, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Lai, Ming-Der

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the pathogenesis of enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains mostly ambiguous, identifying the factors that mediate viral binding and entry to host cells is indispensable to ultimately uncover the mechanisms that underlie virus infection and pathogenesis. Despite the identification of several receptors/attachment molecules for EV71, the binding, entry, and infection mechanisms of EV71 remain unclear. Herein, we employed glycoproteomic approaches to identify human nucleolin as a novel binding receptor for EV71. Glycoproteins purified by lectin chromatography from the membrane extraction of human cells were treated with sialidase, followed by immunoprecipitation with EV71 particles. Among the 16 proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis, cell surface nucleolin attracted our attention. We found that EV71 interacted directly with nucleolin via the VP1 capsid protein and that an antinucleolin antibody reduced the binding of EV71 to human cells. In addition, the knockdown of cell surface nucleolin decreased EV71 binding, infection, and production in human cells. Furthermore, the expression of human nucleolin on the cell surface of a mouse cell line increased EV71 binding and conferred EV71 infection and production in the cells. These results strongly indicate that human nucleolin can mediate EV71 binding to and infection of cells. Our findings also demonstrate that the use of glycoproteomic approaches is a reliable methodology to discover novel receptors for pathogens. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in Asia-Pacific countries and have caused thousands of deaths in young children during the last 2 decades. The discovery of new EV71-interacting molecules to understand the infection mechanism has become an emergent issue. Hence, this study uses glycoproteomic approaches to comprehensively investigate the EV71-interacting glycoproteins. Several EV71-interacting glycoproteins are identified, and the role of cell surface nucleolin in

  1. Photodynamic induction of a bacterial cell surface polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hoober, J K

    1977-01-01

    The photodynamic action of several dyes on cells of a bacterium, tentatively identified as a species of Arthrobacter, resulted in remarkable stimulation of synthesis of a polypeptide 21,000 daltons in mass. This polypeptide resides on the cell surface and can be solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate without lysis of the cells. Chlorophyllin and rose bengal are effective in inducing synthesis of the polypeptide in proportion to their ability to sensitize the photooxidation of histidine. Etiolated cells of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii y-1 excrete a substance into the medium that also sensitized the photoinduction of the polypeptide. Images PMID:885841

  2. A Second Quorum-Sensing System Regulates Cell Surface Properties but Not Phenazine Antibiotic Production in Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongge; Pierson, Leland S.

    2001-01-01

    The root-associated biological control bacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 produces a range of exoproducts, including protease and phenazines. Phenazine antibiotic biosynthesis by phzXYFABCD is regulated in part by the PhzR-PhzI quorum-sensing system. Mutants defective in phzR or phzI produce very low levels of phenazines but wild-type levels of exoprotease. In the present study, a second genomic region of strain 30-84 was identified that, when present in trans, increased β-galactosidase activity in a genomic phzB::lacZ reporter and partially restored phenazine production to a phzR mutant. Sequence analysis identified two adjacent genes, csaR and csaI, that encode members of the LuxR-LuxI family of regulatory proteins. No putative promoter region is present upstream of the csaI start codon and no lux box-like element was found in either the csaR promoter or the 30-bp intergenic region between csaR and csaI. Both the PhzR-PhzI and CsaR-CsaI systems are regulated by the GacS-GacA two-component regulatory system. In contrast to the multicopy effects of csaR and csaI in trans, a genomic csaR mutant (30-84R2) and a csaI mutant (30-84I2) did not exhibit altered phenazine production in vitro or in situ, indicating that the CsaR-CsaI system is not involved in phenazine regulation in strain 30-84. Both mutants also produced wild-type levels of protease. However, disruption of both csaI and phzI or both csaR and phzR eliminated both phenazine and protease production completely. Thus, the two quorum-sensing systems do not interact for phenazine regulation but do interact for protease regulation. Additionally, the CsaI N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal was not recognized by the phenazine AHL reporter 30-84I/Z but was recognized by the AHL reporters Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136(pCF240). Inactivation of csaR resulted in a smooth mucoid colony phenotype and formation of cell aggregates in broth, suggesting that CsaR is involved in

  3. Maps of context-dependent putative regulatory regions and genomic signal interactions.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Klev; Umer, Husen M; Kruczyk, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J; Cavalli, Marco; Wadelius, Claes; Komorowski, Jan

    2016-11-02

    Gene transcription is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs). ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics provide global binding profiles of TFs, which can be used to identify regulatory regions. To this end we implemented a method to systematically construct cell-type and species-specific maps of regulatory regions and TF-TF interactions. We illustrated the approach by developing maps for five human cell-lines and two other species. We detected ∼144k putative regulatory regions among the human cell-lines, with the majority of them being ∼300 bp. We found ∼20k putative regulatory elements in the ENCODE heterochromatic domains suggesting a large regulatory potential in the regions presumed transcriptionally silent. Among the most significant TF interactions identified in the heterochromatic regions were CTCF and the cohesin complex, which is in agreement with previous reports. Finally, we investigated the enrichment of the obtained putative regulatory regions in the 3D chromatin domains. More than 90% of the regions were discovered in the 3D contacting domains. We found a significant enrichment of GWAS SNPs in the putative regulatory regions. These significant enrichments provide evidence that the regulatory regions play a crucial role in the genomic structural stability. Additionally, we generated maps of putative regulatory regions for prostate and colorectal cancer human cell-lines.

  4. Maps of context-dependent putative regulatory regions and genomic signal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti, Klev; Umer, Husen M.; Kruczyk, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J.; Cavalli, Marco; Wadelius, Claes; Komorowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene transcription is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs). ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics provide global binding profiles of TFs, which can be used to identify regulatory regions. To this end we implemented a method to systematically construct cell-type and species-specific maps of regulatory regions and TF–TF interactions. We illustrated the approach by developing maps for five human cell-lines and two other species. We detected ∼144k putative regulatory regions among the human cell-lines, with the majority of them being ∼300 bp. We found ∼20k putative regulatory elements in the ENCODE heterochromatic domains suggesting a large regulatory potential in the regions presumed transcriptionally silent. Among the most significant TF interactions identified in the heterochromatic regions were CTCF and the cohesin complex, which is in agreement with previous reports. Finally, we investigated the enrichment of the obtained putative regulatory regions in the 3D chromatin domains. More than 90% of the regions were discovered in the 3D contacting domains. We found a significant enrichment of GWAS SNPs in the putative regulatory regions. These significant enrichments provide evidence that the regulatory regions play a crucial role in the genomic structural stability. Additionally, we generated maps of putative regulatory regions for prostate and colorectal cancer human cell-lines. PMID:27625394

  5. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  6. Cell Surface Measurements in Hydrocarbon and Carbohydrate Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, R. J.; Zajic, J. E.; Gerson, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was grown in 11-liter batch fermentations with hexadecane or sodium citrate as the sole source of carbon. Surface and interfacial tension measurements of the microbial broth indicated that surface-active compounds were being produced only during growth on the hydrocarbon substrate. Contact angle measurements of an aqueous drop on a smooth lawn of cells in a hexadecane bath indicated a highly hydrophobic surface of the cells in the initial stages of the hydrocarbon fermentation (120° contact angle). At this stage, the entire cell population was bound to the hydrocarbon-aqueous interface. The contact angle dropped rapidly to approximately 45° after 14 h into the fermentation. This coincided with a shift of the cell population to the aqueous phase. Thus, the cells demonstrated more hydrophilic characteristics in the later stages of the fermentation. Contact angles on cells grown on sodium citrate ranged from 18 to 24° throughout the fermentation. The cells appear to be highly hydrophilic during growth on a soluble substrate. From the contact angle and aqueous-hydrocarbon interfacial tension, the surface free energy of the cells was calculated along with the cell-aqueous and cell-hydrocarbon interfacial tension. The results of these measurements were useful in quantitatively evaluating the hydrophobic nature of the cell surface during growth on hydrocarbons and comparing it with the hydrophilic nature of the cell surface during growth on a soluble substrate. PMID:16345526

  7. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  8. Neutrophil cell surface receptors and their intracellular signal transduction pathways☆

    PubMed Central

    Futosi, Krisztina; Fodor, Szabina; Mócsai, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but their inappropriate activation also contributes to tissue damage during autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils express a large number of cell surface receptors for the recognition of pathogen invasion and the inflammatory environment. Those include G-protein-coupled chemokine and chemoattractant receptors, Fc-receptors, adhesion receptors such as selectins/selectin ligands and integrins, various cytokine receptors, as well as innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins. The various cell surface receptors trigger very diverse signal transduction pathways including activation of heterotrimeric and monomeric G-proteins, receptor-induced and store-operated Ca2 + signals, protein and lipid kinases, adapter proteins and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here we provide an overview of the receptors involved in neutrophil activation and the intracellular signal transduction processes they trigger. This knowledge is crucial for understanding how neutrophils participate in antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory tissue damage and may also point to possible future targets of the pharmacological therapy of neutrophil-mediated autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23994464

  9. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  10. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER.

  11. Characterization of putative effectors from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiangkuan; Peng, Huan; Qiao, Fen; Wang, Gaofeng; Huang, Wenkun; Wu, Duqign; Peng, Deliang

    2017-09-20

    Few molecular details of effectors of Heterodera avenae parasitism are known. We performed a high-throughput sequencing analysis of the H. avenae transcriptome at five developmental stages. A total of 82,549 unigenes were ultimately obtained, and 747 transcripts showed best hits to genes putatively encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes in plant parasitic nematodes that play an important role in the invasion process. A total of 1480 unigenes were homologous to known phytonematode effectors, and 63 putative novel effectors were identified in the H. avenae transcriptomes. Twenty-three unigenes were analyzed by qRT-PCR and confirmed to be highly expressed during at least one developmental stage. For in situ hybridization, 17 of the 22 tested putative effectors were specifically expressed and located in the subventral gland cells, and five putative novel effectors were specifically expressed in the dorsal gland. Furthermore, 115 transcripts were found to have putative lethal RNA interference (RNAi) phenotypes. Three target genes with lethal RNAi phenotypes and two of the four tested putative effectors were associated with a decrease in the number of cysts through in vitro RNAi technology. These transcriptomic data lay a foundation for further studies of interactions of H. avenae with cereal and H. avenae parasitic control.

  12. Only scratching the cell surface: extracellular signals in cerebrum development.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Jean M

    2013-08-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type's competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development.

  13. Autonomous Molecular Cascades for Evaluation of Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs1–4. Previously studied nucleic acid-based-automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata3,5) and finite-state automata for analysis of nucleic acids6 with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells7,8. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement9,10 cascades directed by antibodies that can analyze cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  14. Only scratching the cell surface; extracellular signals in cerebrum development

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Jean M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type’s competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development. PMID:23669550

  15. Advances in targeting cell surface signalling molecules for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Yuwen; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the development of immunomodulatory approaches to combat a broad range of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, autoimmunity and inflammation as well as in the prevention of transplant rejection. Immunomodulatory approaches mostly involve the use of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant fusion proteins that target cell surface signalling molecules on immune cells to drive immune responses towards the desired direction. Advances in our understanding of the human immune system, along with valuable lessons learned from the first generation of therapeutic biologics, are aiding the design of the next generation of immunomodulatory biologics with better therapeutic efficacy, minimized adverse effects and long-lasting clinical benefit. The recent encouraging results from antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and B7 homolog 1 (B7H1; also known as PDL1) for the treatment of various advanced human cancers show that immunomodulatory therapy has come of age. PMID:23370250

  16. Mechanotransduction across the cell surface and through the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Butler, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin beta 1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  17. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-09

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  18. Novel eukaryotic enzymes modifying cell-surface biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic extracellular matrices such as proteoglycans, sclerotinized structures, mucus, external tests, capsules, cell walls and waxes contain highly modified proteins, glycans and other composite biopolymers. Using comparative genomics and sequence profile analysis we identify several novel enzymes that could be potentially involved in the modification of cell-surface glycans or glycoproteins. Results Using sequence analysis and conservation we define the acyltransferase domain prototyped by the fungal Cas1p proteins, identify its active site residues and unify them to the superfamily of classical 10TM acyltransferases (e.g. oatA). We also identify a novel family of esterases (prototyped by the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain of Cas1p) that have a similar fold as the SGNH/GDSL esterases but differ from them in their conservation pattern. Conclusions We posit that the combined action of the acyltransferase and esterase domain plays an important role in controlling the acylation levels of glycans and thereby regulates their physico-chemical properties such as hygroscopicity, resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis and physical strength. We present evidence that the action of these novel enzymes on glycans might play an important role in host-pathogen interaction of plants, fungi and metazoans. We present evidence that in plants (e.g. PMR5 and ESK1) the regulation of carbohydrate acylation by these acylesterases might also play an important role in regulation of transpiration and stress resistance. We also identify a subfamily of these esterases in metazoans (e.g. C7orf58), which are fused to an ATP-grasp amino acid ligase domain that is predicted to catalyze, in certain animals, modification of cell surface polymers by amino acid or peptides. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Frank Eisenhaber PMID:20056006

  19. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  20. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  1. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J.; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M.; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J.; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J.; Fuller, William

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme–substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump. PMID:25422474

  2. Identification of Putative Potassium Channel Homologues in Pathogenic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Prole, David L.; Marrion, Neil V.

    2012-01-01

    K+ channels play a vital homeostatic role in cells and abnormal activity of these channels can dramatically alter cell function and survival, suggesting that they might be attractive drug targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and dysentery that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. The genomes of many protozoan parasites have recently been sequenced, allowing rational design of targeted therapies. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of K+ channels. These protozoan K+ channel homologues represent novel targets for anti-parasitic drugs. Differences in the sequences and diversity of human and parasite proteins may allow pathogen-specific targeting of these K+ channel homologues. PMID:22363819

  3. Thrombomucin, a Novel Cell Surface Protein that Defines Thrombocytes and Multipotent Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McNagny, Kelly M.; Pettersson, Inger; Rossi, Fabio; Flamme, Ingo; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Graf, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    MEP21 is an avian antigen specifically expressed on the surface of Myb-Ets–transformed multipotent hematopoietic precursors (MEPs) and of normal thrombocytes. Using nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we have sequenced and subsequently cloned the MEP21 cDNA and named the gene thrombomucin as it encodes a 571–amino acid protein with an extracellular domain typical of the mucin family of proteoglycans. Thrombomucin is distantly related to CD34, the best characterized and most used human hematopoietic stem cell marker. It is also highly homologous in its transmembrane/intracellular domain to podocalyxinlike protein–1, a rabbit cell surface glycoprotein of kidney podocytes. Single cell analysis of yolk sac cells from 3-d-old chick embryos revealed that thrombomucin is expressed on the surface of both lineage-restricted and multipotent progenitors. In the bone marrow, thrombomucin is also expressed on mono- and multipotent progenitors, showing an overlapping but distinct expression pattern from that of the receptor-type stem cell marker c-kit. These observations strengthen the notion that the Myb-Ets oncoprotein can induce the proliferation of thrombomucin-positive hematopoietic progenitors that have retained the capacity to differentiate along multiple lineages. They also suggest that thrombomucin and CD34 form a family of stem cell–specific proteins with possibly overlapping functions in early hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:9298993

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates its cell surface via an oligopeptide permease (Opp) transport system

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Morris, Rowan P.; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial species utilize a vast repertoire of surface structures to interact with their surroundings and employ a number of strategies to reconfigure the cellular envelope according to specific stimuli. Gram-positive bacteria, exemplified by Streptomyces and Bacillus species, control production of some exposed molecules by importing oligopeptide signals via permeases (Opp). Such oligopeptides modulate intracellular signaling pathways. In this work, we functionally characterized an Opp of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and propose its reannotation. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found that Opp was required to modulate (fold-change ranging from −3.5 to 2.0) the expression of several genes, most of them encoding surface-exposed molecules. These included the virulence-associated lipids mycolic acids and phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) as well as PE-family proteins. By thin-layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF-MS we confirmed changes in the lipid profile, including an altered accumulation of triacylglycerides and an affected ratio of mycolic acids to PDIMs. An Opp loss of function mutant showed no in vitro growth defect, but had diminished burden during chronic infection and produced a slightly delayed time to death of animals when compared to WT Mtb infection.—Flores-Valdez, M. A., Morris, R. P., Laval, F., Daffé, M., Schoolnik, G. K. Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates its cell surface via an oligopeptide permease (Opp) transport system. PMID:19671666

  5. Characterization of a Putative Ancestor of Coxsackievirus B5 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Jonsson, Nina; Mulders, Mick N.; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Van Ranst, Marc; Lemey, Philippe; Hafenstein, Susan; Lindberg, A. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Like other RNA viruses, coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) exists as circulating heterogeneous populations of genetic variants. In this study, we present the reconstruction and characterization of a probable ancestral virion of CVB5. Phylogenetic analyses based on capsid protein-encoding regions (the VP1 gene of 41 clinical isolates and the entire P1 region of eight clinical isolates) of CVB5 revealed two major cocirculating lineages. Ancestral capsid sequences were inferred from sequences of these contemporary CVB5 isolates by using maximum likelihood methods. By using Bayesian phylodynamic analysis, the inferred VP1 ancestral sequence dated back to 1854 (1807 to 1898). In order to study the properties of the putative ancestral capsid, the entire ancestral P1 sequence was synthesized de novo and inserted into the replicative backbone of an infectious CVB5 cDNA clone. Characterization of the recombinant virus in cell culture showed that fully functional infectious virus particles were assembled and that these viruses displayed properties similar to those of modern isolates in terms of receptor preferences, plaque phenotypes, growth characteristics, and cell tropism. This is the first report describing the resurrection and characterization of a picornavirus with a putative ancestral capsid. Our approach, including a phylogenetics-based reconstruction of viral predecessors, could serve as a starting point for experimental studies of viral evolution and might also provide an alternative strategy for the development of vaccines. PMID:20631132

  6. Heterogeneous distribution of Candida albicans cell-surface antigens demonstrated with an Als1-specific monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David A.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an abundance of data describing expression of genes in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) gene family, little is known about the production of Als proteins on individual cells, their spatial localization or stability. Als proteins are most commonly discussed with respect to function in adhesion of C. albicans to host and abiotic surfaces. Development of a mAb specific for Als1, one of the eight large glycoproteins encoded by the ALS family, provided the opportunity to detect Als1 during growth of yeast and hyphae, both in vitro and in vivo, and to demonstrate the utility of the mAb in blocking C. albicans adhesion to host cells. Although most C. albicans yeast cells in a saturated culture are Als1-negative by indirect immunofluorescence, Als1 is detected on the surface of nearly all cells shortly after transfer into fresh growth medium. Als1 covers the yeast cell surface, with the exception of bud scars. Daughters of the inoculum cells, and sometimes granddaughters, also have detectable Als1, but Als1 is not detectable on cells from subsequent generations. On germ tubes and hyphae, most Als1 is localized proximal to the mother yeast. Once deposited on yeasts or hyphae, Als1 persists long after the culture has reached saturation. Growth stage-dependent production of Als1, coupled with its persistence on the cell surface, results in a heterogeneous population of cells within a C. albicans culture. Anti-Als1 immunolabelling patterns vary depending on the source of the C. albicans cells, with obvious differences between cells recovered from culture and those from a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Results from this work highlight the temporal parallels for ALS1 expression and Als1 production in yeasts and germ tubes, the specialized spatial localization and persistence of Als1 on the C. albicans cell surface, and the differences in Als1 localization that occur in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20705663

  7. The cell surface protein Ag43 facilitates phage infection of Escherichia coli in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gabig, Magdalena; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Los, Marcin; Thomas, Mark S; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2002-05-01

    It was found that infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage lambda is inhibited in the presence of certain bile salts and carbohydrates when cells are in the "OFF" state for production of the phase-variable cell surface protein antigen 43 (Ag43). The inhibition of phage growth was found to be due to a significant impairment in the process of phage adsorption. Expression of the gene encoding Ag43 (agn43) from a plasmid or inactivation of the oxyR gene (encoding an activator of genes important for defence against oxidative stress) suppressed this inhibition. A mutation, rpoA341, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase also facilitated phage adsorption in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates. The rpoA341 mutation promoted efficient production of Ag43 in a genetic background that would otherwise be in the "OFF" phase for expression of the agn43 gene. Analysis of a reporter gene fusion demonstrated that the promoter for the agn43 gene was more active in the rpoA341 mutant than in the otherwise isogenic rpoA(+) strain. The combined inhibitory action of bile salts and carbohydrates on phage adsorption and the abolition of this inhibition by production of Ag43 was not restricted to lambda, as a similar phenomenon was observed for the coliphages P1 and T4.

  8. TNFα protects cardiac mitochondria independently of its cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Lydia; McCarthy, Joy; Mungly, Shazia F K; Lynn, Edward G; Sack, Michael N; Opie, Lionel H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2010-11-01

    Our novel proposal is that TNFα exerts a direct effect on mitochondrial respiratory function in the heart, independently of its cell surface receptors. TNFα-induced cardioprotection is known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) and sphingolipids. We therefore further propose that this direct mitochondrial effect is mediated via ROS and sphingolipids. The protective concentration of TNFα (0.5 ng/ml) was added to isolated heart mitochondria from black 6 × 129 mice (WT) and double TNF receptor knockout mice (TNFR1&2(-/-)). Respiratory parameters and inner mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed in the presence/absence of two antioxidants, N-acetyl-L: -cysteine or N-tert-butyl-α-(2-sulfophenyl)nitrone or two antagonists of the sphingolipid pathway, N-oleoylethanolamine (NOE) or imipramine. In WT, TNFα reduced State 3 respiration from 279.3 ± 3 to 119.3 ± 2 (nmol O₂/mg protein/min), increased proton leak from 15.7 ± 0.6% (control) to 36.6 ± 4.4%, and decreased membrane potential by 20.5 ± 3.1% compared to control groups. In TNFR1&2(-/-) mice, TNFα reduced State 3 respiration from 205.2 ± 4 to 75.7 ± 1 (p < 0.05 vs. respective control). In WT mice, both antioxidants added with TNFα restored State 3 respiration to 269.2 ± 2 and 257.6 ± 2, respectively. Imipramine and NOE also restored State 3 respiration to 248.4 ± 2 and 249.0 ± 2, respectively (p < 0.01 vs. TNFα alone). Similarly, both antioxidant and inhibitors of the sphingolipid pathway restored the proton leak to pre-TNF values. TNFα-treated mitochondria or isolated cardiac muscle fibers showed an increase in respiration after anoxia-reoxygenation, but this effect was lost in the presence of an antioxidant or NOE. Similar data were obtained in TNFR1&2(-/-) mice. TNFα exerts a protective effect on respiratory function in isolated mitochondria subjected to an anoxia-reoxygenation insult. This effect appears to be independent of its cell surface receptors, but is likely to be mediated

  9. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  10. Isolation of cell surface-specific human monoclonal antibodies using phage display and magnetically-activated cell sorting: applications in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Chang, T Y; Russell, S L; Bunya, V Y

    1997-08-07

    A method is described for the isolation of filamentous phage-displayed human monoclonal antibodies directed at unpurifiable cell surface-expressed molecules. To optimize the capture of antigen-specific phage and minimize the binding of irrelevant phage antibodies, a simultaneous positive and negative selection strategy is employed. Cells bearing the antigen of interest are pre-coated with magnetic beads and diluted into an excess of unmodified antigen-negative cells. Following incubation of the cell admixture with a Fab/phage library, the antigen-positive cell population is retrieved using magnetically-activated cell sorting and antigen-specific Fab/phage are eluted and propagated in bacterial culture. Utilizing this protocol with magnetically-labeled Rh(D)-positive and excess unlabeled Rh(D)-negative human red blood cells and a Fab/phage library constructed from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, dozens of unique clinically-useful gamma 1 kappa and gamma 1 lambda anti-Rh(D) antibodies were isolated from a single alloimmunized individual. This cell-surface selection method is readily adaptable for use in other systems, such as for the identification of putative tumor-specific antigens and provides a rapid (< 1 month), high-yield approach for isolating self-replicative antibody reagents directed at novel or conformationally-dependent cell-surface epitopes.

  11. The modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus is cell-attached, and its C-terminal domain has several putative homologues among cell-attached proteins within the phylum Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Hachem, Maher Abou; Ramchuran, Santosh; Costa, Hugo; Holst, Olle; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O

    2004-12-15

    Until recently, the function of the fifth domain of the thermostable modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus was unresolved. A putative homologue to this domain was however identified in a mannanase (Man26A) from the same microorganism which raised questions regarding a common function. An extensive search of all accessible data-bases as well as the partially sequenced genomes of R. marinus and Cytophaga hutchinsonii showed that homologues of this domain were encoded by multiple genes in microorganisms in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Moreover, the domain occurred invariably at the C-termini of proteins that were predominantly extra-cellular/cell attached. A primary structure motif of three conserved regions including structurally important glycines and a proline was also identified suggesting a conserved 3D fold. This bioinformatic evidence suggested a possible role of this domain in mediating cell attachment. To confirm this theory, R. marinus was grown, and activity assays showed that the major part of the xylanase activity was connected to whole cells. Moreover, immunocytochemical detection using a Xyn10A-specific antibody proved presence of Xyn10A on the R. marinus cell surface. In the light of this, a revision of experimental data present on both Xyn10A and Man26A was performed, and the results all indicate a cell-anchoring role of the domain, suggesting that this domain represents a novel type of module that mediates cell attachment in proteins originating from members of the phylum Bacteroidetes.

  12. A Putative PP2C-Encoding Gene Negatively Regulates ABA Signaling in Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuan; Zhang, Dongzhi; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Tian, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    A PP2C homolog gene was cloned from the drought-treated cDNA library of Populus euphratica. Multiple sequence alignment analysis suggested that the gene is a potential ortholog of HAB1. The expression of this HAB1 ortholog (PeHAB1) was markedly induced by drought and moderately induced by ABA. To characterize its function in ABA signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing this gene. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced responses to exogenous ABA and reduced tolerance to drought compared to wide-type lines. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PeHAB1 could interact with the ABA receptor PYL4 in an ABA-independent manner. Taken together; these results indicated that PeHAB1 is a new negative regulator of ABA responses in poplar.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  14. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  15. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  16. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Summary The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery on cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, were also evaluated for effects on mutacin production and genetic competence. PMID:26386361

  17. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    PubMed

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence.

  18. [Cell surface display of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a-agglutinin as carrier protein].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshan; Xu, Li; Zhao, Heyun; Yang, Jiangke; Yan, Yunjun

    2008-11-01

    In order to display extracellular.lipase Lip2 from Yarrowia lipolytica on the surface of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for whole cell catalysts. The mature Lip2 encoding fragment was amplified from Yarrowia lipolytica total DNA, and was inserted into the 3'terminal of AGA2 to give the plasmid pCTLIP2 for surface display of Lip2. Olive oil, tributyrin and p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) were used as substrates to measure lipase activity. Moreover, the characterization of displayed lipase and its free form was analyzed. The surface displayed lipase was confirmed to be active towards olive oil, tributyrin and p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP), and reached its highest expression level at 182 U/g dry cell after induced by galactose for 72h. The optimum temperature of cell surface displayed Lip2 was 40 degrees C After incubated at 50 degrees C for 4h, the surface displayed lipase retained 23.2% of its full activity, improved a little compared to free Lip2. The surface displayed lipase showed a preference to medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids p-nitrophenyl esters (C8-C16). The cell surface display system based on a-agglutinin is an effective system for displaying Lip2, and the whole cell EBY100-pCTLIP2 will be probably suited to a different range of applications.

  19. Ly9 (CD229) Cell-Surface Receptor is Crucial for the Development of Spontaneous Autoantibody Production to Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    de Salort, Jose; Cuenca, Marta; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo; Romero, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family (SLAMF) genes, which encode cell-surface receptors that modulate innate and adaptive immune responses, lay within a genomic region of human and mouse chromosome 1 that confers a predisposition for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we demonstrate that the SLAMF member Ly9 arises as a novel receptor contributing to the reinforcement of tolerance. Specifically, Ly9-deficient mice spontaneously developed features of systemic autoimmunity such as the production of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), -dsDNA, and -nucleosome autoantibodies, independently of genetic background [(B6.129) or (BALB/c.129)]. In aged (10- to 12-month-old) Ly9−/− mice key cell subsets implicated in autoimmunity were expanded, e.g., T follicular helper (Tfh) as well as germinal center (GC) B cells. More importantly, in vitro functional experiments showed that Ly9 acts as an inhibitory receptor of IFN-γ producing CD4+ T cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that the Ly9 receptor triggers cell intrinsic safeguarding mechanisms to prevent a breach of tolerance, emerging as a new non-redundant inhibitory cell-surface receptor capable of disabling autoantibody responses. PMID:23914190

  20. Cloning, protein expression and display of synthetic multi-epitope mycobacterial antigens on Salmonella typhi Ty21a cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Musa, Mustaffa; Zainuddin, Zainul F

    2011-09-01

    Expressing proteins of interest as fusion to proteins of bacterial envelope is a powerful technique for biotechnological and medical applications. The synthetic gene (VacII) encoding for T-cell epitopes of selected genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis namely, ESAT6, MTP40, 38 kDa, and MPT64 was fused with N- terminus of Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein (INP) outer membrane protein. The fused genes were cloned into a bacterial expression vector pKK223-3. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NAT column. VacII gene was displayed on the cell surface of Salmonella typhi Ty21a using N-terminal region of ice nucleation proteins (INP) as an anchoring motif. Glycine method confirmed that VacII was anchored on the cell surface. Western blot analysis further identified the synthesis of INP derivatives containing the N-terminal domain INP- VacII fusion protein of the expected size (52 kDa).

  1. Ly9 (CD229) Cell-Surface Receptor is Crucial for the Development of Spontaneous Autoantibody Production to Nuclear Antigens.

    PubMed

    de Salort, Jose; Cuenca, Marta; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo; Romero, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family (SLAMF) genes, which encode cell-surface receptors that modulate innate and adaptive immune responses, lay within a genomic region of human and mouse chromosome 1 that confers a predisposition for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we demonstrate that the SLAMF member Ly9 arises as a novel receptor contributing to the reinforcement of tolerance. Specifically, Ly9-deficient mice spontaneously developed features of systemic autoimmunity such as the production of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), -dsDNA, and -nucleosome autoantibodies, independently of genetic background [(B6.129) or (BALB/c.129)]. In aged (10- to 12-month-old) Ly9 (-/-) mice key cell subsets implicated in autoimmunity were expanded, e.g., T follicular helper (Tfh) as well as germinal center (GC) B cells. More importantly, in vitro functional experiments showed that Ly9 acts as an inhibitory receptor of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that the Ly9 receptor triggers cell intrinsic safeguarding mechanisms to prevent a breach of tolerance, emerging as a new non-redundant inhibitory cell-surface receptor capable of disabling autoantibody responses.

  2. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  3. Domain deletion in the extracellular portion of the EGF-receptor reduces ligand binding and impairs cell surface expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lax, I; Bellot, F; Honegger, A M; Schmidt, A; Ullrich, A; Givol, D; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    Cultured NIH-3T3 cells were transfected with cDNA constructs encoding human epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)* and two deletion mutants in the extracellular portion of the receptor molecule. One mutant is devoid of 124 amino-terminal amino acids, and the other lacks 76 residues. Mutant receptors were not delivered to the cell surface unless the transfected cells contained also endogenous EGF-Rs, suggesting that receptor interaction complements the mutation and allows surface display of mutant receptors. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association between mutant and endogenous EGF-Rs when both proteins were expressed in the same cell. Hence, receptor-oligomers may exist in the plane of the membrane even in the absence of ligand binding, and oligomerization may play a role in normal trafficking of EGF-Rs to the cell surface. Mutant receptors retained partial ligand binding activity as 125I-labeled EGF was covalently cross-linked to both mutant receptors, and EGF stimulated, albeit weakly, their protein tyrosine kinase activity. Both mutant EGF-Rs bind EGF with a 10-fold lower affinity than that of the solubilized wild type EGF-R. These results provide further evidence that the region flanked by the two cysteine-rich domains plays a crucial role in defining ligand-binding specificity of EGF-R. Images PMID:2100196

  4. Glycoprotein C of equine herpesvirus 4 plays a role in viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Azab, Walid; Tsujimura, Koji; Maeda, Ken; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Mohamed, Yassir Mahgoub; Kato, Kentaro; Matsumura, Tomio; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2010-07-01

    Heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for several herpesviruses. For herpes simplex virus 1, pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1, glycoprotein C (gC) homologues have been shown to mediate the binding to cell surface heparan sulfate. However, the role of gC in equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) infection has not yet been analyzed. Using pull-down assay, we first determined that EHV-4 gC as well as gB are heparin-binding glycoproteins. To study the role of gC in EHV-4 infection, we constructed a gC-deletion mutant, WA79DeltagC, where the kanamycin resistant gene was inserted instead of the open reading frame encoding gC. We found that soluble heparin was capable of blocking both wild-type EHV-4 and WA79DeltagC infection of fetal horse kidney. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with heparinase reduces considerably the ability of both viruses to adsorb to these cells and to form plaques. Similar results were obtained when cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis was inhibited by chlorate treatment. In addition, we did find that gC protects EHV-4 from complement-mediated neutralization. These results suggest that, like other herpesviruses, EHV-4 gC plays a role in the interaction of the virus with cellular heparan sulfate. Moreover, gC can protect the virus from complement-mediated neutralization.

  5. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    SciTech Connect

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  6. The Putative Son's Attractiveness Alters the Perceived Attractiveness of the Putative Father.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2015-08-01

    A body of literature has investigated female mate choice in the pre-mating context (pre-mating sexual selection). Humans, however, are long-living mammals forming pair-bonds which sequentially produce offspring. Post-mating evaluations of a partner's attractiveness may thus significantly influence the reproductive success of men and women. I tested herein the theory that the attractiveness of putative sons provides extra information about the genetic quality of fathers, thereby influencing fathers' attractiveness across three studies. As predicted, facially attractive boys were more frequently attributed to attractive putative fathers and vice versa (Study 1). Furthermore, priming with an attractive putative son increased the attractiveness of the putative father with the reverse being true for unattractive putative sons. When putative fathers were presented as stepfathers, the effect of the boy's attractiveness on the stepfather's attractiveness was lower and less consistent (Study 2). This suggests that the presence of an attractive boy has the strongest effect on the perceived attractiveness of putative fathers rather than on non-fathers. The generalized effect of priming with beautiful non-human objects also exists, but its effect is much weaker compared with the effects of putative biological sons (Study 3). Overall, this study highlighted the importance of post-mating sexual selection in humans and suggests that the heritable attractive traits of men are also evaluated by females after mating and/or may be used by females in mate poaching.

  7. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  8. Diffusion-limited reactions on the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Tauber, Uwe; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) stimulates proliferation of many cell types, and are crucial in such processes as eg. wound healing. Cells have specific receptor (R) protein molecules on their surface which bind FGF for this purpose. FGF is also bound by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) molecules which are present on the cell surface. In isolation, both these complexes are unstable, with half-life of the order of 10-20 minutes, wheras in intact cells, the half-life of FGF-R complex is nearly 5 hours! To account for this increased stability, it has been proposed that R-FGF complex combines with HSPG via surface diffusion and forms the triad R-FGF-HSPG. We examine the feasibility of this reaction using the well-known Smoluchowski theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results support the triad formation theory, and are in qualitative agreement with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of slowing down of surface diffusion of these molecules by such factors as eg. the cytosekeletal network and anchored proteins.

  9. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  10. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  11. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  12. Encephalitis and antibodies to synaptic and neuronal cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The identification of encephalitis associated with antibodies against cell surface and synaptic proteins, although recent, has already had a substantial impact in clinical neurology and neuroscience. The target antigens are receptors and proteins that have critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity, including the NMDA receptor, the AMPA receptor, the GABAB receptor, and the glycine receptor. Other autoantigens, such as leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2, form part of trans-synaptic complexes and neuronal cell adhesion molecules involved in fine-tuning synaptic transmission and nerve excitability. Syndromes resulting from these immune responses resemble those of pharmacologic or genetic models in which the antigens are disrupted. For some immune responses, there is evidence that the antibodies alter the structure and function of the antigen, suggesting a direct pathogenic effect. These disorders are important because they can affect children and young adults, are severe and protracted, occur with or without tumor association, and respond to treatment but may relapse. This review provides an update on these syndromes and autoantigens with special emphasis on clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21747075

  13. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  14. Development of a novel mammalian cell surface antibody display platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Cai, Ling; Chen, Qing; Shen, Weyen David

    2010-01-01

    Antibody display systems have been successfully applied to screen, select and characterize antibody fragments. These systems typically use prokaryotic organisms such as phage and bacteria or lower eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast. These organisms possess either no or different post-translational modification functions from mammalian cells and prefer to display small antibody fragments instead of full-length IgGs. We report here a novel mammalian cell-based antibody display platform that displays full-length functional antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. Through recombinase-mediated DNA integration, each host cell contains one copy of the gene of interest in the genome. Utilizing a hot-spot integration site, the expression levels of the gene of interest are high and comparable between clones, ensuring a high signal to noise ratio. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology, our platform is high throughput and can distinguish antibodies with very high antigen binding affinities directly on the cell surface. Single-round FACS can enrich high affinity antibodies by more than 500 fold. Antibodies with significantly improved neutralizing activity have been identified from a randomly mutagenized library, demonstrating the power of this platform in screening and selecting antibody therapeutics.

  15. Cells under siege: Viral glycoprotein interactions at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2011-01-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses are required to enter and replicate within their host, a process which employs many of their proteins to hijack natural cellular processes. High resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis has proven to be an ideal method to visualize the mechanisms by which such virus-host interactions occur and has revealed the innovative capacity of viruses to adapt efficiently to their hosts. In this review, we draw upon recently elucidated paramyxovirus-, arenavirus-, and poxvirus-host protein complex crystal structures to reveal both the capacity of viruses to appropriate one component of a physiological protein–protein binding event (often modifying it to out-compete the host-protein), and the ability to utilize novel binding sites on host cell surface receptors. The structures discussed shed light on a number of biological processes ranging from viral entry to virulence and host antagonism. Drawn together they reveal the common strategies which viruses have evolved to interact with their natural host. The structures also support molecular level rationales for how viruses can be transmitted to unrelated organisms and thus pose severe health risks. PMID:21440638

  16. Turnover of cell surface proteoglycans in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Brauker, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were cultured in /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup -2/ to label the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs); the extracellular matrix was derived from these labeled cells by removal of cells with the chelating agent ethylene glycol-bis-(..beta..-amino ethyl ether)N,N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA). When unlabeled cells were plated onto these radiolabeled extracellular matrices, two distinct events were observed: (a) the cells actively released (/sup 35/S)PG from the matrix and; (b) the cells degraded a large fraction of the matrix PG, releasing free sulfate. The latter degradation event could be inhibited in a specific dose-dependent manner by addition of mannose 6-phosphate to the culture medium. Analyses of this effect in terms of the saccharide specificity, NH/sub 4/Cl sensitivity, and the requirement for cells suggest that both an intracellular compartment and the mannose 6-phosphate receptor that binds lysosomal enzymes at the cell surface may play important roles in the turnover of PG of the extracellular matrix.

  17. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  18. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  19. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  20. Molecular and Genetic Analyses of the Putative Proteus O Antigen Gene Locus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups. PMID:20581173

  1. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared.

  2. An efficient delivery of DAMPs on the cell surface by the unconventional secretion pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Dongmei; Min, Zhihui; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Min; Gu, Jianxin

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Hsp60 transported to cell surface through the classical secretory pathway was modified with N-glycosylation. {yields} HSAPB-N18 could efficiently deliver Hsp60 to the cell surface via the unconventional secretory pathway. {yields} Cell surface Hsp60 delivered by HASPB-N18 has a proper conformation. {yields} HASPB-N18 is an efficient delivery signal for other DAMP molecules such as Hsp70 and HMGB1. -- Abstract: Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are signals released from dying cells evoking the immune system response in several inflammatory disorders. In normal situations, many of DAMPs are nuclear or cytosolic proteins with defined intracellular function, but they could be found on the cell surface following tissue injury. The biological function of the translocated DAMPs is still not well known and an efficient delivery of these molecules on the cell surface is required to clarify their biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated that an unclassical secretory signal peptide, N-terminal 18 amino acids of HASPB (HASPB-N18), could efficiently deliver Hsp60, Hsp70, and HMGB1 on the cell surface. Furthermore, the delivery of these molecules on the cell surface by HASPB-N18 is not limited to a special cell line because several cell lines could use this delivery signal to deliver these molecules on the cell surface. Moreover, we demonstrated that Hsp60 on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 could be recognized by a soluble form of LOX-1, which implies that DAMPs on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 have a proper conformation during transport. Therefore, delivery of DAMPs by HASPB-N18 is a reliable model to further understand the biological significance of DAMPs on the cell surface.

  3. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  4. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  5. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  6. Quantification of macrophage cell surface molecules in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hessian, P A; Highton, J; Palmer, D G

    1989-01-01

    The response of macrophages to stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in vitro is characterized by an increase in the cell surface expression of MHC class II HLA-DR antigen (HLA-DR) and the high-affinity Fc-receptor for immunoglobulin G (FcRI) while the expression of the C3b-receptor (CR1) is reduced. Based on these observations, we have examined further the possibility that IFN-gamma may modulate the activation of mononuclear phagocytes (Mph) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As reported by others, we found low levels of IFN-gamma in the synovial fluid of these patients (less than 0.3 IU/ml using radioimmunoassay). As an alternative means of establishing whether Mph are influenced by levels of IFN-gamma too low to measure directly, we have quantified the expression of membrane associated HLA-DR, FcRI and CR1 on cell populations isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood. The expression of these molecules by Mph is known to be influenced by IFN-gamma. We found that Mph isolated from the synovial fluid of patients with RA showed a significantly increased HLA-DR expression. Significantly less CR1 was associated with the synovial fluid Mph than with peripheral blood monocytes. However the expression of the FcRI by the synovial fluid Mph and peripheral blood monocyte populations was similar. The quantitative changes in HLA-DR and CR1 expression by synovial fluid Mph (but not those of FcRI) were consistent with those seen following IFN-gamma activation of monocytes in vitro. While these results indicate that IFN-gamma may have a role in activating the Mph present in synovial fluid, the apparent independent regulation of FcRI observed suggests other mediators may also be involved. PMID:2527651

  7. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  8. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  9. Genetically-encoded Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacoff, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    One of the principle goals of neuroscience has been to understand the cellular basis of information processing and the plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Efforts in this area have mainly relied on electrical recording and optical imaging with chemical dyes. Over the last few years we and others have begun to develop genetically-encoded optical reporter "dyes" which should provide several important advantages over the classical methods for monitoring signal transmission in the nervous system. The advantages are that genetically-encoded reporters can be molecularly targeted a) to specific cell types via cell-specific promoters, and b) to specific subcellular compartments by peptides that are recognized by the protein sorting machinery of the cell. This makes it possible, in principle, to exclude signals from non-neuronal cells and to visualize selectively, in a brain region that contains many cell types with numerous kinds of synaptic connections, the activity of specific types of neurons (e.g. GABAergic interneurons) and specific synaptic elements (e.g. nerve terminals or dendrites), something that has hitherto not been possible. An additional advantage is that protein reporters may be rationally and irrationally "tuned" with mutations in functional domains known to control their dynamic range of operation. The general idea behind genetically-encoded reporters of cell signaling is to encode a protein that is either intrinsically fluorescent, or that can be labeled orthogonally with a fluorescent probe, and where the physiological signal changes fluorescence emission. I will describe recent progress employing both kinds of approaches.

  10. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  11. Atypical cohesin-dockerin complex responsible for cell surface attachment of cellulosomal components: binding fidelity, promiscuity, and structural buttresses.

    PubMed

    Salama-Alber, Orly; Jobby, Maroor K; Chitayat, Seth; Smith, Steven P; White, Bryan A; Shimon, Linda J W; Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix; Bayer, Edward A

    2013-06-07

    The rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens produces a highly organized multienzyme cellulosome complex that plays a key role in the degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, notably cellulose. The R. flavefaciens cellulosomal system is anchored to the bacterial cell wall through a relatively small ScaE scaffoldin subunit, which bears a single type IIIe cohesin responsible for the attachment of two major dockerin-containing scaffoldin proteins, ScaB and the cellulose-binding protein CttA. Although ScaB recruits the catalytic machinery onto the complex, CttA mediates attachment of the bacterial substrate via its two putative carbohydrate-binding modules. In an effort to understand the structural basis for assembly and cell surface attachment of the cellulosome in R. flavefaciens, we determined the crystal structure of the high affinity complex (Kd = 20.83 nM) between the cohesin module of ScaE (CohE) and its cognate X-dockerin (XDoc) modular dyad from CttA at 1.97-Å resolution. The structure reveals an atypical calcium-binding loop containing a 13-residue insert. The results further pinpoint two charged specificity-related residues on the surface of the cohesin module that are responsible for specific versus promiscuous cross-strain binding of the dockerin module. In addition, a combined functional role for the three enigmatic dockerin inserts was established whereby these extraneous segments serve as structural buttresses that reinforce the stalklike conformation of the X-module, thus segregating its tethered complement of cellulosomal components from the cell surface. The novel structure of the RfCohE-XDoc complex sheds light on divergent dockerin structure and function and provides insight into the specificity features of the type IIIe cohesin-dockerin interaction.

  12. Influence of carbon source on cell surface topology of Thermomonospora curvata.

    PubMed Central

    Hostalka, F; Moultrie, A; Stutzenberger, F

    1992-01-01

    The appearance of cell surface protuberances in Thermomonospora curvata correlated with cell-bound exoenzymes which could be removed by brief sonication. Mycelia grown on cellulose or xylan had numerous protuberances and retained 20 to 25% of endoglucanase and endoxylanase at cell surfaces, while those grown on pectin or starch had few protuberances and negligible bound pectinase or amylase. Images PMID:1400256

  13. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  14. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  15. Expression of putative virulence factors in the potato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus during infection.

    PubMed

    Holtsmark, Ingrid; Takle, Gunnhild W; Brurberg, May Bente

    2008-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is the causal agent of bacterial wilt and ring rot of potato. So far, only two proteins have been shown to be essential for virulence, namely a plasmid-encoded cellulase CelA and a hypersensitive response-inducing protein. We have examined the relative expression of CelA and eight putative virulence factors during infection of potato and in liquid culture, using quantitative real-time PCR. The examined putative virulence genes were celB, a cellulase-encoding gene and genes encoding a pectate lyase, a xylanase and five homologues of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity factor Pat-1 thought to encode a serine protease. Six of the nine assayed genes were up-regulated during infection of potato, including celA, celB, the xylanase gene, and two of the pat genes. The pectate lyase gene showed only slightly elevated expression, whereas three of the five examined pat genes were down-regulated during infection in potato. Interestingly, the two up-regulated pat genes showed a noticeable sequence difference compared to the three down-regulated pat genes. These results reveal several new proteins that are likely to be involved in Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus pathogenicity.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Putative Integron-Like Elements of the Heavy-Metal-Hypertolerant Strains of Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Ciok, Anna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Bartosik, Dariusz; Dziewit, Lukasz

    2016-11-28

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from the heavily contaminated Lubin copper mine and Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir in Poland were screened for the presence of integrons. This analysis revealed that two strains carried homologous DNA regions composed of a gene encoding a DNA_BRE_C domain-containing tyrosine recombinase (with no significant sequence similarity to other integrases of integrons) plus a three-component array of putative integron gene cassettes. The predicted gene cassettes encode three putative polypeptides with homology to (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) GCN5 family acetyltransferases, and (iii) hypothetical proteins of unknown function (homologous proteins are encoded by the gene cassettes of several class 1 integrons). Comparative sequence analyses identified three structural variants of these novel integron-like elements within the sequenced bacterial genomes. Analysis of their distribution revealed that they are found exclusively in strains of the genus Pseudomonas.

  17. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  18. TARM1 is a novel LRC-encoded ITAM receptor that co-stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten; Zaccone, Paola; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Jane C; Chilvers, Edwin R; Juss, Jatinder K; Jones, Des C; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2015-01-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human Leukocyte Receptor Complex (LRC) and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residue, consistent with association with a signaling adaptor. TARM1 associated with the ITAM adaptor Fc receptor common γ chain but not with DAP10 or DAP12. In healthy mice, TARM1 is constitutively expressed on the cell-surface of mature and immature CD11b+ Gr-1+ neutrophils within the bone marrow. Following intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment or systemic bacterial challenge TARM1 expression was upregulated by neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes and TARM1+ cells were rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation. TARM1 expression was also upregulated by bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells following stimulation with TLR agonists in vitro. Ligation of TARM1 receptor in the presence of TLR ligands, such as LPS, enhanced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and primary mouse neutrophils, whereas TARM1 stimulation alone had no effect. Finally, an immobilized TARM1-Fc fusion protein suppressed CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that a putative T cell ligand can interact with TARM1 receptor resulting in bi-directional signaling, raising the T cell activation threshold whilst co-stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:26311901

  19. Immune response to E7 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 anchored on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nemecková, Sárka; Stránská, Růzena; Subrtová, Jana; Kutinová, Luda; Otáhal, Pavel; Hainz, Petr; Maresová, Lucie; Sroller, Vojtech; Hamsíková, Eva; Vonka, Vladimír

    2002-04-01

    To target the E7 protein of human papilloma virus 16 to the cell surface, a fusion gene was constructed. It encodes the signal peptide, part of the immunoglobulin (IgG)-like domain, the transmembrane anchor of vaccinia virus (VV) hemagglutinin (HA), and the complete E7-coding sequence. The fusion gene was expressed under the HA late promoter by a recombinant VV, designated VV-E7-HA. The E7-HA protein was displayed on the surface of cells infected with the recombinant virus and was more stable than unmodified E7. The biological properties of the VV-E7-HA virus were compared with those of a VV-E7 virus that expressed the unmodified E7 and with a VV expressing the Sig-E7-LAMP fusion protein. While the first two of these recombinants were based on VV strain Praha, the third was derived from the WR strain of VV. Infection of mice with the VV-E7-HA virus induced the formation of E7-specific antibodies with the predominance of the IgG2a isotype, whereas the other two viruses did not induce the formation of E7-specific antibodies. Unlike the other two viruses, VV-E7-HA did not induce a response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes or Th1 cells and did not protect mice against the growth of E7-expressing tumors. Thus, VV-E7-HA induced a differently polarized immune response to the E7 protein than the other two viruses.

  20. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates.

  1. Novel Properties for Endoglucanase Acquired by Cell-Surface Display Technique.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baosheng; Ke, Xiaojing; Yu, Hongwei; Xie, Jing; Jia, Yingmin; Guo, Runfang

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve the stability of endoglucanase under thermal and acidic conditions, the endoglucanase gene was fused to the N-terminus of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pir gene, encoding the cell wall protein PIR. The fusion gene was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 for expression. A resulting strain with high expression and high activity was identified by examining resistance to Geneticin 418, Congo red staining, and quantitative analysis of enzyme activity. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the endoglucanase was successfully displayed on the yeast cell surface. The displayed endoglucanase (DEG) showed maximum activity towards sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose at approximately 275 IU/g cell dry weight. DEG exhibited greater than 60% residual activity in the pH range 2.5-8.5, higher than free endoglucanase (FEG), which had 40% residual activity at the same pH range. The highest tolerated temperature for DEG was 70°C, much higher than that of FEG, which was approximately 50°C. Moreover, DEG showed 91.1% activity at 65°C for 120 min, while FEG only kept 77.8% residual activity over the same period. The half-life of DEG was 270 min at 65°C, compared with only 150 min for FEG. DEG could be used repeatedly at least three times. These results suggest that the DEG has broad applications as a yeast whole-cell biocatalyst, due to its novel properties of high catalytic efficiency, acid-thermal stabilities, and reusability.

  2. Murine Immunoprotective Activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae Cell Surface Preparations: Comparative Study with Ribosomal Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jean-Michel; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Jouin, Hélène

    1981-01-01

    Cell surface preparations and ribosomal preparations were extracted from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Agar gel diffusion with antisera to cell surface preparations or ribosomal preparations indicated common antigenic components among the preparations. Lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide were identified in the cell surface preparations. These results and the previous identification of lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide in ribosomal preparations suggest that these antigens are responsible for the immunochemical cross-reactivity observed among these two bacterial extracts. Active protection could be induced in mice by these two preparations. On a dry-weight basis, cell surface preparations provided better immunoprotective activity than did ribosomal preparations. However, the 50% protective dose of both preparations is practically the same on the basis of their capsular polysaccharide content. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the immunoprotective moiety of ribosomal preparations is the contaminating cell surface antigens. Furthermore, the low level of nucleotidic components detected in purified cell surface preparations led us to infer that the immunoprotective activity of capsular polysaccharide may not be dependent on the adjuvant activity of ribonucleic acid. The involvement of capsular polysaccharide in the immunoprotective capacity of cell surface preparations is demonstrated either by using a degradation of this antigen by K. pneumoniae bacteriophage K2-associated glycanase or by using a preparation extracted from a noncapsulated mutant of K. pneumoniae. Nevertheless, the low protective ability of purified capsular polysaccharides is in contrast to its greater activity when induced in bacterial cell surface preparations. The protective activity of K. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide may be dependent on its association with other surface antigenic components present in cell surface preparations or may be dependent on its

  3. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-12-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  4. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-01-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  5. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  6. Time-Encoded Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Nowack, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two neutron detector systems based on time-encoded imaging and demonstrated their applicability toward non-proliferation missions. The 1D-TEI system was designed for and evaluated against the ability to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in very low signal to noise environments; in particular, very large stand-off and/or weak sources that may be shielded. We have demonstrated significant detection (>5 sigma) of a 2.8e5 n/s neutron fission source at 100 meters stand-off in 30 min. If scaled to an IAEA significant quantity of Pu, we estimate that this could be reduced to as few as ~5 minutes. In contrast to simple counting detectors, this was accomplished without the need of previous background measurements. The 2D-TEI system was designed for high resolution spatial mapping of distributions of SNM and proved feasibility of twodimensional fast neutron imaging using the time encoded modulation of rates on a single pixel detector. Because of the simplicity of the TEI design, there is much lower systematic uncertainty in the detector response typical coded apertures. Other imaging methods require either multiple interactions (e.g. neutron scatter camera or Compton imagers), leading to intrinsically low efficiencies, or spatial modulation of the signal (e.g., Neutron Coded Aperture Imager (Hausladen, 2012)), which requires a complicated, high channel count, and expensive position sensitive detector. In contrast, a single detector using a time-modulated collimator can encode directional information in the time distribution of detected events. This is the first investigation of time-encoded imaging for nuclear nonproliferation applications.

  7. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean.

    PubMed

    Vik, Dean R; Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Bolduc, Ben; Emerson, Joanne B; Padilla, Cory C; Stewart, Frank J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce "MArVD", for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments.

  8. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R.; Bolduc, Ben; Emerson, Joanne B.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stewart, Frank J.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2017-01-01

    Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce “MArVD”, for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments. PMID:28630803

  9. PPB1, a putative spliced leader RNA gene transcription factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Wen, L M; Xu, P; Benegal, G; Carvalho, M R; Buck, G A

    2000-10-01

    In trypanosomatids, the spliced leader RNA, or SL RNA, donates its 5' 39 nucleotides to mature nuclear mRNAs in a process termed trans-splicing. We have previously characterized the SL RNA gene from Trypanosoma cruzi and identified its transcription promoter, including a 14 nt proximal sequence element, or PSE, that binds a putative transcription factor and activates transcription of the gene. Herein, we describe establishment of a yeast one-hybrid system using the 14 nt PSE as bait, and use this system to select T. cruzi cDNAs encoding a putative transcription factor that activates transcription of the SL RNA gene. The cDNA was selected from a normalized library and encodes an approximately 45 kDa putative PSE promoter-binding protein, PPB1. PPB1 in vitro translated or overexpressed in and isolated from transformed E. coli, showed PSE-specific binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Finally, overexpression of PPB1 in T. cruzi led to increased expression of the SL RNA gene as well as reporter genes in episomal constructs under the control of the SL RNA gene promoter. These observations suggest that PPB1 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in SL RNA gene expression.

  10. Diverse Intestinal Bacteria Contain Putative Zwitterionic Capsular Polysaccharides with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Neff, C Preston; Rhodes, Matthew E; Arnolds, Kathleen L; Collins, Colm B; Donnelly, Jody; Nusbacher, Nichole; Jedlicka, Paul; Schneider, Jennifer M; McCarter, Martin D; Shaffer, Michael; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Palmer, Brent E; Lozupone, Catherine A

    2016-10-12

    Zwitterionic capsular polysaccharides (ZPSs) are bacterial products that modulate T cells, including inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10-secreting T regulatory cells (Tregs). However, only a few diverse bacteria are known to modulate the host immune system via ZPS. We present a genomic screen for bacteria encoding ZPS molecules. We identify diverse host-associated bacteria, including commensals and pathogens with known anti-inflammatory properties, with the capacity to produce ZPSs. Human mononuclear cells stimulated with lysates from putative ZPS-producing bacteria induce significantly greater IL-10 production and higher proportions of Tregs than lysates from non-ZPS-encoding relatives or a commensal strain of Bacteroides cellulosilyticus in which a putative ZPS biosynthetic operon was genetically disrupted. Similarly, wild-type B. cellulosilyticus DSM 14838, but not a close relative lacking a putative ZPS, attenuated experimental colitis in mice. Collectively, this screen identifies bacterial strains that may use ZPSs to interact with the host as well as those with potential probiotic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi.

  12. Functional Analysis of the Putative Integrin Recognition Motif on Adeno-associated Virus 9*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shen; Berry, Garrett E.; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M.; Cheung, Roland Y.; Troupes, Andrew N.; Brown, Sarah M.; Kafri, Tal; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) display a highly conserved NGR motif on the capsid surface. Earlier studies have established this tripeptide motif as being essential for integrin-mediated uptake of recombinant AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) in cultured cells. However, functional attributes of this putative integrin recognition motif in other recombinant AAV serotypes displaying systemic transduction in vivo remain unknown. In this study, we dissect the biology of an integrin domain capsid mutant derived from the human isolate AAV9 in mice. The AAV9/NGA mutant shows decreased systemic transduction in mice. This defective phenotype was accompanied by rapid clearance of mutant virions from the blood circulation and nonspecific sequestration by the spleen. Transient vascular hyperpermeability, induced by histamine coinjection, exacerbated AAV9/NGA uptake by the spleen but not the liver. However, such treatment did not affect AAV9 virions, suggesting a potential entry/post-entry defect for the mutant in different tissues. Further characterization revealed modestly decreased cell surface binding but a more pronounced defect in the cellular entry of mutant virions. These findings were corroborated by the observation that blocking multiple integrins adversely affected recombinant AAV9 transduction in different cell types, albeit with variable efficiencies. From a structural perspective, we observed that the integrin recognition motif is located in close proximity to the galactose binding footprint on AAV9 capsids and postulate that this feature could influence cell surface attachment, cellular uptake at the tissue level, and systemic clearance by the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:25404742

  13. Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Cell Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abdolahi, Mohammad; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Laurent, Sophie; Sermeus, Corine; Gruettner, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface antigens as biomarkers offer tremendous potential for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response in a variety of diseases such as cancers. In this research, a simple, rapid, accurate, inexpensive, and easily available in vitro assay based on magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic cell separation principle was applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the cell surface antigen expression in the case of prostate cancer cells. Comparing the capability of the assay with flow cytometry as a gold standard method showed similar results. The results showed that the antigen-specific magnetic cell separation with antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles has high potential for quantitative cell surface antigen detection and analysis. PMID:23484112

  14. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0478 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0478 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study investigated a function for cell surface GRP78 in regulating prostate cancer stem-like cells . In year 1, we showed that

  15. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  16. A new putative alphapartitivirus recovered from the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe palczewskii.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guihong; Qiu, Ping; Li, Cong; Chen, Zhuo; Islam, Saif Ul; Fang, Shouguo; Wu, Zujian; Zhang, Songbai; Du, Zhenguo

    2017-02-27

    Two double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) likely representing the genome of a novel alphapartitivirus which we provisionally named Erysiphe palczewskii alphapartitivirus 1 (EpV1) were recovered from the powdery mildew fungus E. palczewskii infecting Sophora japonica in Jingzhou, Hubei province of China. The two dsRNAs, 1955 (dsRNA1) and 1917 (dsRNA2) bp in size, respectively, each contains a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 585- and 528-aa protein, respectively. The 585-aa protein contains a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain and shows significant homology to RdRps of approved or putative partitiviruses, particularly those belonging to the genus Alphapartitivirus. However, it shares an aa sequence identity lower than 80% with its closest relative, the RdRp of the putative alphapartitivirus Grapevine partitivirus, and lower than 60% with the RdRps of other partitiviruses. In a phylogenetic tree constructed with RdRp aa sequences of selected partitiviruses, the putative virus EpV1 clustered with Grapevine partitivirus and formed a well-supported monophyletic clade with known or putative alphapartitiviruses.

  17. Interactions of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Human and Simian Retroviral Transmembrane Proteins with Components of the Clathrin Adaptor Complexes Modulate Intracellular and Cell Surface Expression of Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Erdtmann, Lars; Delamarre, Lelia; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Sonigo, Pierre; Dokhelar, Marie Christine; Benarous, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of the transmembrane (TM) envelope proteins (TM-CDs) of most retroviruses have a Tyr-based motif, YXXØ, in their membrane-proximal regions. This signal is involved in the trafficking and endocytosis of membrane receptors via clathrin-associated AP-1 and AP-2 adaptor complexes. We have used CD8-TM-CD chimeras to investigate the role of the Tyr-based motif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM-CDs in the cell surface expression of the envelope glycoprotein. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies showed that this motif is a major determinant of the cell surface expression of the CD8-HTLV chimera. The YXXØ motif also plays a key role in subcellular distribution of the envelope of lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, these viruses, which encode TM proteins with a long cytoplasmic domain, have additional determinants distal to the YXXØ motif that participate in regulating cell surface expression. We have also used the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro binding assays to demonstrate that all three retroviral YXXØ motifs interact with the μ1 and μ2 subunits of AP complexes and that the C-terminal regions of HIV-1 and SIV TM proteins interact with the β2 adaptin subunit. The TM-CDs of HTLV-1, HIV-1, and SIV also interact with the whole AP complexes. These results clearly demonstrate that the cell surface expression of retroviral envelope glycoproteins is governed by interactions with adaptor complexes. The YXXØ-based signal is the major determinant of this interaction for the HTLV-1 TM, which contains a short cytoplasmic domain, whereas the lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV have additional determinants distal to this signal that are also involved. PMID:9882340

  18. BAT1, a putative acyltransferase, modulates brassinosteroid levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunhwa; Cho, Young-hyun; Kim, Kangmin; Matsui, Minami; Son, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Seong-Ki; Fujioka, Shozo; Hwang, Ildoo

    2013-02-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for various aspects of plant development. Cellular BR homeostasis is critical for proper growth and development of plants; however, its regulatory mechanism remains largely unknown. BAT1 (BR-related acyltransferase 1), a gene encoding a putative acyltransferase, was found to be involved in vascular bundle development in a full-length cDNA over-expressor (FOX) screen. Over-expression of BAT1 resulted in typical BR-deficient phenotypes, which were rescued by exogenously applied castasterone and brassinolide. Analyses of BR profiles demonstrated that BAT1 alters levels of several brassinolide biosynthetic intermediates, including 6-deoxotyphasterol, typhasterol and 6-deoxocastasterone. BAT1 is mainly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. BAT1 is highly expressed in young tissues and vascular bundles, and its expression is induced by auxin. These data suggest that BAT1 is involved in BR homeostasis, probably by conversion of brassinolide intermediates into acylated BR conjugates. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Decher, Niels; Netter, Michael F; Streit, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all organisms use RNA editing as a powerful post-transcriptional mechanism to recode genomic information and to increase functional protein diversity. The enzymatic editing of pre-mRNA by ADARs and CDARs is known to change the functional properties of neuronal receptors and ion channels regulating cellular excitability. However, RNA editing is also an important mechanism for genes expressed outside the brain. The fact that RNA editing breaks the 'one gene encodes one protein' hypothesis is daunting for scientists and a probable drawback for drug development, as scientists might search for drugs targeting the 'wrong' protein. This possible difficulty for drug discovery and development became more evident from recent publications, describing that RNA editing events have profound impact on the pharmacology of some common drug targets. These recent studies highlight that RNA editing can cause massive discrepancies between the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology. Here, we review the putative impact of RNA editing on drug discovery, as RNA editing has to be considered before using high-throughput screens, rational drug design or choosing the right model organism for target validation.

  20. Altered cell surface expression of human MC1R variant receptor alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Newton, Richard A; Smit, Darren J; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2005-08-01

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily expressed on melanocytes, where it plays a key role in pigmentation regulation. Variant alleles are associated with red hair colour and fair skin, known as the RHC phenotype, as well as skin cancer risk. The R151C, R160W and D294H alleles, designated 'R', are strongly associated with the RHC phenotype and have been proposed to result in loss of function receptors due to impaired G-protein coupling. We recently provided evidence that the R151C and R160W variants can efficiently couple to G-proteins in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The possibility that altered cellular localization of the R151C and R160W variant receptors could underlie their association with RHC was therefore considered. Using immunofluorescence and ligand binding studies, we found that melanocytic cells exogenously or endogenously expressing MC1R show strong surface localization of the wild-type and D294H alleles but markedly reduced cell surface expression of the R151C and R160W receptors. In additional exogenous expression studies, the R variant D84E and the rare I155T variant, also demonstrated a significant reduction in plasma membrane receptor numbers. The V60L, V92M and R163Q weakly associated RHC alleles, designated 'r', were expressed with normal or intermediate cell surface receptor levels. These results indicate that reduced receptor coupling activity may not be the only contributing factor to the genetic association between the MC1R variants and the RHC phenotype, with MC1R polymorphisms now linked to a change in receptor localization.

  1. Cell surface heparan sulfate is a receptor for human herpesvirus 8 and interacts with envelope glycoprotein K8.1.

    PubMed

    Birkmann, A; Mahr, K; Ensser, A; Yağuboğlu, S; Titgemeyer, F; Fleckenstein, B; Neipel, F

    2001-12-01

    An immunodominant envelope glycoprotein is encoded by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) (also termed Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus) K8.1 gene. The functional role of glycoprotein K8.1 is unknown, and recognizable sequence homology to K8.1 is not detectable in the genomes of most other closely related gammaherpesviruses, such as herpesvirus saimiri or Epstein-Barr virus. In search for a possible function for K8.1, we expressed the ectodomain of K8.1 fused to the Fc part of human immunoglobulin G1 (K8.1DeltaTMFc). K8.1DeltaTMFc specifically bound to the surface of cells expressing glycosaminoglycans but not to mutant cell lines negative for the expression of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Binding of K8.1DeltaTMFc to mammalian cells could be blocked by heparin. Interestingly, the infection of primary human endothelial cells by HHV-8 could also be blocked by similar concentrations of heparin. The specificity and affinity of these interactions were then determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements using immobilized heparin and soluble K8.1. This revealed that K8.1 binds to heparin with an affinity comparable to that of glycoproteins B and C of herpes simplex virus, which are known to be involved in target cell recognition by binding to cell surface proteoglycans, especially heparan sulfate. We conclude that cell surface glycosaminoglycans play a crucial role in HHV-8 target cell recognition and that HHV-8 envelope protein K8.1 is at least one of the proteins involved.

  2. Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Is a Receptor for Human Herpesvirus 8 and Interacts with Envelope Glycoprotein K8.1

    PubMed Central

    Birkmann, Alexander; Mahr, Kerstin; Ensser, Armin; Yağuboğlu, Svenja; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Neipel, Frank

    2001-01-01

    An immunodominant envelope glycoprotein is encoded by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) (also termed Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus) K8.1 gene. The functional role of glycoprotein K8.1 is unknown, and recognizable sequence homology to K8.1 is not detectable in the genomes of most other closely related gammaherpesviruses, such as herpesvirus saimiri or Epstein-Barr virus. In search for a possible function for K8.1, we expressed the ectodomain of K8.1 fused to the Fc part of human immunoglobulin G1 (K8.1ΔTMFc). K8.1ΔTMFc specifically bound to the surface of cells expressing glycosaminoglycans but not to mutant cell lines negative for the expression of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Binding of K8.1ΔTMFc to mammalian cells could be blocked by heparin. Interestingly, the infection of primary human endothelial cells by HHV-8 could also be blocked by similar concentrations of heparin. The specificity and affinity of these interactions were then determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements using immobilized heparin and soluble K8.1. This revealed that K8.1 binds to heparin with an affinity comparable to that of glycoproteins B and C of herpes simplex virus, which are known to be involved in target cell recognition by binding to cell surface proteoglycans, especially heparan sulfate. We conclude that cell surface glycosaminoglycans play a crucial role in HHV-8 target cell recognition and that HHV-8 envelope protein K8.1 is at least one of the proteins involved. PMID:11689640

  3. Cell surface-engineered yeast displaying a histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) has enhanced adsorption of and tolerance to heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, K; Shibasaki, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    2001-12-01

    A histidine oligopeptide (hexa-His) with the ability to chelate divalent heavy metal ions was displayed on the yeast cell surface for the purpose of enhanced adsorption of heavy metal ions. We genetically fused a hexa-His-encoding gene with the gene encoding the C-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin that includes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment signal sequence and attached the hexa-His peptide on the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This surface-engineered yeast adsorbed three to eight times more copper ions than the parent strain and was more resistant to copper (4 mM) than the parent (below 1 mM at pH 7.8). It was possible to recover about a half of the copper ions adsorbed by whole cells with EDTA treatment without disintegrating the cells. Thus, we succeeded in constructing a novel yeast cell with both tolerance to toxic contaminants and enhanced adsorption of metal ions onto the cell surface.

  4. Large-Scale Identification of Putative Exported Proteins in Candida albicans by Genetic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, L.; López Matas, M.; Gil, C.; Nombela, C.; Pla, J.

    2002-01-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:12456000

  5. Large-scale identification of putative exported proteins in Candida albicans by genetic selection.

    PubMed

    Monteoliva, L; Matas, M López; Gil, C; Nombela, C; Pla, J

    2002-08-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism.

  6. Induction of pepper cDNA encoding a lipid transfer protein during the resistance response to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; Lee, Gil-Je; You, Jin-Sam; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-02-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibit hypersensitive response (HR) against infection by many tobamoviruses. A clone encoding a putative nonspecific lipid transfer protein (CaLTP1) was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from resistant pepper leaves when inoculated with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) pathotype P0. The predicted amino acid sequence of CaLTP1 is highly similar to that of the other plant LTPs. Southern blot analysis showed that a small gene family of LTP-related sequences was present in the pepper genome. Transcripts homologous to CaLTP1 accumulated abundantly in old leaves and flowers. CaLTP1 expression was induced in the incompatible interaction with TMV-P0 but was not induced in the compatible interaction with TMV-P1.2. In correlation with the temporal progression of HR in the inoculated leaves, CaLTP1 transcripts started to accumulate at 24 h after TMV-P0 inoculation, reaching a maximal level at 48 h. A strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) that carries the bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2, was infiltrated into leaves of a pepper cultivar containing the Bs2 resistance gene. A marked induction of CaLTP1 expression was observed in Xcv-infiltrated leaves. Effects of exogenously applied abiotic elicitors on CaLTP1 expression were also examined. Salicylic acid caused a rapid accumulation of CaLTP1 transcripts in pepper leaves and ethephon treatment also induced the expression of the CaLTP1 gene. Transient expression in the detached pepper leaves by biolistic gene bombardment indicated that CaLTP1 is localized mostly at the plant cell surface, possibly in the cell wall. These results suggest possible role(s) for LTPs in plant defense against pathogens including viruses.

  7. Cell surface markers of cancer stem cells: diagnostic macromolecules and targets for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Timothy E; Wang, Dan; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-04-01

    The recognition that the persistence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in patients following chemotherapy can result in disease relapse underscores the necessity to develop therapeutics against those cells. CSCs display a unique repertoire of cell surface macromolecules, which have proven essential for their characterization and isolation. Additionally, CSC-specific cell surface macromolecules or markers provide targets for the development of specific agents to destroy them. In this review, we compiled those cell surface molecules that have been validated as CSC markers for many common blood and solid tumors. We describe the unique chemical and structural features of the most common cell surface markers, as well as recent efforts to deliver chemotherapeutic agents into CSCs by targeting those macromolecules.

  8. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates.

  9. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  10. Mechanical guidance through cell-cell and cell-surface contact during multicellular streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Driscoll, Meghan; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    During collective cell migration, mechanical forces arise from the extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface contact and from other cells through cell-cell contact. These forces regulate the motion of migrating cell groups. To determine how these mechanical interactions balance during cell migration, we measured the shape dynamics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells at the multicellular streaming stage. We found that cells can coordinate their motion by synchronizing protrusion waves that travel along their membranes when they form proper cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion. In addition, our experiments on live actin labeled cells show that intracellular actin polymerization actively responds to the change of cell-cell/surface adhesion and helps to stabilize multicellular migration streams. Our finding suggests that the coordination of motion between neighboring cells in collective migration requires a balance between cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion, and that the cell cytoskeleton plays an important role in this balance.

  11. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  12. A method for microbial cell surface fingerprinting based on surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Råvik, Mattias; Cimander, Christian; Elofsson, Ulla; Veide, Andres

    2007-06-10

    A method for microbial cell surface fingerprinting using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is suggested. Four different Escherichia coli mutants have been used as model cells. Cell surface fingerprints were generated by registration of the interaction between the cell mutants and four different surfaces, with different physical and chemical properties, when a cell suspension was flown over the surface. Significant differences in fingerprint pattern between some of the mutants were observed. At the same time, the physical properties of the cell surfaces were determined using microelectrophoresis, contact angle measurements and aqueous two-phase partitioning and compared to the SPR fingerprints. The generated cell surface fingerprints and the physical property data were evaluated with multivariate data analysis that showed that the cells were separated into individual groups in a similar way using principal component analysis plots (PCA).

  13. Isolation of cell surface proteins for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Elschenbroich, Sarah; Kim, Yunee; Medin, Jeffrey A; Kislinger, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Defining the cell surface proteome has profound importance for understanding cell differentiation and cell-cell interactions, as well as numerous pathogenic abnormalities. Owing to their hydrophobic nature, plasma membrane proteins that reside on the cell surface pose analytical challenges and, despite efforts to overcome difficulties, remain under-represented in proteomic studies. Limitations in the classically employed ultracentrifugation-based approaches have led to the invention of more elaborate techniques for the purification of cell surface proteins. Three of these methods--cell surface coating with cationic colloidal silica beads, biotinylation and chemical capture of surface glycoproteins--allow for marked enrichment of this subcellular proteome, with each approach offering unique advantages and characteristics for different experiments. In this article, we introduce the principles of each purification method and discuss applications from the recent literature.

  14. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  15. The naturally competent strain Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9 as a new tool to anchor heterologous proteins on the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From fundamental studies to industrial processes, synthesis of heterologous protein by micro-organisms is widely employed. The secretion of soluble heterologous proteins in the extracellular medium facilitates their recovery, while their attachment to the cell surface permits the use of the recombinant host cells as protein or peptide supports. One of the key points to carry out heterologous expression is to choose the appropriate host. We propose to enlarge the panel of heterologous secretion hosts by using Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9. This lactic acid bacterium has a generally recognised as safe status, is widely used in the manufacture of yogurts, fermented milks and cheeses, and is easy to transform by natural competence. This study demonstrates the feasibility of secretion of a heterologous protein anchored to the cell surface by S. thermophilus. For this, we used the cell envelope proteinase (CEP) PrtH of Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ32 CIRM-BIA 103. Results Using S. thermophilus LMD-9 as the background host, three recombinant strains were constructed: i) a negative control corresponding to S. thermophilus PrtS- mutant where the prtS gene encoding its CEP was partially deleted; ii) a PrtH+ mutant expressing the L. helveticus PrtH pro-protein with its own motif (S-layer type) of cell-wall attachment and iii) a PrtH+WANS mutant expressing PrtH pro-protein with the LPXTG anchoring motif from PrtS. The PrtH + and PrtH + WANS genes expression levels were measured by RT-qPCR in the corresponding mutants and compared to that of prtS gene in the strain LMD-9. The expression levels of both fused prtH CEPs genes, regardless of the anchoring motif, reached up-to more than 76% of the wild-type prtS expression level. CEPs were sought and identified on the cell surface of LMD-9 wild-type strain, PrtH+ and PrtH+WANS mutants using shaving technique followed by peptide identification with tandem mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the heterologous secretion

  16. Cell/surface interactions and adhesion on bioactive glass 45S5.

    PubMed

    Levy, S; Van Dalen, M; Agonafer, S; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of surface texture (smooth versus rough) on cell/surface interactions on the bioactive glass, 45S5. The cell surface interactions associated with cell spreading are studied using cell culture experiments. Subsequent energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is also used to reveal the distributions of calcium, phosphorous, sodium and oxygen on the surfaces of the bioactive glasses. The implications of the results are then discussed for the applications of textured bioactive glasses in medicine.

  17. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  18. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25476450

  20. Cell surface-engineering to embed targeting ligands or tracking agents on the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Suk; Lee, Daniel Y; Valencia, Gabriel M; Won, Young-Wook; Bull, David A

    2017-01-22

    The key challenge to improve the efficacy of cell therapy is how to efficiently modify cells with a specific molecule or compound that can guide the cells to the target tissue. To address this, we have developed a cell surface engineering technology to non-invasively modify the cell surface. This technology can embed a wide variety of bioactive molecules on any cell surface and allow for the targeting of a wide range of tissues in a variety of disease states. Using our cell surface engineering technology, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)s were modified with: 1) a homing peptide or a recombinant protein to facilitate the migration of the cells toward a specific molecular target; or 2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents to allow for in vivo tracking of the cells. The incorporation of a homing peptide or a targeting ligand on MSCs facilitated the migration of the cells toward their molecular target. MRI contrast agents were successfully embedded on the cell surfaces without adverse effects to the cells and the contrast agent-labeled cells were detectable by MRI. Our technology is a promising method of cell surface engineering that is applicable to a broad range of cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced cell surface polymer grafting in concentrated and nonreactive aqueous polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Nicholas A A; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2010-03-17

    Macromolecular cell surface modification techniques have shown tremendous utility in various biomedical applications. However, a major drawback concerns inefficient cell surface modification caused by the poor association of hydrophilic macromolecules with cell surfaces. Here, a novel, highly efficient, and universal strategy in which nonreactive "additive" macromolecules are used to modulate the grafting efficiency of cell surface reactive, hydrophilic macromolecules is described. Unprecedented enhanced cell surface modifications by up to 10-fold were observed when various concentrations of a suitable "additive" polymer was present with a constant and low concentration of a "reactive" macromolecule. The importance of this increased efficiency and the possible mechanisms involved are discussed. The cell compatible technique is demonstrated in the case of four different cell types--red blood cells (RBC), leukocytes, platelets, and Jurkat cells. A practical application of grafting macromolecules to cell surfaces in concentrated polymer solutions is demonstrated by the enhanced camouflage of RBC surface antigens for the development of RhD null RBC. In principle, the technique can be adapted to various macromolecular systems and cell types, with significant potential for biomedical applications such as live cell based technologies.

  2. Influence of manufacturing processes on cell surface properties of probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35®.

    PubMed

    Nivoliez, Adrien; Veisseire, Philippe; Alaterre, Elina; Dausset, Caroline; Baptiste, Fabrice; Camarès, Olivier; Paquet-Gachinat, Marylise; Bonnet, Muriel; Forestier, Christiane; Bornes, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the industrial process on the properties of probiotics, administered as complex manufactured products, has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we comparatively assessed the cell wall characteristics of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35® together with three of its commercial formulations with intestinal applications. Putative secreted and transmembrane-protein-encoding genes were initially searched in silico in the genome of L. rhamnosus Lcr35®. A total of 369 candidate genes were identified which expressions were followed using a custom Lactobacillus DNA chip. Among them, 60 or 67 genes had their expression either upregulated or downregulated in the Lcr Restituo® packet or capsule formulations, compared to the native Lcr35® strain. Moreover, our data showed that the probiotic formulations (Lcr Lenio®, Lcr restituo® capsule and packet) showed a better capacity to adhere to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells than the native Lcr35® strain. Microbial (MATS) tests showed that the probiotic was an electron donor and that they were more hydrophilic than the native strain. The enhanced adhesion capacity of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to epithelial Caco-2 cells and their antipathogen effect could be due to this greater surface hydrophilic character. These findings suggest that the manufacturing process influences the protein composition and the chemical properties of the cell wall. It is therefore likely that the antipathogen effect of the formulation is modulated by the industrial process. Screening of the manufactured products' properties would therefore represent an essential step in evaluating the effects of probiotic strains.

  3. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  4. Derivation and evaluation of putative adverse outcome ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition is of concern in fish because COX inhibitors (e.g., ibuprofen) are ubiquitous in aquatic systems/fish tissues, and can disrupt synthesis of prostaglandins that modulate a variety of essential biological functions including reproduction. High content (transcriptomic) empirical data and publicly available high throughput toxicity data (actor.epa.gov) were utilized to develop putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for molecular initiating event (MIE) of COX inhibition. Effects of a waterborne, 96h exposure to indomethacin (IN; 100 µg/L), ibuprofen (IB; 200 µg/L) and celecoxib (CX; 20 µg/L) on liver metabolome and ovarian gene expression (using oligonucleotide microarrays) in sexually mature fathead minnows (n=8) were examined. Metabolomic profiles of IN, IB and CX were not significantly different from control or one another. Exposure to IB and CX resulted in differential expression of comparable numbers of genes (IB = 433, CX= 545). In contrast, 2558 genes were differentially expressed in IN-treated fish. Functional analyses (canonical pathway and gene set enrichment) indicated extensive effects of IN on prostaglandin synthesis pathway, oocyte meiosis and several other processes consistent with physiological roles of prostaglandins. Transcriptomic data was congruent with apical endpoint data - IN reduced plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentrations, and ovarian COX activity, whereas IB and CX did not. Putative AOPs pathways for

  5. Role of N-glycosylation in cell surface expression and protection against proteolysis of the intestinal anion exchanger SLC26A3.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Yukari

    2012-03-01

    SLC26A3 is a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger that plays a major role in Cl(-) absorption from the intestine. Its mutation causes congenital chloride-losing diarrhea. It has been shown that SLC26A3 are glycosylated, with the attached carbohydrate being extracellular and perhaps modulating function. However, the role of glycosylation has yet to be clearly determined. We used the approaches of biochemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to prevent glycosylation. Deglycosylation experiments with glycosidases indicated that the mature glycosylated form of SLC26A3 exists at the plasma membrane, and a putative large second extracellular loop contains all of the N-linked carbohydrates. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes depression of transport activity compared with wild-type, although robust intracellular pH changes were still observed, suggesting that N-glycosylation is not absolutely necessary for transport activity. To localize glycosylation sites, we mutated the five consensus sites by replacing asparagine (N) with glutamine. Immnoblotting suggests that SLC26A3 is glycosylated at N153, N161, and N165. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes a defect in cell surface processing with decreased cell surface expression. We also assessed whether SLC26A3 is protected from tryptic digestion. While the mature glycosylated SLC26A3 showed little breakdown after treatment with trypsin, deglycosylated SLC26A3 exhibited increased susceptibility to trypsin, suggesting that the oligosaccharides protect SLC26A3 from tryptic digestion. In conclusion, our data indicate that N-glycosylation of SLC26A3 is important for cell surface expression and for protection from proteolytic degradation that may contribute to the understanding of pathogenesis of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  6. Time Encoded Radiation Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D.; Schuster, Patricia Frances; Steele, John T.

    2011-09-01

    Passive detection of special nuclear material (SNM) at long range or under heavy shielding can only be achieved by observing the penetrating neutral particles that it emits: gamma rays and neutrons in the MeV energy range. The ultimate SNM standoff detector system would have sensitivity to both gamma and neutron radiation, a large area and high efficiency to capture as many signal particles as possible, and good discrimination against background particles via directional and energy information. Designing such a system is a daunting task. Using timemodulated collimators could be a transformative technique leading to practical gamma-neutron imaging detector systems that are highly efficient with the potential to exhibit simultaneously high angular and energy resolution. A new technique using time encoding to make a compact, high efficiency imaging detector was conceived. Design considerations using Monte Carlo modeling and the construction and demonstration of a prototype imager are described.

  7. Time encoded radiation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  8. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  9. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  10. Hodgkin's lymphoma: the role of cell surface receptors in regulation of tumor cell fate.

    PubMed

    Yurchenko, M; Sidorenko, S P

    2010-12-01

    , it triggered activation of JNK signaling cascade. The review presents the current views on the role of cell surface receptors in maintenance of HL microenvironment favorable for HRS cells survival.

  11. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    PubMed

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  12. Alteration in cell surface properties of Burkholderia spp. during surfactant-aided biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Mukherji, Suparna

    2012-04-01

    Chemical surfactants may impact microbial cell surface properties, i.e., cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and cell surface charge, and may thus affect the uptake of components from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). This work explored the impact of Triton X-100, Igepal CA 630, and Tween 80 (at twice the critical micelle concentration, CMC) on the cell surface characteristics of Burkholderia cultures, Burkholderia cepacia (ES1, aliphatic degrader) and Burkholderia multivorans (NG1, aromatic degrader), when grown on a six-component model NAPL. In the presence of Triton X-100, NAPL biodegradation was enhanced from 21% to 60% in B. cepacia and from 18% to 53% in B. multivorans. CSH based on water contact angle (50-52°) was in the same range for both strains while zeta potential at neutral pH was -38 and -31 mV for B. cepacia and B. multivorans, respectively. In the presence of Triton X-100, their CSH increased to greater than 75° and the zeta potential decreased. This induced a change in the mode of uptake and initiated aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation by B. multivorans and increased the rate of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation in B. cepacia. Igepal CA 630 and Tween 80 also altered the cell surface properties. For B. cepacia grown in the presence of Triton X-100 at two and five times its CMC, CSH increased significantly in the log growth phase. Growth in the presence of the chemical surfactants also affected the abundance of chemical functional groups on the cell surface. Cell surface changes had maximum impact on NAPL degradation in the presence of emulsifying surfactants, Triton X-100 and Igepal CA630.

  13. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  14. Dietary sugar utilisation by putative oral probiotics.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, I; Kari, K; Hervonen, L; Meurman, J H

    2012-09-01

    Probiotic consumption and repeated probiotic intake have shown promising results as adjunct therapies in prevention and alleviation of some chronic disease conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent evidence suggests that probiotics may also be beneficial in preventing oral diseases. An efficient probiotic candidate in the mouth, however, should not impose any risk to oral tissues, such as acid demineralisation of tooth enamel because of sugar fermentation. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the utilisation of some sugars and sugar alcohols by yogurt starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and to assess the influence of these carbohydrate sources on cell surface properties. For comparsion, a commercially available probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, was used. The results showed that lactose, glucose and fructose were readily metabolised by all strains tested. However, strain-specific metabolic patterns were observed when other sugars and sugar alcohols were used as sole carbohydrate source in the growth medium. Surface properties of the bacteria such as hydrophobicity and surface-associated proteins appeared to vary with the carbohydrate content of the growth medium. Based on these results it can be concluded that among the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains probiotic candidate strains are available that warrant further studies due to their inability to ferment sugars with pronounced cariogenic properties.

  15. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  16. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  17. Genetically encoding new bioreactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2017-09-25

    The genetic code can be expanded to include unnatural amino acids (Uaas) by engineering orthogonal components involved in protein translation. To be compatible with live cells, side chains of Uaas have been limited to either chemically inert or bio-orthogonal (i.e., nonreactive toward biomolecules) functionalities. To introduce bioreactivity into live systems, the genetic code has recently been engineered to encode a new class of Uaas, the bioreactive Uaas. These Uaas, after being incorporated into proteins, specifically react with target natural amino acid residues via proximity-enabled bioreactivity, enabling the selective formation of new covalent linkages within and between proteins both in vitro and in live systems. The new covalent bonding ability has been harnessed within proteins to enhance photostability, increase thermostability, staple proteins recombinantly, and build optical nano-switches, and between proteins to pinpoint ligand-receptor interaction, target native receptors irreversibly, and generate covalent macromolecular inhibitors. These diverse bioreactivities, inaccessible to natural proteins, thus open doors to novel protein engineering and provide new avenues for biological studies, biotherapeutics and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  19. cDNA cloning and expression of HIP, a novel cell surface heparan sulfate/heparin-binding protein of human uterine epithelial cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Smith, S E; Julian, J; Rohde, L H; Karin, N J; Carson, D D

    1996-05-17

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans and their corresponding binding sites have been suggested to play an important role during the initial attachment of murine blastocysts to uterine epithelium and human trophoblastic cell lines to uterine epithelial cell lines. Previous studies on RL95 cells, a human uterine epithelial cell line, had characterized a single class of cell surface heparin/heparan sulfate (HP/HS)-binding sites. Three major HP/HS-binding peptide fragments were isolated from cell surfaces by tryptic digestion, and partial amino-terminal amino acid sequence for each peptide fragment was obtained (Raboudi, N., Julian, J., Rohde, L. H., and Carson, D. D. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 11930-11939). In the current study, using approaches of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and cDNA library screening, we have cloned and expressed a novel, cell surface HP/HS-binding protein, named HP/HS interacting protein (HIP), from RL95 cells. The full-length cDNA of HIP encodes a protein of 159 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 17,754 Da and pI of 11.75. Transfection of HIP full-length cDNA into NIH-3T3 cells demonstrated cell surface expression and a size similar to that of HIP expressed by human cells. Predicted amino acid sequence indicates that HIP lacks a membrane spanning region and has no consensus sites for glycosylation. Northern blot analysis detected a single transcript of 1.3 kilobases in both total RNA and poly(A+) RNA. Examination of human cell lines and normal tissues using both Northern blot and Western blot analyses revealed that HIP is expressed at different levels in a variety of human cell lines and normal tissues but absent in some cell lines and some cell types of normal tissues examined. HIP has relatively high homology (approximately 80% both at the levels of nucleotide and protein sequence) to a rodent ribosomal protein L29. Thus, members of the L29 family may be displayed on cell surfaces where they may participate in HP

  20. Parietal cell surface reactive autoantibody in pernicious anaemia demonstrated by indirect membrane immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    de Aizpurua, H J; Toh, B H; Ungar, B

    1983-01-01

    We examined, in a 'double blind' study, 60 sera from patients with pernicious anaemia for immunofluorescence reactivity with the surface membranes of viable parietal cells isolated from dog stomachs. Fifty-three sera (88%) gave an IgG autoantibody reaction with the surface membranes of parietal cells. Surface staining was also seen with parietal cells from monkey, pig, rat and mouse. The parietal cell surface reactive autoantibody was not found in any of 14 sera from patients with chronic active hepatitis, 10 from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and 50 from healthy persons. The surface reactivity autoantibody was present in 13 of 14 sera without parietal cell microsomal antibody, 28 of 31 sera without intrinsic factor antibody and in four of four sera without microsomal and intrinsic factor antibodies. Absorption with parietal cell enriched gastric mucosal cells neutralized the activity of the surface reactive but not the microsomal antibody and cross absorption with gastric microsomes neutralized the activity of the microsomal but not the surface reactive antibody. Surface staining of parietal cells was not abolished by absorption with dog or rat hepatocytes, dog or rat kidney cells, human fibroblasts or human AB red blood cells. The results suggest that the parietal cell surface reactive antibody is probably different from the microsomal antibody. Immune reactions of the cell surface reactive antibody with parietal cell surface antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of the gastric lesion in pernicious anaemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6345039

  1. SCAMP 37, a new marker within the general cell surface recycling system.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S H; Castle, J D

    1993-01-01

    Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are widely distributed as components of post-Golgi membranes that function as recycling carriers to the cell surface. In fibroblasts, SCAMPs are concentrated in compartments involved in the endocytosis and recycling of cell surface receptors while in neurons and other cell types having regulated transport pathways, SCAMPs are also components of regulated carriers (synaptic vesicles, secretion granules and transporter vesicles). Their presence in multiple pathways distinguishes them from proteins (e.g. recycling cell surface receptors and synaptic vesicle proteins) which are concentrated in selected pathways. The SCAMPs also do not appear to reside beyond the boundaries of these pathways. This distribution suggests that SCAMPs are general markers of membranes that function in cell surface recycling. The primary sequence of SCAMP 37 reveals a novel polypeptide containing a series of structural motifs, including a calcium binding domain, a leucine zipper and two zinc fingers. The very broad tissue distribution, subcellular localization and sequence analysis all predict that SCAMPs play a fundamental role in cell surface recycling. Images PMID:8404846

  2. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  3. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  4. Yeast cell surface display: An efficient strategy for improvement of bioethanol fermentation performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianzhong

    2017-03-04

    The cell surface serves as a functional interface between the inside and the outside of the cell. Within the past 20 y the ability of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to display heterologous proteins on the cell surface has been demonstrated. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae has been both developed and applied in expression of various proteins on the cell surface. Using this novel and useful strategy, proteins and peptides of various kinds can be displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusing the protein of interest with the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring system. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) using S. cerevisiae represents a promising technology for bioethanol production. However, further work is needed to improve the fermentation performance. There is some excellent previous research regarding construction of yeast biocatalyst using the surface display system to decrease cost, increase efficiency of ethanol production and directly utilize starch or biomass for fuel production. In this commentary, we reviewed the yeast surface display system and highlighted recent work. Additionally, the strategy for decrease of phytate phosphate content in dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) by display of phytase on the yeast cell surface is discussed.

  5. Investigating biomolecular recognition at the cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-05-01

    Probing the interaction forces that drive biomolecular recognition on cell surfaces is essential for understanding diverse biological processes. Force spectroscopy has been a widely used dynamic analytical technique, allowing measurement of such interactions at the molecular and cellular level. The capabilities of working under near physiological environments, combined with excellent force and lateral resolution make atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy a powerful approach to measure biomolecular interaction forces not only on non-biological substrates, but also on soft, dynamic cell surfaces. Over the last few years, AFM-based force spectroscopy has provided biophysical insight into how biomolecules on cell surfaces interact with each other and induce relevant biological processes. In this review, we focus on describing the technique of force spectroscopy using the AFM, specifically in the context of probing cell surfaces. We summarize recent progress in understanding the recognition and interactions between macromolecules that may be found at cell surfaces from a force spectroscopy perspective. We further discuss the challenges and future prospects of the application of this versatile technique.

  6. Cell surface of sea urchin micromeres and primary mesenchyme. [Arbacia punctulata; Strongylocentrotus drobachiensis; Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    SciTech Connect

    DeSimone, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) of the sea urchin embryo were studied during the early morphogenetic events involved in the differentiation of the micromere cell lineage. Sixteen-cell and early cleavage stage blastomeres were isolated and the protein composition of their cell surfaces examined by /sup 125/I-labelling followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Micromere-specific cell surface proteins are reported for Arbacia punctulata, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Cell surface glycoproteins were characterized on the basis of lectin binding specificity with a novel lectin affinity transfer technique. Using this procedure, cell-type specific surface proteins, which are also lectin-binding specific, can be detected. In addition, fluorescein conjugated lectins were microinjected into the blastocoels of living S. drobachiensis and Lytechinus pictus embryos and the patterns of lectin bindings observed by fluorescence microscopy. The evidence presented in this thesis suggests that the differentiation of the primary mesenchyme cells is correlated with changes in the molecular composition of the cell-surface and the ECM.

  7. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. )

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  8. Cell surface hydrophobicity of pigmented and nonpigmented clinical Serratia marcescens strains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M; Blumberger, Y; Judes, H; Bar-Ness, R; Rubinstein, E; Mazor, Y

    1986-01-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of 10 pigmented and 4 nonpigmented clinical Serratia marcescens strains was studied, based on the ability of the strains to adhere to hydrocarbons and to polystyrene. The cell surface hydrophobicity depended greatly on growth temperature; all of the strains tested were adherent following growth at 30 degrees C, whereas none was adherent following growth at 38 degrees C. In previous studies, the pigment prodigiosin has been cited as responsible for cell surface hydrophobicity in various Serratia strains. However, the observed ability of the nonpigmented strains to adhere to the test hydrocarbons and to polystyrene indicates that Serratia strains can possess hydrophobic surface properties in the absence of this pigment. Moreover, strain 1785 cells were adherent whether they were grown at 30 or 36.5 degrees C, even though pigment was not synthesized at the higher temperature. In Escherichia coli correlations have been noted between increased cell surface hydrophobicity and the presence of mannose-specific adhesins; no such relationship was found in the S. marcescens strains tested. The expression of cell surface hydrophobicity in clinical S. marcescens strains at 30 degrees C and the loss of hydrophobicity at host temperatures raise the possibility that infective cells from the environment are initially hydrophobic, but lose this property upon subsequent proliferation within a host. PMID:3512440

  9. Cell Surface Proteomics of N-Linked Glycoproteins for Typing of Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Haverland, Nicole A; Waas, Matthew; Ntai, Ioanna; Keppel, Theodore; Gundry, Rebekah L; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-08-18

    Lymphocytes are immune cells that are critical for the maintenance of adaptive immunity. Differentiation of lymphoid progenitors yields B-, T-, and NK-cell subtypes that individually correlate with specific forms of leukemia or lymphoma. Therefore, it is imperative a precise method of cell categorization is utilized to detect differences in distinct disease states present in patients. One viable means of classification involves evaluation of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies. Specifically, this manuscript details the use of an antibody independent approach known as Cell Surface Capture Technology, to assess N-glycoproteome of four human lymphocyte cell lines. Altogether, 404 cell surface N-glycoproteins as markers for specific cell types involved in lymphocytic malignancies, including 82 N-glycoproteins that had not been previously been described for B- or T-cells within the Cell Surface Protein Atlas. Comparative analysis, hierarchical clustering techniques, and label free quantitation was used to reveal proteins most informative for each cell type. Undoubtedly, the characterization of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies is a first step towards improving personalized diagnosis and treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Yeast cell surface display: An efficient strategy for improvement of bioethanol fermentation performance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell surface serves as a functional interface between the inside and the outside of the cell. Within the past 20 y the ability of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to display heterologous proteins on the cell surface has been demonstrated. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae has been both developed and applied in expression of various proteins on the cell surface. Using this novel and useful strategy, proteins and peptides of various kinds can be displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusing the protein of interest with the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring system. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) using S. cerevisiae represents a promising technology for bioethanol production. However, further work is needed to improve the fermentation performance. There is some excellent previous research regarding construction of yeast biocatalyst using the surface display system to decrease cost, increase efficiency of ethanol production and directly utilize starch or biomass for fuel production. In this commentary, we reviewed the yeast surface display system and highlighted recent work. Additionally, the strategy for decrease of phytate phosphate content in dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) by display of phytase on the yeast cell surface is discussed. PMID:27459271

  11. Cloning, expression, and cell surface localization of Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 xylanase 5, a multidomain xylanase.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuko; Tomita, Toshio; Roy, Narayan; Nakano, Akito; Sugawara-Tomita, Noriko; Watanabe, Seiji; Okai, Naoko; Abe, Naoki; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2003-12-01

    We have shown that a xylan-degrading bacterium, W-61, excretes multiple xylanases, including xylanase 5 with a molecular mass of 140 kDa. Here, we emend the previously used classification of the bacterium (i.e., Aeromonas caviae W-61) to Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene, and we clone and express the xyn5 gene encoding xylanase 5 (Xyn5) in Escherichia coli and study the subcellular localization of Xyn5. xyn5 encodes 1,326 amino acid residues, including a 27-amino-acid signal sequence. Sequence analysis indicated that Xyn5 comprises two family 22 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM), a family 10 catalytic domain of glycosyl hydrolases, a family 9 CBM, a domain similar to the lysine-rich region of Clostridium thermocellum SdbA, and three S-layer-homologous (SLH) domains. Recombinant Xyn5 bound to a crystalline cellulose, Avicel PH-101, while an N-terminal 90-kDa fragment of Xyn5, which lacks the C-terminal half of the family 9 CBM, did not bind to Avicel PH-101. Xyn5 was cell bound, and the cell-bound protein was digested by exogenous trypsin to produce immunoreactive and xylanolytic fragments with molecular masses of 80 and 60 kDa. Xyn5 was exclusively distributed in the cell envelope fraction consisting of a peptidoglycan-containing layer and an associated S layer. Thus, Paenibacillus sp. strain W-61 Xyn5 is a cell surface-anchored modular xylanase possessing a functional cellulose-binding module and SLH domains. Possible cooperative action of multiple xylanases produced by strain W-61 is discussed on the basis of the modular structure of Xyn5.

  12. The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a putative ABC transporter permease is inversely correlated during biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes 4b G

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the molecular basis of biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the deletion mutant of lm.G_1771 gene, which encodes for a putative ABC_transporter permease, is highly expressed in biofilm. In this study, the sod gene deletion mutant delta ...

  13. Improving the performance of industrial ethanol-producing yeast by expressing the aspartyl protease on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhong-yang; Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2010-12-01

    The yeasts used in fuel ethanol manufacture are unable to metabolize soluble proteins. The PEP4 gene, encoding a vacuolar aspartyl protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was either secretively or cell-surface anchored expressed in industrial ethanol-producing S. cerevisiae. The obtained recombinant strains APA (expressing the protease secretively) and APB (expressing the protease on the cell wall) were studied under ethanol fermentation conditions in feed barley cultures. The effects of expression of the protease on product formation, growth and cell protein content were measured. The biomass yield of the wild-type was clearly lower than that of the recombinant strains (0.578 ± 0.12 g biomass/g glucose for APA and 0.582 ± 0.08 g biomass/g glucose for APB). In addition, nearly 98-99% of the theoretical maximum level of ethanol yield was achieved (relative to the amount of substrate consumed) for the recombinant strains, while limiting the nitrogen source resulted in dissatisfactory fermentation for the wild-type and more than 30 g/l residual sugar was detected at the end of fermentation. In addition, higher growth rate, viability and lower yields of byproducts such as glycerol and pyruvic acid for recombinant strains were observed. Expressing acid protease can be expected to lead to a significant increase in ethanol productivity.

  14. Mouse novel Ly9: a new member of the expanding CD150 (SLAM) family of leukocyte cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Victoria; del Valle, Juana; Zapater, Nuria; Martin, Margarita; Romero, Xavier; Pizcueta, Pilar; Bosch, Jaime; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2002-09-01

    Human CS1, also known as novel Ly9, 19A24, or CRACC, is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily (IgSF) expressed on natural killer cells and other leukocytes. Here we describe the cloning of the mouse homologue of this gene. The mouse novel Ly9 gene is shown to encode a transmembrane protein composed of two extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane region and an 88-amino acid cytoplasmic domain. Mouse novel Ly9 is structurally similar to the extracellular domains of CD84 and CD229 (Ly9). Both mouse and human novel Ly9 genes mapped close to the CD229gene in a region where other members of the CD150 family have also been mapped, and analysis of their genomic sequences showed that they have an identical intron/exon organization. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of mouse and human novel Ly9 was predominantly restricted to hematopoietic tissues, with the exception of testis. Here we show that SAP (SH2D1A), an adapter protein responsible for the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, binds to the phosphorylated cytoplasmic tail of human but not mouse novel Ly9. Taken together, these data indicate that mouse novel Ly9 is a new member of the expanding CD150 family of cell surface receptors.

  15. Characterization of mouse CD229 (Ly9), a leukocyte cell surface molecule of the CD150 (SLAM) family.

    PubMed

    Sintes, J; Vidal-Laliena, M; Romero, X; Tovar, V; Engel, P

    2007-11-01

    Mouse CD229 (Ly9) is a cell surface molecule of the CD150 (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule) family. This family consists of nine leukocyte receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily that are involved in leukocyte activation. CD229 binds to SAP, a protein encoded by the gene for X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. In this study, mouse CD229 expression was assessed with a new CD229-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) (Ly9.ab3), raised using CD229-transfected cells. CD229 was expressed on Sca-1+c-kit+Lin- hematopoietic stem cells, and this expression increased during lymphocyte maturation. Virtually, all T and B cells expressed high levels of CD229. CD229 was absent on granulocytes, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs). However, it was expressed at significant levels on monocytes, indicating that it is also expressed on mouse myeloid cells. We also show that natural killer cells, natural killer T cells, and B1 cells express very high levels of this molecule. In vitro functional experiments showed that ligation of CD229 inhibited the expression of the activation markers CD69 and CD25 on T lymphocytes in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. Moreover, this reduced activation was concurrent with a reduction in cytokine production. Our results show that CD229 is a pan-lymphocyte marker and indicate that mAbs against CD229 are able to down-modulate T-cell activation.

  16. Identification and Analysis of Putative Homologues of Mechanosensitive Channels in Pathogenic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels play important roles in the physiology of many organisms, and their dysfunction can affect cell survival. This suggests that they might be therapeutic targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, dysentery, leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels. Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Trichomonas vaginalis have genes encoding homologues of Piezo channels, while most pathogenic protozoa have genes encoding homologues of mechanosensitive small-conductance (MscS) and K+-dependent (MscK) channels. In contrast, all parasites examined lack genes encoding mechanosensitive large-conductance (MscL), mini-conductance (MscM) and degenerin/epithelial Na+ (DEG/ENaC) channels. Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily distant protozoan, amoeban, plant, insect and vertebrate Piezo channel subunits define an absolutely conserved motif that may be involved in channel conductance or gating. MscS channels are not present in humans, and the sequences of protozoan and human homologues of Piezo channels differ substantially. This suggests the possibility for specific targeting of mechanosensitive channels of pathogens by therapeutic drugs. PMID:23785469

  17. Identification and analysis of putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels in pathogenic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Prole, David L; Taylor, Colin W

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels play important roles in the physiology of many organisms, and their dysfunction can affect cell survival. This suggests that they might be therapeutic targets in pathogenic organisms. Pathogenic protozoa lead to diseases such as malaria, dysentery, leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis that are responsible for millions of deaths each year worldwide. We analyzed the genomes of pathogenic protozoa and show the existence within them of genes encoding putative homologues of mechanosensitive channels. Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Trichomonas vaginalis have genes encoding homologues of Piezo channels, while most pathogenic protozoa have genes encoding homologues of mechanosensitive small-conductance (MscS) and K(+)-dependent (MscK) channels. In contrast, all parasites examined lack genes encoding mechanosensitive large-conductance (MscL), mini-conductance (MscM) and degenerin/epithelial Na(+) (DEG/ENaC) channels. Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily distant protozoan, amoeban, plant, insect and vertebrate Piezo channel subunits define an absolutely conserved motif that may be involved in channel conductance or gating. MscS channels are not present in humans, and the sequences of protozoan and human homologues of Piezo channels differ substantially. This suggests the possibility for specific targeting of mechanosensitive channels of pathogens by therapeutic drugs.

  18. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  19. Possible role for cell-surface carbohydrate-binding molecules in lymphocyte recirculation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We are investigating the hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding molecules on the cell surface are involved in the recirculation of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into lymphoid organs. This phenomenon requires the specific attachment of circulating lymphocytes to the endothelial cells of postcapillary venules. Using an in vitro assay to measure the adhesive interaction between lymphocytes and postcapillary venules, we have found that L-fucose, D mannose, and the L-fucose-rich, sulfated polysaccharide fucoidin specifically inhibit this binding interaction. L-fucose shows stereo-selective inhibitory activity at concentrations greater than 18 mM while fucoidin produces 50% inhibition at approximately 1-5 X 10(-8) M. Fucoidin appears to interact with the lymphocyte, and not the postcapillary venule, to inhibit binding. These data suggest that cell surface carbohydrates (fucoselike) and carbohydrate-binding molecules (cell surface lectins) may contribute to the specific attachment of lymphocytes to postcapillary venules. PMID:6833380

  20. Cellular membrane enrichment of self-assembling D-peptides for cell surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Wang, Youzhi; Han, Aitian; Cai, Yanbin; Xiao, Nannan; Wang, Ling; Ding, Dan; Yang, Zhimou

    2014-06-25

    We occasionally found that several self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids would be preferentially enriched in cellular membranes at self-assembled stages while distributed evenly in the cytoplasma of cells at unassembled stages. Self-assembling peptides containing only Lamino acids distributed evenly in cytoplasma of cells at both self-assembled and unassembled stages. The self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids could therefore be applied for engineering cell surface with peptides. More importantly, by integrating a protein binding peptide (a PDZ domain binding hexapeptide of WRESAI) with the self-assembling peptide containing D-amino acids, protein could also be introduced to the cell surface. This study not only provided a novel approach to engineer cell surface, but also highlighted the unusual properties and potential applications of self-assembling peptides containing D-amino acids in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  1. Pharmacological induction of cell surface GRP78 contributes to apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer tumor with triple-negative receptors (estrogen, progesterone and Her 2, receptors) is the most aggressive and deadly subtype, with high rates of disease recurrence and poor survival. Here, we show that induction in cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin was associated with CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and increase in apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer tumor cells. GRP78 is a major regulator of the stress induced unfolded protein response pathway and CHOP/GADD153 is a pro-apoptotic transcription factor associated exclusively with stress induced apoptosis. The blocking of cell surface GRP78 by anti-GRP78 antibody prevented apoptosis, suggesting that induction of cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin is required for apoptosis. A better understanding of stress induction of apoptotic signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25360516

  2. Lysyl oxidase drives tumour progression by trapping EGF receptors at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Tang, HaoRan; Leung, Leo; Saturno, Grazia; Viros, Amaya; Smith, Duncan; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Morrison, Eamonn; Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Lopes, Filipa; Johnson, Louise; Dhomen, Nathalie; Springer, Caroline; Marais, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) remodels the tumour microenvironment by cross-linking the extracellular matrix. LOX overexpression is associated with poor cancer outcomes. Here, we find that LOX regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to drive tumour progression. We show that LOX regulates EGFR by suppressing TGFβ1 signalling through the secreted protease HTRA1. This increases the expression of Matrilin2 (MATN2), an EGF-like domain-containing protein that traps EGFR at the cell surface to facilitate its activation by EGF. We describe a pharmacological inhibitor of LOX, CCT365623, which disrupts EGFR cell surface retention and delays the growth of primary and metastatic tumour cells in vivo. Thus, we show that LOX regulates EGFR cell surface retention to drive tumour progression, and we validate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting this pathway with the small molecule inhibitor CCT365623. PMID:28416796

  3. Chemical remodeling of cell-surface sialic acids through a palladium-triggered bioorthogonal elimination reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cheng, Bo; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Hong, Weiyao; Chen, Xing; Chen, Peng R

    2015-04-27

    We herein report a chemical decaging strategy for the in situ generation of neuramic acid (Neu), a unique type of sialic acid, on live cells by the use of a palladium-mediated bioorthogonal elimination reaction. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were found to be a highly efficient and biocompatible depropargylation catalyst for the direct conversion of metabolically incorporated N-(propargyloxycarbonyl)neuramic acid (Neu5Proc) into Neu on cell-surface glycans. This conversion chemically mimics the enzymatic de-N-acetylation of N-acetylneuramic acid (Neu5Ac), a proposed mechanism for the natural occurrence of Neu on cell-surface glycans. The bioorthogonal elimination was also exploited for the manipulation of cell-surface charge by unmasking the free amine at C5 to neutralize the negatively charged carboxyl group at C1 of sialic acids.

  4. Mapping of endoglucanases displayed on yeast cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Musashi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Inokuma, Kentaro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The surface of yeast cells has been an attractive interface for the effective use of cellulose. Surface enzymes, however, are difficult to visualize and evaluate. In this study, two kinds of unique anchoring regions were used to display the cellulase, endoglucanase (EG), on a yeast cell surface. Differences in the display level and the localization of EG were observed by atomic force microscopy. By surveying the yeast cell surface with a chemically modified cantilever, the interactive force between the cellulose and EG was measured. Force curve mapping revealed differences in the display levels and the localization of EG according to anchoring regions. The proposed methodology enables visualization of displayed enzymes such as EG on the yeast cell surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular design of the microbial cell surface toward the recovery of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-06-01

    The genetic engineering of microorganisms to adsorb metal ions is an attractive method to facilitate the environmental cleanup of metal pollution and to enrich the recovery of metal ions such as rare metal ions. For the recovery of metal ions by microorganisms, cell surface design is an effective strategy for the molecular breeding of bioadsorbents as an alternative to intracellular accumulation. The cell surface display of known metal-binding proteins/peptides and the molecular design of novel metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The adsorption of specific metal ions is the important challenge for the practical recovery of metal ions. In this paper, we discuss the recent progress in surface-engineered bioadsorbents for the recovery of metal ions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lysyl oxidase drives tumour progression by trapping EGF receptors at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Tang, HaoRan; Leung, Leo; Saturno, Grazia; Viros, Amaya; Smith, Duncan; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Morrison, Eamonn; Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Lopes, Filipa; Johnson, Louise; Dhomen, Nathalie; Springer, Caroline; Marais, Richard

    2017-04-18

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) remodels the tumour microenvironment by cross-linking the extracellular matrix. LOX overexpression is associated with poor cancer outcomes. Here, we find that LOX regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to drive tumour progression. We show that LOX regulates EGFR by suppressing TGFβ1 signalling through the secreted protease HTRA1. This increases the expression of Matrilin2 (MATN2), an EGF-like domain-containing protein that traps EGFR at the cell surface to facilitate its activation by EGF. We describe a pharmacological inhibitor of LOX, CCT365623, which disrupts EGFR cell surface retention and delays the growth of primary and metastatic tumour cells in vivo. Thus, we show that LOX regulates EGFR cell surface retention to drive tumour progression, and we validate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting this pathway with the small molecule inhibitor CCT365623.

  7. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Zilkens, C.; Zanger, K.; Krauspe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically. PMID:18274618

  8. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  9. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  10. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  11. In silico identification of a putative new paramyxovirus related to the Henipavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2004-12-05

    A database search for genes encoding paramyxoviral proteins revealed sequences that were designated as human but presented strong evidence of being of viral origin. The two cDNA-derived sequences designated AngRem104 and AngRem52 were originally described as human gene products that were upregulated by angiotensin II in primary mesangial kidney cells. However, their high degree of sequence relatedness to known viral proteins suggests that they represent the P/C/V, M, and F genes of a putative new member of family Paramyxoviridae. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences and nucleotide motifs suggests that this putative virus is a divergent relative of the Hendra and Nipah viruses; hence, we suggest henipa-like virus or HNLV as a provisional name. Compared to Nipah virus, the percentage of identical (similar) amino acids varied from 19% (42%) for the C protein to 51% (75%) for the M protein. The presence and conservation of presumptive viral transcription start and stop signals and an apparent P editing motif also indicate a relationship of this putative virus to the henipaviruses. Given the highly pathogenic nature of the henipaviruses, the origin of these sequences is enigmatic, and attempts to identify and isolate HNLV are warranted.

  12. Identification of Enteroviruses by Using Monoclonal Antibodies against a Putative Common Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo-Youn; Kim, Ki-Soon; Lee, Yoon-Sung; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Park, Kwi-Sung; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Moon, Youngjoon; Choi, Jee-Hye; Cho, Hang-Eui; Min, Na-Young; Son, Jin-Sook; Park, Young-Hoon; Jee, Youngmee; Yoon, Jae-Deuk; Song, Chul-Yong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2003-01-01

    A common epitope region of enteroviruses was identified by sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA), followed by immunoscreening of 11 cDNA libraries from two Korean enterovirus isolates (echoviruses 7 and 30) and a coxsackievirus B3 (ATCC-VR 30). The putative common epitope region was localized in the N terminus of VP1 when the displayed recombinant proteins from the phages were chased by the convalescent-phase sera. The genomic region encoding the common epitope region was amplified and then expressed by using the vector pGEX-5X-1. The antigenicity of the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blotting with guinea pig antisera for six different serotypes of enteroviruses. After successive immunization of mice with the recombinant common epitope protein, splenocytes were extracted and hybridized with P3X63-Ag8-653 cells. A total of 24 hybridomas that produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses were selected. Four of these were immunoglobulin G1 isotypes with a kappa light chain. These MAbs recognized 15 Korean endemic serotypes and prototypes of enteroviruses in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. These results suggest that the expressed protein might be a useful antigen for producing group common antibodies and that the use of the MAbs against the putative common epitope of enteroviruses might be a valuable diagnostic tool for rapidly identifying a broad range of enteroviruses. PMID:12843038

  13. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  14. Surface-exposed amino acid residues of HPV16 L1 protein mediating interaction with cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Maren; Bodevin, Sabrina; Selinka, Hans-Christoph; Spillmann, Dorothe; Streeck, Rolf E; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Lindahl, Ulf; Sapp, Martin

    2007-09-21

    Efficient infection of cells by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and pseudovirions requires primary interaction with cell surface proteoglycans with apparent preference for species carrying heparan sulfate (HS) side chains. To identify residues contributing to virus/cell interaction, we performed point mutational analysis of the HPV16 major capsid protein, L1, targeting surface-exposed amino acid residues. Replacement of lysine residues 278, 356, or 361 for alanine reduced cell binding and infectivity of pseudovirions. Various combinations of these amino acid exchanges further decreased cell attachment and infectivity with residual infectivity of less than 5% for the triple mutant, suggesting that these lysine residues cooperate in HS binding. Single, double, or triple exchanges for arginine did not impair infectivity, demonstrating that interaction is dependent on charge distribution rather than sequence-specific. The lysine residues are located within a pocket on the capsomere surface, which was previously proposed as the putative receptor binding site. Fab fragments of binding-neutralizing antibody H16.56E that recognize an epitope directly adjacent to lysine residues strongly reduced HS-mediated cell binding, further corroborating our findings. In contrast, mutation of basic surface residues located in the cleft between capsomeres outside this pocket did not significantly reduce interaction with HS or resulted in assembly-deficient proteins. Computer-simulated heparin docking suggested that all three lysine residues can form hydrogen bonds with 2-O-, 6-O-, and N-sulfate groups of a single HS molecule with a minimal saccharide domain length of eight monomer units. This prediction was experimentally confirmed in binding experiments using capsid protein, heparin molecules of defined length, and sulfate group modifications.

  15. Megaplasmids encode differing combinations of lantibiotics in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Wescombe, Philip A; Burton, Jeremy P; Cadieux, Peter A; Klesse, Nikolai A; Hyink, Otto; Heng, Nicholas C K; Chilcott, Chris N; Reid, Gregor; Tagg, John R

    2006-10-01

    Streptococcus salivarius strains commonly produce bacteriocins as putative anti-competitor or signalling molecules. Here we report that bacteriocin production by the oral probiotic strain S. salivarius K12 is encoded by a large (ca. 190 kb) plasmid. Oral cavity transmission of the plasmid from strain K12 to a plasmid-negative variant of this bacterium was demonstrated in two subjects. Tests of additional S. salivarius strains showed large (up to ca. 220 kb) plasmids present in bacteriocin-producing isolates. Various combinations (up to 3 per plasmid) of loci encoding the known streptococcal lantibiotics salivaricin A, salivaricin B, streptin and SA-FF22 were localised to these plasmids. Since all bacteriocin-producing strains of S. salivarius tested to date appear to harbour plasmids, it appears that they may function as mobile repositories for bacteriocin loci, especially those of the lantibiotic class.

  16. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  17. Peri-encoding predictors of memory encoding and consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Noga; Pell, Liat; Edelson, Micah G; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Pine, Alex; Dudai, Yadin

    2015-03-01

    We review reports of brain activations that occur immediately prior to the onset or following the offset of to-be-remembered information and can predict subsequent mnemonic success. Memory-predictive pre-encoding processes, occurring from fractions of a second to minutes prior to event onset, are mainly associated with activations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), amygdala and midbrain, and with enhanced theta oscillations. These activations may be considered as the neural correlates of one or more cognitive operations, including contextual processing, attention, and the engagement of distinct computational modes associated with prior encoding or retrieval. Post-encoding activations that correlate with subsequent memory performance are mainly observed in the MTL, sensory cortices and frontal regions. These activations may reflect binding of elements of the encoded information and initiation of memory consolidation. In all, the findings reviewed here illustrate the importance of brain states in the immediate peri-encoding time windows in determining encoding success. Understanding these brain states and their specific effects on memory may lead to optimization of the encoding of desired memories and mitigation of undesired ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell surface properties of organic solvent-tolerant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Aono, R; Kobayashi, H

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we examined cell surface properties of mutants of Escherichia coli for which organic solvent tolerance levels were elevated. The cell surface of each mutant was less hydrophobic than that of the parent, probably due to an increase in lipopolysaccharide content. OmpF synthesis was repressed in the mutants. Organic solvent bound readily to viable E. coli cells in response to the polarity of the solvent. The mutants were bound less abundantly with the organic solvent than was the parent. PMID:9293016

  19. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem-like...investigate the hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem...investigate these signaling pathways in year 2. Task 4: Investigate the relative expression of Snail -1, a GSK-3 target, in adherent prostate cancer cells

  20. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  1. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  2. Atomic force microscopic study of the effects of ethanol on yeast cell surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-02-01

    The detrimental effects of ethanol toxicity on the cell surface morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354) were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In combination with culture viability and mean cell volume measurements AFM studies allowed us to relate the cell surface morphological changes, observed on nanometer lateral resolution, with the cellular stress physiology. Exposing yeasts to increasing stressful concentrations of ethanol led to decreased cell viabilities and mean cell volumes. Together with the roughness and bearing volume analyses of the AFM images, the results provided novel insight into the relative ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Sc. pombe.

  3. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.