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Sample records for encoding sterol regulatory

  1. A novel processing system of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c regulated by polyunsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Nakakuki, Masanori; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    The proteolytic cascade is the key step in transactivation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a transcriptional factor of lipid synthesis. Proteolysis of SREBP-2 is strictly regulated by sterols, but that of SREBP-1c was not strongly sterol-regulated, but inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this study, the proteolytic processing of SREBP-1 and -2 was examined by transfection studies of cDNA-encoding mutants in which all the known cleavage sites were disrupted. In cultured cells, sterol-regulated SREBP-2 processing was completely eliminated by mutation of cleavage sites. In contrast, the corresponding SREBP-1c mutants as well as wild type exhibited large amounts of cleaved products in the nuclear extracts from culture cells and murine liver in vivo. The nuclear form of the mutant SREBP-1c was induced by delipidated condition and suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 PUFA, but not by sterols. This novel processing mechanism was affected by neither SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) nor insulin-induced gene (Insig)-1, unlike SREBP-2, but abolished by a serine protease inhibitor. Through analysis of deletion mutant, a site-2 protease recognition sequence (DRSR) was identified to be involved in this novel processing. These findings suggest that SREBP-1c cleavage could be subjected to a novel PUFA-regulated cleavage system in addition to the sterol-regulatory SCAP/Insig system.

  2. The Major Cellular Sterol Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Andes Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Didigu, Chukwuka A.; Wilen, Craig B.; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D.; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W.; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection. PMID:24516383

  3. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are transcriptional regulators of the thyroglobulin gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genes encoding sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), both of which are essential for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, were shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1c and -2. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that transcription of a further gene essential for TH synthesis, the thyroglobulin (TG) gene, is under the control of SREBP. To test this hypothesis, we studied the influence of inhibition of SREBP maturation and SREBP knockdown on TG expression in FRTL-5 thyrocytes and explored transcriptional regulation of the TG promoter by reporter gene experiments in FRTL-5 and HepG2 cells, gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of SREBP maturation by 25-hydroxycholesterol and siRNA-mediated knockdown of either SREBP-1c or SREBP-2 decreased mRNA and protein levels of TG in FRTL-5 thyrocytes. Reporter gene assays with wild-type and mutated TG promoter reporter truncation constructs revealed that the rat TG promoter is transcriptionally activated by nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2. DNA-binding assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2 bind to a SREBP binding motif with characteristics of an E-box SRE at position -63 in the rat TG promoter. In connection with recent findings that NIS and TPO are regulated by SREBP in thyrocytes the present findings support the view that SREBP are regulators of essential steps of TH synthesis in the thyroid gland such as iodide uptake, iodide oxidation and iodination of tyrosyl residues of TG. This moreover suggests that SREBP may be molecular targets for pharmacological modulation of TH synthesis. PMID:27321819

  4. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  5. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  7. Endotoxin regulates the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 through the induction of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Albani, D; Bianchi, M; Salmona, M

    2001-01-01

    Endotoxin (LPS), by raising the levels of cytokines, markedly influences lipid metabolism. To clarify the molecular mechanism of this effect, we examined the action of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo on the regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). In HepG2 cells stimulated with LPS, a dose-dependent increase in the level of the mature form of SREBP-1 was observed. For in vivo studies, endotoxin was administered intraperitoneally to CD1 mice fed with a standard or a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase the basal levels of circulating and liver cholesterol. Endotoxin raised cholesterol levels and stimulated the maturation of hepatic SREBP-1 in both normal and cholesterol-fed mice, indicating that the lipogenic effect of LPS was independent of endogenous sterol levels. To assess whether the lipogenic effect of endotoxin was linked to cytokine production, we administered LPS to C57Bl/6J endotoxin-sensitive and to C3H/HeJ endotoxin-resistant mice, which do not produce tumor necrosis factor in response to LPS. Significant induction of cholesterol levels and SREBP-1 activation was observed only in C57Bl/6J mice, indicating that cytokine production is crucial for the regulation of SREBP-1, and that the transcriptional activation of cholesterol biosynthesis may be part of the acute-phase response.

  8. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  9. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  10. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  11. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  12. Mechanism of action of regulatory proteins encoded by complex retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    Complex retroviruses are distinguished by their ability to control the expression of their gene products through the action of virally encoded regulatory proteins. These viral gene products modulate both the quantity and the quality of viral gene expression through regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The most intensely studied retroviral regulatory proteins, termed Tat and Rev, are encoded by the prototypic complex retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, considerable information also exists on regulatory proteins encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type I, as well as several other human and animal complex retroviruses. In general, these data demonstrate that retrovirally encoded transcriptional trans-activators can exert a similar effect by several very different mechanisms. In contrast, posttranscriptional regulation of retroviral gene expression appears to occur via a single pathway that is probably dependent on the recruitment of a highly conserved cellular cofactor. These two shared regulatory pathways are proposed to be critical to the ability of complex retroviruses to establish chronic infections in the face of an ongoing host immune response. Images PMID:1406488

  13. Curcumin up-regulates LDL receptor expression via the sterol regulatory element pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaobing; Fan, Chunlei; Wo, Like; Yan, Jin; Qian, Ying; Wo, Xingde

    2008-09-01

    Plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) is mainly taken up and cleared by the hepatocellular LDL receptor (LDL-R). LDL-R gene expression is regulated by the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). Previous studies have shown that curcumin reduces plasma LDL-C and has hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Herein, we investigated the effect of curcumin on LDL-R expression and its molecular mechanism in HepG2 cells. Curcumin increased LDL-R expression (mRNA and protein) and the resultant uptake of DiI-LDL in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using a GFP reporter system in a transfected HepG2/SRE-GFP cell line, we found that curcumin activated the sterol regulatory element of the LDL-R promoter. In HepG2/Insig2 cells, curcumin reversed the inhibition of LDL-R expression induced by Insig2 overexpression. These data demonstrate that curcumin increases LDL-R protein expression and uptake activity via the SREBPs pathway. These findings contribute to our further understanding of the cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherosclerotic effects of curcumin.

  14. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jeremy H.; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  15. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jeremy H; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  16. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jeremy H; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  17. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  18. Regulation of sterol regulatory-element binding protein 1 gene expression in liver: role of insulin and protein kinase B/cAkt.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, M; Iynedjian, P B

    2000-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the transcription of the sterol regulatory- element binding protein (SREBP) 1/ADD1 gene in liver. Hepatocytes in primary culture were used to delineate the insulin signalling pathway for induction of SREBP1 gene expression. The inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), wortmannin and LY 294002, abolished the insulin-dependent increase in SREBP1 mRNA, whereas the inhibitor of the mitogen- activated protein kinase cascade, PD 98059, was without effect. To investigate the role of protein kinase B (PKB)/cAkt downstream of PI 3-kinase, hepatocytes were transduced with an adenovirus encoding a PKB--oestrogen receptor fusion protein. The PKB activity of this recombinant protein was rapidly activated in hepatocytes challenged with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), as was endogenous PKB in hepatocytes challenged with insulin. The addition of OHT to transduced hepatocytes resulted in accumulation of SREBP1 mRNA, with a time-course and magnitude similar to the effect of insulin in non-transduced cells. The level of SREBP1 mRNA was not increased by OHT in hepatocytes expressing a mutant form of the recombinant protein whose PKB activity was not activated by OHT. Thus acute activation of PKB is sufficient to induce SREBP1 mRNA accumulation in primary hepatocytes, and might be the major signalling event by which insulin induces SREBP1 gene expression in the liver. PMID:10861205

  19. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  20. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses. PMID:27677551

  1. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  2. Hepatic PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status via insulin and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lambert, Gilles; Lalanne, Florent; Lardeux, Bernard; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Grefhorst, Aldo; Staels, Bart; Krempf, Michel

    2006-03-10

    Familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is associated with high risk for cardiovascular accidents and is related to mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor or its ligand apolipoprotein B (apoB). Mutations in a third gene, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9), were recently associated to this disease. PCSK9 acts as a natural inhibitor of the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway, and both genes are regulated by depletion of cholesterol cell content and statins, via sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Here we investigated the regulation of PCSK9 gene expression during nutritional changes. We showed that PCSK9 mRNA quantity is decreased by 73% in mice after 24 h of fasting, leading to a 2-fold decrease in protein level. In contrast PCSK9 expression was restored upon high carbohydrate refeeding. PCSK9 mRNA increased by 4-5-fold in presence of insulin in rodent primary hepatocytes, whereas glucose had no effect. Moreover, insulin up-regulated hepatic PCSK9 expression in vivo during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in mice. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a dominant or negative form of SREBP-1c confirmed the implication of this transcription factor in insulin-mediated stimulation of PCSK9 expression. Liver X receptor agonist T0901317 also regulated PCSK9 expression via this same pathway (a 2-fold increase in PCSK9 mRNA of primary hepatocytes cultured for 24 h in presence of 1 microm T0901317). As our last investigation, we isolated PCSK9 proximal promoter and verified the functionality of a SREBP-1c responsive element located from 335 bp to 355 bp upstream of the ATG. Together, these results show that PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status and insulinemia. PMID:16407292

  3. A sterol C-14 reductase encoded by FgERG24B is responsible for the intrinsic resistance of Fusarium graminearum to amine fungicides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Jing; Yun, Yingzi; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2011-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of wheat head blight, shows intrinsic resistance to amine fungicides. It is commonly accepted that the amines target sterol C-14 reductase and sterol Δ(8)-Δ(7) isomerase of ergosterol biosynthesis, encoded by the genes ERG24 and ERG2, respectively. Analysis of the genome sequence of F. graminearum revealed that the fungus contains two paralogous FgERG24 genes (FgERG24A and FgERG24B), which are homologous to the ERG24 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we disrupted FgERG24A and FgERG24B in F. graminearum. Compared to the wild-type strain HN9-1, FgERG24A and FgERG24B deletion mutants did not show recognizable phenotypic changes in mycelial growth on potato dextrose agar or in virulence on wheat heads. HPLC analysis showed that the amount of ergosterol in FgERG24A or FgERG24B deletion mutants was not significantly different from that in the wild-type strain. These results indicate that neither of the two genes is essential for growth, pathogenicity or ergosterol biosynthesis in F. graminearum. FgERG24B deletion mutants exhibited significantly increased sensitivity to amine fungicides, including tridemorph, fenpropidin and spiroxamine, but not to non-amine fungicides. In contrast, FgERG24A deletion mutants did not show changed sensitivity to any amine tested. The resistance of the FgERG24B deletion mutant to amines was restored by genetic complementation of the mutant with wild-type FgERG24B. These results indicate that FgERG24B controls the intrinsic resistance of F. graminearum to amines. The finding of this study provides new insights into amine resistance in filamentous fungi.

  4. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  5. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1)c promoter: Characterization and transcriptional regulation by mature SREBP-1 and liver X receptor α in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Wang, H P; Wang, H; Zhang, T Y; Tian, H B; Yao, D W; Loor, J J

    2016-02-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates lipogenesis in rodent liver. Two isoforms (SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c) of SREBP-1 are transcribed by an alternative promoter on the same gene (SREBF1), and the isoforms differ only in their first exon. Although the regulatory effects of SREBP-1 on lipid and milk fat synthesis have received much attention in ruminants, SREBP-1c promoter and its regulatory mechanisms have not been characterized in the goat. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced a 2,012-bp fragment of the SREBP-1c 5'-flanking region from goat genomic DNA. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that SREBP-1c is transcriptionally activated by the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist T0901317, and is decreased by SREBP-1 small interfering (si)RNA. A 5' deletion analysis revealed a core promoter region located -395 to +1 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (TSS). Site-directed mutagenesis of LXRα binding elements (LXRE1 and LXRE2) and sterol regulatory elements (SRE1 and SRE2) revealed that the full effects of T 4506585 require the presence of both LXRE and SRE. We also characterized a new SRE (SRE1) and demonstrated a direct role of SREBP-1 (auto-loop regulation) in maintaining its basal transcription activity. Results suggest that goat SREBP-1c gene is transcriptionally regulated by mature SREBP-1 (auto-loop circuit regulation) and LXRα in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26709176

  6. Suppression of the pancreatic duodenal homeodomain transcription factor-1 (Pdx-1) promoter by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c).

    PubMed

    Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Oka, Junko; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yahagi, Naoya; Matsuzaka, Kaori; Okazaki, Sachiko; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Murase, Toshio; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2011-08-12

    Overexpression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in β cells causes impaired insulin secretion and β cell dysfunction associated with diminished pancreatic duodenal homeodomain transcription factor-1 (PDX-1) expression in vitro and in vivo. To identify the molecular mechanism responsible for this effect, the mouse Pdx-1 gene promoter (2.7 kb) was analyzed in β cell and non-β cell lines. Despite no apparent sterol regulatory element-binding protein-binding sites, the Pdx-1 promoter was suppressed by SREBP-1c in β cells in a dose-dependent manner. PDX-1 activated its own promoter. The E-box (-104/-99 bp) in the proximal region, occupied by ubiquitously expressed upstream stimulatory factors (USFs), was crucial for the PDX-1-positive autoregulatory loop through direct PDX-1·USF binding. This positive feedback activation was a prerequisite for SREBP-1c suppression of the promoter in non-β cells. SREBP-1c and PDX-1 directly interact through basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox domains, respectively. This robust SREBP-1c·PDX-1 complex interferes with PDX-1·USF formation and inhibits the recruitment of PDX-1 coactivators. SREBP-1c also inhibits PDX-1 binding to the previously described PDX-1-binding site (-2721/-2646 bp) in the distal enhancer region of the Pdx-1 promoter. Endogenous up-regulation of SREBP-1c in INS-1 cells through the activation of liver X receptor and retinoid X receptor by 9-cis-retinoic acid and 22-hydroxycholesterol inhibited PDX-1 mRNA and protein expression. Conversely, SREBP-1c RNAi restored Pdx-1 mRNA and protein levels. Through these multiple mechanisms, SREBP-1c, when induced in a lipotoxic state, repressed PDX-1 expression contributing to the inhibition of insulin expression and β cell dysfunction.

  7. The sterol C-14 reductase encoded by the Neurospora crassa erg-3 gene: essential charged and polar residues identified by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Kasbekar, D P

    2002-01-01

    Sterol C-14 reductase catalyses the reduction of the Delta(14,15) bond in intermediates in the sterol biosynthesis pathway using NADPH as a cofactor. We have undertaken a systematic site-directed mutational analysis of all the conserved charged and potentially proton-donating residues of the sterol C-14 reductase from Neurospora crassa. The effect of each mutation was determined using an in vivo assay based on the complementation of the corresponding N. crassa mutant ( erg-3). The non-complementing mutations were also tested in the erg24 mutant of Saccharomyces cervisiae. The results are discussed with reference to the predicted topology of the enzyme and to its proposed catalytic mechanism, which involves addition of a proton from an appropriately positioned charged or polar residue to the substrate double bond, followed by addition of hydride ion from NADPH. PMID:11810252

  8. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  9. Pu-Erh Tea Down-Regulates Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein and Stearyol-CoA Desaturase to Reduce Fat Storage in Caenorhaditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ding, YiHong; Zou, XiaoJu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, JieYu; Zhang, YuRu; Chen, Dan; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of Pu-erh has been reported to result in numerous health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying purported weight-loss and lowering of lipid are poorly understood. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhaditis elegans to explore the water extract of Pu-erh tea (PTE) functions to reduce fat storage. We found that PTE down-regulates the expression of the master fat regulator SBP-1, a homologue of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and its target stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme in fat biosynthesis, leading to an increased ratio of stearic acid (C18:0) to oleic acid (C18:1n-9), and subsequently decreased fat storage. We also found that both the pharyngeal pumping rate and food uptake of C. elegans decreased with exposure to PTE. Collectively, these results provide an experimental basis for explaining the ability of Pu-erh tea in promoting inhibition of food uptake and the biosynthesis of fat via SBP-1 and SCD, thereby reducing fat storage. PMID:25659129

  10. Regulation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Expression by Adipocyte Differentiation and Determination Factor 1/Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: Implications for Adipocyte Differentiation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fajas, Lluis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Gelman, Laurent; Kim, Jae B.; Najib, Jamila; Martin, Genevieve; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Briggs, Michael; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Auwerx, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor implicated in adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether PPARγ expression is dependent on the activity of adipocyte differentiation and determination factor 1/sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (ADD-1/SREBP-1), another transcription factor associated with both adipocyte differentiation and cholesterol homeostasis. Ectopic expression of ADD-1/SREBP-1 in 3T3-L1 and HepG2 cells induced endogenous PPARγ mRNA levels. The related transcription factor SREBP-2 likewise induced PPARγ expression. In addition, cholesterol depletion, a condition known to result in proteolytic activation of transcription factors of the SREBP family, induced PPARγ expression and improved PPRE-driven transcription. The effect of the SREBPs on PPARγ expression was mediated through the PPARγ1 and -3 promoters. Both promoters contain a consensus E-box motif that mediates the regulation of the PPARγ gene by ADD-1/SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. These results suggest that PPARγ expression can be controlled by the SREBP family of transcription factors and demonstrate new interactions between transcription factors that can regulate different pathways of lipid metabolism. PMID:10409739

  11. Sterol regulatory element-binding factor 2 (SREBF-2) predicts 7-year NAFLD incidence and severity of liver disease and lipoprotein and glucose dysmetabolism.

    PubMed

    Musso, Giovanni; Cassader, Maurizio; Bo, Simona; De Michieli, Franco; Gambino, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    We prospectively assessed the impact of a sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2) polymorphism on the risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and on liver histology and lipoprotein and glucose metabolism in biopsy-proven NAFLD. In a population-based study, we followed 175 nonobese, nondiabetic participants without NAFLD or metabolic syndrome at baseline, characterized for the SREBF-2 rs133291 C/T polymorphism, dietary habits, physical activity, adipokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and endothelial adhesion molecules. A comparable cohort of NAFLD patients underwent liver biopsy, an oral glucose tolerance test with minimal model analysis to yield glucose homeostasis parameters, and an oral fat tolerance test with measurement of plasma lipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokeratin-18 fragments. After 7 years, 27% of subjects developed NAFLD and 5% developed diabetes. SREBF-2 predicted incident NAFLD and diabetes and CRP and endothelial adhesion molecule changes. In biopsy-proven NAFLD patients, SREBF-2 predicted nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (odds ratio 2.92 [95% CI 2.08-4.18], P = 0.002) and the severity of tissue insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and oral fat intolerance (characterized by higher postprandial lipemia, cholesterol enrichment of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and oxidized LDLs, HDL cholesterol fall, adipokine imbalance, and postprandial apoptosis activation). An SREBF-2 polymorphism predisposes individuals to NAFLD and associated cardiometabolic abnormalities and affects liver histology and glucose and lipid metabolism in biopsy-proven NAFLD.

  12. Andrographolide prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice by suppressing the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Binfeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiming; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and triglycerides. We investigated the effect of the specific SREBP suppressor andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, on the regulation of SREBP signaling by use of Western blot, reporter gene assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the antiobesity effects of andrographolide were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Our results showed that andrographolide downregulated the expressions of SREBPs target genes and decreased cellular lipid accumulation in vitro. Further, andrographolide (100 mg/kg per day) attenuated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin or glucose sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Andrographolide effectively suppressed the respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, and oxygen consumption, which may have contributed to the decreased body-weight gain of the obese mice fed with a HFD. Consistently, andrographolide regulated SREBP target genes and metabolism-associated genes in liver or brown adipose tissue, which may have directly contributed to the lower lipid levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results indicated that andrographolide ameliorated lipid metabolism and improved glucose use in mice with HFD-induced obesity. Andrographolide has potential as a leading compound in the prevention or treatment of obesity and insulin resistance.

  13. Tanshinone IIA inhibits the dihydrotestosterone-induced secretion of lipids and activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 in HaCaT cells

    PubMed Central

    SONG, DONG-YAN; HUANG, QIU-HONG; ZHOU, BING-RONG; XU, YANG; YIN, ZHI-QIANG; PERMATASARI, FELICIA; LUO, DAN

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects and mechanisms of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) on the dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), the synthesis and secretion of lipids in HaCaT cells were examined. HaCaT cells were treated with DHT and Tan IIA at different concentrations. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of SREBP-1c, fatty acid synthase (FAS), acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) mRNA in HaCaT cells. Western blotting was used to analyze the protein expression of SREBP-1 and phosphorylation of Akt. Flow cytometry and Nile red staining were used to detect the synthesis and secretion of lipids in HaCaT cells. We observed that Tan IIA inhibited the DHT-induced expression of SREBP-1 and p-AKT in HaCaT cells, which produced an effect similar to that of LY294002. Tan IIA significantly inhibited the transcription of lipid synthesis-related genes and decreased lipid secretion in HaCaT cells. In conclusion, Tan IIA downregulates the expression of lipid synthesis-related genes and decreases lipid secretion in HaCaT cells, which is correlated with the inhibitory effect on the DHT-induced mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-1 in HaCaT cells. PMID:23139722

  14. Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 2 Couples HIV-1 Transcription to Cholesterol Homeostasis and T Cell Activation ▿§

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Harry E.; Linde, Michael E.; Khatua, Atanu K.; Popik, Waldemar; Hildreth, James E. K.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an essential role in the life cycle of several enveloped viruses. Many of these viruses manipulate host cholesterol metabolism to facilitate their replication. HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells activates the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) transcriptional program, which includes genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. However, the role of SREBP2-dependent transcription in HIV-1 biology has not been fully examined. Here, we identify TFII-I, a gene critical for HIV-1 transcription in activated T cells, as a novel SREBP2 target gene. We found TFII-I expression increased after HIV-1 infection or activation of human primary CD4+ T cells. We show that inhibition of SREBP2 activity reduced TFII-I induction in response to these stimuli. More importantly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing of either SREBP2 or TFII-I significantly reduced HIV-1 production in CD4+ T cells. We also found that TFII-I potentiates Tat-dependent viral gene expression, consistent with a role at the level of HIV-1 transcription. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that HIV-1 transcription in T cells is linked to cholesterol homeostasis through control of TFII-I expression by SREBP2. PMID:21613400

  15. Renoprotective effect of myricetin restrains dyslipidemia and renal mesangial cell proliferation by the suppression of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-11-15

    Myricetin is a natural flavonoid used in various health management systems. In this present study myricetin tested to evaluate the effect on lipids and lipid metabolism enzymes in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) with cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Diabetic nephrotoxic rats were significantly (P<0.05) increased the levels of urinary albumin and lipid profiles: total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), free fatty acids (FFAs), phospholipids (PLs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and decreased in the levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In addition, the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) were decreased significantly, whereas the 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HmgCoA) reductase activity was increased. The upregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a), SREBP-1c, SREBP-2, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and downregulation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) proteins expression levels were noticed. An administration of myricetin (1.0 mg/kg body weight (b/w)) for 12 weeks was brought the above parameters towards normal level. Histopathological study of kidney samples showed that extracellular mesangial matrix expansion, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephrotoxic rats was suppressed by myricetin treatment. Further our results indicate that administration of myricetin afforded remarkable protection against STZ-Cd induced alterations in lipid metabolism and thereby reduced the diabetic nephropathy in experimental rats. PMID:25240712

  16. Pu-erh tea down-regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein and stearyol-CoA desaturase to reduce fat storage in Caenorhaditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ding, YiHong; Zou, XiaoJu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, JieYu; Zhang, YuRu; Chen, Dan; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of Pu-erh has been reported to result in numerous health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying purported weight-loss and lowering of lipid are poorly understood. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhaditis elegans to explore the water extract of Pu-erh tea (PTE) functions to reduce fat storage. We found that PTE down-regulates the expression of the master fat regulator SBP-1, a homologue of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and its target stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme in fat biosynthesis, leading to an increased ratio of stearic acid (C18:0) to oleic acid (C18:1n-9), and subsequently decreased fat storage. We also found that both the pharyngeal pumping rate and food uptake of C. elegans decreased with exposure to PTE. Collectively, these results provide an experimental basis for explaining the ability of Pu-erh tea in promoting inhibition of food uptake and the biosynthesis of fat via SBP-1 and SCD, thereby reducing fat storage. PMID:25659129

  17. Preventing Phosphorylation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a by MAP-Kinases Protects Mice from Fatty Liver and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP–1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP–1a mice the phosphorylation–deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo. PMID:22384276

  18. Over-expression of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) in rat pancreatic islets induces lipogenesis and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin release: modulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR).

    PubMed Central

    Diraison, Frédérique; Parton, Laura; Ferré, Pascal; Foufelle, Fabienne; Briscoe, Celia P; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular lipid by pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to inhibit normal glucose-regulated insulin secretion ('glucolipotoxicity'). In the present study, we determine whether over-expression in rat islets of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBP1c (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c) affects insulin release, and whether changes in islet lipid content may be reversed by activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Infection with an adenovirus encoding the constitutively active nuclear fragment of SREBP1c resulted in expression of the protein in approx. 20% of islet cell nuclei, with a preference for beta-cells at the islet periphery. Real-time PCR (TaqMan) analysis showed that SREBP1c up-regulated the expression of FAS (fatty acid synthase; 6-fold), acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (2-fold), as well as peroxisomal-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (7-fold), uncoupling protein-2 (1.4-fold) and Bcl2 (B-cell lymphocytic-leukaemia proto-oncogene 2; 1.3-fold). By contrast, levels of pre-proinsulin, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase and GLUT2 (glucose transporter isoform-2) mRNAs were unaltered. SREBP1c-transduced islets displayed a 3-fold increase in triacylglycerol content, decreased glucose oxidation and ATP levels, and a profound inhibition of glucose-, but not depolarisation-, induced insulin secretion. Culture of islets with the AMPK activator 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside decreased the expression of the endogenous SREBP1c and FAS genes, and reversed the effect of over-expressing active SREBP1c on FAS mRNA levels and cellular triacylglycerol content. We conclude that SREBP1c over-expression, even when confined to a subset of beta-cells, leads to defective insulin secretion from islets and may contribute to some forms of Type II diabetes. PMID:14690455

  19. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression.

  20. The HAP3 regulatory locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes divergent overlapping transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, S; Pinkham, J; Wei, R; Miller, R; Guarente, L

    1988-01-01

    Activation of the CYC1 upstream activation site, UAS2, and transcription of several other genes encoding respiratory functions requires the product of the regulatory gene HAP2. We report here the isolation and characterization of a second UAS2 regulatory gene, HAP3. Like mutations in HAP2, a mutation in HAP3 abolishes the activity of UAS2 and prevents growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. The HAP3 gene was cloned and, surprisingly, was found to encode two divergently transcribed, overlapping transcripts: a 570-base RNA and a 3-kilobase (kb) RNA. Chromosomal disruption experiments defined the critical region for HAP3 function to a 1.3-kb segment in which the two transcripts overlap. Analysis of the HAP3 DNA sequence showed that the 570-base transcript could encode a protein of 144 amino acids. Synthesis of the 144-amino-acid protein under regulatory control in vivo demonstrated that this protein is essential for activity of UAS2 as well as for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. The largest open reading frame in the critical region of the 3-kb transcript is only 86 amino acids. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the 86-amino-acid open reading frame was not involved in UAS2 activity. The possible role of this 3-kb antisense RNA in HAP3 expression or function is discussed. Images PMID:2832732

  1. Yeast sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage requires Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing subunit of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Emerson V; Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Burg, John S; Nwosu, Christine C; Lintner, Robert E; Daza, Riza; Russ, Carsten; Ponchner, Karen; Nusbaum, Chad; Espenshade, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sre1 is a membrane-bound transcription factor that controls adaptation to hypoxia. Like its mammalian homolog, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), Sre1 activation requires release from the membrane. However, in fission yeast, this release occurs through a strikingly different mechanism that requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasome. The mechanistic details of Sre1 cleavage, including the link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and proteasome, are not well understood. Here, we present results of a genetic selection designed to identify additional components required for Sre1 cleavage. From the selection, we identified two new components of the fission yeast SREBP pathway: Dsc5 and Cdc48. The AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein, interact with known Dsc complex components and are required for SREBP cleavage. These findings provide a mechanistic link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and the proteasome in SREBP cleavage and add to a growing list of similarities between the Dsc E3 ligase and membrane E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

  2. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  3. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  4. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  5. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  6. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  7. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  8. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  9. Overexpression of erg20 gene encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase has contrasting effects on activity of enzymes of the dolichyl and sterol branches of mevalonate pathway in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Piłsyk, Sebastian; Perlińska-Lenart, Urszula; Górka-Nieć, Wioletta; Graczyk, Sebastian; Antosiewicz, Beata; Zembek, Patrycja; Palamarczyk, Grażyna; Kruszewska, Joanna S

    2014-07-10

    The mevalonate pathway is the most diverse metabolic route resulting in the biosynthesis of at least 30,000 isoprenoid compounds, many of which, such as sterols or dolichols, are indispensable for living cells. In the filamentous fungus Trichoderma of major biotechnological interest isoprenoid metabolites are also involved in the biocontrol processes giving the mevalonate pathway an additional significance. On the other hand, little is known about genes coding for enzymes of the mevalonate pathway in Trichoderma. Here, we present cloning and functional analysis of the erg20 gene from Trichoderma reesei coding for farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.10), an enzyme located at the branching point of the mevalonate pathway. Expression of the gene in a thermosensitive erg20-2 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae impaired in the FPP synthase activity suppressed the thermosensitive phenotype. The same gene overexpressed in T. reesei significantly enhanced the FPP synthase activity and also stimulated the activity of cis-prenyltransferase, an enzyme of the dolichyl branch of the mevalonate pathway. Unexpectedly, the activity of squalene synthase from the other, sterol branch, was significantly decreased without, however, affecting ergosterol level.

  10. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents.

  11. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  12. Regulatory roles of LINE-1-encoded reverse transcriptase in cancer onset and progression.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Piazza, Pier Francesco; Spadafora, Corrado

    2014-09-30

    LINE-1 retrotransposons encode the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, required for their own mobility, the expression of which is inhibited in differentiated tissues while being active in tumors. Experimental evidence indicate that the inhibition of LINE-1-derived RT restores differentiation in cancer cells, inhibits tumor progression and yields globally reprogrammed transcription profiles. Newly emerging data suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT modulates the biogenesis of miRNAs, by governing the balance between the production of regulatory double-stranded RNAs and RNA:DNA hybrid molecules, with a direct impact on global gene expression. Abnormally high RT activity unbalances the transcriptome in cancer cells, while RT inhibition restores "normal" miRNA profiles and their regulatory networks. This RT-dependent mechanism can target the myriad of transcripts - both coding and non-coding, sense and antisense - in eukaryotic transcriptomes, with a profound impact on cell fates. LINE-1-encoded RT emerges therefore as a key regulator of a previously unrecognized mechanism in tumorigenesis.

  13. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  14. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  15. A dynamic role for sterols in embryogenesis of Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Schrick, Kathrin; Cordova, Cindy; Li, Grace; Murray, Leigh; Fujioka, Shozo

    2011-04-01

    Molecular roles of sterols in plant development remain to be elucidated. To investigate sterol composition during embryogenesis, the occurrence of 25 steroid compounds in stages of developing seeds and pods of Pisum sativum was examined by GC-MS analysis. Immature seeds containing very young embryos exhibited the greatest concentrations of sterols. Regression models indicated that the natural log of seed or pod fr. wt was a consistent predictor of declining sterol content during embryonic development. Although total sterol levels were reduced in mature embryos, the composition of major sterols sitosterol and campesterol remained relatively constant in all 12 seed stages examined. In mature seeds, a significant decrease in isofucosterol was observed, as well as minor changes such as increases in cycloartenol branch sterols and campesterol derivatives. In comparison to seeds and pods, striking differences in composition were observed in sterol profiles of stems, shoots, leaves, flowers and flower buds, as well as cotyledons versus radicles. The highest levels of isofucosterol, a precursor to sitosterol, occurred in young seeds and flower buds, tissues that contain rapidly dividing cells and cells undergoing differentiation. Conversely, the highest levels of stigmasterol, a derivative of sitosterol, were found in fully-differentiated leaves while all seed stages exhibited low levels of stigmasterol. The observed differences in sterol content were correlated to mRNA expression data for sterol biosynthesis genes from Arabidopsis. These findings implicate the coordinated expression of sterol biosynthesis enzymes in gene regulatory networks underlying the embryonic development of flowering plants.

  16. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  17. Cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol. A concerted role for Sp1 and NF-Y-binding sites for sterol-mediated regulation of rat 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Lee, J N; Paik, Y K

    2001-05-25

    The 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (Dhcr7) is the terminal enzyme in the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis. We have previously reported that sterol depletion in vivo caused a significant induction of both liver mRNA and enzyme activity of Dhcr7 (Bae, S.-H., Lee, J. N., Fitzky, B. U., Seong, J., and Paik, Y.-K. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 14624-14631). In this paper, we also observed liver cell-specific sterol-mediated Dhcr7 gene induction in vitro by sterol depletion in rat hepatoma cells, suggesting the presence of sterol-mediated regulatory elements in the Dhcr7 gene. To understand the mechanisms responsible for regulating Dhcr7 expression, we have isolated the 5'-flanking region of the gene encoding rat Dhcr7 and have characterized the potential regulatory elements of the gene that are responsible for sterol-mediated regulation. The Dhcr7 promoter contains binding sites for Sp1 (at -177, -172, -125, and -20), NF-Y (at -88 and -51), and SREBP-1 or ADD1 (at -33). Deletion analysis of the Dhcr7 gene promoter (-1053/+31), employing a nested series of Dhcr7-luciferase constructs, demonstrated that the -179 upstream region of the gene is necessary and sufficient for optimal efficient sterol-regulated transcription. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the SRE1/E box (-33/-22) involved in sterol response of many sterol-related enzyme genes was protected specifically by the overexpressed recombinant ADD1. Mutational analysis for the functional relationship between the identified cis-elements in this region indicate that one of the binding sites for Sp1 (GC box at -125) and NF-Y (CCAAT box at -88) plays a cooperative role in the sterol-mediated activation, in which the latter site also acts as a co-regulator for SREBP-activated Dhcr7 promoter activity. We believe that Dhcr7 is the first enzyme characterized with a sterol-regulatory function in the post-lanosterol pathway. This may be important for understanding the coordinated

  18. A LINE-1-encoded reverse transcriptase-dependent regulatory mechanism is active in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Corrado

    2015-04-01

    LINE-1 (long interspersed nuclear elements) retrotransposons constitute a large family of retrotransposable elements, accounting for 17% of the human genome. They encode proteins required for their own mobilization, including a reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme highly expressed in mouse embryos and mouse and human cancer cells and repressed in somatic differentiated healthy cells. We have found that reverse transcription takes place in early murine embryos, yielding an increase in LINE-1 copy number during preimplantation development, which also occurs in tumor progression. RT inhibition irreversibly arrests embryo development, reduces cancer cell proliferation, promotes differentiation, antagonizes tumor growth, and causes a global reprogramming of transcription profiles. These results strongly suggest that a previously unrecognized RT-dependent regulatory mechanism operates during preimplantation development, is repressed during differentiation to normal tissues, and, when erroneously reactivated in adult life, promotes cell transformation and cancer progression by "resurrecting" embryonic transcriptional pathways. The RT-dependent mechanism emerges as a major source of genetic and epigenetic changes with physiological, pathological, and evolutionary implications.

  19. Carbenoxolone prevents the development of fatty liver in C57BL/6-Lep ob/ob mice via the inhibition of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c activity and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sang Dal; Kim, Chi-Hyun; Park, Ji Seon; Jung, Won Hoon; Park, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Youn; Bae, Gyu Hwan; Kim, Ta Jan; Kim, Ki Young

    2012-09-15

    Carbenoxolone is the 3-hemisuccinate of glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principal of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). It was reported that carbenoxolone improved glucose tolerance with increased insulin sensitivity in mice with high fat diet-induced obesity. In the present study, we elucidated the protective effect of carbenoxolone in fatty liver animal models of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice through inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis and apoptosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which carbenoxolone could exert such protection were elucidated. Carbenoxolone was daily administrated by gavage for 28 days in C57BL/6 and C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Carbenoxolone prevented the plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid accumulation associated with the reduction of the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, liver X receptor, fatty acid synthase and acethyl-CoA carboxylase in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Carbenoxolone also prevented hepatic injury through anti-apoptotic action in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice, accompanied by increased Bcl-2 expression and suppressed Bax and cytochrome c expression. As a mechanism, increased inflammatory cytokine expressions were inhibited by carbenoxolone in the fatty livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, carbenoxolone inhibited free fatty acid (oleate/palmitate) induced reactive oxygen species formation and reversed free fatty acid induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization in HepG2 cells. Carbenoxolone prevents the development of fatty liver by inhibiting sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c expression and activity with an anti-apoptotic mechanism via the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine and reactive oxygen species formation in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. It is suggested that carbenoxolone prevents the development and progression of fatty liver disease in patients with insulin resistance.

  20. Ginsenoside F2 reduces hair loss by controlling apoptosis through the sterol regulatory element-binding protein cleavage activating protein and transforming growth factor-β pathways in a dihydrotestosterone-induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heon-Sub; Park, Sang-Yong; Hwang, Eun-Son; Lee, Don-Gil; Mavlonov, Gafurjon Turdalievich; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to test whether ginsenoside F2 can reduce hair loss by influencing sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) pathway of apoptosis in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated hair cells and in a DHT-induced hair loss model in mice. Results for ginsenoside F2 were compared with finasteride. DHT inhibits proliferation of hair cells and induces androgenetic alopecia and was shown to activate an apoptosis signal pathway both in vitro and in vivo. The cell-based 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that the proliferation rates of DHT-treated human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs) and HaCaTs increased by 48% in the ginsenoside F2-treated group and by 12% in the finasteride-treated group. Western blot analysis showed that ginsenoside F2 decreased expression of TGF-β2 related factors involved in hair loss. The present study suggested a hair loss related pathway by changing SCAP related apoptosis pathway, which has been known to control cholesterol metabolism. SCAP, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and caspase-12 expression in the ginsenoside F2-treated group were decreased compared to the DHT and finasteride-treated group. C57BL/6 mice were also prepared by injection with DHT and then treated with ginsenoside F2 or finasteride. Hair growth rate, density, thickness measurements and tissue histotological analysis in these groups suggested that ginsenoside F2 suppressed hair cell apoptosis and premature entry to catagen more effectively than finasteride. Our results indicated that ginsenoside F2 decreased the expression of TGF-β2 and SCAP proteins, which have been suggested to be involved in apoptosis and entry into catagen. This study provides evidence those factors in the SCAP pathway could be targets for hair loss prevention drugs.

  1. Mutations in yeast ARV1 alter intracellular sterol distribution and are complemented by human ARV1.

    PubMed

    Tinkelenberg, A H; Liu, Y; Alcantara, F; Khan, S; Guo, Z; Bard, M; Sturley, S L

    2000-12-29

    Intracellular cholesterol redistribution between membranes and its subsequent esterification are critical aspects of lipid homeostasis that prevent free sterol toxicity. To identify genes that mediate sterol trafficking, we screened for yeast mutants that were inviable in the absence of sterol esterification. Mutations in the novel gene, ARV1, render cells dependent on sterol esterification for growth, nystatin-sensitive, temperature-sensitive, and anaerobically inviable. Cells lacking Arv1p display altered intracellular sterol distribution and are defective in sterol uptake, consistent with a role for Arv1p in trafficking sterol into the plasma membrane. Human ARV1, a predicted sequence ortholog of yeast ARV1, complements the defects associated with deletion of the yeast gene. The genes are predicted to encode transmembrane proteins with potential zinc-binding motifs. We propose that ARV1 is a novel mediator of eukaryotic sterol homeostasis.

  2. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Dikiy, Igor; Kiburu, Irene; Eliezer, David; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-08-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix.

  3. The prrF-Encoded Small Regulatory RNAs Are Required for Iron Homeostasis and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Alexandria A.; Powell, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Angela T.; O'Neill, Maura; Djapgne, Louise; Wilks, Angela; Ernst, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that requires iron to cause infection, but it also must regulate the uptake of iron to avoid iron toxicity. The iron-responsive PrrF1 and PrrF2 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are part of P. aeruginosa's iron regulatory network and affect the expression of at least 50 genes encoding iron-containing proteins. The genes encoding the PrrF1 and PrrF2 sRNAs are encoded in tandem in P. aeruginosa, allowing for the expression of a distinct, heme-responsive sRNA named PrrH that appears to regulate genes involved in heme metabolism. Using a combination of growth, mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis, we showed that the ΔprrF1,2 mutant, which lacks expression of the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs, is defective for both iron and heme homeostasis. We also identified phuS, encoding a heme binding protein involved in heme acquisition, and vreR, encoding a previously identified regulator of P. aeruginosa virulence genes, as novel targets of prrF-mediated heme regulation. Finally, we showed that the prrF locus encoding the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in a murine model of acute lung infection. Moreover, we showed that inoculation with a ΔprrF1,2 deletion mutant protects against future challenge with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Combined, these data demonstrate that the prrF-encoded sRNAs are critical regulators of P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:25510881

  4. Evaluation of sterol transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria using mitochondrially targeted bacterial sterol acyltransferase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tian, Siqi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interorganelle sterol transport, a system to evaluate sterol transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the mitochondria was constructed. A bacterial glycerophospholipid: cholesterol acyltransferase fused with a mitochondria-targeting sequence and a membrane-spanning domain of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein Pet100 and enhanced green fluorescent protein was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant deleted for ARE1 and ARE2 encoding acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferases. Microscopic observation and subcellular fractionation suggested that this fusion protein, which was named mito-SatA-EGFP, was localized in the mitochondria. Steryl esters were synthesized in the mutant expressing mito-SatA-EGFP. This system will be applicable for evaluations of sterol transport from the ER to the mitochondria in yeast by examining sterol esterification in the mitochondria.

  5. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-10-29

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibited lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles.

  6. Short communication: Effects of β-lactoglobulin, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1, and sterol regulatory element binding protein gene allelic variants on milk production, composition, acidity, and coagulation properties of Brown Swiss cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Ribeca, C; Maurmayr, A; Penasa, M; De Marchi, M; Macciotta, N P P; Mele, M; Secchiari, P; Pagnacco, G; Bittante, G

    2012-01-01

    Associations of allelic variants of the β-lactoglobulin (LGB), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1) genes with milk production, composition (fat, protein, and casein content), acidity (pH and titratable acidity), and coagulation properties (rennet coagulation time and curd firmness) were investigated in Brown Swiss cows. In total, 294 animals (progeny of 15 sires) reared in 16 herds were milk-sampled once. The additive effects of LGB (rs109625649:C>T), SCD (ss469414220:C>T), and SREBP-1 (AB355704: g.101_185ins) polymorphisms on the aforementioned traits were analyzed through Bayesian linear models. The LGB genotype affected rennet coagulation time, with TT (or BB) alleles showing longer rennet coagulation time compared with CC (or AA) cows. The SCD gene allelic variants were found to be associated with protein and casein contents and curd firmness: CC animals had the lowest values for the aforementioned traits. An association was found between SREBP-1 alleles and fat content, with the highest values for cows carrying the 84-bp insertion (or L) allele. Results suggest a possible use of these loci in gene-assisted selection programs for the improvement of milk quality traits and coagulation properties in Brown Swiss cattle.

  7. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-01-01

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver. PMID:25730060

  8. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-02-06

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver.

  9. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/choleserol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibtied lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles. PMID:26510459

  10. The Hexane Fraction of cyperus rotundus Prevents Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Through the Inhibition of Liver X Receptor α-Mediated Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Lee, Gang Gu; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to examine the effects of Cyperus rotundus (CR) rhizome on cellular lipogenesis and non-alcoholic/diet-induced fatty liver disease, and (2) to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind its actions. The present investigation showed that the hexane fraction of CR rhizome (CRHF) reduced the elevated transcription levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in primary hepatocytes following exposure to the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist. The SREBP-1c gene is a master regulator of lipogenesis and a key target of LXRα. CRHF inhibited not only the LXRα-dependent activation of the synthetic LXR response element (LXRE) promoter, but also the activation of the natural SREBP-1c promoter. Moreover, CRHF decreased (a) the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the LXRE of the SREBP-1c gene; (b) the LXRα-dependent up-regulation of various lipogenic genes; and (c) the LXRα-mediated accumulation of triglycerides in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, CRHF ameliorated fatty liver disease and reduced the expression levels of hepatic lipogenic genes in high sucrose diet (HSD)-fed mice. Interestingly, CRHF did not affect the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, another important LXR target gene that is required for reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results suggest that CRHF might be a novel therapeutic remedy for fatty liver disease through the selective inhibition of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:25967664

  11. The effects of sterol structure upon sterol esterification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Don S; Steiner, Robert D; Merkens, Louise S; Pappu, Anuradha S; Connor, William E

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is esterified in mammals by two enzymes: LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase) in plasma and ACAT(1) and ACAT(2) (acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferases) in the tissues. We hypothesized that the sterol structure may have significant effects on the outcome of esterification by these enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sterol esters in plasma and tissues in patients having non-cholesterol sterols (sitosterolemia and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). The esterification of a given sterol was defined as the sterol ester percentage of total sterols. The esterification of cholesterol in plasma by LCAT was 67% and in tissues by ACAT was 64%. Esterification of nine sterols (cholesterol, cholestanol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, campestanol, sitostanol, 7-dehydrocholesterol and 8-dehydrocholesterol) was examined. The relative esterification (cholesterol being 1.0) of these sterols by the plasma LCAT was 1.00, 0.95, 0.89, 0.40, 0.85, 0.82 and 0.80, 0.69 and 0.82, respectively. The esterification by the tissue ACAT was 1.00, 1.29, 0.75, 0.49, 0.45, 1.21 and 0.74, respectively. The predominant fatty acid of the sterol esters was linoleic acid for LCAT and oleic acid for ACAT. We compared the esterification of two sterols differing by only one functional group (a chemical group attached to sterol nucleus) and were able to quantify the effects of individual functional groups on sterol esterification. The saturation of the A ring of cholesterol increased ester formation by ACAT by 29% and decreased the esterification by LCAT by 5.9%. Esterification by ACAT and LCAT was reduced, respectively, by 25 and 11% by the presence of an additional methyl group on the side chain of cholesterol at the C-24 position. This data supports our hypothesis that the structure of the sterol substrate has a significant effect on its esterification by ACAT or LCAT.

  12. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression. PMID:25429295

  13. Sterol Biosynthesis and Azole Tolerance Is Governed by the Opposing Actions of SrbA and the CCAAT Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gsaller, Fabio; Furukawa, Takanori; Carr, Paul D.; Rash, Bharat; Capilla, Javier; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz; Bowyer, Paul; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A.; Bromley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Azole drugs selectively target fungal sterol biosynthesis and are critical to our antifungal therapeutic arsenal. However, resistance to this class of drugs, particularly in the major human mould pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, is emerging and reaching levels that have prompted some to suggest that there is a realistic probability that they will be lost for clinical use. The dominating class of pan-azole resistant isolates is characterized by the presence of a tandem repeat of at least 34 bases (TR34) within the promoter of cyp51A, the gene encoding the azole drug target sterol C14-demethylase. Here we demonstrate that the repeat sequence in TR34 is bound by both the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA, and the CCAAT binding complex (CBC). We show that the CBC acts complementary to SrbA as a negative regulator of ergosterol biosynthesis and show that lack of CBC activity results in increased sterol levels via transcriptional derepression of multiple ergosterol biosynthetic genes including those coding for HMG-CoA-synthase, HMG-CoA-reductase and sterol C14-demethylase. In agreement with these findings, inactivation of the CBC increased tolerance to different classes of drugs targeting ergosterol biosynthesis including the azoles, allylamines (terbinafine) and statins (simvastatin). We reveal that a clinically relevant mutation in HapE (P88L) significantly impairs the binding affinity of the CBC to its target site. We identify that the mechanism underpinning TR34 driven overexpression of cyp51A results from duplication of SrbA but not CBC binding sites and show that deletion of the 34 mer results in lack of cyp51A expression and increased azole susceptibility similar to a cyp51A null mutant. Finally we show that strains lacking a functional CBC are severely attenuated for pathogenicity in a pulmonary and systemic model of aspergillosis. PMID:27438727

  14. Plant Sterols, Stanols, and Sitosterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Ajagbe, Bridget O.; Othman, Rgia A.; Myrie, Semone B.

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterolemia (sitosterolemia) is a rare autosomal recessive sterol storage disease caused by mutations in either of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporter genes; (ABC)G5 or ABCG8, leading to impaired elimination of plant sterols and stanols, with their increased accumulation in the blood and tissues. Thus the disease is characterized by substantially elevated serum plant sterols and stanols, with moderate to high plasma cholesterol levels, and increased risk of premature atherosclerosis. Hematologic abnormalities including macrothrombocytopenia, stomatocytosis and hemolysis are frequently observed in sitosterolemia patients. Currently, ezetimibe, a sterol absorption inhibitor, is used as the routine treatment for sitosterolemia, with reported improvement in plant sterol levels and hemolytic parameters. This review summarizes the research related to the health impact of plant sterols and stanols on sitosterolemia. PMID:25941971

  15. Advanced Running Performance by Genetic Predisposition in Male Dummerstorf Marathon Mice (DUhTP) Reveals Higher Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) Related mRNA Expression in the Liver and Higher Serum Levels of Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Brenmoehl, Julia; Walz, Christina; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred; Fuellen, Georg; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Long-term-selected DUhTP mice represent a non-inbred model for inborn physical high-performance without previous training. Abundance of hepatic mRNA in 70-day male DUhTP and control mice was analyzed using the Affymetrix mouse array 430A 2.0. Differential expression analysis with PLIER corrected data was performed using AltAnalyze. Searching for over-representation in biochemical pathways revealed cholesterol metabolism being most prominently affected in DUhTP compared to unselected control mice. Furthermore, pathway analysis by AltAnalyze plus PathVisio indicated significant induction of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of DUhTP mice versus unselected control mice. In contrast, gluconeogenesis was partially inactivated as judged from the analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance in DUhTP mice. Analysis of mRNA transcripts related to steroid hormone metabolism inferred elevated synthesis of progesterone and reduced levels of sex steroids. Abundance of steroid delta isomerase-5 mRNA (Hsd3b5, FC 4.97) was increased and steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase mRNA (Cyp17a1, FC -11.6) was massively diminished in the liver of DUhTP mice. Assessment of steroid profiles by LC-MS revealed increased levels of progesterone and decreased levels of sex steroids in serum from DUhTP mice versus controls. Analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance indicates that sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) may play a major role in metabolic pathway activation in the marathon mouse model DUhTP. Thus, results from bioinformatics modeling of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance correlated with direct steroid analysis by mass spectrometry and further indicated functions of SREBP-1 and steroid hormones for endurance performance in DUhTP mice. PMID:26799318

  16. Berberine-improved visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance associated with altered sterol regulatory element-binding proteins, liver x receptors, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors transcriptional programs in diabetic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Han; Zhu, Hua; Huang, Lan; Liu, Ya-Li; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic "lipotoxicity" hypothesis presents that fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Berberine, a hypolipidemic agent, has been reported to have antidiabetic activities. The molecular mechanisms for this property are, however, not well clarified. Therefore in this study type 2 diabetic hamsters were induced by high-fat diet with low-dose streptozotocin. Then, we investigated the gene expression alterations and explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in diabetic hamsters by microarray analysis followed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmation. Type 2 diabetic hamsters exhibited hyperglycemia and relative hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, intra-adipocyte lipid accumulation, significant increase in body weight and visceral white adipose tissue weight, abnormal serum adipokines levels, and deleterious dyslipidemia. Furthermore, they had increased sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) expression and decreased liver X receptors (LXRs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) expression in visceral white adipose tissue. After 9-week berberine treatment, fat-induced insulin resistance and diabetic phenotype in type 2 diabetic hamsters were significantly improved. Compared with diabetic hamsters, expression of LXRs and PPARs significantly increased and SREBPs significantly decreased in visceral white adipose tissue from berberine-treated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that altered visceral white adipose tissue LXRs, PPARs, and SREBPs transcriptional programs are involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic hamsters.

  17. MicroRNA-33b knock-in mice for an intron of sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (Srebf1) exhibit reduced HDL-C in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horie, Takahiro; Nishino, Tomohiro; Baba, Osamu; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Nakao, Tetsushi; Nishiga, Masataka; Usami, Shunsuke; Izuhara, Masayasu; Nakazeki, Fumiko; Ide, Yuya; Koyama, Satoshi; Sowa, Naoya; Yahagi, Naoya; Shimano, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Kume, Noriaki; Yokode, Masayuki; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Ono, Koh

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that bind to specific mRNAs and inhibit translation or promote mRNA degradation. Recent reports, including ours, indicated that miR-33a located within the intron of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 2 controls cholesterol homeostasis and can be a possible therapeutic target for treating atherosclerosis. Primates, but not rodents, express miR-33b from an intron of SREBF1. Therefore, humanized mice, in which a miR-33b transgene is inserted within a Srebf1 intron, are required to address its function in vivo. We successfully established miR-33b knock-in (KI) mice and found that protein levels of known miR-33a target genes, such as ABCA1, ABCG1, and SREBP-1, were reduced compared with those in wild-type mice. As a consequence, macrophages from the miR-33b KI mice had a reduced cholesterol efflux capacity via apoA-I and HDL-C. Moreover, HDL-C levels were reduced by almost 35% even in miR-33b KI hetero mice compared with the control mice. These results indicate that miR-33b may account for lower HDL-C levels in humans than those in mice and that miR-33b is possibly utilized for a feedback mechanism to regulate its host gene SREBF1. Our mice will also aid in elucidating the roles of miR-33a/b in different genetic disease models. PMID:24931346

  18. Bezafibrate at clinically relevant doses decreases serum/liver triglycerides via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c in mice: a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takero; Tanaka, Naoki; Kanbe, Hiroki; Hara, Atsushi; Kamijo, Yuji; Zhang, Xiaowei; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2009-04-01

    The triglyceride-lowering effect of bezafibrate in humans has been attributed to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha activation based on results from rodent studies. However, the bezafibrate dosages used in conventional rodent experiments are typically higher than those in clinical use (> or =50 versus < or =10 mg/kg/day), and thus it remains unclear whether such data can be translated to humans. Furthermore, because bezafibrate is a pan-PPAR activator, the actual contribution of PPARalpha to its triglyceride-lowering properties remains undetermined. To address these issues, bezafibrate at clinically relevant doses (10 mg/kg/day; low) was administered to wild-type and Ppara-null mice, and its effects were compared with those from conventionally used doses (100 mg/kg/day; high). Pharmacokinetic analyses showed that maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve in bezafibrate-treated mice were similar to those in humans at low doses, but not at high doses. Low-dose bezafibrate decreased serum/liver triglycerides in a PPARalpha-independent manner by attenuation of hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride secretion. It is noteworthy that instead of PPAR activation, down-regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c was observed in mice undergoing low-dose treatment. High-dose bezafibrate decreased serum/liver triglycerides by enhancement of hepatic fatty acid uptake and beta-oxidation via PPARalpha activation, as expected. In conclusion, clinically relevant doses of bezafibrate exert a triglyceride-lowering effect by suppression of the SREBP-1c-regulated pathway in mice and not by PPARalpha activation. Our results may provide novel information about the pharmacological mechanism of bezafibrate action and new insights into the treatment of disorders involving SREBP-1c. PMID:19124612

  19. Dietary green tea extract lowers plasma and hepatic triglycerides and decreases the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mRNA and its responsive genes in fructose-fed, ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sudeep; Ehlers, Sarah J; Lee, Ji-Young; Fernandez, Maria-Luz; Koo, Sung I

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether green tea (GT) inhibits the expression of genes regulating hepatic lipogenesis and intestinal lipid transport in fructose-fed ovariectomized (OX) rats. OX rats were assigned to: 1) a control group (S) fed the AIN-93G diet with corn starch as the major carbohydrate source; 2) another control group (F) fed the same diet but containing fructose at 60% as the major carbohydrate source; 3) a group fed the F diet but containing 0.5% GT; and 4) a group fed the F diet containing 1% GT. At 6 wk, plasma and liver triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol and expression of liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and selected genes involved in lipogenesis and lipid transport were measured. Fructose elevated plasma TG and cholesterol compared with the S group. GT at 0.5 and 1.0% markedly lowered plasma and liver TG. Fructose increased the expression of SREBP-1c, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 mRNA in the liver, whereas GT decreased the expression of these lipogenic genes. Similarly, fructose increased the abundance of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA, whereas GT significantly decreased its expression. GT did not alter the expression of scavenger receptor class B, type 1, microsomal TG transfer protein, and apobec 1 in the liver and intestine. The results suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of GT is mediated partly by its inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis involving SREBP-1c and its responsive genes without affecting lipoprotein assembly.

  20. "Dinoflagellate Sterols" in marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Wikfors, Gary H

    2011-10-01

    Sterol compositions for three diatom species, recently shown to contain sterols with side chains typically found in dinoflagellates, were determined by HPLC and ¹H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The centric diatom Triceratium dubium (=Biddulphia sp., CCMP 147) contained the highest percentage of 23-methylated sterols (37.2% (24R)-23-methylergosta-5,22-dienol), whereas the pennate diatom Delphineis sp. (CCMP 1095) contained the cyclopropyl sterol gorgosterol, as well as the 27-norsterol occelasterol. The sterol composition of Ditylum brightwellii (CCMP 358) was the most complex, containing Δ⁰- and Δ⁷-sterols, in addition to the predominant Δ⁵-sterols. A pair of previously unknown sterols, stigmasta-5,24,28-trienol and stigmasta-24,28-dienol, were detected in D. brightwellii and their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic analysis and by synthesis of the former sterol from saringosterol. Also detected in D. brightwellii was the previously unknown 23-methylcholesta-7,22-dienol. PMID:21621802

  1. Sterol carrier and lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Scallen, T J; Pastuszyn, A; Noland, B J; Chanderbhan, R; Kharroubi, A; Vahouny, G V

    1985-09-01

    The discovery of the sterol carrier and lipid transfer proteins was largely a result of the findings that cells contained cytosolic factors which were required either for the microsomal synthesis of cholesterol or which could accelerate the transfer or exchange of phospholipids between membrane preparations. There are two sterol carrier proteins present in rat liver cytosol. Sterol carrier protein 1 (SCP1) (Mr 47 000) participates in the microsomal conversion of squalene to lanosterol, and sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) (Mr 13 500) participates in the microsomal conversion of lanosterol to cholesterol. In addition SCP2 also markedly stimulates the esterification of cholesterol by rat liver microsomes, as well as the conversion of cholesterol to 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol - the major regulatory step in bile acid formation. Also, SCP2 is required for the intracellular transfer of cholesterol from adrenal cytoplasmic lipid inclusion droplets to mitochondria for steroid hormone production, as well as cholesterol transfer from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane. SCP2 is identical to the non-specific phospholipid exchange protein. While SCP2 is capable of phospholipid exchange between artificial donors/acceptors, e.g. liposomes and microsomes, it does not enhance the release of lipids other than unesterified cholesterol from natural donors/acceptors, e.g. adrenal lipid inclusion droplets, and will not enhance exchange of labeled phosphatidylcholine between lipid droplets and mitochondria. Careful comparison of SCP2 and fatty acid binding protein (FABP) using six different assay procedures demonstrates separate and distinct physiological functions for each protein, with SCP2 participating in reactions involving sterols and FABP participating in reactions involving fatty acid binding and/or transport. Furthermore, there is no overlap in substrate specificities, i.e. FABP does not possess sterol carrier protein activity and SCP2 does not specifically bind or

  2. Effects of bovine fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, and growth hormone gene polymorphisms on fatty acid composition and carcass traits in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, T; Maruyama, S; Uemoto, Y; Kobayashi, N; Mannen, H; Abe, T; Sakaguchi, S; Kobayashi, E

    2011-01-01

    The quality of fat is an important factor in defining the quality of meat. Fat quality is determined by the composition of fatty acids. Among lipid metabolism-related genes, including fatty acid synthesis genes, several genetic variations have been reported in the bovine fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and GH genes. In the present study, we evaluated the single and epistatic effects of 5 genetic variations (4 SNP and 1 insertion/deletion) in 4 genes (FASN, SCD, SREBP1, and GH) on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle and carcass and meat quality traits in 480 commercial Japanese Black cattle. Significant single effects of FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V) polymorphisms on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle were detected. The A293V polymorphism of SCD had the largest effect on myristic acid (C14:0, P < 0.001), myristoleic acid (C14:1, P < 0.001), stearic acid (C18:0, P < 0.001), oleic acid (C18:1, P < 0.001), and MUFA (P < 0.001). Polymorphisms in the FASN, SCD, and SREBP1 genes showed no effect on any meat yield trait. There were no significant epistatic effects on fatty acid composition among pairs of the 3 genes (FASN, SCD, and SREBP1) involved in fatty acid synthesis. No epistatic interactions (P > 0.1) were detected between FASN and SCD for any carcass trait. When the genotypes of 3 markers (FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V)) were substituted from the lesser effect allele to the greater effect allele, the proportion of C18:1 increased by 4.46%. More than 20% of the genetic variance in the C18:1 level could be accounted for by these 3 genetic markers. The present results revealed that polymorphisms in 2 fatty acid synthesis genes (FASN and SCD) independently influenced fatty acid composition in the longissimus thoracis muscle. These results suggest that SNP in the FASN and SCD genes are useful markers for the improvement of fatty acid composition in

  3. Study of Behavior of Sterols at Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, P. D.; Knight, J. C.; Szczepanik, P. A.

    1968-01-01

    Behavior of sterols and sterol acetates on various types of interfaces indicates that the function of a sterol depends upon a surface orientation and surface energy of the interface. Column-chromatographic techniques determine the retention volume of various sterols under standard conditions.

  4. Modulation of interferon regulatory factor 5 activities by the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded viral interferon regulatory factor 3 contributes to immune evasion and lytic induction.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaohui; Yang, Lisong; Mancl, Margo E; Barnes, Betsy J

    2011-04-01

    Multiple Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded proteins with potential roles in KSHV-associated neoplasms have been identified. KSHV encodes 4 genes with homology to transcription factors of the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) family. Viral IRF3 (vIRF3) is expressed in latently KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells and was recently shown to be essential for the survival of PEL cells. The focus of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) of vIRF3 oncogenic activity contributing to KSHV-associated lymphoma. We report that vIRF3 interacts with the amino-terminal DNA binding domain of human IRF5, leading to a complex manipulation of IRF5 function. vIRF3 associated with both exogenous and endogenous IRF5, thereby inhibiting IRF5-mediated IFN promoter activation and the synthesis of biologically active type I IFNs by blocking its binding to endogenous IFNA promoters. The function of this interaction was not limited to the IFN system as IRF5-mediated cell growth regulation was significantly altered by overexpression of vIRF3 in B cells. vIRF3 prevented IRF5-mediated growth inhibition and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Important, IRF5 was upregulated by the protein kinase C agonist 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in BCBL1 PEL cells and interaction with vIRF3 was observed at the endogenous p21 promoter in response to 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, suggesting that these 2 proteins cooperate in the regulation of lytic cycle-induced G1 arrest, which is an important early step for the reactivation of KSHV. In conclusion, cellular IRF5 and vIRF3 interact, leading to the functional modulation of IRF5-mediated type I IFN expression and cell cycle regulation. These findings support an important role for vIRF3 in immune evasion and cell proliferation that likely contribute to the survival of PEL cells.

  5. A critical role of sterols in embryonic patterning and meristem programming revealed by the fackel mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jyan-Chyun; Fujioka, Shozo; Tasaka, Masao; Seto, Hideharu; Takatsuto, Suguru; Ishii, Akira; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Sheen, Jen

    2000-01-01

    Here we report a novel Arabidopsis dwarf mutant, fackel-J79, whose adult morphology resembles that of brassinosteroid-deficient mutants but also displays distorted embryos, supernumerary cotyledons, multiple shoot meristems, and stunted roots. We cloned the FACKEL gene and found that it encodes a protein with sequence similarity to both the human sterol reductase family and yeast C-14 sterol reductase and is preferentially expressed in actively growing cells. Biochemical analysis indicates that the fk-J79 mutation results in deficient C-14 sterol reductase activity, abnormal sterol composition, and reduction of brassinosteroids (BRs). Unlike other BR-deficient mutants, the defect of hypocotyl elongation in fk-J79 cannot be corrected by exogenous BRs. The unique phenotypes and sterol composition in fk-J79 indicate crucial roles of sterol regulation and signaling in cell division and cell expansion in embryonic and post-embryonic development in plants. PMID:10859167

  6. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  7. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  8. Cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols.

    PubMed

    AbuMweis, Suhad S; Jones, Peter J H

    2008-12-01

    Plant sterols are plant components that have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol except for the addition of an extra methyl or ethyl group; however, plant sterol absorption in humans is considerably less than that of cholesterol. In fact, plant sterols reduce cholesterol absorption and thus reduce circulating levels of cholesterol. Earlier studies that have tested the efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol-lowering agents incorporated plant sterols into fat spreads. Later on, plant sterols were added to other food matrices, including juices, nonfat beverages, milk and yogurt, cheese, meat, croissants and muffins, and cereal and chocolate bars. The beneficial physiologic effects of plant sterols could be further enhanced by combining them with other beneficial substances, such as olive and fish oils, fibers, and soy proteins, or with exercise. The addition of plant sterols to the diet is suggested by health experts as a safe and effective way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:18937893

  9. Distribution and Functions of Sterols and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Hannich, J. Thomas; Umebayashi, Kyohei; Riezman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Sterols and sphingolipids are considered mainly eukaryotic lipids even though both are present in some prokaryotes, with sphingolipids being more widespread than sterols. Both sterols and sphingolipids differ in their structural features in vertebrates, plants, and fungi. Interestingly, some invertebrates cannot synthesize sterols de novo and seem to have a reduced dependence on sterols. Sphingolipids and sterols are found in the plasma membrane, but we do not have a clear picture of their precise intracellular localization. Advances in lipidomics and subcellular fractionation should help to improve this situation. Genetic approaches have provided insights into the diversity of sterol and sphingolipid functions in eukaryotes providing evidence that these two lipid classes function together. Intermediates in sphingolipid biosynthesis and degradation are involved in signaling pathways, whereas sterol structures are converted to hormones. Both lipids have been implicated in regulating membrane trafficking. PMID:21454248

  10. TRC8, A KIDNEY CANCER-ASSOCIATED UBIQUITIN LIGASE, IS STEROL-REGULATED AND INTERACTS WITH LIPID AND PROTEIN BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason P.; Brauweiler, Anne; Rudolph, Michael; Hooper, Joan E.; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    TRC8/RNF139 encodes an ER-resident E3-ubiquitin ligase that inhibits growth in a RING- and ubiquitylation-dependent manner. TRC8 also contains a predicted sterol-sensing domain. Here we report that TRC8 protein levels are sterol-responsive, and that it binds and stimulates ubiquitylation of the ER-anchor protein, INSIG. Induction of TRC8 destabilized the precursor forms of the transcription factors, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. Loss of SREBP precursors was proteasome-dependent, required a functional RING domain, occurred without generating processed nuclear forms and suppressed SREBP target genes. TRC8 knockdown had opposite effects in sterol-deprived cells. In Drosophila, growth inhibition by DTrc8 was genetically suppressed by loss of specific MPN domain-containing proteins found in the COP9 signalosome and eIF3. DTrc8 genetically and physicially interacted with two eIF3 subunits, eIF3f and eIF3h. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed these interactions in mammalian cells and TRC8 over-expression suppressed polysome profiles. Moreover, high molecular weight ubiquitylated proteins were observed in eIF3 immunoprecipitations from TRC8 over-expressing cells. Thus, TRC8 function may provide a regulatory link between the lipid and protein biosynthetic pathways. PMID:20068067

  11. Plant Sterol Diversity in Pollen from Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Villette, Claire; Berna, Anne; Compagnon, Vincent; Schaller, Hubert

    2015-08-01

    Here we have examined the composition of free sterols and steryl esters of pollen from selected angiosperm species, as a first step towards a comprehensive analysis of sterol biogenesis in the male gametophyte. We detected four major sterol structural groups: cycloartenol derivatives bearing a 9β,19-cyclopropyl group, sterols with a double bond at C-7(8), sterols with a double bond at C-5(6), and stanols. All these groups were unequally distributed among species. However, the distribution of sterols as free sterols or as steryl esters in pollen grains indicated that free sterols were mostly Δ(5)-sterols and that steryl esters were predominantly 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols. In order to link the sterol composition of a pollen grain at anthesis with the requirement for membrane lipid constituents of the pollen tube, we germinated pollen grains from Nicotiana tabacum, a model plant in reproductive biology. In the presence of radiolabelled mevalonic acid and in a time course series of measurements, we showed that cycloeucalenol was identified as the major neosynthesized sterol. Furthermore, the inhibition of cycloeucalenol neosynthesis by squalestatin was in full agreement with a de novo biogenesis and an apparent truncated pathway in the pollen tube.

  12. A new sterol glycoside from Securidaca inappendiculata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Jie; Yang, Xue-Dong; Xu, Li-Zhen; Zou, Zhong-Mei; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2005-08-01

    From the roots of Securidaca inappendiculata, one new sterol glycoside securisteroside (1) has been isolated, along with two known sterols, spinasterol (2) and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-spinasterol (3). The new sterol was characterized by chemical and spectrometric methods, including EIMS, FABMS and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. PMID:16087640

  13. Biosynthesis of Phytosterol Esters: Identification of a Sterol O-Acyltransferase in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qilin; Steinhauer, Lee; Hammerlindl, Joe; Keller, Wilf; Zou, Jitao

    2007-01-01

    Fatty acyl esters of phytosterols are a major form of sterol conjugates distributed in many parts of plants. In this study we report an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene, AtSAT1 (At3g51970), which encodes for a novel sterol O-acyltransferase. When expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), AtSAT1 mediated production of sterol esters enriched with lanosterol. Enzyme property assessment using cell-free lysate of yeast expressing AtSAT1 suggested the enzyme preferred cycloartenol as acyl acceptor and saturated fatty acyl-Coenyzme A as acyl donor. Taking a transgenic approach, we showed that Arabidopsis seeds overexpressing AtSAT1 accumulated fatty acyl esters of cycloartenol, accompanied by substantial decreases in ester content of campesterol and β-sitosterol. Furthermore, fatty acid components of sterol esters from the transgenic lines were enriched with saturated and long-chain fatty acids. The enhanced AtSAT1 expression resulted in decreased level of free sterols, but the total sterol content in the transgenic seeds increased by up to 60% compared to that in wild type. We conclude that AtSAT1 mediates phytosterol ester biosynthesis, alternative to the route previously described for phospholipid:sterol acyltransferase, and provides the molecular basis for modification of phytosterol ester level in seeds. PMID:17885082

  14. Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Displaced SREBP Proteins as the Major Sterol Regulators during Saccharomycotina Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Wang, Can; Holland, Linda M.; Brunel, François; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1) and C. albicans (Cph2) have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1) and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina. PMID:24453983

  15. The structure of the human sterol carrier protein X/sterol carrier protein 2 gene (SCP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takashi; Rennert, H.; Pfeifer, S.M.

    1994-11-15

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a 58-kDa protein that is localized to peroxisomes. The amino acid sequence of the protein suggests that SCPx may function as a thiolase. The gene encoding SCPx also codes for a 15.3-kDa protein called sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). Here the authors report the structure of this gene (SCP2), which spans approximately 80 kb and consists of 16 exons and 15 introns. Multiple transcription start sites were identified. The 5{prime} flanking region has characteristics of other peroxisomal protein promoters, which include the absence of a TATA box and G+C-enriched region containing several reverse GC boxes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  17. FACKEL is a sterol C-14 reductase required for organized cell division and expansion in Arabidopsis embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schrick, Kathrin; Mayer, Ulrike; Horrichs, Andrea; Kuhnt, Christine; Bellini, Catherine; Dangl, Jeff; Schmidt, Jürgen; Jürgens, Gerd

    2000-01-01

    In flowering plants, the developing embryo consists of growing populations of cells whose fates are determined in a position-dependent manner to form the adult organism. Mutations in the FACKEL (FK) gene affect body organization of the Arabidopsis seedling. We report that FK is required for cell division and expansion and is involved in proper organization of the embryo. We isolated FK by positional cloning. Expression analysis in embryos revealed that FK mRNA becomes localized to meristematic zones. FK encodes a predicted integral membrane protein related to the vertebrate lamin B receptor and sterol reductases across species, including yeast sterol C-14 reductase ERG24. We provide functional evidence that FK encodes a sterol C-14 reductase by complementation of erg24. GC/MS analysis confirmed that fk mutations lead to accumulation of intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway preceding the C-14 reductase step. Although fk represents a sterol biosynthetic mutant, the phenotype was not rescued by feeding with brassinosteroids (BRs), the only plant sterol signaling molecules known so far. We propose that synthesis of sterol signals in addition to BRs is important in mediating regulated cell growth and organization during embryonic development. Our results indicate a novel role for sterols in the embryogenesis of plants. PMID:10859166

  18. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci. PMID:14645274

  19. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics. PMID:9148788

  20. The sterols of calcareous sponges (Calcarea, Porifera).

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Andrea; Voigt, Oliver; Wörheide, Gert; Thiel, Volker

    2008-11-01

    Sponges are sessile suspension-feeding organisms whose internal phylogenetic relationships are still the subject of intense debate. Sterols may have the potential to be used as independent markers to test phylogenetic hypotheses. Twenty representative specimens of calcareous sponges (class Calcarea, phylum Porifera) with a broad coverage within both subclasses Calcinea and Calcaronea were analysed for their sterol content. Two major pseudohomologous series were found, accompanied by some additional sterols. The first series encompassing conventional C(27) to C(29)Delta(5,7,22) sterols represented the major sterols, with ergosterol (ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3beta-ol, C(28)Delta(5,7,22)) being most prominent in many species. The second series consisted of unusual C(27) to C(29)Delta(5,7,9(11),22) sterols. Cholesterol occurred sporadically, mostly in trace amounts. The sterol patterns did not resolve intraclass phylogenetic relationships, namely the distinction between the subclasses, Calcinea and Calcaronea. This pointed towards major calcarean lipid traits being established prior to the separation of subclasses. Furthermore, calcarean sterol patterns clearly differ from those found in Hexactinellida, whereas partial overlap occurred with some Demospongiae. Hence, sterols only partly reflect the phylogenetic separation of Calcarea from both of the other poriferan classes that was proposed by recent molecular work and fatty acid analyses.

  1. A Novel Sterol Desaturase-Like Protein Promoting Dealkylation of Phytosterols in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomazic, Mariela L.; Najle, Sebastián R.; Nusblat, Alejandro D.; Uttaro, Antonio D.; Nudel, Clara B.

    2011-01-01

    The gene TTHERM_00438800 (DES24) from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila encodes a protein with three conserved histidine clusters, typical of the fatty acid hydroxylase superfamily. Despite its high similarity to sterol desaturase-like enzymes, the phylogenetic analysis groups Des24p in a separate cluster more related to bacterial than to eukaryotic proteins, suggesting a possible horizontal gene transfer event. A somatic knockout of DES24 revealed that the gene encodes a protein, Des24p, which is involved in the dealkylation of phytosterols. Knocked-out mutants were unable to eliminate the C-24 ethyl group from C29 sterols, whereas the ability to introduce other modifications, such as desaturations at positions C-5(6), C-7(8), and C-22(23), were not altered. Although C-24 dealkylations have been described in other organisms, such as insects, neither the enzymes nor the corresponding genes have been identified to date. Therefore, this is the first identification of a gene involved in sterol dealkylation. Moreover, the knockout mutant and wild-type strain differed significantly in growth and morphology only when cultivated with C29 sterols; under this culture condition, a change from the typical pear-like shape to a round shape and an alteration in the regulation of tetrahymanol biosynthesis were observed. Sterol analysis upon culture with various substrates and inhibitors indicate that the removal of the C-24 ethyl group in Tetrahymena may proceed by a mechanism different from the one currently known. PMID:21257793

  2. Sterol phylogenesis and algal evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W D; Norton, R A; Crumley, F G; Madigan, S J; Katz, E R

    1990-01-01

    The stereochemistry of several sterol precursors and end products synthesized by two fungal-like micro-organisms Prototheca wickerhamii (I) and Dictyostelium discoideum (II) have been determined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (UV, MS, and 1H NMR) methods. From I and II the following sterols were isolated from the cells: cycloartenol, cyclolaudenol, 24(28)-methylenecycloartanol, ergosterol, protothecasterol, 4alpha-methylergostanol, 4alpha-methylclionastanol, clionastanol, 24beta-ethylcholesta-8,22-enol, and dictyosterol. In addition, the mechanism of C-24 methylation was investigated in both organisms by feeding to I [2-3H]lanosterol, [2-3H]cycloartenol, [24-3H]lanosterol, and [methyl-2H3]methionine and by feeding to II [methyl-2H3]methionine. The results demonstrate that the 24beta configuration is formed by different alkylation routes in I and II. The Delta25(27) route operates in I while the Delta24(28) route operates in II. Based on what is known in the literature regarding sterol distribution and phylogenesis together with our findings that the stereochemical outcome of squalene oxide cyclization leads to the production of cycloartenol rather than lanosterol (characteristic of the fungal genealogy) and the chirality of the C-24 alkyl group is similar in the two nonphotosynthetic microbes (beta oriented), we conclude that Prototheca is an apoplastic Chlorella (i.e., an alga) and that Dictyostelium as well as the other soil amoebae that synthesize cycloartenol evolved from algal rather than fungal ancestors. PMID:11607106

  3. The tra-3 sex determination gene of Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a member of the calpain regulatory protease family.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, T M; Hodgkin, J

    1996-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans sex determination gene tra-3 is required for the correct sexual development of the soma and germ line in hermaphrodites, while being fully dispensable in males. Genetic analysis of tra-3 has suggested that its product may act as a potentiator of another sex determination gene, tra-2. Molecular analysis reported here reveals that the predicted tra-3 gene product is a member of the calpain family of calcium-regulated cytosolic proteases, though it lacks the calcium binding regulatory domain. Calpains are regulatory processing proteases, exhibiting marked substrate specificity, and mutations in the p94 isoform underlie the human hereditary condition limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. The molecular identity of TRA-3 is consistent with previous genetic analysis which suggested that tra-3 plays a very selective modulatory role and is required in very small amounts. Based on these observations and new genetic data, we suggest a refinement of the position of tra-3 within the sex determination cascade and discuss possible mechanisms of action for the TRA-3 protein. PMID:8887539

  4. Bioorthogonal probes for imaging sterols in cells.

    PubMed

    Jao, Cindy Y; Nedelcu, Daniel; Lopez, Lyle V; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Welti, Ruth; Salic, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a fundamental lipid component of eukaryotic membranes and a precursor of potent signaling molecules, such as oxysterols and steroid hormones. Cholesterol and oxysterols are also essential for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Despite their importance, the use of imaging sterols in cells is currently very limited. We introduce a robust and versatile method for sterol microscopy based on C19 alkyne cholesterol and oxysterol analogues. These sterol analogues are fully functional; they rescue growth of cholesterol auxotrophic cells and faithfully recapitulate the multiple roles that sterols play in Hedgehog signal transduction. Alkyne sterol analogues incorporate efficiently into cellular membranes and can be imaged with high resolution after copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction with fluorescent azides. We demonstrate the use of alkyne sterol probes for visualizing the subcellular distribution of cholesterol and for two-color imaging of sterols and choline phospholipids. Our imaging strategy should be broadly applicable to studying the role of sterols in normal physiology and disease.

  5. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Chandler, Madison R.; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R.; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl− transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  6. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Chandler, Madison R; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl(-) transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  7. Sterol phylogenesis and algal evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nes, W.D.; Norton, R.A.; Crumley, F.G. ); Madigan, S.J.; Katz, E.R. )

    1990-10-01

    The stereochemistry of several sterol precursors and end products synthesized by two fungal-like microorganisms Prototheca wickerhamii (I) and Dictyostelium discoideum (II) have been determined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (UV, MS, and {sup 1}H NMR) methods. From I and II the following sterols were isolated from the cells: cycloartenol, cyclolaudenol, 24(28)-methylenecy-cloartanol, ergosterol, protothecasterol, 4{alpha}-methylergostanol, 4{alpha}-methylclionastanol, clionastanol, 24{beta}-ethylcholesta-8,22-enol, and dictyosterol. In addition, the mechanism of C-24 methylation was investigated in both organisms by feeding to I (2-{sup 3}H)lanosterol, (2-{sup 3}H)cycloartenol, (24{sup 3}H)lanosterol, and (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine and by feeding to II (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. The results demonstrate that the 24{beta} configuration is formed by different alkylation routes in I and II. The authors conclude that Prototheca is an apoplastic Chlorella (i.e., an alga) and that Dictyostelium as well as the other soil amoebae that synthesize cycloartenol evolved from algal rather than fungal ancestors.

  8. Design of modular "plug-and-play" expression platforms derived from natural riboswitches for engineering novel genetically encodable RNA regulatory devices.

    PubMed

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Batey, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encodable RNA devices that directly detect small molecules in the cellular environment are of increasing interest for a variety of applications including live cell imaging and synthetic biology. Riboswitches are naturally occurring sensors of intracellular metabolites, primarily found in the bacterial mRNA leaders and regulating their expression. These regulatory elements are generally composed of two domains: an aptamer that binds a specific effector molecule and an expression platform that informs the transcriptional or translational machinery. While it was long established that riboswitch aptamers are modular and portable, capable of directing different output domains including ribozymes, switches, and fluorophore-binding modules, the same has not been demonstrated until recently for expression platforms. We have engineered and validated a set of expression platforms that regulate transcription through a secondary structural switch that can host a variety of different aptamers, including those derived through in vitro selection methods, to create novel chimeric riboswitches. These synthetic switches are capable of a highly specific regulatory response both in vitro and in vivo. Here we present the methodology for the design and engineering of chimeric switches using biological expression platforms. PMID:25605380

  9. Thresholds for sterol-limited growth of Daphnia magna: a comparative approach using 10 different sterols.

    PubMed

    Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Oexle, Sarah; Wacker, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Arthropods are incapable of synthesizing sterols de novo and thus require a dietary source to cover their physiological demands. The most prominent sterol in animal tissues is cholesterol, which is an indispensable structural component of cell membranes and serves as precursor for steroid hormones. Instead of cholesterol, plants and algae contain a variety of different phytosterols. Consequently, herbivorous arthropods have to metabolize dietary phytosterols to cholesterol to meet their requirements for growth and reproduction. Here, we investigated sterol-limited growth responses of the freshwater herbivore Daphnia magna by supplementing a sterol-free diet with increasing amounts of 10 different phytosterols and comparing thresholds for sterol-limited growth. In addition, we analyzed the sterol composition of D. magna to explore sterol metabolic constraints and bioconversion capacities. We show that dietary phytosterols strongly differ in their potential to support somatic growth of D. magna. The dietary threshold concentrations obtained by supplementing the different sterols cover a wide range (3.5-34.4 μg mg C(-1)) and encompass the one for cholesterol (8.9 μg mg C(-1)), indicating that certain phytosterols are more efficient in supporting somatic growth than cholesterol (e.g., fucosterol, brassicasterol) while others are less efficient (e.g., dihydrocholesterol, lathosterol). The dietary sterol concentration gradients revealed that the poor quality of particular sterols can be alleviated partially by increasing dietary concentrations, and that qualitative differences among sterols are most pronounced at low to moderate dietary concentrations. We infer that the dietary sterol composition has to be considered in zooplankton nutritional ecology to accurately assess potential sterol limitations under field conditions.

  10. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Caron, K M; Soo, S C; Wetsel, W C; Stocco, D M; Clark, B J; Parker, K L

    1997-10-14

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids-with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic-pituitary levels-whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR's essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis.

  11. Sterols in spermatogenesis and sperm maturation.

    PubMed

    Keber, Rok; Rozman, Damjana; Horvat, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex developmental program in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. One intriguing aspect of sperm production is the dynamic change in membrane lipid composition that occurs throughout spermatogenesis. Cholesterol content, as well as its intermediates, differs vastly between the male reproductive system and nongonadal tissues. Accumulation of cholesterol precursors such as testis meiosis-activating sterol and desmosterol is observed in testes and spermatozoa from several mammalian species. Moreover, cholesterogenic genes, especially meiosis-activating sterol-producing enzyme cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase, display stage-specific expression patterns during spermatogenesis. Discrepancies in gene expression patterns suggest a complex temporal and cell-type specific regulation of sterol compounds during spermatogenesis, which also involves dynamic interactions between germ and Sertoli cells. The functional importance of sterol compounds in sperm production is further supported by the modulation of sterol composition in spermatozoal membranes during epididymal transit and in the female reproductive tract, which is a prerequisite for successful fertilization. However, the exact role of sterols in male reproduction is unknown. This review discusses sterol dynamics in sperm maturation and describes recent methodological advances that will help to illuminate the complexity of sperm formation and function.

  12. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Elizabeth L; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E; Barker, Katherine S; Kelly, Stephen L; Rogers, P David

    2015-10-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the H-NS and Sfh regulatory networks in Salmonella Typhimurium identifies a plasmid-encoded transcription silencing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Shane C; Cameron, Andrew D S; Hokamp, Karsten; Lucchini, Sacha; Hinton, Jay C D; Dorman, Charles J

    2010-06-01

    The conjugative IncHI1 plasmid pSfR27 from Shigella flexneri 2a strain 2457T encodes the Sfh protein, a paralogue of the global transcriptional repressor H-NS. Sfh allows pSfR27 to be transmitted to new bacterial hosts with minimal impact on host fitness, providing a 'stealth' function whose molecular mechanism has yet to be determined. The impact of the Sfh protein on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transcriptome was assessed and binding sites for Sfh in the Salmonella Typhimurium genome were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Sfh did not bind uniquely to any sites. Instead, it bound to a subset of the larger H-NS regulatory network. Analysis of Sfh binding in the absence of H-NS revealed a greatly expanded population of Sfh binding sites that included the majority of H-NS target genes. Furthermore, the presence of plasmid pSfR27 caused a decrease in H-NS interactions with the S. Typhimurium chromosome, suggesting that the A + T-rich DNA of this large plasmid acts to titrate H-NS, removing it from chromosomal locations. It is proposed that Sfh acts as a molecular backup for H-NS and that it provides its 'stealth' function by replacing H-NS on the chromosome, thus minimizing disturbances to the H-NS-DNA binding pattern in cells that acquire pSfR27.

  14. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans.

  15. Mutations and polymorphisms in the gene encoding regulatory subunit type 1-alpha of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A): an update.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Anélia; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Tsang, Kitman; Cazabat, Laure; Libé, Rosella; Remmers, Elaine; René-Corail, Fernande; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Clauser, Eric; Calender, Alain; Bertagna, Xavier; Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-04-01

    PRKAR1A encodes the regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (RIalpha) of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Inactivating PRKAR1A mutations are known to be responsible for the multiple neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome Carney complex (CNC). To date, at least 117 pathogenic variants in PRKAR1A have been identified (online database: http://prkar1a.nichd.nih.gov). The majority are subject to nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD), leading to RIalpha haploinsufficiency and, as a result, activated cAMP signaling. Recently, it became apparent that CNC may be caused not only by RIalpha haploinsufficiency, but also by the expression of altered RIalpha protein, as proven by analysis of expressed mutations in the gene, consisting of amino acid substitutions and in-frame genetic alterations. In addition, a new subgroup of mutations that potentially escape NMD and result in CNC through altered (rather than missing) protein has been analyzed-these are frame-shifts in the 3' end of the coding sequence that shift the stop codon downstream of the normal one. The mutation detection rate in CNC patients is recently estimated at above 60%; PRKAR1A mutation-negative CNC patients are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. In this report, we present a comprehensive analysis of all presently known PRKAR1A sequence variations and discuss their molecular context and clinical phenotype. PMID:20358582

  16. Identification of the Sensory Neuron Specific Regulatory Region for the Mouse Gene Encoding the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are critical membrane components that participate in the electrical activity of excitable cells. The type one VGSC family includes the tetrodotoxin insensitive sodium channel, Nav1.8, encoded by the Scn10a gene. Nav1.8 expression is restricted to small and medium diameter nociceptive sensory neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and cranial sensory ganglia. In order to understand the stringent transcriptional regulation of the Scn10a gene, the sensory neuron specific promoter was functionally identified. While identifying the mRNA 5’ end, alternative splicing within the 5’ UTR was observed to create heterogeneity in the RNA transcript. Four kilobases of upstream genomic DNA was cloned and the presence of tissue specific promoter activity was tested by microinjection and adenoviral infection of fluorescent protein reporter constructs into primary mouse and rat neurons, and cell lines. The region contained many putative transcription factor binding sites and strong homology with the predicted rat ortholog. Homology to the predicted human ortholog was limited to the proximal end and several conserved cis elements were noted. Two regulatory modules were identified by microinjection of reporter constructs into DRG and superior cervical ganglia neurons: a neuron specific proximal promoter region between −1.6 and −0.2kb of the transcription start site cluster, and a distal sensory neuron switch region beyond −1.6kb that restricted fluorescent protein expression to a subset of primary sensory neurons. PMID:18466327

  17. Transcriptional Organization and Regulatory Elements of a Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP Operon Encoding a LysR-Type Regulator and a Putative Solute Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Platero, Ana Isabel; García-Jaramillo, Manuel; Santero, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The atzS-atzT-atzU-atzV-atzW gene cluster of the Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP atrazine-degradative plasmid pADP-1, which carries genes for an outer membrane protein and the components of a putative ABC-type solute transporter, is located downstream from atzR, which encodes the LysR-type transcriptional regulator of the cyanuric acid-degradative operon atzDEF. Here we describe the transcriptional organization of these genes. Our results show that all six genes are cotranscribed from the PatzR promoter to form the atzRSTUVW operon. A second, stronger promoter, PatzT, is found within atzS and directs transcription of the four distal genes. PatzT is σN dependent, activated by NtrC in response to nitrogen limitation with the aid of IHF, and repressed by AtzR. A combination of in vivo mutational analysis and primer extension allowed us to locate the PatzT promoter and map the transcriptional start site. Similarly, we used deletion and point mutation analyses, along with in vivo expression studies and in vitro binding assays, to locate the NtrC, IHF, and AtzR binding sites and address their functionality. Our results suggest a regulatory model in which NtrC activates PatzT transcription via DNA looping, while AtzR acts as an antiactivator that diminishes expression by interfering with the activation process. PMID:23042989

  18. Plant sterols in food: No consensus in guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Weingärtner, Oliver; Baber, Ronny; Teupser, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Plant sterols are used as food supplement to reduce serum cholesterol levels. • Reductions in serum cholesterol levels are achieved at the expense of increased plant sterol levels. • The potential atherogenicity of increased serum plant sterol levels is controversially debated. • This dispute is reflected by different guideline recommendations in regard to plant sterols. - Abstract: Plant sterols are supplemented in foods to reduce cardiovascular risk. Randomized controlled trials show 2 g of plant sterols a day reduce serum cholesterol by about 10%. This reduction in serum cholesterol levels is achieved at the expense of increased serum plant sterol levels. Findings in patients with phytosterolemia, in experimental studies and in clinical trials have lead to speculations that plant sterols might be atherogenic. In view of emerging safety issues the role of plant sterols in cardiovascular prevention has become controversial. This review reflects the ongoing controversial scientific debate and points out recent developments in guidelines of national and international societies.

  19. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J.; Kasson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol’s ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  20. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  1. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  2. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Fabio R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and non-classic (all others) NHRs; 17 non-classic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and non-sterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and non-classic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review we summarize the roles of non-classic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  3. Sterol composition of Bulgarian soya and corn oils.

    PubMed

    Milkova, T; Popov, A; Selva, A; Vettori, U

    1977-01-01

    The free sterols, the sterol esters and the sterol glycosides of the raw soya and corn oils as well as those of the technical lecithin and the deodorizer distillated of the latter oils were isolated by preparative TLC. The composition of each of the isolated sterol derivatives was determined by GLC and MS. Sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and an unknown sterol with a molecular weight of 428 are contained in almost all of the examined fractions of the soya oil and its refinement byproducts. Dehydrocampesterol is present in the free sterols of the raw soya oil and the soya lecithin. Stigmasterol is contained in the soya deodorizer distillate in high amounts. It was established that cholesterol was present in the sterol esters of the raw soya oil high amounts. Delta7-stigmastenol occurs only in the sterol esters of the latter oil. Sitosterol, campesterol and stimgasterol are the main components of all sterol fractions of the corn oil and its refinement products. Dehydrocampesterol and unknown sterols with molecular weights of 428 are present in the free sterols of the raw corn oil. Some sterol glycosides of the soya and corn lecithin are esterified with the same major fatty acid components of the glycerides, palmitic acid being the main one. The fatty acid compositon of sterol esters of the raw soya and corn oil roughly corresponds to the fatty acid composition of oils. PMID:558512

  4. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam; Feizi, Amir; Buskov, Steen; Hallström, Björn M; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype.

  5. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam; Feizi, Amir; Buskov, Steen; Hallström, Björn M; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype. PMID:25278608

  6. Same host-plant, different sterols: variation in sterol metabolism in an insect herbivore community.

    PubMed

    Janson, Eric M; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T; Abbot, Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Insects lack the ability to synthesize sterols de novo, which are required as cell membrane inserts and as precursors for steroid hormones. Herbivorous insects typically utilize cholesterol as their primary sterol. However, plants rarely contain cholesterol, and herbivorous insects must, therefore, produce cholesterol by metabolizing plant sterols. Previous studies have shown that insects generally display diversity in phytosterol metabolism. Despite the biological importance of sterols, there has been no investigation of their metabolism in a naturally occurring herbivorous insect community. Therefore, we determined the neutral sterol profile of Solidago altissima L., six taxonomically and ecologically diverse herbivorous insect associates, and the fungal symbiont of one herbivore. Our results demonstrated that S. altissima contained Delta(7)-sterols (spinasterol, 22-dihydrospinasterol, avenasterol, and 24-epifungisterol), and that 85% of the sterol pool existed in a conjugated form. Despite feeding on a shared host plant, we observed significant variation among herbivores in terms of their qualitative tissue sterol profiles and significant variation in the cholesterol content. Cholesterol was absent in two dipteran gall-formers and present at extremely low levels in a beetle. Cholesterol content was highly variable in three hemipteran phloem feeders; even species of the same genus showed substantial differences in their cholesterol contents. The fungal ectosymbiont of a dipteran gall former contained primarily ergosterol and two ergosterol precursors. The larvae and pupae of the symbiotic gall-former lacked phytosterols, phytosterol metabolites, or cholesterol, instead containing an ergosterol metabolite in addition to unmetabolized ergosterol and erogsterol precursors, thus demonstrating the crucial role that a fungal symbiont plays in their nutritional ecology. These data are discussed in the context of sterol physiology and metabolism in insects, and the

  7. Enzyme mechanisms for sterol C-methylations.

    PubMed

    Nes, W David

    2003-09-01

    The mechanisms by which sterol methyl transferases (SMT) transform olefins into structurally different C-methylated products are complex, prompting over 50 years of intense research. Recent enzymological studies, together with the latest discoveries in the fossil record, functional analyses and gene cloning, establish new insights into the enzymatic mechanisms of sterol C-methylation and form a basis for understanding regulation and evolution of the sterol pathway. These studies suggest that SMTs, originated shortly after life appeared on planet earth. SMTs, including those which ultimately give rise to 24 alpha- and 24 beta-alkyl sterols, align the si(beta)-face pi-electrons of the Delta(24)-double bond with the S-methyl group of AdoMet relative to a set of deprotonation bases in the active site. From the orientation of the conformationally flexible side chain in the SMT Michaelis complex, it has been found that either a single product is formed or cationic intermediates are partitioned into multiple olefins. The product structure and stereochemistry of SMT action is phylogenetically distinct and physiologically significant. SMTs control phytosterol homeostasis and their activity is subject to feedback regulation by specific sterol inserts in the membrane. A unified conceptual framework has been formulated in the steric-electric plug model that posits SMT substrate acceptability on the generation of single or double 24-alkylated side chains, which is the basis for binding order, stereospecificity and product diversity in this class of AdoMet-dependent methyl transferase enzymes. The focus of this review is the mechanism of the C-methylation process which, as discussed, can be altered by point mutations in the enzyme to direct the shape of sterol structure to optimize function.

  8. Effect of the feeding system on the fatty acid composition, expression of the Δ9-desaturase, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, Gamma, and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 genes in the semitendinous muscle of light lambs of the Rasa Aragonesa breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are receiving increasing attention because of their beneficial effects on human health, with milk and meat products derived from ruminants as important sources of CLA in the human diet. SCD gene is responsible for some of the variation in CLA concentration in adipose tissues, and PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 genes are regulator of SCD gene. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the feeding system on fatty acid composition, CLA content and relative gene expression of Δ9-desaturase (SCD), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, (PPARα) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP1) in Rasa Aragonesa light lambs in semitendinous muscle. Forty-four single-born male lambs were used to evaluate the effect of the feeding system, varying on an intensity gradient according to the use of concentrates: 1. grazing alfalfa, 2. grazing alfalfa with a supplement for lambs, 3. indoor lambs with grazing ewes and 4. drylot. Results Both grazing systems resulted in a higher concentration of vaccenic acid (VA), CLA, CLA/VA acid ratio, and a lower oleic content, oleic acid (C18:1)/stearic acid (C18:0) ratio, PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio and SCD expression compared to other diets. In addition feeding system affected the fatty acid composition and SCD expression, possibly due to CLA concentration or the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio. Both expression of the SCD gene and the feeding system were important factors affecting CLA concentration in the animal's semitendinous muscle. PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 expression seemed to be unaffected by the feeding system. Although no significant results were found, PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 showed similar expression pattern as SCD. Moreover, the correlation results between SCD expression and PPARγ (p < 0.01), as well as SREBP1 (p < 0.01) expression, may suggest that these genes were affecting SCD expression in a different way. Conclusions

  9. Deficiency in the Lipid Exporter ABCA1 Impairs Retrograde Sterol Movement and Disrupts Sterol Sensing at the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Rogers, Maximillian A; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Chang, Catherine C Y; Ishigami, Masato; Kishimoto, Takuma; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Furukawa, Koichi; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2015-09-25

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis involves sterol sensing at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and sterol export from the plasma membrane (PM). Sterol sensing at the ER requires efficient sterol delivery from the PM; however, the macromolecules that facilitate retrograde sterol transport at the PM have not been identified. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol and phospholipid export to apolipoprotein A-I for the assembly of high density lipoprotein (HDL). Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease, a familial HDL deficiency. Several lines of clinical and experimental evidence suggest a second function of ABCA1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in addition to mediating cholesterol efflux. Here, we report the unexpected finding that ABCA1 also plays a key role in facilitating retrograde sterol transport from the PM to the ER for sterol sensing. Deficiency in ABCA1 delays sterol esterification at the ER and activates the SREBP-2 cleavage pathway. The intrinsic ATPase activity in ABCA1 is required to facilitate retrograde sterol transport. ABCA1 deficiency causes alternation of PM composition and hampers a clathrin-independent endocytic activity that is required for ER sterol sensing. Our finding identifies ABCA1 as a key macromolecule facilitating bidirectional sterol movement at the PM and shows that ABCA1 controls retrograde sterol transport by modulating a certain clathrin-independent endocytic process.

  10. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and nonclassic (all others) NHRs; 17 nonclassic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and nonsterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and nonclassic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the roles of nonclassic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system.

  11. Regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and sterol uptake in a sterol-auxotrophic yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, R T; Parks, L W

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition of sterol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sterol auxotroph FY3 (alpha hem1 erg7 ura) by delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is dependent on the ability of the organism to synthesize heme from ALA. Sterol-depleted cells not exposed to ALA or strain PFY3 cells, with a double heme mutation, exposed to ALA did not exhibit inhibition of sterol uptake. Addition of ALA to sterol-depleted FY3 stimulated production of a high endogenous concentration of 2,3-oxidosqualene (25.55 micrograms mg-1 [dry weight]) at 24 h, whereas FY3 not exposed to ALA or PFY3 exposed to ALA did not accumulate 2,3-oxidosqualene. The high concentration of 2,3-oxidosqualene in FY3 with ALA decreased, and 2,3;22,23-dioxidosqualene increased to a very high level. The elevation of 2,3-oxidosqualene by ALA was correlated with a fivefold increase in the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34). The enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase was prevented by cycloheximide but not chloramphenicol and was dependent on a fermentative energy source. Inhibition of sterol uptake could not be attributed to 2,3-oxidosqualene or 2,3;22,23-dioxidosqualene but was due to a nonsaturating level of ergosterol produced as a consequence of heme competency through a leaky erg7 mutation. PMID:3301810

  12. Steroleosin, a Sterol-Binding Dehydrogenase in Seed Oil Bodies1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Jen; Tai, Sorgan S.K.; Peng, Chi-Chung; Tzen, Jason T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Besides abundant oleosin, three minor proteins, Sop 1, 2, and 3, are present in sesame (Sesamum indicum) oil bodies. The gene encoding Sop1, named caleosin for its calcium-binding capacity, has recently been cloned. In this study, Sop2 gene was obtained by immunoscreening, and it was subsequently confirmed by amino acid partial sequencing and immunological recognition of its overexpressed protein in Escherichia coli. Immunological cross recognition implies that Sop2 exists in seed oil bodies of diverse species. Along with oleosin and caleosin genes, Sop2 gene was transcribed in maturing seeds where oil bodies are actively assembled. Sequence analysis reveals that Sop2, tentatively named steroleosin, possesses a hydrophobic anchoring segment preceding a soluble domain homologous to sterol-binding dehydrogenases/reductases involved in signal transduction in diverse organisms. Three-dimensional structure of the soluble domain was predicted via homology modeling. The structure forms a seven-stranded parallel β-sheet with the active site, S-(12X)-Y-(3X)-K, between an NADPH and a sterol-binding subdomain. Sterol-coupling dehydrogenase activity was demonstrated in the overexpressed soluble domain of steroleosin as well as in purified oil bodies. Southern hybridization suggests that one steroleosin gene and certain homologous genes may be present in the sesame genome. Comparably, eight hypothetical steroleosin-like proteins are present in the Arabidopsis genome with a conserved NADPH-binding subdomain, but a divergent sterol-binding subdomain. It is indicated that steroleosin-like proteins may represent a class of dehydrogenases/reductases that are involved in plant signal transduction regulated by various sterols. PMID:11950969

  13. Severe facial clefting in Insig-deficient mouse embryos caused by sterol accumulation and reversed by lovastatin

    PubMed Central

    Engelking, Luke J.; Evers, Bret M.; Richardson, James A.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Liang, Guosheng

    2006-01-01

    Insig-1 and Insig-2 are regulatory proteins that restrict the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway by preventing proteolytic activation of SREBPs and by enhancing degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. Here, we created Insig–double-knockout (Insig-DKO) mice that are homozygous for null mutations in Insig-1 and Insig-2. After 18.5 days of development, 96% of Insig-DKO embryos had defects in midline facial development, ranging from cleft palate (52%) to complete cleft face (44%). Middle and inner ear structures were abnormal, but teeth and skeletons were normal. The animals were lethargic and runted; they died within 1 day of birth. The livers and heads of Insig-DKO embryos overproduced sterols, causing a marked buildup of sterol intermediates. Treatment of pregnant mice with the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin reduced sterol synthesis in Insig-DKO embryos and reduced the pre-cholesterol intermediates. This treatment ameliorated the clefting syndrome so that 54% of Insig-DKO mice had normal faces, and only 7% had cleft faces. We conclude that buildup of pre-cholesterol sterol intermediates interferes with midline fusion of facial structures in mice. These findings have implications for the pathogenesis of the cleft palate component of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and other human malformation syndromes in which mutations in enzymes catalyzing steps in cholesterol biosynthesis produce a buildup of sterol intermediates. PMID:16955138

  14. Cloning and Characterization of the Genes Encoding a Cytochrome P450 (PipA) Involved in Piperidine and Pyrrolidine Utilization and Its Regulatory Protein (PipR) in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155

    PubMed Central

    Poupin, Pascal; Ducrocq, Véronique; Hallier-Soulier, Sylvie; Truffaut, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 enabled the isolation of a mutant strain (called LGM1) altered in the regulation of piperidine and pyrrolidine utilization. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene inactivated in mutant LGM1 was determined from the wild-type strain. This gene (pipR) encoded a member of the GntR family of bacterial regulatory proteins. An insertion element (IS1096), previously described for M. smegmatis, was detected downstream of the gene pipR. Three additional open reading frames were found downstream of IS1096. The first open reading frame (pipA) appeared to encode a protein identified as a cytochrome P450 enzyme. This gene is the first member of a new family, CYP151. By a gene replacement experiment, it was demonstrated that the cytochrome P450 pipA gene is required for piperidine and pyrrolidine utilization in M. smegmatis mc2155. Genes homologous to pipA were detected by hybridization in several, previously isolated, morpholine-degrading mycobacterial strains. A gene encoding a putative [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin (orf1) and a truncated gene encoding a putative glutamine synthetase (orf2′) were found downstream of pipA. PMID:10348853

  15. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  16. Functional cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA encoding cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase.

    PubMed

    Lovato, M A; Hart, E A; Segura, M J; Giner, J L; Matsuda, S P

    2000-05-01

    Plants and certain protists use cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase (EC ) to convert pentacyclic cyclopropyl sterols to conventional tetracyclic sterols. We used a novel complementation strategy to clone a cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase cDNA. Expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana cycloartenol synthase cDNA in a yeast lanosterol synthase mutant provided a sterol auxotroph that could be genetically complemented with the isomerase. We transformed this yeast strain with an Arabidopsis yeast expression library and selected sterol prototrophs to obtain a strain that accumulated biosynthetic ergosterol. The novel phenotype was conferred by an Arabidopsis cDNA that potentially encodes a 36-kDa protein. We expressed this cDNA (CPI1) in Escherichia coli and showed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that extracts from this strain isomerized cycloeucalenol to obtusifoliol in vitro. The cDNA will be useful for obtaining heterologously expressed protein for catalytic studies and elucidating the in vivo roles of cyclopropyl sterols.

  17. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs/SOATs): Enzymes with multiple sterols as substrates and as activators.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Maximillian A; Liu, Jay; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Cholesterol is essential to the growth and viability of cells. The metabolites of cholesterol include: steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids, all of which play important physiological functions. Cholesterol and its metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases, including: atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Thus, understanding how cells maintain the homeostasis of cholesterol and its metabolites is an important area of study. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs, also abbreviated as SOATs) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and play key roles in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. ACATs are most unusual enzymes because (i) they metabolize diverse substrates including both sterols and certain steroids; (ii) they contain two different binding sites for steroidal molecules. In mammals, there are two ACAT genes that encode two different enzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2. Both are allosteric enzymes that can be activated by a variety of sterols. In addition to cholesterol, other sterols that possess the 3-beta OH at C-3, including PREG, oxysterols (such as 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, etc.), and various plant sterols, could all be ACAT substrates. All sterols that possess the iso-octyl side chain including cholesterol, oxysterols, various plant sterols could all be activators of ACAT. PREG can only be an ACAT substrate because it lacks the iso-octyl side chain required to be an ACAT activator. The unnatural cholesterol analogs epi-cholesterol (with 3-alpha OH in steroid ring B) and ent-cholesterol (the mirror image of cholesterol) contain the iso-octyl side chain but do not have the 3-beta OH at C-3. Thus, they can only serve as activators and cannot serve as substrates. Thus, within the ACAT holoenzyme, there are site(s) that bind sterol as substrate and site(s) that bind sterol as activator; these sites are distinct from each other. These features form

  18. Distribution of sterols in the fungi. I - Fungal spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Laseter, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Mass spectrometry was used to examine freely extractable sterols from spores of several species of fungi. Ergosterol was the most common sterol produced by any individual species, but it was completely absent from two species belonging to apparently distantly related groups of fungi: the aquatic Phycomycetes and the rust fungi. This fact could have taxonomic or phylogenetic implications. The use of glass capillary columns in the resolution of the sterols is shown to eliminate some of the difficulty inherent in this process.

  19. Mutations in the human sterol delta7-reductase gene at 11q12-13 cause Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, C A; Maslen, C; Kachilele-Linjewile, S; Lin, D; Linck, L M; Connor, W E; Steiner, R D; Porter, F D

    1998-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS; also known as "RSH syndrome" [MIM 270400]) is an autosomal recessive multiple malformation syndrome due to a defect in cholesterol biosynthesis. Children with SLOS have elevated serum 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) levels and typically have low serum cholesterol levels. On the basis of this biochemical abnormality, it has been proposed that mutations in the human sterol Delta7-reductase (7-DHC reductase; E.C.1.3.1.21) gene cause SLOS. However, one could also propose a defect in a gene that encodes a protein necessary for either the expression or normal function of sterol Delta7-reductase. We cloned cDNA encoding a human sterol Delta7-reductase (DHCR7) on the basis of its homology with the sterol Delta7-reductase from Arabidopsis thaliana, and we confirmed the enzymatic function of the human gene product by expression in SLOS fibroblasts. SLOS fibroblasts transfected with human sterol Delta7-reductase cDNA showed a significant reduction in 7-DHC levels, compared with those in SLOS fibroblasts transfected with the vector alone. Using radiation-hybrid mapping, we show that the DHCR7 gene is encoded at chromosome 11q12-13. To establish that defects in this gene cause SLOS, we sequenced cDNA clones from SLOS patients. In three unrelated patients we have identified four different mutant alleles. Our results demonstrate both that the cDNA that we have identified encodes the human sterol Delta7-reductase and that mutations in DHCR7 are responsible for at least some cases of SLOS. PMID:9634533

  20. The Cytochrome b5 dependent C-5(6) sterol desaturase DES5A from the endoplasmic reticulum of Tetrahymena thermophila complements ergosterol biosynthesis mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Poklepovich, Tomas J.; Rinaldi, Mauro A.; Tomazic, Mariela L.; Favale, Nicolas O.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.; Nudel, Clara B.; Nusblat, Alejandro D.

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a free-living ciliate with no exogenous sterol requirement. However, it can perform several modifications on externally added sterols including desaturation at C5(6), C7(8), and C22(23). Sterol desaturases in Tetrahymena are microsomal enzymes that require Cyt b5, Cyt b5 reductase, oxygen, and reduced NAD(P)H for their activity, and some of the genes encoding these functions have recently been identified. The DES5A gene encodes a C-5(6) sterol desaturase, as shown by gene knockout in Tetrahymena. To confirm and extend that result, and to develop new approaches to gene characterization in Tetrahymena, we have now, expressed DES5A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The DES5A gene was codon optimized and expressed in a yeast mutant, erg3Δ, which is disrupted for the gene encoding the S. cerevisiae C-5(6) sterol desaturase ERG3. The complemented strain was able to accumulate 74% of the wild type level of ergosterol, and also lost the hypersensitivity to cycloheximide associated with the lack of ERG3 function. C-5(6) sterol desaturases are expected to function at the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, a GFP-tagged copy of Des5Ap was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in both Tetrahymena and yeast. This work shows for the first time that both function and localization are conserved for a microsomal enzyme between ciliates and fungi, notwithstanding the enormous evolutionary distance between these lineages. The results suggest that heterologous expression of ciliate genes in S. cerevisiae provides a useful tool for the characterization of genes in Tetrahymena, including genes encoding membrane protein complexes. PMID:22982564

  1. Concentration of sterols of Porphyridium cruentum biomass at stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Yasar; Monteiro, Margarida; Koru, Edis; Bandarra, Narcisa

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate sterols content of Porphyridium cruentum batch cultured in laboratory at 18 degrees C and harvested in the stationary. The sterol distribution of this species is characterized by a predominance of cholesterol, with values as 199.0 mg 100 g(-1) freeze dry weight (92.2%). The second most important sterol was stigmasterol (4.9%) followed by beta-sitosterol (2.2%). Studied sterols give to this species a special importance in for being used in food as supplements/nutraceuticals (including aquaculture).

  2. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux.

  3. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  4. Analysis of the activity and regulon of the two-component regulatory system encoded by Cjj1484 and Cjj1483 of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease throughout the world and a frequent commensal in the intestinal tract of poultry and many other animals. For maintaining optimal growth and ability to colonize various hosts, C. jejuni depends upon two-component regulatory system...

  5. The product of the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX of Azotobacter vinelandii is functionally and structurally homologous to the uridylyltransferase encoded by glnD in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, A; Drummond, M; Bali, A; Blanco, G; Garcia, E; Bush, G; Kennedy, C; Merrick, M

    1991-01-01

    We sequenced the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX from Azotobacter vinelandii, mutations in which cause a Nif- phenotype, and found that it encodes a 105-kDa protein (NfrX), the N terminus of which is highly homologous to that of the uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme encoded by glnD in Escherichia coli. In vivo complementation experiments demonstrate that the glnD and nfrX products are functionally interchangeable. A vinelandii nfrX thus appears to encode a uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme, and in this paper we report the first sequence of such a protein. The Nif- phenotype of nfrX mutants can be suppressed by a second mutation in a recently identified nifL-like gene immediately upstream of nifA in A. vinelandii. NifL mediates nif regulation in response to the N status in A. vinelandii, presumably by inhibiting NifA activator function as occurs in Klebsiella pneumoniae; thus, one role of NfrX is to modify, either directly or indirectly, the activity of the nifL product. PMID:1683868

  6. The product of the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX of Azotobacter vinelandii is functionally and structurally homologous to the uridylyltransferase encoded by glnD in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Contreras, A; Drummond, M; Bali, A; Blanco, G; Garcia, E; Bush, G; Kennedy, C; Merrick, M

    1991-12-01

    We sequenced the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX from Azotobacter vinelandii, mutations in which cause a Nif- phenotype, and found that it encodes a 105-kDa protein (NfrX), the N terminus of which is highly homologous to that of the uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme encoded by glnD in Escherichia coli. In vivo complementation experiments demonstrate that the glnD and nfrX products are functionally interchangeable. A vinelandii nfrX thus appears to encode a uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme, and in this paper we report the first sequence of such a protein. The Nif- phenotype of nfrX mutants can be suppressed by a second mutation in a recently identified nifL-like gene immediately upstream of nifA in A. vinelandii. NifL mediates nif regulation in response to the N status in A. vinelandii, presumably by inhibiting NifA activator function as occurs in Klebsiella pneumoniae; thus, one role of NfrX is to modify, either directly or indirectly, the activity of the nifL product.

  7. Molecular Cloning of the Genes Encoding the PR55/Bβ/δ Regulatory Subunits for PP-2A and Analysis of Their Functions in Regulating Development of Goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Qiong; Xie, Si-Si; Liu, Wen-Bin; Xiao, Ya-Mei; Zeng, Xiao-Ming; Deng, Mi; Gong, Lili; Liu, Jin-Ping; Chen, Pei-Chao; Zhou, Jie; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Lv, Jia-Han; Yu, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Dao; Li, Chi; Peng, Yun-Lei; Liao, Gao-Peng; Liu, Yun; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The protein phosphatase-2A (PP-2A), one of the major phosphatases in eukaryotes, is a heterotrimer, consisting of a scaffold A subunit, a catalytic C subunit and a regulatory B subunit. Previous studies have shown that besides regulating specific PP-2A activity, various B subunits encoded by more than 16 different genes, may have other functions. To explore the possible roles of the regulatory subunits of PP-2A in vertebrate development, we have cloned the PR55/B family regulatory subunits: β and δ, analyzed their tissue specific and developmental expression patterns in Goldfish ( Carassius auratus). Our results revealed that the full-length cDNA for PR55/Bβ consists of 1940 bp with an open reading frame of 1332 nucleotides coding for a deduced protein of 443 amino acids. The full length PR55/Bδ cDNA is 2163 bp containing an open reading frame of 1347 nucleotides encoding a deduced protein of 448 amino acids. The two isoforms of PR55/B display high levels of sequence identity with their counterparts in other species. The PR55/Bβ mRNA and protein are detected in brain and heart. In contrast, the PR55/Bδ is expressed in all 9 tissues examined at both mRNA and protein levels. During development of goldfish, the mRNAs for PR55/Bβ and PR55/Bδ show distinct patterns. At the protein level, PR55/Bδ is expressed at all developmental stages examined, suggesting its important role in regulating goldfish development. Expression of the PR55/Bδ anti-sense RNA leads to significant downregulation of PR55/Bδ proteins and caused severe abnormality in goldfish trunk and eye development. Together, our results suggested that PR55/Bδ plays an important role in governing normal trunk and eye formation during goldfish development.

  8. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments.

  9. Biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sánchez, Isvett J; Ortega-López, Jaime; del Carmen Montes-Horcasitas, María; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2002-12-01

    Pectin administered to Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures, was found to increase the production of triterpene acids (ursolic and oleanolic acid), however, neither growth nor sterol accumulation were affected. Cell cultures showed that pectin treatment caused a rapid threefold increase in the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of C(5) and C(30 )isoprenoid, such as isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and squalene synthase. The activity of a farnesyl diphosphatase, which could divert the flux of farnesyl diphosphate to farnesol, was two times lower in elicited than in control cells. Elicited cells also transformed more rapidly a higher percentage of [5-(3)H]mevalonic acid into triterpene acids. Interestingly, addition of terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase, to elicited cell cultures inhibited sterol accumulation while triterpene production was not inhibited. These results suggest that in U. tomentosa cells, both the previously mentioned enzymes and those involved in squalene 2,3-oxide formation play an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes.

  10. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  11. Sterol evolution and the physics of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M.; Thewalt, J.; Miao, L.; Ipsen, J. H.; Bloom, M.; Zuckermann, M. J.; Mouritsen, O. G.

    2000-11-01

    Sterols are important molecular components of the plasma membranes of eucaryotic cells. Using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with statistical mechanical modelling, we present a unifying picture of how the evolution-engineered differences in molecular chemistry between cholesterol and its precursor lanosterol are manifested in the physical properties of model membranes in terms of molecular order and phase equilibria. Cholesterol optimizes the stability of a particular membrane phase, the liquid-ordered phase, that is a liquid and at the same time exhibits high molecular conformational order.

  12. Flanking regulatory sequences of the locus encoding the murine GDNF receptor, c-ret, directs lac Z (beta-galactosidase) expression in developing somatosensory system.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, M; Waxman, S G; Wood, J N; Pachnis, V

    2001-11-01

    RET forms the catalytic component within the receptor complex that transmits signals from the GDNF family of neurotrophic factors. To study the mechanisms regulating the cell-type specific expression of this gene, we have cloned and characterised the murine c-ret locus. A cosmid contig comprising approximately 60 kb of the mouse genome encompassing the entire structural gene and flanking sequences have been isolated and the transcription initiation site identified and promoter characterised. The murine c-ret promoter lacks a TATA initiation motif and has GC enriched DNA sequences reminiscent of CpG islands. Analysis of transgenic mice lines bearing the Lac Z (beta-galactosidase) reporter gene under the control of 5' flanking sequences show modularity in the organisation of cis-regulatory domains within the locus. Cloned 5' flanking sequences comprise a distal regulatory domain directing Lac Z expression at the primitive streak, lateral mesoderm and facial ganglia and a proximal sensory neurones specific regulatory domain inducing Lac Z expression primarily within the developing somatosensory system. The spatial and temporal progression of transgene expression precisely recapitulates endogenous gene expression in developing sensory ganglia including its induction in postnatal Isolectin B4 binding nociceptive neurones. PMID:11747074

  13. A Reappraisal of the Mechanism by Which Plant Sterols Promote Neutral Sterol Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brufau, Gemma; Kuipers, Folkert; Lin, Yuguang; Trautwein, Elke A.; Groen, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary plant sterols (PS) reduce serum total and LDL-cholesterol in hyperlipidemic animal models and in humans. This hypocholesterolemic effect is generally ascribed to inhibition of cholesterol absorption. However, whether this effect fully explains the reported strong induction of neutral sterol excretion upon plant sterol feeding is not known. Recent data demonstrate that the intestine directly mediates plasma cholesterol excretion into feces, i.e., without involvement of the hepato-biliary route. Objective Aim of this study was to determine whether stimulation of fecal neutral sterol loss during PS feeding is (partly) explained by increased intestinal cholesterol excretion and to assess the role of the cholesterol transporter Abcg5/Abcg8 herein. Methods and Results Wild-type mice were fed a control diet or diets enriched with increasing amounts of PS (1%, 2%, 4% or 8%, wt/wt) for two weeks. In addition, Abcg5-/- mice were fed either control or 8% PS diet. PS feeding resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of fractional cholesterol absorption (∼2–7-fold reduction) in wild-type mice and ∼80% reduction in Abcg5-/- mice. Furthermore, PS feeding led to a strong, dose-independent induction of neutral sterol excretion (3.4-fold in wild-types and 2.7-fold in Abcg5-/- mice) without changes in biliary cholesterol secretion. It was calculated that PS feeding stimulated intestinal cholesterol excretion by ∼500% in wild-type mice and by ∼250% in Abcg5-/-. Conclusions Our data indicate that in mice the cholesterol-lowering effects of PS are to a large extent attributable to stimulation of intestinal, non-bile derived, cholesterol excretion. The Abcg5/Abcg8 heterodimer is involved in facilitating this PS-induced flux of cholesterol. PMID:21738715

  14. STEROLS AS BIOMARKERS IN GYMNODINIUM BREVE DISTRIBUTION IN DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of marine microalgae has been shown to be a chemotaxonomic property potentially of value in distinguishing members of different algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae display sterol compositions ranging from as few as two (cholesterol ...

  15. Composition of Plant Sterols and Stanols in Supplemented Food Products.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    All fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant materials contain small amounts of plant sterols, which are essential for the function of the biological membranes in living cells. The average human consumption of plant sterols has been estimated to be about 150-350 mg/day and trace amounts of stanols (which are defined as saturated sterols such as sitostanol), but this number varies regionally and is higher for vegetarians. When consumed in the diet, plant sterols reduce the levels of serum cholesterol. In 1995 the first functional food product, Benecol spread (enriched in plant stanol fatty acid esters), was developed by Raisio and marketed, first in Finland and then globally. Since then many other functional food products have been developed and are now available globally. In addition to stanol esters, other functional food products contain plant sterol esters and/or free (unesterified) plant sterols and stanols. In essentially all of the current functional foods that are enriched in sterols and stanols, the feedstock from which the sterols and stanols are obtained is either tall oil (a byproduct/coproduct of the pulping of pine wood) or vegetable oil deodorizer distillate (a byproduct/coproduct of the refining of vegetable oils).

  16. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs/SOATs): enzymes with multiple sterols as substrates and as activators

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Maximillian A.; Liu, Jay; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C.Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential to the growth and viability of cells. The metabolites of cholesterol include: steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids, all of which play important physiological functions. Cholesterol and its metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases, including: atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Thus, understanding how cells maintain the homeostasis of cholesterol and its metabolites is an important area of study. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs, also abbreviated as SOATs) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and play key roles in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. ACATs are most unusual enzymes because (i) they metabolize diverse substrates including both sterols and certain steroids; (ii) they contain two different binding sites for steroidal molecules. In mammals, there are two ACAT genes that encode two different enzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2. Both are allosteric enzymes that can be activated by a variety of sterols. In addition to cholesterol, other sterols that possess the 3-beta OH at C-3, including PREG, oxysterols (such as 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, etc.), and various plant sterols, could all be ACAT substrates. All sterols that possess the iso-octyl side chain including cholesterol, oxysterols, various plant sterols could all be activators of ACAT. PREG can only be an ACAT substrate because it lacks the isooctyl side chain required to be an ACAT activator. The unnatural cholesterol analogs epi-cholesterol (with 3-alpha OH in steroid ring B) and ent-cholesterol (the mirror image of cholesterol) contain the iso-octyl side chain but do not have the 3-beta OH at C-3. Thus, they can only serve as activators and cannot serve as substrates. Thus, within the ACAT holoenzyme, there are site(s) that bind sterol as substrate and site(s) that bind sterol as activator; these sites are distinct from each other. These features form

  17. Origin assessment of EV olive oils by esterified sterols analysis.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Rosa; Giuliano, Salvatore; Gulotta, Eleonora; Monfreda, Maria; Presti, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    In this study extra virgin olive oils of Italian and non-Italian origin (from Spain, Tunisia and blends of EU origin) were differentiated by GC-FID analysis of sterols and esterified sterols followed by chemometric tools. PCA allowed to highlight the high significance of esterified sterols to characterise extra virgin olive oils in relation to their origin. SIMCA provided a sensitivity and specificity of 94.39% and 91.59% respectively; furthermore, an external set of 54 extra virgin olive oils bearing a designation of Italian origin on the labelling was tested by SIMCA. Prediction results were also compared with organoleptic assessment. Finally, the poor correlation found between ethylesters and esterified sterols allowed to hazard the guess, worthy of further investigations, that esterified sterols may prove to be promising in studies of geographical discrimination: indeed they appear to be independent of those factors causing the formation of ethyl esters and related to olive oil production.

  18. Diversity of Sterol Composition in Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Mezni, Faten; Labidi, Arbia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Martine, Lucy; Berdeaux, Olivier; Khaldi, Abdelhamid

    2016-05-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. seed oil is used in some Mediterranean forest area for culinary and medicinal purposes. In this study, we aim to examine, for the first time, the effect of growing area on sterol content of Pistacia lentiscus seed oil. Fruits were harvested from 13 different sites located in northern and central Tunisia. Gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to quantify sterols and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify them. The major sterol identified was β-sitosterol with a value ranging from 854.12 to 1224.09 mg/kg of oil, thus making up more than 54% of the total sterols. The other two main sterols were cycloartenol (11%) and 24-methylene-cycloartenol (5%). Statistical results revealed that growing location significantly (P < 0.001) affected phytosterol levels in these oils. PMID:27060921

  19. Fecal neutral sterols in omnivorous and vegetarian women.

    PubMed

    Korpela, J T; Adlercreutz, H

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a vegetarian diet on human fecal neutral sterol excretion. Free and esterified fecal neutral sterols were analyzed by capillary gas-chromatography in healthy North-American white women who were consuming either a mixed Western diet (n = 19) or a vegetarian diet (n = 20). Vegetarians had lower mean concentrations of bacterial metabolites of cholesterol, coprostanol, and coprostanone, and their relative amounts of esterified neutral sterol metabolism in both populations. Most of the subjects in both groups excreted their neutral sterols mainly as metabolites. However, 25% of the omnivores and 21% of the vegetarians had exceptionally low amounts of these metabolites in their feces. The vegetarians in this study differed only slightly from omnivores with regard to intestinal bacterial metabolism of neutral sterols.

  20. Profiling and Metabolism of Sterols in the Weaver Ant Genus Oecophylla.

    PubMed

    Vidkjær, Nanna H; Jensen, Karl-Martin V; Gislum, René; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential to insects because they are vital for many biochemical processes, nevertheless insects cannot synthesize sterols but have to acquire them through their diet. Studies of sterols in ants are sparse and here the sterols of the weaver ant genus Oecophylla are identified for the first time. The sterol profile and the dietary sterols provided to a laboratory Oecophylla longinoda colony were analyzed. Most sterols originated from the diet, except one, which was probably formed via dealkylation in the ants and two sterols of fungal origin, which likely originate from hitherto unidentified endosymbionts responsible for supplying these two compounds. The sterol profile of a wild Oecophylla smaragdina colony was also investigated. Remarkable qualitative similarities were established between the two species despite the differences in diet, species, and origin. This may reflect a common sterol need/aversion in the weaver ants. Additionally, each individual caste of both species displayed unique sterol profiles.

  1. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  2. MtrR control of a transcriptional regulatory pathway in Neisseria meningitidis that influences expression of a gene (nadA) encoding a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Cloward, Jason M; Shafer, William M

    2013-01-01

    The surface-exposed NadA adhesin produced by a subset of capsular serogroup B strains of Neisseria meningitidis is currently being considered as a vaccine candidate to prevent invasive disease caused by a hypervirulent lineage of meningococci. Levels of NadA are known to be controlled by both transcriptional regulatory factors and a component of human saliva, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. Herein, we confirmed the capacity of a DNA-binding protein termed FarR to negatively control nadA expression. We also found that a known transcriptional regulator of farR in N. gonorrhoeae termed MtrR can have a negative regulatory impact on farR and nadA expression, especially when over-expressed. MtrR-mediated repression of nadA was found to be direct, and its binding to a target DNA sequence containing the nadA promoter influenced formation and/or stability of FarR::nadA complexes. The complexity of the multi-layered regulation of nadA uncovered during this investigation suggests that N. meningitidis modulates NadA adhesin protein levels for the purpose of interacting with host cells yet avoiding antibody directed against surface exposed epitopes.

  3. Biallelic truncating mutations in FMN2, encoding the actin-regulatory protein Formin 2, cause nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Law, Rosalind; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Jerber, Julie; Cai, Na; Abbasi, Ansar A; Zaki, Maha S; Mittal, Kirti; Gabriel, Stacey B; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Khan, Valeed; Nguyen, Maria; Ali, Ghazanfar; Copeland, Brett; Scott, Eric; Vasli, Nasim; Mikhailov, Anna; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Andrade, Danielle M; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major site of neuronal activity in the brain; they serve as the receiving point for neurotransmitters and undergo rapid activity-dependent morphological changes that correlate with learning and memory. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and next-generation sequencing in two consanguineous families affected by nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we identified truncating mutations in formin 2 (FMN2), encoding a protein that belongs to the formin family of actin cytoskeleton nucleation factors and is highly expressed in the maturing brain. We found that FMN2 localizes to punctae along dendrites and that germline inactivation of mouse Fmn2 resulted in animals with decreased spine density; such mice were previously demonstrated to have a conditioned fear-learning defect. Furthermore, patient neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells showed correlated decreased synaptic density. Thus, FMN2 mutations link intellectual disability either directly or indirectly to the regulation of actin-mediated synaptic spine density.

  4. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11)

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny A.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Dickens, Caroline; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F) to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL) for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P < 0.014–0.0006) upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11), consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen. PMID:25013815

  5. Encoding Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Describes problems in devising a Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) encoding format for dictionaries. Asserts that the high degree of structuring and compression of information are among the most complex text types treated in the TEI. Concludes that the source of some TEI problems lies in the design of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). (CFR)

  6. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  7. Sterols of Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg6 Knockout Mutant Expressing the Pneumocystis carinii S-Adenosylmethionine:Sterol C-24 Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Johnston, Laura Q; Nkinin, Stephenson W; Romero, Becky I; Giner, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS-associated lung pathogen Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus although Pneumocystis has several distinct features such as the absence of ergosterol, the major sterol of most fungi. The Pneumocystis carinii S-adenosylmethionine:sterol C24-methyltransferase (SAM:SMT) enzyme, coded by the erg6 gene, transfers either one or two methyl groups to the C-24 position of the sterol side chain producing both C28 and C29 24-alkylsterols in approximately the same proportions, whereas most fungal SAM:SMT transfer only one methyl group to the side chain. The sterol compositions of wild-type Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the erg6 knockout mutant (Δerg6), and Δerg6 expressing the P. carinii or the S. cerevisiae erg6 gene were analyzed by a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures to examine functional complementation in the yeast expression system. Detailed sterol analyses were obtained using high performance liquid chromatography and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). The P. carinii SAM:SMT in the Δerg6 restored its ability to produce the C28 sterol ergosterol as the major sterol, and also resulted in low levels of C29 sterols. This indicates that while the P. carinii SAM:SMT in the yeast Δerg6 cells was able to transfer a second methyl group to the side chain, the action of Δ(24(28)) -sterol reductase (coded by the erg4 gene) in the yeast cells prevented the formation and accumulation of as many C29 sterols as that found in P. carinii.

  8. Sterol Composition in Infant Formulas and Estimated Intake.

    PubMed

    Claumarchirant, Lorena; Matencio, Esther; Sanchez-Siles, Luis Manuel; Alegría, Amparo; Lagarda, María Jesús

    2015-08-19

    Sterol contents in infant formulas (IFs) from the European market were determined, and their intakes by infants between 0 and 6 months were evaluated. Total animal sterols (mg/100 mL) ranged from 1.71 to 5.46, cholesterol being the main animal sterol (1.46-5.1). In general, cholesterol and desmosterol were lower than the human milk (HM) values indicated by other authors. Total plant sterol (mg/100 mL) ranged from 3.1 to 5.0. β-Sitosterol, the most abundant phytosterol, ranged from 1.82 to 3.01, followed by campesterol (0.72-1.15), stigmasterol (0.27-0.53), and brassicasterol (0.14-0.28). Cholesterol intake (mg/day) ranged from 9 to 51 and plant sterol intake (mg/day) from 19 to 50. The sterol profile of IFs is highly dependent on the type and quantity of fats used in their formula. The use of bovine milk fat and milk fat globule membrane in the IFs can approximate the profile of animal sterols to those found in HM, though cholesterol intakes in breastfed infants are still higher than in formula-fed infants.

  9. Sterols of a contemporary lacustrine sediment. [in English postglacial lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, S. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for detailed sterol analyses of several depths (corresponding to between zero and about 150 yr in age) in a contemporary lacustrine sediment from a freshwater lake of postglacial origin in England. Delta 5-, delta 22-, and delta 5,22-sterols are identified along with 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanols as well as a C26 stanol with a C7 side chain. Solvent extraction yields carbon number distributions for the 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanol sediment constituents that parallel the corresponding delta 5-sterol distributions. The amounts of 5 alpha-stanols are found to exceed those of 5 beta-stanols in the sediment, and variations in the ratio of 5 alpha- to 5 beta-stanol between sediment samples from similar depths are shown to suggest an inhomogeneity of the sediment. It is found that the sterol composition of sediment cores varies markedly with depth, reflecting both the effects of a sterol hydrogenation process and a changing input to the sediment. It is concluded that C29 sterols, of probable higher-plant origin, predominate at lower sediment depths while C27 sterols, possibly derived from autochthonous sources, are more abundant in the surface sediment.

  10. Sterol Composition in Infant Formulas and Estimated Intake.

    PubMed

    Claumarchirant, Lorena; Matencio, Esther; Sanchez-Siles, Luis Manuel; Alegría, Amparo; Lagarda, María Jesús

    2015-08-19

    Sterol contents in infant formulas (IFs) from the European market were determined, and their intakes by infants between 0 and 6 months were evaluated. Total animal sterols (mg/100 mL) ranged from 1.71 to 5.46, cholesterol being the main animal sterol (1.46-5.1). In general, cholesterol and desmosterol were lower than the human milk (HM) values indicated by other authors. Total plant sterol (mg/100 mL) ranged from 3.1 to 5.0. β-Sitosterol, the most abundant phytosterol, ranged from 1.82 to 3.01, followed by campesterol (0.72-1.15), stigmasterol (0.27-0.53), and brassicasterol (0.14-0.28). Cholesterol intake (mg/day) ranged from 9 to 51 and plant sterol intake (mg/day) from 19 to 50. The sterol profile of IFs is highly dependent on the type and quantity of fats used in their formula. The use of bovine milk fat and milk fat globule membrane in the IFs can approximate the profile of animal sterols to those found in HM, though cholesterol intakes in breastfed infants are still higher than in formula-fed infants. PMID:26242905

  11. Fecal Sterol and Runoff Analysis for Nonpoint Source Tracking.

    PubMed

    Fahrenfeld, N L; Del Monaco, N; Coates, J T; Elzerman, A W

    2016-01-01

    Fecal pollution source identification is needed to quantify risk, target installation of source controls, and assess performance of best management practices in impaired surface waters. Sterol analysis is a chemical method for fecal source tracking that allows for differentiation between several fecal pollution sources. The objectives of this study were to use these chemical tracers for quantifying human fecal inputs in a mixed-land-use watershed without point sources of pollution and to determine the relationship between land use and sterol ratios. Fecal sterol analysis was performed on bed and suspended sediment from impaired streams. Human fecal signatures were found at sites with sewer overflow and septic inputs. Different sterol ratios used to indicate human fecal pollution varied in their sensitivity. Next, geospatial data was used to determine the runoff volumes associated with each land-use category in the watersheds. Fecal sterol ratios were compared between sampling locations and correlations were tested between ratio values and percentage of runoff for a given land-use category. Correlation was not observed between percentage of runoff from developed land and any of the five tested human-indicating sterol ratios in streambed sediments, confirming that human fecal inputs were not evenly distributed across the urban landscape. Several practical considerations for adopting this chemical method for microbial source tracking in small watersheds are discussed. Results indicate that sterol analysis is useful for identifying the location of human fecal nonpoint-source inputs. PMID:26828187

  12. Interaction of the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Transporter with Sterols.

    PubMed

    Clay, Adam T; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J

    2015-11-01

    The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) actively exports structurally diverse substrates from within the lipid bilayer, leading to multidrug resistance. Many aspects of Pgp function are altered by the phospholipid environment, but its interactions with sterols remain enigmatic. In this work, the functional interaction between purified Pgp and various sterols was investigated in detergent solution and proteoliposomes. Fluorescence studies showed that dehydroergosterol, cholestatrienol, and NBD-cholesterol interact intimately with Pgp, resulting in both quenching of protein Trp fluorescence and enhancement of sterol fluorescence. Kd values indicated binding affinities in the range of 3-9 μM. Collisional quenching experiments showed that Pgp-bound NBD-cholesterol was protected from the external milieu, resonance energy transfer was observed between Pgp Trp residues and the sterol, and the fluorescence emission of bound sterol was enhanced. These observations suggested an intimate interaction of bound sterols with the transporter at a protected nonpolar site. Cholesterol hemisuccinate altered the thermal unfolding of Pgp and greatly stabilized its basal ATPase activity in both a detergent solution and reconstituted proteoliposomes of certain phospholipids. Other sterols, including dehydroergosterol, did not stabilize the basal ATPase activity of detergent-solubilized Pgp, which suggests that this is not a generalized sterol effect. The phospholipid composition and cholesterol hemisuccinate content of Pgp proteoliposomes altered the basal ATPase and drug transport cycles differently. Sterols may interact with Pgp and modulate its structure and function by occupying part of the drug-binding pocket or by binding to putative consensus cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) motifs located within the transmembrane domains.

  13. Glycerol derivatives and sterols from Sargassum parvivesiculosum.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Huang, Jian-She; Xiao, Zhi-Hui; Wu, Jun; Long, Li-Juan

    2004-08-01

    Five glycerol derivatives (1-5) and three sterols (6-8) were isolated from the EtOH extraction of the brown alga of Sargassum parvivesiculosum. On the basis of spectroscopic methods, their structures were elucidated as 1,3-di-O-[2',2'-di-(p-phenylene) isopropylidene] glycerol (1), (2S)-1-O-heptatriacontanoyl glycerol (2), (2S)-1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(6-sulpho-alpha-D-quinovopyranosyl) glycerol (3), (2S)-1-O-palmitoyl glycerol (4), (2S)-1,3-di-(O-palmitoyl)-2-O-octadecanoyl glycerol (5), 24-ethylcholest-5,23Z-dien-3beta,28zeta-diol (6), 24-vinylcholest-5-en-24zeta-hydroperoxy (7), 24-ethylcholest-4,24(28)-dien-3beta-ol (8), respectively. Among them, 1 and 2 were new.

  14. Characterization of various promoter regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes and identification of duplicated ets (GGAA) motifs as an essential transcription regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Uchiumi, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Tanuma, Sei-ichi

    2010-05-15

    DNA helicases are important in the regulation of DNA transaction and thereby various cellular functions. In this study, we developed a cost-effective multiple DNA transfection assay with DEAE-dextran reagent and analyzed the promoter activities of the human DNA helicases. The 5'-flanking regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes were isolated and subcloned into luciferase (Luc) expression plasmids. They were coated onto 96-well plate and used for co-transfection with a renilla-Luc expression vector into various cells, and dual-Luc assays were performed. The profiles of promoter activities were dependent on cell lines used. Among these human DNA helicase genes, XPB, RecQL5, and RTEL promoters were activated during TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation. Interestingly, duplicated ets (GGAA) elements are commonly located around the transcription start sites of these genes. The duplicated GGAA motifs are also found in the promoters of DNA replication/repair synthesis factor genes including PARG, ATR, TERC, and Rb1. Mutation analyses suggested that the duplicated GGAA-motifs are necessary for the basal promoter activity in various cells and some of them positively respond to TPA in HL-60 cells. TPA-induced response of 44-bp in the RTEL promoter was attenuated by co-transfection of the PU.1 expression vector. These findings suggest that the duplicated ets motifs regulate DNA-repair associated gene expressions during macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells.

  15. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Márkus, Nóra M.; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F. S.; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C.; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T. Ian; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  16. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Nóra M; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F S; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T Ian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms.

  17. The Proprotein Convertase Encoded by amontillado (amon) Is Required in Drosophila Corpora Cardiaca Endocrine Cells Producing the Glucose Regulatory Hormone AKH

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Jeanne M.; Wegener, Christian; Bender, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Peptide hormones are potent signaling molecules that coordinate animal physiology, behavior, and development. A key step in activation of these peptide signals is their proteolytic processing from propeptide precursors by a family of proteases, the subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs). Here, we report the functional dissection of amontillado (amon), which encodes the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PC2 protein, using cell-type specific inactivation and rescue experiments, and we show that amon is required in the islet-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH)–producing cells that regulate sugar homeostasis. In Drosophila, AKH acts analogously to vertebrate glucagon to increase circulating sugar levels from energy stores, while insulin-like peptides (DILPs) act to decrease sugar levels. amon mutant larvae have significantly reduced hemolymph sugar levels, and thus phenocopy larvae where the AKH–producing cells in the corpora cardiaca have been ablated. Reduction of amon expression in these cells via cell-specific RNA inactivation also results in larvae with reduced sugar levels while expression of amon in AKH cells in an amon mutant background rescues hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia in larvae resulting from amon RNA inactivation in the AKH cells can be rescued by global expression of the akh gene. Finally, mass spectrometric profiling shows that the production of mature AKH is inhibited in amon mutants. Our data indicate that amon function in the AKH cells is necessary to maintain normal sugar homeostasis, that amon functions upstream of akh, and that loss of mature AKH is correlated with loss of amon activity. These observations indicate that the AKH propeptide is a proteolytic target of the amon proprotein convertase and provide evidence for a conserved role of PC2 in processing metabolic peptide hormones. PMID:20523747

  18. The proprotein convertase encoded by amontillado (amon) is required in Drosophila corpora cardiaca endocrine cells producing the glucose regulatory hormone AKH.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Jeanne M; Wegener, Christian; Bender, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Peptide hormones are potent signaling molecules that coordinate animal physiology, behavior, and development. A key step in activation of these peptide signals is their proteolytic processing from propeptide precursors by a family of proteases, the subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs). Here, we report the functional dissection of amontillado (amon), which encodes the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PC2 protein, using cell-type specific inactivation and rescue experiments, and we show that amon is required in the islet-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH)-producing cells that regulate sugar homeostasis. In Drosophila, AKH acts analogously to vertebrate glucagon to increase circulating sugar levels from energy stores, while insulin-like peptides (DILPs) act to decrease sugar levels. amon mutant larvae have significantly reduced hemolymph sugar levels, and thus phenocopy larvae where the AKH-producing cells in the corpora cardiaca have been ablated. Reduction of amon expression in these cells via cell-specific RNA inactivation also results in larvae with reduced sugar levels while expression of amon in AKH cells in an amon mutant background rescues hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia in larvae resulting from amon RNA inactivation in the AKH cells can be rescued by global expression of the akh gene. Finally, mass spectrometric profiling shows that the production of mature AKH is inhibited in amon mutants. Our data indicate that amon function in the AKH cells is necessary to maintain normal sugar homeostasis, that amon functions upstream of akh, and that loss of mature AKH is correlated with loss of amon activity. These observations indicate that the AKH propeptide is a proteolytic target of the amon proprotein convertase and provide evidence for a conserved role of PC2 in processing metabolic peptide hormones. PMID:20523747

  19. A Potential Regulatory Role for Intronic microRNA-338-3p for Its Host Gene Encoding Apoptosis-Associated Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Aron; Olde Loohuis, Nikkie F. M.; Wieczorek, Martha L.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Kolk, Sharon M.; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important gene regulators that are abundantly expressed in both the developing and adult mammalian brain. These non-coding gene transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes by binding to specific target mRNAs. Approximately one third of known miRNA genes are located within intronic regions of protein coding and non-coding regions, and previous studies have suggested a role for intronic miRNAs as negative feedback regulators of their host genes. In the present study, we monitored the dynamic gene expression changes of the intronic miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p and their host gene Apoptosis-associated Tyrosine Kinase (AATK) during the maturation of rat hippocampal neurons. This revealed an uncorrelated expression pattern of mature miR-338 strands with their host gene. Sequence analysis of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of rat AATK mRNA revealed the presence of two putative binding sites for miR-338-3p. Thus, miR-338-3p may have the capacity to modulate AATK mRNA levels in neurons. Transfection of miR-338-3p mimics into rat B35 neuroblastoma cells resulted in a significant decrease of AATK mRNA levels, while the transfection of synthetic miR-338-5p mimics did not alter AATK levels. Our results point to a possible molecular mechanism by which miR-338-3p participates in the regulation of its host gene by modulating the levels of AATK mRNA, a kinase which plays a role during differentiation, apoptosis and possibly in neuronal degeneration. PMID:22363537

  20. Phytoalexin-Deficient Mutants of Arabidopsis Reveal That Pad4 Encodes a Regulatory Factor and That Four Pad Genes Contribute to Downy Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, J.; Zook, M.; Mert, F.; Kagan, I.; Rogers, E. E.; Crute, I. R.; Holub, E. B.; Hammerschmidt, R.; Ausubel, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We are working to determine the role of the Arabidopsis phytoalexin, camalexin, in protecting the plant from pathogen attack by isolating phytoalexin-deficient (pad) mutants in the accession Columbia (Col-0) and examining their response to pathogens. Mutations in PAD1, PAD2, and PAD4 caused enhanced susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326 (PsmES4326), while mutations in PAD3 or PAD5 did not. Camalexin was not detected in any of the double mutants pad1-1 pad2-1, pad1-1 pad3-1 or pad2-1 pad3-1. Growth of PsmES4326 in pad1-1 pad2-1 was greater than that in pad1-1 or pad2-1 plants, while growth in pad1-1 pad3-1 and pad2-1 pad3-1 plants was similar to that in pad1-1 and pad2-1 plants, respectively. The pad4-1 mutation caused reduced camalexin synthesis in response to PsmES4326 infection, but not in response to Cochliobolus carbonum infection, indicating that PAD4 has a regulatory function. PAD1, PAD2, PAD3 and PAD4 are all required for resistance to the eukaryotic biotroph Peronospora parasitica. The pad4-1 mutation caused the most dramatic change, exhibiting full susceptibility to four of six Col-incompatible parasite isolates. Interestingly, each combination of double mutants between pad1-1, pad2-1 and pad3-1 exhibited additive shifts to moderate or full susceptibility to most of the isolates. PMID:9136026

  1. Use of Animal Models in Plant Sterol and Stanol Research.

    PubMed

    Solati, Zahra; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol-lowering properties of plant sterols were reported approximately six decades ago. However, over the past couple of decades we have learnt more about other cardiovascular benefits of regular consumption of plant sterols and/or plant stanols. In particular a series of animal studies has consistently reported that dietary plant sterols and/or plant stanols or their fatty acid esters can reduce atherogenesis to a different extent in different animal models. Such effects may be mediated not only through reductions in LDL cholesterol levels, but also through other mechanisms including anti-inflammatory effects. In this manuscript, various animal models including mice, rabbits, hamsters, and others which have been used to establish cardiovascular benefits of plant sterols are discussed. PMID:25942701

  2. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-01

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15m×0.25mm, 0.25μm film thickness, in a temperature program from 50°C for 1 min, then ramped at 15°C/min to 300°C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  3. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-23

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15mx0.25mm, 0.25{mu}m film thickness, in a temperature program from 50 deg. C for 1 min, then ramped at 15 deg. C/min to 300 deg. C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  4. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by oxygenated sterol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.I.; Bass, J.; Yachnin, S.

    1980-07-01

    When preincubated with certain oxygenated sterol compounds in lipoprotein-depleted serum (20% (vol/vol)), human polymorphonuclear leukocytes show inhibition of chemotaxis toward the synthetic dipeptide N-formylmethionylphenylalinine without alteration of random movement or loss of cell viability. These effects can occur at sterol concentrations as low as 6.25 ..mu..M and after as little as 5 min of preincubation, but they are increased at higher concentrations and longer preincubation times. The inhibition can be almost completely reversed by preincubation in lipoprotein-replete serum (human AB serum, 20% (vol/vol)) and may be partially corrected by addition of free cholesterol (0.125 mM) to the medium. These effects are unlikely to be due to inhibition of cellular sterol synthesis, competition for chemotaxin membrane binding sites, or deactivation of the leukocytes but they may be a consequence of insertion of the sterol molecule into the leukocyte plasma membranes.

  5. Sterol-dependent induction of plant defense responses by a microbe-associated molecular pattern from Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Sharfman, Miya; Bar, Maya; Schuster, Silvia; Leibman, Meirav; Avni, Adi

    2014-02-01

    Plant-microbe interactions involve numerous regulatory systems essential for plant defense against pathogens. An ethylene-inducing xylanase (Eix) of Trichoderma viride is a potent elicitor of plant defense responses in specific cultivars of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We demonstrate that tomato cyclopropyl isomerase (SlCPI), an enzyme involved in sterol biosynthesis, interacts with the LeEix2 receptor. Moreover, we examined the role of SlCPI in signaling during the LeEix/Eix defense response. We found that SlCPI is an important factor in the regulation of the induction of defense responses such as the hypersensitive response, ethylene biosynthesis, and the induction of pathogenesis-related protein expression in the case of LeEix/Eix. Our results also suggest that changes in the sterol composition reduce LeEix internalization, thereby attenuating the induction of plant defense responses. PMID:24351686

  6. Sterols in a unicellular relative of the metazoans.

    PubMed

    Kodner, Robin B; Summons, Roger E; Pearson, Ann; King, Nicole; Knoll, Andrew H

    2008-07-22

    Molecular clocks suggest that animals originated well before they first appear as macroscopic fossils, but geologic tests of these hypotheses have been elusive. A rare steroid hydrocarbon, 24-isopropylcholestane, has been hypothesized to be a biomarker for sponges or their immediate ancestors because of its relatively high abundance in pre-Ediacaran to Early Cambrian sedimentary rocks and oils. Biolipid precursors of this sterane have been reported to be prominent in several demosponges. Whether 24-isopropylcholestane can be interpreted as a sponge (and, hence, animal) biomarker, and so provide clues about early metazoan history, depends on an understanding of the distribution of sterol biosynthesis among animals and their protistan relatives. Accordingly, we characterized the sterol profile of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, a representative of the unicellular sister group of animals. M. brevicollis does not produce a candidate sterol precursor for 24-isopropylcholestane under our experimental growth conditions. It does, however, produce a number of other sterols, and comparative genomics confirms its biosynthetic potential to produce the full suite of compounds recovered. Consistent with the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates, the sterol profile and biosynthetic pathway of M. brevicollis display characteristics of both fungal and poriferan sterol biosynthesis. This is an example in which genomic and biochemical information have been used together to investigate the taxonomic specificity of a fossil biomarker.

  7. Fiber, intestinal sterols, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, C T; Gopalakrishna, G S; Nichols, B L

    1978-03-01

    It has been postulated that dietary fiber's protective effect against the development of colon cancer, diverticular disease, and atherosclerosis may be due to the adsorption and/or dilution of intestinal sterols such as bile acids and neural sterols and their bacterial metabolites by component(s) of fiber. Dietary fiber is made up of four major components-cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and pectin. There is evidence that hemicellulose and pectin may induce an increase in fecal bile acid excretion in man which may be accompanied by a decrease in serum cholesterol. Natural fibers, such as rolled oats, alfalfa, guar gum, and Bengal gram have been shown to have hypocholesterolemic properties of alfalfa, wheat straw, and some other fibers found considerable amounts of bile acids in vitro. On the other hand, wheat bran, oat hulls, and all the synthetic fibers tested bound only negligible amounts of bile acids under the same conditions. Vegetarians in the United States have lower plasma lipids and different plasma lipoprotein patterns than those of comparable control populations on regular mixed diet. They also have smaller daily fractional turnover rates of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid pool size. In addition, populations on a mixed Western diet, where the rate of large bowel cancer is high (North American, English, Scottish, etc.) degraded and excreted cholesterol and bile acid metabolites to a greater degree than populations where the rate of colon cancer is comparatively low (Ugandan, Japanese, etc). It cannot be denied that the fiber theory linking fiber deficiency with the development of colon cancer and other diseases, is simple, attractive and appears to be firmly based in common sense. When subjected to research studies, however, the situation appears much more complex than expected. Although some progress is being made, the data are often contradictory and confusing, probably due to lack of adequate documentation of fiber intake (e.g., use of dietary fiber

  8. SURVEY OF THE STEROL COMPOSITION OF THE MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES KARENIA BREVIS, KARENIA MIKIMOTOI, AND KARLODINIUM MICRUM: DISTRIBUTION OF STEROLS WITHIN OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS DINOPHYCEAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of different marine microalgae was examined to determine the utility of sterols as biomarkers to distinguish members of various algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae possess certain 4-methyl sterols, such as dinosterol, which are rare...

  9. The biosynthesis of sterols in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Goad, L. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. [2-14C]Mevalonate was incorporated into squalene and the major phytosterols of pea and maize leaves; it was also incorporated into compounds belonging to the 4,4-dimethyl and 4α-methyl steroid groups and which may be possible phytosterol intermediates. 2. l-[Me-14C]Methionine was incorporated into the major sterols and also into the 4,4-dimethyl and 4α-methyl steroid groups. No radioactivity was detected in squalene. 3. Under anaerobic conditions incorporation of [2-14C]-mevalonate into the non-saponifiable lipid of pea leaves was drastically decreased but radioactive squalene was accumulated. 4. Cycloartenol, 24-methylenecycloartanol, 24-methylenelophenol, 24-ethylidenelophenol, fucosterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol have been identified by gas–liquid chromatography in pea leaves. 5. The significance of these results in connexion with phytosterol biosynthesis and the introduction of the alkyl group at C-24 into phytosterols is discussed. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5964970

  10. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed. PMID:26370196

  11. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed.

  12. The 5' flanking region of the gene for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 contains a cell type specific cis-acting regulatory element that activates transcription in transfected B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ricksten, A; Olsson, A; Andersson, T; Rymo, L

    1988-01-01

    We have recently identified the promoter that positions the initiation (cap) site for RNA encoding the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) determined nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) in transfected COS-1 cells. The cells were transfected with recombinant vectors that contained the BamHI WYH region of the EBV genome. In order to delineate regulatory DNA sequences required for the expression of EBNA2 the 5' flanking region of the gene was linked to reporter genes in expression vectors and transfected into EBV genome-negative lymphoid DG75 cells. We demonstrate that several cis-acting elements contribute to a transcriptional enhancer activity found in the region between nucleotides-553 and -86 relative to the cap site. The enhancer was active in lymphoid DG75 cells but not in HeLa cells and stimulated transcription also from the heterologous thymidine kinase (TK) and beta-globin promoters. Nuclear extracts of lymphoid cells contained protein factors that bound to the enhancer. The in vitro introduction of a mutation in the enhancer sequence that substantially reduced the transcription stimulatory activity concurrently blocked the binding of one of the factors. Images PMID:2843816

  13. Cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, functional expression and liver-specific gene regulation of rat sterol delta8-isomerase, a cholesterogenic enzyme with multiple functions.

    PubMed Central

    Bae, S; Seong, J; Paik, Y

    2001-01-01

    Sterol Delta(8)-isomerase (SI) (EC 5.3.3.5), also known as emopamil binding protein or sigma receptor, catalyses the conversion of the 8-ene isomer into the 7-ene isomer in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in mammals. Recently, mutations of SI have been found to be associated with Conradi-Hünermann syndrome in humans. To investigate the in vitro and in vivo modes of molecular regulation of SI and its role in cholesterol biosynthesis in mammals, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding rat SI. The deduced amino-acid sequence of rat SI predicts a 230-residue protein (26737 Da) with 87% and 80% amino-acid identity to mouse and human counterparts. The rat SI gene was mapped to chromosome 12q1.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The biological function of the cloned rat SI cDNA was verified by overexpressing recombinant Myc-SI in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It showed a characteristic pattern of inhibition on exposure to trans-2-[4-(1,2-diphenylbuten-1-yl)phenoxy]-N,N-dimethylethylamine (tamoxifen; IC(50)=11.2 microM) and 3beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A; IC(50)=4.2 microM), two well known potent inhibitors of SI. Northern-blot analysis of 3-week-old rats compared with 2-year-old rats showed that SI mRNA expression in both age groups was restricted to liver, where a 70% reduction in mRNA levels was observed in 2-year-old rats. The FISH studies revealed ubiquitous expression of SI mRNA in rat hepatocytes. The in vitro studies showed that the SI mRNA was highly suppressed by 25-hydroxycholesterol in H4IIE cells. Treatment of H4IIE cells grown in medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum with tamoxifen for 24 h resulted in a dose-dependent induction of SI mRNA, with a concomitant suppression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 mRNA. Interestingly, this effect was not seen in emopamil-treated cells. The in vivo experiments also indicate that both mRNA expression and enzymic activity of SI in liver were induced approx. 3

  14. An unexpectedly high degree of specialization and a widespread involvement in sterol metabolism among the C. elegans putative aminophospholipid translocases

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Miteva, Yana; Gilroy, Simon; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Schlegel, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Background P-type ATPases in subfamily IV are exclusively eukaryotic transmembrane proteins that have been proposed to directly translocate the aminophospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of the plasma membrane. Eukaryotic genomes contain many genes encoding members of this subfamily. At present it is unclear why there are so many genes of this kind per organism or what individual roles these genes perform in organism development. Results We have systematically investigated expression and developmental function of the six, tat-1 through 6, subfamily IV P-type ATPase genes encoded in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. tat-5 is the only ubiquitously-expressed essential gene in the group. tat-6 is a poorly-transcribed recent duplicate of tat-5. tat-2 through 4 exhibit tissue-specific developmentally-regulated expression patterns. Strong expression of both tat-2 and tat-4 occurs in the intestine and certain other cells of the alimentary system. The two are also expressed in the uterus, during spermatogenesis and in the fully-formed spermatheca. tat-2 alone is expressed in the pharyngeal gland cells, the excretory system and a few cells of the developing vulva. The expression pattern of tat-3 is almost completely different from those of tat-2 and tat-4. tat-3 expression is detectable in the steroidogenic tissues: the hypodermis and the XXX cells, as well as in most cells of the pharynx (except gland), various tissues of the reproductive system (except uterus and spermatheca) and seam cells. Deletion of tat-1 through 4 individually interferes little or not at all with the regular progression of organism growth and development under normal conditions. However, tat-2 through 4 become essential for reproductive growth during sterol starvation. Conclusion tat-5 likely encodes a housekeeping protein that performs the proposed aminophospholipid translocase function routinely. Although individually

  15. Hepatic entrapment of esterified cholesterol drives continual expansion of whole body sterol pool in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Aqul, Amal; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Taylor, Anna M; Repa, Joyce J; Burns, Dennis K; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-10-15

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) results from loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Hepatomegaly and deposition of esterified cholesterol (EC) in multiple organs ensue. The present studies quantitated rates of synthesis, absorption, and disposition of cholesterol, and whole body cholesterol pool size in a mouse model of CESD. In 50-day-old lal(-/-) and matching lal(+/+) mice fed a low-cholesterol diet, whole animal cholesterol content equalled 210 and 50 mg, respectively, indicating that since birth the lal(-/-) mice sequestered cholesterol at an average rate of 3.2 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). The proportion of the body sterol pool contained in the liver of the lal(-/-) mice was 64 vs. 6.3% in their lal(+/+) controls. EC concentrations in the liver, spleen, small intestine, and lungs of the lal(-/-) mice were elevated 100-, 35-, 15-, and 6-fold, respectively. In the lal(-/-) mice, whole liver cholesterol synthesis increased 10.2-fold, resulting in a 3.2-fold greater rate of whole animal sterol synthesis compared with their lal(+/+) controls. The rate of cholesterol synthesis in the lal(-/-) mice exceeded that in the lal(+/+) controls by 3.7 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). Fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal bile acid excretion were unchanged in the lal(-/-) mice, but their rate of neutral sterol excretion was 59% higher than in their lal(+/+) controls. Thus, in this model, the continual expansion of the body sterol pool is driven by the synthesis of excess cholesterol, primarily in the liver. Despite the severity of their disease, the median life span of the lal(-/-) mice was 355 days.

  16. Characterization of fatty alcohol and sterol fractions in olive tree.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Solano, Mara; Ruiz-Jimenez, José; Luque De Castro, María D

    2010-07-14

    The determination of sterols and fatty alcohols is a part of the study of the metabolomic profile of the unsaponifiable fraction in olive tree. Leaves and drupes from three varieties of olive tree (Arbequina, Picual, and Manzanilla) were used. The content of the target compounds was studied in five ripeness stages and three harvesting periods for olive drupes and leaves, respectively. A method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction and derivatization for the individual identification and quantitation of sterols and fatty alcohols, involving chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry detection by selected ion monitoring, was used. The concentrations of alcohols and sterols in the drupes ranged between 0.1 and 1086.9 mug/g and between 0.1 and 5855.3 mug/g, respectively, which are higher than in leaves. Statistical studies were developed to show the relationship between the concentration of the target analytes and variety, ripeness stage, and harvesting period. PMID:20550122

  17. Sterols and sphingolipids: Dynamic duo or partners in crime?

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sonia; Liu, Ying; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Wilcox, Lisa; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    One manner in which eukaryotic cells respond to their environments is by optimizing the composition and proportions of sterols and sphingolipids in membranes. The physical association of the planar ring of sterols with the acyl chains of phospholipids, particularly sphingolipids, produces membrane micro-heterogeneity that is exploited to coordinate several crucial pathways. We hypothesize that these lipid molecules play an integrated role in human disease; when one of the partners is mis-regulated, pathology frequently ensues. Sterols and sphingolipid levels are not coordinated by the action of a single master regulator, however the cross talk between their metabolic pathways is considerable. We describe our perspectives on the key components of synthesis, catabolism and transport of these lipid partners with an emphasis on evolutionarily conserved reactions that produce disease states when defective. PMID:20362613

  18. Sterols as biomarkers in the surface microlayer of the estuarine areas.

    PubMed

    Alsalahi, Murad Ali; Latif, Mohd Talib; Ali, Masni Mohd; Dominick, Doreena; Khan, Md Firoz; Mustaffa, Nur Ili Hamizah; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Nasher, Essam; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2015-04-15

    This study aims to determine the concentration of sterols used as biomarkers in the surface microlayer (SML) in estuarine areas of the Selangor River, Malaysia. Samples were collected during different seasons through the use of a rotation drum. The analysis of sterols was performed using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID). The results showed that the concentrations of total sterols in the SML ranged from 107.06 to 505.55 ng L(-1). The total sterol concentration was found to be higher in the wet season. Cholesterol was found to be the most abundant sterols component in the SML. The diagnostic ratios of sterols show the influence of natural sources and waste on the contribution of sterols in the SML. Further analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct inputs of sterols derived from human activity (40.58%), terrigenous and plant inputs (22.59%) as well as phytoplankton and marine inputs (17.35%).

  19. A data mining approach to dinoflagellate clustering according to sterol composition: Correlations with evolutionary history.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the sterol compositions of 102 dinoflagellates (including several previously unexamined species) using clustering techniques as a means of determining the relatedness of the organisms. In addition, dinoflagellate sterol-based relationships were compared statistically to dinoflag...

  20. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Summons, Roger E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650-540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago.

  1. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A.; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650–540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago. PMID:26903629

  2. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Summons, Roger E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650-540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago. PMID:26903629

  3. Characterization of microsomal methyl sterol demethylase in two Morris hepatomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, M T; Gaylor, J L; Morris, H P

    1976-02-01

    Previously, we reported that the rate of metabolism of methyl sterol intermediates of cholesterol biosynthesis by broken-cell preparations of Morriss hepatoma 7777 is very slow, whereas the intact tumors are known to synthesize cholesterol quite efficiently. Active preparations have now been obtained by substitution of pyrophosphate for phosphate buffer. Although substitution of pyrophosphate buffer markedly enhances microsomal methyl sterol demethylation rates 3- to 4-fold in hepatoma 7777, other microsomal enzymes and electron carriers in either liver or a more slowly growing hepatoma appear to be unaffected by pyrophosphate. Several properties of the active microsomal methyl sterol demethylase have now been compared for control rat liver, host liver, tumor 7777, and tumor 5123C. Conditions necessary for the assay of initial velocities of enzymic reactions in the tumor microsomes have been established with respect to the amount of protein, time-course, concentrations of cofactors and substrate, pH, and other variables. The K'm and the responses to the variables studied above are very similar for methyl sterol demethylase of microsomes isolated from control liver, host liver, tumor 5123C, and tumor 7777. The multienzymic demethylase in the various preparations has been found to be inhibited similarly by in vitro additions of cyanide, cytochrome c, and bile salts. Thus, the enzymes of the microsomal-bound 4-methyl sterol demethylase of cholesterol biosynthesis appear to be very similar in liver and these 2 Morris hepatomas. When xenobiotic inducers of microsomal oxidases, such as phenobarbital and methylcholanthrene, are administered to normal and tumor-bearing rats, elevated rates of methyl sterol demethylation are observed with isolated liver microsomes obtained from both normal and tumor-bearing rats. Similar increases are not observed in the tumors. Furthermore, daily administration of an intestinal bile acid sequestrant elevates hepatic methyl sterol

  4. Protein Mediators of Sterol Transport Across Intestinal Brush Border Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Yu, Liqing

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol balance contributes significantly to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), the leading cause of death in the United States. The intestine has the unique capability to act as a gatekeeper for entry of cholesterol into the body, and inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption is now widely regarded as an attractive non-statin therapeutic strategy for ASCVD prevention. In this chapter we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding sterol transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. The purpose of this work is to summarize substantial progress made in the last decade in regards to protein-mediated sterol trafficking, and to discuss this in the context of human disease. PMID:20213550

  5. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take place in

  6. The physiology of sterol nutrition in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; T Behmer, Spencer; Lin, George G; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Douglas, Angela E

    2012-11-01

    The phloem sap of fava bean (Vicia faba) plants utilized by the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains three sterols, cholesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol, in a 2:2:1 ratio. To investigate the nutritional value of these sterols, pea aphids were reared on chemically-defined diets containing each sterol at 0.1, 1 and 10μgml(-1) with a sterol-free diet as control. Larval growth rate and aphid lifespan did not vary significantly across the diets, indicating that sterol reserves can buffer some performance indices against a shortfall in dietary sterol over at least one generation. However, lifetime reproductive output was depressed in aphids on diets containing stigmasterol or no sterol, relative to diets supplemented with cholesterol or sitosterol. The cholesterol density of embryos in teneral adults was significantly higher than in the total body; and the number and biomass of embryos in aphids on diets with stigmasterol and no sterols were reduced relative to diets with cholesterol or sitosterol, indicating that the reproductive output of the pea aphid can be limited by the amount and composition of dietary sterol. In a complementary RNA-seq analysis of pea aphids reared on plants and diets with different sterol contents, 7.6% of the 17,417 detected gene transcripts were differentially expressed. Transcript abundance of genes with annotated function in sterol utilization did not vary significantly among treatments, suggesting that the metabolic response to dietary sterol may be mediated primarily at the level of enzyme function or metabolite concentration.

  7. Influence of the sterol aliphatic side chain on membrane properties: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Robalo, João R; Ramalho, J P Prates; Huster, Daniel; Loura, Luís M S

    2015-09-21

    Following a recent experimental investigation of the effect of the length of the alkyl side chain in a series of cholesterol analogues (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 12848-12851), we report here an atomistic molecular dynamics characterization of the behaviour of methyl-branched side chain sterols (iso series) in POPC bilayers. The studied sterols included androstenol (i-C0-sterol) and cholesterol (i-C8-sterol), as well as four other derivatives (i-C5, i-C10, i-C12 and i-C14-sterol). For each sterol, both subtle local effects and more substantial differential alterations of membrane properties along the iso series were investigated. The location and orientation of the tetracyclic ring system is almost identical in all compounds. Among all the studied sterols, cholesterol is the sterol that presents the best matching with the hydrophobic length of POPC acyl chains, whereas longer-chained sterols interdigitate into the opposing membrane leaflet. In accordance with the experimental observations, a maximal ordering effect is observed for intermediate sterol chain length (i-C5, cholesterol, i-C10). Only for these sterols a preferential interaction with the saturated sn-1 chain of POPC (compared to the unsaturated sn-2 chain) was observed, but not for either shorter or longer-chained derivatives. This work highlights the importance of the sterol alkyl chain in the modulation of membrane properties and lateral organization in biological membranes.

  8. The counterflow transport of sterols and PI4P.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol levels in intracellular membranes are constantly adjusted to match with specific organelle functions. Cholesterol is kept high in the plasma membrane (PM) because it is essential for its barrier function, while low levels are found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where cholesterol mediates feedback control of its own synthesis by sterol-sensor proteins. The ER→Golgi→PM concentration gradient of cholesterol in mammalian cells, and ergosterol in yeast, appears to be sustained by specific intracellular transport processes, which are mostly mediated by lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Here we review a recently described function of two LTPs, OSBP and its yeast homolog Osh4p, which consists in creating a sterol gradient between membranes by vectorial transport. OSBP also contributes to the formation of ER/Golgi membrane contact sites, which are important hubs for the transfer of several lipid species. OSBP and Osh4p organize a counterflow transport of lipids whereby sterols are exchanged for the phosphoinositide PI4P, which is used as a fuel to drive sterol transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  9. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  10. Effect of oxygenated sterol compounds on human bone marrow granulocytic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.C.; Richman, C.M.; Hsu, R.C.; Chung, J.; Scanu, A.M.; Yachnin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Oxygenated sterol compounds are potent inhibitors of sterol and DNA synthesis in mammalian cells. We studied the effects of oxygenated sterols on human marrow granulocytic progenitor cells in vitro (CFU-C)*. 25-Hydroxycholesterol, as well as 6-ketocholestanol, 7-ketocholesterol, and 20 ..cap alpha..-hydroxycholesterol, demonstrated marked inhibition of CFU-C proliferation. The latter effect, which was not a result of direct cytoxicity of the compounds, was reversible by cholesterol, but not by mevalonic acid. We conclude that inhibition of sterol synthesis by oxygenated sterol compounds may be insufficient to explain their suppression of CFU-C proliferation.

  11. [The ENCODE project and functional genomics studies].

    PubMed

    Ding, Nan; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-03-01

    Upon the completion of the Human Genome Project, scientists have been trying to interpret the underlying genomic code for human biology. Since 2003, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has invested nearly $0.3 billion and gathered over 440 scientists from more than 32 institutions in the United States, China, United Kingdom, Japan, Spain and Singapore to initiate the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, aiming to identify and analyze all regulatory elements in the human genome. Taking advantage of the development of next-generation sequencing technologies and continuous improvement of experimental methods, ENCODE had made remarkable achievements: identified methylation and histone modification of DNA sequences and their regulatory effects on gene expression through altering chromatin structures, categorized binding sites of various transcription factors and constructed their regulatory networks, further revised and updated database for pseudogenes and non-coding RNA, and identified SNPs in regulatory sequences associated with diseases. These findings help to comprehensively understand information embedded in gene and genome sequences, the function of regulatory elements as well as the molecular mechanism underlying the transcriptional regulation by noncoding regions, and provide extensive data resource for life sciences, particularly for translational medicine. We re-viewed the contributions of high-throughput sequencing platform development and bioinformatical technology improve-ment to the ENCODE project, the association between epigenetics studies and the ENCODE project, and the major achievement of the ENCODE project. We also provided our prospective on the role of the ENCODE project in promoting the development of basic and clinical medicine.

  12. Azasterol inhibitors in yeast. Inhibition of the 24-methylene sterol delta24(28)-reductase and delta24-sterol methyltransferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 23-azacholesterol.

    PubMed

    Pierce, H D; Pierce, A M; Srinivasan, R; Unrau, A M; Oehlschlager, A C

    1978-06-23

    The effects of 23-azacholesterol on sterol biosynthesis and growth of Saccharomyces cervisiae were examined. In the presence of 0.2, 0.5, and 1 micron 23-azacholesterol, aerobically-growing yeast produced a nearly constant amount of ergosta-5,7,22,24(28)-tetraenol (approx. 36% of total sterol) and slowly accumulated zymosterol with a concommitant decline in ergosterol synthesis. Growth and total sterol content of yeast cultures treated with 0.2-1 micron 23-azacholesterol were similar to that of the control culture. Yeast cultures treated with 5 and 10 micron 23-azacholesterol produced mostly zymosterol (58-61% of total sterol), while ergosta-5,7,22,24(28)-tetraenol production declined to less than 10% of total sterol. The observed changes in the distribution of sterols in treated cultures are consistent with inhibition of 24-methylene sterol 24(28)-sterol reductase (total inhibition at 1 micron 23-azacholesterol) and of 24-sterol methyltransferase (71% inhibition at 10 micron 23-azacholesterol). Yeast cultures treated with 10 micron 23-azacholesterol were found to contain 4,4-dimethylcholesta-8,14,24-trienol and 4alpha-methylcholesta-8,14,24-trienol, which were isolated and characterized for the first time. PMID:352402

  13. Characterization of the sterol carrier protein-x/sterol carrier protein-2 gene in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Ma, Haihao; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Kaiyu; Peng, Jianxin; Lan, Que; Hong, Huazu

    2012-11-01

    Cholesterol is a membrane component and the precursor of ecdysteroids in insects, but insects cannot synthesize cholesterol de novo. Therefore, cholesterol uptake and transportation during the feeding larval stages are critical processes in insects. The sterol carrier protein-2 domain (SCP-2) in sterol carrier proteins-x (SCP-x) has been speculated to be involved in intracellular cholesterol transfer and metabolism in vertebrates. However, a direct association between SCP-x gene expression, cholesterol absorption and development in lepidopteran insects is poorly understood. We identified the Helicoverpa armigera sterol carrier protein-x/2 (HaSCP-x/2) gene from the larval midgut cDNAs. The HaSCP-x/2 gene is well conserved during evolution and relatively divergent in heterogenetic species. Transcripts of HaSCP-x/2 were detected by qRT-PCR at the highest level in the midgut of H. armigera during the larval stages. Expression knockdown of HaSCP-x/2 transcripts via dsRNA interference resulted in delayed larval development and decreased adult fecundity. Sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitors were lethal to young larvae and decreased fertility in adults emerged from treated elder larvae in H. armigera. The results taken together suggest that HaSCPx/2 gene is important for normal development and fertility in H. armigera.

  14. Suppressing Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Alters Chloroplast Development and Triggers Sterol-Dependent Induction of Jasmonate- and Fe-Related Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Arró, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes (FPS1 and FPS2) encoding FPS. Single fps1 and fps2 knockout mutants are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, while fps1/fps2 double mutants are embryo lethal. To assess the effect of FPS down-regulation at postembryonic developmental stages, we generated Arabidopsis conditional knockdown mutants expressing artificial microRNAs devised to simultaneously silence both FPS genes. Induction of silencing from germination rapidly caused chlorosis and a strong developmental phenotype that led to seedling lethality. However, silencing of FPS after seed germination resulted in a slight developmental delay only, although leaves and cotyledons continued to show chlorosis and altered chloroplasts. Metabolomic analyses also revealed drastic changes in the profile of sterols, ubiquinones, and plastidial isoprenoids. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction transcriptomic analysis showed that a reduction in FPS activity levels triggers the misregulation of genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses, the most prominent one being the rapid induction of a set of genes related to the jasmonic acid pathway. Down-regulation of FPS also triggered an iron-deficiency transcriptional response that is consistent with the iron-deficient phenotype observed in FPS-silenced plants. The specific inhibition of the sterol biosynthesis pathway by chemical and genetic blockage mimicked these transcriptional responses, indicating that sterol depletion is the primary cause of the observed alterations. Our results highlight the importance of sterol homeostasis for normal chloroplast development and function and reveal important clues about how isoprenoid and sterol metabolism is integrated within plant physiology and development. PMID

  15. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species.

  16. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  17. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(-)) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(-) mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(-) causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance.

  18. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(-)) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(-) mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(-) causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance. PMID:25340392

  19. Differential effects of fenpropimorph and fenhexamid, two sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicides, on arbuscular mycorrhizal development and sterol metabolism in carrot roots.

    PubMed

    Campagnac, Estelle; Fontaine, Joël; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Laruelle, Frédéric; Durand, Roger; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne

    2008-12-01

    Sterols composition of transformed carrot roots incubated in presence of increasing concentrations of fenpropimorph (0.02; 0.2; 2mgl(-1)) and fenhexamid (0.02; 0.2; 2; 20mgl(-1)), colonized or not by Glomus intraradices was determined. In mycorrhizal roots treated with fenpropimorph, normal Delta(5)-sterols were replaced by unusual compounds such as 9beta,19-cyclopropylsterols (24-methylpollinastanol), Delta(8,14)-sterols (ergosta-8,14-dienol, stigmasta-8,14-dienol), Delta(8)-sterols (Delta(8) sitosterol) and Delta(7)-sterols (ergosta-7,22-dienol). After application of fenpropimorph, a drastic reduction of the mycorrhizal root growth, root colonization and extraradical fungal development was observed. Application of fenhexamid did not modify sterol profiles and the total colonization of roots. But the arbuscule frequency of the fungal partner was significantly affected. Comparison of the effects caused by the tested fungicides indicates that the usual phytosterols may be involved in symbiosis development. Indeed, observed modifications of root sterols composition could explain the high fenpropimorph toxicity to the AM symbiosis. However, the absence of sterolic modifications in the roots treated with fenhexamid could account for its more limited impact on mycorrhization.

  20. The sterols of Cucurbita moschata ("calabacita") seed oil.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J B; Gros, E G; Bertoni, M H; Cattaneo, P

    1996-11-01

    From the sterol fraction of seed oil from commercial Cucurbita moschata Dutch ("calabacita") delta 5 and delta 7 sterols having saturated and unsaturated side chain were isolated by chromatographic procedures and characterized by spectroscopic (1H and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry) methods. The main components were identified as 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,22E-dien-3 beta-ol (alpha-spinasterol); 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,22E,25-trien-3 beta-ol (25-dehydrochondrillasterol); 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,25-dien-3 beta-ol; 24R-ethyl-cholesta-7-en-3 beta-ol (delta 7-stigmastenol) and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7, 24(28)-dien-3 beta-ol (delta 7,24(28)-stigmastadienol).

  1. [Sterol extracts from Begonia Sinensis Rhizome against respiratory inflammation].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yu-shan

    2015-08-01

    The acute and chronic respiratory tract inflammation models were made to investigate the effect and mechanism of sterol extracts from Begonia Sinensis Rhizome (BSR). The first model of acute lung injury was made with Kunming mice by inhaling cigarette smoke, then the mice were treated with different concentrations of BSR sterol extracts. Lung tissue morphology was detected by HE staining, TNF-alpha/MPO were detected by Elisa, and cPLA2 protein were, detected by Western blotting respectively. Results showed that in model group, lung sheet became real, alveolar space shrank or disappeared, alveolar septum was thickened, plenty of inflammatory cells were infiltrated, capillary blood vessels were congestive and the expression of TNF-α, MPO, cPLA2 increased; after administration, a small amount of inflammatory cells were infiltrated, alveolar septum became obvious, capillary congestion status was significantly relieved and the expression of TNF-α, MPO, cPLA2 decreased (P < 0.05). The second model of chronic respiratory tract inflammation in BALB/c mice with bronchial asthma was induced by OVA, then the mice were treated with different concentrations of BSR sterol extracts. Lung tissue morphology was detected by HE staining, indexes such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 were detected by Elisa, and the cPLA2 protein expression was detected by Western blotting respectively. Results showed that in model group, a lot of inflammatory cells around lung vessels and bronchi exuded, bronchial goblet cells proliferated and the expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, cPLA2 increased; after administration, inflammatory and goblet cell hyperplasia reduced, the expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, cPLA2 also decreased (P < 0.05). The above results showed BSR sterol extracts could resist against respiratory inflammation by inhibiting cPLA2 in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  3. Attenuation of Leishmania infantum chagasi Metacyclic Promastigotes by Sterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gaur Dixit, Upasna; Barker, Jason H.; Teesch, Lynn M.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The infectious metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania protozoa establish infection in a mammalian host after they are deposited into the dermis by a sand fly vector. Several Leishmania virulence factors promote infection, including the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane-anchored major surface protease (MSP). Metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating reagent, causing a 3-fold reduction in total cellular sterols as well as enhancing MSP release without affecting parasite viability in vitro. MβCD-treated promastigotes were more susceptible to complement-mediated lysis than untreated controls and reduced the parasite load 3-fold when inoculated into BALB/c mice. Paradoxically, MβCD-treated promastigotes caused a higher initial in vitro infection rate in human or murine macrophages than untreated controls, although their intracellular multiplication was hindered upon infection establishment. There was a corresponding larger amount of covalently bound C3b than iC3b on the parasite surfaces of MβCD-treated promastigotes exposed to healthy human serum in vitro, as well as loss of MSP, a protease that enhances C3b cleavage to iC3b. Mass spectrometry showed that MβCD promotes the release of proteins into the extracellular medium, including both MSP and MSP-like protein (MLP), from virulent metacyclic promastigotes. These data support the hypothesis that plasma membrane sterols are important for the virulence of Leishmania protozoa at least in part through retention of membrane virulence proteins. PMID:23630964

  4. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  5. Cloning of an emopamil-binding protein (EBP)-like protein that lacks sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Fabian F; Fitzky, Barbara U; Wietzorrek, Georg; Haidekker, Alexander; Eder, Andrea; Glossmann, Hartmut

    2003-08-15

    EBP (emopamil-binding protein) is a high-affinity binding protein for [3H]emopamil and belongs to the family of so-called sigma receptors. Mutations that disrupt EBP's 3beta-hydroxysteroid sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase activity (EC 5.3.3.5) impair cholesterol biosynthesis and cause X-chromosomal dominant chondrodysplasia punctata. We identified a human cDNA for a novel EBPL (EBP-like protein) with a calculated mass of 23.2 kDa. Amino acid sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis revealed that EBPL is distantly related to EBP (31% identity and 52% similarity) and found in animals but not in plants. EBPL is encoded by four exons on human chromosome 13q14.2 covering 30.7 kb, and a partially processed EBPL pseudogene was found on 16q21. The EBPL mRNA was expressed ubiquitously and most abundant in liver, lung and kidney. Upon heterologous expression in yeast EBPL had no detectable 3beta-hydroxysteroid sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase and sigma-ligand-binding activity. Nine out of ten amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity of EBP were conserved in EBPL. Replacement of the only differing residue (EBP-Y111W) reduced catalytic activity of EBP. Transfer of the divergent residue from EBP to EBPL (EBPL-W91Y) and chimaerization of EBP and EBPL at various positions failed to restore catalytic activity of EBPL. Chemical cross-linking induced homodimerization of EBPL and EBP. Whereas mevinolin increased the mRNA for EBP and DHCR7 (delta7-sterol reductase) in HepG2 cells, it had no effect on mRNAs for EBPL and sigma1 receptor, indicating that EBP and EBPL expression are not co-ordinated. We propose that EBPL has a yet-to-be-discovered function other than cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:12760743

  6. Cloning of an emopamil-binding protein (EBP)-like protein that lacks sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Fabian F; Fitzky, Barbara U; Wietzorrek, Georg; Haidekker, Alexander; Eder, Andrea; Glossmann, Hartmut

    2003-01-01

    EBP (emopamil-binding protein) is a high-affinity binding protein for [3H]emopamil and belongs to the family of so-called sigma receptors. Mutations that disrupt EBP's 3beta-hydroxysteroid sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase activity (EC 5.3.3.5) impair cholesterol biosynthesis and cause X-chromosomal dominant chondrodysplasia punctata. We identified a human cDNA for a novel EBPL (EBP-like protein) with a calculated mass of 23.2 kDa. Amino acid sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis revealed that EBPL is distantly related to EBP (31% identity and 52% similarity) and found in animals but not in plants. EBPL is encoded by four exons on human chromosome 13q14.2 covering 30.7 kb, and a partially processed EBPL pseudogene was found on 16q21. The EBPL mRNA was expressed ubiquitously and most abundant in liver, lung and kidney. Upon heterologous expression in yeast EBPL had no detectable 3beta-hydroxysteroid sterol delta8-delta7 isomerase and sigma-ligand-binding activity. Nine out of ten amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity of EBP were conserved in EBPL. Replacement of the only differing residue (EBP-Y111W) reduced catalytic activity of EBP. Transfer of the divergent residue from EBP to EBPL (EBPL-W91Y) and chimaerization of EBP and EBPL at various positions failed to restore catalytic activity of EBPL. Chemical cross-linking induced homodimerization of EBPL and EBP. Whereas mevinolin increased the mRNA for EBP and DHCR7 (delta7-sterol reductase) in HepG2 cells, it had no effect on mRNAs for EBPL and sigma1 receptor, indicating that EBP and EBPL expression are not co-ordinated. We propose that EBPL has a yet-to-be-discovered function other than cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:12760743

  7. StAR enhances transcription of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteases involved in its own degradation.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR.

  8. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark

    2016-02-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. PMID:26729489

  9. Bioactive sterols from marine resources and their potential benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Van Ta, Quang

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive agents from marine resources have shown their valuable health beneficial effects. Therefore, increase knowledge on novel functional ingredients with biological activities from marine animal and microbe has gained much attention. Sterols are recognized as potential in development functional food ingredients and pharmaceutical agents. Marine resources, with a great diversity, can be a very interesting natural resource of sterols. This chapter focuses on biological activities of marine animal and microbe sterols with potential health beneficial applications in functional foods and pharmaceuticals.

  10. The physiology of sterol nutrition in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; T Behmer, Spencer; Lin, George G; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Douglas, Angela E

    2012-11-01

    The phloem sap of fava bean (Vicia faba) plants utilized by the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains three sterols, cholesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol, in a 2:2:1 ratio. To investigate the nutritional value of these sterols, pea aphids were reared on chemically-defined diets containing each sterol at 0.1, 1 and 10μgml(-1) with a sterol-free diet as control. Larval growth rate and aphid lifespan did not vary significantly across the diets, indicating that sterol reserves can buffer some performance indices against a shortfall in dietary sterol over at least one generation. However, lifetime reproductive output was depressed in aphids on diets containing stigmasterol or no sterol, relative to diets supplemented with cholesterol or sitosterol. The cholesterol density of embryos in teneral adults was significantly higher than in the total body; and the number and biomass of embryos in aphids on diets with stigmasterol and no sterols were reduced relative to diets with cholesterol or sitosterol, indicating that the reproductive output of the pea aphid can be limited by the amount and composition of dietary sterol. In a complementary RNA-seq analysis of pea aphids reared on plants and diets with different sterol contents, 7.6% of the 17,417 detected gene transcripts were differentially expressed. Transcript abundance of genes with annotated function in sterol utilization did not vary significantly among treatments, suggesting that the metabolic response to dietary sterol may be mediated primarily at the level of enzyme function or metabolite concentration. PMID:22878342

  11. Molecular genetics of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and postsqualene sterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fitzky, B U; Glossmann, H; Utermann, G; Moebius, F F

    1999-04-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is a disorder of morphogenesis resulting from an enzymatic defect in the last step of cholesterol metabolism (reduction of 7-dehydrocholesterol). Analysis of the defective gene and identification of mutations therein have paved the way for the study of the molecular genetics of the disorder which is caused by numerous different mutations. Future efforts should identify a postulated intracellular signalling activity of sterol intermediates, isolate proteins that govern the sterol traffic between intracellular compartments, structurally characterize the enzyme delta 7-sterol reductase defective in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and investigate the pathomechanism of sterol depletion-induced dysmorphogenesis. PMID:10327280

  12. Some studies on the biosynthesis of ubiquinone, isoprenoid alcohols, squalene and sterols by marine invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M. J.; Pennock, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The ability of fourteen marine invertebrates to utilize [14C]mevalonate for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid compounds was investigated. Several of the animals, in particular crustaceans, bivalve molluscs, a coelenterate and a sponge, were unable to synthesize squalene and sterols, whereas gastropod molluscs, echinoderms, an annelid and a sponge could. Regardless of sterol-synthesizing ability the animals (with the exception of a sponge) always made dolichol and ubiquinone, and thus a specific block in squalene and sterol synthesis was indicated in some animals. Radioactivity accumulated in relatively large amounts in farnesol and geranylgeraniol in those animals incapable of making sterols. PMID:4403925

  13. Propiconazole inhibits the sterol 14α-demethylase in Glomus irregulare like in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Calonne, Maryline; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Campagnac, Estelle; Debiane, Djouher; Laruelle, Frédéric; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne; Fontaine, Joël

    2012-04-01

    The increasing concentrations impact (0.02, 0.2 and 2 mg L(-1)) of a Sterol Biosynthesis Inhibitor (SBI) fungicide, propiconazole, was evaluated on development and sterol metabolism of two non-target organisms: mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal transformed chicory roots and the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus irregulare using monoxenic cultures. In this work, we provide the first evidence of a direct impact of propiconazole on the AMF by disturbing its sterol metabolism. A significant decrease in end-products sterols contents (24-methylcholesterol and in 24-ethylcholesterol) was observed concomitantly to a 24-methylenedihydrolanosterol accumulation indicating the inhibition of a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis pathway, the sterol 14α-demethylase like in phytopathogenic fungi. A decrease in end-product sterol contents in propiconazole-treated roots was also observed suggesting a slowing down of the sterol metabolism in plant. Taken together, our findings suggest that the inhibition of the both AM symbiotic partners development by propiconazole results from their sterol metabolism alterations.

  14. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Sterols in Qingmuguan Underground River].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Shen, Li-cheng; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang Mei; LIAO, Yu; Xie, Zheng-lan; Zhang, Yuan-zhu

    2015-11-01

    Water samples were collected from the Qinmuguan underground river from July to November in 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), dissolved sterols were quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the average variation content of dissolved sterols ranges from 415 to 629 ng x L(-1), with the increasing migration distance of dissolved sterols in underground river, its contents are decreased. Between the inlet and outlet of Qingmuguan underground river, the average variation contents of dissolved sterol are between 724 and 374 ng x L(-1), and the average variation ratios of the content of stigmasterol with cholesterol range from 0.29 to 0.12. In short, their values are decreased accompanied by the increasing migration distance of underground river. The composing component in dissolved sterols varied differently between July to December, and the main component of dissolved sterols is cholesterin, the ratios of the content of dissolved sterols with cholesterin to the total dissolved sterols range from 37.30% to 94.85%. In addition, the ratios of the content of dissolved sterols with coprostanol to cholesterin, coprostanol to cholesterin are below 0.2 respectively, indicating the water quality of underground river is not contaminated by domestic sewage, but with the passage of time water quality tends to deterioration.

  15. Lessons from modENCODE.

    PubMed

    Brown, James B; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The modENCODE (Model Organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) Consortium aimed to map functional elements-including transcripts, chromatin marks, regulatory factor binding sites, and origins of DNA replication-in the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. During its five-year span, the consortium conducted more than 2,000 genome-wide assays in developmentally staged animals, dissected tissues, and homogeneous cell lines. Analysis of these data sets provided foundational insights into genome, epigenome, and transcriptome structure and the evolutionary turnover of regulatory pathways. These studies facilitated a comparative analysis with similar data types produced by the ENCODE Consortium for human cells. Genome organization differs drastically in these distant species, and yet quantitative relationships among chromatin state, transcription, and cotranscriptional RNA processing are deeply conserved. Of the many biological discoveries of the modENCODE Consortium, we highlight insights that emerged from integrative studies. We focus on operational and scientific lessons that may aid future projects of similar scale or aims in other, emerging model systems. PMID:26133010

  16. Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization of a Recombinant Sterol 3-O-Glucosyltransferase from Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. Catalyzing Biosynthesis of Steryl Glucosides

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Mishra, B. N.; Sangwan, Neelam S.

    2014-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R.Br., a pharmacologically important herb vernacularly called Gur-Mar (sugar eliminator), is widely known for its antidiabetic action. This property of the herb has been attributed to the presence of bioactive triterpene glycosides. Although some information regarding pharmacology and phytochemical profiles of the plant are available, no attempts have been made so far to decipher the biosynthetic pathway and key enzymes involved in biosynthesis of steryl glucosides. The present report deals with the identification and catalytic characterization of a glucosyltransferase, catalyzing biosynthesis of steryl glycosides. The full length cDNA (2572 bp) contained an open reading frame of 2106 nucleotides that encoded a 701 amino acid protein, falling into GT-B subfamily of glycosyltransferases. The GsSGT was expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme suggested its key role in the biosynthesis of steryl glucosides with catalytic preference for C-3 hydroxyl group of sterols. To our knowledge, this pertains to be the first report on cloning and biochemical characterization of a sterol metabolism gene from G. sylvestre R.Br. catalyzing glucosylation of a variety of sterols of biological origin from diverse organisms such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. PMID:25250339

  17. Expression of the Hevea brasiliensis (H.B.K.) Mull. Arg. 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase 1 in Tobacco Results in Sterol Overproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, H.; Grausem, B.; Benveniste, P.; Chye, M. L.; Tan, C. T.; Song, Y. H.; Chua, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    A genomic fragment encoding one (HMGR1) of the three 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductases (HMGRs) from Hevea brasiliensis (H.B.K.) Mull. Arg. (M.-L. Chye, C.-T. Tan, N.-H. Chua [1992] Plant Mol Biol 19: 473-484) was introduced into Nicotiana tabacum L. cv xanthi via Agrobacterium transformation to study the influence of the hmg1 gene product on plant isoprenoid biosynthesis. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild-type plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Transgenic lines showed an increase in the level of total sterols up to 6-fold, probably because of an increased expression level of hmg1 mRNA and a corresponding increased enzymatic activity for HMGR, when compared with the level of total sterols from control lines not expressing the hmg1 transgene. In addition to the pathway end products, campesterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol, some biosynthetic intermediates such as cycloartenol also accumulated in transgenic tissues. Most of the overproduced sterols were detected as steryl-esters and were likely to be stored in cytoplasmic lipid bodies. These data strongly support the conclusion that plant HMGR is a key limiting enzyme in phytosterol biosynthesis. PMID:12228630

  18. Characterization of a sterol carrier protein 2/3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase from the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis): a lepidopteran mechanism closer to that in mammals than that in dipterans

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Numerous invertebrate species belonging to several phyla cannot synthesize sterols de novo and rely on a dietary source of the compound. SCPx (sterol carrier protein 2/3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase) is a protein involved in the trafficking of sterols and oxidation of branched-chain fatty acids. We have isolated SCPx protein from Spodoptera littoralis (cotton leafworm) and have subjected it to limited amino acid sequencing. A reverse-transcriptase PCR-based approach has been used to clone the cDNA (1.9 kb), which encodes a 57 kDa protein. Northern blotting detected two mRNA transcripts, one of 1.9 kb, encoding SCPx, and one of 0.95 kb, presumably encoding SCP2 (sterol carrier protein 2). The former mRNA was highly expressed in midgut and Malpighian tubules during the last larval instar. Furthermore, constitutive expression of the gene was detected in the prothoracic glands, which are the main tissue producing the insect moulting hormone. There was no significant change in the 1.9 kb mRNA in midgut throughout development, but slightly higher expression in the early stages. Conceptual translation of the cDNA and a database search revealed that the gene includes the SCP2 sequence and a putative peroxisomal targeting signal in the C-terminal region. Also a cysteine residue at the putative active site for the 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase is conserved. Southern blotting showed that SCPx is likely to be encoded by a single-copy gene. The mRNA expression pattern and the gene structure suggest that SCPx from S. littoralis (a lepidopteran) is evolutionarily closer to that of mammals than to that of dipterans. PMID:15149283

  19. Impact of ice melting on distribution of particulate sterols in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H.; Riquelme, Pablo; Pantoja, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed variability in abundance and composition of sterols in waters of the fjord adjacent to glacier Jorge Montt, one of the fastest retreated glaciers in Patagonian Icefields. The study was carried out between August 2012 and November 2013 under different meltwater scenarios. Distribution of sterols in surface and bottom waters was determined by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry. Sterol concentration ranged from 18 to 1726 ng/L in surface and bottom waters and was positive correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. Under high melting conditions in austral summer, surface meltwaters showed high concentrations of sterols and were dominated by methylene-cholesterol, a representative sterol of centric diatoms. In the area near open ocean and in austral autumn, winter and spring in proglacial fjord, lower sterol concentrations in surface waters were accompanied by other microalgae sterols and an increase in relative abundance of plant sterols, evidencing a different source of organic matter. In autumn, when high meltwater flux was also evidenced, presence of stanols and an uncommon tri-unsaturated sterol suggests influence of meltwaters in composition of sterols in the downstream fjord. We conclude that ice melting can modify sterol composition by setting conditions for development of a singular phytoplankton population able to thrive in surface meltwater and by carrying glacier organic matter into Patagonian glacial fjords. In projected ice melting scenario, these changes in organic matter quantity and quality can potentially affect availability of organic substrates for heterotrophic activity and trophic status of glacial fjords. This research was funded by COPAS Sur-Austral (PFB-31)

  20. Transmembrane peptides influence the affinity of sterols for phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Joel H; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2010-07-21

    Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mbetaCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mbetaCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mbetaCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins can

  1. Expression of a fungal sterol desaturase improves tomato drought tolerance, pathogen resistance and nutritional quality

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Azam, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2012-01-01

    Crop genetic engineering mostly aims at improving environmental stress (biotic and abiotic) tolerance as well as nutritional quality. Empowering a single crop with multiple traits is highly demanding and requires manipulation of more than one gene. However, we report improved drought tolerance and fungal resistance along with the increased iron and polyunsaturated fatty acid content in tomato by expressing a single gene encoding C-5 sterol desaturase (FvC5SD) from an edible fungus Flammulina velutipes. FvC5SD is an iron binding protein involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. Morphological and biochemical analyses indicated ≈23% more epicuticular wax deposition in leaves of transgenic plants that provides an effective waterproof barrier resulting in improved protection from drought and infection by phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Furthermore, the transgenic fruits have improved nutritional value attributed to enhanced level of beneficial PUFA and 2-3 fold increase in total iron content. This strategy can be extended to other economically important crops. PMID:23230516

  2. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  3. A potential biochemical mechanism underlying the influence of sterol deprivation stress on Caenorhabditis elegans longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism for sterol-mediated alteration in aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we established sterol depletion conditions by treating worms with azacoprostane, which reduced mean lifespan of adult C. elegans by 35%. Proteomic analyses of egg proteins from treated and un...

  4. Inhaled tobacco sterols: uptake by the lungs and disposition to selected organs of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, W.E.; Maier, J.M.; Liebler, J.M.; Malinow, M.R.

    1988-08-01

    Tobacco sterols (cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) are present in tobacco smoke and appear in plasma of mammals exposed to cigarette smoke. Because tobacco sterols may be important in the pathogenesis of smoking-induced lung and vascular diseases, we studied the pattern of deposition of cigarette sterols in the lungs and appearance of cigarette sterols in plasma and body organs of rats. After exposure to twenty 5 ml puffs of smoke from tobacco labeled with (4-/sup 14/C)cholesterol or beta-(4-/sup 14/C)sitosterol, rats were killed just after exposure (day 0) and on days 2, 5, 8, 11, 15, and 30, and the lungs and selected body organs analyzed for activity. We found that cigarette sterols are associated with particulates in cigarette smoke, deposited mostly in distal airspaces and parenchyma of the lungs, and appear in plasma and several body organs for more than 30 days after this single exposure to cigarette smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained relatively small amounts of radiolabel for only the first few days, suggesting that most of the sterols were rapidly incorporated in lung parenchyma. Because disorders of sterol metabolism have been implicated in a variety of diseases including atherosclerosis and cancer, the significance of tobacco sterols to human smoking-induced diseases deserves further study.

  5. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D; Andersen, Tonni G; Pomorski, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S. cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans.

  6. Processes of recovering fatty acids and sterols from tall oil pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R. E.

    1985-06-18

    An improved process of enhancing the recovery of fatty acids from tall oil pitch is disclosed. The process includes a hydrolysis step for increasing the free fatty acid available for recovery from tall oil pitch during the distillation process. The hydrolysis step also enables the recovery of sterols where the tall oil pitch is of the type which is rich in sterol esters.

  7. Phylogenomics of Sterol Synthesis: Insights into the Origin, Evolution, and Diversity of a Key Eukaryotic Feature

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, Elie

    2009-01-01

    The availability of complete genomes from a wide sampling of eukaryotic diversity has allowed the application of phylogenomics approaches to study the origin and evolution of unique eukaryotic cellular structures, but these are still poorly applied to study unique eukaryotic metabolic pathways. Sterols are a good example because they are an essential feature of eukaryotic membranes. The sterol pathway has been well dissected in vertebrates, fungi, and land plants. However, although different types of sterols have been identified in other eukaryotic lineages, their pathways have not been fully characterized. We have carried out an extensive analysis of the taxonomic distribution and phylogeny of the enzymes of the sterol pathway in a large sampling of eukaryotic lineages. This allowed us to tentatively indicate features of the sterol pathway in organisms where this has not been characterized and to point out a number of steps for which yet-to-discover enzymes may be at work. We also inferred that the last eukaryotic common ancestor already harbored a large panel of enzymes for sterol synthesis and that subsequent evolution over the eukaryotic tree occurred by tinkering, mainly by gene losses. We highlight a high capacity of sterol synthesis in the myxobacterium Plesiocystis pacifica, and we support the hypothesis that the few bacteria that harbor homologs of the sterol pathway have likely acquired these via horizontal gene transfer from eukaryotes. Finally, we propose a potential candidate for the elusive enzyme performing C-3 ketoreduction (ERG27 equivalent) in land plants and probably in other eukaryotic phyla. PMID:20333205

  8. The sterols isolated from Evening Primrose oil modulate the release of proinflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Fernández-Arche, Angeles; Angel-Martín, María; García-Giménez, María Dolores

    2012-09-15

    Evening Primrose oil is a natural product extracted by cold-pressed from Oenothera biennis L. seeds. The unsaponifiable matter of this oil is an important source of interesting minor compounds, like long-chain fatty alcohols, sterols and tocopherols. In the present study, sterols were isolated from the unsaponifiable matter of Evening Primrose oil, and the composition was identified and quantified by GC and GC-MS. The major components of sterols fraction were β-Sitosterol and campesterol. We investigated the ability of sterols from Evening Primrose oil to inhibit the release of different proinflammatory mediators in vitro by murine peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Sterols significantly and dose-dependently decreased nitric oxide production. Western blot analysis showed that nitric oxide reduction was a consequence of the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthetase expression. Sterols also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukine 1β and tromboxane B₂. However, sterols did not reduce prostaglandin E₂. The reduction of eicosanoid release was related to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These results showed that sterols may have a protective effect on some mediators involved in inflammatory damage development, suggesting its potential value as a putative functional component of Evening Primrose oil.

  9. The use of the Dhcr7 knockout mouse to accurately determine the origin of fetal sterols

    PubMed Central

    Tint, G. S.; Yu, Hongwei; Shang, Quan; Xu, Guorong; Patel, Shailendra B.

    2006-01-01

    Mice with a targeted mutation of 3β-hydroxysterol Δ7-reductase (Dhcr7) that cannot convert 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol were used to identify the origin of fetal sterols. Because their heterozygous mothers synthesize cholesterol normally, virtually all sterols found in a Dhcr7 knockout fetus having a Δ7 or a Δ8 double bond must have been synthesized by the fetus itself but any cholesterol had to have come from the mother. Early in gestation, most fetal sterols were of maternal origin, but at approximately E13–14, in situ synthesis became increasingly important, and by birth, 55–60% of liver and lung sterols had been made by the fetus. In contrast, at E10–11, upon formation of the blood-brain barrier, the brain rapidly became the source of almost all of its own sterols (90% at birth). New, rapid, de novo sterol synthesis in brain was confirmed by the observation that concentrations of C24,25-unsaturated sterols were low in the brains of all very young fetuses but increased rapidly beginning at approximately E11–12. Reduced activity of sterol C24,25-reductase (Dhcr24) in brain, suggested by the abundance of C24,25-unsaturated compounds, seems to be the result of suppressed Dhcr24 expression. The early fetal brain also appears to conserve cholesterol by keeping cholesterol 24-hydroxylase expression low until approximately E18. PMID:16651660

  10. The biosynthesis, absorption, and origin of cholesterol and plant sterols in the Florida land crab.

    PubMed

    Douglass, T S; Connor, W E; Lin, D S

    1981-08-01

    In order to study the biosynthesis, composition, and origin of sterols in the Florida land crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi (Latreille), we fed 17 male crabs either a cholesterol-free or a high cholesterol diet for 2 to 7 weeks. The origin of sterols in these crabs, whether from biosynthesis or from the diet, was determined by tahree procedures: the incorporation of isotopic mevalonate into the cholesterol when the diet was cholesterol-free; the absorption of isotopic cholesterol and sitosterol from the diet; the cholesterol and plant sterol concentrations of hepatopancreas, plasma, and muscle under conditions of cholesterol-free and high cholesterol diets. In addition, the interconversion of cholesterol and sitosterol was investigated. Dietary sterols of plant and animal sources were readily absorbed and provided the major source of sterols for this species of crab. The biosynthesis of cholesterol from mevalonate in this crab was minimal. However, cholesterol was synthesized from dietary sitosterol by dealkylation. Cholesterol and the three plant sterols (24 epsilon-methyl cholesterol, stigmasterol, and sitosterol) were found in the hepatopancreas, plasma, and muscle of the crab. Plant sterols contributed from 9 to 37% of the total sterols in the hepatopancreas, plasma, and muscle of the crabs fed a cholesterol-free diet.

  11. Effect of sterol esters on lipid composition and antioxidant status of erythrocyte membrane of hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Avery; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cause of coronary heart disease. Erythrocyte membrane is affected during hypercholesterolemia. The effect of EPA-DHA rich sterol ester and ALA rich sterol ester on erythrocyte membrane composition, osmotic fragility in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats and changes in antioxidant status of erythrocyte membrane were studied. Erythrocyte membrane composition, osmotic fragility of the membrane and antioxidant enzyme activities was analyzed. Osmotic fragility data suggested that the erythrocyte membrane of hypercholesterolemia was relatively more fragile than that of the normal rats' membrane which could be reversed with the addition of sterol esters in the diet. The increased plasma cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats could also be lowered by the sterol ester administration. There was also marked changes in the antioxidant enzyme activities of the erythrocyte membrane. Antioxidant enzyme levels decreased in the membrane of the hypercholesterolemic subjects were increased with the treatment of the sterol esters. The antioxidative activity of ALA rich sterol ester was better in comparison to EPA-DHA rich sterol ester. In conclusion, rat erythrocytes appear to be deformed and became more fragile in cholesterol rich blood. This deformity and fragility was partially reversed by sterol esters by virtue of their ability to lower the extent of hypercholesterolemia.

  12. Lovastatin insensitive 1, a Novel pentatricopeptide repeat protein, is a potential regulatory factor of isoprenoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Tang, Jianwei; Nagata, Noriko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Seki, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Reiko; Kaneko, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Matsumoto, Shogo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2007-02-01

    Higher plants have two metabolic pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidal non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Despite the compartmentalization of these two pathways, metabolic flow occurs between them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cross-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lovastatin insensitive 1 (loi1), which is resistant to lovastatin and clomazone, inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. The accumulation of the major products of these pathways, i.e. sterols and chlorophyll, was less affected by lovastatin and clomazone, respectively, in loi1 than in the wild type. Furthermore, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity analysis showed higher activity of HMGR in loi1-1 treated with lovastatin than that in the WT. We consider that the lovastatin-resistant phenotype of loi1-1 was derived from this post-transcriptional up-regulation of HMGR. The LOI1 gene encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. PPR proteins are thought to regulate the expression of genes encoded in organelle genomes by post-transcriptional regulation in mitochondria or plastids. Our results demonstrate that LOI1 is predicted to localize in mitochondria and has the ability to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Our investigation revealed that the post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial RNA may be involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in both the MVA and MEP pathways.

  13. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” except that if the sole source of the plant sterols or stanols is vegetable oil, the claim may use the term “vegetable oil sterol esters” or “vegetable oil stanol esters”; (E) The claim does not attribute... supplies ___grams of vegetable oil sterol esters. (ii) Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol...

  14. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” except that if the sole source of the plant sterols or stanols is vegetable oil, the claim may use the term “vegetable oil sterol esters” or “vegetable oil stanol esters”; (E) The claim does not attribute... supplies ___grams of vegetable oil sterol esters. (ii) Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol...

  15. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...,” except that if the sole source of the plant sterols or stanols is vegetable oil, the claim may use the term “vegetable oil sterol esters” or “vegetable oil stanol esters”; (E) The claim does not attribute... supplies ___grams of vegetable oil sterol esters. (ii) Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol...

  16. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...,” except that if the sole source of the plant sterols or stanols is vegetable oil, the claim may use the term “vegetable oil sterol esters” or “vegetable oil stanol esters”; (E) The claim does not attribute... supplies ___grams of vegetable oil sterol esters. (ii) Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol...

  17. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” except that if the sole source of the plant sterols or stanols is vegetable oil, the claim may use the term “vegetable oil sterol esters” or “vegetable oil stanol esters”; (E) The claim does not attribute... supplies ___grams of vegetable oil sterol esters. (ii) Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol...

  18. Serum lipid and antioxidant responses in hypercholesterolemic men and women receiving plant sterol esters vary by apolipoprotein E genotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant sterol esters reduce serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), but with striking inter-individual variability. In this randomized, double-blind, controlled study, serum lipid, plant sterol, fat-soluble vitamin, and carotenoid responses to plant sterols were studied according to...

  19. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arcega-Cabrera, F; Velázquez-Tavera, N; Fargher, L; Derrien, M; Noreña-Barroso, E

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g(-1)) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g(-1)). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings

  20. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcega-Cabrera, F.; Velázquez-Tavera, N.; Fargher, L.; Derrien, M.; Noreña-Barroso, E.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g- 1) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g- 1). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings indicate

  1. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arcega-Cabrera, F; Velázquez-Tavera, N; Fargher, L; Derrien, M; Noreña-Barroso, E

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g(-1)) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g(-1)). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings

  2. Differential scanning calorimetric study of the effect of sterol side chain length and structure on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine thermotropic phase behavior.

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, T. P.; Vilchèze, C.; McElhaney, R. N.; Bittman, R.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers containing a series of cholesterol analogues varying in the length and structure of their alkyl side chains. We find that upon the incorporation of up to approximately 25 mol % of any of the side chain analogues, the DPPC main transition endotherm consists of superimposed sharp and broad components representing the hydrocarbon chain melting of sterol-poor and sterol-rich phospholipid domains, respectively. Moreover, the behavior of these components is dependent on sterol side chain length. Specifically, for all sterol/DPPC mixtures, the sharp component enthalpy decreases linearly to zero by 25 mol % sterol while the cooperativity is only moderately reduced from that observed in the pure phospholipid. In addition, the sharp component transition temperature decreases for all sterol/DPPC mixtures; however, the magnitude of the decrease is dependent on the sterol side chain length. With respect to the broad component, the enthalpy initially increases to a maximum around 25 mol % sterol, thereafter decreasing toward zero by 50 mol % sterol with the exception of the sterols with very short alkyl side chains. Both the transition temperature and cooperativity of the broad component clearly exhibit alkyl chain length-dependent effects, with both the transition temperature and cooperativity decreasing more dramatically for sterols with progressively shorter side chains. We ascribe the chain length-dependent effects on transition temperature and cooperativity to the hydrophobic mismatch between the sterol and the host DPPC bilayer (see McMullen, T. P. W., Lewis, R. N. A. H., and McElhaney, R. N. (1993) Biochemistry 32:516-522). Moreover, the effective stoichiometry of sterol/DPPC interactions is altered by a significantly large degree of hydrophobic mismatch between the sterol and the DPPC bilayer. Thus the short chain sterols appear to exhibit considerable immiscibility in

  3. High affinity of sigma1-binding sites for sterol isomerization inhibitors: evidence for a pharmacological relationship with the yeast sterol C8–C7 isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Fabian F; Reiter, Raphael J; Hanner, Markus; Glossmann, Hartmut

    1997-01-01

    The sigma-drug binding site of guinea-pig liver is carried by a protein which shares significant amino acid sequence similarities with the yeast sterol C8–C7 isomerase (ERG2 protein). Pharmacologically - but not structurally - the sigma1-site is also related to the emopamil binding protein, the mammalian sterol C8–C7 isomerase. We therefore investigated if sterol C8–C7 isomerase inhibitors are high affinity ligands for the (+)-[3H]-pentazocine labelled sigma1-binding site.Among the compounds which bound with high affinity to native hepatic and cerebral as well as to yeast expressed sigma1-binding sites were the agricultural fungicide fenpropimorph (Ki 0.005 nM), the antihypocholesterinaemic drugs triparanol (Ki 7.0 nM), AY-9944 (Ki 0.46 nM) and MDL28,815 (Ki 0.16 nM), the enantiomers of the ovulation inducer clomiphene (Ki 5.5 and 12 nM, respectively) and the antioestrogene tamoxifen (Ki 26 nM).Except for tamoxifen these affinities are essentially identical with those for the [3H]-ifenprodil labelled sterol C8–C7 isomerase of S. cerevisiae. This demonstrates that sigma1-binding protein and yeast isomerase are not only structurally but also pharmacologically related. Because of its affiliations with yeast and mammalian sterol isomerases we propose that the sigma1-binding site is localized on a sterol isomerase related protein, involved in postsqualene sterol biosynthesis. PMID:9146879

  4. Roles of Sterol Derivatives in Regulating the Properties of Phospholipid Bilayer Systems.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tham Thi; Suga, Keishi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Liposomes are considered an ideal biomimetic environment and are potential functional carriers for important molecules such as steroids and sterols. With respect to the regulation of self-assembly via sterol insertion, several pathways such as the sterol biosynthesis pathway are affected by the physicochemical properties of the membranes. However, the behavior of steroid or sterol molecules (except cholesterol (Chl)) in the self-assembled membranes has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, to analyze the fundamental behavior of steroid molecules in fluid membranes, Chl, lanosterol, and ergosterol were used as representative sterols in order to clarify how they regulate the physicochemical properties of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes. Membrane properties such as surface membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, surface membrane polarity, inner membrane polarity, and inner membrane fluidity were investigated using fluorescent probes, including 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylamino) naphthalene, 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene, and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. The results indicated that each sterol derivative could regulate the membrane properties in different ways. Specifically, Chl successfully increased the packing of the DOPC/Chl membrane proportional to its concentration, and lanosterol and ergosterol showed lower efficiencies in ordering the membrane in hydrophobic regions. Given the different binding positions of the probes in the membranes, the differences in membrane properties reflected the relationship between sterol derivatives and their locations in the membrane.

  5. Lipid-lowering Activity of Natural and Semi-Synthetic Sterols and Stanols.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of plant sterols/ stanols has long been demonstrated to reduce plasma cholesterol levels. The objective of this review is to demonstrate the lipid-lowering activity and anti-atherogenic effects of natural and semi-synthetic plant sterols/ stanols based on evidence from cell-culture studies, animal studies and clinical trials. Additionally, this review highlights certain molecular mechanisms by which plant sterols/ stanols lower plasma cholesterol levels with a special emphasis on factors that affect the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols. The crystalline nature and the poor oil solubility of these natural products could be important factors that limit their cholesterol-lowering efficiency. Several attempts have been made to improve the cholesterol-lowering activity by enhancing the bioavailability of crystalline sterols and stanols. Approaches involved reduction of the crystal size and/or esterification with fatty acids from vegetable or fish oils. However, the most promising approach in this context is the chemical modification of plant sterols /stanols into water soluble disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphates analogue by esterification with ascorbic acid. This novel semi-synthetic stanol derivative has improved efficacy over natural plant sterols/ stanols and can provide additional benefits by combining the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant stanols with the antioxidant potential of ascorbic acid. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626241

  6. Sterol Transport In Yeast and the Oxysterol Binding Protein Homologue (OSH) Family

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Prinz, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol are a significant component of eukaryotic cellular membranes, and their unique physical properties influence a wide variety of membrane processes. It is known that the concentration of sterol within the membrane varies widely between organelles, and that the cell actively maintains this distribution through various transport processes. Vesicular pathways such as secretion or endocytosis may account for this traffic, but increasing evidence highlights the importance of nonvesicular routes as well. The structure of an oxysterol-binding protein homologue (OSH) in yeast (Osh4p/Kes1p) has recently been solved, identifying it as a sterol binding protein, and there is evidence consistent with the role of a cytoplasmic, nonvesicular sterol transporter. Yeast have seven such proteins, which appear to have distinct but overlapping functions with regard to maintaining intracellular sterol distribution and homeostasis. Control of sterol distribution can have far-reaching effects on membrane-related functions, and Osh proteins have been implicated in a variety of processes such as secretory vesicle budding from the Golgi and establishment of cell polarity. This review summarizes the current body of knowledge regarding this family and its potential functions, placing it in the context of known and hypothesized pathways of sterol transport in yeast. PMID:17434796

  7. Relationship between changes in mRNAs of the genes encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage in head kidney and plasma levels of cortisol in response to different kinds of acute stress in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Geslin, Malika; Auperin, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the expression of several genes involved in cortisol synthesis in head kidneys, the site of cortisol production, and in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was examined in response to two different acute stressors and an acute ACTH treatment. mRNAs levels of the "steroidogenic acute regulatory" (StAR) sterol transport protein, which transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane as well as cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage (P450(SCC)) were determined in head kidney (containing the interrenal tissue). In one experiment, we also quantified 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3B-HSD) and cytochrome P450(11beta) (11B-H) mRNAs. The presence of these four transcripts in the head kidney was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. For each stress condition, mRNA levels were quantified by quantitative or real-time RT-PCR. The results of these two methods were highly correlated. An acute stress induced by capture, short confinement (2min), and anesthesia (3min) resulted in significant elevation of plasma cortisol (30-fold higher than controls) and an increase in levels of StAR and P450(SCC) mRNAs 3h post-stress. When fish were submitted to an acute stress caused by 5min of chase with a net in a tank, plasma cortisol reached a peak within 1h, but after 3h, levels were only 5-fold higher in stressed trout than in controls and no variations in the expression of StAR, P450(SCC), 3B-HSD, and 11B-H were observed whatever the time post-stress. One hour after acute ACTH stimulation (5IU/kg), plasma cortisol level was 4-fold higher than in control trout and no changes in StAR and P450(SCC) mRNAs levels were detected. The data suggest that the high levels of cortisol after stress need an activation of genes involved in cortisol synthesis, but lower levels do not. Futhermore, under these three test conditions, we always found a strong positive correlation between mRNA levels of StAR and P450(SCC), in contrast to what has been described in

  8. Post-ingestive feedbacks and associative learning regulate the intake of unsuitable sterols in a generalist grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Behmer, S T; Elias, D O; Bernays, E A

    1999-03-01

    Behavioural studies of the grasshopper Schistocerca americana were undertaken to identify the mechanisms that regulate the intake of dietary sterols. In the first experiment, grasshoppers were allowed to feed on spinach, a plant containing only unsuitable sterols; immediately after this first meal, a suitable or unsuitable sterol was injected into the haemolymph. Grasshoppers injected with unsuitable sterols had second meals on spinach that were significantly shorter than those of grasshoppers injected with suitable sterols, indicating that unsuitable dietary sterols are detected post-ingestively. In the second experiment, grasshoppers were fed food containing only unsuitable sterols and were then presented with glass-fibre discs containing different concentrations of a suitable sterol or sucrose only (the control). The results suggest that grasshoppers do not use a direct feedback operating on mouthpart chemoreceptors to regulate their intake of suitable sterols. In the third experiment, grasshoppers were presented with artificial diets containing different sterols and flavours, and feeding was observed over a sequence of meals. The results from both the first and last experiments suggest a role for associative learning in regulating the intake of unsuitable sterols.

  9. Sterols and triterpenes in cell culture of Hyssopus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Zuzanna; Wysokińska, Halina

    2003-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures from hypocotyl-derived callus of Hyssopus officinalis were found to produce two sterols i. e. beta-sitosterol (1) and stigmasterol (2), as well as several known pentacyclic triterpenes with an oleanene and ursene skeleton. The triterpenes were identified as oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (5), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6), 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (7), and 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (8). Compounds 5-8 were isolated as their acetates (6, 8) or bromolactone acetates (5, 7).

  10. Sterols and triterpenes in cell culture of Hyssopus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Zuzanna; Wysokińska, Halina

    2003-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures from hypocotyl-derived callus of Hyssopus officinalis were found to produce two sterols i. e. beta-sitosterol (1) and stigmasterol (2), as well as several known pentacyclic triterpenes with an oleanene and ursene skeleton. The triterpenes were identified as oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (5), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6), 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (7), and 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (8). Compounds 5-8 were isolated as their acetates (6, 8) or bromolactone acetates (5, 7). PMID:12872919

  11. Sterol carrier protein2-like activity in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, A; Wadsworth, J A; Chanderbhan, R; Wiesenfeld, P; Noland, B; Scallen, T; Vahouny, G V; Gallo, L L

    1988-03-01

    A sterol carrier protein2 (SCP2)-like activity has been demonstrated in rat intestinal mucosal homogenates and in isolated intestinal cells from both crypt and villus zones. The results indicate the presence of a protein with similar molecular weight and antigenicity to that of authentic SCP2 purified from rat liver cytosol. Like liver SCP2, mucosal cytosol stimulates pregnenolone production in rat adrenal mitochondria and acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase activity of liver and mucosal microsomes. The distribution of SCP2-like activity as determined by radioimmunoassay indicates high levels in mitochondria and cytosol and relatively lower levels in microsomes and in brush-border membranes. The widespread distribution of SCP2-like protein in the intestine is consistent with potential transfer functions in all phases of cholesterol processing. PMID:3379341

  12. Cell-free transfer of sterols by plant fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Morre, D.J.; Wilkinson, F.E.; Morre, D.M. ); Moreau, P. ); Sandelius, A.S. ); Penel, C.; Greppin, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Microsomes from etiolated hypocotyls of soybean or leaves of light-grown spinach radiolabeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)acetate or in vitro with ({sup 3}H)squalene or ({sup 3}H)cholesterol as donor transferred radioactivity to unlabeled acceptor membranes immobilized on nitrocellulose. Most efficient transfer was with plasma membrane or tonoplast as the acceptor. The latter were highly purified by aqueous two-phase partition (plasma membrane) and preparative free-flow electrophoresis (tonoplast and plasma membrane). Plasma membrane- and tonoplast-free microsomes and purified mitochondria were less efficient acceptors. Sterol transfer was verified by thin-layer chromatography of extracted lipids. Transfer was time- and temperature-dependent, required ATP but was not promoted by cytosol. The nature of the donor (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus or both) and of the transfer mechanism is under investigation.

  13. Multicomponent synthesis of 4,4-dimethyl sterol analogues and their effect on eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fernando; Cirigliano, Adriana M; Dávola, María Eugenia; Cabrera, Gabriela M; García Liñares, Guadalupe E; Labriola, Carlos; Barquero, Andrea A; Ramírez, Javier A

    2014-06-01

    Most sterols, such as cholesterol and ergosterol, become functional only after the removal of the two methyl groups at C-4 from their biosynthetic precursors. Nevertheless, some findings suggest that 4,4-dimethyl sterols might be involved in specific physiological processes. In this paper we present the synthesis of a collection of analogues of 4,4-dimethyl sterols with a diamide side chain and a preliminary analysis of their in vitro activity on selected biological systems. The key step for the synthesis involves an Ugi condensation, a versatile multicomponent reaction. Some of the new compounds showed antifungal and cytotoxic activity.

  14. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry study of sterols from Pinus elliotti tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Evans, R.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A comparative study of the sterol components of slash pine (Pinus elliotti) callus tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings was carried out using GC-MS techniques. Cholesterol, desmosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and cycloeucalenol were identified in all tissues while lophenol and 24-methylenelophenol were identified in only the seed and seedlings. 24-Ethylidenelophenol was detected in trace concentrations in only the seedlings. Sitosterol was the predominant sterol component, i.e., 80.8, 38.1 and 47.8% of the tissue culture, seed and seedling sterols, respectively.

  15. Distribution and factors affecting adsorption of sterols in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Qiao, Xiuwen; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanman

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the concentrations and distribution of eight sterol compounds in the surface sediments of Bosten Lake and Manas Lake, Xinjiang, China. The ratios of sterols as diagnostic indices were used to identify pollution sources. The sediment of the two lakes was selected as an adsorbent to investigate the adsorption behaviour of sterols. Results showed that the sterols were widely distributed in the sediments of the lakes in the study areas. The total concentrations of the detected sterols in Bosten Lake and in Manas Lake were 1.584-27.897 and 2.048-18.373 μg g(-1)∙dw, respectively. In all of the sampling sites, the amount of faecal sterols was less than that of plant sterols. β-sitosterol was the dominant plant sterol with a mean concentration of 2.378 ± 2.234 μg g(-1)∙dw; cholesterol was the most abundant faecal sterol with a mean concentration of 1.060 ± 1.402 μg g(-1)∙dw. The pollution level was higher in Bosten Lake than in Manas Lake. Majority of the ratios clearly demonstrated that the contamination by human faecal sources was occurring at stations which are adjacent to residential areas and water inlets. The adsorption behaviour of sterols to sediment suggested that the sterol adsorption coefficients were reduced as temperature increased. As salinity increased, the adsorption quantity also increased. As pH increased, the sediment adsorption of sterol slightly increased because the strong alkaline solution is not conducive to the adsorption of sterols. The ratios between sterols did not change largely with the change in external factors.

  16. Structure of the human gene and two rat cDNAs encoding the alpha chain of GTP-binding regulatory protein Go: two different mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, T; Toyama, R; Itoh, H; Kozasa, T; Matsuoka, M; Kaziro, Y

    1991-01-01

    Go is a specific class ("other") of signal-transducing heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) that is expressed in high levels in mammalian brain. We have cloned two different rat cDNAs encoding the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2) and a human Go alpha chromosomal gene. The human Go alpha gene spans more than 100 kilobases and contains 11 exons, including one noncoding exon in the 3' flanking region. The 5' flanking region is highly G + C-rich and contains five G.C boxes (Sp1 binding sites) but no TATA box. Exons 7 and 8 coding for amino acid residues 242-354 of Go alpha protein are duplicated (referred to as exons 7A, 7B, 8A, and 8B). It was found that exons 7A and 8A code for Go alpha-1, and 7B and 8B code for Go alpha-2. This indicates that two different Go alpha mRNAs may be generated by alternative splicing of a single Go alpha gene. The splice sites of the Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2 genes are completely identical with those encoding human inhibitory G protein alpha subunits Gi2 alpha and Gi3 alpha [Itoh, H., Toyama, R., Kozasa, T., Tsukamoto, T., Matsuoka, M. & Kaziro, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 6656-6664] and also transducin G protein alpha subunit Gt1 alpha [Raport, C. J., Dere, B. & Hurley, J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 7122-7128]. Sequence homology and conservation of the exon-intron organization indicate that the genes coding for Go alpha, Gi2 alpha, Gi3 alpha, Gt1 alpha, and probably Gi1 alpha may be evolved from a common progenitor. Like Go alpha-1, Go alpha-2 is expressed mainly in brain. Images PMID:1901650

  17. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking.

  18. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nancy C.; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  19. Mutations in UDP-Glucose:sterol glucosyltransferase in Arabidopsis cause transparent testa phenotype and suberization defect in seeds.

    PubMed

    DeBolt, Seth; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schrick, Kathrin; Auer, Manfred; Beisson, Fred; Bischoff, Volker; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Carroll, Andrew; Hematy, Kian; Li, Yonghua; Milne, Jennifer; Nair, Meera; Schaller, Hubert; Zemla, Marcin; Somerville, Chris

    2009-09-01

    In higher plants, the most abundant sterol derivatives are steryl glycosides (SGs) and acyl SGs. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes, UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, that encode UDP-Glc:sterol glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of SGs. Lines having mutations in UGT80A2, UGT80B1, or both UGT80A2 and UGT8B1 were identified and characterized. The ugt80A2 lines were viable and exhibited relatively minor effects on plant growth. Conversely, ugt80B1 mutants displayed an array of phenotypes that were pronounced in the embryo and seed. Most notable was the finding that ugt80B1 was allelic to transparent testa15 and displayed a transparent testa phenotype and a reduction in seed size. In addition to the role of UGT80B1 in the deposition of flavanoids, a loss of suberization of the seed was apparent in ugt80B1 by the lack of autofluorescence at the hilum region. Moreover, in ugt80B1, scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the outer integument of the seed coat lost the electron-dense cuticle layer at its surface and displayed altered cell morphology. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers confirmed a drastic decrease in aliphatic suberin and cutin-like polymers that was associated with an inability to limit tetrazolium salt uptake. The findings suggest a membrane function for SGs and acyl SGs in trafficking of lipid polyester precursors. An ancillary observation was that cellulose biosynthesis was unaffected in the double mutant, inconsistent with a predicted role for SGs in priming cellulose synthesis.

  20. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  1. Unsaturated lipid matrices protect plant sterols from degradation during heating treatment.

    PubMed

    Barriuso, Blanca; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2016-04-01

    The interest in plant sterols enriched foods has recently enhanced due to their healthy properties. The influence of the unsaturation degree of different fatty acids methyl esters (FAME: stearate, oleate, linoletate and linolenate) on a mixture of three plant sterols (PS: campesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol) was evaluated at 180 °C for up to 180 min. Sterols degraded slower in the presence of unsaturated FAME. Both PS and FAME degradation fit a first order kinetic model (R(2)>0.9). Maximum oxysterols concentrations were achieved at 20 min in neat PS and 120 min in lipid mixtures and this maximum amount decreased with increasing their unsaturation degree. In conclusion, the presence of FAME delayed PS degradation and postponed oxysterols formation. This protective effect was further promoted by increasing the unsaturation degree of FAME. This evidence could help industries to optimize the formulation of sterol-enriched products, so that they could maintain their healthy properties during cooking or processing.

  2. Evaluation of anthropogenic contamination using sterol markers in a tropical estuarine system of northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frena, Morgana; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Madureira, Luiz A S; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-08-15

    The São Francisco River estuarine system, located in the Northeast coast of Brazil, has great economic, tourist and social importance. Its waters are used for activities such as agriculture, aquaculture, navigation and fishery, which supplies the surrounding communities. In this study, sterols markers were determined in twenty-eight sediment samples from São Francisco River estuary by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sterol analysis was useful to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic organic matter (OM) sources in the studied area. Six sterols were quantified, suggesting different sources. Concentrations of fecal sterol (coprostanol) were lower than 500ngg(-1), suggesting no indicative of severe sewage contamination.However, two stations showed concentrations around 100ngg(-1) and the values for the coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol ratios indicates sewage contamination. The results in this study may be considered as baseline concentrations to be used as future reference for monitoring programs to prevent anthropogenic impacts.

  3. Non-cholesterol Sterols in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dyslipidemias: A Review.

    PubMed

    Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Non-cholesterol sterols have been used as markers of cholesterol intestinal absorption and hepatic synthesis, leading to a better understanding of cholesterol homeostasis in humans. This review discusses the main noncholesterol sterols that are clinically useful, different methods to quantify the factors associated with blood concentration, and the potential role of non-cholesterol sterols in the diagnosis and treatment of different types of dyslipidemia. The main indication is the use of non-cholesterol sterols for the diagnosis of rare diseases associated with defects in cholesterol synthesis or anomalies in the absorption and/or elimination of phytosterols. However, other potential uses, including the diagnosis of certain hypercholesterolemias and the individualization of lipid-lowering therapies, are promising as they could help treat a wider population.

  4. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    IKEKAWA, Nobuo; FUJIMOTO, Yoshinori; ISHIGURO, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970–1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids. PMID:24126284

  5. Excretion of sterols from the skin of normal and hypercholesterolemic humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Ashim K.; Connor, William E.; Spector, Arthur A.

    1972-01-01

    The 24 hr sterol excretion from the entire skin surface was determined in six normal and five hypercholesterolemic (Type II) patients fed a controlled, eucaloric diet containing 400 mg of plant sterols. All subjects received radiolabeled cholesterol intravenously in order to measure cholesterol turnover and exchange. The 24 hr skin surface lipids were collected subsequently at intervals of 7-10 days. Sterols were quantified and identified by a combination of thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographic methods. The mean 24 hr excretion of cholesterol in milligrams was 82.6 in the normal subjects and 82.7 in the hypercholesterolemic patients. Cholesterol constituted 89% of the total sterol excretion through the skin surface in both groups. The specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the skin surface lipids increased gradually after the intravenous administration of the isotope. Within 4-5 wk the specific activity equaled and then remained higher than that of the plasma up to 10 wk. These specific activity curves suggested that, for at least some of skin surface cholesterol, there was a precursor-product relationship between the plasma cholesterol and the skin cholesterol. The presence of plant sterols, β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol in the skin surface lipids of man has not been reported previously. We identified these sterols in the skin surface lipids of all of our subjects. They constituted about 7% of the total skin surface sterols. The occurrence of plant sterols in the skin surface lipids suggested that plasma sterols were transferred from the plasma into the skin. 1-2% of the skin surface sterols were tentatively identified as lathosterol and lanosterol. The present study documented that a significant amount of cholesterol was excreted from the skin surface and that probably there was a net transfer of plasma cholesterol into the skin surface lipids. Both normal subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients excreted similar amounts of cholesterol per

  6. Characterization, mutagenesis and mechanistic analysis of an ancient algal sterol C24-methyltransferase: Implications for understanding sterol evolution in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Brad A; Collins, Emily K; Howard, Alicia L; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J; Miller, Matthew B; Thomas, Crista D; Pleasant, Stephanie K; Nes, W David

    2015-05-01

    Sterol C24-methyltransferases (SMTs) constitute a group of sequence-related proteins that catalyze the pattern of sterol diversity across eukaryotic kingdoms. The only gene for sterol alkylation in green algae was identified and the corresponding catalyst from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) was characterized kinetically and for product distributions. The properties of CrSMT were similar to those predicted for an ancient SMT expected to possess broad C3-anchoring requirements for substrate binding and formation of 24β-methyl/ethyl Δ(25(27))-olefin products typical of primitive organisms. Unnatural Δ(24(25))-sterol substrates, missing a C4β-angular methyl group involved with binding orientation, convert to product ratios in favor of Δ(24(28))-products. Remodeling the active site to alter the electronics of Try110 (to Leu) results in delayed timing of the hydride migration from methyl attack of the Δ(24)-bond, that thereby produces metabolic switching of product ratios in favor of Δ(25(27))-olefins or impairs the second C1-transfer activity. Incubation of [27-(13)C]lanosterol or [methyl-(2)H3]SAM as co-substrates established the CrSMT catalyzes a sterol methylation pathway by the "algal" Δ(25(27))-olefin route, where methylation proceeds by a conserved SN2 reaction and de-protonation proceeds from the pro-Z methyl group on lanosterol corresponding to C27. This previously unrecognized catalytic competence for an enzyme of sterol biosynthesis, together with phylogenomic analyses, suggest that mutational divergence of a promiscuous SMT produced substrate- and phyla-specific SMT1 (catalyzes first biomethylation) and SMT2 (catalyzes second biomethylation) isoforms in red and green algae, respectively, and in the case of SMT2 selection afforded modification in reaction channeling necessary for the switch in ergosterol (24β-methyl) biosynthesis to stigmasterol (24α-ethyl) biosynthesis during the course of land plant evolution.

  7. Free, esterified and residual bound sterols in Black Sea Unit I sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, J. W.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schenck, P. A.; Volkman, J. K.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed compositional data for the sterols isolated from a surface, Unit I, sediment from the Black Sea are reported. A procedure based on digitonin precipitation has been used to separate the more abundant free sterols from those occurring in esterified forms. Saponification of the solvent extracted sediment residue liberated only a small quantity of residual bound sterols in contrast to studies of other sediments. 4-Methylsterols are much more abundant than 4-desmethylsterols in both the free and esterified sterol fractions which we attribute to a major dinoflagellate input, as in deeper Unit II sediment. The desmethylsterol fraction appears to derive from a variety of sources including dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, diatoms, terrigenous detritus and perhaps invertebrates. 5α(H)-Stanols are particularly abundant in the free sterol fraction. An analysis of the stanol/stenol ratios suggests that the 4-desmethyl-5α(H)-stanols are the result of specific microbial reductions of Δ 5-sterols and/or the reflection of a contribution of stanol containing source organisms.

  8. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals

    PubMed Central

    Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion—via a novel pathway—of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages. PMID:27383626

  9. Fluorescent Sterols and Cholesteryl Esters as Probes for Intracellular Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Solanko, Katarzyna A.; Modzel, Maciej; Solanko, Lukasz M.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol transport between cellular organelles comprised vesicular trafficking and nonvesicular exchange; these processes are often studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. A major challenge for using this approach is producing analogs of cholesterol with suitable brightness and structural and chemical properties comparable with those of cholesterol. This review surveys currently used fluorescent sterols with respect to their behavior in model membranes, their photophysical properties, as well as their transport and metabolism in cells. In the first part, several intrinsically fluorescent sterols, such as dehydroergosterol or cholestatrienol, are discussed. These polyene sterols (P-sterols) contain three conjugated double bonds in the steroid ring system, giving them slight fluorescence in ultraviolet light. We discuss the properties of P-sterols relative to cholesterol, outline their chemical synthesis, and explain how to image them in living cells and organisms. In particular, we show that P-sterol esters inserted into low-density lipoprotein can be tracked in the fibroblasts of Niemann–Pick disease using high-resolution deconvolution microscopy. We also describe fluorophore-tagged cholesterol probes, such as BODIPY-, NBD-, Dansyl-, or Pyrene-tagged cholesterol, and eventual esters of these analogs. Finally, we survey the latest developments in the synthesis and use of alkyne cholesterol analogs to be labeled with fluorophores by click chemistry and discuss the potential of all approaches for future applications. PMID:27330304

  10. Quantitation of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus Chia) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa

    2006-10-01

    The chemical composition (fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols) of the oil from 14 samples of turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus L.) fruits is presented in this study. The oil content of the samples varied in a relatively small range between 38.4 g/100 g and 45.1 g/100 g. The dominating fatty acid of the oil is oleic acid, which accounted for 43.0 to 51.3% of the total fatty acids. The total content of vitamin E active compounds in the oils ranged between 396.8 and 517.7 mg/kg. The predominant isomers were alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, with approximate equal amounts between about 110 and 150 mg/kg. The seed oil of P. terebinthus also contained different tocotrienols, with gamma-tocotrienol as the dominate compound of this group, which amounted to between 79 and 114 mg/kg. The total content of sterols of the oils was determined to be between 1341.3 and 1802.5 mg/kg, with beta-sitosterol as the predominent sterol that accounted for more than 80% of the total amount of sterols. Other sterols in noteworthy amounts were campesterol, Delta5-avenasterol, and stigmasterol, which came to about 3-5% of the total sterols.

  11. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Najle, Sebastián R; Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2016-07-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion-via a novel pathway-of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages.

  12. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Najle, Sebastián R; Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2016-07-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion-via a novel pathway-of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages. PMID:27383626

  13. Sterol limitation in a pollen-fed omnivorous lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Pilorget, Lucia; Buckner, James; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional constraints of non-prey foods for entomophagous arthropods are seldom investigated, yet are crucial to understanding their nutritional ecology and function within natural and managed environments. We investigated whether pollen from five maize hybrids was of variable quality for the lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata, whether suitability of these pollens was related with their sterol profiles, and how augmenting sterols (beta-sitosterol, cholesterol, or ergosterol) affected the fitness and performance of C. maculata. Preimaginal survival, development rates, the duration of the pre-oviposition period, post-mortem adult dry weight, adult hind tibial length, sex ratio, fecundity, cohort generation time (T(c)), net replacement rate (R(0)) and intrinsic rate of increase (r) were measured. Individual sterols in the pollens were quantified using GC-MS. Pollens were of variable suitability for C. maculata; the development rate was positively correlated with the amount of 24-methylene-cholesterol and r was positively correlated with episterol and 24-methylene-lophenol found in the pollens. Performance of C. maculata was entirely unaffected by augmenting pollen meals with sterols. This research shows that pollens clearly vary in their sterol contents intraspecifically, which affects their suitability for omnivores that rely on pollen. However, sterols appear to be only one of the limiting nutrients in pollens.

  14. Sterol limitation in a pollen-fed omnivorous lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Pilorget, Lucia; Buckner, James; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional constraints of non-prey foods for entomophagous arthropods are seldom investigated, yet are crucial to understanding their nutritional ecology and function within natural and managed environments. We investigated whether pollen from five maize hybrids was of variable quality for the lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata, whether suitability of these pollens was related with their sterol profiles, and how augmenting sterols (beta-sitosterol, cholesterol, or ergosterol) affected the fitness and performance of C. maculata. Preimaginal survival, development rates, the duration of the pre-oviposition period, post-mortem adult dry weight, adult hind tibial length, sex ratio, fecundity, cohort generation time (T(c)), net replacement rate (R(0)) and intrinsic rate of increase (r) were measured. Individual sterols in the pollens were quantified using GC-MS. Pollens were of variable suitability for C. maculata; the development rate was positively correlated with the amount of 24-methylene-cholesterol and r was positively correlated with episterol and 24-methylene-lophenol found in the pollens. Performance of C. maculata was entirely unaffected by augmenting pollen meals with sterols. This research shows that pollens clearly vary in their sterol contents intraspecifically, which affects their suitability for omnivores that rely on pollen. However, sterols appear to be only one of the limiting nutrients in pollens. PMID:19772860

  15. Postprandial plasma oxyphytosterol concentrations after consumption of plant sterol or stanol enriched mixed meals in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sabine; Mensink, Ronald P; Konings, Maurice; Schött, Hans-F; Friedrichs, Silvia; Husche, Constanze; Lütjohann, Dieter; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent results on the relationship between increased plant sterol concentrations with cardiovascular risk, which might be related to the formation of oxyphytosterols (plant sterol oxidation products) from plant sterols. However, determinants of oxyphytosterol formation and metabolism are largely unknown. It is known, however, that serum plant sterol concentrations increase after daily consumption of plant sterol enriched products, while concentrations decrease after plant stanol consumption. Still, we have earlier reported that fasting oxyphytosterol concentrations did not increase after consuming a plant sterol- or a plant stanol enriched margarine (3.0g/d of plant sterols or stanols) for 4weeks. Since humans are in a non-fasting state for most part of the day, we have now investigated effects on oxyphytosterol concentrations during the postprandial state. For this, subjects consumed a shake (50g of fat, 12g of protein, 67g of carbohydrates), containing no, or 3.0g of plant sterols or plant stanols. Blood samples were taken up to 8h and after 4h subjects received a second shake (without plant sterols or plant stanols). Serum oxyphytosterol concentrations were determined in BHT-enriched EDTA plasma via GC-MS/MS. 7β-OH-campesterol and 7β-OH-sitosterol concentrations were significantly higher after consumption of a mixed meal enriched with plant sterol esters compared to the control and plant stanol ester meal. These increases were seen only after consumption of the second shake, illustrative for a second meal effect. Non-oxidized campesterol and sitosterol concentrations also increased after plant sterol consumption, in parallel with 7β-OH concentrations and again only after the second meal. Apparently, plant sterols and oxyphytosterols follow the same second meal effect as described for dietary cholesterol. However, the question remains whether the increase in oxyphytosterols in the postprandial phase is due to

  16. Postprandial plasma oxyphytosterol concentrations after consumption of plant sterol or stanol enriched mixed meals in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sabine; Mensink, Ronald P; Konings, Maurice; Schött, Hans-F; Friedrichs, Silvia; Husche, Constanze; Lütjohann, Dieter; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent results on the relationship between increased plant sterol concentrations with cardiovascular risk, which might be related to the formation of oxyphytosterols (plant sterol oxidation products) from plant sterols. However, determinants of oxyphytosterol formation and metabolism are largely unknown. It is known, however, that serum plant sterol concentrations increase after daily consumption of plant sterol enriched products, while concentrations decrease after plant stanol consumption. Still, we have earlier reported that fasting oxyphytosterol concentrations did not increase after consuming a plant sterol- or a plant stanol enriched margarine (3.0g/d of plant sterols or stanols) for 4weeks. Since humans are in a non-fasting state for most part of the day, we have now investigated effects on oxyphytosterol concentrations during the postprandial state. For this, subjects consumed a shake (50g of fat, 12g of protein, 67g of carbohydrates), containing no, or 3.0g of plant sterols or plant stanols. Blood samples were taken up to 8h and after 4h subjects received a second shake (without plant sterols or plant stanols). Serum oxyphytosterol concentrations were determined in BHT-enriched EDTA plasma via GC-MS/MS. 7β-OH-campesterol and 7β-OH-sitosterol concentrations were significantly higher after consumption of a mixed meal enriched with plant sterol esters compared to the control and plant stanol ester meal. These increases were seen only after consumption of the second shake, illustrative for a second meal effect. Non-oxidized campesterol and sitosterol concentrations also increased after plant sterol consumption, in parallel with 7β-OH concentrations and again only after the second meal. Apparently, plant sterols and oxyphytosterols follow the same second meal effect as described for dietary cholesterol. However, the question remains whether the increase in oxyphytosterols in the postprandial phase is due to

  17. Enhancement of carotenoid production by disrupting the C22-sterol desaturase gene (CYP61) in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast that synthesizes astaxanthin, which is a carotenoid with a great biotechnological impact. The ergosterol and carotenoid synthesis pathways are derived from the mevalonate pathway, and in both pathways, cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Results In this study, we isolated and described the X. dendrorhous CYP61 gene, which encodes a cytochrome P450 involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. This gene is composed of nine exons and encodes a 526 amino acid polypeptide that shares significant percentages of identity and similitude with the C22-sterol desaturase, CYP61, from other fungi. Mutants derived from different parental strains were obtained by disrupting the CYP61 gene with an antibiotic selection marker. These mutants were not able to produce ergosterol and accumulated ergosta-5,8,22-trien-3-ol and ergosta-5,8-dien-3-ol. Interestingly, all of the mutants had a more intense red color phenotype than their respective parental strains. The carotenoid composition was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by RP-HPLC, revealing that the carotenoid content was higher in the mutant strains without major changes in their composition. The expression of the HMGR gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in the mevalonate pathway (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase), was analyzed by RT-qPCR showing that its transcript levels are higher in the CYP61 mutants. Conclusions These results suggest that in X. dendrorhous, ergosterol regulates HMGR gene expression by a negative feedback mechanism and in this way; it contributes in the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23075035

  18. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  19. Effect of plant sterols on the lipid profile of patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Randomised, experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have been conducted on supplementing the daily diet with plant sterol ester-enriched milk derivatives in order to reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and, consequently, cardiovascular risk. However, clinical practice guidelines on hypercholesterolaemia state that there is not sufficient evidence to recommend their use in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia. The main objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of the intake of 2 g of plant sterol esters a day in lowering LDL-cholesterol levels in patients diagnosed with hypercholesterolaemia. The specific objectives are: 1) to quantify the efficacy of the daily intake of plant sterol esters in lowering LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypercholesterolaemia; 2) to evaluate the occurrence of adverse effects of the daily intake of plant sterol esters; 3) to identify the factors that determine a greater reduction in lipid levels in subjects receiving plant sterol ester supplements. Methods/Design Randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled experimental trial carried out at family doctors' surgeries at three health centres in the Health Area of Albacete (Spain). The study subjects will be adults diagnosed with "limit" or "defined" hypercholesterolaemia and who have LDL cholesterol levels of 130 mg/dl or over. A dairy product in the form of liquid yoghurt containing 2 g of plant sterol ester per container will be administered daily after the main meal, for a period of 24 months. The control group will receive a daily unit of yogurt not supplemented with plant sterol esters that has a similar appearance to the enriched yoghurt. The primary variable is the change in lipid profile at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The secondary variables are: change in cardiovascular risk, adherence to the dairy product, adverse effects, adherence to dietary recommendations, frequency of food consumption, basic physical examination data, health problems, lipid

  20. Sterol composition in field-grown and cultured mycelia of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-fa; Liu, Tong; Xiang, Xiao-yan; Gu, Qi

    2007-07-01

    Sterols are one of the active classes of compounds in Inonotus obliquus for their effective therapy of many diseases. In field environment, this fungus accumulates large amount of sterols. In cultured mycelia, however, this class of compounds is less accumulated. For analyzing the factors responsible for differing sterol composition, the field-grown and cultured mycelia were extracted with 80% ethanol at room temperature and total sterols were prepared using silicon gel column chromatography followed by identification using either GC-MS or spectroscopic methods. For culturing Inonotus obliquus, the seed culture was grown either in basic medium consisting of glucose (2%), yeast extract (0.5%), KH2PO4 (0.01%), MgSO4.7H20 (0.05%) and distilled water at pH 6.5, or the basic medium supplemented with serial concentrations of AgNO3. The results indicated that field-grown mycelia contained lanosterol and inotodiol (comprised 45. 47% and 25. 36% of the total sterols, respectively) and other 10 sterols (comprising the remaining 30.17%) including ergosterol biosynthetic intermediates such as 24-methylene dihydrolanosterol, 4,4-dimethylfecosterol, 4-methyl fecosterol, fecosterol and episterol. Column chromatography also led to the isolation of lanosterol, Inotodiol, trametenolic acid, foscoparianol B and a new triterpenoid foscoparianol D in field-grown mycelia. In comparison, the cultured mycelia only contained three sterols with ergosterol as the predominant one (82.20%). Lanosterol only accounted for 3.68%. Supplementing Ag+ into the culture at 0.28 micromol x L(-1) greatly enhanced content of lanosterol (accounting for 56.81%) and decreased the content of ergosterol (18.5%) together with the presence of intermediates for ergosterol biosynthesis. These results suggested that the sterol composition in mycelia of the fungus can be diversified by supplementing substances inhibiting enzymatic process towards the synthesis of ergosterol. Harsh growth conditions in field

  1. Sterol carrier protein-2: binding protein for endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Liedhegner, Elizabeth Sabens; Vogt, Caleb D; Sem, Daniel S; Cunningham, Christopher W; Hillard, Cecilia J

    2014-08-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of eCB ligands and the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), subserves retrograde, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the brain. eCB signaling occurs "on-demand," thus the processes regulating synthesis, mobilization and degradation of eCBs are also primary mechanisms for the regulation of CB1R activity. The eCBs, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are poorly soluble in water. We hypothesize that their aqueous solubility, and, therefore, their intracellular and transcellular distribution, are facilitated by protein binding. Using in silico docking studies, we have identified the nonspecific lipid binding protein, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP-2), as a potential AEA binding protein. The docking studies predict that AEA and AM404 associate with SCP-2 at a putative cholesterol binding pocket with ∆G values of -3.6 and -4.6 kcal/mol, respectively. These values are considerably higher than cholesterol (-6.62 kcal/mol) but consistent with a favorable binding interaction. In support of the docking studies, SCP-2-mediated transfer of cholesterol in vitro is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AEA; and heterologous expression of SCP-2 in HEK 293 cells increases time-related accumulation of AEA in a temperature-dependent fashion. These results suggest that SCP-2 facilitates cellular uptake of AEA. However, there is no effect of SCP-2 transfection on the cellular accumulation of AEA determined at equilibrium or the IC50 values for AEA, AM404 or 2-AG to inhibit steady state accumulation of radiolabelled AEA. We conclude that SCP-2 is a low affinity binding protein for AEA that can facilitate its cellular uptake but does not contribute significantly to intracellular sequestration of AEA.

  2. Towards New Insights in the Sterol/Amphotericin Nanochannels Formation: A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Boukari, Khaoula; Balme, Sébastien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene which self-organizes into membrane cell in order to cause the cell death. Its specific action towards fungal cell is not fully understood but was proved to become from sterol composition. The mechanism was shown experimentally to require the formation of stable sterol/polyene couples which could then organize in a nanochannel. This would allow the leakage of ions responsible for the death of fungal cells, only. In this present study, we investigate the arrangement of AmB/sterols in biological membrane using molecular dynamic simulations in order to understand the role of the sterol structure on the antifungal action of the polyene. We show in particular that the nanochannels tend to close up when cell was composed with cholesterol (animal cell) due to strong interaction between amphotericin and sterol. On the other side, with ergosterol (fungal cell) the largest interactions between amphotericin and lipid membrane lead to the appearance of large hole that could favor the important leakage of ions and thus, the fungal cell death. This work appears as a good complement in the extensive studies linked to the understanding of the antifungal molecules in membrane cells.

  3. Method Development for the Determination of Free and Esterified Sterols in Button Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Ergosterol is the major sterol in button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) and can occur as free alcohol or esterified with fatty acids (ergosteryl esters). In this study, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM) was used to determine ergosterol and ergosteryl esters as well as other sterols and steryl esters in button mushrooms. Different quality control measures were established and sample preparation procedures were compared to prevent the formation of artifacts and the degradation of ergosteryl esters. The final method was then used for the determination of ergosterol (443 ± 44 mg/100 g dry matter (d.m.)) and esterified ergosterol (12 ± 6 mg/100 g d.m.) in button mushroom samples (n = 4). While the free sterol fraction was vastly dominated by ergosterol (∼90% of five sterols in total), the steryl ester fraction was more diversified (nine sterols in total, ergosterol ∼55%) and consisted primarily of linoleic acid esters. PMID:27064103

  4. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Stong, Rachel A; Kolodny, Eli; Kelsey, Rick G; González-Hernández, M P; Vivanco, Jorge M; Manter, Daniel K

    2013-06-01

    Elicitin-mediated acquisition of plant sterols is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. This study examined the interactions between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. Ground leaf tissue, sterols, and tannin-enriched extracts were obtained from three different plant species (California bay laurel, California black oak, and Oregon white oak) in order to evaluate the effect of differing sterol/tannin contents on Phytophthora ramorum growth. For all three species, high levels of foliage inhibited P. ramorum growth and sporulation, with a steeper concentration dependence for the two oak samples. Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation were inhibited by either phytosterols or tannin-enriched extracts. High levels of sterols diminished elicitin gene expression in P. ramorum; whereas the tannin-enriched extract decreased the amount of 'functional' or ELISA-detectable elicitin, but not gene expression. Across all treatment combinations, P. ramorum growth and sporulation correlated strongly with the amount of ELISA-detectable elicitin (R (2) = 0.791 and 0.961, respectively).

  5. Reassessment of the role of phospholipids in sexual reproduction by sterol-auxotrophic fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, J L; Duddles, N D

    1989-01-01

    Several genera of oomycete fungi which are incapable of de novo sterol synthesis do not require these compounds for vegetative growth. The requirement for an exogenous source of sterols for sexual reproduction by several members of the Pythiaceae has been questioned by reports of apparent induction and maturation of oospores on defined media supplemented with phospholipids in the absence of sterols. A more detailed examination of this phenomenon suggested that trace levels of sterols in the inoculum of some pythiaceous fungi act synergistically with phospholipid medium supplements containing unsaturated fatty acid moieties to induce oosporogenesis. Phospholipid analysis of one species, Pythium ultimum, suggested that only the fatty acid portion of the exogenous phospholipid is taken up by the fungus. Enrichment of the phospholipid fraction of total cell lipid of P. ultimum with unsaturated fatty acids promoted oospore induction, and enhanced levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the neutral lipid fraction increased oospore viability. For some pythiaceous fungi, the levels of sterols required for the maturation of oospores with appropriate phospholipid medium supplementation suggest that these compounds are necessary only for the sparking and critical domain roles previously described in other fungi. PMID:2738023

  6. Fenpropimorph slows down the sterol pathway and the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Campagnac, E; Fontaine, J; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, A; Laruelle, F; Durand, R; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A

    2009-08-01

    The direct impact of fenpropimorph on the sterol biosynthesis pathway of Glomus intraradices when extraradical mycelia alone are in contact with the fungicide was investigated using monoxenic cultures. Bi-compartmental Petri plates allowed culture of mycorrhizal chicory roots in a compartment without fenpropimorph and exposure of extraradical hyphae to the presence of increasing concentrations of fenpropimorph (0, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20 mg l(-1)). In the fungal compartment, sporulation, hyphal growth, and fungal biomass were already reduced at the lowest fungicide concentration. A decrease in total sterols, in addition to an increase in the amount of squalene and no accumulation of abnormal sterols, suggests that the sterol pathway is severely slowed down or that squalene epoxidase was inhibited by fenpropimorph in G. intraradices. In the root compartment, neither extraradical and intraradical development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus nor root growth was affected when they were not in direct contact with the fungicide; only hyphal length was significantly affected at 2 mg l(-1) of fenpropimorph. Our results clearly demonstrate a direct impact of fenpropimorph on the AM fungus by a perturbation of its sterol metabolism.

  7. Differential Modulation of Membrane Structure and Fluctuations by Plant Sterols and Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Aden; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Laggner, Peter; Pabst, Georg

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the concentration and temperature dependent influence of cholesterol, stigmasterol, and sitosterol on the global structure and the bending fluctuations of fluid dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers applying small-angle x-ray scattering, as well as dilatometry and ultrasound velocimetry. Independent of the lipid matrix, cholesterol was found to be most efficient in modulating bilayer thickness and elasticity, followed by sitosterol and stigmasterol. This can be attributed to the additional ethyl groups and double bond at the C17 alkyl side-chain of the two plant sterols. Hence, it seems that some flexibility of the sterol hydrocarbon chain is needed to accommodate within the lipid bilayer. In addition, we did not observe two populations of membranes within the putative liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence regime of binary sterol/lipid mixtures. Instead, the diffraction patterns could be interpreted in terms of a uniform phase. This lends further support to the idea of compositional fluctuations of unstable sterol rich domains recently brought up by fluorescence microscopy experiments, which contrasts the formation of stable domains within the miscibility gap of binary lipid/sterol mixtures. PMID:18234811

  8. Crystal structure of the human sterol transporter ABCG5/ABCG8.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jyh-Yeuan; Kinch, Lisa N; Borek, Dominika M; Wang, Jin; Wang, Junmei; Urbatsch, Ina L; Xie, Xiao-Song; Grishin, Nikolai V; Cohen, Jonathan C; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Hobbs, Helen H; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2016-05-26

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters play critical roles in maintaining sterol balance in higher eukaryotes. The ABCG5/ABCG8 heterodimer (G5G8) mediates excretion of neutral sterols in liver and intestines. Mutations disrupting G5G8 cause sitosterolaemia, a disorder characterized by sterol accumulation and premature atherosclerosis. Here we use crystallization in lipid bilayers to determine the X-ray structure of human G5G8 in a nucleotide-free state at 3.9 Å resolution, generating the first atomic model of an ABC sterol transporter. The structure reveals a new transmembrane fold that is present in a large and functionally diverse superfamily of ABC transporters. The transmembrane domains are coupled to the nucleotide-binding sites by networks of interactions that differ between the active and inactive ATPases, reflecting the catalytic asymmetry of the transporter. The G5G8 structure provides a mechanistic framework for understanding sterol transport and the disruptive effects of mutations causing sitosterolaemia.

  9. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Stong, Rachel A; Kolodny, Eli; Kelsey, Rick G; González-Hernández, M P; Vivanco, Jorge M; Manter, Daniel K

    2013-06-01

    Elicitin-mediated acquisition of plant sterols is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. This study examined the interactions between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. Ground leaf tissue, sterols, and tannin-enriched extracts were obtained from three different plant species (California bay laurel, California black oak, and Oregon white oak) in order to evaluate the effect of differing sterol/tannin contents on Phytophthora ramorum growth. For all three species, high levels of foliage inhibited P. ramorum growth and sporulation, with a steeper concentration dependence for the two oak samples. Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation were inhibited by either phytosterols or tannin-enriched extracts. High levels of sterols diminished elicitin gene expression in P. ramorum; whereas the tannin-enriched extract decreased the amount of 'functional' or ELISA-detectable elicitin, but not gene expression. Across all treatment combinations, P. ramorum growth and sporulation correlated strongly with the amount of ELISA-detectable elicitin (R (2) = 0.791 and 0.961, respectively). PMID:23689874

  10. Comparison and analysis of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in eight vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Changmo; Yao, Yunping; Zhao, Guozhong; Cheng, Wen; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Zhen; Chen, Yao; Wang, Shuo

    2011-12-14

    The similarities and differences of eight vegetable oils produced in China were investigated in terms of their fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol compositions and subsequent data processing by hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The lipid profiles, acquired by analytical techniques tailored to each lipid class, revealed great similarities among the fatty acid profiles of corn and sesame oil as well as few differences in their sterol profiles. It turns out that not only was there great similarity between the fatty acid profiles of corn oil and sesame oil but also there were not too many differences for the sterol profiles. Sunflower and tea-seed oil showed similar sterol compositions, while the tea-seed oil tocopherol was very similar to palm oil. The results demonstrated that the use of only one of these profiles was unreliable for indentifying oil origin and authenticity. In contrast, the use of the sterol or tocopherol profile together with the fatty acid profile more accurately discriminates these oils.

  11. Osh4p exchanges sterols for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate between lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    de Saint-Jean, Maud; Delfosse, Vanessa; Douguet, Dominique; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Bourguet, William

    2011-01-01

    Osh/Orp proteins transport sterols between organelles and are involved in phosphoinositide metabolism. The link between these two aspects remains elusive. Using novel assays, we address the influence of membrane composition on the ability of Osh4p/Kes1p to extract, deliver, or transport dehydroergosterol (DHE). Surprisingly, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) specifically inhibited DHE extraction because PI(4)P was itself efficiently extracted by Osh4p. We solve the structure of the Osh4p–PI(4)P complex and reveal how Osh4p selectively substitutes PI(4)P for sterol. Last, we show that Osh4p quickly exchanges DHE for PI(4)P and, thereby, can transport these two lipids between membranes along opposite routes. These results suggest a model in which Osh4p transports sterol from the ER to late compartments pinpointed by PI(4)P and, in turn, transports PI(4)P backward. Coupled to PI(4)P metabolism, this transport cycle would create sterol gradients. Because the residues that recognize PI(4)P are conserved in Osh4p homologues, other Osh/Orp are potential sterol/phosphoinositol phosphate exchangers. PMID:22162133

  12. Following intracellular cholesterol transport by linear and non-linear optical microscopy of intrinsically fluorescent sterols.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Elucidation of intracellular cholesterol transport is important for understanding the molecular basis of several metabolic and neuronal diseases, like atheroclerosis or lysosomal storage disorders. Progress in this field depends crucially on the development of new technical approaches to follow the cellular movement of this essential lipid molecule. In this article, a survey of the various methods being used for analysis of sterol trafficking is given. Various classical biochemical methods are presented and their suitability for analysis of sterol trafficking is assessed. Special emphasis is on recent developments in imaging technology to follow the intracellular fate of intrinsically fluorescent sterols as faithful cholesterol markers. In particular, UV-sensitive wide field and multiphoton microscopy of the sterol dehydroergosterol, DHE, is explained and new methods of quantitative image analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented. PMID:21470123

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of the human delta7-sterol reductase.

    PubMed

    Moebius, F F; Fitzky, B U; Lee, J N; Paik, Y K; Glossmann, H

    1998-02-17

    Inhibitors of the last steps of cholesterol biosynthesis such as AY9944 and BM15766 severely impair brain development. Their molecular target is the Delta7-sterol reductase (EC 1.3.1.21), suspected to be defective in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, a frequent inborn disorder of sterol metabolism. Molecular cloning of the cDNA revealed that the human enzyme is a membrane-bound protein with a predicted molecular mass of 55 kDa and six to nine putative transmembrane segments. The protein is structurally related to plant and yeast sterol reductases. In adults the ubiquitously transcribed mRNA is most abundant in adrenal gland, liver, testis, and brain. The Delta7-sterol reductase is the ultimate enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis in vertebrates and is absent from yeast. Microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains heterologously expressing the human cDNA remove the C7-8 double bond in 7-dehydrocholesterol. The conversion to cholesterol depends on NADPH and is potently inhibited by AY9944 (IC50 0.013 microM), BM15766 (IC50 1.2 microM), and triparanol (IC50 14 microM). Our work paves the way to clarify whether a defect in the delta7-sterol reductase gene underlies the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. PMID:9465114

  14. Molecular cloning and expression of the human Δ7-sterol reductase

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Fabian F.; Fitzky, Barbara U.; Lee, Joon No; Paik, Young-Ki; Glossmann, Hartmut

    1998-01-01

    Inhibitors of the last steps of cholesterol biosynthesis such as AY9944 and BM15766 severely impair brain development. Their molecular target is the Δ7-sterol reductase (EC 1.3.1.21), suspected to be defective in the Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome, a frequent inborn disorder of sterol metabolism. Molecular cloning of the cDNA revealed that the human enzyme is a membrane-bound protein with a predicted molecular mass of 55 kDa and six to nine putative transmembrane segments. The protein is structurally related to plant and yeast sterol reductases. In adults the ubiquitously transcribed mRNA is most abundant in adrenal gland, liver, testis, and brain. The Δ7-sterol reductase is the ultimate enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis in vertebrates and is absent from yeast. Microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains heterologously expressing the human cDNA remove the C7–8 double bond in 7-dehydrocholesterol. The conversion to cholesterol depends on NADPH and is potently inhibited by AY9944 (IC50 0.013 μM), BM15766 (IC50 1.2 μM), and triparanol (IC50 14 μM). Our work paves the way to clarify whether a defect in the Δ7-sterol reductase gene underlies the Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome. PMID:9465114

  15. Colimitation of a freshwater herbivore by sterols and polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Sperfeld, Erik; Wacker, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Empirical data providing evidence for a colimitation of an herbivore by two or more essential nutrients are scarce, particularly in regard to biochemical resources. Here, a graphical model is presented, which describes the growth of an herbivore in a system with two potentially limiting resources. To verify this model, life-history experiments were conducted with the herbivore Daphnia magna feeding on the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, which was supplemented with increasing amounts of cholesterol either in the presence or the absence of saturating amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). For comparison, D. magna was raised on diets containing different proportions of S. elongatus and the cholesterol- and EPA-rich eukaryotic alga Nannochloropsis limnetica. Somatic and population growth of D. magna on a sterol- and EPA-deficient diet was initially constrained by the absence of sterols. With increased sterol availability, a colimitation by EPA became apparent and when the sterol requirements were met, the growth-limiting factor was shifted from a limitation by sterols to a limitation by EPA. These data imply that herbivores are frequently limited by two or more essential nutrients simultaneously. Hence, the concept of colimitation has to be incorporated into models assessing nutrient-limited growth kinetics of herbivores to accurately predict demographic changes and population dynamics. PMID:19324803

  16. Plant sterols: factors affecting their efficacy and safety as functional food ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Alvin; Jones, Peter JH; Abumweis, Suhad S

    2004-01-01

    Plant sterols are naturally occurring molecules that humanity has evolved with. Herein, we have critically evaluated recent literature pertaining to the myriad of factors affecting efficacy and safety of plant sterols in free and esterified forms. We conclude that properly solubilized 4-desmetyl plant sterols, in ester or free form, in reasonable doses (0.8–1.0 g of equivalents per day) and in various vehicles including natural sources, and as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, are important dietary components for lowering low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and maintaining good heart health. In addition to their cholesterol lowering properties, plant sterols possess anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenicity, and anti-oxidation activities, and should thus be of clinical importance, even for those individuals without elevated LDL cholesterol. The carotenoid lowering effect of plant sterols should be corrected by increasing intake of food that is rich in carotenoids. In pregnant and lactating women and children, further study is needed to verify the dose required to decrease blood cholesterol without affecting fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoid status. PMID:15070410

  17. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E.

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein–related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes. PMID:20008566

  18. Shading Influence on the Sterol Balance of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Claus

    1978-01-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were grown in the field and the apex was removed at the 42-day stage. Shading screens were set up which produced 0, 26, 67, and 90% shade. Plants were grown an additional 25 days before leaves from top, middle, and bottom stalk positions were harvested. Each leaf group was analyzed for free sterol, steryl ester, steryl glycoside, and acylsteryl glycoside. The free sterol content was lowest in top leaves and highest in bottom leaves; however, the top leaves had more steryl ester than the bottom leaves. Leaf position had no effect on steryl glycosides and acylsteryl glycosides. Shading did not influence the level of any sterol class; but in general, shading increased stigmasterol and decreased sitosterol. This trend was observed for all sterol classes, and the free sterols showed the largest and most consistent change. The younger top leaves showed a greater response than the older bottom leaves, but bottom leaves always had more stigmasterol than sitosterol even without shade. PMID:16660242

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Sterol-Lipid Storage and Trafficking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Weihua; Alfaro, Gabriel; Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Klaassen, Zachary; Graham, Todd R.; Yang, Hongyuan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2008-01-01

    The pandemic of lipid-related disease necessitates a determination of how cholesterol and other lipids are transported and stored within cells. The first step in this determination is the identification of the genes involved in these transport and storage processes. Using genome-wide screens, we identified 56 yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes involved in sterol-lipid biosynthesis, intracellular trafficking, and/or neutral-lipid storage. Direct biochemical and cytological examination of mutant cells revealed an unanticipated link between secretory protein glycosylation and triacylglycerol (TAG)/steryl ester (SE) synthesis for the storage of lipids. Together with the analysis of other deletion mutants, these results suggested at least two distinct events for the biogenesis of lipid storage particles: a step affecting neutral-lipid synthesis, generating the lipid core of storage particles, and another step for particle assembly. In addition to the lipid storage mutants, we identified mutations that affect the localization of unesterified sterols, which are normally concentrated in the plasma membrane. These findings implicated phospholipase C and the protein phosphatase Ptc1p in the regulation of sterol distribution within cells. This study identified novel sterol-related genes that define several distinct processes maintaining sterol homeostasis. PMID:18156287

  20. Sterol biosynthesis via cycloartenol and other biochemical features related to photosynthetic phyla in the amoeba Naegleria lovaniensis and Naegleria gruberi.

    PubMed

    Raederstorff, D; Rohmer, M

    1987-04-15

    The sterols and sterol precursors of two amoebae of the genus Naegleria, Naegleria lovaniensis and Naegleria gruberi were investigated. Cycloartenol, the sterol precursor in photosynthetic organisms, is present in both amoebae. In N. lovaniesis, it is accompanied by lanosterol and parkeol, as well as by the 24,25-dihydro derivatives of these triterpenes. One of the most striking features of these amoebae is the accumulation of 4 alpha-methylsterols which are present in similar amounts as those of 4,4-desmethylsterols (3-5 mg/g, dry weight). 4 alpha-Methylergosta-7,22-dienol was identified as a new compound. Ergosterol was the major 4,4-desmethylsterol, accompanied by small amounts of C27 and other C28 sterols. Treatment of N. lovaniensis with fenpropimorph modified the sterol pattern of this amoeba and inhibited its growth. This fungicide, known to inhibit steps of sterol biosynthesis in fungi and plants, induced the disappearance of 4 alpha-methyl-delta 7-sterols and the appearance of the unusual delta 6,8,22-ergostatrienol as in A. polyphaga. These results might be explained by a partial inhibition of the delta 8----delta 7 isomerase, the small amounts of delta 7-sterols formed being converted into ergosterol which is still present in fenpropimorph-exposed cells. De novo sterol biosynthesis in N. lovaniensis was shown by incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into sterols and sterol precursors, especially cycloartenol. Lanosterol and parkeol were not significantly labelled. Furthermore, [3-3H]squalene epoxide was efficiently cyclized by a cell-free system of this amoeba into cycloartenol, and again no significant radioactivity was detected in lanosterol and parkeol. This shows that cycloartenol, the sterol precursor in plants and algae, is also the sterol precursor in Naegleria species, and that these amoebae, like A. polyphaga, are related by some biosynthetic pathways to photosynthetic phyla. Lanosterol, the sterol precursor in non-photosynthetic phyla (animal and

  1. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  2. Sewage contamination of sediments from two Portuguese Atlantic coastal systems, revealed by fecal sterols.

    PubMed

    Rada, Jesica P A; Duarte, Armando C; Pato, Pedro; Cachada, Anabela; Carreira, Renato S

    2016-02-15

    Fecal sterols in sediments were used to assess the degree of sewage contamination in Ria de Aveiro lagoon and Mondego River estuary for the first time. Coprostanol, the major fecal sterol, averaged 1.82 ± 4.12 μg g(-1), with maxima of 16.6 μg g(-1). The northwestern sector of the Ria and a marina at Mondego estuary showed the highest level of sewage contamination. This scenario was confirmed by several diagnostic ratios based on fecal sterols and other phytosterols. Our data revealed that in spite of the improvements achieved in the last decades, there is still a need for control the organic inputs into the aquatic environment in the studied regions. PMID:26778497

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane sterol modifications in response to growth in the presence of ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Caprioglio, H M; Casey, W M; Parks, L W

    1990-01-01

    Membranes isolated from yeasts grown in the presence of ethanol do not display the thermally induced transition in diphenylhexatriene anisotropy that is seen in control cells when they are exposed to ethanol in vitro. The total sterol content of the cells that were exposed to ethanol during growth is reduced, with no steryl esters being detected. A greater proportion of the total sterol pool is ergosterol in cells grown in the presence of alcohol. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase is reduced by ethanol in vitro. Ethanol-exposed cells take up more exogenous sterol under aerobic conditions than do control cells. The presence of ethanol during growth reduces the activity of the plasma membrane enzyme, chitin synthase, as well as increasing the thermosensitivity of this enzyme. PMID:2275534

  4. Plant Sterols as Anticancer Nutrients: Evidence for Their Role in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    While many factors are involved in the etiology of cancer, it has been clearly established that diet significantly impacts one’s risk for this disease. More recently, specific food components have been identified which are uniquely beneficial in mitigating the risk of specific cancer subtypes. Plant sterols are well known for their effects on blood cholesterol levels, however research into their potential role in mitigating cancer risk remains in its infancy. As outlined in this review, the cholesterol modulating actions of plant sterols may overlap with their anti-cancer actions. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women and there remains a need for effective adjuvant therapies for this disease, for which plant sterols may play a distinctive role. PMID:23434903

  5. Plant sterols and cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Genser, Bernd; Silbernagel, Günther; De Backer, Guy; Bruckert, Eric; Carmena, Rafael; Chapman, M. John; Deanfield, John; Descamps, Olivier S.; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; Dias, Karen C.; März, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    The impact of increased serum concentrations of plant sterols on cardiovascular risk is unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to investigate whether there is an association between serum concentrations of two common plant sterols (sitosterol, campesterol) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We systematically searched the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COCHRANE for studies published between January 1950 and April 2010 that reported either risk ratios (RR) of CVD in relation to serum sterol concentrations (either absolute or expressed as ratios relative to total cholesterol) or serum sterol concentrations in CVD cases and controls separately. We conducted two meta-analyses, one based on RR of CVD contrasting the upper vs. the lower third of the sterol distribution, and another based on standardized mean differences between CVD cases and controls. Summary estimates were derived by fixed and random effects meta-analysis techniques. We identified 17 studies using different designs (four case–control, five nested case–control, three cohort, five cross-sectional) involving 11 182 participants. Eight studies reported RR of CVD and 15 studies reported serum concentrations in CVD cases and controls. Funnel plots showed evidence for publication bias indicating small unpublished studies with non-significant findings. Neither of our meta-analyses suggested any relationship between serum concentrations of sitosterol and campesterol (both absolute concentrations and ratios to cholesterol) and risk of CVD. Our systematic review and meta-analysis did not reveal any evidence of an association between serum concentrations of plant sterols and risk of CVD. PMID:22334625

  6. Microbial symbionts shape the sterol profile of the xylem-feeding woodwasp, Sirex noctilio.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brian M; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T; Gruner, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    The symbiotic fungus Amylostereum areolatum is essential for growth and development of larvae of the invasive woodwasp, Sirex noctilio. In the nutrient poor xylem of pine trees, upon which Sirex feeds, it is unknown whether Amylostereum facilitates survival directly through consumption (mycetophagy) and/or indirectly through digestion of recalcitrant plant polymers (external rumen hypothesis). We tested these alternative hypotheses for Amylostereum involvement in Sirex foraging using the innate dependency of all insects on dietary sources of sterol and the unique sterols indicative of fungi and plants. We tested alternative hypotheses by using GC-MS to quantify concentrations of free and bound sterol pools from multiple life-stages of Sirex, food sources, and waste products in red pine (Pinus resinosa). Cholesterol was the primary sterol found in all life-stages of Sirex. However, cholesterol was not found in significant quantities in either plant or fungal resources. Ergosterol was the most prevalent sterol in Amylostereum but was not detectable in either wood or insect tissue (<0.001 μg/g). Phytosterols were ubiquitous in both pine xylem and Sirex. Therefore, dealkylation of phytosterols (sitosterol and campesterol) is the most likely pathway to meet dietary demand for cholesterol in Sirex. Ergosterol concentrations from fungal-infested wood demonstrated low fungal biomass, which suggests mycetophagy is not the primary source of sterol or bulk nutrition for Sirex. Our findings suggest there is a potentially greater importance for fungal enzymes, including the external digestion of recalcitrant plant polymers (e.g., lignin and cellulose), shaping this insect-fungal symbiosis.

  7. A Genomewide Screen Reveals a Role of Mitochondria in Anaerobic Uptake of Sterols in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Sonja; Micolod, Delphine; Zellnig, Günther; Schneiter, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms that govern intracellular transport of sterols in eukaryotic cells are not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a facultative anaerobic organism that becomes auxotroph for sterols and unsaturated fatty acids in the absence of oxygen. To identify pathways that are required for uptake and transport of sterols, we performed a systematic screen of the yeast deletion mutant collection for genes that are required for growth under anaerobic conditions. Of the ∼4800 nonessential genes represented in the deletion collection, 37 were essential for growth under anaerobic conditions. These affect a wide range of cellular functions, including biosynthetic pathways for certain amino acids and cofactors, reprogramming of transcription and translation, mitochondrial function and biogenesis, and membrane trafficking. Thirty-three of these mutants failed to grow on lipid-supplemented media when combined with a mutation in HEM1, which mimics anaerobic conditions in the presence of oxygen. Uptake assays with radio- and fluorescently labeled cholesterol revealed that 17 of the 33 mutants strongly affect uptake and/or esterification of exogenously supplied cholesterol. Examination of the subcellular distribution of sterols in these uptake mutants by cell fractionation and fluorescence microscopy indicates that some of the mutants block incorporation of cholesterol into the plasma membrane, a presumably early step in sterol uptake. Unexpectedly, the largest class of uptake mutants is affected in mitochondrial functions, and many of the uptake mutants show electron-dense mitochondrial inclusions. These results indicate that a hitherto uncharacterized mitochondrial function is required for sterol uptake and/or transport under anaerobic conditions and are discussed in light of the fact that mitochondrial import of cholesterol is required for steroidogenesis in vertebrate cells. PMID:16251356

  8. Concentrations of surfactants and sterols in the surface microlayer of the estuarine areas of Selangor River, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalahi, Murad Ali; Talib Latif, Mohd; Mohd Ali, Masni; Dominick, Doreena; Firoz Khan, Md; Bahiyah Abd Wahid, Nurul; Ili Hamizah Mustaffa, Nur

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the concentration of surfactant and sterols as biomarkers in the surface microlayer (SML) in estuarine areas of the Selangor River, Malaysia. SML samples were collected during different seasons using a rotation drum method. The compositions of surfactants in SML were determined as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and disulphine blue active substances (DBAS) as anionic and cationic surfactants respectively. The concentration of sterols was determined using a gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID). The results show that the concentrations of surfactants around the estuarine area were dominated by anionic surfactants (MBAS) with average concentrations of 0.39 μmol L-1. The concentrations of total sterols in the SML ranged from 107.06 to 505.55 ng L-1. The surfactants and total sterol concentrations were found to be higher in the wet season. Cholesterol was found to be the most abundant sterols component in the SML of the Selangor River. The diagnostic ratios of sterols show the influence of natural sources and waste on the contribution of sterols in the SML. Further analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct inputs of sterols derived from human activity (40.58%), terrigenous and plant inputs (22.59%) as well as phytoplankton and marine inputs (17.35%).

  9. Sterol patterns of cultured zooxanthellae isolated from marine invertebrates: Synthesis of gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol by aposymbiotic algae.

    PubMed

    Withers, N W; Kokke, W C; Fenical, W; Djerassi, C

    1982-06-01

    QUANTITATIVE STEROL COMPOSITIONS OF CULTURED ZOOXANTHELLAE ISOLATED FROM VARIOUS PACIFIC AND ATLANTIC INVERTEBRATE HOSTS: Zoanthus sociatus (a zoanthid), Oculina diffusa (a scleractian coral), Tridacna gigas (a giant clam), Melibe pilosa (a nudibranch), and Aiptasia pulchella (a sea anemone) are reported. The results clearly demonstrate large differences in sterol patterns of zooxanthellae and that there is no obvious relationship between the taxonomic affiliation of the host and the sterol pattern of its isolated symbiont. The sterols of the zooxanthellae of O. diffusa (Cnidaria) and T. gigas (Mollusca) are qualitatively equivalent. Based on the structures of the two major free sterols synthesized by each alga, the zooxanthellae from different hosts were separated into three distinct groups. It was also found that an aposymbiotic alga can synthesize the unique marine sterols gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol. Most of the sterols were identified by using mass spectroscopy and 360-MHz proton magnetic resonance. Spectroscopic data are reported for four novel sterols-(23,24R)-dimethyl-5alpha-cholest-(22E)-en-3beta-o l, 23-methyl-5alpha-cholest-22E-en-3beta-ol, cholesta-5,14-dien-3beta-ol, and 4alpha-methyl-5alpha-cholesta-8(14)-24-dien-3beta-ol.

  10. Fecal free and conjugated bile acids and neutral sterols in vegetarians, omnivores, and patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Korpela, J T; Adlercreutz, H; Turunen, M J

    1988-04-01

    Increased excretion and intestinal bacterial metabolism of bile acids and neutral sterols have been suggested to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. We determined fecal neutral sterol and bile acid profiles by new capillary column gas-liquid chromatographic methods in 18 patients with colorectal cancer, 10 omnivores, and 10 vegetarians. The methods also determine concentrations of esterified neutral sterols and saponifiable bile acids formed by intestinal bacterial action. Patients with colorectal cancer had the highest concentrations of neutral animal sterols, the lowest degree of esterification of neutral sterols, the lowest relative amount of saponifiable bile acids, and the highest concentrations of unconjugated primary bile acids. These differences were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) and more profound when the patients were compared with vegetarians than with omnivores. Since epidemiologic studies suggest that vegetarians have a lower risk of colorectal cancer than omnivores, these differences are discussed as possible risk factors for colorectal cancer.

  11. Sterol-Dependent Nuclear Import of ORP1S Promotes LXR Regulated Trans-Activation of APOE

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G. W.; Michaely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. PMID:22728266

  12. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  13. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  14. Video Time Encoding Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value. PMID:21296708

  15. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  16. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  17. Effect of inhibition of sterol delta 14-reductase on accumulation of meiosis-activating sterol and meiotic resumption in cumulus-enclosed mouse oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leonardsen, L; Strömstedt, M; Jacobsen, D; Kristensen, K S; Baltsen, M; Andersen, C Y; Byskov, A G

    2000-01-01

    Two sterols of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway induce resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes in vitro. The sterols, termed meiosis-activating sterols (MAS), have been isolated from human follicular fluid (FF-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,14,24-triene-3 beta-ol) and from bull testicular tissue (T-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,24-diene-3 beta-ol). FF-MAS is the first intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol and is converted to T-MAS by sterol delta 14-reductase. An inhibitor of delta 7-reductase and delta 14 reductase, AY9944-A-7, causes cells with a constitutive cholesterol biosynthesis to accumulate FF-MAS and possibly other intermediates between lanosterol and cholesterol. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether AY9944-A-7 added to cultures of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from mice resulted in accumulation of MAS and meiotic maturation. AY9944-A-7 stimulated dose dependently (5-25 mumol l-1) COC to resume meiosis when cultured for 22 h in alpha minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing 4 mmol hypoxanthine l-1, a natural inhibitor of meiotic maturation. In contrast, naked oocytes were not induced to resume meiosis by AY9944-A-7. When cumulus cells were separated from their oocytes and co-cultured, AY9944-A-7 did not affect resumption of meiosis, indicating that intact oocyte-cumulus cell connections are important for AY9944-A-7 to exert its effect on meiosis. Cultures of COC with 10 mumol AY9944-A-7 l-1 in the presence of [3H]mevalonic acid, a natural precursor for steroid synthesis, resulted in accumulation of labelled FF-MAS, which had an 11-fold greater amount of radioactivity incorporated per COC compared with the control culture without AY9944-A-7. In contrast, incorporation of radioactivity into the cholesterol fraction was reduced 30-fold in extracts from the same oocytes. The present findings demonstrate for the first time that COC can synthesize cholesterol from mevalonate and accumulate FF-MAS in

  18. Evaluation of anthropogenic contamination using sterol markers in a tropical estuarine system of northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frena, Morgana; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Madureira, Luiz A S; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-08-15

    The São Francisco River estuarine system, located in the Northeast coast of Brazil, has great economic, tourist and social importance. Its waters are used for activities such as agriculture, aquaculture, navigation and fishery, which supplies the surrounding communities. In this study, sterols markers were determined in twenty-eight sediment samples from São Francisco River estuary by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sterol analysis was useful to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic organic matter (OM) sources in the studied area. Six sterols were quantified, suggesting different sources. Concentrations of fecal sterol (coprostanol) were lower than 500ngg(-1), suggesting no indicative of severe sewage contamination.However, two stations showed concentrations around 100ngg(-1) and the values for the coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and coprostanol/cholesterol ratios indicates sewage contamination. The results in this study may be considered as baseline concentrations to be used as future reference for monitoring programs to prevent anthropogenic impacts. PMID:27207024

  19. Plant Growth Retardants as Inhibitors of Sterol Biosynthesis in Tobacco Seedlings 12

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Trevor J.; Paleg, Leslie G.

    1974-01-01

    Three plant-growth retardants 2′-isopropy1-4′-(trimethylammonium chloride)-5-methylphenylpiperidine carboxylate (Amo 1618), β-chloroethyltrimethylammonium chloride, and tributyl-2, 4-dichlorobenzylphosphonium chloride were tested for their effects on sterol production in, and growth of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings. As the concentration of each retardant increased, there was an increased inhibition of the incorporation of dl-2-14C-mevalonic acid into sterol (particularly desmethylsterol) fractions and an increased retardation of stem growth. Growth retardation was observed with both single and repeated retardant treatments, and with Amo 1618, in particular, a close quantitative relationship between inhibition of sterol biosynthesis and stem growth was obtained. Gibberellic acid completely overcame retardant effects and application of sterols also restored normal growth. It is concluded that the concept of causality in the relationship between growth retardation and gibberellin biosynthesis is probably premature, since growth retardants have a more general inhibitory action on isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:16658867

  20. Chromatic aberration correction and deconvolution for UV sensitive imaging of fluorescent sterols in cytoplasmic lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-08-01

    Intrinsically fluorescent sterols, like dehydroergosterol (DHE), mimic cholesterol closely and are therefore suitable to determine cholesterol transport by fluorescence microscopy. Disadvantages of DHE are its low quantum yield, rapid bleaching, and the fact that its excitation and emission is in the UV region of the spectrum. Thus, one has to deal with chromatic aberration and low signal-to-noise ratio. We developed a method to correct for chromatic aberration between the UV channel and the red/green channel in multicolor imaging of DHE compared with the lipid droplet marker Nile Red in living macrophage foam cells and in adipocytes. We used deconvolution microscopy and developed image segmentation techniques to assess the DHE content of lipid droplets in both cell types in an automated manner. Pulse-chase studies and colocalization analysis were performed to monitor the redistribution of DHE upon adipocyte differentiation. DHE is targeted to transferrin-positive recycling endosomes in preadipocytes but associates with droplets in mature adipocytes. Only in adipocytes but not in foam cells fluorescent sterol was confined to the droplet-limiting membrane. We developed an approach to visualize and quantify sterol content of lipid droplets in living cells with potential for automated high content screening of cellular sterol transport.

  1. Effect of frequency of dosing of plant sterols on plasma cholesterol levels and synthesis rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to compare the effects of plant sterols (PS) consumed as a single dose (single) at breakfast or as three doses consumed with breakfast, lunch and dinner (divided) on plasma lipoprotien levels and cholesterol endogenous fractional synthesis rate (FSR). A randomized, placebo-controll...

  2. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  3. Amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profile of some marine organisms from Portuguese waters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, David M; Valentão, Patrícia; Teixeira, Natércia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-01

    Marine organisms have been increasingly regarded as good sources of new drugs for human therapeutics and also as nutrients for human diet. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols profiles of the widely consumed echinoderms Paracentrotus lividus Lamarck (sea urchin), Holothuria forskali Chiaje (sea cucumber), the gastropod molluscs Aplysia fasciata Poiret and Aplysia punctata Cuvier (sea hares), from Portuguese waters, were established by GC-MS analysis. Overall, 10 amino acids, 14 fatty acids and 4 sterols were determined. In general, all species presented the 10 amino acids identified, with the exceptions of H. forskali, in which no glycine, proline, trans-4-hydroxy-proline or phenylalanine were found, and of A. fasciata which did not contain proline. Unsaturated fatty acids were predominant compounds, with those from the ω-6 series, being in higher amounts than their ω-3 homologues, and cholesterol being the main sterol. The amino acids, fatty acids and sterols qualitative and quantitative composition of A. fasciata, A. punctata and H. forskali is reported here for the first time.

  4. Absence of sterols constrains carbon transfer between cyanobacteria and a freshwater herbivore (Daphnia galeata).

    PubMed Central

    von Elert, Eric; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Le Coz, Jean R

    2003-01-01

    A key process in freshwater plankton food webs is the regulation of the efficiency of energy and material transfer. Cyanobacterial carbon (C) in particular is transferred very inefficiently to herbivorous zooplankton, which leads to a decoupling of primary and secondary production and the accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass, which is associated with reduced recreational quality of water bodies and hazards to human health. A recent correlative field study suggested that the low transfer efficiency of cyanobacterial C is the result of the absence of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet of the zooplankton. By supplementation of single-lipid compounds in controlled growth experiments, we show here that the low C transfer efficiency of coccal and filamentous cyanobacteria to the keystone herbivore Daphnia is caused by the low sterol content in cyanobacteria, which constrains cholesterol synthesis and thereby growth and reproduction of the herbivore. Estimations of sterol requirement in Daphnia suggest that, when cyanobacteria comprise more than 80% of the grazed phytoplankton, growth of the herbivore may be limited by sterols and Daphnia may subsequently fail to control phytoplankton biomass. Dietary sterols therefore may play a key role in freshwater food webs and in the control of water quality in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria. PMID:12816661

  5. A new cytotoxic dihydroxy sterol from the soft coral Alcyonium patagonicum.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Li, X; Su, J; Fu, X; Schmitz, F J

    1995-02-01

    A new sterol, 24-methylenecholest-4-ene-3 beta,6 beta-diol [1] was isolated from the soft coral Alcyonium patagonicum collected from the South China Sea. Its structure was determined by spectral analysis. Compound 1 was cytotoxic against the P-388 cell line with an IC50 value of 1 microgram/ml.

  6. Effects of Temperature and Nutrients on Sterol Concentration in Marine Diatoms and Implications for Productivity Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Bi, R.; Zhao, M.; Zhang, L. H.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sterols as phytoplankton productivity and community structure proxies have been widely applied for paleo-reconstructions, while quantitative reconstructions using sterols remain understudied. In this study, we aimed to determine the quantitative relationship between sterols and biomass in three species of marine diatoms under different temperature (15℃, 20℃ and25℃) and different nutrient supply (N:P=10:1, 24:1 and 63:1). Brassicasterol is the major sterol in Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohli, an important species in marginal seas. The effects of temperature on the cellular concentration of brassicasterol is minimum, with values of 1.01×10 -4 ng cell-1 at 15℃, 1.07×10 -4 ng cell-1 at 20℃ and 1.17×10 -4 ng cell-1 at 25℃. Work is underway to evaluate the effects of nutrients on the cellular concentration of brassicasterol. Our preliminary results suggest that brassicasterol could be used to quantitatively reconstruct diatom productivity, and we will report the results of its application in several sediment cores.

  7. Recognition of Membrane Sterols by Polyene Antifungals Amphotericin B and Natamycin, A 13C MAS NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Filip; Griffin, David C.; Loraine, Jessica; Rittig, Michael; Delves-Broughton, Joss; Bonev, Boyan B.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular action of polyene macrolides with antifungal activity, amphotericin B and natamycin, involves recognition of sterols in membranes. Physicochemical and functional studies have contributed details to understanding the interactions between amphotericin B and ergosterol and, to a lesser extent, with cholesterol. Fewer molecular details are available on interactions between natamycin with sterols. We use solid state 13C MAS NMR to characterize the impact of amphotericin B and natamycin on mixed lipid membranes of DOPC/cholesterol or DOPC/ergosterol. In cholesterol-containing membranes, amphotericin B addition resulted in marked increase in both DOPC and cholesterol 13C MAS NMR linewidth, reflecting membrane insertion and cooperative perturbation of the bilayer. By contrast, natamycin affects little either DOPC or cholesterol linewidth but attenuates cholesterol resonance intensity preferentially for sterol core with lesser impact on the chain. Ergosterol resonances, attenuated by amphotericin B, reveal specific interactions in the sterol core and chain base. Natamycin addition selectively augmented ergosterol resonances from sterol core ring one and, at the same time, from the end of the chain. This puts forward an interaction model similar to the head-to-tail model for amphotericin B/ergosterol pairing but with docking on opposite sterol faces. Low toxicity of natamycin is attributed to selective, non-cooperative sterol engagement compared to cooperative membrane perturbation by amphotericin B. PMID:27379235

  8. Increased sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and an apparent decrease in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated tobacco cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Voegeli, U.; Bhatt, P.N.; Chappell, J.

    1987-04-01

    Addition of fungel elicitor prepared from Phytophthora parasitica to tobacco cell suspension cultures leads to an increased production of the phytoalexin capsidiol. Capsidiol is a sesquiterpenoid which is most likely synthesized from farnesylpyrophosphat (FPP) by a bicyclic cyclase reaction. Because FPP is also a substrate for squalene synthetase and therefore a precursor of sterol biosynthesis, the question arises whether or not the accumulation of capsidiol in elicitor-treated cells occurs at the expense of sterol biosynthesis. (/sup 14/C)-acetate was given to elicitor-treated and control (no treatment) cell cultures and incorporation into sterols and capsidiol determined. No labeled capsidiol was detected in control cells. In elicitor-treated cells about 12-15% of the radioactivity taken up by the cells was incorporated into capsidiol. In contrast, control cells incorporated 4 times more radioactivity into sterols than elicitor-treated cells. Similar results were obtained using (/sup 3/H)-mevalonate as a precursor of capsidiol and sterol biosynthesis. Likely explanations for the apparently decline in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated cells include: (1) inhibition of squalene synthetase; (2) induction of capsidiol synthesizing enzymes; and (3) metabolic channeling of FPP into capsidiol versus sterols. These possibilities will be discussed further together with other results.

  9. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  10. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Li, Sijia; Henke, Adam; Muse, Evan D; Cheng, Bo; Welzel, Gustav; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Wang, Danling; Roland, Jason; Glass, Christopher K; Tremblay, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR), a nuclear hormone receptor, is an essential regulator of immune responses. Activation of LXR-mediated transcription by synthetic agonists, such as T0901317 and GW3965, attenuates progression of inflammatory disease in animal models. However, the adverse effects of these conventional LXR agonists in elevating liver lipids have impeded exploitation of this intriguing mechanism for chronic therapy. Here, we explore the ability of a series of sterol-based LXR agonists to alleviate inflammatory conditions in mice without hepatotoxicity. We show that oral treatment with sterol-based LXR agonists in mice significantly reduces dextran sulfate sodium colitis-induced body weight loss, which is accompanied by reduced expression of inflammatory markers in the large intestine. The anti-inflammatory property of these agonists is recapitulated in vitro in mouse lamina propria mononuclear cells, human colonic epithelial cells, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, treatment with LXR agonists dramatically suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression in a model of traumatic brain injury. Importantly, in both disease models, the sterol-based agonists do not affect the liver, and the conventional agonist T0901317 results in significant liver lipid accumulation and injury. Overall, these results provide evidence for the development of sterol-based LXR agonists as novel therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.-Yu, S., Li, S., Henke, A., Muse, E. D., Cheng, B., Welzel, G., Chatterjee, A. K., Wang, D., Roland, J., Glass, C. K., Tremblay, M. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025962

  11. Acetate-mediated growth inhibition in sterol 14alpha-demethylation-deficient cells of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, O; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus thought to be viable in the presence of a deficiency in sterol 14alpha-demethylation. We showed in a strain of this species that the deficiency, caused either by a mutation or by an azole antifungal agent, made the cells susceptible to growth inhibition by acetate included in the culture medium. Studies with a mutant demonstrated that the inhibition was complete at a sodium acetate concentration of 0.24 M (20 g/liter) and was evident even at a pH of 8, the latter result indicating the involvement of acetate ions rather than the undissociated form of acetic acid. In fluconazole-treated cells, sterol profiles determined by thin-layer chromatography revealed that the minimum sterol 14alpha-demethylation-inhibitory concentrations (MDICs) of the drug, thought to be the most important parameter for clinical purposes, were practically identical in the media with and without 0.24 M acetate and were equivalent to the MIC in the acetate-supplemented medium. The acetate-mediated growth inhibition of azole-treated cells was confirmed with two additional strains of C. albicans and four different agents, suggesting the possibility of generalization. From these results, it was surmised that the acetate-containing medium may find use in azole susceptibility testing, for which there is currently no method capable of measuring MDICs directly for those fungi whose viability is not lost as a result of sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency. Additionally, the acetate-supplemented agar medium was found to be useful in detecting reversions from sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency to proficiency. PMID:9869573

  12. History and development of plant sterol and stanol esters for cholesterol-lowering purposes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Gilbert R; Grundy, Scott M

    2005-07-01

    Plant stanol esters provide a novel approach to lowering plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by dietary means. Their development was preceded by a long period of research into the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant sterols and, recently, plant stanols. Both classes of compound competitively inhibit the absorption of cholesterol and thus lower its level in plasma. Initial impressions were that stanols were more effective and safer than sterols, but the negative outcome of a study led to the recognition that the lipid solubility of free stanols was very limited. This was overcome by esterifying them with fatty acids, with the resultant stanol esters being freely soluble in fat spreads. This led to the launch of Benecol (margarine; Raisio Group, Raisio, Finland) in 1995. The coincident publication of the year-long North Karelia study conclusively demonstrated the long-term LDL-lowering efficacy of plant stanol esters. Variables that might influence the efficacy of stanol esters include dose, frequency of administration, food vehicle in which the stanol ester is incorporated, and background diet. The effective dose is 1 to 3 g/day, expressed as free stanol, which, in placebo-controlled studies, decreased LDL cholesterol by 6% to 15%. This effect is maintained, appears to be similar with once-daily or divided dosage, and is independent of the fat content of the food vehicle. Short-term studies suggest that equivalent amounts of plant sterol and stanol esters are similarly effective in lowering LDL, the main difference being that plasma plant sterol levels increase on plant sterols and decrease on plant stanols. The clinical significance of these changes remains to be determined.

  13. Sterols in red and green algae: quantification, phylogeny, and relevance for the interpretation of geologic steranes.

    PubMed

    Kodner, R B; Pearson, A; Summons, R E; Knoll, A H

    2008-08-01

    Steroids, a class of triterpenoid lipids with high preservation potential, are widely distributed in sedimentary rocks. All eukaryotes have a physiological requirement for these molecules, making steroids important biomarkers for aiding our understanding of eukaryote molecular evolution and geologic history. C(26)-C(30) sterols are the molecules most commonly incorporated or synthesized by eukaryotes, and correspond to C(26)-C(30) steranes ubiquitously and abundantly preserved in petroleums and sedimentary bitumens. Because these sterols occur in evolutionarily diverse taxa, it can be difficult to associate any particular compound with a single group of organisms. Nevertheless, geochemists have still been able to draw parallels between the empirical patterns in geologic sterane abundances and the age of petroleum source rocks. Paleobiologists have also used sterane data, in particular the patterns in C(29) and C(28) steranes, to support fossil evidence of an early radiation of green algae in latest Proterozoic and Paleozoic and the succession of the major modern phytoplankton groups in the Mesozoic. Although C(29) sterols are found in many eukaryotes, organisms that produce them in proportional abundances comparable to those preserved in Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks are limited. Based on a large, phylogenetically based survey of sterol profiles from the kingdom Plantae, we conclude that modern ulvophyte and early diverging prasinophyte green algae produce high abundances of C(29) relative to C(27) and C(28) sterols most consistent with the sterane profiles observed in Paleozoic rocks. Our analysis also suggests that ancestral stem groups among the Plantae, including the glaucocystophytes and early divergent red algae are also plausible candidates.

  14. Inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis by Delta22-unsaturated phytosterols via competitive inhibition of sterol Delta24-reductase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Carlos; Suárez, Yajaira; Ferruelo, Antonio J; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2002-01-01

    Dietary phytosterols are cholesterol-lowering agents that interfere with the intestinal absorption of cholesterol. In the present study, we have studied their effects on cholesterol biosynthesis in human cells, particularly in the sterol-conversion pathway. For this, both Caco-2 (intestinal mucosa) and HL-60 (promyelocytic) human cell lines were incubated with [(14)C]acetate, and the incorporation of radioactivity into sterols was determined using HPLC and radioactivity detection online. Sterols containing a double bond at C-22 in the side chain (stigmasterol, brassicasterol and ergosterol) dramatically inhibited the activity of sterol Delta(24)-reductase, as indicated by the decrease in radioactivity incorporation into cholesterol and the accumulation of its precursors (mainly desmosterol). Phytosterols with the saturated side chain (beta-sitosterol and campesterol) were inactive in this regard. The inhibition of sterol (24)-reductase was confirmed in rat liver microsomes by using (14)C-labelled desmosterol as the substrate. The (22)-unsaturated phytosterols acted as competitive inhibitors of sterol (24)-reductase, with K(i) values (41.1, 42.7 and 36.8 microM for stigmasterol, brassicasterol and ergosterol respectively) similar to the estimated K(m) for desmosterol (26.3 microM). The sterol 5,22-cholestedien-3beta-ol, an unusual desmosterol isomer that lacks the alkyl groups characteristic of phytosterols, acted as a much stronger inhibitor of (24)-reductase (K(i)=3.34 microM). The usually low intracellular concentrations of the physiological substrates of (24)-reductase explains the strong inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis that these compounds exert in cells. Given that inhibition of sterol (24)-reductase was achieved at physiologically relevant concentrations, it may represent an additional mechanism for the cholesterol-lowering action of phytosterols, and opens up the possibility of using certain (22)-unsaturated sterols as effective hypocholesterolaemic

  15. The Text Encoding Initiative: Flexible and Extensible Document Encoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David T.; Ide, Nancy M.

    1997-01-01

    The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), an international collaboration aimed at producing a common encoding scheme for complex texts, examines the requirement for generality versus the requirement to handle specialized text types. Discusses how documents and users tax the limits of fixed schemes requiring flexible extensible encoding to support…

  16. Clotrimazole as a Potent Agent for Treating the Oomycete Fish Pathogen Saprolegnia parasitica through Inhibition of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51)

    PubMed Central

    Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Hull, Claire M.; Rolley, Nicola J.; Parker, Josie E.; Nes, W. David; Smith, Stephen N.

    2014-01-01

    A candidate CYP51 gene encoding sterol 14α-demethylase from the fish oomycete pathogen Saprolegnia parasitica (SpCYP51) was identified based on conserved CYP51 residues among CYPs in the genome. It was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. Lanosterol, eburicol, and obtusifoliol bound to purified SpCYP51 with similar binding affinities (Ks, 3 to 5 μM). Eight pharmaceutical and six agricultural azole antifungal agents bound tightly to SpCYP51, with posaconazole displaying the highest apparent affinity (Kd, ≤3 nM) and prothioconazole-desthio the lowest (Kd, ∼51 nM). The efficaciousness of azole antifungals as SpCYP51 inhibitors was confirmed by 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 0.17 to 2.27 μM using CYP51 reconstitution assays. However, most azole antifungal agents were less effective at inhibiting S. parasitica, Saprolegnia diclina, and Saprolegnia ferax growth. Epoxiconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, and posaconazole failed to inhibit Saprolegnia growth (MIC100, >256 μg ml−1). The remaining azoles inhibited Saprolegnia growth only at elevated concentrations (MIC100 [the lowest antifungal concentration at which growth remained completely inhibited after 72 h at 20°C], 16 to 64 μg ml−1) with the exception of clotrimazole, which was as potent as malachite green (MIC100, ∼1 μg ml−1). Sterol profiles of azole-treated Saprolegnia species confirmed that endogenous CYP51 enzymes were being inhibited with the accumulation of lanosterol in the sterol fraction. The effectiveness of clotrimazole against SpCYP51 activity (IC50, ∼1 μM) and the concentration inhibiting the growth of Saprolegnia species in vitro (MIC100, ∼1 to 2 μg ml−1) suggest that clotrimazole could be used against Saprolegnia infections, including as a preventative measure by pretreatment of fish eggs, and for freshwater-farmed fish as well as in leisure activities. PMID:25085484

  17. Disorders of phonological encoding.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, B

    1992-03-01

    Studies of phonological disturbances in aphasic speech are reviewed. It is argued that failure to test for error consistency in individual patients makes it generally improper to draw inferences about specific disorders of phonological encoding. A minimalist interpretation of available data on phonological errors is therefore proposed that involves variable loss of information in transmission between processing subsystems. Proposals for systematic loss or corruption of phonological information in lexical representations or in translation subsystems is shown to be inadequately grounded. The review concludes with some simple methodological prescriptions for future research.

  18. Cumulative Mutations Affecting Sterol Biosynthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Result in Synthetic Lethality That Is Suppressed by Alterations in Sphingolipid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Valachovic, Martin; Bareither, Bart M.; Bhuiyan, M. Shah Alam; Eckstein, James; Barbuch, Robert; Balderes, Dina; Wilcox, Lisa; Sturley, Stephen L.; Dickson, Robert C.; Bard, Martin

    2006-01-01

    UPC2 and ECM22 belong to a Zn(2)–Cys(6) family of fungal transcription factors and have been implicated in the regulation of sterol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. Previous reports suggest that double deletion of these genes in S. cerevisiae is lethal depending on the genetic background of the strain. In this investigation we demonstrate that lethality of upc2Δ ecm22Δ in the S288c genetic background is attributable to a mutation in the HAP1 transcription factor. In addition we demonstrate that strains containing upc2Δ ecm22Δ are also inviable when carrying deletions of ERG6 and ERG28 but not when carrying deletions of ERG3, ERG4, or ERG5. It has previously been demonstrated that UPC2 and ECM22 regulate S. cerevisiae ERG2 and ERG3 and that the erg2Δ upc2Δ ecm22Δ triple mutant is also synthetically lethal. We used transposon mutagenesis to isolate viable suppressors of hap1Δ, erg2Δ, erg6Δ, and erg28Δ in the upc2Δ ecm22Δ genetic background. Mutations in two genes (YND1 and GDA1) encoding apyrases were found to suppress the synthetic lethality of three of these triple mutants but not erg2Δ upc2Δ ecm22Δ. We show that deletion of YND1, like deletion of GDA1, alters the sphingolipid profiles, suggesting that changes in sphingolipids compensate for lethality produced by changes in sterol composition and abundance. PMID:16702413

  19. Side effects of the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide, propiconazole, on a beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Calonne, M; Fontaine, J; Debiane, D; Laruelle, F; Grandmougin, A; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A

    2011-01-01

    The Sterol Biosynthesis Inhibitor (SBI) fungicide, propiconazole, is extensively used in modern agriculture to control fungal diseases. Unfortunately, little is known about its potential side effects on non-target plant-beneficial soil organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The direct impact of increasing propiconazole concentrations (0.02; 0.2 and 2 mg x L(-1)) on the lipid metabolism of the AMF Glomus irregulare in relation with its development, was studied by using axenic cultures. The propiconazole impact on G. irregulare was investigated, firstly, through sterol (the target-metabolism of SBI fungicides), phospholipids (PL) and their associated fatty acids (PLFA) analysis (the main membrane components) and secondly by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) (a biomarker of lipid peroxidation) formation. Finally, the storage lipid quantity, triacylglycerol (TAG), was quantified. Our results demonstrated that the drastic reduction of G. irregulare development (germination, germ tube elongation, colonization, extraradical hyphae growth and sporulation) could be explained not only by the decreases of the total sterol end-products (24-methylcholesterol and 24-ethylcholesterol) and by 24-methylene dihydrolanosterol (a sterol precursor) accumulation, suggesting an inhibition of a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis pathway (14alpha-demethylase), but also by the increases in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PLFA (C16:0; C18:0 and C18:3) quantities as well as by MDA accumulation. Moreover, TAG quantity was found to be reduced in the presence of propiconazole, suggesting their use by G. irregulare in a response to propiconazole toxicity. In conclusion, taken together, the findings of the current study highlighted a relationship between the SBI fungicide toxicity against the beneficial AMF G. irregulare and (1) the disturbance in the sterol metabolism, (2) the membrane alteration (PC decrease, lipid peroxidation) as well as (3) the reduction in storage lipids, TAG. More

  20. Cloning the sterol carrier protein 2 genes of Japanese toad (Bufo japonicus formosus) and Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) and its tissue expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu-Cheng; Zhuge, Hui; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Shu-Fang; Yang, Xian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    In this study, to clarify the bioactive polypeptides included in the skins and secretions of Bufo, we screened the Japanese toad (Bufo japonicus formosus) skin cDNA liary by colony polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and obtained a transcript of 1 075 bp consisting of 1 37 bp 5' untranslated region (UTR), 515 bp 3' UTR and a 423 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 140 amino acid residues (GenBank accession number: KF359945). Homolog analysis showed a 70%-96% homology with sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) present in other animals, which is implicated in lipid metabolism of other organisms. The gene SCP-2 of Chinese toad (B. gargarizans) was cloned from a first strand cDNA of Bufo skin (GenBank accession number: KF381341) via PCR, whose encoding polypeptide has only one amino acid difference from that of Japanese toad. Tissue distribution analysis showed that SCP-2 expressed in all organs tested, though in the liver and spleen it manifested lower expression than in other organs. These findings might indicate SCP-2 being one of the active ingredients in toad skin. These findings may in turn have implications for further drug development from traditional Chinese medicine sources.

  1. Cloning the sterol carrier protein 2 genes of Japanese toad (Bufo japonicus formosus) and Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) and its tissue expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu-Cheng; Zhuge, Hui; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Shu-Fang; Yang, Xian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    In this study, to clarify the bioactive polypeptides included in the skins and secretions of Bufo, we screened the Japanese toad (Bufo japonicus formosus) skin cDNA liary by colony polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and obtained a transcript of 1 075 bp consisting of 1 37 bp 5' untranslated region (UTR), 515 bp 3' UTR and a 423 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 140 amino acid residues (GenBank accession number: KF359945). Homolog analysis showed a 70%-96% homology with sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) present in other animals, which is implicated in lipid metabolism of other organisms. The gene SCP-2 of Chinese toad (B. gargarizans) was cloned from a first strand cDNA of Bufo skin (GenBank accession number: KF381341) via PCR, whose encoding polypeptide has only one amino acid difference from that of Japanese toad. Tissue distribution analysis showed that SCP-2 expressed in all organs tested, though in the liver and spleen it manifested lower expression than in other organs. These findings might indicate SCP-2 being one of the active ingredients in toad skin. These findings may in turn have implications for further drug development from traditional Chinese medicine sources. PMID:25297079

  2. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the Delta9, Delta10, and Delta11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 C cells and the lowest in 50 C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  3. Structural Features and Potent Antidepressant Effects of Total Sterols and β-sitosterol Extracted from Sargassum horneri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Donghai; Zheng, Lianwen; Qi, Ling; Wang, Shuran; Guan, Liping; Xia, Yanan; Cai, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    The purified total sterols and β-sitosterol extracted from Sargassum horneri were evaluated for their antidepressant-like activity using the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) in mice. Total sterols and β-sitosterol significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST and TST. Total sterols were administered orally for 7 days at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, and β-sitosterol was administered intraperitoneally at doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg. β-sitosterol had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field test. In addition, total sterols and β-sitosterol significantly increased NE, 5-HT, and the metabolite 5-HIAA in the mouse brain, suggesting that the antidepressant-like activity may be mediated through these neurotransmitters. PMID:27367705

  4. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 degrees C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the delta 9, delta 10 and delta 11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 degrees C cells and the lowest in 50 degrees C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  5. Structural Features and Potent Antidepressant Effects of Total Sterols and β-sitosterol Extracted from Sargassum horneri

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Donghai; Zheng, Lianwen; Qi, Ling; Wang, Shuran; Guan, Liping; Xia, Yanan; Cai, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    The purified total sterols and β-sitosterol extracted from Sargassum horneri were evaluated for their antidepressant-like activity using the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) in mice. Total sterols and β-sitosterol significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST and TST. Total sterols were administered orally for 7 days at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, and β-sitosterol was administered intraperitoneally at doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg. β-sitosterol had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field test. In addition, total sterols and β-sitosterol significantly increased NE, 5-HT, and the metabolite 5-HIAA in the mouse brain, suggesting that the antidepressant-like activity may be mediated through these neurotransmitters. PMID:27367705

  6. Identification and in vitro characterization of a Marek’s disease virus encoded ribonucleotide reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a key regulatory enzyme in the DNA synthesis pathway. The gene coding for the RR of MDV is located in the unique long (UL) region of the genome. The large subunit is encoded by UL39 (RR1) and is predicted to comprise 860 amino acid...

  7. Stellettins L and M, cytotoxic isomalabaricane-type triterpenes, and sterols from the marine sponge Stelletta tenuis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hou-wen; Wang, Zeng-lei; Wu, Jiu-hong; Shi, Ning; Zhang, Hong-jun; Chen, Wan-sheng; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lin, An-Shen

    2007-07-01

    Two new isomalabaricane-type triterpenes, stellettins L (1) and M (2), and three new sterols (3-5) were isolated from the marine sponge Stelletta tenuis collected in the South China Sea. Chemical structures were established from spectroscopic data and comparison with known compounds. In addition, spectroscopic data reported for the known sterol 24-methylene-27-methylcholest-5-en-3beta-ol-7-one (6) were revised. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against stomach cancer (AGS) in vitro.

  8. A user's guide to the encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE).

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective effort to discover and define the functional elements encoded in the human genome, including genes, transcripts, and transcriptional regulatory regions, together with their attendant chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel algorithms have been developed to facilitate analysis. Data and derived results are made available through a freely accessible database. Here we provide an overview of the project and the resources it is generating and illustrate the application of ENCODE data to interpret the human genome.

  9. Regulatory network rewiring for secondary metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana under various conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant secondary metabolites are critical to various biological processes. However, the regulations of these metabolites are complex because of regulatory rewiring or crosstalk. To unveil how regulatory behaviors on secondary metabolism reshape biological processes, we constructed and analyzed a dynamic regulatory network of secondary metabolic pathways in Arabidopsis. Results The dynamic regulatory network was constructed through integrating co-expressed gene pairs and regulatory interactions. Regulatory interactions were either predicted by conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or proved by experiments. We found that integrating two data (co-expression and predicted regulatory interactions) enhanced the number of highly confident regulatory interactions by over 10% compared with using single data. The dynamic changes of regulatory network systematically manifested regulatory rewiring to explain the mechanism of regulation, such as in terpenoids metabolism, the regulatory crosstalk of RAV1 (AT1G13260) and ATHB1 (AT3G01470) on HMG1 (hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, AT1G76490); and regulation of RAV1 on epoxysqualene biosynthesis and sterol biosynthesis. Besides, we investigated regulatory rewiring with expression, network topology and upstream signaling pathways. Regulatory rewiring was revealed by the variability of genes’ expression: pathway genes and transcription factors (TFs) were significantly differentially expressed under different conditions (such as terpenoids biosynthetic genes in tissue experiments and E2F/DP family members in genotype experiments). Both network topology and signaling pathways supported regulatory rewiring. For example, we discovered correlation among the numbers of pathway genes, TFs and network topology: one-gene pathways (such as δ-carotene biosynthesis) were regulated by a fewer TFs, and were not critical to metabolic network because of their low degrees in topology. Upstream signaling pathways of 50

  10. Virus-encoded microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Grundhoff, Adam; Sullivan, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are the subject of enormous interest. They are small non-coding RNAs that play a regulatory role in numerous and diverse cellular processes such as immune function, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. Several virus families have been shown to encode miRNAs, and an appreciation for their roles in the viral infectious cycle continues to grow. Despite the identification of numerous (>225) viral miRNAs, an in depth functional understanding of most virus-encoded miRNAs is lacking. Here we focus on a few viral miRNAs with well-defined functions. We use these examples to extrapolate general themes of viral miRNA activities including autoregulation of gene expression, avoidance of host defenses, and a likely important role in maintaining latent and persistent infections. We hypothesize that although the molecular mechanisms and machinery are similar, the majority of viral miRNAs may utilize a target strategy that differs from host miRNAs. That is, many viral miRNAs may have evolved to regulate viral-encoded transcripts or networks of host genes that are unique to viral miRNAs. Included in this latter category are a likely abundant class of viral miRNAs that may regulate only one or a few principal host genes. Key steps forward for the field are discussed, including the need for additional functional studies that utilize surgical viral miRNA mutants combined with relevant models of infection. PMID:21277611

  11. Parameters for Martini sterols and hopanoids based on a virtual-site description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M. N.; Ingólfsson, H. I.; Marrink, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sterols play an essential role in modulating bilayer structure and dynamics. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics parameters for cholesterol and related molecules are available for the Martini force field and have been successfully used in multiple lipid bilayer studies. In this work, we focus on the use of virtual sites as a means of increasing the stability of cholesterol and cholesterol-like structures. We improve and extend the Martini parameterization of sterols in four different ways: 1—the cholesterol parameters were adapted to make use of virtual interaction sites, which markedly improves numerical stability; 2—cholesterol parameters were also modified to address reported shortcomings in reproducing correct lipid phase behavior in mixed membranes; 3—parameters for ergosterol were created and adapted from cholesterols; and 4—parameters for the hopanoid class of bacterial polycyclic molecules were created, namely, for hopane, diploptene, bacteriohopanetetrol, and for their polycyclic base structure.

  12. [Terpenoids and sterols from Ricinus communis and their activities against diabetes].

    PubMed

    Li, Shen-Hua; Deng, Qing; Zhu, Li; Lai, Chun-Hua; Wang, Heng-Shan; Tan, Qin-Gang

    2014-02-01

    Seven terpenoids and three sterols were isolated from the methanol extracts of the aerial parts of Ricinus communis by chromatography methods and their structures were identified by spectra analysis as ficusic acid( 1), phytol(2), callyspinol(3) , lupeol(4), 30-norlupan-3beta-ol-20-one(5) , lup-20(29)-en-3beta,15alpha-diol(6) , acetylaleuritolic acid( 7), stigmast4-en-3-one(8) , stig-mast-4-en-6beta-ol-3-one(9) , and stigmast4-en-3,6-dione(10). Compounds 1-3 and 5-10 were obtained from this species for the first time and 5 and 6 showed significant inhibitive activity and good selectivity against 11beta-HSD of mouse and human in vitro. [Key words] Ricinus communis; terpenoids; sterols; 11beta-HSD

  13. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  14. Microbial water quality and sedimentary faecal sterols as markers of sewage contamination in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Lyons, B P; Devlin, M J; Abdul Hamid, S A; Al-Otiabi, A F; Al-Enezi, M; Massoud, M S; Al-Zaidan, A S; Smith, A J; Morris, S; Bersuder, P; Barber, J L; Papachlimitzou, A; Al-Sarawi, H A

    2015-11-30

    Microbial water quality and concentrations of faecal sterols in sediment have been used to assess the degree of sewage contamination in Kuwait's marine environment. A review of microbial (faecal coliform, faecal streptococci and Escherichia coli) water quality data identified temporal and spatial sources of pollution around the coastline. Results indicated that bacterial counts regularly breach regional water quality guidelines. Sediments collected from a total of 29 sites contained detectable levels of coprostanol with values ranging from 29 to 2420 ng g(-1) (dry weight). Hot spots based on faecal sterol sediment contamination were identified in Doha Bay and Sulaibikhat Bay, which are both smaller embayments of Kuwait Bay. The ratio of epicoprostanol/coprostanol indicates that a proportion of the contamination was from raw or partially treated sewage. Sewage pollution in these areas are thought to result from illegal connections and discharges from storm drains, such as that sited at Al-Ghazali.

  15. Potential of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase for biotechnologically relevant hydrolysis reactions

    PubMed Central

    Barba Cedillo, Víctor; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete Ophiostoma piceae produces a sterol esterase (OPE) with high affinity toward p-nitrophenol, glycerol, and sterol esters. Recently, this enzyme has been heterologously expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris under the AOX1 methanol-inducible promoter (PAOX1) using sorbitol as co-susbtrate, and the hydrolytic activity of the recombinant protein (OPE*) turned out to be improved from a kinetic point of view. In this study, we analyze the effects of sorbitol during the expression of OPE*, at first added as an additional carbon source, and methanol as inducer. The O. piceae enzyme was successfully used for PVAc hydrolysis, suggesting its potential applicability in recycled paper production to decrease stickies problems. PMID:23138020

  16. Antioxidative succinobucol-sterol conjugates: Crystal structures and pseudosymmetry in the crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Satu; Jurček, Ondřej; Wimmer, Zdeněk; Drašar, Pavel; Kolehmainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    An extensive study to attach succinobucol to sterols has provided conjugates which comprise two pharmaceutically important compounds into one entity where the components are expected to have a synergistic effect. The motivation to design these novel conjugates was the need to broaden the armamentarium of current agents used in the treatment of atherosclerotic diseases and type 2 diabetes. In desire for detailed information of these compounds in solid state, which also have an influence to their physiological activity, systematic crystallization experiments were performed and as a result, X-ray quality single crystals were obtained from four succinobucol-sterol conjugates. All of these compounds crystallized in space group P1 with two or four molecules in an asymmetric unit and the crystallographically independent molecules were found to be related by pseudosymmetry (i.e. by pseudoinversion in 1-3 and by pseudoinversion plus pseudotranslation in 4).

  17. New polyhydroxylated sterols from Palythoa tuberculosa and their apoptotic activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Elbagory, Abdulrahman M; Meyer, Mervin; Ali, Abdel-Hamid A M; Ameer, Farouk; Parker-Nance, Shirley; Benito, Maria Teresa; Doyagüez, Elisa Garcia; Jimeno, Maria Luisa; Hussein, Ahmed A

    2015-09-01

    The chemical study on the total extract of the zoanthid Palythoa tuberculosa, collected from the Red Sea, resulted in the isolation of seven polyhydroxylated sterols (1-7), six of which, palysterols A-F (2-7), are new. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive analysis of their 1-, 2D NMR and MS spectroscopic data. This is the first chemical investigation on the species collected from Red Sea. We studied the cytotoxic effects of the total extract and some of the new polyhydroxylated sterols in three human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, HeLa, and HT-29) and one non-cancerous human cell line (KMST-6). Palysterol F (7), in particular, was able to selectively induce high levels of apoptosis (>75%) in breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells but not HeLa, HT-29 and KMST-6 cells. PMID:26095205

  18. Structural Sterols Are Involved in Both the Initiation and Tip Growth of Root Hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    PubMed Central

    Ovečka, Miroslav; Berson, Tobias; Beck, Martina; Derksen, Jan; Šamaj, Jozef; Baluška, František; Lichtscheidl, Irene K.

    2010-01-01

    Structural sterols are abundant in the plasma membrane of root apex cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. They specifically accumulate in trichoblasts during the prebulging and bulge stages and show a polar accumulation in the tip during root hair elongation but are distributed evenly in mature root hairs. Thus, structural sterols may serve as a marker for root hair initiation and growth. In addition, they may predict branching events in mutants with branching root hairs. Structural sterols were detected using the sterol complexing fluorochrome filipin. Application of filipin caused a rapid, concentration-dependent decrease in tip growth. Filipin-complexed sterols accumulated in globular structures that fused to larger FM4-64–positive aggregates in the tip, so-called filipin-induced apical compartments, which were closely associated with the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane appeared malformed and the cytoarchitecture of the tip zone was affected. Trans-Golgi network/early endosomal compartments containing molecular markers, such as small Rab GTPase RabA1d and SNARE Wave line 13 (VTI12), locally accumulated in these filipin-induced apical compartments, while late endosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, plastids, and cytosol were excluded from them. These data suggest that the local distribution and apical accumulation of structural sterols may regulate vesicular trafficking and plasma membrane properties during both initiation and tip growth of root hairs in Arabidopsis. PMID:20841426

  19. Evidence from mycelial studies for differences in the sterol biosynthetic pathway of Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S G; Gottlieb, D

    1978-01-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi, a member of the Pythiacease, does not synthesize sterols. Small amounts of squalene, but no squalene epoxide or sterol, were isolated from the dried mycelium of this fungus after growth in sterol-free medium. The dried mycelium of Rhizoctonia solani, a sterol-synthesizing fungus grown under the same conditions, contained small amounts of squalene and squalene epoxide and large amounts of ergosterol. When the two organisms were grown in the presence of [14C]acetate, only labelled geraniol, farnesol and squalene were recovered from the P. cinnamomi mycelium, whereas labelled geraniol, farnesol, squalene, squalene epoxide and ergosterol were recovered from the R. solani mycelium. Similar results were obtained when the organisms were incubated in the presence of [2(-14)C]mevalonate; in this case, labelled lanosterol was also detected in the R. solani mycelium. Both organisms, when incubated in the presence of unlabelled squalene, squalene epoxide or lanosterol, incorporated these compounds into their mycelia; however, only the R. solani mycelium was able to convert these substrates into products further along the sterol pathway. It appears that squalene is the terminal compound in the sterol biosynthetic pathway of P. cinnamomi. PMID:637849

  20. Regulatory gene networks and the properties of the developmental process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instructions for development are encoded in arrays of regulatory DNA. These specify large networks of interactions among genes producing transcription factors and signaling components. The architecture of such networks both explains and predicts developmental phenomenology. Although network analysis is yet in its early stages, some fundamental commonalities are already emerging. Two such are the use of multigenic feedback loops to ensure the progressivity of developmental regulatory states and the prevalence of repressive regulatory interactions in spatial control processes. Gene regulatory networks make it possible to explain the process of development in causal terms and eventually will enable the redesign of developmental regulatory circuitry to achieve different outcomes.

  1. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE MICRON-SCALE SEGREGATION OF STEROLS AND GM1 IN LIVE MAMMALIAN SPERM

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Asano, Atsushi; Buttke, Danielle E.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Weiss, Robert S.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that a stable, micron-scale segregation of focal enrichments of sterols exists at physiological temperature in the plasma membrane of live murine and human sperm. These enrichments of sterols represent microheterogeneities within this membrane domain overlying the acrosome. Previously, we showed that cholera toxin subunit B (CTB), which binds the glycosphingolipid, GM1, localizes to this same domain in live sperm. Interestingly, the GM1 undergoes an unexplained redistribution upon cell death. We now demonstrate that GM1 is also enriched in the acrosome, an exocytotic vesicle. Transfer of lipids between this and the plasma membrane occurs at cell death, increasing GM1 in the plasma membrane without apparent release of acrosomal contents. This finding provides corroborative support for an emerging model of regulated exocytosis in which membrane communications might occur without triggering the “acrosome reaction.” Comparison of the dynamics of CTB-bound endogenous GM1 and exogenous BODIPY-GM1 in live murine sperm demonstrate that the sub-acrosomal ring functions as a specialized diffusion barrier segregating specific lipids within the sperm head plasma membrane. Our data show significant differences between endogenous lipids and exogenous lipid probes in terms of lateral diffusion. Based on these studies, we propose a hierarchical model to explain the segregation of this sterol- and GM1-enriched domain in live sperm, which is positioned to regulate sperm fertilization competence and mediate interactions with the oocyte. Moreover, our data suggest potential origins of sub-types of membrane raft microdomains enriched in sterols and/or GM1 that can be separated biochemically. PMID:19012288

  2. An efficient diethyl ether-based soxhlet protocol to quantify faecal sterols from catchment waters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vikas Kumar G; Dunstan, Hugh; Taylor, Warren

    2006-03-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency and reproducibility of a diethyl ether-based soxhlet extraction procedure for faecal sterols occurring from catchment waters. Water samples spiked with a mixture of faecal sterols were filtered and analytes were extracted using the diethyl ether-based soxhlet method and the Bligh and Dyer chloroform extraction process. For diethyl ether-based soxhlet extraction procedure, solvent extracts were saponified with 100 microL of 10% KOH in methanol (100 degrees C/120 min) and then acidified with 60 microL of 6M HCl. Lipid contents were extracted by ethanol (0.5 mL) from the saponification products. The lipid extracts were then reacted with 100 microL of bis(trimethyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethyl chlorosilane (100 degrees C/60 min) to form the trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The derivatised extracts were then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. For sterol concentrations ranging from 35 to 175 microg mL(-1), the soxhlet-based extraction process yielded the following recovery efficiencies for coprostanol (101%), epicoprostanol (97%), cholesterol (97%), dihydrocholesterol (97%) and 5alpha-cholestane (111%), whereas the Bligh and Dyer process yielded recoveries of 32, 41, 0, 36 and 51%, respectively. The results suggested that the diethyl ether-based soxhlet extraction method was more efficient and reproducible than the Bligh and Dyer chloroform extraction process for the analyses of trace levels of faecal sterols from water samples. Moreover, it was revealed that the diethyl ether-based soxhlet extraction method used less solvent and was logistically easier.

  3. Isolation and structure elucidation of azoricasterol, a new sterol of the deepwater sponge Macandrewia azorica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Harald; Reitner, Joachim; König, Gabriele M.

    2004-09-01

    Chemical investigation of the deepwater sponge Macandrewia azorica, collected from the flanks of the Gettysburg and Ormonde Sea Mount, North Atlantic, from a depth of 600 m, has led to the isolation of a new sterol with an unusual side chain (1), along with S-methylergothioneine (2). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were established by employing spectroscopic techniques (NMR, MS, UV, IR and polarimetry). This is the first report of metabolites of a sponge belonging to the genus Macandrewia.

  4. Sterol Methyl Oxidases Affect Embryo Development via Auxin-Associated Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Sun, Shuangli; Nie, Xiang; Boutté, Yohann; Grison, Magali; Li, Panpan; Kuang, Susu; Men, Shuzhen

    2016-05-01

    Sterols are essential molecules for multiple biological processes, including embryogenesis, cell elongation, and endocytosis. The plant sterol biosynthetic pathway is unique in the involvement of two distinct sterol 4α-methyl oxidase (SMO) families, SMO1 and SMO2, which contain three and two isoforms, respectively, and are involved in sequential removal of the two methyl groups at C-4. In this study, we characterized the biological functions of members of the SMO2 gene family. SMO2-1 was strongly expressed in most tissues during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) development, whereas SMO2-2 showed a more specific expression pattern. Although single smo2 mutants displayed no obvious phenotype, the smo2-1 smo2-2 double mutant was embryonic lethal, and the smo2-1 smo2-2/+ mutant was dwarf, whereas the smo2-1/+ smo2-2 mutant exhibited a moderate phenotype. The phenotypes of the smo2 mutants resembled those of auxin-defective mutants. Indeed, the expression of DR5rev:GFP, an auxin-responsive reporter, was reduced and abnormal in smo2-1 smo2-2 embryos. Furthermore, the expression and subcellular localization of the PIN1 auxin efflux facilitator also were altered. Consistent with these observations, either the exogenous application of auxin or endogenous auxin overproduction (YUCCA9 overexpression) partially rescued the smo2-1 smo2-2 embryonic lethality. Surprisingly, the dwarf phenotype of smo2-1 smo2-2/+ was completely rescued by YUCCA9 overexpression. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed a substantial accumulation of 4α-methylsterols, substrates of SMO2, in smo2 heterozygous double mutants. Together, our data suggest that SMO2s are important for correct sterol composition and function partially through effects on auxin accumulation, auxin response, and PIN1 expression to regulate Arabidopsis embryogenesis and postembryonic development. PMID:27006488

  5. Plant sterols and host plant suitability for generalist and specialist caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiangfeng; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T

    2012-02-01

    Insects, unlike plants and vertebrates, lack the ability to biosynthesize sterols. Cholesterol is typically the most common sterol found in plant-feeding insects, but it is rarely found in plants above trace levels, so plant-feeding insects must produce the cholesterol they need by metabolizing the sterols found in the plants they eat. Plant-feeding insects are, however, often limited in terms of which sterols can be converted to cholesterol. In the current study we used a transgenic tobacco plant line that displays high levels of atypical plant steroids, specifically stanols and ketone-steroids, to explore how novel steroid structural features affect performance in three economically important caterpillars (Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera exigua, and Manduca sexta). For each species we measured pupation success, larval development, pupal mass, pupal development, and eclosion success. For the two generalists species (H. virescens and S. exigua) we also measured egg production and egg viability. We then used these eggs to replicate the experiment, so that we could examine the effect of parental steroid dietary history on survival, growth and reproduction of 2nd-generation individuals. Significant negative effects of novel steroids on larval and pupal performance were observed for each caterpillar in the first generation, although these were often subtle, and were not consistent between the three species. In the second generation, larval survival estimated by 'pupation number/plant' on the tobacco plants with novel steroids was significantly reduced, while eclosion success was significantly lower for H. virescens. With respect to adult reproduction (i.e. egg production and egg viability) there were no observed differences in the first generation, but novel steroids significantly negatively impacted reproduction in the second generation. The findings from this study, when integrated into a simple population growth model, demonstrate the potential in using plants with

  6. Recovery of sterols as fatty acid steryl esters from waste material after purification of tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Toshihiro; Hirota, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yomi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Fujita, Tokio; Kitano, Motohiro; Shimada, Yuji

    2004-08-01

    Tocopherols are purified industrially from soybean oil deodorizer distillate by a process comprising distillation and ethanol fractionation. The waste material after ethanol fractionation (TC waste) contains 75% sterols, but a purification process has not yet been developed. We thus attempted to purify sterols by a process including a lipase-catalyzed reaction. Candida rugosa lipase efficiently esterified sterols in TC waste with oleic acid (OA). After studying several factors affecting esterification, the reaction conditions were determined as follows: ratio of TC waste/OA, 1:2 (wt/wt); water content, 30%; amount of lipase, 120 U/g-reaction mixture; temperature, 40 degrees C. Under these conditions, the degree of esterification reached 82.7% after 24 h. FA steryl esters (steryl esters) in the oil layer were purified successfully by short-path distillation (purity, 94.9%; recovery, 73.1%). When sterols in TC waste were esterified with FFA originating from olive, soybean, rapeseed, safflower, sunflower, and linseed oils, the FA compositions of the steryl esters differed somewhat from those of the original oils: The content of saturated FA was lower and that of unsaturated FA was higher. The m.p. of the steryl esters synthesized (21.7-36.5 degrees C) were remarkably low compared with those of the steryl esters purified from high-b.p. soybean oil deodorizer distillate substances (56.5 degrees C; JAOCS 80, 341-346, 2003). The low-m.p. steryl esters were soluble in rapeseed oil even at a final concentration of 10%. PMID:15638248

  7. Molecular aspects of polyene- and sterol-dependent pore formation in thin lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Dennis, V W; Stead, N W; Andreoli, T E

    1970-03-01

    Amphotericin B modifies the permeability properties of thin lipid membranes formed from solutions containing sheep red cell phospholipids and cholesterol. At 10(-6)M amphotericin B, the DC membrane resistance fell from approximately 10(8) to approximately 10(2) ohm-cm(2), and the membranes became Cl(-)-, rather than Na(+)-selective; the permeability coefficients for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes increased in inverse relationship to solute size, and the rate of water flow during osmosis increased 30-fold. These changes may be rationalized by assuming that the interaction of amphotericin B with membrane-bound sterol resulted in the formation of aqueous pores. N-acetylamphotericin B and the methyl ester of N-acetylamphotericin B, but not the smaller ring compounds, filipin, rimocidin, and PA-166, produced comparable permeability changes in identical membranes, and amphotericin B and its derivatives produced similar changes in the properties of membranes formed from phospholipid-free sterol solutions. However, amphotericin B did not affect ionic selectivity or water and nonelectrolyte permeability in membranes formed from solutions containing phospholipids and no added cholesterol, or when cholesterol was replaced by either cholesterol palmitate, dihydrotachysterol, epicholesterol, or Delta5-cholesten-3-one. Phospholipid-free sterol membranes exposed to amphotericin B or its derivatives were anion-selective, but the degree of Cl(-) selectivity varied among the compounds, and with the aqueous pH. The data are discussed with regard to, first, the nature of the polyene-sterol interactions which result in pore formation, and second, the functional groups on amphotericin B responsible for membrane anion selectivity.

  8. Epigenetic modifier-induced biosynthesis of novel acetylenic sterols from Cladosporium colocasiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Ze; Liang, Bo-Wen; Li, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The addition of an HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SBHA), to the culture medium of Cladosporium colocasiae, dramatically altered its metabolic profiles. Analysis of the culture broth extract led to the isolation of two new acetylenic sterols (1-2). The isolated compounds were further evaluated for their cytotoxic and antibacterial activities. Compound 1 showed activity against Bacillus subtilis, affording a zone of inhibition of 12mm at 100μg/disk. However, none of them showed noticeable growth inhibitory effects.

  9. Sesterterpenes and a new sterol from the marine sponge Phyllospongia foliascens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jun; Yi, Yang-Hua; Yang, Fan; Chen, Wan-Sheng; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2010-02-01

    A new scalarane sesterterpene, phyllofolactone M (1), and a new sterol, (24E)-5alpha,6alpha-epoxystigmasta-7,24(28)-dien-3beta-ol (3), together with a known sesterterpene, phyllofolactone B (2), were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Phyllospongia foliascens. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and comparison with known compounds. In addition, previous NMR data assignments for the known sesterterpene phyllofolactone B (2) were revised.

  10. [Isolation and identification of two novel polyhydroxylated sterol from Spongia obligue].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; He, H; Guo, S; Zeng, L

    2001-03-01

    Two novel sterols have been isolated from Spongia obligue collected from South China sea and their structure were identified as 24(28)-methylene-1,3,4,11-tetrohydroxycholest-5-en-18-oic acid and 24(28)-methylene-cholestene-5-en-1,3,8,11-tetraol respectively on the basic of the spectral data of MS, IR, 1HNMR and 13CNMR(DEPT).

  11. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  12. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  13. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  14. A Potential Biochemical Mechanism Underlying the Influence of Sterol Deprivation Stress on Caenorhabditis elegans Longevity*

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Mi Cheong; Na, Keun; Kim, Heekyeong; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Chitwood, David J.; Paik, Young-Ki

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism underlying the effect of sterol deprivation on longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans, we treated parent worms (P0) with 25-azacoprostane (Aza), which inhibits sitosterol-to-cholesterol conversion, and measured mean lifespan (MLS) in F2 worms. At 25 μm (∼EC50), Aza reduced total body sterol by 82.5%, confirming sterol depletion. Aza (25 μm) treatment of wild-type (N2) C. elegans grown in sitosterol (5 μg/ml) reduced MLS by 35%. Similar results were obtained for the stress-related mutants daf-16(mu86) and gas-1(fc21). Unexpectedly, Aza had essentially no effect on MLS in the stress-resistant daf-2(e1370) or mitochondrial complex II mutant mev-1(kn1) strains, indicating that Aza may target both insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) and mitochondrial complex II. Aza increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels 2.7-fold in N2 worms, but did not affect ROS production by mev-1(kn1), suggesting a direct link between Aza treatment and mitochondrial ROS production. Moreover, expression of the stress-response transcription factor SKN-1 was decreased in amphid neurons by Aza and that of DAF-28 was increased when DAF-6 was involved, contributing to lifespan reduction. PMID:21186286

  15. Fluorinated Sterols Are Suicide Inhibitors of Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Growth in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Leaver, David J; Patkar, Presheet; Singha, Ujjal K; Miller, Matthew B; Haubrich, Brad A; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W David

    2015-10-22

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causal agent for sleeping sickness, depends on ergosterol for growth. Here, we describe the effects of a mechanism-based inhibitor, 26-fluorolanosterol (26FL), which converts in vivo to a fluorinated substrate of the sterol C24-methyltransferase essential for sterol methylation and function of ergosterol, and missing from the human host. 26FL showed potent inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis and growth of procyclic and bloodstream forms while having no effect on cholesterol biosynthesis or growth of human epithelial kidney cells. During exposure of cloned TbSMT to 26-fluorocholesta-5,7,24-trienol, the enzyme is gradually killed as a consequence of the covalent binding of the intermediate C25 cation to the active site (kcat/kinact = 0.26 min(-1)/0.24 min(-1); partition ratio of 1.08), whereas 26FL is non-productively bound. These results demonstrate that poisoning of ergosterol biosynthesis by a 26-fluorinated Δ(24)-sterol is a promising strategy for developing a new treatment for trypanosomiasis.

  16. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications. PMID:25108239

  17. GPCR stabilization using the bicelle-like architecture of mixed sterol-detergent micelles†

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Jeffrey J.; Chun, Eugene; Wacker, Daniel; Wu, Huixian; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-01-01

    The biophysical characterization of purified membrane proteins typically requires detergent mediated extraction from native lipid membrane environments. In the case of human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), this process has been complicated by their conformational heterogeneity and the general lack of understanding the composition and interactions within the diverse human cellular membrane environment. Several successful GPCR structure determination efforts have shown that the addition of cholesterol analogs is often critical for maintaining protein stability. We have identified sterols that substantially increase the stability of the NOP receptor (ORL-1), a member of the opioid GPCR family, in a mixed micelle environment. Using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have determined that the most thermal stabilizing sterol, cholesteryl hemmisuccinate, induces the formation of a bicelle-like micelle architecture when mixed with dodecyl maltoside detergent. Together with mutagenesis studies and recent GPCR structures, our results provide indications that stabilization is attained through a combination of specific sterol binding to GPCRs and modulation of micelle morphology. PMID:22041719

  18. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications.

  19. Rapid determination of sterols in vegetable oils by CEC using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Lerma-García, María Jesús; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto F; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José M

    2008-11-01

    A method for the determination of sterols in vegetable oils by CEC with UV-Vis detection, using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns, has been developed. To prepare the columns, polymerization mixtures containing monomers of different hydrophobicities were tried. The influence of composition of polymerization mixture was optimized in terms of porogenic solvent, monomers/porogens and monomer/crosslinker ratios. The composition of the mobile phase was also studied. The optimum monolith was obtained with lauryl methacrylate monomer at 60:40% (wt:wt) lauryl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate ratio and 60 wt% porogens with 20 wt% of 1,4-butanediol (12 wt% 1,4-butanediol in the polymerization mixture). Excellent resolution between sterols was achieved in less than 7 min with an 85:10:5 v/v/v ACN-2-propanol-water buffer containing 5 mM Tris at pH 8.0. The limits of detection were lower than 0.04 mM, and inter-day and column-to-column reproducibilities at 0.75 mM were better than 6.2%. The method was applied to the determination of sterols in vegetable oils with different botanical origins and to detect olive oil adulteration with sunflower and soybean oils.

  20. Novel Synthesis of Phytosterol Ester from Soybean Sterol and Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuming; Oyeyinka, Samson A; Ma, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Phytosterols are important bioactive compounds which have several health benefits including reduction of serum cholesterol and preventing cardiovascular diseases. The most widely used method in the synthesis of its ester analogous form is the use of catalysts and solvents. These methods have been found to present some safety and health concern. In this paper, an alternative method of synthesizing phytosterol ester from soybean sterol and acetic anhydride was investigated. Process parameters such as mole ratio, temperature and time were optimized. The structure and physicochemical properties of phytosterol acetic ester were analyzed. By the use of gas chromatography, the mole ratio of soybean sterol and acetic anhydride needed for optimum esterification rate of 99.4% was 1:1 at 135 °C for 1.5 h. FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of phytosterol ester with strong absorption peaks at 1732 and 1250 cm(-1) , which corresponds to the stretching vibration of C=O and C-O-C, respectively. These peaks could be attributed to the formation of ester links which resulted from the reaction between the hydroxyl group of soybean sterol and the carbonyl group of acetic anhydride. This paper provides a better alternative to the synthesis of phytosterol ester without catalyst and solvent residues, which may have potential application in the food, health-care food, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27240315

  1. Short-Term Water Deficit Changes Cuticular Sterol Profile in the Eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Haliński, Łukasz P; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Crop irrigation uses a majority of a total world water supply, at the same time displaying low efficiency. As the expected, future water requirements are higher than the current ones; there is a risk of a growing deficit of water for the agricultural use. Hence, there is an arising need for better understanding the effects of water deprivation on the crop plants. Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is a vegetable crop cultivated in arid and semi-arid parts of the world. Because of its high water demands, the eggplant is a convenient model organism for studies concerning the effects of water deficit on the plant growth. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of short-term water deficit on eggplant leaf cuticular waxes and total sterols. Water deprivation did not affect the amount and composition of aliphatic components of cuticular waxes. Significant decrease in the total cuticular sterols and the increase in cuticular cholesterol were observed as an effect of water deficit. In contrast, some of the free internal sterols were more abundant in water-deprived plants. The possible importance of these observations, including increased biosynthesis of defensive compounds and the need to maintain the cell membrane stability, was discussed.

  2. Fatty acids, sterols, and antioxidant activity in minimally processed avocados during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Lucía; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; de Ancos, Begoña; Cano, M Pilar

    2009-04-22

    Avocado ( Persea americana Mill.) is a good source of bioactive compounds such as monounsaturated fatty acids and sterols. The impact of minimal processing on its health-promoting attributes was investigated. Avocados cut into slices or halves were packaged in plastic bags under nitrogen, air, or vacuum and stored at 8 degrees C for 13 days. The stabilities of fatty acids and sterols as well as the effect on antioxidant activity were evaluated. The main fatty acid identified and quantified in avocado was oleic acid (about 57% of total content), whereas beta-sitosterol was found to be the major sterol (about 89% of total content). In general, after refrigerated storage, a significant decrease in fatty acid content was observed. Vacuum/halves and air/slices were the samples that maintained better this content. With regard to phytosterols, there were no significant changes during storage. Antioxidant activity showed a slight positive correlation against stearic acid content. At the end of refrigerated storage, a significant increase in antiradical efficiency (AE) was found for vacuum samples. AE values were quite similar among treatments. Hence, minimal processing can be a useful tool to preserve health-related properties of avocado fruit.

  3. Sterol oxidation in ready-to-eat infant foods during storage.

    PubMed

    García-Llatas, Guadalupe; Cercaci, Luisito; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lagarda, M Jesús; Farré, Rosaura; Lercker, Giovanni

    2008-01-23

    The effect of storage on sterol oxidation of ready-to-eat infant foods was evaluated. Two different liquid infant foods (honey or fruits flavors), prepared with milk and cereals, were stored for 0, 2, 4, 7 and 9 months at 25 degrees C. Sterol oxidation products (SOP) were isolated by cold saponification, purified by silica solid-phase extraction, and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry. beta-Sitosterol was the most representative sterol, followed by cholesterol and campesterol. No significant differences in the total and single SOP content (0.8-1 mg/kg of product) were observed with respect to storage time and type of sample; the main SOP found was 7-ketositosterol (<0.2 mg/kg of product). The extent of stigmasterol oxidation (2.9%) was higher than that of cholesterol (1.9%) and beta-sitosterol (1.4%). The type and quality of raw materials, as well as the processing conditions, seem to greatly influence SOP formation and accumulation in infant foods.

  4. Glucosylation of phosphorylpolyisoprenol and sterol at the plasma membrane of soya-bean (Glycine max) protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, C M; Northcote, D H

    1980-01-01

    Protoplasts were prepared from cells of soya-bean (Glycine max) suspension cultures and the plasma membrane was labelled with diazotized [G-3H]sulphanilic acid. Homogenates were fractionated by differential and isopycnic centrifugation, and membrane fractions in a density gradient were characterized by enzymic markers and the radioactive label. When fractions containing a large amount of protein were incubated with UDP-[U-14C]glucose, radioactive material soluble in chloroform/methanol was formed and this separated into acidic and neutral fractions on ion-exchange chromatograms of DEAE-cellulose. The acidic fraction was shown to consist of dolichol phosphate glucose, and the neutral fraction sterol glucosides and acylsterol glucosides. Optimum conditions for glucosylation of dolichol phosphate were established as 5 mM-MgCl2, pH 6.0, and the enzyme had a Michaelis constant of 1.5 x 10(-5) m-UDP-glucose. Optimum conditions for glucosylation of sterol were 5 mM-MgCl2, pH 8.0 GDP-[U-14C]glucose was a poor substrate for the synthesis of both acidic and neutral lipids. Although the synthesis of dolichol phosphate glucose and sterol glucosides occurred throughout the sucrose gradient, the specific activities of both glucosyltransferases were greatest in a fraction coincident with the radioactively labelled plasma membrane. Results are discussed in relation to the likely role fo these transglucosylase activities. PMID:6445731

  5. Short-Term Water Deficit Changes Cuticular Sterol Profile in the Eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Haliński, Łukasz P; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Crop irrigation uses a majority of a total world water supply, at the same time displaying low efficiency. As the expected, future water requirements are higher than the current ones; there is a risk of a growing deficit of water for the agricultural use. Hence, there is an arising need for better understanding the effects of water deprivation on the crop plants. Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is a vegetable crop cultivated in arid and semi-arid parts of the world. Because of its high water demands, the eggplant is a convenient model organism for studies concerning the effects of water deficit on the plant growth. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of short-term water deficit on eggplant leaf cuticular waxes and total sterols. Water deprivation did not affect the amount and composition of aliphatic components of cuticular waxes. Significant decrease in the total cuticular sterols and the increase in cuticular cholesterol were observed as an effect of water deficit. In contrast, some of the free internal sterols were more abundant in water-deprived plants. The possible importance of these observations, including increased biosynthesis of defensive compounds and the need to maintain the cell membrane stability, was discussed. PMID:27127890

  6. Learning About Gene Regulatory Networks From Gene Deletion Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brazma, Alvis

    2002-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are a major focus of interest in molecular biology. A crucial question is how complex regulatory systems are encoded and controlled by the genome. Three recent publications have raised the question of what can be learned about gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments on gene deletion mutants. Using this indirect approach, topological features such as connectivity and modularity have been studied. PMID:18629255

  7. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  8. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  9. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  10. Relationship of the neutral sterols and ecdysteroids of the parasitic mite, Varroa jacobsoni to those of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Hartfelder, K; Feldlaufer, M F.

    1997-06-01

    The neutral sterols of the parasitic mite Varroa jacobsoni were compared with Apis mellifera carnica drone pupae. Analysis by GLC-mass spectrometry indicated mite sterols were reflective of the sterol composition of the drones; 24-methylenecholesterol was the major sterol in both species, with lesser amounts of sitosterol and isofucosterol. Cholesterol accounted for less than 1% of the total sterols. Ecdysteroid analyses indicated drones contained primarily makisterone A. In addition to makisterone A, mites contained ecdysone and 20-hydroxyecdysone, which accounted for over 66% of the ecdysteroid detected. These results indicate that while V. jacobsoni are apparently unable to convert dietary sterols to cholesterol, they are able to produce significant amount of C(27) ecdysteroids in a low cholesterol environment.

  11. Tracing the Temporal and Spatial Variations in the Origin of Fecal Material in Three Oklahoma Watersheds Using Sterol Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Philp, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Organic wastes, in particular fecal material, are qualified as one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. Their accumulation in water bodies may increase algal proliferation and eutrophication and the number of pathogenic organisms, which are responsible for many intestinal diseases especially when the water is used for recreational activities and/or as a supply for drinking water. In order to estimate the risk level associated with primary body contact in recreational water bodies, enumeration of some specific micro-organisms, such as Enterococci and Escherichia coli, are commonly used. Sterol distributions can provide some relevant information on the origin of fecal material in water system, since they are ubiquitous organic compounds and their distributions in many warm-blooded animal feces can be used as evidence for their source. In this study, we monitored fecal material contamination in three Oklahoma watersheds based on sterol fingerprints over a one-year period (2012 ~ 2013). The sterols from sediments and water samples (sterols associated to suspended particles as well as free sterols in water) were recovered using sonication and solid phase extraction (SPE), respectively, using different organic solvents. They were then identified and quantified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using an internal standard. The GC-MS was previously calibrated with a sterol mixture injected at different concentrations. Our primary results show that the concentration of total sterols generally increases from the Upper Canadian < Neosho Grand < Cimarron - Upper Arkansas Basins in Oklahoma. The fecal sterols commonly represent a small proportion (<15%) within the total sterols quantified in these three basins. Their distributions show a significant contribution from herbivore feces. By means of this monitoring, we are able to determine the presence of fecal contamination and provide a better understanding on the ability of using sterol

  12. Regulatory link between steryl ester formation and hydrolysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Korber, Martina; Schmidt, Claudia; Koch, Barbara; Leitner, Erich; Daum, Günther

    2015-07-01

    Steryl esters and triacylglycerols are the major storage lipids of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Steryl esters are formed in the endoplasmic reticulum by the two acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferases Are1p and Are2p, whereas steryl ester hydrolysis is catalyzed by the three steryl ester hydrolases Yeh1p, Yeh2p and Tgl1p. To shed light on the regulatory link between steryl ester formation and hydrolysis in the maintenance of cellular sterol and free fatty acid levels we employed yeast mutants which lacked the enzymes catalyzing the degradation of steryl esters. These studies revealed feedback regulation of steryl ester formation by steryl ester hydrolysis although in a Δtgl1Δyeh1Δyeh2 triple mutant the gene expression levels of ARE1 and ARE2 as well as protein levels and stability of Are1p and Are2p were not altered. Nevertheless, the capacity of the triple mutant to synthesize steryl esters was significantly reduced as shown by in vitro and in vivo labeling of lipids with [(14)C]oleic acid and [(14)C]acetate. Enzymatic analysis revealed that inhibition of steryl ester formation occurred at the enzyme level. As the amounts and the formation of sterols and fatty acids were also decreased in the triple mutant we concluded that defects in steryl ester hydrolysis also caused feedback inhibition on the formation of sterols and fatty acids which serve as precursors for steryl ester formation. In summary, this study demonstrates a regulatory link within the steryl ester metabolic network which contributes to non-polar lipid homeostasis in yeast cells.

  13. Sterol Regulatory Transcription Factor-1: Key Regulator of Fasting Response in the Adipose Tissue inGPigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic mechanisms controlling appetite and feeding behaviors are not well understood. In this study, transcriptional profiling was used to identify porcine genes and pathways that respond to a fasting treatment or to a missense mutation (D298N) in the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene, which...

  14. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  15. Final report of the amended safety assessment of PEG-5, -10, -16, -25, -30, and -40 soy sterol.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    PEGs Soy Sterol are polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives of soybean oil sterols used in a variety of cosmetic formulations as surfactants and emulsifying agents, skin-conditioning agents, and cleansing and solubilizing agents. When the safety of these ingredients were first reviewed, the available data were insufficient to support safety. New data have since been received and the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics has been substantiated. Current concentration of use ranges from a low of 0.05% in makeup preparations to 2% in moisturizers and several other products. PEGs Soy Sterol are produced by the reaction of the soy sterol hydroxyl with ethylene oxide. In general, ethoxylated fatty acids can contain 1,4-dioxane as a byproduct of ethoxylation. The soy sterols include campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol. The distribution of sterols found in oils derived from common plants is similar, with beta-sitosterol comprising a major component. Impurities include sterol hydrocarbons and cholesterol (4% to 6%) and triterpine alcohols, keto-steroids, and other steroid-like substances (4% to 6%). No pesticide residues were detected. PEGS: Because PEGs are an underlying structure in PEGs Soy Sterols, the previous assessment of PEGs was considered. It is generally recognized that the PEG monomer, ethylene glycol, and certain of its monoalkyl ethers are reproductive and developmental toxins. Given the methods of manufacture of PEGs Soy Sterol, there is no likelihood of ethylene glycol or its alkyl ethers being present. Also, the soybean oil sterol ethers in this ingredient are chemically different from the ethylene glycol alkyl ethers of concern. PEGs are not carcinogenic, although sensitization and nephrotoxicity were observed in burn patients treated with a PEG-based cream. No evidence of systemic toxicity or sensitization was found in studies with intact skin. Plant Phytosterols: Intestinal absorption of ingested plant phytosterols is on the order of 5%, with

  16. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  17. Integrative annotation of chromatin elements from ENCODE data

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michael M.; Ernst, Jason; Wilder, Steven P.; Kundaje, Anshul; Harris, Robert S.; Libbrecht, Max; Giardine, Belinda; Ellenbogen, Paul M.; Bilmes, Jeffrey A.; Birney, Ewan; Hardison, Ross C.; Dunham, Ian; Kellis, Manolis; Noble, William Stafford

    2013-01-01

    The ENCODE Project has generated a wealth of experimental information mapping diverse chromatin properties in several human cell lines. Although each such data track is independently informative toward the annotation of regulatory elements, their interrelations contain much richer information for the systematic annotation of regulatory elements. To uncover these interrelations and to generate an interpretable summary of the massive datasets of the ENCODE Project, we apply unsupervised learning methodologies, converting dozens of chromatin datasets into discrete annotation maps of regulatory regions and other chromatin elements across the human genome. These methods rediscover and summarize diverse aspects of chromatin architecture, elucidate the interplay between chromatin activity and RNA transcription, and reveal that a large proportion of the genome lies in a quiescent state, even across multiple cell types. The resulting annotation of non-coding regulatory elements correlate strongly with mammalian evolutionary constraint, and provide an unbiased approach for evaluating metrics of evolutionary constraint in human. Lastly, we use the regulatory annotations to revisit previously uncharacterized disease-associated loci, resulting in focused, testable hypotheses through the lens of the chromatin landscape. PMID:23221638

  18. Effect of plant sterol-enriched diets on plasma and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Thiessen, S; House, J D; Jones, P J H

    2010-02-01

    Egg exists as a major dietary source of cholesterol in Western diets. In North America, laying hen diets are usually devoid of cholesterol when diets are formulated to exclude animal-based products. Hence, laying hens meet their physiological cholesterol requirement through de novo synthesis. Plant sterols exert a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans by interfering with intestinal sterol absorption. However, it is unknown whether plant sterol supplementation could be effective in reducing intestinal reabsorption of biliary cholesterol in laying hens, thus modulating whole body cholesterol in favor of lower plasma and yolk cholesterol content. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of diets enriched with 0, 0.5, 1, and 2% plant sterols on cholesterol absorption, synthesis, as well as plasma, liver, and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. After 8 wk of plant sterol intervention (first 2 wk were acclimatization), feed intake, BW, egg weight, egg yolk weight, egg production, Haugh units, liver mass, plasma, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations did not differ as a function of plant sterol supplementation. Egg cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) fluctuated during the 6-wk experimental period. At wk 6, a minor reduction in egg yolk cholesterol concentration (mg per g of yolk, P<0.05, vs. control) was observed in hens fed 1 and 2% cholesterol-enriched diets, respectively. However, such result failed to affect total egg cholesterol content. No statistical difference was observed across treatments over 6 wk. Neither cholesterol absorption rates nor synthesis differed as a function of treatment. Results suggested that overall cholesterol content in egg yolk was not affected by feeding hens plant sterol-enriched diets over 6 wk. PMID:20075279

  19. Coordinate developmental expression of genes regulating sterol economy and cholesterol side-chain cleavage in the porcine ovary.

    PubMed

    LaVoie, H A; Benoit, A M; Garmey, J C; Dailey, R A; Wright, D J; Veldhuis, J D

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the coordinate developmental expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme messages throughout the pig estrous cycle, RNase protection analysis was performed using homologous (partially cloned) porcine sequences. Total RNA was isolated from ovarian tissues from unstimulated prepubertal gilts and gilts stimulated with eCG (Day -3) and hCG (Day 0) to induce follicular growth and ovulation. Specific transcripts (relative to 18S rRNA) were quantified in immature ovaries, preovulatory follicles (> or = 5 mm), corpora lutea (CL), and corpora albicantia. As an index of steroidogenesis, tissue progesterone content (per microgram protein) was low in the unstimulated ovary and preovulatory follicles, and it began to increase 4 days post-hCG, peaked at 12 days, and returned to preovulatory concentrations by 20 days post-hCG. HMG-CoA reductase mRNA was expressed at low levels and did not change significantly throughout the estrous cycle. The amount of LDL receptor mRNA increased approximately 6-fold after eCG stimulation and was expressed at similar concentrations in both preovulatory follicles and functional CL. Expression of SCP2 mRNA did not differ among the four tissue types but tended to be highest in midcycle (Day 12) CL compared other stages of CL (p = 0.007). StAR mRNA expression was minimal in unstimulated ovaries, was higher in preovulatory follicles (p = 0.014), and then rose again in CL (p = 0.009 compared with unstimulated ovary). P450scc mRNA concentrations were low in unstimulated ovaries, increased in preovulatory follicles (p = 0.044), and increased further in CL (p = 0.001 compared with preovulatory follicles). P450scc and StAR mRNA levels correlated with progesterone levels (r = +0.37, p = 0.025, and r = +0.71, p < 0.001, respectively). The

  20. Designing and encoding models for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Lukas; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Juty, Nick; Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Laibe, Camille; Li, Chen; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    A key component of any synthetic biology effort is the use of quantitative models. These models and their corresponding simulations allow optimization of a system design, as well as guiding their subsequent analysis. Once a domain mostly reserved for experts, dynamical modelling of gene regulatory and reaction networks has been an area of growth over the last decade. There has been a concomitant increase in the number of software tools and standards, thereby facilitating model exchange and reuse. We give here an overview of the model creation and analysis processes as well as some software tools in common use. Using markup language to encode the model and associated annotation, we describe the mining of components, their integration in relational models, formularization and parametrization. Evaluation of simulation results and validation of the model close the systems biology ‘loop’. PMID:19364720

  1. THAP and ATF-2 Regulated Sterol Carrier Protein-2 Promoter Activities in the Larval Midgut of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong; Fu, Qiang; Hong, Huazhu; Schwaegler, Tyler; Lan, Que

    2012-01-01

    Expression of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) in Aedes aegypti shows a distinct temporal/spatial pattern throughout the life cycle. In order to identify the transcription factors responsible for the larval temporal/spatial regulation of AeSCP-2 transcription, AeSCP-2 promoter activities were studied in vivo via transient transfection of promoter/reporter gene assays. Regulatory sequences upstream −1.3 kb of the transcription start site of AeSCP-2 were found to be critical for the in vivo temporal/spatial promoter activity. Interestingly, the −1.6 kb promoter sequence efficiently drove the larval midgut-specific siRNA expression, indicating that the −1.6 kb upstream sequence is sufficient for temporal/spatial AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity. Four transcription factors were identified in the midgut nuclear extract from feeding larvae via labeled −1.6/−1.3 kb DNA probe pull-down and proteomic analysis. Co-transfection of the promoter/reporter gene with inducible siRNA expression of each transcription factor was performed to confirm the regulatory function of individual transcription factor on AeSCP-2 transcriptional activities in the larval midgut. The results indicate that two of the identified transcription factors, Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), antagonistically control AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity in the midgut of feeding larvae via the regulatory sequences between −1.6 to −1.3 kb 5′ upstream of the transcription start site. In vivo expression knockdown of THAP and ATF-2 resulted in significant changes in developmental progression, which may be partially due to their effects on AeSCP-2 expression. PMID:23056538

  2. THAP and ATF-2 regulated sterol carrier protein-2 promoter activities in the larval midgut of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rong; Fu, Qiang; Hong, Huazhu; Schwaegler, Tyler; Lan, Que

    2012-01-01

    Expression of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) in Aedes aegypti shows a distinct temporal/spatial pattern throughout the life cycle. In order to identify the transcription factors responsible for the larval temporal/spatial regulation of AeSCP-2 transcription, AeSCP-2 promoter activities were studied in vivo via transient transfection of promoter/reporter gene assays. Regulatory sequences upstream -1.3 kb of the transcription start site of AeSCP-2 were found to be critical for the in vivo temporal/spatial promoter activity. Interestingly, the -1.6 kb promoter sequence efficiently drove the larval midgut-specific siRNA expression, indicating that the -1.6 kb upstream sequence is sufficient for temporal/spatial AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity. Four transcription factors were identified in the midgut nuclear extract from feeding larvae via labeled -1.6/-1.3 kb DNA probe pull-down and proteomic analysis. Co-transfection of the promoter/reporter gene with inducible siRNA expression of each transcription factor was performed to confirm the regulatory function of individual transcription factor on AeSCP-2 transcriptional activities in the larval midgut. The results indicate that two of the identified transcription factors, Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), antagonistically control AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity in the midgut of feeding larvae via the regulatory sequences between -1.6 to -1.3 kb 5' upstream of the transcription start site. In vivo expression knockdown of THAP and ATF-2 resulted in significant changes in developmental progression, which may be partially due to their effects on AeSCP-2 expression. PMID:23056538

  3. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  4. Kinetic studies on recombinant UDP-glucose: sterol 3-O-β-glycosyltransferase from Micromonospora rhodorangea and its bioconversion potential.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen Huu; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Kim, Byul; Park, Je Won

    2016-12-01

    Kinetics of a recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucose: sterol glycosyltransferase from Micromonospora rhodorangea ATCC 27932 (MrSGT) were studied using a number of sterols (including phytosterols) as glycosyl acceptors. The lowest K m value and the highest catalytical efficiency (k cat/K m) were found when β-sitosterol was the glycosyl acceptor in the enzymatic reaction. In contrast to the enzyme's flexibility toward the glycosyl acceptor substrate, this recombinant enzyme was highly specific to uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as the donor substrate. Besides, the UDP-glucose-dependent MrSGT was able to attach one glucose moiety specifically onto the C-3 hydroxyl group of other phytosterols such as fucosterol and gramisterol, yielding stereo-specific fucosterol-3-O-β-D-glucoside and gramisterol-3-O-β-D-glucoside, respectively. Based on kinetic data obtained from the enzyme's reactions using five different sterol substrates, the significance of the alkene (or ethylidene) side chains on the C-24 position in the sterol scaffolds was described and the possible relationship between the substrate structure and enzyme activity was discussed. This is the first report on the enzymatic bioconversion of the above two phytosteryl 3-O-β-glucosides, as well as on the discovery of a stereospecific bacterial SGT which can attach a glucose moiety in β-conformation at the C-3 hydroxyl group of diverse sterols, thus highlighting the catalytic potential of this promiscuous glycosyltransferase to expand the structural diversity of steryl glucosides. PMID:27485517

  5. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous determination of hydroxy sterols and bile acids.

    PubMed

    John, Clara; Werner, Philipp; Worthmann, Anna; Wegner, Katrin; Tödter, Klaus; Scheja, Ludger; Rohn, Sascha; Heeren, Joerg; Fischer, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hydroxy sterols and bile acids have gained growing interest as they are important regulators of energy homoeostasis and inflammation. The high number of different hydroxy sterols and bile acid species requires powerful analytical tools to quantify these structurally and chemically similar analytes. Here, we introduce a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method for rapid quantification of 34 sterols (hydroxy sterols, primary, secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates). Chromatographic baseline separation of isomeric hydroxy sterols and bile acids is obtained using a rugged amide embedded C18 (polar embedded) stationary phase. The current method features a simple extraction protocol validated for blood plasma, urine, gall bladder, liver, feces, and adipose tissue avoiding solid phase extraction as well as derivatization procedures. The total extraction recovery for representative analytes ranged between 58-86% in plasma, 85% in urine, 79-92% in liver, 76-98% in adipose tissue, 93-104% in feces and 62-79% in gall bladder. The validation procedure demonstrated that the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges for 97% of the analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R2) of greater than 0.99. A feeding study in wild type mice with a standard chow and a cholesterol-enriched Western type diet illustrated that the protocol described here provides a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify cholesterol derivatives and bile acids in metabolically active tissues and to follow the enterohepatic circulation.

  6. Fermentation of soybean oil deodorizer distillate with Candida tropicalis to concentrate phytosterols and to produce sterols-rich yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoqun; Hu, Tao; Zhao, Lihua

    2014-03-01

    Phytosterols have been recovered from the deodorizer distillate produced in the final deodorization step of vegetable oil refining by various processes. The deodorizer distillate contains mainly free fatty acids (FFAs), phytosterols, and tocopherols. The presence of FFAs hinders recovery of phytosterols. In this study, fermentation of soybean oil deodorizer distillate (SODD) with Candida tropicalis 1253 was carried out. FFAs were utilized as carbon source and converted into cellular components as the yeast cells grew. Phytosterols concentration in SODD increased from 15.2 to 28.43 % after fermentation. No significant loss of phytosterols was observed during the process. Microbial fermentation of SODD is a potential approach to concentrate phytosterols before the recovery of phytosterols from SODD. During SODD fermentation, sterols-rich yeast cells were produced and the content of total sterols was as high as 6.96 %, but its major sterol was not ergosterol, which is the major sterol encountered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Except ergosterol, other sterols synthesized in the cells need to be identified. PMID:24297326

  7. Diet micronutrient balance matters: How the ratio of dietary sterols/steroids affects development, growth and reproduction in two lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiangfeng; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T

    2014-08-01

    Insects lack the ability to synthesize sterols de novo so they acquire this essential nutrient from their food. Cholesterol is the dominant sterol found in most insects, but in plant vegetative tissue it makes up only a small fraction of the total sterol profile. Instead, plants mostly contain phytosterols; plant-feeding insects generate the majority of their cholesterol by metabolizing phytosterols. However, not all phytosterols are readily converted to cholesterol, and some are even deleterious when ingested above a threshold level. In a recent study we showed that caterpillars reared on tobacco accumulating novel sterols/steroids exhibited reduced performance, even when suitable sterols were present. In the current study we examined how the dominant sterols (cholesterol and stigmasterol) and steroids (cholestanol and cholestanone) typical of the modified tobacco plants affected two insect herbivores (Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea). The sterols/steroids were incorporated into synthetic diets singly, as well as in various combinations, ratios and amounts. For each insect species, a range of performance values was recorded for two generations, with the eggs from the 1st-generation adults as the source of neonates for the 2nd-generation. Performance on the novel steroids (cholestanol and cholestanone) was extremely poor compared to suitable sterols (cholesterol and stigmasterol). Additionally, performance tended to decrease as the ratio of the novel dietary steroids increased. We discuss how the balance of different dietary sterols/steroids affected our two caterpillar species, relate this back to recent studies on sterol/steroid metabolism in these two species, and consider the potential application of sterol/steroid modification in crops.

  8. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  9. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  10. Sterols with antileishmanial activity isolated from the roots of Pentalinon andrieuxii

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Lezama-Davila, Claudio M.; Isaac-Marquez, Angelica P.; Calomeni, Edward P.; Fuchs, James R.; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A new cholesterol derivative, pentalinonsterol (cholest-4,20,24-trien-3-one, 1), and a new polyoxygenated pregnane sterol glycoside, pentalinonside (2), together with 18 known compounds, including 14 sterols (3–16), three coumarins (17–19), and a triterpene (20), were isolated from a n-hexane partition of a methanol extract of the roots of the Mexican medicinal plant Pentalinon andrieuxii. Structure elucidation of compounds 1 and 2 was accomplished by spectroscopic data interpretation. All isolates were evaluated in vitro for their antileishmanial activity. Among these compounds, 6,7-dihydroneridienone (15) was found to be the most potent principle against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana (L. mexicana). The cholesterol analogue, pentalinonsterol (1), together with two known sterols, 24-methylcholest-4,24(28)-dien-3-one (3) and neridienone (16), also exhibited significant leishmanicidal activity in this same bioassay. Compounds 1, 3, 15, 16, cholest-4-en-3-one (4), and cholest-5,20,24-trien-3β-ol (7), showed strong antileishmanial activity against amastigotes of L. mexicana, and 4 was found to be the most potent agent with an IC50 value of 0.03 μM. All the isolates were also evaluated for their cytotoxicity in non-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages, but none of these compounds was found active towards this cell line. The intracellular parasites treated with compounds 1, 3, 4, 15, and 16 were further studied by electron microscopy; morphological abnormalities and destruction of the amastigotes were observed, as a result of treatment with these compounds. PMID:22840389

  11. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Sterol Carrier Protein in Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Zheng, Sichun; He, Hongwu; Wan, Jian; Feng, Qili

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds In insects, cholesterol is one of the membrane components in cells and a precursor of ecdysteroid biosynthesis. Because insects lack two key enzymes, squalene synthase and lanosterol synthase, in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, they cannot autonomously synthesize cholesterol de novo from simple compounds and therefore have to obtain sterols from their diet. Sterol carrier protein (SCP) is a cholesterol-binding protein responsible for cholesterol absorption and transport. Results In this study, a model of the three-dimensional structure of SlSCPx-2 in Spodoptera litura, a destructive polyphagous agricultural pest insect in tropical and subtropical areas, was constructed. Docking of sterol and fatty acid ligands to SlSCPx-2 and ANS fluorescent replacement assay showed that SlSCPx-2 was able to bind with relatively high affinities to cholesterol, stearic acid, linoleic acid, stigmasterol, oleic acid, palmitic acid and arachidonate, implying that SlSCPx may play an important role in absorption and transport of these cholesterol and fatty acids from host plants. Site-directed mutation assay of SlSCPx-2 suggests that amino acid residues F53, W66, F89, F110, I115, T128 and Q131 are critical for the ligand-binding activity of the SlSCPx-2 protein. Virtual ligand screening resulted in identification of several lead compounds which are potential inhibitors of SlSCPx-2. Bioassay for inhibitory effect of five selected compounds showed that AH-487/41731687, AG-664/14117324, AG-205/36813059 and AG-205/07775053 inhibited the growth of S. litura larvae. Conclusions Compounds AH-487/41731687, AG-664/14117324, AG-205/36813059 and AG-205/07775053 selected based on structural modeling showed binding affinity to SlSCPx-2 protein and inhibitory effect on the growth of S. litura larvae. PMID:24454688

  12. Regulatory RNAs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory RNAs play versatile roles in bacteria in the coordination of gene expression during various physiological processes, especially during stress adaptation. Photosynthetic bacteria use sunlight as their major energy source. Therefore, they are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of excess light or UV irradiation. In addition, like all bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria must adapt to limiting nutrient concentrations and abiotic and biotic stress factors. Transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of potential regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in model cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and in environmentally relevant genera such as Trichodesmium, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Some sRNAs have been shown to actually contain μORFs and encode short proteins. Examples include the 40-amino-acid product of the sml0013 gene, which encodes the NdhP subunit of the NDH1 complex. In contrast, the functional characterization of the non-coding sRNA PsrR1 revealed that the 131 nt long sRNA controls photosynthetic functions by targeting multiple mRNAs, providing a paradigm for sRNA functions in photosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that actuatons comprise a new class of genetic elements in which an sRNA gene is inserted upstream of a coding region to modify or enable transcription of that region.

  13. Identification of hopanoid, sterol, and tetrahymanol production in the aerobic methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welander, P. V.; Summons, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Correlating the occurrence of molecular biosignatures preserved in the rock record with specific microbial taxa is a compelling strategy for studying microbial life in the context of the Earth's distant past. Polycyclic triterpenoids, including the hopanes and steranes, comprise classes of biomarkers that are readily detected in a variety of ancient sediments and are clearly recognized as the diagenetic products of modern day bacterial hopanoids and eukaryotic sterols. Thus, based on the distribution of these lipids in extant microbes, the occurrence of their diagenetic products in the rock record is often utilized as evidence for the existence of specific bacterial and eukaryotic taxa in ancient ecosystems. However, questions have arisen about our understanding of the taxonomic distribution of many of these molecular biomarkers in extant microbes. This is prompting reassessments of the use of polycyclic triterpenoids as geological proxies for microbial taxa, especially in the light of the poorly defined issue of microbial diversity. Recently, significant effort has been put forth to better understand the biosynthesis, function, and regulation of these lipid molecules in a variety of modern organisms so that a more informed interpretation of their occurrence in the rock record can be reached. Here we report the unprecedented production of three different classes of polycyclic triterpenoid biomarker lipids in one bacterium. Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a member of the Gammaproteobacteria, is a halotolerant alkaliphilic aerobic methanotroph previously isolated from a moderately saline soda lake in Tuva (Central Asia). In this study, M. alcaliphilum is shown to produce C-3 methylated and unmethylated aminohopanoids commonly associated with other mesophilic aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, this organism is also able to produce 4,4-dimethyl sterols and surprisingly, the gammacerane triterpenoid tetrahymanol. Previously, tetrahymanol production has only been

  14. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  15. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  16. Premature termination codon at the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene causes cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis in a French family.

    PubMed

    Segev, H; Reshef, A; Clavey, V; Delbart, C; Routier, G; Leitersdorf, E

    1995-02-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is an autosomal recessive lipid-storage disease caused by mutations in the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene (CYP27). So far several mutations causing CTX have been identified and characterized. A new mutation creating an insertion of cytosine at position 6 in the cDNA, which is expected to result in a frameshift and a premature termination codon at codon 179, has been identified in a French family. The mutation creates a new site for the restriction endonuclease HaeIII.

  17. Recombinant sterol esterase from Ophiostoma piceae: an improved biocatalyst expressed in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ascomycete Ophiostoma piceae produces a sterol esterase (OPE) with high affinity towards p-nitrophenol, glycerol and sterol esters. Its hydrolytic activity on natural mixtures of triglycerides and sterol esters has been proposed for pitch biocontrol in paper industry since these compounds produce important economic losses during paper pulp manufacture. Results Recently, this enzyme has been heterologously expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, and the hydrolytic activity of the recombinant protein (OPE*) studied. After the initial screening of different clones expressing the enzyme, only one was selected for showing the highest production rate. Different culture conditions were tested to improve the expression of the recombinant enzyme. Complex media were better than minimal media for production, but in any case the levels of enzymatic activity were higher (7-fold in the best case) than those obtained from O. piceae. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of 76 kDa, higher than that reported for the native enzyme under SDS-PAGE (60 kDa). Steady-state kinetic characterization of the recombinant protein showed improved catalytic efficiency for this enzyme as compared to the native one, for all the assayed substrates (p-nitrophenol, glycerol, and cholesterol esters). Different causes for this were studied, as the increased glycosylation degree of the recombinant enzyme, their secondary structures or the oxidation of methionine residues. However, none of these could explain the improvements found in the recombinant protein. N-terminal sequencing of OPE* showed that two populations of this enzyme were expressed, having either 6 or 8 amino acid residues more than the native one. This fact affected the aggregation behaviour of the recombinant protein, as was corroborated by analytical ultracentrifugation, thus improving the catalytic efficiency of this enzyme. Conclusion P. pastoris resulted to be an optimum biofactory for the

  18. Brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons and sterols from the sponge Xestospongia testudinaria with their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Yanan; Lin, Xiuping; Yang, Bin; Yang, Xianwen; Liu, Yonghong

    2011-10-01

    Four brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons (1-4), including a novel brominated ene-tetrahydrofuran named as mutafuran H (1), and five sterols (5-9) were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of NMR ((1)H, (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY), MS, and optical rotation analysis. Known compounds were identified by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature. Compounds 1-4, and 6-9 were evaluated for their toxicity against Artemia salina larvae, and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity.

  19. Evaluating standard terminologies for encoding allergy information

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Foster R; Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph M; Broverman, Carol; Robinson, George; Middleton, Blackford; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Allergy documentation and exchange are vital to ensuring patient safety. This study aims to analyze and compare various existing standard terminologies for representing allergy information. Methods Five terminologies were identified, including the Systemized Nomenclature of Medical Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), National Drug File–Reference Terminology (NDF-RT), Medication Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), Unique Ingredient Identifier (UNII), and RxNorm. A qualitative analysis was conducted to compare desirable characteristics of each terminology, including content coverage, concept orientation, formal definitions, multiple granularities, vocabulary structure, subset capability, and maintainability. A quantitative analysis was also performed to compare the content coverage of each terminology for (1) common food, drug, and environmental allergens and (2) descriptive concepts for common drug allergies, adverse reactions (AR), and no known allergies. Results Our qualitative results show that SNOMED CT fulfilled the greatest number of desirable characteristics, followed by NDF-RT, RxNorm, UNII, and MedDRA. Our quantitative results demonstrate that RxNorm had the highest concept coverage for representing drug allergens, followed by UNII, SNOMED CT, NDF-RT, and MedDRA. For food and environmental allergens, UNII demonstrated the highest concept coverage, followed by SNOMED CT. For representing descriptive allergy concepts and adverse reactions, SNOMED CT and NDF-RT showed the highest coverage. Only SNOMED CT was capable of representing unique concepts for encoding no known allergies. Conclusions The proper terminology for encoding a patient's allergy is complex, as multiple elements need to be captured to form a fully structured clinical finding. Our results suggest that while gaps still exist, a combination of SNOMED CT and RxNorm can satisfy most criteria for encoding common allergies and provide sufficient content coverage. PMID:23396542

  20. Final report of the amended safety assessment of PEG-5, -10, -16, -25, -30, and -40 soy sterol.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    PEGs Soy Sterol are polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives of soybean oil sterols used in a variety of cosmetic formulations as surfactants and emulsifying agents, skin-conditioning agents, and cleansing and solubilizing agents. When the safety of these ingredients were first reviewed, the available data were insufficient to support safety. New data have since been received and the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics has been substantiated. Current concentration of use ranges from a low of 0.05% in makeup preparations to 2% in moisturizers and several other products. PEGs Soy Sterol are produced by the reaction of the soy sterol hydroxyl with ethylene oxide. In general, ethoxylated fatty acids can contain 1,4-dioxane as a byproduct of ethoxylation. The soy sterols include campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol. The distribution of sterols found in oils derived from common plants is similar, with beta-sitosterol comprising a major component. Impurities include sterol hydrocarbons and cholesterol (4% to 6%) and triterpine alcohols, keto-steroids, and other steroid-like substances (4% to 6%). No pesticide residues were detected. PEGS: Because PEGs are an underlying structure in PEGs Soy Sterols, the previous assessment of PEGs was considered. It is generally recognized that the PEG monomer, ethylene glycol, and certain of its monoalkyl ethers are reproductive and developmental toxins. Given the methods of manufacture of PEGs Soy Sterol, there is no likelihood of ethylene glycol or its alkyl ethers being present. Also, the soybean oil sterol ethers in this ingredient are chemically different from the ethylene glycol alkyl ethers of concern. PEGs are not carcinogenic, although sensitization and nephrotoxicity were observed in burn patients treated with a PEG-based cream. No evidence of systemic toxicity or sensitization was found in studies with intact skin. Plant Phytosterols: Intestinal absorption of ingested plant phytosterols is on the order of 5%, with

  1. Sterols and triterpenoids as potential anti-inflammatories: Molecular docking studies for binding to some enzymes involved in inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Loza-Mejía, Marco A; Salazar, Juan Rodrigo

    2015-11-01

    Triterpenes and sterols are good candidates for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs and use in chemoprevention or chemotherapy of cancer via the interaction with therapeutic targets related to inflammation, such as COX-1 and -2; LOX-5; MPO, PLA2 and i-NOS. In this study, we use molecular docking to evaluate the potential binding of a database of selected sterol and triterpenoid compounds with several skeletons against enzymes related to inflammation to propose structural requirements beneficial for anti-inflammatory activity that can be used for the design of more potent and selective anti-inflammatory and antitumor drugs. Our results suggest that the substitution pattern is important and that there is an important relationship between the class of sterol or triterpenoid skeleton and enzyme binding.

  2. Classification of vegetable oils according to their botanical origin using sterol profiles established by direct infusion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lerma-García, María J; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José M; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto F

    2008-04-01

    A simple and quick method to classify vegetable oils according to their botanical origin, based on direct infusion of sterol extracts into a mass spectrometer, was developed. Using mass spectrometry (MS) with either an electrospray ionization or an atmospheric pressure photoionization source, followed by linear discriminant analysis of the mass spectral data, oil samples corresponding to eight different botanical origins were perfectly classified with an excellent resolution among all the categories. An excellent correlation between the sterol profiles obtained by MS and by the official gas chromatography (with flame ionization detection) method was obtained. Thus, the proposed method is a promising alternative for sterol fingerprinting of vegetable oils, with the advantage that prior chromatographic separation is not required.

  3. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  4. Two digital video encoder circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, John A.

    1992-11-01

    Central to `multimedia' image processing is the desire to encode computer graphics data into a standard television signal, complete with line, field, and color subcarrier synchronizing information. The numerous incompatibilities between television and computer display standards render this operation far less trivial than it sounds to anyone who hasn't worked with both types of signals. To simplify the task of encoding computer graphics signals into standard NTSC (North America and Japan) or PAL (most of Europe) television format for display, broadcast, or recording, TRW LSI Products Inc. has introduced the two newest members of it multimedia integrated circuit family, the TMC22090 and TMC22190 digital video encoders.

  5. GC-MS method for determining faecal sterols as biomarkers of human and pastoral animal presence in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Battistel, Dario; Piazza, Rossano; Argiriadis, Elena; Marchiori, Enrico; Radaelli, Marta; Barbante, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    In order to determine sterols and stanols in freshwater sediments to reconstruct the past presence of humans and pastoral animals, we developed an analytical method based on pressurised liquid extraction (PLE), clean-up performed using solid phase extraction (SPE) and sterol determination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PLE extraction conditions were optimised using dichloromethane (DCM) and DCM/methanol mixtures. Clean-up was performed with 2 g silica SPE cartridges, and the concentrated extracts were eluted with 70 mL DCM. Extraction yield was evaluated using an in-house reference material spiked with (13)C-labelled cholesterol and aged for 10 days. In comparison with pre-extraction, where the sediment is extracted and then spiked with a known analyte concentration, this approach preserves the original composition of the sediment. DCM and DCM/methanol mixtures resulted in high extraction yields ranging from 86 to 92 % with good reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) 5-8 %). PLE extraction yields obtained with DCM as the extracting solvent were about 1.5 times higher than extractions using an ultrasonic bath. The solvent extraction mixture and matrix composition strongly affected the solvent extraction composition where higher overall recoveries (70-80 %) for each compound were obtained with DCM. The extraction mixture and matrix composition also affected the analyte concentrations, resulting in a method precision ranging from 1 to 18 %. Diatomaceous earth spiked with 10 to 100 ng of sterols, and environmental samples fortified with suitable amounts of sterols provided apparent recovery values ranging from 90 to 110 %. We applied the method to environmental samples both close to and upstream from sewage discharge zones, resulting in substantially higher faecal sterol (FeSt) concentrations near the sewage. In addition, we also applied the method to a 37-cm freshwater sediment core in order to evaluate its applicability for

  6. Characterization of Arabidopsis sterol glycosyltransferase TTG15/UGT80B1 role during freeze and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manoj K; Singh, Gaurav; Tiwari, Shalini; Singh, Ruchi; Kumari, Nishi; Misra, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Sterol glycosyltransferases regulate the properties of sterols by catalyzing the transfer of carbohydrate molecules to the sterol moiety for the synthesis of steryl glycosides and acyl steryl glycosides. We have analyzed the functional role of TTG15/UGT80B1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana in freeze/thaw and heat shock stress using T-DNA insertional sgt knockout mutants. Quantitative study of spatial as well as temporal gene expression showed tissue-specific and dynamic expression patterns throughout the growth stages. Comparative responses of Col-0, TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines were analyzed under heat and freeze stress conditions. Heat tolerance was determined by survival of plants at 42°C for 3 h, MDA analysis and chlorophyll fluorescence image (CFI) analysis. Freezing tolerance was determined by survival of the plants at -1°C temperature in non-acclimatized (NA) and cold acclimatized (CA) conditions and also by CFI analysis, which revealed that, p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored plants were more adapted to freeze stress than TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant under CA condition. HPLC analysis of the plants showed reduced sterol glycoside in mutant seedlings as compared to other genotypes. Following CA condition, both β-sitosterol and sitosterol glycoside quantity was more in Col-0 and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines, whereas it was significantly less in TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutants. From these results, it may be concluded that due to low content of free sterols and sterol glycosides, the physiology of mutant plants was more affected during both, the chilling and heat stress. PMID:26382564

  7. Characterization of Arabidopsis sterol glycosyltransferase TTG15/UGT80B1 role during freeze and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manoj K; Singh, Gaurav; Tiwari, Shalini; Singh, Ruchi; Kumari, Nishi; Misra, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Sterol glycosyltransferases regulate the properties of sterols by catalyzing the transfer of carbohydrate molecules to the sterol moiety for the synthesis of steryl glycosides and acyl steryl glycosides. We have analyzed the functional role of TTG15/UGT80B1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana in freeze/thaw and heat shock stress using T-DNA insertional sgt knockout mutants. Quantitative study of spatial as well as temporal gene expression showed tissue-specific and dynamic expression patterns throughout the growth stages. Comparative responses of Col-0, TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines were analyzed under heat and freeze stress conditions. Heat tolerance was determined by survival of plants at 42°C for 3 h, MDA analysis and chlorophyll fluorescence image (CFI) analysis. Freezing tolerance was determined by survival of the plants at -1°C temperature in non-acclimatized (NA) and cold acclimatized (CA) conditions and also by CFI analysis, which revealed that, p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored plants were more adapted to freeze stress than TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant under CA condition. HPLC analysis of the plants showed reduced sterol glycoside in mutant seedlings as compared to other genotypes. Following CA condition, both β-sitosterol and sitosterol glycoside quantity was more in Col-0 and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines, whereas it was significantly less in TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutants. From these results, it may be concluded that due to low content of free sterols and sterol glycosides, the physiology of mutant plants was more affected during both, the chilling and heat stress.

  8. Potential of the Desert Locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Unconventional Source of Dietary and Therapeutic Sterols

    PubMed Central

    Cheseto, Xavier; Kuate, Serge Philibert; Tchouassi, David P.; Ndung’u, Mary; Teal, Peter E. A.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2015-01-01

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, focusing on those with potential importance as dietary and therapeutic components for humans. Using coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we analyzed and compared the quantities of sterols in the different sections of the gut and tissues of the locust. In the gut, we identified 34 sterols which showed a patchy distribution, but with the highest composition in the foregut (55%) followed by midgut (31%) and hindgut (14%). Fed ad libitum on wheat seedlings, five sterols unique to the insect were detected. These sterols were identified as 7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, fucosterol, (3β, 5α) cholesta-8, 14, 24-trien-3-ol, 4, 4-dimethyl, and (3β, 20R) cholesta-5, 24-dien-3, 20-diol with the first three having known health benefits in humans. Incubation of the fore-, mid- and hindgut with cholesterol-[4-13C] yielded eight derivatives, three of these were detected in the gut of the desert locust after it had consumed the vegetative diet but were not detected in the diet. Our study shows that the desert locust ingests phytosterols from a vegetative diet and, amplifies and metabolizes them into derivatives with potential salutary benefits and we discuss our findings in this context. PMID:25970517

  9. Substrate Preferences and Catalytic Parameters Determined by Structural Characteristics of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase (CYP51) from Leishmania infantum

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Jialin; Nes, W. David; Waterman, Michael R.; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2012-05-14

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects populations of {approx}90 countries worldwide, with no vaccine and only a few moderately effective drugs. Here we report the structure/function characterization of sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) from Leishmania infantum. The enzyme catalyzes removal of the 14{alpha}-methyl group from sterol precursors. The reaction is essential for membrane biogenesis and therefore has great potential to become a target for antileishmanial chemotherapy. Although L. infantum CYP51 prefers C4-monomethylated sterol substrates such as C4-norlanosterol and obtusifoliol (V{sub max} of {approx}10 and 8 min{sup -1}, respectively), it is also found to 14{alpha}-demethylate C4-dimethylated lanosterol (V{sub max} = 0.9 min{sup -1}) and C4-desmethylated 14{alpha}-methylzymosterol (V{sub max} = 1.9 min{sup -1}). Binding parameters with six sterols were tested, with K{sub d} values ranging from 0.25 to 1.4 {mu}m. Thus, L. infantum CYP51 is the first example of a plant-like sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase, where requirements toward the composition of the C4 atom substituents are not strict, indicative of possible branching in the postsqualene portion of sterol biosynthesis in the parasite. Comparative analysis of three CYP51 substrate binding cavities (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and L. infantum) suggests that substrate preferences of plant- and fungal-like protozoan CYP51s largely depend on the differences in the enzyme active site topology. These minor structural differences are also likely to underlie CYP51 catalytic rates and drug susceptibility and can be used to design potent and specific inhibitors.

  10. GC-MS method for determining faecal sterols as biomarkers of human and pastoral animal presence in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Battistel, Dario; Piazza, Rossano; Argiriadis, Elena; Marchiori, Enrico; Radaelli, Marta; Barbante, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    In order to determine sterols and stanols in freshwater sediments to reconstruct the past presence of humans and pastoral animals, we developed an analytical method based on pressurised liquid extraction (PLE), clean-up performed using solid phase extraction (SPE) and sterol determination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PLE extraction conditions were optimised using dichloromethane (DCM) and DCM/methanol mixtures. Clean-up was performed with 2 g silica SPE cartridges, and the concentrated extracts were eluted with 70 mL DCM. Extraction yield was evaluated using an in-house reference material spiked with (13)C-labelled cholesterol and aged for 10 days. In comparison with pre-extraction, where the sediment is extracted and then spiked with a known analyte concentration, this approach preserves the original composition of the sediment. DCM and DCM/methanol mixtures resulted in high extraction yields ranging from 86 to 92 % with good reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD) 5-8 %). PLE extraction yields obtained with DCM as the extracting solvent were about 1.5 times higher than extractions using an ultrasonic bath. The solvent extraction mixture and matrix composition strongly affected the solvent extraction composition where higher overall recoveries (70-80 %) for each compound were obtained with DCM. The extraction mixture and matrix composition also affected the analyte concentrations, resulting in a method precision ranging from 1 to 18 %. Diatomaceous earth spiked with 10 to 100 ng of sterols, and environmental samples fortified with suitable amounts of sterols provided apparent recovery values ranging from 90 to 110 %. We applied the method to environmental samples both close to and upstream from sewage discharge zones, resulting in substantially higher faecal sterol (FeSt) concentrations near the sewage. In addition, we also applied the method to a 37-cm freshwater sediment core in order to evaluate its applicability for

  11. Effect of Transition Metal Ions on the B Ring Oxidation of Sterols and their Kinetics in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Baiyi; Hu, Yinzhou; Huang, Weisu; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Yuan; Lou, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of metal ions on the oxidation of sterols and their kinetics in oil-in-water emulsions. Sterol substrates were added with different metal ions (Cu2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Na+, and Mg2+) of five concentrations and investigated after 2 h of heating at 90 °C. The substrates added with Fe2+ and Cu2+ were heated continuously to evaluate the kinetics of four sterols and their corresponding sterol oxidation products (SOPs). Sterol oxidation increased as the metal ion concentration increased and the heating time was prolonged. The capability of the metal ions oxidizing sterols ranked as followed: Fe2+ > Cu2+ > Mn2+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ ≈ Na+. 7-Ketosterol, 7β/7α-Hydroxysterol, 5β,6β/5α,6α-Epoxysterol, and Triols were the main oxides on the B ring, whereas 6β-Hydroxysterol was not or only slightly influenced. The acceleration of sterol degradation induced by Fe2+ and Cu2+, as well as the formation of oxidation products, followed first-order formation/elimination kinetics. The acceleration effect may be partly ascribed to the increase in elimination rate constant and formation rate constant. Transition metal ions can significantly induce sterol oxidation, which reduces food nutritional quality and triggers the formation of undesirable compounds, such as SOPs. PMID:27328709

  12. Fully automated determination of the sterol composition and total content in edible oils and fats by online liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Nestola, Marco; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-09-01

    Sterol analysis of edible oils and fats is important in authenticity control. The gas chromatographic determination of the sterol distribution and total content is described by ISO norm 12228. Extraction, purification, and detection of the sterols are time-consuming and error-prone. Collaborative trials prove this regularly. Purification by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and robust GC determination of all mentioned sterols is not straightforward. Therefore, a fully automated LC-GC-FID method was developed to facilitate the determination of sterols. The only manual step left was to weigh the sample into an autosampler vial. Saponification and extraction were performed by an autosampler while purification, separation, and detection were accomplished by online coupled normal-phase LC-GC-FID. Interlacing of sample preparation and analysis allowed an average sample throughput of one sample per hour. The obtained quantitative results were fully comparable with the ISO method with one apparent exception. In the case of sunflower oils, an additional unknown sterol was detected generally missed by ISO 12228. The reason was found in the omission of sterol silylation before subjection to GC-FID. The derivatization reaction changed the retention time and hid this compound behind a major sterol. The compound could be identified as 14-methyl fecosterol. Its structure was elucidated by GC-MS and ensured by HPLC and GC retention times. Finally, validation of the designed method confirmed its suitability for routine environments. PMID:27522150

  13. Effect of Transition Metal Ions on the B Ring Oxidation of Sterols and their Kinetics in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baiyi; Hu, Yinzhou; Huang, Weisu; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Yuan; Lou, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of metal ions on the oxidation of sterols and their kinetics in oil-in-water emulsions. Sterol substrates were added with different metal ions (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Na(+), and Mg(2+)) of five concentrations and investigated after 2 h of heating at 90 °C. The substrates added with Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) were heated continuously to evaluate the kinetics of four sterols and their corresponding sterol oxidation products (SOPs). Sterol oxidation increased as the metal ion concentration increased and the heating time was prolonged. The capability of the metal ions oxidizing sterols ranked as followed: Fe(2+) > Cu(2+) > Mn(2+) > Zn(2+) > Mg(2+) ≈ Na(+). 7-Ketosterol, 7β/7α-Hydroxysterol, 5β,6β/5α,6α-Epoxysterol, and Triols were the main oxides on the B ring, whereas 6β-Hydroxysterol was not or only slightly influenced. The acceleration of sterol degradation induced by Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), as well as the formation of oxidation products, followed first-order formation/elimination kinetics. The acceleration effect may be partly ascribed to the increase in elimination rate constant and formation rate constant. Transition metal ions can significantly induce sterol oxidation, which reduces food nutritional quality and triggers the formation of undesirable compounds, such as SOPs. PMID:27328709

  14. Δ(24)-Sterol Methyltransferase Plays an Important Role in the Growth and Development of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Borba-Santos, Luana P; Visbal, Gonzalo; Gagini, Thalita; Rodrigues, Anderson M; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M; Ishida, Kelly; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Δ(24)-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMT) in Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis was investigated in vitro. The effects on fungal growth and sterol composition of the 24-SMT inhibitor 22-hydrazone-imidazolin-2-yl-chol-5-ene-3β-ol (H3) were compared to those of itraconazole. MIC and MFC analysis showed that H3 was more effective than itraconazole against both species in both their filamentous and yeast forms. H3 showed fungistatic activity in a time-kill assay, with inhibitory activity stronger than that of itraconazole. GC analysis of cell sterol composition showed that sterols present in control cells (ergosterol and precursors) were completely replaced by 14α-methylated sterols after H3 exposure. Itraconazole only partially inhibited ergosterol synthesis but completely arrested synthesis of other sterols found in control cells, promoting accumulation of nine 14α-methyl sterols. Based on these results, we propose a schematic model of sterol biosynthesis pathways in S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Effects on cell morphology due to 24-SMT inhibition by H3 as analyzed by SEM and TEM included irregular cell shape, reduced cytoplasmic electron-density, and reduced thickness of the microfibrillar cell wall layer. Moreover, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 promoted mitochondrial disturbance, as demonstrated by alterations in MitoTracker(®) Red CMXRos fluorescence intensity evaluated by flow cytometry. When used in conjunction with itraconazole, H3 enhanced the effectiveness of itraconazole against all tested strains, reducing at least half (or more) the MIC values of itraconazole. In addition, cytotoxicity assays revealed that H3 was more selective toward these fungi than was itraconazole. Thus, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 was an effective antifungal strategy against S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Inhibition of the methylation reaction catalyzed by 24-SMT has a strong antiproliferative effect via disruption of ergosterol homeostasis

  15. Recoverable Pd/C catalyst mediated dehydrogenation of sterols and an improved synthesis of 1α-hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi-Zhen; Liu, Chao; Tang, Long-Qian; Liu, Zhao-Peng

    2012-11-01

    A novel recyclable Pd/C catalyst mediated dehydrogenation of sterols is developed. The conversion of sterols to 1,4,6-trien-3-ones is best achieved with Pd/C as a catalyst (10%) in the presence of six equivalents of allyl diethyl phosphate (ADP) and excess amount of sodium carbonate in DMF under vigorous reflux conditions. This transformation gives 17,17-ethylenedioxyandrost-1,4,6-trien-3-one in better yield than that of DDQ oxidation and thus provides an improved synthesis of 1α-hydroxydehydroepiandrosterone from DHEA. PMID:23000152

  16. Effects of a Plant Sterol or Stanol Enriched Mixed Meal on Postprandial Lipid Metabolism in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Sabine; Mensink, Ronald P.; Plat, Jogchum

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is increasing that plant sterols and stanols not only lower fasting serum low-density lipoprotein concentrations, but also those of triglycerides (TG). Insight into effects of these components on postprandial TG metabolism, an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is missing. Objective Our objective was to examine the 8-hour postprandial response after consuming plant sterol or stanol enriched margarine as part of a mixed meal. Methods This postprandial study was part of a randomized crossover study in which 42 subjects consumed plant sterol enriched (3 g/d plant sterols), plant stanol enriched (3 g/d plant stanols), and control margarines for 4 weeks. After each period, subjects consumed a shake enriched with 3g plant sterols (sterol period), 3g plant stanols (stanol period) or no addition (control period). Subjects received a second shake with no addition after 4 hours. Results TG and apoB48 incremental areas under the curves (iAUC) of the total (0-8h) and 1st meal response (0-4h) were comparable between the meals and in all age categories (I:18-35y, II:36-52y, III:53-69y). In subjects aged 53-69y, TG iAUC after the 2nd meal (4-8h) was higher in the stanol period as compared with the sterol (63.1±53.0 mmol/L/min; P < 0.01) and the control period (43.2±52.4 mmol/L/min; P < 0.05). ApoB48 iAUC after the 2nd meal was higher after the stanol than after the sterol period (67.1±77.0 mg/L/min; P < 0.05) and tended to be higher than after the control period (43.1±64.5 mg/L/min; P = 0.08) in subjects aged 53-69y. These increased postprandial responses may be due to reduced lipoprotein lipase activity, since postprandial apoCIII/II ratios were increased after stanol consumption compared with the control meal. Conclusion Postprandial TG and apoB48 responses are age-dependently increased after plant stanol consumption, which might be related to a changed clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  17. Δ24-Sterol Methyltransferase Plays an Important Role in the Growth and Development of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Borba-Santos, Luana P.; Visbal, Gonzalo; Gagini, Thalita; Rodrigues, Anderson M.; de Camargo, Zoilo P.; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.; Ishida, Kelly; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Δ24-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMT) in Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis was investigated in vitro. The effects on fungal growth and sterol composition of the 24-SMT inhibitor 22-hydrazone-imidazolin-2-yl-chol-5-ene-3β-ol (H3) were compared to those of itraconazole. MIC and MFC analysis showed that H3 was more effective than itraconazole against both species in both their filamentous and yeast forms. H3 showed fungistatic activity in a time-kill assay, with inhibitory activity stronger than that of itraconazole. GC analysis of cell sterol composition showed that sterols present in control cells (ergosterol and precursors) were completely replaced by 14α-methylated sterols after H3 exposure. Itraconazole only partially inhibited ergosterol synthesis but completely arrested synthesis of other sterols found in control cells, promoting accumulation of nine 14α-methyl sterols. Based on these results, we propose a schematic model of sterol biosynthesis pathways in S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Effects on cell morphology due to 24-SMT inhibition by H3 as analyzed by SEM and TEM included irregular cell shape, reduced cytoplasmic electron-density, and reduced thickness of the microfibrillar cell wall layer. Moreover, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 promoted mitochondrial disturbance, as demonstrated by alterations in MitoTracker® Red CMXRos fluorescence intensity evaluated by flow cytometry. When used in conjunction with itraconazole, H3 enhanced the effectiveness of itraconazole against all tested strains, reducing at least half (or more) the MIC values of itraconazole. In addition, cytotoxicity assays revealed that H3 was more selective toward these fungi than was itraconazole. Thus, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 was an effective antifungal strategy against S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Inhibition of the methylation reaction catalyzed by 24-SMT has a strong antiproliferative effect via disruption of ergosterol homeostasis

  18. Δ(24)-Sterol Methyltransferase Plays an Important Role in the Growth and Development of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Borba-Santos, Luana P; Visbal, Gonzalo; Gagini, Thalita; Rodrigues, Anderson M; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M; Ishida, Kelly; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Δ(24)-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMT) in Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis was investigated in vitro. The effects on fungal growth and sterol composition of the 24-SMT inhibitor 22-hydrazone-imidazolin-2-yl-chol-5-ene-3β-ol (H3) were compared to those of itraconazole. MIC and MFC analysis showed that H3 was more effective than itraconazole against both species in both their filamentous and yeast forms. H3 showed fungistatic activity in a time-kill assay, with inhibitory activity stronger than that of itraconazole. GC analysis of cell sterol composition showed that sterols present in control cells (ergosterol and precursors) were completely replaced by 14α-methylated sterols after H3 exposure. Itraconazole only partially inhibited ergosterol synthesis but completely arrested synthesis of other sterols found in control cells, promoting accumulation of nine 14α-methyl sterols. Based on these results, we propose a schematic model of sterol biosynthesis pathways in S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Effects on cell morphology due to 24-SMT inhibition by H3 as analyzed by SEM and TEM included irregular cell shape, reduced cytoplasmic electron-density, and reduced thickness of the microfibrillar cell wall layer. Moreover, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 promoted mitochondrial disturbance, as demonstrated by alterations in MitoTracker(®) Red CMXRos fluorescence intensity evaluated by flow cytometry. When used in conjunction with itraconazole, H3 enhanced the effectiveness of itraconazole against all tested strains, reducing at least half (or more) the MIC values of itraconazole. In addition, cytotoxicity assays revealed that H3 was more selective toward these fungi than was itraconazole. Thus, 24-SMT inhibition by H3 was an effective antifungal strategy against S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis. Inhibition of the methylation reaction catalyzed by 24-SMT has a strong antiproliferative effect via disruption of ergosterol homeostasis

  19. Origins of suspended particulate matter based on sterol distribution in low salinity water mass observed in the offshore East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkoo; Jung, Jee-Hyun; Jin, Yongnu; Han, Gi Myeong; Lee, Taehee; Hong, Sang Hee; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Choi, Dong-Lim; Kannan, Narayanan

    2016-07-15

    The molecular composition and distribution of sterols were investigated in the East China Sea to identify the origins of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in offshore waters influenced by Changjiang River Diluted Water (CRDW). Total sterol concentrations ranged from 3200 to 31,900pgL(-1) and 663 to 5690pgL(-1) in the particulate and dissolved phases, respectively. Marine sterols dominated representing 71% and 66% in the particulate and dissolved phases, respectively. Typical sewage markers, such as coprostanol, were usually absent at ~250km offshore. However, sterols from allochthonous terrestrial plants were still detected at these sites. A negative relationship was observed between salinity and concentrations of terrestrial sterols in SPM, suggesting that significant amounts of terrestrial particulate matter traveled long distance offshore in the East China Sea, and the Changjiang River Diluted Water (CRDW) was an effective carrier of land-derived particulate organic matter to the offshore East China Sea. PMID:27167134

  20. Origins of suspended particulate matter based on sterol distribution in low salinity water mass observed in the offshore East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkoo; Jung, Jee-Hyun; Jin, Yongnu; Han, Gi Myeong; Lee, Taehee; Hong, Sang Hee; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Choi, Dong-Lim; Kannan, Narayanan

    2016-07-15

    The molecular composition and distribution of sterols were investigated in the East China Sea to identify the origins of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in offshore waters influenced by Changjiang River Diluted Water (CRDW). Total sterol concentrations ranged from 3200 to 31,900pgL(-1) and 663 to 5690pgL(-1) in the particulate and dissolved phases, respectively. Marine sterols dominated representing 71% and 66% in the particulate and dissolved phases, respectively. Typical sewage markers, such as coprostanol, were usually absent at ~250km offshore. However, sterols from allochthonous terrestrial plants were still detected at these sites. A negative relationship was observed between salinity and concentrations of terrestrial sterols in SPM, suggesting that significant amounts of terrestrial particulate matter traveled long distance offshore in the East China Sea, and the Changjiang River Diluted Water (CRDW) was an effective carrier of land-derived particulate organic matter to the offshore East China Sea.

  1. Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) an intestinal sterol transporter.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harry R; Altmann, Scott W

    2009-07-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) has been identified and characterized as an essential protein in the intestinal cholesterol absorption process. NPC1L1 localizes to the brush border membrane of absorptive enterocytes in the small intestine. Intestinal expression of NPC1L1 is down regulated by diets containing high levels of cholesterol. While otherwise phenotypically normal, Npc1l1 null mice exhibit a significant reduction in the intestinal uptake and absorption of cholesterol and phytosterols. Characterization of the NPC1L1 pathway revealed that cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe specifically binds to an extracellular loop of NPC1L1 and inhibits its sterol transport function. Npc1l1 null mice are resistant to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, and when crossed with apo E null mice, are completely resistant to the development of atherosclerosis. Intestinal gene expression studies in Npc1l1 null mice indicated that no exogenous cholesterol was entering enterocytes lacking NPC1L1, which resulted in an upregulation of intestinal and hepatic LDL receptor and cholesterol biosynthetic gene expression. Polymorphisms in the human NPC1L1 gene have been found to influence cholesterol absorption and plasma low density lipoprotein levels. Therefore, NPC1L1 is a critical intestinal sterol uptake transporter which influences whole body cholesterol homeostasis.

  2. Determination of triacyl glycerol and sterol components of fat to authenticate ghee based sweets.

    PubMed

    Kala, A L Amrutha; Sabeena, K; Havanur, Priya Pramod

    2016-04-01

    Method comparison of triacyl glycerol (TAG) and sterol components of fats of ghee based sweets was carried out on dairy ghee, laboratory prepared control sample and market samples. The fat was extracted from control and market samples. Determination of TAG and sterol composition of the fats was carried out using low resolution Gas Chromatography. The quantification of cholesterol and β-sitosterol and TAG classes of dairy ghee, control and market samples fat was also determined using single short column. Adulteration at 5 % level in milk fats showed varied TAG compositions of C50, C52 and C54 as compared to control and pure ghee sample. The cholesterol content of ghee and control sample was 2.30 ± 0.8, 2.00 ± 0.24 g/kg respectively and β-sitosterol content of control was 0.20 ± 0.11 g/kg. The adulterated samples showed varied cholesterol and β-sitosterol contents as compared to control sample fat. PMID:27413245

  3. Sterols and Stanols Preserved in Pond Sediments Track Seabird Biovectors in a High Arctic Environment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenhan; Sun, Liguang; Kimpe, Linda E; Mallory, Mark L; Smol, John P; Gallant, Lauren R; Li, Jinping; Blais, Jules M

    2016-09-01

    Seabirds are major vertebrates in the coastal ecosystems of the Canadian High Arctic, where they transport substantial amounts of marine-derived nutrients and pollutants from oceans to land by depositing guano and stomach oils to their nesting area, which often includes nearby freshwater ponds. Here we present novel indicators for evaluating the impact of seabirds on freshwater ecosystems. The ratio of cholesterol/(cholesterol + sitosterol) in pond sediments showed significant enrichment near a nesting colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) and was significantly correlated with ornithogenic enrichment of sediment as determined by sedimentary δ(15)N. The sterol ratio was also correlated with several bioaccumulative persistent organic pollutants (POPs), suggesting its usefulness in tracking biovector enrichment of contaminants. Human-derived epicoprostanol was also analyzed in the sediments, and its relationship with an abandoned, prehistoric camp was recorded, suggesting its potential as a tracer of prehistoric human activities in the Arctic. Sterols and stanols preserved in sediments appear to be useful geochemical tools that will inform our understanding of migratory species and the presence of prehistoric human populations in the Arctic, and possibly other animal populations. PMID:27409713

  4. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  5. Endogenous sterol metabolites regulate growth of EGFR/KRAS-dependent tumors via LXR

    PubMed Central

    Gabitova, Linara; Restifo, Diana; Gorin, Andrey; Manocha, Kunal; Handorf, Elizabeth; Yang, Dong-Hua; Cai, Kathy Q.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Cunningham, David; Kratz, Lisa E.; Herman, Gail E.; Golemis, Erica A.; Astsaturov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Summary Meiosis activating sterols (MAS) are substrates of SC4MOL and NSDHL in the cholesterol pathway and are important for normal organismal development. Oncogenic transformation by EGFR or RAS increases the demand for cholesterol, suggesting a possibility for metabolic interference. To test this idea in vivo, we ablated Nsdhl in adult keratinocytes expressing KRASG12D. Strikingly, Nsdhl inactivation antagonized the growth of skin tumors, while having little effect on normal skin. Loss of Nsdhl induced the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, reduced the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), decreased intracellular cholesterol and was dependent on the liver X receptor (LXR) α. Importantly, EGFR signaling opposed LXRα effects on cholesterol homeostasis, while an EGFR inhibitor synergized with LXRα agonists in killing cancer cells. Inhibition of SC4MOL or NSDHL, or activation of LXRα by sterol metabolites can be an effective strategy against carcinomas with activated EGFR-KRAS signaling. PMID:26344763

  6. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and sterol composition of the marine algae, Sargassum glaucescens

    PubMed Central

    Payghami, Nasrin; Jamili, Shahla; Rustaiyan, Abdolhossein; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Nikan, Marjan; Gohari, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sargassum species (phaeophyceae) are economically important brown algae in southern parts of Iran. Sargassum is mainly harvested as a row material in alginate production industries and is a source of plant foods or plant bio-stimulants even a component of animal foods. Objective: In this study, Sargassum glaucescens, collected from the seashore of Chabahar, was employed for phytochemical and biological evaluations. Materials and Methods: For that purpose, the dried algae was extracted by methanol and subjected to different chromatographic separation methods. Results: Six sterols, fucosterol (1), 24(S)-hydroxy-24-vinylcholesterol (2), 24(R)-hydroxy-24-vinylcholesterol (3), stigmasterol (4), β-sitosterol (5) and cholesterol (6) were identified by spectroscopic methods including 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and mass spectroscopy. In vitro alpha-amylase inhibitory test was performed on the methanolic extract and the results revealed a potent inhibition (IC50 = 8.9 ± 2.4 mg/mL) of the enzyme compared to acarbose as a positive control. Conclusion: Various biological activities and distribution of sterols in Sargassum genus have been critically reviewed here. The results concluded that these algae are a good candidate for further anti-diabetic investigations in animals and human. PMID:26692744

  7. Targeting Ergosterol biosynthesis in Leishmania donovani: essentiality of sterol 14 alpha-demethylase.

    PubMed

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; El Aroussi, Amale; Choi, Jun Yong; Vieira, Debora F; De Muylder, Geraldine; Johnston, Jonathan B; Chen, Steven; Kellar, Danielle; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; Roush, William R; Podust, Larissa M; McKerrow, James H

    2015-03-01

    Leishmania protozoan parasites (Trypanosomatidae family) are the causative agents of cutaneous, mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis worldwide. While these diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, there are few adequate treatments available. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51) in the parasite sterol biosynthesis pathway has been the focus of considerable interest as a novel drug target in Leishmania. However, its essentiality in Leishmania donovani has yet to be determined. Here, we use a dual biological and pharmacological approach to demonstrate that CYP51 is indispensable in L. donovani. We show via a facilitated knockout approach that chromosomal CYP51 genes can only be knocked out in the presence of episomal complementation and that this episome cannot be lost from the parasite even under negative selection. In addition, we treated wild-type L. donovani and CYP51-deficient strains with 4-aminopyridyl-based inhibitors designed specifically for Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51. While potency was lower than in T. cruzi, these inhibitors had increased efficacy in parasites lacking a CYP51 allele compared to complemented parasites, indicating inhibition of parasite growth via a CYP51-specific mechanism and confirming essentiality of CYP51 in L. donovani. Overall, these results provide support for further development of CYP51 inhibitors for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25768284

  8. Structure of Dehydroergosterol Monohydrate and Interaction with Sterol Carrier Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Gallegos, Adalberto M.; Storey, Stephen M.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.; Kier, Ann B.; Meyer, Edgar; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol [ergosta-5,7,9(11),22-tetraen-3β-ol] is a naturally-occurring, fluorescent sterol utilized extensively to probe membrane cholesterol distribution, cholesterol-protein interactions, and intracellular cholesterol transport both in vitro and in vivo. In aqueous solutions, the low solubility of dehydroergosterol results in the formation of monohydrate crystals similar to cholesterol. Low temperature x-ray diffraction analysis reveals that dehydroergosterol monohydrate crystallizes in the space group P21 with 4 molecules in the unit cell and monoclinic crystal parameters a = 9.975(1)Å, b = 7.4731(9)Å, c = 34.054(4)Å, and β = 92.970(2)° somewhat similar to ergosterol monohydrate. The molecular arrangement is in a slightly closer packed bilayer structure resembling cholesterol monohydrate. Since dehydroergosterol fluorescence emission undergoes a quantum yield enhancement and red-shift of its maximum wavelength when crystallized, formation or disruption of microcrystals was monitored with high sensitivity using cuvette-based spectroscopy and multi-photon laser scanning imaging microscopy (MPLSM). This manuscript reports on the dynamical effect of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) interacting between aqueous dispersions of dehydroergosterol monohydrate microcrystal donors and acceptors consisting not only of model membranes but also vesicles derived from plasma membranes isolated by biochemical fractionation and affinity purification from Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, this study provides real-time measurements of the effect of increased SCP-2 levels on the rate of disappearance of dehydroergosterol microcrystals in living cells. PMID:19020914

  9. Sterols from Mytilidae show anti-aging and neuroprotective effects via anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujuan; Lin, Yanfei; Cao, Xueli; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2014-11-25

    For screening anti-aging samples from marine natural products, K6001 yeast strain was employed as a bioassay system. The active mussel extract was separated to give an active sterol fraction (SF). SF was further purified, and four sterol compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined to be cholesterol (CHOL), brassicasterol, crinosterol, and 24-methylenecholesterol. All compounds showed similar anti-aging activity. To understand the action mechanism involved, anti-oxidative experiments, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and malondialdehyde (MDA) tests were performed on the most abundant compound, CHOL. Results indicated that treatment with CHOL increases the survival rate of yeast under oxidative stress and decreases ROS and MDA levels. In addition, mutations of uth1, skn7, sod1, and sod2, which feature a K6001 background, were employed and the lifespans of the mutations were not affected by CHOL. These results demonstrate that CHOL exerts anti-aging effects via anti-oxidative stress. Based on the connection between neuroprotection and anti-aging, neuroprotective experiments were performed in PC12 cells. Paraquat was used to induce oxidative stress and the results showed that the CHOL and SF protect the PC12 cells from the injury induced by paraquat. In addition, these substance exhibited nerve growth factor (NGF) mimic activities again confirmed their neuroprotective function.

  10. Acute sterol o-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) knockdown rapidly mobilizes hepatic cholesterol for fecal excretion.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephanie M; Gromovsky, Anthony D; Kelley, Kathryn L; Davis, Matthew A; Wilson, Martha D; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark; Temel, Ryan E

    2014-01-01

    The primary risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is LDL cholesterol, which can be reduced by increasing cholesterol excretion from the body. Fecal cholesterol excretion can be driven by a hepatobiliary as well as a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE). We previously showed that chronic knockdown of the hepatic cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) increased fecal cholesterol loss via TICE. To elucidate the initial events that stimulate TICE, C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce hepatic cholesterol accumulation and were then treated for 1 or 2 weeks with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting SOAT2. Within 2 weeks of hepatic SOAT2 knockdown (SOAT2HKD), the concentration of cholesteryl ester in the liver was reduced by 70% without a reciprocal increase in hepatic free cholesterol. The rapid mobilization of hepatic cholesterol stores resulted in a ∼ 2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol loss but no change in biliary cholesterol concentration. Acute SOAT2HKD increased plasma cholesterol carried primarily in lipoproteins enriched in apoB and apoE. Collectively, our data suggest that acutely reducing SOAT2 causes hepatic cholesterol to be swiftly mobilized and packaged onto nascent lipoproteins that feed cholesterol into the TICE pathway for fecal excretion.

  11. Acute Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) Knockdown Rapidly Mobilizes Hepatic Cholesterol for Fecal Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephanie M.; Gromovsky, Anthony D.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Davis, Matthew A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Lee, Richard G.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Graham, Mark J.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is LDL cholesterol, which can be reduced by increasing cholesterol excretion from the body. Fecal cholesterol excretion can be driven by a hepatobiliary as well as a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE). We previously showed that chronic knockdown of the hepatic cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) increased fecal cholesterol loss via TICE. To elucidate the initial events that stimulate TICE, C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce hepatic cholesterol accumulation and were then treated for 1 or 2 weeks with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting SOAT2. Within 2 weeks of hepatic SOAT2 knockdown (SOAT2HKD), the concentration of cholesteryl ester in the liver was reduced by 70% without a reciprocal increase in hepatic free cholesterol. The rapid mobilization of hepatic cholesterol stores resulted in a ∼2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol loss but no change in biliary cholesterol concentration. Acute SOAT2HKD increased plasma cholesterol carried primarily in lipoproteins enriched in apoB and apoE. Collectively, our data suggest that acutely reducing SOAT2 causes hepatic cholesterol to be swiftly mobilized and packaged onto nascent lipoproteins that feed cholesterol into the TICE pathway for fecal excretion. PMID:24901470

  12. A series of cationic sterol lipids with gene transfer and bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Randazzo, R. A. S.; Bucki, R.; Janmey, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    A family of cationic lipids was synthesized via direct amide coupling of spermine to the C-24 position of cholic acid analogs. Four monosubstituted spermines and a bis-substituted spermine were evaluated as plasmid transfection reagents, as bacteriostatic agents, and as bactericidal agents. The incorporation of a double bond in the sterol moiety enhanced transfection efficiency significantly and produced two compounds with little cytotoxicity and transfection potency comparable to Lipofectamine2000. Inclusion of the double bond had no effect on the general trend of increasing bactericidal activity with increasing sterol hydrophobicity. Co-formulation of the most hydrophilic of the compounds with its bis-substituted analogue led to enhancement in transfection activity. The bis-substituted compound, when tested alone, emerged as the most bacteriostatic compound in the family with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 4 μM against B. subtilis and 16 μM against E. coli and therapeutic indexes (minimum hemolytic concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration) of 61 and 15, respectively. Cationic lipids can be optimized for both gene delivery and antibacterial applications by similar modifications. PMID:19364656

  13. Functional Analysis of Sterol Transporter Orthologues in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Nicole; Hagiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Polarized growth in filamentous fungi needs a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the growing hyphal tip. One of the important membrane compounds in fungi is ergosterol. At the apical plasma membrane ergosterol accumulations, which are called sterol-rich plasma membrane domains (SRDs). The exact roles and formation mechanism of the SRDs remained unclear, although the importance has been recognized for hyphal growth. Transport of ergosterol to hyphal tips is thought to be important for the organization of the SRDs. Oxysterol binding proteins, which are conserved from yeast to human, are involved in nonvesicular sterol transport. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae seven oxysterol-binding protein homologues (OSH1 to -7) play a role in ergosterol distribution between closely located membranes independent of vesicle transport. We found five homologous genes (oshA to oshE) in the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans. The functions of OshA-E were characterized by gene deletion and subcellular localization. Each gene-deletion strain showed characteristic phenotypes and different sensitivities to ergosterol-associated drugs. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Osh proteins showed specific localization in the late Golgi compartments, puncta associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, or diffusely in the cytoplasm. The genes expression and regulation were investigated in a medically important species Aspergillus fumigatus, as well as A. nidulans. Our results suggest that each Osh protein plays a role in ergosterol distribution at distinct sites and contributes to proper fungal growth. PMID:26116213

  14. Silibinin inhibits aberrant lipid metabolism, proliferation and emergence of androgen-independence in prostate cancer cells via primarily targeting the sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Dhanya K.; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) kills thousands of men every year, demanding additional approaches to better understand and target this malignancy. Recently, critical role of aberrant lipogenesis is highlighted in prostate carcinogenesis, offering a unique opportunity to target it to reduce PCA. Here, we evaluated efficacy and associated mechanisms of silibinin in inhibiting lipid metabolism in PCA cells. At physiologically achievable levels in human, silibinin strongly reduced lipid and cholesterol accumulation specifically in human PCA cells but not in non-neoplastic prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells. Silibinin also decreased nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) and their target genes only in PCA cells. Mechanistically, silibinin activated AMPK, thereby increasing SREBP1 phosphorylation and inhibiting its nuclear translocation; AMPK inhibition reversed silibinin-mediated decrease in nuclear SREBP1 and lipid accumulation. Additionally, specific SREBP inhibitor fatostatin and stable overexpression of SREBP1 further confirmed the central role of SREBP1 in silibinin-mediated inhibition of PCA cell proliferation and lipid accumulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, silibinin also inhibited synthetic androgen R1881-induced lipid accumulation and completely abrogated the development of androgen-independent LNCaP cell clones via targeting SREBP1/2. Together, these mechanistic studies suggest that silibinin would be effective against PCA by targeting critical aberrant lipogenesis. PMID:25294820

  15. Serial position encoding of signs.

    PubMed

    Miozzo, Michele; Petrova, Anna; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Peressotti, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Reduced short-term memory (STM) capacity has been reported for sign as compared to speech when items have to be recalled in a specific order. This difference has been attributed to a more precise and efficient serial position encoding in verbal STM (used for speech) than visuo-spatial STM (used for sign). We tested in the present investigation whether the reduced STM capacity with signs stems from a lack of positional encoding available in verbal STM. Error analyses reported in prior studies have revealed that positions are defined in verbal STM by distance from both the start and the end of the sequence (both-edges positional encoding scheme). Our analyses of the errors made by deaf participants with finger-spelled letters revealed that the both-edges positional encoding scheme underlies the STM representation of signs. These results indicate that the cause of the STM disadvantage is not the type of positional encoding but rather the difficulties in binding an item in visuo-spatial STM to its specific position in the sequence. Both-edges positional encoding scheme could be specific of sign, since it has not been found in visuo-spatial STM tasks conducted with hearing participants. PMID:27244095

  16. Desmosterol, the main sterol in rabbit semen: distribution among semen subfractions and its role in the in vitro spermatozoa acrosome reaction and motility

    PubMed Central

    Mourvaki, Evangelia; Cardinali, Raffaella; Roberti, Rita; Dal Bosco, Alessandro; Castellini, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of the cell membrane lipid bilayer that include molecules such as cholesterol and desmosterol, which are significantly found in the spermatozoa of several animal species. However, the presence of desmosterol in rabbit semen has never been investigated. The aims of this study were to characterize the sterol composition of subfractions of ejaculated rabbit semen and evaluate the in vitro effects of sterol on the spermatozoa acrosome reaction and motility. Two sterols, occurring prevalently in the free form (94.3%), were identified in whole semen collected from 10 fertile New Zealand White rabbits, specifically desmosterol (58.5% of total sterols) and cholesterol (35.9% of total sterols). Desmosterol was the predominant sterol found in all subfractions of rabbit semen, varying from 56.7% (in the prostatic secretory granules, PSGs) to 63.8% (in the seminal plasma). Spermatozoa contained an intermediate proportion of desmosterol (59.8%), which was asymmetrically distributed between the heads (52.0% of the total content of sterols) and the tails (81.8%). Results showed that both desmosterol and cholesterol can be transferred from the PSGs to the spermatozoa and are equally effective in inhibiting in vitro spermatozoa capacitation at a concentration higher than 1 mg L−1. In contrast, neither desmosterol nor cholesterol had a significant effect on spermatozoa motility. Thus, it was concluded that, the various fractions of rabbit seminal fluid differ from each other in sterol composition and quantity, probably due to their different functional properties, and these fractions may undergo significant sterol changes depending on the stage of spermatozoa capacitation. PMID:20729867

  17. Hair sterol signatures coupled to multivariate data analysis reveal an increased 7β-hydroxycholesterol production in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyun-Hwa; Lee, Do-Yup; Seo, Hong Seog; Jeong, Jihyeon; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Chung, Bong Chul; Kim, Eosu; Choi, Man Ho

    2016-01-01

    Altered cholesterol metabolism could be associated with cognitive impairment. The quantitative profiling of 19 hair sterols was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to multivariate data analysis. The limit of quantification of all sterols ranged from 5 to 20 ng/g, while the calibration linearity was higher than 0.98. The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 3.2% to 9.8% and from 83.2% to 119.4%, respectively. Among the sterols examined, 8 were quantitatively detected from two strands of 3-cm-long scalp hair samples of female participants, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=31), and healthy controls (HC, n=36). The cognitive impairment (MCI or AD) was correlated with a higher metabolic rate than that of HCs based on 7β-hydroxycholesterol (P<0.005). Significant negative correlations (r=-0.822) were detected between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and hair sample metabolic ratios of 7β-hydroxycholesterol to cholesterol, which is an accepted, sensitive, and specific tool for discriminating HCs from individuals with MCI or AD. In conclusion, improved diagnostic values can be obtained using hair sterol signatures coupled with MMSE scores. This method may prove useful for predictive diagnosis in population screening of cognitive impairment. PMID:26385606

  18. Sebaceous lipid profiling of bat integumentary tissues: quantitative analysis of free Fatty acids, monoacylglycerides, squalene, and sterols.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Gilmore, David F; Fuller, Nathan W; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2013-12-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans and is devastating North American bat populations. Sebaceous lipids secreted from host integumentary tissues are implicated in the initial attachment and recognition of host tissues by pathogenic fungi. We are interested in determining if ratios of lipid classes in sebum can be used as biomarkers to diagnose severity of fungal infection in bats. To first establish lipid compositions in bats, we isolated secreted and integral lipid fractions from the hair and wing tissues of three species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), Eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), and evening bats (Nycticeius humeralis). Sterols, FFAs, MAGs, and squalene were derivatized as trimethylsilyl esters, separated by gas chromatography, and identified by mass spectrometry. Ratios of sterol to squalene in different tissues were determined, and cholesterol as a disease biomarker was assessed. Free sterol was the dominant lipid class of bat integument. Squalene/sterol ratio is highest in wing sebum. Secreted wing lipid contained higher proportions of saturated FFAs and MAGs than integral wing or secreted hair lipid. These compounds are targets for investigating responses of P. destructans to specific host lipid compounds and as biomarkers to diagnose WNS. PMID:24327437

  19. Vitamin D and sterol composition of ten types of mushrooms from retail suppliers in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D, ergosterol, ergosterol metabolites, and phytosterols were analyzed in ten mushroom types sampled nationwide in the U.S. to update the USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Sterols were analyzed by GC-FID with mass spectrometric confirmation of components. Vitamin D was assayed ...

  20. Use of Enterococcus, BST and sterols as indicators for poultry pollution source tracking in surface and groundwater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study has applied Enterococcus, Bacterial Source Tracking (BST) and sterol analysis for pollution source identification from poultry sources. Fecal contamination was detected in 100% of surface water and 15% of groundwater sites tested. E. faecium was the dominant species in aged litter sampl...