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Sample records for encoding ten leading

  1. Contrasting Population Structures of the Genes Encoding Ten Leading Vaccine-Candidate Antigens of the Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Buckee, Caroline O.; Reeder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The extensive diversity of Plasmodium falciparum antigens is a major obstacle to a broadly effective malaria vaccine but population genetics has rarely been used to guide vaccine design. We have completed a meta-population genetic analysis of the genes encoding ten leading P. falciparum vaccine antigens, including the pre-erythrocytic antigens csp, trap, lsa1 and glurp; the merozoite antigens eba175, ama1, msp's 1, 3 and 4, and the gametocyte antigen pfs48/45. A total of 4553 antigen sequences were assembled from published data and we estimated the range and distribution of diversity worldwide using traditional population genetics, Bayesian clustering and network analysis. Although a large number of distinct haplotypes were identified for each antigen, they were organized into a limited number of discrete subgroups. While the non-merozoite antigens showed geographically variable levels of diversity and geographic restriction of specific subgroups, the merozoite antigens had high levels of diversity globally, and a worldwide distribution of each subgroup. This shows that the diversity of the non-merozoite antigens is organized by physical or other location-specific barriers to gene flow and that of merozoite antigens by features intrinsic to all populations, one important possibility being the immune response of the human host. We also show that current malaria vaccine formulations are based upon low prevalence haplotypes from a single subgroup and thus may represent only a small proportion of the global parasite population. This study demonstrates significant contrasts in the population structure of P. falciparum vaccine candidates that are consistent with the merozoite antigens being under stronger balancing selection than non-merozoite antigens and suggesting that unique approaches to vaccine design will be required. The results of this study also provide a realistic framework for the diversity of these antigens to be incorporated into the design of next

  2. Encoding details: positive emotion leads to memory broadening.

    PubMed

    Yegiyan, Narine S; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2011-11-01

    In the current experiment we tested the hypothesis that unlike negative arousal, which leads to memory narrowing effects whereby an increase in memory for the central details is accompanied by a decrease in memory for the peripheral details, positive arousing events might lead to a memory broadening effect such that positive arousal would increase memory for both central and peripheral details. This was assessed by testing recognition for central and peripheral details of pictures that were selected to vary in a continuous manner across a wide range of arousal for both positive and negative items. The results indicated that increases in both positive and negative stimulus arousal levels led to gradual increases in memory for the central aspects of the photos. In contrast, negative arousal first increased then decreased memory for peripheral detail as arousal levels increased, whereas positive arousal led to a continuous increase in memory for peripheral details. Thus, arousing negative materials lead to memory narrowing, whereas arousing positive materials can lead to memory broadening.

  3. Genes encoding ten newly designated OXA-63 group class D β-lactamases identified in strains of the pathogenic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    La, Tom; Neo, Eugene; Phillips, Nyree D; Hampson, David J

    2015-11-01

    The anaerobic spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli colonizes the large intestine of birds and mammals, including human beings, and may induce colitis and diarrhoea. B. pilosicoli has a recombinant population structure, and strains show extensive genomic rearrangements and different genome sizes. The resident chromosomal gene blaOXA-63 in B. pilosicoli encodes OXA-63, a narrow-spectrum group IV class D β-lactamase. Genes encoding four OXA-63 variants have been described in B. pilosicoli, and the current study was designed to investigate the distribution and diversity of such genes and proteins in strains of B. pilosicoli. PCRs were used to amplify blaOXA-63 group genes from 118 B. pilosicoli strains from different host species and geographical origins. One primer set was targeted externally to the gene and two sets were designed to amplify internal components. A total of 16 strains (13.6%) showed no evidence of possessing blaOXA-63 group genes, 44 (37.3%) had a full gene, 27 (22.9%) apparently had a gene but it failed to amplify with external primers, and 29 (24.6%) had only one or other of the two internal components amplified. Based on translation of the nucleotide sequences, ten new variants of the β-lactamase, designated OXA-470 through OXA-479, were identified amongst the 44 strains that had the full gene amplified. The 16 strains lacking blaOXA-63 group genes had a region of 1674 bp missing around where the gene was expected to reside. Despite apparent genomic rearrangements occurring in B. pilosicoli, positive selection pressures for conservation of blaOXA-63 group genes and OXA proteins appear to have been exerted.

  4. Mutations in MBOAT7, Encoding Lysophosphatidylinositol Acyltransferase I, Lead to Intellectual Disability Accompanied by Epilepsy and Autistic Features.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anide; Rosti, Rasim O; Musaev, Damir; Sticca, Evan; Harripaul, Ricardo; Zaki, Maha; Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Azam, Matloob; Sultan, Tipu; Froukh, Tawfiq; Reis, André; Popp, Bernt; Ahmed, Iltaf; John, Peter; Ayub, Muhammad; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Vincent, John B; Gleeson, Joseph G; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2016-10-06

    The risk of epilepsy among individuals with intellectual disability (ID) is approximately ten times that of the general population. From a cohort of >5,000 families affected by neurodevelopmental disorders, we identified six consanguineous families harboring homozygous inactivating variants in MBOAT7, encoding lysophosphatidylinositol acyltransferase (LPIAT1). Subjects presented with ID frequently accompanied by epilepsy and autistic features. LPIAT1 is a membrane-bound phospholipid-remodeling enzyme that transfers arachidonic acid (AA) to lysophosphatidylinositol to produce AA-containing phosphatidylinositol. This study suggests a role for AA-containing phosphatidylinositols in the development of ID accompanied by epilepsy and autistic features. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Ten-Year Monitored Natural Recovery of Lead-Contaminated Mine Tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Otwong, Ashijya; Chantharit, Aphichart; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Klity Creek has become Thailand’s first official remediation ordered by the court in 2013, 15 years after the spill of lead (Pb)-contaminated mine tailing into the creek. The Pollution Control Department (PCD) decided to restore the creek through monitored natural recovery (MNR) since 2006 but has not been successful. Interestingly, the most recent remediation plan in 2015 will still apply MNR to five out of the seven portions of the creek, despite no scientific feasibility evaluation of using MNR to restore the creek. Objective: This study qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the feasibility of using MNR to clean up the creek in order to protect the Klity children from excess Pb exposure. Methods: We analyzed the physical and chemical transformation of Pb contaminated sediment in the creek and developed a remedial action goal and cleanup level using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK). We empirically determined the natural recovery (NR) potentials and rates using 10 years of data monitoring the water and sediment samples from eight monitoring stations (KC1 to KC8). Results: Klity Creek has NR potential for water except at KC2, which is closest to the spill and the other improperly managed Pb sources. However, the creek has no NR potential for sediment except at the KC8 location (NR rate = 11.1 ± 3.0 × 10–3 month–1) farthest from the spill. Conclusion: The MNR method is not suitable to use as the sole remedial approach for Klity Creek (KC2 to KC7). Although MNR is applicable at KC8, it may require up to 377 ± 76 years to restore the sediment to the background Pb concentration. Citation: Phenrat T, Otwong A, Chantharit A, Lowry GV. 2016. Ten-year monitored natural recovery of lead-contaminated mine tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand. Environ Health Perspect 124:1511–1520; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP215 PMID:27157823

  6. DNA-encoded chemical libraries: foundations and applications in lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Gunther; Neri, Dario

    2016-11-01

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries have emerged as a powerful tool for hit identification in the pharmaceutical industry and in academia. Similar to biological display techniques (such as phage display technology), DNA-encoded chemical libraries contain a link between the displayed chemical building block and an amplifiable genetic barcode on DNA. Using routine procedures, libraries containing millions to billions of compounds can be easily produced within a few weeks. The resulting compound libraries are screened in a single test tube against proteins of pharmaceutical interest and hits can be identified by PCR amplification of DNA barcodes and subsequent high-throughput sequencing.

  7. When Overlap Leads to Competition: Effects of Phonological Encoding on Word Duration

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Loretta K.; Watson, Duane G.

    2015-01-01

    Some accounts of acoustic reduction propose that variation in word duration is a reflection of the speaker’s internal production processes, but it is unclear why lengthening within a word benefits planning. The present study examines whether variability in word length is partly attributable to phonological encoding. In an event description task, speakers produced words with longer durations when the word shared part of its phonology with a previously articulated word than when it did not. More importantly, lengthening was greater when the overlap was word-initial than when it was word-final. These differences in duration are in line with predictions of serial phonological competition models, which claim that words that overlap in onsets create more competition than words that overlap in offsets and are thus more difficult to produce. That word duration is sensitive to differences in production difficulty suggests a link between speakers’ duration choices and phonological encoding. We propose that lengthening provides the production system with the necessary processing time to produce a word’s sounds. PMID:25855202

  8. When overlap leads to competition: Effects of phonological encoding on word duration.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Loretta K; Watson, Duane G

    2015-12-01

    Some accounts of acoustic reduction propose that variation in word duration is a reflection of the speaker's internal production processes, but it is unclear why lengthening within a word benefits planning. The present study examines whether variability in word length is partly attributable to phonological encoding. In an event-description task, speakers produced words with longer durations when the word shared part of its phonology with a previously articulated word than when it did not. More importantly, lengthening was greater when the overlap was word-initial than when it was word-final. These differences in duration are in line with predictions of serial phonological competition models, which claim that words that overlap in onsets create more competition than words that overlap in offsets and are thus more difficult to produce. That word duration is sensitive to differences in production difficulty suggests a link between speakers' duration choices and phonological encoding. We propose that lengthening provides the production system with the necessary processing time to produce a word's sounds.

  9. Spatiotemporal exposome dynamics of soil lead and children's blood lead pre- and ten years post-Hurricane Katrina: Lead and other metals on public and private properties in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Gonzales, Christopher R; Powell, Eric T; Mielke, Paul W

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic re-distribution of lead (Pb) principally through its use in gasoline additives and lead-based paints have transformed the urban exposome. This unique study tracks urban-scale soil Pb (SPb) and blood Pb (BPb) responses of children living in public and private communities in New Orleans before and ten years after Hurricane Katrina (29 August 2005). To compare and evaluate associations of pre- and ten years post-Katrina SPb and children's BPb on public and private residential census tracts in the core and outer areas of New Orleans, and to examine correlations between SPb and nine other soil metals. The Louisiana Healthy Housing and Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program BPb (µg/dL) data from pre- (2000-2005) and post-Katrina (2010-2015) for ≤6-year-old children. Data from public and adjacent private residential census tracts within core and outer areas are stratified from a database that includes 916 and 922 SPb and 13,379 and 4830 BPb results, respectively, from pre- and post-Katrina New Orleans. Statistical analyses utilize Multi-Response Permutation Procedure and Spearman's Rho Correlation. Pre- to Post-Katrina median SPb decreases in public and private core census tracts were from 285 to 55mg/kg and 710-291mg/kg, respectively. In public and private outer census tracts the median SPb decreased from 109 to 56mg/kg and 88-55mg/kg. Children's BPb percent ≥5µg/dL on public and private core areas pre-Katrina was 63.2% and 67.5%, and declined post-Katrina to 7.6% and 20.2%, respectively. BPb decreases also occurred in outer areas. Soil Pb is strongly correlated with other metals. Post-Katrina re-building of public housing plus landscaping amends the exposome and reduces children's BPb. Most importantly, Hurricane Katrina revealed that decreasing the toxicants in the soil exposome is an effective intervention for decreasing children's BPb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations in LARS2, encoding mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase, lead to premature ovarian failure and hearing loss in Perrault syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gersak, Ksenija; Michaelson-Cohen, Rachel; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Malach, Daniel; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2013-04-04

    The genetic causes of premature ovarian failure (POF) are highly heterogeneous, and causative mutations have been identified in more than ten genes so far. In two families affected by POF accompanied by hearing loss (together, these symptoms compose Perrault syndrome), exome sequencing revealed mutations in LARS2, encoding mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase: homozygous c.1565C>A (p.Thr522Asn) in a consanguineous Palestinian family and compound heterozygous c.1077delT and c.1886C>T (p.Thr629Met) in a nonconsanguineous Slovenian family. LARS2 c.1077delT leads to a frameshift at codon 360 of the 901 residue protein. LARS2 p.Thr522Asn occurs in the LARS2 catalytic domain at a site conserved from bacteria through mammals. LARS2 p.Thr629Met occurs in the LARS2 leucine-specific domain, which is adjacent to a catalytic loop critical in all species but for which primary sequence is not well conserved. A recently developed method of detecting remote homologies revealed threonine at this site in consensus sequences derived from multiple-species alignments seeded by human and E. coli residues at this region. Yeast complementation indicated that LARS2 c.1077delT is nonfunctional and that LARS2 p.Thr522Asn is partially functional. LARS2 p.Thr629Met was functional in this assay but might be insufficient as a heterozygote with the fully nonfunctional LARS2 c.1077delT allele. A known C. elegans strain with the protein-truncating alteration LARS-2 p.Trp247Ter was confirmed to be sterile. After HARS2, LARS2 is the second gene encoding mitochondrial tRNA synthetase to be found to harbor mutations leading to Perrault syndrome, further supporting a critical role for mitochondria in the maintenance of ovarian function and hearing. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A ten-year review of lower extremity burns in diabetics: small burns that lead to major problems.

    PubMed

    Barsun, Alura; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus with its resulting neurovascular changes may lead to an increased risk of burns and impaired wound healing. The purpose of this article is to review 10 years of experience with foot and lower leg burns in patients with diabetes at a single adult burn center. Patients with lower extremity burns and diabetes mellitus, between May 1999 and December 2009, were identified in the Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons database, and their charts were reviewed for data related to their outcomes. Sixty-eight diabetic patients, 87% male, with a mean age of 54 years, sustained foot or lower extremity burns with 37 having burns resulting from insensate feet. The pathogenesis included walking on a hot or very cold surface (8), soaking feet in hot water (22), warming feet on or near something hot such as a heater (13), or spilling hot water (7). The majority of patients were taking insulin (59.6%) or oral hyperglycemic medications (34.6%). Blood sugar levels were not well controlled (mean glucose, 215.8 mg/dl; mean hemoglobin A1c, 9.08%). Renal disease was common with admission serum blood urea nitrogen (27.5 mg/dl) and creatinine (2.21 mg/dl), and 13 were on dialysis preinjury. Cardiovascular problems were common with 39 (57%) having hypertension or cardiac disease, 3 having peripheral vascular disease, and 9, previous amputations. The mean burn size was 4.2% TBSA (range, 0.5-15%) with 57% being full thickness. Despite the small burn, the mean length of stay was 15.2 days (range, 1-95), with 5.65 days per 1% TBSA. Inability to heal these wounds was evident in 19 patients requiring readmission (one required 10 operative procedures). At least one patient sustained more than one burn. There were 62 complications with 30 episodes of infection (cellulitis, 28; osteomyelitis, 4; deep plantar infections, 2; ruptured Achilles tendon, 1) and 3 deaths. Eleven patients needed amputations (7 below-knee amputations, 4 transmetatarsal amputations, and 20 toe

  12. Intranasal inoculation with an adenovirus vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 reduces AD-like pathology and cognitive impairment in Tg-APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Ma, Ying; Zong, Li-Xia; Xing, Xiao-Na; Guo, Rong; Jiang, Tong-Zi; Sha, Sha; Liu, Li; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2012-08-15

    To develop a safe and efficient vaccine for AD treatment, we constructed an adenovirus vector vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 and CpG motif as a molecular adjuvant. We demonstrated that therapeutic immunization with Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG elicits Aβ3-10 specific Th2-polarized immune response with high titers of anti-Aβ antibodies in APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice, which in turn reduced Aβ deposits in brains and cognitive impairment. In addition, Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG reduced astrocytosis without increasing the incidence of microhemorrhage. Our findings of this study raise the possibility that the adenovirus vaccine Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG would be a safe and effective alternative for AD immunotherapy.

  13. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead Contact Us Share Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built ... to protect people from harmful lead exposures. Less Lead in Drinking Water = Better Health Learn about the ...

  14. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  15. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  16. Inactivation of Genes Encoding Plastoglobulin-Like Proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Leads to a Light-Sensitive Phenotype▿

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Tice, Ashley B.; Pham, Christina; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Plastoglobulins (PGL) are the predominant proteins of lipid globules in the plastids of flowering plants. Genes encoding proteins similar to plant PGL are also present in algae and cyanobacteria but in no other organisms, suggesting an important role for these proteins in oxygenic photosynthesis. To gain an understanding of the core and fundamental function of PGL, the two genes that encode PGL-like polypeptides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (pgl1 and pgl2) were inactivated individually and in combination. The resulting mutants were able to grow under photoautotrophic conditions, dividing at rates that were comparable to that of the wild-type (WT) under low-light (LL) conditions (10 microeinsteins·m−2·s−1) but lower than that of the WT under moderately high-irradiance (HL) conditions (150 microeinsteins·m−2·s−1). Under HL, each Δpgl mutant had less chlorophyll, a lower photosystem I (PSI)/PSII ratio, more carotenoid per unit of chlorophyll, and very much more myxoxanthophyll (a carotenoid symptomatic of high light stress) per unit of chlorophyll than the WT. Large, heterogeneous inclusion bodies were observed in cells of mutants inactivated in pgl2 or both pgl2 and pgl1 under both LL and HL conditions. The mutant inactivated in both pgl genes was especially sensitive to the light environment, with alterations in pigmentation, heterogeneous inclusion bodies, and a lower PSI/PSII ratio than the WT even for cultures grown under LL conditions. The WT cultures grown under HL contained 2- to 3-fold more PGL1 and PGL2 per cell than cultures grown under LL conditions. These and other observations led us to conclude that the PGL-like polypeptides of Synechocystis play similar but not identical roles in some process relevant to the repair of photooxidative damage. PMID:20081034

  17. Inactivation of genes encoding plastoglobuli-like proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 leads to a light-sensitive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Francis X; Tice, Ashley B; Pham, Christina; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2010-03-01

    Plastoglobulins (PGL) are the predominant proteins of lipid globules in the plastids of flowering plants. Genes encoding proteins similar to plant PGL are also present in algae and cyanobacteria but in no other organisms, suggesting an important role for these proteins in oxygenic photosynthesis. To gain an understanding of the core and fundamental function of PGL, the two genes that encode PGL-like polypeptides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (pgl1 and pgl2) were inactivated individually and in combination. The resulting mutants were able to grow under photoautotrophic conditions, dividing at rates that were comparable to that of the wild-type (WT) under low-light (LL) conditions (10 microeinsteins x m(-2) x s(-1)) but lower than that of the WT under moderately high-irradiance (HL) conditions (150 microeinsteins x m(-2) x s(-1)). Under HL, each Deltapgl mutant had less chlorophyll, a lower photosystem I (PSI)/PSII ratio, more carotenoid per unit of chlorophyll, and very much more myxoxanthophyll (a carotenoid symptomatic of high light stress) per unit of chlorophyll than the WT. Large, heterogeneous inclusion bodies were observed in cells of mutants inactivated in pgl2 or both pgl2 and pgl1 under both LL and HL conditions. The mutant inactivated in both pgl genes was especially sensitive to the light environment, with alterations in pigmentation, heterogeneous inclusion bodies, and a lower PSI/PSII ratio than the WT even for cultures grown under LL conditions. The WT cultures grown under HL contained 2- to 3-fold more PGL1 and PGL2 per cell than cultures grown under LL conditions. These and other observations led us to conclude that the PGL-like polypeptides of Synechocystis play similar but not identical roles in some process relevant to the repair of photooxidative damage.

  18. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... are approximately half a million U.S. children ages 1-5 with blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL), the reference level at which CDC recommends public health actions be initiated. No safe blood lead level in children has been ...

  19. Intranasal delivery of naked DNA encoding the LACK antigen leads to protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniel Cláudio de Oliveira; Pinto, Eduardo Fonseca; de Melo, Luiz Dione Barbosa; Lima, Wallace Pacienza; Larraga, Vicente; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2007-03-08

    We previously showed that intranasal (i.n.) vaccination with pCIneo plasmid encoding the leishmanial LACK gene (pCIneo-LACK) induces long-lasting protective immunity against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice. In this work, we proposed to investigate whether the efficacy of i.n. pCIneo-LACK is extensive to visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice received two i.n. doses of 30 microg pCIneo-LACK prior to intravenous (i.v.) infection with Leishmania chagasi. Vaccinated mice developed significantly lower parasite burden in the liver and spleen than control mice receiving empty pCIneo or saline. The spleen cells of vaccinated mice produced significantly increased IFN-gamma and IL-4 concomitant with decreased IL-10 production during infection. Serum levels of specific IgG were elevated whereas TNF-alpha were decreased as compared with controls. These results show that the practical needle-free i.n. pCIneo-LACK vaccine displays potential broad-spectrum activity against leishmaniasis.

  20. Mutations in genes encoding inner arm dynein heavy chains in Tetrahymena thermophila lead to axonemal hypersensitivity to Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siming; Hennessey, Todd; Rankin, Scott; Pennock, David G

    2005-11-01

    Calcium-dependent ciliary reversals are seen in ciliated protozoans such as Tetrahymena in response to depolarizing stimuli, but the axonemal mechanisms responsible for this response are not well understood. The model is that the outer arm dyneins (OADs) control the beating frequency while the inner arm dyneins (IADs) regulate ciliary waveform. Since ciliary reversal is a type of waveform change, the model would predict that IAD mutations could affect ciliary reversal. We have used gene disruption techniques to generate several behavioral mutants of Tetrahymena with functional disruptions of various IADs. One such mutant, called KO-6, is missing I1 (the two-headed IAD) and is unable to show ciliary reversals in response to any stimuli due to a loss of axonemal Ca2+ sensitivity [Eur J Cell Biol 80 (2001) 486-497; Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 53 (2002) 281-288.]. In contrast, disruption of 3 one-headed IADs [Liu et al., Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 59 (2004), 201-214] produced mutants, which showed over-responsiveness in bioassays measuring either their depolarization-induced avoiding reactions (AR) in Na+ and Ba2+ solutions or their duration of backward swimming (continuous ciliary reversal or CCR) in K+ solutions. Detergent-extracted and reactivated mutants also showed increased probabilities of CCR at lower Ca2+ concentrations suggesting that the behavioral over-responsiveness of these three mutants in vivo is due to increased axonemal Ca2+ sensitivity. Our data suggest the possibility that the one-headed IADs and the two-headed IAD act antagonistically in vivo and that loss of any one of the one-headed IADs leads to behavioral over-responsiveness due to less resistance to I1-induced reversals. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Overexpression of Pa_1_10620 encoding a mitochondrial Podospora anserina protein with homology to superoxide dismutases and ribosomal proteins leads to lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Böhl, Lena; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-02-01

    In biological systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent 'double edged swords': as signaling molecules they are essential for proper development, as reactive agents they cause molecular damage and adverse effects like degeneration and aging. A well-coordinated control of ROS is therefore of key importance. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are enzymes active in the detoxification of superoxide. The number of isoforms of these proteins varies among species. Here we report the characterization of the putative protein encoded by Pa_1_10620 that has been previously annotated to code for a mitochondrial ribosomal protein but shares also sequence domains with SODs. We report that the gene is transcribed in P. anserina cultures of all ages and that the encoded protein localizes to mitochondria. In strains overexpressing Pa_1_10620 in a genetic background in which PaSod3, the mitochondrial MnSOD of P. anserina, is deleted, no SOD activity could be identified in isolated mitochondria. However, overexpression of the gene leads to lifespan extension suggesting a pro-survival function of the protein in P. anserina.

  2. Deficiencies of effectiveness of intervention studies in veterinary medicine: a cross-sectional survey of ten leading veterinary and medical journals.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Meursinge Reynders, Reint

    2016-01-01

    The validity of studies that assess the effectiveness of an intervention (EoI) depends on variables such as the type of study design, the quality of their methodology, and the participants enrolled. Five leading veterinary journals and 5 leading human medical journals were hand-searched for EoI studies for the year 2013. We assessed (1) the prevalence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among EoI studies, (2) the type of participants enrolled, and (3) the methodological quality of the selected studies. Of 1707 eligible articles, 590 were EoI articles and 435 RCTs. Random allocation to the intervention was performed in 52% (114/219; 95%CI:45.2-58.8%) of veterinary EoI articles, against 87% (321/371; 82.5-89.7%) of human EoI articles (adjusted OR:9.2; 3.4-24.8). Veterinary RCTs were smaller (median: 26 animals versus 465 humans) and less likely to enroll real patients, compared with human RCTs (OR:331; 45-2441). Only 2% of the veterinary RCTs, versus 77% of the human RCTs, reported power calculations, primary outcomes, random sequence generation, allocation concealment and estimation methods. Currently, internal and external validity of veterinary EoI studies is limited compared to human medical ones. To address these issues, veterinary interventional research needs to improve its methodology, increase the number of published RCTs and enroll real clinical patients.

  3. Deficiencies of effectiveness of intervention studies in veterinary medicine: a cross-sectional survey of ten leading veterinary and medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint

    2016-01-01

    The validity of studies that assess the effectiveness of an intervention (EoI) depends on variables such as the type of study design, the quality of their methodology, and the participants enrolled. Five leading veterinary journals and 5 leading human medical journals were hand-searched for EoI studies for the year 2013. We assessed (1) the prevalence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among EoI studies, (2) the type of participants enrolled, and (3) the methodological quality of the selected studies. Of 1707 eligible articles, 590 were EoI articles and 435 RCTs. Random allocation to the intervention was performed in 52% (114/219; 95%CI:45.2–58.8%) of veterinary EoI articles, against 87% (321/371; 82.5–89.7%) of human EoI articles (adjusted OR:9.2; 3.4–24.8). Veterinary RCTs were smaller (median: 26 animals versus 465 humans) and less likely to enroll real patients, compared with human RCTs (OR:331; 45–2441). Only 2% of the veterinary RCTs, versus 77% of the human RCTs, reported power calculations, primary outcomes, random sequence generation, allocation concealment and estimation methods. Currently, internal and external validity of veterinary EoI studies is limited compared to human medical ones. To address these issues, veterinary interventional research needs to improve its methodology, increase the number of published RCTs and enroll real clinical patients. PMID:26835187

  4. Mutation of a Gene Encoding a Putative Glycoprotease Leads to Reduced Salt Tolerance, Altered Pigmentation, and Cyanophycin Accumulation in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Zuther, Ellen; Schubert, Hendrik; Hagemann, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The salt-sensitive mutant 549 of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was genetically and physiologically characterized. The mutated site and corresponding wild-type site were cloned and partially sequenced. The genetic analysis revealed that during the mutation about 1.8 kb was deleted from the chromosome of mutant 549. This deletion affected four open reading frames: a gcp gene homolog, the psaFJ genes, and an unknown gene. After construction of mutants with single mutations, only the gcp mutant showed a reduction in salt tolerance comparable to that of the initial mutant, indicating that the deletion of this gene was responsible for the salt sensitivity and that the other genes were of minor importance. Besides the reduced salt tolerance, a remarkable change in pigmentation was observed that became more pronounced in salt-stressed cells. The phycobilipigment content decreased, and that of carotenoids increased. Investigations of changes in the ultrastructure revealed an increase in the amount of characteristic inclusion bodies containing the high-molecular-weight nitrogen storage polymer cyanophycin (polyaspartate and arginine). The salt-induced accumulation of cyanophycin was confirmed by chemical estimations. The putative glycoprotease encoded by the gcp gene might be responsible for the degradation of cyanophycin in Synechocystis. Mutation of this gene leads to nitrogen starvation of the cells, accompanied by characteristic changes in pigmentation, ultrastructure, and salt tolerance level. PMID:9537367

  5. Learning to Lead: Ten Stories for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirichello, Michael; Richmond, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Principals must be knowledgeable about students, curriculum, teacher performance, and the community that they serve while at the same time, able to manage a myriad of daily activities. Often times, management activities predominate and take time away from leadership leaving little time for principals to engage in reflective thinking and proactive…

  6. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... and JPEG format Causes of Injury Death: Highlighting Violence 2015 [PDF 87KB] (color) 2014 [PDF 90KB] (color) ... Vehicle Safety Prescription Drug Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  7. Learning to Lead: Ten Stories for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirichello, Michael; Richmond, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Principals must be knowledgeable about students, curriculum, teacher performance, and the community that they serve while at the same time, able to manage a myriad of daily activities. Often times, management activities predominate and take time away from leadership leaving little time for principals to engage in reflective thinking and proactive…

  8. RPC53 encodes a subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase C (III) whose inactivation leads to a predominantly G1 arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, C; Micouin, J Y; Chiannilkulchai, N; Treich, I; Buhler, J M; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    RPC53 is shown to be an essential gene encoding the C53 subunit specifically associated with yeast RNA polymerase C (III). Temperature-sensitive rpc53 mutants were generated and showed a rapid inhibition of tRNA synthesis after transfer to the restrictive temperature. Unexpectedly, the rpc53 mutants preferentially arrested their cell division in the G1 phase as large, round, unbudded cells. The RPC53 DNA sequence is predicted to code for a hydrophilic M(r)-46,916 protein enriched in charged amino acid residues. The carboxy-terminal 136 amino acids of C53 are significantly similar (25% identical amino acid residues) to the same region of the human BN51 protein. The BN51 cDNA was originally isolated by its ability to complement a temperature-sensitive hamster cell mutant that undergoes a G1 cell division arrest, as is true for the rpc53 mutants. Images PMID:1406624

  9. Biochemical and molecular analysis of pink tomatoes: deregulated expression of the gene encoding transcription factor SlMYB12 leads to pink tomato fruit color.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Ana-Rosa; Molthoff, Jos; de Vos, Ric; Hekkert, Bas te Lintel; Orzaez, Diego; Fernández-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tripodi, Pasquale; Grandillo, Silvana; Martin, Cathie; Heldens, Jos; Ykema, Marieke; Granell, Antonio; Bovy, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    The color of tomato fruit is mainly determined by carotenoids and flavonoids. Phenotypic analysis of an introgression line (IL) population derived from a cross between Solanum lycopersicum 'Moneyberg' and the wild species Solanum chmielewskii revealed three ILs with a pink fruit color. These lines had a homozygous S. chmielewskii introgression on the short arm of chromosome 1, consistent with the position of the y (yellow) mutation known to result in colorless epidermis, and hence pink-colored fruit, when combined with a red flesh. Metabolic analysis showed that pink fruit lack the ripening-dependent accumulation of the yellow-colored flavonoid naringenin chalcone in the fruit peel, while carotenoid levels are not affected. The expression of all genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes involved in the production of the flavonol rutin from naringenin chalcone was down-regulated in pink fruit, suggesting that the candidate gene underlying the pink phenotype encodes a regulatory protein such as a transcription factor rather than a biosynthetic enzyme. Of 26 MYB and basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors putatively involved in regulating transcription of genes in the phenylpropanoid and/or flavonoid pathway, only the expression level of the MYB12 gene correlated well with the decrease in the expression of structural flavonoid genes in peel samples of pink- and red-fruited genotypes during ripening. Genetic mapping and segregation analysis showed that MYB12 is located on chromosome 1 and segregates perfectly with the characteristic pink fruit color. Virus-induced gene silencing of SlMYB12 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of naringenin chalcone, a phenotype consistent with the pink-colored tomato fruit of IL1b. In conclusion, biochemical and molecular data, gene mapping, segregation analysis, and virus-induced gene silencing experiments demonstrate that the MYB12 transcription factor plays an important role in regulating the flavonoid pathway in tomato fruit

  10. A mutation in Thermosensitive Male Sterile 1, encoding a heat shock protein with DnaJ and PDI domains, leads to thermosensitive gametophytic male sterility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Zhen; Xia, Chuan; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Dou, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Wei; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Xie, Li-Fen; He, Luyan; Ma, Xuan; Ye, De

    2009-03-01

    In most flowering plant species, pollination and fertilization occur during the hot summer, so plants must have evolved a mechanism that ensures normal growth of their pollen tubes at high temperatures. Despite its importance to plant reproduction, little is known about the molecular basis of thermotolerance in pollen tubes. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene, Thermosensitive Male Sterile 1 (TMS1), which plays an important role in thermotolerance of pollen tubes. TMS1 encodes a Hsp40-homologous protein with a DnaJ domain and an a_ERdj5_C domain found in protein disulfide isomerases (PDI). Purified TMS1 expressed in Escherichia coli (BL21 DE3) had the reductive activity of PDI. TMS1 was expressed in pollen grains, pollen tubes and other vegetative tissues, including leaves, stems and roots. Heat shock treatment at 37 degrees C increased its expression levels in growing pollen tubes as well as in vegetative tissues. A knockout mutation in TMS1 grown at 30 degrees C had greatly retarded pollen tube growth in the transmitting tract, resulting in a significant reduction in male fertility. Our study suggests that TMS1 is required for thermotolerance of pollen tubes in Arabidopsis, possibly by functioning as a co-molecular chaperone.

  11. Multiple defects in the respiratory chain lead to the repression of genes encoding components of the respiratory chain and TCA cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Ingrid; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Herbert, Christopher J; Guiard, Bernard; Dujardin, Geneviève; Meunier, Brigitte

    2009-04-17

    Respiratory complexes III, IV and V are formed by components of both nuclear and mitochondrial origin and are embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Their assembly requires the auxiliary factor Oxa1, and the absence of this protein has severe consequences on these three major respiratory chain enzymes. We have studied, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the effect of the loss of Oxa1 function and of other respiratory defects on the expression of nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. We observed that the concomitant decrease in the level of two respiratory enzymes, complexes III and IV, led to their repression. These genes are known targets of the transcriptional activator complex Hap2/3/4/5 that plays a central role in the reprogramming of yeast metabolism when cells switch from a fermenting, glucose-repressed state to a respiring, derepressed state. We found that the Hap4 protein, the regulatory subunit of the transcriptional complex, was present at a lower level in the oxa1 mutants whereas no change in HAP4 transcript level was observed, suggesting a posttranscriptional modulation. In addition, an altered mitochondrial morphology was observed in mutants with decreased expression of Hap2/3/4/5 target genes. We suggest that the aberrant mitochondrial morphology, presumably caused by the severely decreased level of at least two respiratory enzymes, might be part of the signalling pathway linking the mitochondrial defect and Hap2/3/4/5.

  12. Simulated Ten Pin Bowling Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Jacob; Howald, Craig

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the results of the dynamics in the collisions that occur in ten pin bowling. A finite element modeling system (LS-Dyna) was used to construct simplified but approximately physically realistic models and simulate collisions involving the twelve body system composed of a ball, ten pins, and a floor. The investigation focuses on the qualitative features of the map of final pin configuration as a function of the initial conditions. To appropriately limit the breadth of the initial configuration space investigated, the only variables adjusted were the position of the ball upon entering the pins and the initial angle of velocity relative to the long axis of the lane. Results concerning the size and shape of the sets of initial conditions that lead to similar final configurations, in particular those leading to none of the pins remaining standing (aka "strikes"), are shown.

  13. Encoded library technology as a source of hits for the discovery and lead optimization of a potent and selective class of bactericidal direct inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Lourdes; O'Keefe, Heather; Neu, Margarete; Remuiñán, Modesto J; Patel, Amish M; Guardia, Ana; Davie, Christopher P; Pérez-Macías, Natalia; Yang, Hongfang; Convery, Maire A; Messer, Jeff A; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Centrella, Paolo A; Alvarez-Gómez, Daniel; Clark, Matthew A; Huss, Sophie; O'Donovan, Gary K; Ortega-Muro, Fátima; McDowell, William; Castañeda, Pablo; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Pajk, Stane; Rullás, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Alvarez-Ruíz, Emilio; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Ballell Pages, Lluís; Castro-Pichel, Julia; Evindar, Ghotas

    2014-02-27

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world's oldest and deadliest diseases, killing a person every 20 s. InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the target of the frontline antitubercular drug isoniazid (INH). Compounds that directly target InhA and do not require activation by mycobacterial catalase peroxidase KatG are promising candidates for treating infections caused by INH resistant strains. The application of the encoded library technology (ELT) to the discovery of direct InhA inhibitors yielded compound 7 endowed with good enzymatic potency but with low antitubercular potency. This work reports the hit identification, the selected strategy for potency optimization, the structure-activity relationships of a hundred analogues synthesized, and the results of the in vivo efficacy studies performed with the lead compound 65.

  14. Ten Propositions Regarding Spacepower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. V.

    2001-06-01

    This study rides the coattails of Colonel Phillip S. Meilinger's book, Ten Propositions Regarding Air Power. As the United States ponders its future regarding space operations, the time has come to flame similar propositions regarding spacepower. Specifically, this study seeks to answer the question, "What is the nature of spacepower?" It also tests the aerospace integration school's hypothesis that spacepower is simply a continuation or extension of airpower. Two points come immediately to the forefront of this work. First, spacepower is different from airpower even though both share the vertical dimension of warfare. Second, space operations have matured to a point wherein valid and unique propositions regarding spacepower are identifiable. The ten propositions presented here do not represent a complete list. The method used to derive these propositions involved literary research that resulted in a long list. The list evolved over three years during numerous brainstorming sessions with several space experts most of them space weapons officers with theater and often combat experience until the list was carefully refined into the ten most salient propositions. There were many ways to present the Ten Propositions Regarding Spacepower, but the author deferred to Meilinger's approach of citing each proposition as a thesis statement with supporting material immediately following. The objective of this work is to stimulate discussions and help those who do not yet understand or appreciate the nature of spacepower in modern warfare.

  15. The Ten Information Commandments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    In response to fears that current institutions and laws may not adapt to rapid technological change with the necessary alacrity, a justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales presents and briefly discusses ten information commandmants, summarized as follows: (1) contemporary technological developments endanger human rights and civil liberties…

  16. Ten Tips for Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eleanor B.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ten attributes of leadership and offers suggestions for school librarians to implement them. Highlights include communicating vision and ideas; ethical values and integrity; self-awareness and self-knowledge; context; cooperation; diverse skills and flexibility; organizational development; personal growth; and taking action. (LRW)

  17. Ten Top Tech Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  18. Ten Top Tech Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  19. Ten Tips for Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eleanor B.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ten attributes of leadership and offers suggestions for school librarians to implement them. Highlights include communicating vision and ideas; ethical values and integrity; self-awareness and self-knowledge; context; cooperation; diverse skills and flexibility; organizational development; personal growth; and taking action. (LRW)

  20. Affordances: Ten Years On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill P.; Stillman, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago the construct, affordance, was rising in prominence in scholarly literature. A proliferation of different uses and meanings was evident. Beginning with its origin in the work of Gibson, we traced its development and use in various scholarly fields. This paper revisits our original question with respect to its utility in mathematics…

  1. Ten years of PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, Piero

    2016-07-01

    Pamela experiment has been designed as a cosmic ray observatory at 1 AU, dedicated to the precise and high statistics study of CR fluxes on a three decades energy range, form a few tens MeV up to several hundred GeV region. It is the last step of the 'Russian-Italian Mission' (RIM) program born in 1992 between several Italian and Russian institutes and with the participation of the Royal Institute of Technology of Stockholm (Sweden) and the Siegen University (German). Launched the 16 June 2006 from Baikonur cosmodrome on board of the Resurs-DK1 Russian satellite by a Soyuz rocket in an elliptical (350-610 km) quasi polar orbit (70° inclination) it was activated on 21 June 2006, afterword has been in a continuous data taking mode for ten years. The Pamela program pays particular attention to the study of particles (protons and electrons) and antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) energy spectra. It also includes search for possible signals of dark matter annihilation, search for primordial antimatter (antihelium), search for new Matter in the Universe (Strangelets?), study of cosmic-ray propagation, solar physics and solar modulation, terrestrial magnetosphere. This program is made possible thanks to the outstanding performance of the instrument, the low energy threshold, the quasi-polar orbit, the 10 years duration of the observation. Protons and helium nuclei are the most abundant components of the cosmic radiation and the precise measurements of their fluxes allow understanding the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Their spectral shapes cannot be well described by a single power law: at 230-240 GV they exhibit an abrupt spectral hardening. They challenge the current paradigm of cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants followed by diffusive propagation in the Galaxy. Of paramount importance is the discover of the anomalous increase of the positron flux at energies higher that 50 GeV (the so called 'Pamela anomaly'). The review of

  2. Peri-encoding predictors of memory encoding and consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Noga; Pell, Liat; Edelson, Micah G; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Pine, Alex; Dudai, Yadin

    2015-03-01

    We review reports of brain activations that occur immediately prior to the onset or following the offset of to-be-remembered information and can predict subsequent mnemonic success. Memory-predictive pre-encoding processes, occurring from fractions of a second to minutes prior to event onset, are mainly associated with activations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), amygdala and midbrain, and with enhanced theta oscillations. These activations may be considered as the neural correlates of one or more cognitive operations, including contextual processing, attention, and the engagement of distinct computational modes associated with prior encoding or retrieval. Post-encoding activations that correlate with subsequent memory performance are mainly observed in the MTL, sensory cortices and frontal regions. These activations may reflect binding of elements of the encoded information and initiation of memory consolidation. In all, the findings reviewed here illustrate the importance of brain states in the immediate peri-encoding time windows in determining encoding success. Understanding these brain states and their specific effects on memory may lead to optimization of the encoding of desired memories and mitigation of undesired ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Encoded Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Nowack, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two neutron detector systems based on time-encoded imaging and demonstrated their applicability toward non-proliferation missions. The 1D-TEI system was designed for and evaluated against the ability to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in very low signal to noise environments; in particular, very large stand-off and/or weak sources that may be shielded. We have demonstrated significant detection (>5 sigma) of a 2.8e5 n/s neutron fission source at 100 meters stand-off in 30 min. If scaled to an IAEA significant quantity of Pu, we estimate that this could be reduced to as few as ~5 minutes. In contrast to simple counting detectors, this was accomplished without the need of previous background measurements. The 2D-TEI system was designed for high resolution spatial mapping of distributions of SNM and proved feasibility of twodimensional fast neutron imaging using the time encoded modulation of rates on a single pixel detector. Because of the simplicity of the TEI design, there is much lower systematic uncertainty in the detector response typical coded apertures. Other imaging methods require either multiple interactions (e.g. neutron scatter camera or Compton imagers), leading to intrinsically low efficiencies, or spatial modulation of the signal (e.g., Neutron Coded Aperture Imager (Hausladen, 2012)), which requires a complicated, high channel count, and expensive position sensitive detector. In contrast, a single detector using a time-modulated collimator can encode directional information in the time distribution of detected events. This is the first investigation of time-encoded imaging for nuclear nonproliferation applications.

  4. Ten Days of Weather

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Tomorrow is the start of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season but the eastern Pacific is currently quiet. The Atlantic Ocean hurricane season begins on June 1. NASA/NOAA's GOES Project combined imagery from NOAA's GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellites to provide this animation of weather in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific over the last 10 days. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Virtual Round Table on ten leading questions for network research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    The following discussion is an edited summary of the public debate started during the conference “Growing Networks and Graphs in Statistical Physics, Finance, Biology and Social Systems” held in Rome in September 2003. Drafts documents were circulated electronically among experts in the field and additions and follow-up to the original discussion have been included. Among the scientists participating to the discussion L.A.N. Amaral, A. Barrat, A.L. Barabasi, G. Caldarelli, P. De Los Rios, A. Erzan, B. Kahng, R. Mantegna, J.F.F. Mendes, R. Pastor-Satorras, A. Vespignani are acknowledged for their contributions and editing.

  6. Time Encoded Radiation Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D.; Schuster, Patricia Frances; Steele, John T.

    2011-09-01

    Passive detection of special nuclear material (SNM) at long range or under heavy shielding can only be achieved by observing the penetrating neutral particles that it emits: gamma rays and neutrons in the MeV energy range. The ultimate SNM standoff detector system would have sensitivity to both gamma and neutron radiation, a large area and high efficiency to capture as many signal particles as possible, and good discrimination against background particles via directional and energy information. Designing such a system is a daunting task. Using timemodulated collimators could be a transformative technique leading to practical gamma-neutron imaging detector systems that are highly efficient with the potential to exhibit simultaneously high angular and energy resolution. A new technique using time encoding to make a compact, high efficiency imaging detector was conceived. Design considerations using Monte Carlo modeling and the construction and demonstration of a prototype imager are described.

  7. String universality in ten dimensions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Taylor, Washington; Dewolfe, Oliver

    2010-08-13

    We show that the N=1 supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups U(1){496} and E{8}×U(1){248} are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and Abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  8. Ten Myths about Spanking Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Murray A.

    One of a series of studies on corporal punishment of children, this paper argues that the reasons provided for the strong support of spanking are myths. Ten myths about spanking children are discussed by offering arguments that support the action and by quoting findings from studies that refute the arguments. The ten myths are: (1) spanking works…

  9. Ten Commandments of System Conversions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabotar, Kent John

    1998-01-01

    Administrators at Bowdoin College (Maine) have translated lessons learned from the process of administrative software conversion into ten commandments for other small colleges undertaking such changes. Three approaches to management information systems are outlined, with advantages and limitations highlighted, as well as the ten recommendations,…

  10. Genetically-encoded probes for measurement of intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Small, fluorescent, calcium-sensing molecules have been enormously useful in mapping intracellular calcium signals in time and space, as chapters in this volume attest. Despite their widespread adoption and utility, they suffer some disadvantages. Genetically-encoded calcium sensors that can by expressed inside cells by transfection or transgenesis are desirable. The last ten years have been marked by a rapid evolution in the laboratory of genetically encoded calcium sensors two families both figuratively and literally, resulting in11distinct configurations of fluorescent proteins and their attendant calcium sensor modules. Here, I described the design logic and performance of this abundant collection of sensors and describe their use and performance in intro and in vivo. Genetically-encoded calcium sensors have proved valuable in the measurement of calcium concentration in cellular organelles, for the most part in single cells in vitro. Their success as quantitative calcium sensors in tissues in vitro and in vivo is qualified, but they have proved valuable in imaging the pattern of calcium signals within tissues in whole animals. Some branches of the calcium sensor evolutionary tree continue to evolve rapidly and the steady progress in optimising sensor parameters leads to the certain hope that these drawbacks will eventually be overcome by further genetic engineering. PMID:21035686

  11. Ten Problems in Artificial Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    REPORT NUMBER -9 dVT ACCES~iIVN NO𔃻 3 RCCIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMGER 4. TITLE (and Subtile) S YEOF REPORT A PERIOO COvEREC Ten ~ .i in Arti’Ficiz1...7 AD-F1183 552 TEN PROBLEMS IN RTIFICIL INTELLIGENCE(U) VLE UNIV j’ N UN HVEN CT DEPT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE RSCHANK ET AL. JAN 8? VALEU/CSD/RR-514...IET VI Ten Problems in Artificial Intelligence Roger C. Schank Christopher C. Owens YALEU/CSD/RR #514 January 1987 I~~~. -- ’ -.... e"- . .I YALE

  12. Ten new primitive binary trinomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, Richard P.; Zimmermann, Paul

    2009-06-01

    We exhibit ten new primitive trinomials over GF(2) of record degrees 24 036 583 , 25 964 951 , 30 402 457 , and 32 582 657 . This completes the search for the currently known Mersenne prime exponents.

  13. Ten Problems in Experimental Mathematics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Kapoor, Vishaal; Weisstein, Eric

    2004-09-30

    This article was stimulated by the recent SIAM ''100 DigitChallenge'' of Nick Trefethen, beautifully described in a recent book. Indeed, these ten numeric challenge problems are also listed in a recent book by two of present authors, where they are followed by the ten symbolic/numeric challenge problems that are discussed in this article. Our intent was to present ten problems that are characteristic of the sorts of problems that commonly arise in ''experimental mathematics''. The challenge in each case is to obtain a high precision numeric evaluation of the quantity, and then, if possible, to obtain a symbolic answer, ideally one with proof. Our goal in this article is to provide solutions to these ten problems, and in the process present a concise account of how one combines symbolic and numeric computation, which may be termed ''hybrid computation'', in the process of mathematical discovery.

  14. The Job Corps at Ten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shales, Tom

    1975-01-01

    Job Corps programs have changed during its ten years, and include new residential manpower centers, support centers, coeducational centers, and civilian conservation centers. The article traces the history and development of this vital educational program. (MW)

  15. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  16. Experimental Ten-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, W.; Huang, H.-L.; Liu, C.; Chen, C.; Luo, Y.-H.; Su, Z.-E.; Wu, D.; Li, Z.-D.; Lu, H.; Hu, Y.; Jiang, X.; Peng, C.-Z.; Li, L.; Liu, N.-L.; Chen, Yu-Ao; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-11-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement among ten spatially separated single photons. A near-optimal entangled photon-pair source was developed with simultaneously a source brightness of ˜12 MHz /W , a collection efficiency of ˜70 % , and an indistinguishability of ˜91 % between independent photons, which was used for a step-by-step engineering of multiphoton entanglement. Under a pump power of 0.57 W, the ten-photon count rate was increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments, while maintaining a state fidelity sufficiently high for proving the genuine ten-particle entanglement. Our work created a state-of-the-art platform for multiphoton experiments, and enabled technologies for challenging optical quantum information tasks, such as the realization of Shor's error correction code and high-efficiency scattershot boson sampling.

  17. Experimental Ten-Photon Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, W; Huang, H-L; Liu, C; Chen, C; Luo, Y-H; Su, Z-E; Wu, D; Li, Z-D; Lu, H; Hu, Y; Jiang, X; Peng, C-Z; Li, L; Liu, N-L; Chen, Yu-Ao; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-11-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement among ten spatially separated single photons. A near-optimal entangled photon-pair source was developed with simultaneously a source brightness of ∼12  MHz/W, a collection efficiency of ∼70%, and an indistinguishability of ∼91% between independent photons, which was used for a step-by-step engineering of multiphoton entanglement. Under a pump power of 0.57 W, the ten-photon count rate was increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments, while maintaining a state fidelity sufficiently high for proving the genuine ten-particle entanglement. Our work created a state-of-the-art platform for multiphoton experiments, and enabled technologies for challenging optical quantum information tasks, such as the realization of Shor's error correction code and high-efficiency scattershot boson sampling.

  18. Mutation of Rice BC12/GDD1, Which Encodes a Kinesin-Like Protein That Binds to a GA Biosynthesis Gene Promoter, Leads to Dwarfism with Impaired Cell Elongation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Jiafu; Qian, Qian; Xu, Yunyuan; Zhang, Cui; Xiao, Jun; Du, Cheng; Luo, Wei; Zou, Guoxing; Chen, Mingluan; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yuan, Ming; Chong, Kang

    2011-01-01

    The kinesins are a family of microtubule-based motor proteins that move directionally along microtubules and are involved in many crucial cellular processes, including cell elongation in plants. Less is known about kinesins directly regulating gene transcription to affect cellular physiological processes. Here, we describe a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, gibberellin-deficient dwarf1 (gdd1), that has a phenotype of greatly reduced length of root, stems, spikes, and seeds. This reduced length is due to decreased cell elongation and can be rescued by exogenous gibberellic acid (GA3) treatment. GDD1 was cloned by a map-based approach, was expressed constitutively, and was found to encode the kinesin-like protein BRITTLE CULM12 (BC12). Microtubule cosedimentation assays revealed that BC12/GDD1 bound to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner. Whole-genome microarray analysis revealed the expression of ent-kaurene oxidase (KO2), which encodes an enzyme involved in GA biosynthesis, was downregulated in gdd1. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GDD1 bound to the element ACCAACTTGAA in the KO2 promoter. In addition, GDD1 was shown to have transactivation activity. The level of endogenous GAs was reduced in gdd1, and the reorganization of cortical microtubules was altered. Therefore, BC12/GDD1, a kinesin-like protein with transcription regulation activity, mediates cell elongation by regulating the GA biosynthesis pathway in rice. PMID:21325138

  19. Mutation of rice BC12/GDD1, which encodes a kinesin-like protein that binds to a GA biosynthesis gene promoter, leads to dwarfism with impaired cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Jiafu; Qian, Qian; Xu, Yunyuan; Zhang, Cui; Xiao, Jun; Du, Cheng; Luo, Wei; Zou, Guoxing; Chen, Mingluan; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yuan, Ming; Chong, Kang

    2011-02-01

    The kinesins are a family of microtubule-based motor proteins that move directionally along microtubules and are involved in many crucial cellular processes, including cell elongation in plants. Less is known about kinesins directly regulating gene transcription to affect cellular physiological processes. Here, we describe a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, gibberellin-deficient dwarf1 (gdd1), that has a phenotype of greatly reduced length of root, stems, spikes, and seeds. This reduced length is due to decreased cell elongation and can be rescued by exogenous gibberellic acid (GA₃) treatment. GDD1 was cloned by a map-based approach, was expressed constitutively, and was found to encode the kinesin-like protein BRITTLE CULM12 (BC12). Microtubule cosedimentation assays revealed that BC12/GDD1 bound to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner. Whole-genome microarray analysis revealed the expression of ent-kaurene oxidase (KO2), which encodes an enzyme involved in GA biosynthesis, was downregulated in gdd1. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GDD1 bound to the element ACCAACTTGAA in the KO2 promoter. In addition, GDD1 was shown to have transactivation activity. The level of endogenous GAs was reduced in gdd1, and the reorganization of cortical microtubules was altered. Therefore, BC12/GDD1, a kinesin-like protein with transcription regulation activity, mediates cell elongation by regulating the GA biosynthesis pathway in rice.

  20. Ten Steps for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a

    2005-01-01

    This brief guide is for parents and teachers who seek to nurture the values of compassion and good will in their children?s lives. It describes ten steps or actions to promote peace and goodwill in the home, in family activities, and in school.

  1. Understanding Scale: Powers of Ten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Taylor, Amy; Minogue, James; Broadwell, Bethany; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    The classic film "Powers of Ten" is often employed to catalyze the building of more accurate conceptions of scale, yet its effectiveness is largely unknown. This study examines the impact of the film on students' concepts of size and scale. Twenty-two middle school students and six science teachers participated. Students completed pre- and…

  2. A Ten-Year Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillip, Cyndi

    2016-01-01

    Five initiatives launched during Cyndi Phillip's term as American Association of School Librarians (AASL) President (2006-2007) continue to have an impact on school librarians ten years later. They include the rewriting of AASL's learning standards, introduction of the SKILLS Act, the presentation of the Crystal Apple Award to Scholastic Library…

  3. Ten Rules for Good Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hingsburger, Dave

    1986-01-01

    Ten guidelines for effective use of positive reinforcement as a parenting technique are described. Practical examples are used to illustrate such principles as consistency, immediacy, and specificity in giving praise. A distinction is made between giving reinforcement and giving love. (JW)

  4. Ten Ways to Control Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Dora

    1995-01-01

    Ten guidelines that may improve staff attendance are: create a written sick leave policy, do not make exceptions, be a good role model, require staff to get their own substitutes, have staff call in personally, monitor patterns in absences, supervise through observation, listen and show concern, greet each person when he or she returns, and reward…

  5. A Ten-Year Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillip, Cyndi

    2016-01-01

    Five initiatives launched during Cyndi Phillip's term as American Association of School Librarians (AASL) President (2006-2007) continue to have an impact on school librarians ten years later. They include the rewriting of AASL's learning standards, introduction of the SKILLS Act, the presentation of the Crystal Apple Award to Scholastic Library…

  6. Ten past and ten future GAS/MAUS-payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staniek, S.; Otto, G.; Doepkess, J.

    1988-01-01

    MAUS (materials science autonomous experiments) is one out of a series of flight opportunities which the Space Program of West Germany offers to scientists from the disciplines of materials research and processing for performing materials science investigations under microgravity conditions. Up to now, ten MAUS experiments were flown which were dealing with the following scientific topics: decomposition of binary alloys with miscibility gap in the liquid state, interaction of a solidification front with dispersed particles, critical Marangoni number, investigation of the magnetic compound MnBi, shrinkage of gas bubbles in glass melts and slip casting. The ten future experiments are partly reflights with modification of the scientific objectives as well as new experiments in the fields of chemical reactions, heat transfer, glass technology and Ostwald ripening. Looking to ten flown payloads, the peculiarities of instrument technology in GAS-cans and its evolution is discussed with emphasis on structure, electronics and thermal design. A typical modern payload using 100 percent of the resource is presented.

  7. TEN LAKES WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whipple, James W.; Hamilton, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Ten Lakes Wilderness Study Area, Montana, was conducted. Areas of probable or substantiated mineral potential were found surrounding zones of past mining activity east of Independence Peak where copper-bearing veins are hosted by basaltic lava flows. Three mines contain demonstrated or inferred resources, and there are numerous prospects. Other areas of probable resource potential include an area on Sinclair Creek with copper occurrences similar to those of the Independence Peak area, an area including Gilbralter Ridge where lead and zinc veins are hosted by sedimentary rocks, two areas where zinc-copper occurrences are related to metadiorite sills, and two areas that contain stratabound copper occurrences. The areas with copper and lead-zinc veins may also be of interest for deeply buried mineralized systems, as the veins may be the surface expression of plutons at relatively shallow depths.

  8. Horner's syndrome in ten horses

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sherril L.; Cochrane, Susan M.; Smith-Maxie, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Ten cases of equine Horner's syndrome were reviewed. None of the clinical signs in this series were transient (<48 hours). Sweating and ptosis were consistently observed by the attending clinician in over half of the affected horses. Enophthalmos and prolapse of the third eyelid were not reported consistently. The average duration of the clinical signs was 4.94 months and ranged from 14 days to 15 months. Eight of the ten horses developed associated complications, some of which affected performance. Airway obstruction and impedance of passage of a fiberoptic endoscope due to nasal mucosal edema occurred in five horses. Facial paralysis (4/10) and laryngeal hemiplegia (2/10), which are not direct features of Horner's syndrome, were also observed. PMID:17424002

  9. Inactivation of the lys7 gene, encoding saccharopine reductase in Penicillium chrysogenum, leads to accumulation of the secondary metabolite precursors piperideine-6-carboxylic acid and pipecolic acid from alpha-aminoadipic acid.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Leopoldo; Martín de Valmaseda, Eva; Casqueiro, Javier; Ullán, Ricardo V; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Bañuelos, Oscar; Martín, Juan F

    2004-02-01

    Pipecolic acid serves as a precursor of the biosynthesis of the alkaloids slaframine and swainsonine (an antitumor agent) in some fungi. It is not known whether other fungi are able to synthesize pipecolic acid. Penicillium chrysogenum has a very active alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway that is used for the synthesis of this precursor of penicillin. The lys7 gene, encoding saccharopine reductase in P. chrysogenum, was target inactivated by the double-recombination method. Analysis of a disrupted strain (named P. chrysogenum SR1-) showed the presence of a mutant lys7 gene lacking about 1,000 bp in the 3'-end region. P. chrysogenum SR1- lacked saccharopine reductase activity, which was recovered after transformation of this mutant with the intact lys7 gene in an autonomously replicating plasmid. P. chrysogenum SR1- was a lysine auxotroph and accumulated piperideine-6-carboxylic acid. When mutant P. chrysogenum SR1- was grown with L-lysine as the sole nitrogen source and supplemented with DL-alpha-aminoadipic acid, a high level of pipecolic acid accumulated intracellularly. A comparison of strain SR1- with a lys2-defective mutant provided evidence showing that P. chrysogenum synthesizes pipecolic acid from alpha-aminoadipic acid and not from L-lysine catabolism.

  10. Understanding Scale: Powers of Ten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. Gail; Taylor, Amy; Minogue, James; Broadwell, Bethany; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Glenda

    2007-04-01

    The classic film "Powers of Ten" is often employed to catalyze the building of more accurate conceptions of scale, yet its effectiveness is largely unknown. This study examines the impact of the film on students' concepts of size and scale. Twenty-two middle school students and six science teachers participated. Students completed pre- and post-intervention interviews and a Scale Card Sorting (SCS) task; all students observed the film "Powers of Ten." Experienced teachers' views on the efficacy of the film were assessed through a short written survey. Results showed that viewing the film had a positive influence on students' understandings of powers of ten and scale. Students reported that they had more difficulty with sizes outside of the human scale and found small scales more difficult to conceptualize than large scales. Students' concepts of relative size as well as their ability to accurately match metric sizes in scientific notation to metric scale increased from pre- to post-viewing of the film. Experienced teachers reported that the film was a highly effective tool. Teachers reported that the design of the film that allowed students to move slowly from the human scale to the large and small scales and then quickly back again was effective in laying the foundation for understanding the different scales.

  11. A single cytosine deletion in the OsPLS1 gene encoding vacuolar-type H+-ATPase subunit A1 leads to premature leaf senescence and seed dormancy in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Gong, Pan; Li, Kunyu; Huang, Fudeng; Cheng, Fangmin; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a programmed developmental process orchestrated by many factors, but its molecular regulation is not yet fully understood. In this study, a novel Oryza sativa premature leaf senescence mutant (ospls1) was examined. Despite normal development in early seedlings, the ospls1 mutant leaves displayed lesion-mimics and early senescence, and a high transpiration rate after tillering. The mutant also showed seed dormancy attributable to physical (defect of micropyle structure) and physiological (abscisic acid sensitivity) factors. Using a map-based cloning approach, we determined that a cytosine deletion in the OsPLS1 gene encoding vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit A1 (VHA-A1) underlies the phenotypic abnormalities in the ospls1 mutant. The OsPSL1/VHA-A1 transcript levels progressively declined with the age-dependent leaf senescence in both the ospls1 mutant and its wild type. The significant decrease in both OsPSL1/VHA-A1 gene expression and VHA enzyme activity in the ospls1 mutant strongly suggests a negative regulatory role for the normal OsPLS1/VHA-A1 gene in the onset of rice leaf senescence. The ospls1 mutant featured higher salicylic acid (SA) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and activation of signal transduction by up-regulation of WRKY genes in leaves. Consistent with this, the ospls1 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to exogenous SA and/or H2O2. Collectively, these results indicated that the OsPSL1/VAH-A1 mutation played a causal role in premature leaf senescence through a combination of ROS and SA signals. To conclude, OsPLS1 is implicated in leaf senescence and seed dormancy in rice. PMID:26994476

  12. A Ten Channel Temperature Controller.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    R 1D-A152 664 R TEN CHANNEL TEMPERATURE CONTROLLER(U) ROYAL AXRCRAFT 1/i ESTABLISHMENT FARNBOROUGH ( ENGLAND ) D H LISTER MAY 84 U A E RAE-T-P-1926...obtained with the design and build of a multi-channel temperature control unit for the first NGTE emissions van .While this was a platinum resistance...voltage switch, had proved highly reliable. It was decided therefore to capitalise on this experience and build, in-house, a modular multi-channel unit . A

  13. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, G. California Univ., Irvine, CA . Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ . Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. ); Pasqualetti, M.J. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ )

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Ten reasons to embrace scientism.

    PubMed

    Peels, Rik

    2017-06-01

    A strong version of scientism, such as that of Alex Rosenberg, says, roughly, that natural science reliably delivers rational belief or knowledge, whereas common sense sources of belief, such as moral intuition, memory, and introspection, do not. In this paper I discuss ten reasons that adherents of scientism have or might put forward in defence of scientism. The aim is to show which considerations could plausibly count in favour of scientism and what this implies for the way scientism ought to be formulated. I argue that only three out of these ten reasons potentially hold water and that the evidential weight is, therefore, on their shoulders. These three reasons for embracing scientism are, respectively, particular empirical arguments to the effect that there are good debunking explanations for certain common sense beliefs, that there are incoherences and biases in the doxastic outputs of certain common sense sources of belief, and that beliefs that issue from certain common sense doxastic sources are illusory. From what I argue, it follows that only a version of scientism that is significantly weaker than many versions of scientism that we find in the literature is potentially tenable. I conclude the paper by stating what such a significantly weaker version of scientism could amount to. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  16. Chemical Space of DNA-Encoded Libraries.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Raphael M; Randolph, Cassie

    2016-07-28

    In recent years, DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) have attracted considerable attention as a potential discovery tool in drug development. Screening encoded libraries may offer advantages over conventional hit discovery approaches and has the potential to complement such methods in pharmaceutical research. As a result of the increased application of encoded libraries in drug discovery, a growing number of hit compounds are emerging in scientific literature. In this review we evaluate reported encoded library-derived structures and identify general trends of these compounds in relation to library design parameters. We in particular emphasize the combinatorial nature of these libraries. Generally, the reported molecules demonstrate the ability of this technology to afford hits suitable for further lead development, and on the basis of them, we derive guidelines for DECL design.

  17. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  18. Ten Years Of PACS Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindel, Robert; Meyer-Ebrecht, Dieter; Heu, Ruettger; Oosterwijk, Herman

    1989-05-01

    A few of us here can look back ten years or more of having observed or even having participated in the PACS development. Depending on our point of view, little or much progress has been made since 1978. In the following, the authors will sketch a log book of an industrial developer and vendor, i.e., Philips Medical Systems. Some comments will turn out to be specifically applicable to the Philips Concern but the majority is probably also true for other major X-ray manufacturing companies. There are certain ground rules which have to be observed if a company wants to prove itself in a market as ambitious and complex as the medical market and, in particular, the PACS market. These ground rules will be either explicitly mentioned or are implied for the attentive listener. The following aspects will be considered:

  19. Photovoltaics: The next ten years

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    By 1984 companies manufacturing photovoltaics had been doing serious business making low cost solar arrays for twelve years. Grid connected systems of megawatt size are operating in California, and more are on the drawing board. At least six companies in the USA have produced thin film cells of over ten percent and more are working in the field. New short term goals for thin film efficiency in the twelve to fifteen percent range promise to challenge the single crystal silicon cell which has dominated the business since 1972. ARCO Solar believes that a new class of ULTRA GENERATORS twenty percent efficient and selling for two dollars per peak watt can be deployed by utilities in the 1990's.

  20. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared.

  1. Student Actor Ailments: Ten Ills and How To Cure Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Barbara Long

    2000-01-01

    Lists the top ten acting ailments often encountered in student actors, and offers advice to cure these ailments: the split personality, the beauty queen and the leading man, the comedian, the director in training, the moody one, the character-clueless, the loner, the mimic, the stage-frightened, and the opening night artist. (SR)

  2. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  3. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  4. Genetically-encoded Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacoff, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    One of the principle goals of neuroscience has been to understand the cellular basis of information processing and the plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Efforts in this area have mainly relied on electrical recording and optical imaging with chemical dyes. Over the last few years we and others have begun to develop genetically-encoded optical reporter "dyes" which should provide several important advantages over the classical methods for monitoring signal transmission in the nervous system. The advantages are that genetically-encoded reporters can be molecularly targeted a) to specific cell types via cell-specific promoters, and b) to specific subcellular compartments by peptides that are recognized by the protein sorting machinery of the cell. This makes it possible, in principle, to exclude signals from non-neuronal cells and to visualize selectively, in a brain region that contains many cell types with numerous kinds of synaptic connections, the activity of specific types of neurons (e.g. GABAergic interneurons) and specific synaptic elements (e.g. nerve terminals or dendrites), something that has hitherto not been possible. An additional advantage is that protein reporters may be rationally and irrationally "tuned" with mutations in functional domains known to control their dynamic range of operation. The general idea behind genetically-encoded reporters of cell signaling is to encode a protein that is either intrinsically fluorescent, or that can be labeled orthogonally with a fluorescent probe, and where the physiological signal changes fluorescence emission. I will describe recent progress employing both kinds of approaches.

  5. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  6. Optical-Actuator-Multiplexed, Serial-Transmission Fiber Position Encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark

    1987-10-01

    A miniature, resonant, fiber-optic scanner driven by silicon detector photocurrent requires only 23μW to sequentially address each channel of a ten-bit optical encoder mask. The digital position code is transmitted twice each cycle to a remote readout, constituting a passive optical sensor, with multiplexing capability via its precise resonant frequency.

  7. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Case Studies in Environmental Medicine (CSEM) Patient Information Sheet Lead Toxicity What is lead? How are people exposed to lead? • Lead is a soft, blue- ...

  8. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... high levels of lead in household dust. DRINKING WATER: Lead may get into drinking water when materials used in plumbing materials, such as ... and dishware. Lead may also be in contaminated water. Lead poisoning is harmful to human health and ...

  9. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  10. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    SciTech Connect

    Beiser, L.; Veligdan, J.

    1996-04-01

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic optical system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.

  11. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Honari, S; Gibran, N S; Heimbach, D M; Gibbons, J; Pharmd; Cain, V; Engrav, L H

    2001-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe exfoliative disease of the skin and mucous membranes that results in high mortality. As the elderly population increases, the number of elderly patients with TEN can also be expected to increase. Elderly patients with comparably sized burn wounds usually have a poor prognosis. Our purpose was to determine whether elderly TEN patients exhibit similarly high mortality. A retrospective review was conducted of 52 patients treated for TEN from October 1991 through September 1998. Eleven patients were older than 65 years. All patients were treated according to our TEN protocol. Eight of 11 patients recovered, and 3 died. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) involvement for the patients who recovered was 24%, compared with 66% for the nonsurvivors. The survival rate for elderly patients (73%) compares well with that for those younger than 65 years (89%). Therefore, we propose that we should be aggressive in treating elderly patients with TEN.

  12. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  13. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  14. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey shows some very familiar themes among the top-ten IT issues of strategic importance to technology leaders in higher education. Indeed, all ten of the issues from the 2009 survey are back, albeit in a slightly different order. In addition, Strategic Planning returns as an issue of renewed…

  15. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerman, Bret L.; Yang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey shows some very familiar themes among the top-ten IT issues of strategic importance to technology leaders in higher education. Indeed, all ten of the issues from the 2009 survey are back, albeit in a slightly different order. In addition, Strategic Planning returns as an issue of renewed…

  16. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  17. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  18. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  19. Time encoded radiation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  20. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  1. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  2. The ten-ecosystem study investigation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P.

    1976-01-01

    With the continental United States divided into ten forest and grassland ecosystems, the Ten Ecosystem Study (TES) is designed to investigate the feasibility and applicability of state-of-the-art automatic data processing remote sensing technology to inventory forest, grassland, and water resources by using Land Satellite data. The study will serve as a prelude to a possible future nationwide remote sensing application to inventory forest and rangeland renewable resources. This plan describes project design and phases, the ten ecosystem, data utilization and output, personnel organization, resource requirements, and schedules and milestones.

  3. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  4. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the condition. Children should also be assessed for iron deficiency and general nutrition consistent with AAP guidelines. BLLs ... raised blood lead concentrations should be tested for iron deficiency . Each person eliminates lead differently. Thus, laboratory tests ...

  5. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... through deteriorating paint, household dust, bare soil, air, drinking water, food, ceramics, home remedies, hair dyes and other ... an elevated blood lead level can easily result. Drinking water can also sometimes contribute to elevated blood lead ...

  6. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  7. Genetically encoding new bioreactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2017-09-25

    The genetic code can be expanded to include unnatural amino acids (Uaas) by engineering orthogonal components involved in protein translation. To be compatible with live cells, side chains of Uaas have been limited to either chemically inert or bio-orthogonal (i.e., nonreactive toward biomolecules) functionalities. To introduce bioreactivity into live systems, the genetic code has recently been engineered to encode a new class of Uaas, the bioreactive Uaas. These Uaas, after being incorporated into proteins, specifically react with target natural amino acid residues via proximity-enabled bioreactivity, enabling the selective formation of new covalent linkages within and between proteins both in vitro and in live systems. The new covalent bonding ability has been harnessed within proteins to enhance photostability, increase thermostability, staple proteins recombinantly, and build optical nano-switches, and between proteins to pinpoint ligand-receptor interaction, target native receptors irreversibly, and generate covalent macromolecular inhibitors. These diverse bioreactivities, inaccessible to natural proteins, thus open doors to novel protein engineering and provide new avenues for biological studies, biotherapeutics and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Top Ten Technology Breakthroughs for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Bill; Crystal, Jerry; Davidson, Hall; Holzberg, Carol S.; McIntire, Todd; McLester, Susan; Ohler, Jason; Rose, Ray; Shields, Jean; Warlick, David

    2001-01-01

    Contributors discuss the top ten technologies that allow for thinking in new and innovative ways about the concept of "school": virtual learning; wireless networking; collaboration tools; digital video; Application Service Providers; handheld devices; optical networking; videoconferencing; XML; and simulations. (AEF)

  9. Ten key issues in modern flow chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Jens; Ceylan, Sascha; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-04-28

    Ten essentials of synthesis in the flow mode, a new enabling technology in organic chemistry, are highlighted as flashlighted providing an insight into current and future issues and developments in this field. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. Ten Rules for Managing by Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, William A.

    1979-01-01

    Ten suggestions for administrators concerning objectives setting, employee participation, yearly reviews, and other aspects of management by objectives programs. Reprint available from Business Horizons, School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405. (JM)

  11. Ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-11-15

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24  mm·s(-1)} was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  12. Ultrasonically Encoded Photoacoustic Flowgraphy in Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-11-01

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24mm·s-1 was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Chromosome-Encoded Microcins

    PubMed Central

    Poey, María Eloisa; Azpiroz, María F.; Laviña, Magela

    2006-01-01

    Microcins are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics that are produced by enterobacterial strains. Although the first studies concentrated on plasmid-encoded activities, in the last years three chromosome-encoded microcins have been described: H47, E492, and M. Here, a new microcin, I47, is presented as a fourth member of this group. Common features exhibited by chromosome-encoded microcins were searched for. The comparison of the genetic clusters responsible for microcin production revealed a preserved general scheme. The clusters essentially comprise a pair of activity-immunity genes which determine antibiotic specificity and a set of microcin maturation and secretion genes which are invariably present and whose protein products are highly homologous among the different producing strains. A strict functional relationship between the maturation and secretion pathways of microcins H47, I47, and E492 was demonstrated through genetic analyses, which included heterologous complementation assays. The peptide precursors of these microcins share a maturation process which implies the addition of a catecholate siderophore of the salmochelin type. Microcins thus acquire the ability to enter gram-negative cells through the catechol receptors. In addition, they employ a common mode of secretion to reach the external milieu by means of a type I export apparatus. The results presented herein lead us to propose that chromosome-encoded microcins constitute a defined subgroup of peptide antibiotics which are strictly related by their modes of synthesis, secretion, and uptake. PMID:16569859

  14. Apoferritin-Templated Synthesis of Encoded Metallic Phosphate Nanoparticle Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Dohnalkova, Alice; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-31

    Encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags, with distinct encoding patterns, have been prepared using an apoferritin template. A center-cavity structure as well as the disassociation and reconstructive characteristics of apoferritin at different pH environments provide a facile route for preparing such encoded nanoparticle tags. Encapsulation and diffusion approaches have been investigated during the preparation. The encapsulation approach, which is based on the dissociation and reconstruction of apoferritin at different pHs, exhibits an effective route to prepare such encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags. The compositionally encoded nanoparticle tag leads to a high coding capacity with a large number of distinguishable voltammetric signals, reflecting the predetermined composition of the metal mixture solution (and hence the nanoparticle composition). Releasing the metal components from the nanoparticle tags at pH 4.6 acetate buffer avoids harsh dissolution conditions, such as strong acids. Such a synthesis of encoded nanoparticle tags, including single-component and compositionally encoded nanoparticle tags, is substantially simple, fast, and convenient compared to that of encoded metal nanowires and semiconductor nanoparticle (CdS, PbS, and ZnS) incorporated polystyrene beads. The encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags thus show great promise for bioanalytical or product-tracking/identification/protection applications.

  15. Ten-dimensional anthropomorphic arm control in a human brain-machine interface: difficulties, solutions, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodlinger, B.; Downey, J. E.; Tyler-Kabara, E. C.; Schwartz, A. B.; Boninger, M. L.; Collinger, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. In a previous study we demonstrated continuous translation, orientation and one-dimensional grasping control of a prosthetic limb (seven degrees of freedom) by a human subject with tetraplegia using a brain-machine interface (BMI). The current study, in the same subject, immediately followed the previous work and expanded the scope of the control signal by also extracting hand-shape commands from the two 96-channel intracortical electrode arrays implanted in the subject’s left motor cortex. Approach. Four new control signals, dictating prosthetic hand shape, replaced the one-dimensional grasping in the previous study, allowing the subject to control the prosthetic limb with ten degrees of freedom (three-dimensional (3D) translation, 3D orientation, four-dimensional hand shaping) simultaneously. Main results. Robust neural tuning to hand shaping was found, leading to ten-dimensional (10D) performance well above chance levels in all tests. Neural unit preferred directions were broadly distributed through the 10D space, with the majority of units significantly tuned to all ten dimensions, instead of being restricted to isolated domains (e.g. translation, orientation or hand shape). The addition of hand shaping emphasized object-interaction behavior. A fundamental component of BMIs is the calibration used to associate neural activity to intended movement. We found that the presence of an object during calibration enhanced successful shaping of the prosthetic hand as it closed around the object during grasping. Significance. Our results show that individual motor cortical neurons encode many parameters of movement, that object interaction is an important factor when extracting these signals, and that high-dimensional operation of prosthetic devices can be achieved with simple decoding algorithms. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01364480.

  16. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  17. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  18. Lead Pencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    A study, undertaken to determine the lead content of paint on various pencils in the Goddard supply system, is reported. The survey found that lead content varied from .04 mg per pencil for carmine colored pencils to approximately 43 mg per pencil for yellow colored pencils. Results also show that yellow pencils had higher lead content than other colors analyzed. More detailed results are given in tabular form.

  19. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  20. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  1. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  2. CODAS syndrome is associated with mutations of LONP1, encoding mitochondrial AAA+ Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; Jinks, Robert N; Puffenberger, Erik G; Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Singh, Kamalendra; Cheng, Iteen; Mikita, Natalie; Thilagavathi, Jayapalraja; Lee, Jae; Sarafianos, Stefan; Benkert, Abigail; Koehler, Alanna; Zhu, Anni; Trovillion, Victoria; McGlincy, Madeleine; Morlet, Thierry; Deardorff, Matthew; Innes, A Micheil; Prasad, Chitra; Chudley, Albert E; Lee, Irene Nga Wing; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2015-01-08

    CODAS syndrome is a multi-system developmental disorder characterized by cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, and skeletal anomalies. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, we identified four LONP1 mutations inherited as homozygous or compound-heterozygous combinations among ten individuals with CODAS syndrome. The individuals come from three different ancestral backgrounds (Amish-Swiss from United States, n = 8; Mennonite-German from Canada, n = 1; mixed European from Canada, n = 1). LONP1 encodes Lon protease, a homohexameric enzyme that mediates protein quality control, respiratory-complex assembly, gene expression, and stress responses in mitochondria. All four pathogenic amino acid substitutions cluster within the AAA(+) domain at residues near the ATP-binding pocket. In biochemical assays, pathogenic Lon proteins show substrate-specific defects in ATP-dependent proteolysis. When expressed recombinantly in cells, all altered Lon proteins localize to mitochondria. The Old Order Amish Lon variant (LONP1 c.2161C>G[p.Arg721Gly]) homo-oligomerizes poorly in vitro. Lymphoblastoid cell lines generated from affected children have (1) swollen mitochondria with electron-dense inclusions and abnormal inner-membrane morphology; (2) aggregated MT-CO2, the mtDNA-encoded subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase; and (3) reduced spare respiratory capacity, leading to impaired mitochondrial proteostasis and function. CODAS syndrome is a distinct, autosomal-recessive, developmental disorder associated with dysfunction of the mitochondrial Lon protease.

  3. CODAS Syndrome Is Associated with Mutations of LONP1, Encoding Mitochondrial AAA+ Lon Protease

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Kevin A.; Jinks, Robert N.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Singh, Kamalendra; Cheng, Iteen; Mikita, Natalie; Thilagavathi, Jayapalraja; Lee, Jae; Sarafianos, Stefan; Benkert, Abigail; Koehler, Alanna; Zhu, Anni; Trovillion, Victoria; McGlincy, Madeleine; Morlet, Thierry; Deardorff, Matthew; Innes, A. Micheil; Prasad, Chitra; Chudley, Albert E.; Lee, Irene Nga Wing; Suzuki, Carolyn K.

    2015-01-01

    CODAS syndrome is a multi-system developmental disorder characterized by cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, and skeletal anomalies. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing, we identified four LONP1 mutations inherited as homozygous or compound-heterozygous combinations among ten individuals with CODAS syndrome. The individuals come from three different ancestral backgrounds (Amish-Swiss from United States, n = 8; Mennonite-German from Canada, n = 1; mixed European from Canada, n = 1). LONP1 encodes Lon protease, a homohexameric enzyme that mediates protein quality control, respiratory-complex assembly, gene expression, and stress responses in mitochondria. All four pathogenic amino acid substitutions cluster within the AAA+ domain at residues near the ATP-binding pocket. In biochemical assays, pathogenic Lon proteins show substrate-specific defects in ATP-dependent proteolysis. When expressed recombinantly in cells, all altered Lon proteins localize to mitochondria. The Old Order Amish Lon variant (LONP1 c.2161C>G[p.Arg721Gly]) homo-oligomerizes poorly in vitro. Lymphoblastoid cell lines generated from affected children have (1) swollen mitochondria with electron-dense inclusions and abnormal inner-membrane morphology; (2) aggregated MT-CO2, the mtDNA-encoded subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase; and (3) reduced spare respiratory capacity, leading to impaired mitochondrial proteostasis and function. CODAS syndrome is a distinct, autosomal-recessive, developmental disorder associated with dysfunction of the mitochondrial Lon protease. PMID:25574826

  4. Data-driven encoding for quantitative genetic trait prediction.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Wang, Zhanyong; Parida, Laxmi

    2015-01-01

    Given a set of biallelic molecular markers, such as SNPs, with genotype values on a collection of plant, animal or human samples, the goal of quantitative genetic trait prediction is to predict the quantitative trait values by simultaneously modeling all marker effects. Quantitative genetic trait prediction is usually represented as linear regression models which require quantitative encodings for the genotypes: the three distinct genotype values, corresponding to one heterozygous and two homozygous alleles, are usually coded as integers, and manipulated algebraically in the model. Further, epistasis between multiple markers is modeled as multiplication between the markers: it is unclear that the regression model continues to be effective under this. In this work we investigate the effects of encodings to the quantitative genetic trait prediction problem. We first showed that different encodings lead to different prediction accuracies, in many test cases. We then proposed a data-driven encoding strategy, where we encode the genotypes according to their distribution in the phenotypes and we allow each marker to have different encodings. We show in our experiments that this encoding strategy is able to improve the performance of the genetic trait prediction method and it is more helpful for the oligogenic traits, whose values rely on a relatively small set of markers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that discusses the effects of encodings to the genetic trait prediction problem.

  5. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  6. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... help if this information is not immediately available. Poison Control If someone has severe symptoms from possible ... be caused by lead poisoning, call your local poison control center. Your local poison center can be ...

  7. Ten recommendations for software engineering in research.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Janna; Haug, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Research in the context of data-driven science requires a backbone of well-written software, but scientific researchers are typically not trained at length in software engineering, the principles for creating better software products. To address this gap, in particular for young researchers new to programming, we give ten recommendations to ensure the usability, sustainability and practicality of research software.

  8. Ten Summer Rejuvenators for School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Ten activities for personal and professional rejuvenation include: refurbish your office; purge, condense, and create new files; update scholarship information; visit a university library; enhance your expertise; set a few workable goals; prepare for future expenditures; evaluate new guidance software; consult with grant-seeking experts; and write…

  9. Ten Principles of Effective School Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This brief document offers ten principles of effective school design. They are: (1) Clear Focus and High Expectations for staff and students are defining features of an effective school; (2) A Rigorous Instructional Program provides equitable opportunities to learn and enables every student to master challenging content, skills, and learning…

  10. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  11. 'Safe handling of nanotechnology' ten years on

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Andrew D.; Aitken, Robert J.

    2016-12-01

    In 2006, a group of scientists proposed five grand challenges to support the safe handling of nanotechnology. Ten years on, Andrew Maynard and Robert Aitken -- two of the original authors -- look at where we have come, and where we still need to go.

  12. Preparing Future Faculty: Ten Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sean P.; Aiossa, Elizabeth; Winter, Mary Mugica

    2010-01-01

    When Sean Murphy designed the Graduate Student Internship Program at the College of Lake County (CLC), his 2001 TETYC article about the then two-year-old program detailed his programmatic response to the job market. Ten years later, the CLC-DePaul University partnership remains the strongest of the original dozen cross-sector relationships CLC…

  13. TEN MASTER TEACHER AND PROGRAM AWARD PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOVACH, EDITH M.A.

    IN 1966 THE AMERICAN CLASSICAL LEAGUE HONORED THREE TEACHERS WITH ITS MASTER SECONDARY SCHOOL LATIN TEACHER AND PROGRAM AWARD. AMONG THE 32 PROGRAMS CITED FOR RECOGNITION, TEN (INCLUDING THOSE OF THE AWARD WINNERS) POSSESS CLEARLY INNOVATIVE FEATURES. IN BRIEF THEY FEATURE (1) A FIFTH YEAR ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM, LATIN AS INTRODUCTORY TO…

  14. Ten-year urban forestry action plan

    Treesearch

    J.W." Jerry" Van Sambeek

    2017-01-01

    The Ten-year Urban Forestry Action Plan: 2016-2026 was published in September, 2015 (see http://www.urbanforestry.subr.edu/FinalActionPlan_Complete_11_17_15.pdf). This 260 page heavily illustrated document was prepared by the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (NUCFAC) under leadership and funding from the USDA Forest Service. The Plan's...

  15. Top-Ten IT Issues, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Debra H.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    EDUCAUSE presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the higher education institution, as revealed by the ninth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. This year, "Security" moves back to the top of the list. (Contains 20 notes.)

  16. Ideas from Ten North American Curriculum Thinkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Edmund C.

    The views and attitudes of ten North American educational policy-makers concerning curriculum development and design are presented. The theories and research of Herbert M. Kliebard, Fenwick W. English, Walter Werner, John I. Goodlad, Decker F. Walker, William A. Reid, Norman E. Gleadow, Neil Postman, Elliot W. Eisner, and Michael W. Apple are…

  17. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  18. 'Top Ten' Principles for Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ray

    1986-01-01

    Lists ten prinicples for teaching reading in English as a second language. Some of these principles are: (1) an interesting text is vital; (2) the primary activity of a reading lesson should be learners' reading texts; (3) classroom procedure should reflect the purposeful task-based, interactive nature of reading. (SED)

  19. Ten years of commercial photovoltaic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reviews the author's experience during the ten year period 1972 to 1982. Examples of type and size of photovoltaic systems deployed each year year during this period are given. A table of average photovoltaic module prices and volume is summarized at the end of the paper.

  20. Lightcurve Analysis for Ten Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalnuovo, Giovanni Battista

    2017-07-01

    Photometric observations of ten main-belt asteroids, 2854 Rawson, 3113 Chizhevskij, 5318 Dientzenhofer, (5563) 1991 VZ1, 7143 Haramura, 10421 Dalmatin, (11386) 1998 TA18, (18429) 1994 AO1, (23496) 1991 VN3, and (31782) 1999 KM6 were made at the Eurac Observatory (MPC C62). Results of lightcurve analysis are presented.

  1. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  2. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  3. Leading Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Heynderickx, James

    Chapter 13 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers suggestions to help educators improve their performance in meetings, both as group leaders and as participants. Well-run meetings can rejuvenate an organization, leading to improved teamwork, communication, and morale. A poor meeting, on the other hand, can have a…

  4. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Top Ten Problems in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    In 1900 the world-renowned mathematician David Hilbert presented twenty-three problems at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. These problems have inspired mathematicians throughout the last century. As a piece of millennial madness, all participants of the Strings 2000 Conference were invited to help formulate the ten most important unsolved problems in fundamental physics. Each participant was allowed to submit one candidate problem for consideration. To qualify, the problem must not only have been important but also well-defined and stated in a clear way. The best ten problems were selected at the end of the conference by a selection panel consisting of David Gross, Edward Witten and myself.

  6. Top Ten Problems in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2001-04-01

    In 1900 the world-renowned mathematician David Hilbert presented twenty-three problems at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. These problems have inspired mathematicians throughout the last century. As a piece of millennial madness, all participants of the Strings 2000 Conference were invited to help formulate the ten most important unsolved problems in fundamental physics. Each participant was allowed to submit one candidate problem for consideration. To qualify, the problem must not only have been important but also well-defined and stated in a clear way. The best ten problems were selected at the end of the conference by a selection panel consisting of David Gross, Edward Witten and myself.

  7. Ten year planetary ephemeris: 1986-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, F.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate geocentric positions are tabulated at five day intervals for the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune during the ten year period 1986 through 1995. The apparent angular diameters, radial velocities, declinations and mean times of meridian transit of the seven planets and the Sun are graphically depicted for each year in the interval. Appendices are included which discuss the theory of planetary orbits and a FORTRAN program for calculating planetary ephemerides.

  8. Water Sustainability Assessment for Ten Army Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-26

    Limiting water conservation to the requirements of EO 13514 encou- rages installations to reach for the low hanging fruit . Technologies that have...ER D C/ CE RL T R- 11 -5 Water Sustainability Assessment for Ten Army Installations Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es...March 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CERL TR-11-5 March 2011 Water Sustainability Assessment

  9. Photoelectrical encoder employing an optical grating

    SciTech Connect

    Kabaya, Y.

    1985-02-12

    A photoelectrical encoder is disclosed wherein a physical quantity is detected from brightness obtained by moving a first and a second scale. Each scale is provided thereon with an optical grating relative to each other. The grating in one of the scales is constructed such that a first signal lead-out material layer made of a light shielding conductive material, a PN semiconductor layer for converting light into electricity, and a second signal lead-out material layer made of a light transmitting conductive material are laminated on a light transmitting base member to form a narrow belt-shaped light receiving portion and a plurality of narrow belt-shaped light receiving portions arranged at regular pitches. Against the light from the light transmitting base member, the light receiving portions function as light shielding slits, and intervals between the light receiving portions are formed into light transmitting slits.

  10. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for the correlation coefficients between the subjective ratings on the ten positive emotions per film clip and the corresponding EEG spectral powers in different frequency bands. Based on the similarities of the participants’ ratings on the ten positive emotions, these emotions were further clustered into three representative clusters, as ‘encouragement’ for awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, pride, ‘playfulness’ for amusement, joy, interest, and ‘harmony’ for love, serenity. Using the EEG spectral powers as features, both the binary classification on the higher and lower ratings on these positive emotions and the binary classification between the three positive emotion clusters, achieved accuracies of approximately 80% and above. To our knowledge, our study provides the first piece of evidence on the EEG correlates of different positive emotions. PMID:28184194

  12. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  13. Ten Commandments Revisited: A Ten-Year Perspective on the Industrial Application of Formal Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Jonathan P.; Hinchey, Michael G.

    2005-01-01

    Ten years ago, our 1995 paper Ten Commandments of Formal Methods suggested some guidelines to help ensure the success of a formal methods project. It proposed ten important requirements (or "commandments") for formal developers to consider and follow, based on our knowledge of several industrial application success stories, most of which have been reported in more detail in two books. The paper was surprisingly popular, is still widely referenced, and used as required reading in a number of formal methods courses. However, not all have agreed with some of our commandments, feeling that they may not be valid in the long-term. We re-examine the original commandments ten years on, and consider their validity in the light of a further decade of industrial best practice and experiences.

  14. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  15. Who Leads China's Leading Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the major characteristics of two different groups of institutional leaders in China's leading universities. The study begins with a review of relevant literature and theory. Then, there is a brief introduction to the selection of party secretaries, deputy secretaries, presidents and vice presidents in leading…

  16. Who Leads China's Leading Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the major characteristics of two different groups of institutional leaders in China's leading universities. The study begins with a review of relevant literature and theory. Then, there is a brief introduction to the selection of party secretaries, deputy secretaries, presidents and vice presidents in leading…

  17. Holographically Encoded Volume Phase Masks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    yÞAg; (6) where à and B̃ are the Fourier transforms of A and B, respec- tively, and fx and fy are the spatial frequencies along the x and y axes...collimated and directed onto a reflecting spatial light modulator (SLM). Applying the SLM encoding technique by Arrizón et al.,42 the incident beam was...converted into the LP11 and LP21 HOMs. These modes were selected because their spatial phase pattern match the HPM with the encoded four-sector binary

  18. Ten Take Home Lessons from the First Ten Years of the CTN and Ten Recommendations for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Ball, Samuel A.; Jackson, Ron; Martino, Steve; Petry, Nancy M.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    The first ten years of the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network (CTN) yielded a wealth of data on the effectiveness of a number of behavioral, pharmacologic, and combined approaches in community based settings. As an introduction to this Special Issue on the CTN, we summarize some of the methodological contributions and lessons learned from the behavioral trials conducted during its first ten years, including the capacity and enormous potential of this national research infrastructure; contributions to the methodology of effectiveness research; new insights from secondary analyses; the extent to which approaches with strong evidence bases, such as contingency management, extend their effectiveness to real world clinical settings; new data on ‘standard treatment’ as actually practiced in community programs, the extent to which retention remains a major issue in the field; important data on the safety of specific behavioral therapies for addiction; and heightened the importance of continued sustained attention to bridging the gap between treatment and research. Possible areas of focus for the CTN’s future include defining common outcome measures to be used in treatment outcome studies for illicit drugs; incorporating performance indicators and measures of clinical significance; conducting comparative outcome studies; contributing to the understanding of effective treatments of comorbidity; reaching underserved populations; building implementation science; understanding long-term outcomes of current treatments and sustaining treatment effects; and conducting future trials more efficiently. PMID:21854269

  19. Design of a CAN bus interface for photoelectric encoder in the spaceflight camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Wan, Qiu-hua; She, Rong-hong; Zhao, Chang-hai; Jiang, Yong

    2009-05-01

    In order to make photoelectric encoder usable in a spaceflight camera which adopts CAN bus as the communication method, CAN bus interface of the photoelectric encoder is designed in this paper. CAN bus interface hardware circuit of photoelectric encoder consists of CAN bus controller SJA 1000, CAN bus transceiver TJA1050 and singlechip. CAN bus interface controlling software program is completed in C language. A ten-meter shield twisted pair line is used as the transmission medium in the spaceflight camera, and speed rate is 600kbps.The experiments show that: the photoelectric encoder with CAN bus interface which has the advantages of more reliability, real-time, transfer rate and transfer distance overcomes communication line's shortcomings of classical photoelectric encoder system. The system works well in automatic measuring and controlling system.

  20. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for labour pain.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Because TENS is applied inconsistently and not always in line with optimal TENS application theory, this may explain why TENS for labour pain appears to be effective in some individuals and not in others. This article reviews TENS theory, advises upon optimal TENS application for labour pain and discusses some of the limitations of TENS research on labour pain. TENS application for labour pain may include TENS applied to either side of the lower spine, set to 200 mus pulse duration and 100 pulses per second. As pain increases, TENS intensity should be increased and as pain decreases, TENS intensity should be reduced to maintain a strong but pain free intensity of stimulation. This application may particularly reduce back pain during labour.

  1. How Infants Encode Spatial Extent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Sean; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Levine, Susan; Duffy, Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how infants encode an object's spatial extent. We habituated 6.5-month-old infants to a dowel inside a container and then tested whether they dishabituate to a change in absolute size when the relation between dowel and container is held constant (by altering the size of both container and dowel) and when the relation changes…

  2. Encoding Standards for Linguistic Corpora.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    The demand for extensive reusability of large language text collections for natural languages processing research requires development of standardized encoding formats. Such formats must be capable of representing different kinds of information across the spectrum of text types and languages, capable of representing different levels of…

  3. Encoding Ownership Types in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Nicholas; Noble, James

    Ownership types systems organise the heap into a hierarchy which can be used to support encapsulation properties, effects, and invariants. Ownership types have many applications including parallelisation, concurrency, memory management, and security. In this paper, we show that several flavours and extensions of ownership types can be entirely encoded using the standard Java type system.

  4. Spectrally-encoded color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a technique for ultraminiature endoscopy that encodes each spatial location on the sample with a different wavelength. One limitation of previous incarnations of SEE is that it inherently creates monochromatic images, since the spectral bandwidth is expended in the spatial encoding process. Here we present a spectrally-encoded imaging system that has color imaging capability. The new imaging system utilizes three distinct red, green, and blue spectral bands that are configured to illuminate the grating at different incident angles. By careful selection of the incident angles, the three spectral bands can be made to overlap on the sample. To demonstrate the method, a bench-top system was built, comprising a 2400-lpmm grating illuminated by three 525-μm-diameter beams with three different spectral bands. Each spectral band had a bandwidth of 75 nm, producing 189 resolvable points. A resolution target, color phantoms, and excised swine small intestine were imaged to validate the system's performance. The color SEE system showed qualitatively and quantitatively similar color imaging performance to that of a conventional digital camera. PMID:19688002

  5. Ten steps to successful poster presentation.

    PubMed

    Hardicre, Jayne; Devitt, Patric; Coad, Jane

    Receiving a letter confirming acceptance for you to present a poster at a conference can evoke mixed emotions. Joy, panic, fear and dread are among the many possible emotions and this is not exclusive to first time presenters. Developing an effective poster presentation is a skill that you can learn and can provide a rewarding way to present your work in a manner less intimidating than oral presentation (Shelledy, 2004). The key to successful poster presentation is meticulous, timely, well informed preparation. This article outlines ten steps to help guide you through the process to maximize your success.

  6. Ten new withanolides from Physalis peruviana.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng-Tao; Liu, Ji-Kai; Li, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Ten new withanolides, including four perulactone-type withanolides, perulactones E-H (1-4), three 28-hydroxy-withanolides, withaperuvins I-K (5-7), and three other withanolides, withaperuvins L-N (8-10), together with six known compounds (11-16) were isolated from the aerial parts of Physalis peruviana. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses (1D and 2D NMR, IR, HR-MS) and chemical methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ten steps to successful conference presentations.

    PubMed

    Hardicre, Jayne; Coad, Jane; Devitt, Patric

    Delivering an oral presentation at a conference can be a demanding yet exhilarating experience. It can create a variety of emotions such as excitement, joy and achievement--but for many the overriding emotions are those of anxiety, fear and dread. A certain amount of nervousness can enhance your performance but how can you avoid pre-presentation nerves developing into full-blown anxiety and fear. The key to successful conference presentation is meticulous preparation and practise. This article guides you through ten steps to help maximize your success and enjoyment.

  8. Ten financial management principles for survival.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O

    1988-03-01

    Financial insolvency is the primary cause of hospital failure. Managers may analyze a hospital's financial statements to anticipate and prevent fiscal problems. Ten measures of fiscal status may be used to evaluate the following: operating profitability nonoperating income equity growth liquidity debt capacity age of facilities revenue generation replacement funds receivables survivability Based on data from the Financial Analysis Service, Catholic hospitals are doing better than other U.S. hospitals in some areas of financial preparedness. In most areas, however, all hospitals suffer by comparison with manufacturers. The 10 principles of solvent and successful operations can help hospitals improve financial resiliency.

  9. Permutation-invariant codes encoding more than one qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yingkai; Fitzsimons, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    A permutation-invariant code on m qubits is a subspace of the symmetric subspace of the m qubits. We derive permutation-invariant codes that can encode an increasing amount of quantum information while suppressing leading-order spontaneous decay errors. To prove the result, we use elementary number theory with prior theory on permutation-invariant codes and quantum error correction.

  10. Position and Velocity Measurement by Optical Shaft Encoders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-23

    are 90 deg. out of phase with each other. A leads B for one direction of rotation and B leads A for the other. Thee quadrature waveforms can be...minimum at a point 180 degrees away. The output of an Optical Sensor due to this light intensity is modulated in a quasi-sinusoidal fashion. The Moire...VELOCITY POOSITION ANALOG VELOCIT FIG.4. POSITIN AND VELOCITY MEAURNTSYSE ( BOC DRIVERAS UP - DOWNLAC COUNTERSSUFR A ~STTE I on DATA BUS ENCODER SELECT

  11. Morphological Encoding in German Children's Language Production: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessen, Anna; Fleischhauer, Elisabeth; Clahsen, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This study reports developmental changes in morphological encoding across late childhood. We examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) during the silent production of regularly vs. irregularly inflected verb forms (viz. "-t" vs. "-n" participles of German) in groups of eight- to ten-year-olds, eleven- to…

  12. 47 CFR 76.1906 - Encoding rules for undefined business models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Encoding rules for undefined business models... facts or considerations relied on. Replies shall be due ten (10) days from the date for filing a... earlier release windows, more favorable terms, innovation or original programming, outweighs...

  13. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work.

    PubMed

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Booth, Andrew; Ariss, Steven; Smith, Tony; Enderby, Pam; Roots, Alison

    2013-05-10

    Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate.

  14. Ten Years of Infrasound Observation in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Il; Che, Il-Young; Kim, Tae Sung

    2010-05-01

    Over the ten years after the installation of our first seismo-acoustic array station (CHNAR) in September 1999, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) has been continuously observing infrasound with an infrasound array network, named KIN (Korean Infrasound Network) in Korea. This network consists of seven seismo-acoustic arrays (BRDAR, KMPAR, CHNAR, YAGAR, KSGAR, ULDAR and TJIAR). The aperture size of the smallest array (KMPAR and TJIAR) is about 300m and the largest is about 1.4km. The number of acoustic gauges are between 4 (TJIAR) and 18 (YAGAR), and 1 or 5 seismometers are collocated at the center of the acoustic array. All seismic and infrasonic signals of the arrays are digitized at 40 samples/sec and transmitted to KIGAM in real time. Many interesting infrasound signals associated with different kind of anthropogenic source as well as natural one are detected by KIN. Ten years of seismo-acoustic data are analyzed by using PMCC program, and identified more than five thousand of infrasonic events and catalogued in our infrasound database. This database is used to study characteristics of seasonally dependent propagation of the infrasound wave in local scale, as well as to better understand how atmospheric condition affects the detection ratio at a specific station throughout the year. It also played a valuable role in discriminating the anthropogenic events such as the second nuclear test on 25 May 2009 in North Korea, from natural earthquakes, which is important in estimating the seismicity in Korea.

  15. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. Method This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Results Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. Conclusions We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate. PMID:23663329

  16. Phenotypic characterization of ten methanol oxidation (Mox) mutant classes in methylobacterium AM1

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, D.N.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five methanol oxidation mutants of the facultative methylotroph Methylobacterium strain AM1 have been characterized by complementation analysis and assigned to ten complementation groups, Mox A1,A2,A3 and B-H. We have characterized each of the mutants belonging to the ten Mox complementation groups by PMS-DCPIP dye linked methanol dehydrogenase activity, by methanol-dependent whole cell oxygen consumption, by the presence or absence of methanol dehydrogenase protein by SDS-polyacrylamide gels and Western blotting, by the absorption spectra of purified mutant methanol dehydrogenase proteins and by the presence or absence of the soluble cytochrome c proteins of Methylobacterium AM1. We propose functions for each of the genes deficient in the mutants of the ten Mox complementation groups. These functions include two linked genes that encode the methanol dehydrogenase structural protein and the soluble cytochrome c/sub L/, a gene encoding a secretion function essential for the synthesis and export of methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c/sub L/, three gene functions responsible for the proper association of the PQQ prosthetic group with the methanol dehydrogenase apoprotein and four positive regulatory gene functions controlling the expression of the ability to oxidize methanol. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ten dimensions of public-sector managed care.

    PubMed

    Hoge, M A; Jacobs, S; Thakur, N M; Griffith, E E

    1999-01-01

    Managed care in the public sector remains a poorly defined concept. It is currently understood largely through case examples, an approach of limited usefulness because each managed care initiative is shaped by local forces and is constantly changing. The authors describe ten key dimensions on which such initiatives vary and suggest that they can be used to examine essential characteristics of the initiatives and core differences between them. The dimensions are objectives, scope, organizational structures and authority, enrollment, benefit package, strategies for managing utilization, best practices, financing, quality management and outcomes measurement, and the impact of the initiative on the public mental health system. Using these dimensions to assess existing initiatives, the authors conclude that most focus on one principal dimension to the exclusion of other critical dimensions. The authors argue for a comprehensive approach to planning and implementing managed care projects that should ultimately lead to better care for public-sector populations.

  18. Study Results from the Clinical Trials Network’s First Ten Years: Where Do They Lead?

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Elizabeth A.; Saxon, Andrew J.; Calsyn, Donald A.; Jackson, Thomas R.; Donovan, Dennis M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) began in 2000 with the goal of “improv[ing] the quality of drug abuse treatment throughout the country using science as the vehicle.” Since then, 24 discrete clinical trials were launched, 20 are completed, and 15 have published main outcome papers. Of the latter, four tested pharmacological treatment, eight, psychosocial/behavioral treatment, one, a combination of medication and counseling, and two targeted HIV/HCV risk behavior. We review main study findings for these trials, including treatment retention, substance use or risk behavior outcomes, and secondary outcomes when analyzed. The purpose of this review is to identify the incremental progress toward improving drug treatment made by these trials and to propose next steps for the CTN and for the field arising from these studies. The CTN provides a unique opportunity to systematically design trials that incorporate treatment improvements from previous trials and to direct efforts toward innovations most likely to be incorporated into practice. PMID:20307792

  19. Neutral details associated with emotional events are encoded: evidence from a cued recall paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Knight, Aubrey G; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    Enhanced emotional memory often comes at the cost of memory for surrounding background information. Narrowed-encoding theories suggest that this is due to narrowed attention for emotional information at encoding, leading to impaired encoding of background information. Recent work has suggested that an encoding-based theory may be insufficient. Here, we examined whether cued recall-instead of previously used recognition memory tasks-would reveal evidence that non-emotional information associated with emotional information was effectively encoded. Participants encoded positive, negative, or neutral objects on neutral backgrounds. At retrieval, they were given either the item or the background as a memory cue and were asked to recall the associated scene element. Counter to narrowed-encoding theories, emotional items were more likely than neutral items to trigger recall of the associated background. This finding suggests that there is a memory trace of this contextual information and that emotional cues may facilitate retrieval of this information.

  20. The ecotoxicology of lead shot and lead fishing weights.

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, A M; Norris, S L

    1996-10-01

    : Lead shot ingestion is the primary source of elevated lead exposure and poisoning in waterfowl and most other bird species. For some species (e.g. Common Loons, Gavia immer), lead sinker ingestion is a more frequent cause of lead poisoning. In freshwater environments where recreational angling activity and loon populations co-occur, lead poisoning from ingestion of small (<50 gram) lead sinkers or jigs accounts for 10-50% of recorded adult loon mortality, depending on the locations studied. Lead shot ingestion occurs in waterfowl, and in a wide variety of non-waterfowl species, including upland game birds, shorebirds, raptors, and scavengers. Where it has been explicitly studied in Canada and the US, lead poisoning mortality of bald (Haliacetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysactos) from eating prey animals with lead shot embedded in their tissues accounts for an estimated 10-15% of the recorded post-fledging mortality in these raptorial species. In addition to environments that experience hunting with lead shot, clay target shooting ranges, especially those in which the shotfall zones include ponds, marshes, lakes, rivers, beaches, or other aquatic-type environments, create a significant risk of shot ingestion and poisoning for waterbirds. Metallic lead pellets deposited onto soils and aquatic sediments are not chemically or environmentally inert, although tens or hundreds of years may be required for total breakdown and dissolution of pellets. Functional, affordable non-toxic alternatives to lead shot and sinkers are being currently produced, and additional such products are being developed. Several countries have successfully banned the use of small lead sinkers, and of lead shot for waterfowl and other hunting, also for clay target shooting, using a phasing-out process that gives manufactures, sellers, and users adequate time to adjust to the regulations.

  1. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  2. Spacelab - Ten years of international cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignier, M.; Harrington, J. C.; Sander, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of the Spacelab program are reviewed, with a focus on the cooperative relationship between ESA and NASA. The initial decision to undertake the program and the three agreements signed to begin its implementation are examined, and the division of responsibilities and financial contributions is discussed insofar as it affected the management structure. Consideration is given to the major facilities, the 50-mission operational cycle, communications, the currently scheduled activities (through 1985), the prospective later uses, and the ten dedicated discipline laboratories. The importance of continuous mutual support during the planning and development phases is stressed. The program so far is considered a success, in terms of the goals set by the participants and in terms of the resolution of the problems inherent in international technological endeavors.

  3. Introduction: Spitzer -- The Next Ten Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope passed its ten-year launch anniversary in August 2013 marking a decade of exciting, ground-breaking infrared science programs. The observatory excels at observations aimed at characterizing exoplanets, brown dwarf weather, and studies of the high-redshift universe, and continues to support programs across a wide spectrum of astrophysical disciplines. The science synergy with other NASA missions continues to be outstanding. The current engineering assessment shows that Spitzer can continue operations into at least 2017. The talks in this special session highlight the current state of the art of Spitzer science programs in the fields of high-redshift galaxies, high-redshift clusters, exoplanets, and stellar variability. The speakers will also look to the future when Spitzer will have ceased to operate but will continue to have a substantial scientific impact.

  4. Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    The meeting "Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After" took place at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA June 27-28, 2003. The meeting was sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Women of the American Astronomical Society and was attended by about 155 participants. The purpose of the meeting was: "To review the current status of women in astronomy, understand their work environment, assess development since the 1992 Baltimore conference, and recommend future actions that will improve the environment for all astronomers." A description of the meeting and its background can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/WIA2003.html. The proceedings are being edited by Profs. Meg Urry (Yale University) and Ran Bagenal (University of Colorado). The principal outcome of WIAII was a series of recommendations, "The Pasadena Recommendations", which have been approved by the AAS Council and which can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/.

  5. Periprosthetic Knee Infection: Ten Strategies That Work

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla Ku; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most serious complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The demand for TKA is rapidly increasing, resulting in a subsequent increase in infections involving knee prosthesis. Despite the existence of common management practices, the best approach for several aspects in the management of periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. This review examines the current understanding in the management of the following aspects of PJI: preoperative risk stratification, preoperative antibiotics, preoperative skin preparation, outpatient diagnosis, assessing for infection in revision cases, improving culture utility, irrigation and debridement, one and two-stage revision, and patient prognostic information. Moreover, ten strategies for the management of periprosthetic knee infection based on available literature, and experience of the authors were reviewed. PMID:24368992

  6. Ten thousand revolutions: conjectures about civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, Kathryn

    2011-02-01

    Ten thousand years ago, no-one on Earth was living a "civilized" life. What has happened since is remarkable and impossible to fully comprehend; yet, everyone has ideas about civilization, and how the world came to be as it is. Such understandings of civilizations on Earth inevitably influence speculation about extraterrestrial civilizations, in two ways. First, sometimes a specific Earth civilization or historical experience is explicitly used as a basis for inferences about extraterrestrial civilizations. Second, more general assumptions about the development and functioning of Earth's societies shape conjectures about alien societies. This paper focuses on the latter, general assumptions, with the aim of considering how we can use multidisciplinary approaches, and our knowledge of Earth's civilizations, to our best advantage in SETI.

  7. The ten grand challenges of synthetic life.

    PubMed

    Porcar, Manuel; Danchin, Antoine; de Lorenzo, Victor; Dos Santos, Vitor A; Krasnogor, Natalio; Rasmussen, Steen; Moya, Andrés

    2011-06-01

    The construction of artificial life is one of the main scientific challenges of the Synthetic Biology era. Advances in DNA synthesis and a better understanding of regulatory processes make the goal of constructing the first artificial cell a realistic possibility. This would be both a fundamental scientific milestone and a starting point of a vast range of applications, from biofuel production to drug design. However, several major issues might hamper the objective of achieving an artificial cell. From the bottom-up to the selection-based strategies, this work encompasses the ten grand challenges synthetic biologists will have to be aware of in order to cope with the task of creating life in the lab.

  8. Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    The meeting "Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After" took place at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA June 27-28, 2003. The meeting was sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Women of the American Astronomical Society and was attended by about 155 participants. The purpose of the meeting was: "To review the current status of women in astronomy, understand their work environment, assess development since the 1992 Baltimore conference, and recommend future actions that will improve the environment for all astronomers." A description of the meeting and its background can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/WIA2003.html. The proceedings are being edited by Profs. Meg Urry (Yale University) and Ran Bagenal (University of Colorado). The principal outcome of WIAII was a series of recommendations, "The Pasadena Recommendations", which have been approved by the AAS Council and which can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/.

  9. Analysis of Ten Reverse Engineering Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Jussi; Lehmonen, Tero

    Reverse engineering tools can be used in satisfying the information needs of software maintainers. Especially in case of maintaining large-scale legacy systems tool support is essential. Reverse engineering tools provide various kinds of capabilities to provide the needed information to the tool user. In this paper we analyze the provided capabilities in terms of four aspects: provided data structures, visualization mechanisms, information request specification mechanisms, and navigation features. We provide a compact analysis of ten representative reverse engineering tools for supporting C, C++ or Java: Eclipse Java Development Tools, Wind River Workbench (for C and C++), Understand (for C++), Imagix 4D, Creole, Javadoc, Javasrc, Source Navigator, Doxygen, and HyperSoft. The results of the study supplement the earlier findings in this important area.

  10. Spacelab - Ten years of international cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignier, M.; Harrington, J. C.; Sander, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of the Spacelab program are reviewed, with a focus on the cooperative relationship between ESA and NASA. The initial decision to undertake the program and the three agreements signed to begin its implementation are examined, and the division of responsibilities and financial contributions is discussed insofar as it affected the management structure. Consideration is given to the major facilities, the 50-mission operational cycle, communications, the currently scheduled activities (through 1985), the prospective later uses, and the ten dedicated discipline laboratories. The importance of continuous mutual support during the planning and development phases is stressed. The program so far is considered a success, in terms of the goals set by the participants and in terms of the resolution of the problems inherent in international technological endeavors.

  11. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  12. Ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide toxins from mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jonathan D; Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic peptide toxins of poisonous Amanita mushrooms are chemically unique among known natural products. Furthermore, they differ from other fungal cyclic peptides in being synthesized on ribosomes instead of by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Because of their novel structures and biogenic origins, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of the Amanita cyclic peptides presents both challenges and opportunities. In particular, a full understanding of the pathway should lead to the ability to direct synthesis of a large number of novel cyclic peptides based on the Amanita toxin scaffold by genetic engineering of the encoding genes. Here, we highlight some of the principal methods for working with the Amanita cyclic peptides and the known steps in their biosynthesis.

  13. Simultaneous determination of ten preservatives in ten kinds of foods by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Jing; Xie, Na; Zhao, Shan; Wu, Yu-Chen; Li, Jiang; Wang, Zhi

    2015-08-15

    An improved micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography method (MEKC) for the simultaneous determination of ten preservatives in ten different kinds of food samples was reported. An uncoated fused-silica capillary with 50 μm i.d. and 70 cm total length was used. Under the optimized conditions, the linear response was observed in the range of 1.2-200mg/L for the analytes. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and limits of quantitation (LOQ, S/N=10) ranging from 0.4 to 0.5mg/L and 1.2 to 1.5mg/L, respectively were obtained. The method was used for the determination of sorbic and benzoic acids in two FAPAS® (Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme) proficiency test samples (jam and chocolate cake). The results showed that the current method with simple sample pretreatment and small reagent consumption could meet the needs for routine analysis of the ten preservatives in ten types of food products.

  14. Use of tens in pain management: part two--how to use tens.

    PubMed

    Poole, Debbie

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used in pain management but its effectiveness depends on the stimulation being targeted appropriately. This article, the second in a two-part series, outlines how to set up and use a TENS machine to achieve the most effective results.

  15. Humanities and Social Sciences Books of Ten National Disciplinary Associations, 2000-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberley, Stephen E., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Books are the most important medium of communication in the humanities, a major medium in the social sciences, and a central component of academic library collections. This study examined humanities and social sciences books that won prizes from ten leading United States disciplinary associations between 2000 and 2009. The study extends earlier…

  16. Humanities and Social Sciences Books of Ten National Disciplinary Associations, 2000-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberley, Stephen E., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Books are the most important medium of communication in the humanities, a major medium in the social sciences, and a central component of academic library collections. This study examined humanities and social sciences books that won prizes from ten leading United States disciplinary associations between 2000 and 2009. The study extends earlier…

  17. Ten Years of ENA Imaging from Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus; Mitchell, Donald; Westlake, Joseph; Carbary, James; Paranicas, Christopher; Mauk, Barry; Krimigis, Stamatios

    2014-05-01

    In this presentation we will provide a detailed review of the science highlights of the ENA observations obtained by The Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) on board Cassini. Since the launch of Cassini, INCA has unveiled an invisible world of hot plasma and neutral gas of the two biggest objects of our solar system: the giant magnetosphere of Jupiter and Saturn. Although more than ten years ago, INCA captured the first ENA images of the Jovian system revealing magnetospheric dynamics and an asymmetric Europa neutral gas torus. Approaching Saturn, INCA observed variability of Saturn's magnetospheric activity in response to changes in solar wind dynamic pressure, which was contrary to expectations and current theories. In orbit around Saturn, INCA continued the surprises including the first imaging and global characterization of Titan's exosphere extended out to its gravitational Hill sphere; recurring injections correlating with periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) bursts and magnetic field perturbations; and the discovery of energetic ionospheric outflow. Perhaps most significant, and the focal point of this presentation, is INCA's contribution to the understanding of global magnetospheric particle acceleration and transport, where the combination between ENA imaging and in-situ measurements have demonstrated that transport and acceleration of plasma is likely to occur in a two-step process. First, large-scale injections in the post-midnight sector accelerate and transport plasma in to about 12 RS up to energies of several hundreds of keV. Second, centrifugal interchange acts on the plasma inside of this region and provides further heating and transport in to about 6RS. We discuss this finding in the context of the two fundamental types of injections (or ENA intensifications) that INCA has revealed during its ten years of imaging. The first type is large-scale injections appearing beyond 12 RS in the post-midnight sector that have in many cases had an inward component

  18. Cortical Reinstatement Mediates the Relationship Between Content-Specific Encoding Activity and Subsequent Recollection Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Alan M.; Rissman, Jesse; Kiani, Roozbeh; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic recollection entails the conscious remembrance of event details associated with previously encountered stimuli. Recollection depends on both the establishment of cortical representations of event features during stimulus encoding and the cortical reinstatement of these representations at retrieval. Here, we used multivoxel pattern analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data to examine how cortical and hippocampal activity at encoding and retrieval drive recollective memory decisions. During encoding, words were associated with face or scene source contexts. At retrieval, subjects were cued to recollect the source associate of each presented word. Neurally derived estimates of encoding strength and pattern reinstatement in occipitotemporal cortex were computed for each encoding and retrieval trial, respectively. Analyses demonstrated that (1) cortical encoding strength predicted subsequent memory accuracy and reaction time, (2) encoding strength predicted encoding-phase hippocampal activity, and (3) encoding strength and retrieval-phase hippocampal activity predicted the magnitude of cortical reinstatement. Path analyses further indicated that cortical reinstatement partially mediated both the effect of cortical encoding strength and the effect of retrieval-phase hippocampal activity on subsequent source memory performance. Taken together, these results indicate that memory-guided decisions are driven in part by a pathway leading from hippocampally linked cortical encoding of event attributes to hippocampally linked cortical reinstatement at retrieval. PMID:23921785

  19. Degradation of Cortical Representations during Encoding following Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Poh, Jia-Hou; Chee, Michael W L

    2017-02-01

    A night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) reduces task-related activation of fronto-parietal and higher visual cortical areas. As this reduction in activation corresponds to impaired attention and perceptual processing, it might also be associated with poorer memory encoding. Related animal work has established that cortical columns stochastically enter an 'off' state in sleep deprivation, leading to predictions that neural representations are less stable and distinctive following TSD. To test these predictions participants incidentally encoded scene images while undergoing fMRI, either during rested wakefulness (RW) or after TSD. In scene-selective PPA, TSD reduced stability of neural representations across repetition. This was accompanied by poorer subsequent memory. Greater representational stability benefitted subsequent memory in RW but not TSD. Even for items subsequently recognized, representational distinctiveness was lower in TSD, suggesting that quality of encoding is degraded. Reduced representational stability and distinctiveness are two novel mechanisms by which TSD can contribute to poorer memory formation.

  20. Subversion of cytokine networks by virally encoded decoy receptors

    PubMed Central

    Epperson, Megan L.; Lee, Chung A.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary During the course of evolution, viruses have captured or created a diverse array of open reading frames that encode for proteins that serve to evade and sabotage the host innate and adaptive immune responses, which would otherwise lead to their elimination. These viral genomes are some of the best textbooks of immunology ever written. The established arsenal of immunomodulatory proteins encoded by viruses is large and growing and includes specificities for virtually all known inflammatory pathways and targets. The focus of this review is on herpes and poxvirus-encoded cytokine and chemokine binding proteins that serve to undermine the coordination of host immune surveillance. Structural and mechanistic studies of these decoy receptors have provided a wealth of information, not only about viral pathogenesis but also about the inner workings of cytokine signaling networks. PMID:23046131

  1. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  2. NRZ Data Asymmetry Corrector and Convolutional Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfiffner, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit compensates for timing, amplitude and symmetry perturbations. Data asymmetry corrector and convolutional encoder regenerate data and clock signals in spite of signal variations such as data or clock asymmetry, phase errors, and amplitude variations, then encode data for transmission.

  3. Novel optical encoder for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Mueller, Ulrich; Brac-de-la-Perriere, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    We are presenting a new optical encoder architecture for shaft encoding, both in incremental and absolute modes. This encoder is based on a diffractive optics technology platform. We have developed various disk based rotary diffractive encoders previously. This encoder is different in the way it is not a disk composed of successive gratings or computer generated holograms, but rather composed of a single element placed on the shaft. It is thus best suited for hollow shaft or end of shaft applications such as in encoder controlled electrical motors. This new architecture aims at solving some of the problems encountered with previous implementations of diffractive encoders such as disk wobble, disk to shaft centering and also encoding in harsh environments.

  4. Terahertz wavelength encoding compressive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) compressive imaging can obtain two dimensional image with a single or linear detector, which can overcome the bottleneck problem of lacking of THz two dimensional detectors. In this presentation, we propose a method to obtain two dimensional images using a linear detector. A plano-convex cylindrical lens is employed to perform Fourier transform and to encode one dimensional information of an object into wavelengths. After recording, both amplitude and phase information for different frequency at each pixel of the line detector are extracted, two dimensional image of the object can be reconstructed. Numerical simulation demonstrates the validity of the proposed method.

  5. Ten tips for authors of scientific articles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Tae

    2014-08-01

    Writing a good quality scientific article takes experience and skill. I propose 'Ten Tips' that may help to improve the quality of manuscripts for scholarly journals. It is advisable to draft first version of manuscript and revise it repeatedly for consistency and accuracy of the writing. During the drafting and revising the following tips can be considered: 1) focus on design to have proper content, conclusion, points compliant with scope of the target journal, appropriate authors and contributors list, and relevant references from widely visible sources; 2) format the manuscript in accordance with instructions to authors of the target journal; 3) ensure consistency and logical flow of ideas and scientific facts; 4) provide scientific confidence; 5) make your story interesting for your readers; 6) write up short, simple and attractive sentences; 7) bear in mind that properly composed and reflective titles increase chances of attracting more readers; 8) do not forget that well-structured and readable abstracts improve citability of your publications; 9) when revising adhere to the rule of 'First and Last' - open your text with topic paragraph and close it with resolution paragraph; 10) use connecting words linking sentences within a paragraph by repeating relevant keywords.

  6. Ten years of Lusi: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption has continued uninterrupted for ten years, settling into its current steady-state as a quasi-periodic geyser system. Many past, current, and future studies aim to quantify this system, which increasing evidence suggests is a new-born, tectonic scale hydrothermal system linked to the nearby volcano complex. The debate about whether the triggering of Lusi was a natural event of rather caused by drilling continues, but evidence mounts from the behavior of this system that an anthropogenic cause is highly unlikely. Understanding this system is very important because of its social and economic impact on the surrounding communities, and whether it poses future geohazards in the region from future eruptions. A large effort of infrastructures and constant maintenance activity has been and is being conducted inside the 7km2 mud flooded area. This region is framed by a tall embankment that contains the erupted mud and protects the surrounding settlements. This system is also very important for understanding at a larger scale volcanic hydrothermal systems, and to determine whether this new geothermal resource might be exploited. A large effort is underway from an EU-grant supporting the Lusi-Lab project (CEED, University of Oslo) and an SNF grant supporting the University of Neuchatel to study this system from geochemical, geophysical, and modeling perspectives. This review talk summarizes what is known, what is still unclear, and will revisit the behavior of Lusi since its inception.

  7. Ten years of judicial gatekeeping under Daubert.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Joe S

    2005-01-01

    In the ten years since Daubert v Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc, the standards for admissibility at trial of expert testimony in general and scientific evidence in particular have become more demanding. Reviews of recent cases and empirical studies of federal judges' and attorneys' practices indicate that judges are more likely to consider the admissibility of expert evidence prior to trial, to inquire more deeply into the reasoning and methodology that supports the expert opinions, and to limit or exclude such evidence from presentation at trial. Studies of published cases confirm this finding. Recent cases consider more difficult questions arising from the differing methodologies used in various areas of science. The current legal framework that assesses admissibility in terms of professional practice outside the courtroom is poorly suited to cases that require expertise across a wide range of specialties and force judges to choose from among different scientific methodologies. Future research should focus on the pretrial screening of expert testimony and interactions between the attorneys and experts in shaping that testimony.

  8. Ten unanswered questions in multimodal communication.

    PubMed

    Partan, Sarah R

    2013-01-01

    The study of multimodal communication has become an active and vibrant field. This special issue of Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology brings together new developments in this rapidly expanding area. In this final contribution to the special issue, I look to the future and discuss ten questions in need of further work, touching on issues ranging from theoretical modeling and the evolution of behavior to molecular mechanisms and the development of behavior. In particular, I emphasize that the use of multimodal communication allows animals to switch between sensory channels when one channel becomes too noisy, and suggest that a better understanding of this process may help us both to understand the evolution of multisensory signaling and to predict the success of species facing environmental changes that affect signaling channels, such as urbanization and climate change. An expanded section is included on the effects of climate change on animal communication across sensory channels, urging researchers to pursue this topic due to the rapidity with which the environment is currently transforming.

  9. Ten Tips for Authors of Scientific Articles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Writing a good quality scientific article takes experience and skill. I propose 'Ten Tips' that may help to improve the quality of manuscripts for scholarly journals. It is advisable to draft first version of manuscript and revise it repeatedly for consistency and accuracy of the writing. During the drafting and revising the following tips can be considered: 1) focus on design to have proper content, conclusion, points compliant with scope of the target journal, appropriate authors and contributors list, and relevant references from widely visible sources; 2) format the manuscript in accordance with instructions to authors of the target journal; 3) ensure consistency and logical flow of ideas and scientific facts; 4) provide scientific confidence; 5) make your story interesting for your readers; 6) write up short, simple and attractive sentences; 7) bear in mind that properly composed and reflective titles increase chances of attracting more readers; 8) do not forget that well-structured and readable abstracts improve citability of your publications; 9) when revising adhere to the rule of 'First and Last' - open your text with topic paragraph and close it with resolution paragraph; 10) use connecting words linking sentences within a paragraph by repeating relevant keywords. PMID:25120310

  10. Button Osteoma: A Review of Ten Cases.

    PubMed

    Chae, Soo Yuhl; Sim, Hyun Bo; Kim, Min Ji; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won; Lee, Weon Ju

    2015-08-01

    Button osteoma presents as small circumscribed ivory-like lumps on the skull vault. Although not rare, its diagnosis can be challenging for dermatologists. To clarify the clinical characteristics of button osteoma by reviewing 10 cases. Ten patients diagnosed with button osteoma at the Department of Dermatology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, between January 2011 and August 2014 were enrolled. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and analyzed demographic and clinical characteristics including sex, age, sites, number of lesions, symptoms, duration, histopathological finding, radiological findings, and treatment. All patients presented with an asymptomatic small circumscribed hard lump fixed to a bony structure. There were 9 female and 1 male patient, and the mean age was 54 years (range, 28~61 years). The most common site was the forehead, and disease duration ranged from 2 weeks to more than 20 years. The differential diagnosis included cranial exostosis, ballooned osteoma, epidermal cyst, and lipoma. Simple radiography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography (CT) were used to make a confirmative diagnosis. Histopathological findings showed lamellated bony structures with poor vascularization. Ostectomy was performed for 5 patients, and no recurrence was detected within an average of 13.4 months after treatment. This review characterized button osteoma. Surgical excision is a useful therapeutic modality after CT-based diagnosis. Further studies with more patients are required to confirm the findings.

  11. Ten Characteristics of a Good Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    There is a line in Saint-Exupery's "The Little Prince" that applies to any endeavor, but especially teaching. It reads: "That which is essential cannot be seen with the eye. Only with the heart can one know it rightly." The essence of teaching is difficult to qualify, but that line leads directly into the author's most essential criterion. In this…

  12. Schematic driven layout of Reed Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arave, Kari; Canaris, John; Miles, Lowell; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    Two Reed Solomon error correcting encoders are presented. Schematic driven layout tools were used to create the encoder layouts. Special consideration had to be given to the architecture and logic to provide scalability of the encoder designs. Knowledge gained from these projects was used to create a more flexible schematic driven layout system.

  13. Time Course of Grammatical Encoding in Agrammatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jiyeon

    2011-01-01

    Producing a sentence involves encoding a preverbal message into a grammatical structure by retrieving lexical items and integrating them into a functional (semantic-to-grammatical) structure. Individuals with agrammatism are impaired in this grammatical encoding process. However, it is unclear what aspect of grammatical encoding is impaired and…

  14. Kallmann Syndrome: Mutations in the Genes Encoding Prokineticin-2 and Prokineticin Receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Dodé, Catherine; Teixeira, Luis; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Fouveaut, Corinne; Bouchard, Philippe; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Lespinasse, James; Lienhardt-Roussie, Anne; Mathieu, Michèle; Moerman, Alexandre; Morgan, Graeme; Murat, Arnaud; Toublanc, Jean-Edmont; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Delpech, Marc; Petit, Christine; Young, Jacques; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2) and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2), respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome. PMID:17054399

  15. The VLSI design of a single chip Reed-Solomon encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1982-01-01

    A design for a single chip implementation of a Reed-Solomon encoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of a bit serial finite field multiplication algorithm.

  16. [Neurons that encode sound direction].

    PubMed

    Peña, J L

    In the auditory system, the inner ear breaks down complex signals into their spectral components, and encodes the amplitude and phase of each. In order to infer sound direction in space, a computation on each frequency component of the sound must be performed. Space specific neurons in the owl s inferior colliculus respond only to sounds coming from a particular direction and represent the results of this computation. The interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural level difference (ILD define the auditory space for the owl and are processed in separate neural pathways. The parallel pathways that process these cues merge in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus where the space specific neurons are selective to combinations of ITD and ILD. How do inputs from the two sources interact to produce combination selectivity to ITD ILD pairs? A multiplication of postsynaptic potentials tuned to ITD and ILD can account for the subthreshold responses of these neurons to ITD ILD pairs. Examples of multiplication by neurons or neural circuits are scarce, but many computational models assume the existence of this basic operation. The owl s auditory system uses such operation to create a 2 dimensional map of auditory space. The map of space in the owl s auditory system shows important similarities with representations of space in the cerebral cortex and other sensory systems. In encoding space or other stimulus features, individual neurons appear to possess analogous functional properties related to the synthesis of high order receptive fields.

  17. Anxiety and IBS revisited: ten years later

    PubMed Central

    POPA, STEFAN-LUCIAN; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with high prevalence of psychological and psychiatric disorders. However, the association between IBS and each of its subtypes (diarrhea IBS-D, constipation IBS-C, mixed IBS-M) with anxiety still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the association between anxiety and IBS on a period of ten years. Methods PubMed was searched for studies analyzing IBS and anxiety, published at 10 years interval. The study presents a comparative analysis of the articles that were published between 2003–2005 and 2013–2015, investigating the correlation between anxiety and IBS. Results The initial search identified 220 articles, from which 156 were published between 2013 and 2015, and 64 were published between 2003 and 2005. Of these articles, 15 articles were included in the review. Out of these 15 articles, 10 articles analyzed the correlation between anxiety-depression status in IBS patients using specific questionnaires, 2 articles analyzed genetic variables in IBS, 1 article analyzed serotonin and monoamine oxidase levels in IBS, 1 article analyzed serum levels of IL-1β and IL-10 in IBS, 1 article analyzed somatostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in IBS. The result was a review of 15 studies that analyzed the association between IBS and anxiety. Conclusions IBS is a heterogeneous disorder caused by numerous psychological, immunological, infectious, endocrine and genetic factors. In recent years, the number of studies concentrating on genetic factors, cytokines and hormones has increased in comparison with the 2003–2005 period, when clinical investigation, using mainly questionnaires was the essential method. Also, the total number of papers investigating anxiety and IBS, considerably increased. The recent studies have confirmed the fact that IBS symptoms are often exacerbated during stressful events and the psychiatric treatment has a positive

  18. The lead and lead-acid battery industries during 2002 and 2007 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. Y.; Li, A. J.; Finlow, D. E.

    In the past 15 years, the center of the international lead market has shifted to China. China has become the largest producer of raw and refined lead, plus the largest consumer. This paper reviews the status of the lead and lead-acid battery industries in China, including lead mining, lead refining, secondary lead production, the lead-acid battery industry, new opportunities for lead-acid batteries, and the environmental problems associated with lead and lead-acid batteries. The output of raw and refined lead has increased annually in China, and now accounts for more than 30% of the world total. As a result of a change in the Chinese government's policy regarding the export of lead, plus an increase in the price of lead, the profits of Chinese lead manufacturers were significantly reduced, the trade deficit of the Chinese lead industry increased, the operating rates of lead smelter enterprises greatly reduced, and some small enterprises were forced to shut down. At the present time, an increasing number of enterprises have begun to produce secondary lead, and the scale of production has expanded from tens of tons to tens of thousands of tons. In 2006, the output of secondary lead in China reached 700,000 tons, but outdated technology and equipment limited development of the secondary lead industry. Because of serious pollution problems, raw material shortages, and fierce price competition in the battery market, changes in the development of the lead-acid battery industry have been dramatic; approximately one thousand medium-sized and small lead-acid battery producers have been closed in the past 3 years. The output of large lead-acid battery enterprises has not been reduced, however, as a result of their manufacturing technology and equipment being comparable to those in other advanced industrial countries. In China, the flourishing development of electric bicycles, electric tricycles, and photovoltaic energy systems should provide ongoing opportunities for the

  19. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance.

    PubMed

    Wiltzius, Jed J W; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R; Apostol, Marcin I; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-09-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of beta-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct beta-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  20. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  1. Photolithographic Encoding of Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christiane; Bestgen, Sebastian; Welle, Alexander; Müller, Rouven; Roesky, Peter W; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-10-12

    A platform technology for the creation of spatially resolved surfaces encoded with a monolayer consisting of different metal complexes was developed. The concept entails the light-triggered activation of a self- assembled monolayer (SAM) of UV-labile anchors, that is, phenacylsulfides, and the subsequent cycloaddition of selected diene-functionalized metal complexes at defined areas on the surface. The synthesis and characterization of the metal complexes for the UV-light assisted anchoring on the surface and a detailed study of a short-chain oligomer model system in solution confirm the high efficiency of the photoreaction. The hybrid materials obtained by this concept can potentially be utilized for the design of highly valuable catalytic or (opto-)electronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  3. Photodiodes for ten micrometer laser communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The performance is discussed of 10-micron mercury-cadmiumtelluride and lead-tin-telluride photodiodes in laser heterodyne communication systems. The dependence of detector quantum efficiency, resistance, frequency response, and signal-to-noise ratio on temperature, bias, and local oscillator power are examined. Included in the discussion is an analysis of the feasibility of high temperature operation, and ability of the detector to dissipate power to a heat sink is explored. Some aspects of direct detection response are considered and figures showing flux levels from a blackbody presented.

  4. Genetically Encoded Sensors for Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Deuschle, Karen; Fehr, Marcus; Hilpert, Melanie; Lager, Ida; Lalonde, Sylvie; Looger, Loren L.; Okumoto, Sakiko; Persson, Jörgen; Schmidt, Anja; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolomics, i.e., the multiparallel analysis of metabolite changes occurring in a cell or an organism, has become feasible with the development of highly efficient mass spectroscopic technologies. Functional genomics as a standard tool helped to identify the function of many of the genes that encode important transporters and metabolic enzymes over the past few years. Advanced expression systems and analysis technologies made it possible to study the biochemical properties of the corresponding proteins in great detail. We begin to understand the biological functions of the gene products by systematic analysis of mutants using systematic PTGS/RNAi, knockout and TILLING approaches. However, one crucial set of data especially relevant in the case of multicellular organisms is lacking: the knowledge of the spatial and temporal profiles of metabolite levels at cellular and subcellular levels. Methods We therefore developed genetically encoded nanosensors for several metabolites to provide a basic set of tools for the determination of cytosolic and subcellular metabolite levels in real time by using fluorescence microscopy. Results Prototypes of these sensors were successfully used in vitro and also in vivo, i.e., to measure sugar levels in fungal and animal cells. Conclusions One of the future goals will be to expand the set of sensors to a wider spectrum of substrates by using the natural spectrum of periplasmic binding proteins from bacteria and by computational design of proteins with altered binding pockets in conjunction with mutagenesis. This toolbox can then be applied for four-dimensional imaging of cells and tissues to elucidate the spatial and temporal distribution of metabolites as a discovery tool in functional genomics, as a tool for high-throughput, high-content screening for drugs, to test metabolic models, and to analyze the interplay of cells in a tissue or organ. PMID:15688353

  5. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. TENS machines are frequently operated by women, which may increase a sense of control in labour. Objectives To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain management in labour versus routine care, alternative non-pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. Main results Seventeen trials with 1466 women contribute data to the review. Thirteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points, and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (average risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.54; measured in two studies). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No

  6. Differences of cerebral activation between superior and inferior learners during motor sequence encoding and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Heun, Reinhard; Freymann, Nikolaus; Granath, Dirk Oliver; Stracke, Christian Paul; Jessen, Frank; Barkow, Katrin; Reul, Jürgen

    2004-11-15

    Cerebral activation during memory encoding and retrieval might depend on subjects' learning capacity, either by corresponding to better performance in superior learners or by reflecting increased effort in inferior learners. To investigate these alternative hypotheses, the study compared cerebral activation during encoding and retrieval of a motor sequence in groups of subjects with superior and inferior learning performances. Ten healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a motor sequence encoding paradigm (i.e. finger tapping sequence) and a retrieval paradigm (i.e. reproduction of the learned sequence). Subjects were divided into superior and inferior learners according to the correctness of sequence reproduction during retrieval. During encoding, there was strong bilateral activation in the middle frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area (SMA), the lateral parietal lobe and the cerebellum. During retrieval, again strong activation was found in identical areas of the prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobe and the cerebellum. During encoding, inferior learners showed more left-sided activations in the left middle frontal and inferior parietal gyri. Superior learners showed increased activation in the corresponding right-sided brain areas during encoding as well as during retrieval. Differences of cerebral activations in the prefrontal and parietal cortex during encoding and retrieval were found to be related to retrieval performance, i.e. success and effort. Further intervention studies are needed to assess whether these interindividual differences are the cause or the consequence of differences in memory performance.

  7. Ten-dollar thermal infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Philip C. D.

    2001-12-01

    A thermal infrared imager of competitive sensitivity and very simple construction is presented. It is a pyroelectric device of 96 pixels, based on ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). It uses a novel charge-dispensing multiplexer based on ordinary light emitting diodes to achieve a noise-equivalent temperature change (NETD) of 0.13 K at a 5 Hz frame rate (2.1 Hz BW). Design information, theory, and measured performance are presented. Achieving such a low total system cost requires the use of the very least expensive optical system, a moulded polyethylene Fresnel lens, whose advantages and limitations are discussed. Several possible improvements, aggregating approximately 30 dB in sensitivity are also discussed, leading to the interesting possibility of few-millikelvin NETD values with an uncooled pyroelectric device of extremely low cost.

  8. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS. PMID:25674327

  9. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    PubMed

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  10. Deletion of the gene encoding the reductase component of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase in Rhodococcus equi USA-18 disrupts sterol catabolism, leading to the accumulation of 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-22-oic acid and 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chin-Hsing; Kuo, Yung-Shun; Chang, Che-Ming; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Meng, Menghsiao

    2014-09-09

    The gene encoding the putative reductase component (KshB) of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase was cloned from Rhodococcus equi USA-18, a cholesterol oxidase-producing strain formerly named Arthrobacter simplex USA-18, by PCR according to consensus amino acid motifs of several bacterial KshB subunits. Deletion of the gene in R. equi USA-18 by a PCR-targeted gene disruption method resulted in a mutant strain that could accumulate up to 0.58 mg/ml 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD) in the culture medium when 0.2% cholesterol was used as the carbon source, indicating the involvement of the deleted enzyme in 9α-hydroxylation of steroids. In addition, this mutant also accumulated 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-22-oic acid (Δ1,4-BNC). Because both ADD and Δ1,4-BNC are important intermediates for the synthesis of steroid drugs, this mutant derived from R. equi USA-18 may deserve further investigation for its application potential.

  11. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata

    PubMed Central

    Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Glick, David I.; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K.; Onate, Kathrina C.; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C.; Lee, Brian T.; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Sloan, Cricket A.; Strattan, J. Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y.; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package. PMID:28403240

  12. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    PubMed

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  13. Increasing intensity of TENS prevents analgesic tolerance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Karina L.; Sanada, Luciana S.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) reduces hyperalgesia and pain. Both low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) TENS, delivered at the same intensity (90% motor threshold (MT)) daily, result in analgesic tolerance with repeated use by the 5th day of treatment. Thecurrentstudytestedif 1) increasingintensityby 10% per daypreventsthedevelopmentoftolerance to repeated TENS, and 2) iflowerintensity TENS (50 % MT) produces an equivalentreduction in hyperalgesia when compared to 90% MT TENS. Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral knee joint inflammation (3% carrageenan) were separated according to the intensity of TENS used: Sham, 50% LF, 50% HF, 90% LF, 90% HF, and increased intensity by 10% per day (LF and HF). The reduced mechanical withdrawal threshold following the induction of inflammation was reversed by application of TENS applied at 90% MT and increasing intensity for the first 4 days. On the 5th day, the groups that received 90% MT intensity showed tolerance. Nevertheless, the group that received an increased intensity on each day still showed a reversal of the mechanical withdrawal threshold with TENS. These results show that the development of tolerance can be delayed by increasing intensity of TENS. PMID:22858165

  14. Anticholinesterase and Antityrosinase Activities of Ten Piper Species from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Heng Yen, Khong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and antityrosinase activities of extracts from ten Piper species namely; P. caninum, P. lanatum, P. abbreviatum, P. aborescens, P. porphyrophyllum, P. erecticaule, P. ribesioides, P. miniatum, P. stylosum, and P. majusculum. Methods: Anticholinesterase and antityrosinase activities were evaluated against in vitro Ellman spectroscopy method and mushroom tyrosinase, respectively. Results: The EtOAc extract of P. erecticaule showed the highest AChE and BChE inhibitory with 22.9% and 70.9% inhibition, respectively. In antityrosinase activity, all extracts of P. porphyrophyllum showed the highest inhibitory effects against mushroom tyrosinase, compared to standard, kojic acid. Conclusion: This study showed that P. erecticaule and P. porphyrophyllum have potential AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibition activities. The respective extracts can be explored further for the development of novel lead as AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibitors in therapeutic management of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25671185

  15. Galileo's Finger - The Ten Great Ideas of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Peter

    2003-06-01

    Why Galileo's finger? Galileo, one of whose fingers is preserved in a vessel displayed in Florence, provided much of the impetus for modern science, pointing the way out of medieval ignorance. In this brilliant account of the central ideas of contemporary science, Peter Atkins celebrates the effectiveness of Galileo's symbolic finger for revealing the nature of our universe, our world, and ourselves. Galileo's Finger takes the reader on an extraordinary journey that embraces the ten central ideas of current science. "By a great idea," writes Peter Atkins, "I mean a simple concept of great reach, an acorn of an idea that ramifies into a great oak tree of application, a spider of an idea that can spin a great web and draw in a feast of explanation and elucidation." With wit, charm, and patience, Atkins leads the reader to an understanding of the essence of the whole of science, from evolution and the emergence of complexity, to entropy, the spring of all change in the universe; from energy, the universalization of accountancy, to symmetry, the quantification of beauty; and from cosmology, the globalization of reality, to spacetime, the arena of all action. "My intention is for us to travel to the high ridges of science," Atkins tells us. "As the journey progresses and I lead you carefully to the summit of understanding, you will experience the deep joy of illumination that science alone provides." Galileo's Finger breaks new ground in communicating science to the general reader. Here are the essential ideas of today's science, explained in magical prose.

  16. Evaluation of GOES encoder lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Helmold, N.

    1983-01-01

    Aging characteristics and life expectancies of flight quality, tungsten filament, encoder lamps are similar to those of 'commercial' grade gas filled lamps of similar construction, filament material and filament temperature. The aging and final failure by filament burnout are caused by single crystal growth over large portions of the filament with the concomitant development of facets and notches resulting in reduction of cross section and mechanical weakening of the filament. The life expectancy of presently produced lamps is about one year at their nominal operating voltage of five volts dc. At 4.5 volts, it is about two years. These life times are considerably shorter, and the degradation rates of lamp current and light flux are considerably higher, than were observed in the laboratory and in orbit on lamps of the same type manufactured more than a decade ago. It is speculated that the filaments of these earlier lamps contained a crystallization retarding dopant, possibly thorium oxide. To obtain the desired life expectancy of or = to four years in present lamps, operating voltages of or = to four volts dc would be required.

  17. Multidimensional encoding of brain connectomes.

    PubMed

    Caiafa, Cesar F; Pestilli, Franco

    2017-09-13

    The ability to map brain networks in living individuals is fundamental in efforts to chart the relation between human behavior, health and disease. Advances in network neuroscience may benefit from developing new frameworks for mapping brain connectomes. We present a framework to encode structural brain connectomes and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (dMRI) data using multidimensional arrays. The framework integrates the relation between connectome nodes, edges, white matter fascicles and diffusion data. We demonstrate the utility of the framework for in vivo white matter mapping and anatomical computing by evaluating 1,490 connectomes, thirteen tractography methods, and three data sets. The framework dramatically reduces storage requirements for connectome evaluation methods, with up to 40x compression factors. Evaluation of multiple, diverse datasets demonstrates the importance of spatial resolution in dMRI. We measured large increases in connectome resolution as function of data spatial resolution (up to 52%). Moreover, we demonstrate that the framework allows performing anatomical manipulations on white matter tracts for statistical inference and to study the white matter geometrical organization. Finally, we provide open-source software implementing the method and data to reproduce the results.

  18. Novelty's effect on memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Janenaite, Sigita; Meeter, Martijn

    2015-07-01

    It is often thought that novelty benefits memory formation. However, support for this idea mostly comes from paradigms that are open to alternative explanations. In the present study we manipulated novelty in a word-learning task through task-irrelevant background images. These background images were either standard (presented repeatedly), or novel (presented only once). Two types of background images were used: Landscape pictures and fractals. EEG was also recorded during encoding. Contrary to the idea that novelty aids memory formation, memory performance was not affected by the novelty of the background. In the evoked response potentials, we found evidence of distracting effects of novelty: both the N1 and P3b components were smaller to words studied with novel backgrounds, and the amplitude of the N2b component correlated negatively with subsequent retrieval. We conclude that although evidence from other studies does suggest benefits on a longer time scale, novelty has no instantaneous benefits for learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Image encoding with triangulation wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, D. J.; Kim, HyungJun

    1995-09-01

    We demonstrate some wavelet-based image processing applications of a class of simplicial grids arising in finite element computations and computer graphics. The cells of a triangular grid form the set of leaves of a binary tree and the nodes of a directed graph consisting of a single cycle. The leaf cycle of a uniform grid forms a pattern for pixel image scanning and for coherent computation of coefficients of splines and wavelets. A simple form of image encoding is accomplished with a 1D quadrature mirror filter whose coefficients represent an expansion of the image in terms of 2D Haar wavelets with triangular support. A combination the leaf cycle and an inherent quadtree structure allow efficient neighbor finding, grid refinement, tree pruning and storage. Pruning of the simplex tree yields a partially compressed image which requires no decoding, but rather may be rendered as a shaded triangulation. This structure and its generalization to n-dimensions form a convenient setting for wavelet analysis and computations based on simplicial grids.

  20. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  1. Aging affects neural precision of speech encoding

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Older adults frequently report they can hear what is said but cannot understand the meaning, especially in noise. This difficulty may arise from the inability to process rapidly changing elements of speech. Aging is accompanied by a general slowing of neural processing and decreased neural inhibition, both of which likely interfere with temporal processing in auditory and other sensory domains. Age-related reductions in inhibitory neurotransmitter levels and delayed neural recovery can contribute to decreases in the auditory system’s temporal precision. Decreased precision may lead to neural timing delays, reductions in neural response magnitude, and a disadvantage in processing the rapid acoustic changes in speech. The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a scalp-recorded electrical potential, is known for its ability to capture precise neural synchrony within subcortical auditory nuclei; therefore, we hypothesized that a loss of temporal precision results in subcortical timing delays and decreases in response consistency and magnitude. To assess this hypothesis, we recorded ABRs to the speech syllable /da/ in normal hearing younger (ages 18 to 30) and older adult humans (60 to 67). Older adults had delayed ABRs, especially in response to the rapidly changing formant transition, and greater response variability. We also found that older adults had decreased phase locking and smaller response magnitudes than younger adults. Taken together, our results support the theory that older adults have a loss of temporal precision in subcortical encoding of sound, which may account, at least in part, for their difficulties with speech perception. PMID:23055485

  2. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  3. Unconscious relational encoding depends on hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Duss, Simone B; Reber, Thomas P; Hänggi, Jürgen; Schwab, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Müri, René M; Brugger, Peter; Gutbrod, Klemens; Henke, Katharina

    2014-12-01

    Textbooks divide between human memory systems based on consciousness. Hippocampus is thought to support only conscious encoding, while neocortex supports both conscious and unconscious encoding. We tested whether processing modes, not consciousness, divide between memory systems in three neuroimaging experiments with 11 amnesic patients (mean age=45.55 years, standard deviation=8.74, range=23-60) and 11 matched healthy control subjects. Examined processing modes were single item versus relational encoding with only relational encoding hypothesized to depend on hippocampus. Participants encoded and later retrieved either single words or new relations between words. Consciousness of encoding was excluded by subliminal (invisible) word presentation. Amnesic patients and controls performed equally well on the single item task activating prefrontal cortex. But only the controls succeeded on the relational task activating the hippocampus, while amnesic patients failed as a group. Hence, unconscious relational encoding, but not unconscious single item encoding, depended on hippocampus. Yet, three patients performed normally on unconscious relational encoding in spite of amnesia capitalizing on spared hippocampal tissue and connections to language cortex. This pattern of results suggests that processing modes divide between memory systems, while consciousness divides between levels of function within a memory system. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  4. Unconscious relational encoding depends on hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Duss, Simone B.; Reber, Thomas P.; Hänggi, Jürgen; Schwab, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Müri, René M.; Brugger, Peter; Gutbrod, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Textbooks divide between human memory systems based on consciousness. Hippocampus is thought to support only conscious encoding, while neocortex supports both conscious and unconscious encoding. We tested whether processing modes, not consciousness, divide between memory systems in three neuroimaging experiments with 11 amnesic patients (mean age = 45.55 years, standard deviation = 8.74, range = 23–60) and 11 matched healthy control subjects. Examined processing modes were single item versus relational encoding with only relational encoding hypothesized to depend on hippocampus. Participants encoded and later retrieved either single words or new relations between words. Consciousness of encoding was excluded by subliminal (invisible) word presentation. Amnesic patients and controls performed equally well on the single item task activating prefrontal cortex. But only the controls succeeded on the relational task activating the hippocampus, while amnesic patients failed as a group. Hence, unconscious relational encoding, but not unconscious single item encoding, depended on hippocampus. Yet, three patients performed normally on unconscious relational encoding in spite of amnesia capitalizing on spared hippocampal tissue and connections to language cortex. This pattern of results suggests that processing modes divide between memory systems, while consciousness divides between levels of function within a memory system. PMID:25273998

  5. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Kenneth; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present two encoding methods for block-circulant LDPC codes. The first is an iterative encoding method based on the erasure decoding algorithm, and the computations required are well organized due to the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. The second method uses block-circulant generator matrices, and the encoders are very similar to those for recursive convolutional codes. Some encoders of the second type have been implemented in a small Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and operate at 100 Msymbols/second.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic encoding of polystyrene-based resin beads: converting the encoding peaks into barcodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lie-Xiong; Huang, Zhen-Li; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2005-12-01

    A detailed approach is described for the vibrational spectroscopic encoding of polystyrene-based resin beads by converting the infrared absorption peaks suitable for encoding (encoding peaks) into barcodes. Based on combining the FT-IR measurements and the quantum-chemical computations, the vibrational characteristics of p-tert-butylstyrene monomer, polystyrene and poly(p-tert-butylstyrene) resin beads are analyzed, which are helpful for the selection of encoding peaks. The vibrational spectroscopic encoding of polystyrene-based resin beads could be obtained by converting the wavenumber, intensity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the encoding peaks into barcodes automatically through a computer program designed in our laboratory.

  7. Variation in the strength of lexical encoding across dialects

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Tamati, Terrin N.; Pierrehumbert, Janet B.

    2016-01-01

    Lexical processing is slower and less accurate for unfamiliar dialects than familiar dialects. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that dialect differences in lexical processing reflect differences in lexical encoding strength across dialects. Lexical encoding (i.e., updating the cognitive lexical representation to reflect the current token) was distinguished from lexical recognition (i.e., mapping the incoming acoustic signal to the target lexical category) in a series of lexical processing tasks with Midland and Northern American English. The experiments were conducted in the Midland region with Midland and Northern listeners. The results confirmed differential processing of the two dialects: the Midland dialect was processed more quickly than the Northern dialect. The results further revealed significantly larger repetition benefits (i.e., priming) and cross-dialect lexical interference effects for lexical forms in the Midland dialect than in the Northern dialect for both listener groups, particularly when the stimulus materials were presented in noise. These results suggest that lexical information is more strongly encoded for the contextually-local Midland dialect than for the non-local Northern dialect. We interpret these effects as reflecting cognitive processing costs associated with normalization for dialect variation, which lead to weaker lexical encoding under more difficult processing conditions. PMID:28042187

  8. A Unique Genetically Encoded FRET Pair in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amanda L; Addy, Partha Sarathi; Chin, Melissa A; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-03-16

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two suitable fluorophores is a powerful tool to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure in vitro and in vivo. The ability to genetically encode a FRET pair represents a convenient "labeling-free" strategy to incorporate them into target protein(s). Currently, the only genetically encoded FRET pairs available for use in mammalian cells use fluorescent proteins. However, their large size can lead to unfavorable perturbations, particularly when two are used at the same time. Additionally, fluorescent proteins are largely restricted to a terminal attachment to the target, which might not be optimal. Here, we report the development of an alternative genetically encoded FRET pair in mammalian cells that circumvents these challenges by taking advantage of a small genetically encoded fluorescent unnatural amino acid as the donor and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as the acceptor. The small size of Anap relative to fluorescent proteins, and the ability to co-translationally incorporate it into internal sites on the target protein, endows this novel FRET pair with improved versatility over its counterparts that rely upon two fluorescent proteins. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Chernobyl accident ten years later

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    On April 26, 1986 at 1:23 AM a fire and explosion occurred at the fourth unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Complex, located in the Ukraine, that resulted in the destruction of the reactor core and most of the building in which it was housed. Several environmental impacts resulting from the accident will be discussed in this paper, which will include the effects on plant and wild life, radioactive waste generated and stored or disposed of, effects of evacuations relating to residents within the subsequently established 10km and 30km control zones, impacts of the emergency containment structure (sarcophagus), and potential effects on world opinion and future development of nuclear power. As an immediate result of the fire, 31 people died (2 from the fire & smoke, and 29 from excessive radiation); 237 cases of acute radiation sickness occurred; the total fatalities based upon induced chronic diseases as a result of the accident is unknown: more than 100,000 people were evacuated from within the subsequently established 30 km control zone; in excess of 50 million curies of radionuclides that included finely dispersed nuclear fuel, fragments of graphite, concrete and other building materials were released from the reactor into the environment; an estimated one million cubic meters of radioactive waste were generated (LLW, ILW, HLW); more than 5000 tons of materials (sand, boron, dolomite, cement, and lead) were used to put the fire out by helicopter; shutdown of the adjacent power plants were performed; and other environmental impacts occurred. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit No 4 is an RBMK-1000. It initiated operations in 1983, it was a 1000 MWe with a power output of 3200 MW(th), the reactor core contained 190 MT of fuel, with 1659 assemblies (plus 211 control rods), the average burnup rate was 10.3 MWd/kg, and the reactor operated on a continuous basis with maintenance and fuel reload performed during operations.

  10. Resolved astrometric orbits of ten O-type binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Sana, H.; Gosset, E.; De Becker, M.; Duvert, G.; Absil, O.; Anthonioz, F.; Berger, J.-P.; Ertel, S.; Grellmann, R.; Guieu, S.; Kervella, P.; Rabus, M.; Willson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: Our long-term aim is to derive model-independent stellar masses and distances for long period massive binaries by combining apparent astrometric orbit with double-lined radial velocity amplitudes (SB2). Methods: We followed-up ten O+O binaries with AMBER, PIONIER and GRAVITY at the VLTI. Here, we report on 130 astrometric observations over the last seven years. We combined this dataset with distance estimates to compute the total mass of the systems. We also computed preliminary individual component masses for the five systems with available SB2 radial velocities. Results: Nine of the ten binaries have their three-dimensional orbit well constrained. Four of them are known to be colliding wind, non-thermal radio emitters, and thus constitute valuable targets for future high angular resolution radio imaging. Two binaries break the correlation between period and eccentricity tentatively observed in previous studies. This suggests either that massive star formation produces a wide range of systems, or that several binary formation mechanisms are at play. Finally, we found that the use of existing SB2 radial velocity amplitudes can lead to unrealistic masses and distances. Conclusions: If not understood, the biases in radial velocity amplitudes will represent an intrinsic limitation for estimating dynamical masses from SB2+interferometry or SB2+Gaia. Nevertheless, our results can be combined with future Gaia astrometry to measure the dynamical masses and distances of the individual components with an accuracy of 5 to 15%, completely independently of the radial velocities. Based on observations collected with the PIONIER/VLTI, AMBER/VLTI and GRAVITY/VLTI instruments at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, under programs 087.C-0458, 087.D-0150, 087.D-0264, 090.D-0036, 090.D-0291, 090.D-0600, 091.D-0087, 091.D-0334, 092.C-0243, 092.C-0542, 092.D-0015, 092.D-0366, 092.D-0590, 092.D-0647, 093.C-0503, 093.D-0039, 093.D-0040, 093.D-0673, 094.C-0397, 094.C-0884

  11. Benchmark Dose Software Development and Maintenance Ten Berge Cxt Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is intended to provide an overview of beta version 1.0 of the implementation of a concentration-time (CxT) model originally programmed and provided by Wil ten Berge (referred to hereafter as the ten Berge model). The recoding and development described here represent ...

  12. The Ten Commandments for College Student-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Thomas S.; Henke, Whitney; Dopp, Austin

    2007-01-01

    College student-athletes are often placed in the position of having to be successful on-and-off the playing field. To facilitate their various efforts the following "Ten Commandments for College Student-Athletes" are offered. These "Ten Commandments" should not only indicate to the student-athletes in question what they might be doing wrong, but…

  13. Redefining Assessment? The First Ten Years of Assessment in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadfoot, Patricia; Black, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The completion of the first ten years of this journal is an occasion for review and reflection. The main issues that have been addressed over the ten years are summarized in four main sections: Purposes, International Trends, Quality Concerns and Assessment for Learning. Each of these illustrates the underlying significance of the themes of…

  14. 28 CFR 5.800 - Ten-day filing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ten-day filing requirement. 5.800 Section... REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.800 Ten-day filing requirement. The 10-day filing requirement provided... is deposited in the U.S. mails no later than the 10th day of the period....

  15. 28 CFR 5.800 - Ten-day filing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ten-day filing requirement. 5.800 Section... REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.800 Ten-day filing requirement. The 10-day filing requirement provided... is deposited in the U.S. mails no later than the 10th day of the period....

  16. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104... INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace... calendar days following the maturity of a time deposit, the bank may continue to pay interest on...

  17. 28 CFR 5.800 - Ten-day filing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ten-day filing requirement. 5.800 Section... REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.800 Ten-day filing requirement. The 10-day filing requirement provided... is deposited in the U.S. mails no later than the 10th day of the period....

  18. 28 CFR 5.800 - Ten-day filing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ten-day filing requirement. 5.800 Section... REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.800 Ten-day filing requirement. The 10-day filing requirement provided... is deposited in the U.S. mails no later than the 10th day of the period....

  19. Higher Education's Top-Ten Strategic Technologies for 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The annual "EDUCAUSE" top-ten IT issues in higher education receives a great deal of interest and attention. IT and higher education leaders use it to calibrate their IT-related activities and inform their strategic planning. This year "EDUCAUSE" is introducing a complementary list: the top-ten strategic technologies in higher…

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-09-14

    Neuropathic pain, which is due to nerve disease or damage, represents a significant burden on people and society. It can be particularly unpleasant and achieving adequate symptom control can be difficult. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are often employed by people with neuropathic pain and may include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This review supersedes one Cochrane Review 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain' (Nnoaham 2014) and one withdrawn protocol 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults' (Claydon 2014). This review replaces the original protocol for neuropathic pain that was withdrawn. To determine the analgesic effectiveness of TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, PEDro, LILACS (up to September 2016) and various clinical trials registries. We also searched bibliographies of included studies for further relevant studies. We included randomised controlled trials where TENS was evaluated in the treatment of central or peripheral neuropathic pain. We included studies if they investigated the following: TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. Two review authors independently screened all database search results and identified papers requiring full-text assessment. Subsequently, two review authors independently applied inclusion/exclusion criteria to these studies. The same review authors then independently extracted data, assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane standard tool and rated the quality of evidence using GRADE. We included 15 studies with 724 participants. We found a

  1. Redefining Assessment? The First Ten Years of Assessment in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadfoot, Patricia; Black, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The completion of the first ten years of this journal is an occasion for review and reflection. The main issues that have been addressed over the ten years are summarized in four main sections: Purposes, International Trends, Quality Concerns and Assessment for Learning. Each of these illustrates the underlying significance of the themes of…

  2. Higher Education's Top-Ten Strategic Technologies for 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajek, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The annual "EDUCAUSE" top-ten IT issues in higher education receives a great deal of interest and attention. IT and higher education leaders use it to calibrate their IT-related activities and inform their strategic planning. This year "EDUCAUSE" is introducing a complementary list: the top-ten strategic technologies in higher…

  3. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  4. 28 CFR 5.800 - Ten-day filing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ten-day filing requirement. 5.800 Section 5.800 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF FOREIGN AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.800 Ten-day filing requirement. The 10-day filing requirement...

  5. Benchmark Dose Software Development and Maintenance Ten Berge Cxt Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is intended to provide an overview of beta version 1.0 of the implementation of a concentration-time (CxT) model originally programmed and provided by Wil ten Berge (referred to hereafter as the ten Berge model). The recoding and development described here represent ...

  6. Top Ten List for Choosing to Become a Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Shelly

    2004-01-01

    In true David Letterman style, this article presents a Top Ten List for why and how it's important to get to know the beginning teacher next door or just down the hall and listen for call signals. What follows is the Top Ten List for becoming a mentor: (1) establish reciprocal collaboration through trust; (2) offer a shoulder of support; (3) share…

  7. Encoding and decoding in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Naselaris, Thomas; Kay, Kendrick N.; Nishimoto, Shinji; Gallant, Jack L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade fMRI researchers have developed increasingly sensitive techniques for analyzing the information represented in BOLD activity. The most popular of these techniques is linear classification, a simple technique for decoding information about experimental stimuli or tasks from patterns of activity across an array of voxels. A more recent development is the voxel-based encoding model, which describes the information about the stimulus or task that is represented in the activity of single voxels. Encoding and decoding are complementary operations: encoding uses stimuli to predict activity while decoding uses activity to predict information about stimuli. However, in practice these two operations are often confused, and their respective strengths and weaknesses have not been made clear. Here we use the concept of a linearizing feature space to clarify the relationship between encoding and decoding. We show that encoding and decoding operations can both be used to investigate some of the most common questions about how information is represented in the brain. However, focusing on encoding models offers two important advantages over decoding. First, an encoding model can in principle provide a complete functional description of a region of interest, while a decoding model can provide only a partial description. Second, while it is straightforward to derive an optimal decoding model from an encoding model it is much more difficult to derive an encoding model from a decoding model. We propose a systematic modeling approach that begins by estimating an encoding model for every voxel in a scan and ends by using the estimated encoding models to perform decoding. PMID:20691790

  8. Using TENS for pain control: the state of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Carol GT; Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacological intervention that activates a complex neuronal network to reduce pain by activating descending inhibitory systems in the central nervous system to reduce hyperalgesia. The evidence for TENS efficacy is conflicting and requires not only description but also critique. Population-specific systemic reviews and meta-analyses are emerging, indicating both HF and LF TENS being shown to provide analgesia, specifically when applied at a strong, nonpainful intensity. The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the latest basic science and clinical evidence for TENS. Additional research is necessary to determine if TENS has effects specific to mechanical stimuli and/or beyond reduction of pain and will improve activity levels, function and quality of life. PMID:24953072

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for fibromyalgia in adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark I; Claydon, Leica S; Herbison, G Peter; Jones, Gareth; Paley, Carole A

    2017-10-09

    Fibromyalgia is characterised by persistent, widespread pain; sleep problems; and fatigue. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the delivery of pulsed electrical currents across the intact surface of the skin to stimulate peripheral nerves and is used extensively to manage painful conditions. TENS is inexpensive, safe, and can be self-administered. TENS reduces pain during movement in some people so it may be a useful adjunct to assist participation in exercise and activities of daily living. To date, there has been only one systematic review in 2012 which included TENS, amongst other treatments, for fibromyalgia, and the authors concluded that TENS was not effective. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of TENS alone or added to usual care (including exercise) compared with placebo (sham) TENS; no treatment; exercise alone; or other treatment including medication, electroacupuncture, warmth therapy, or hydrotherapy for fibromyalgia in adults. We searched the following electronic databases up to 18 January 2017: CENTRAL (CRSO); MEDLINE (Ovid); Embase (Ovid); CINAHL (EBSCO); PsycINFO (Ovid); LILACS; PEDRO; Web of Science (ISI); AMED (Ovid); and SPORTDiscus (EBSCO). We also searched three trial registries. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised trials of TENS treatment for pain associated with fibromyalgia in adults. We included cross-over and parallel-group trial designs. We included studies that evaluated TENS administered using non-invasive techniques at intensities that produced perceptible TENS sensations during stimulation at either the site of pain or over nerve bundles proximal (or near) to the site of pain. We included TENS administered as a sole treatment or TENS in combination with other treatments, and TENS given as a single treatment or as a course of treatments. Two review authors independently determined study eligibility by assessing each record and

  10. Effect of burst TENS and conventional TENS combined with cryotherapy on pressure pain threshold: randomised, controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Macedo, L B; Josué, A M; Maia, P H B; Câmara, A E; Brasileiro, J S

    2015-06-01

    To assess the immediate effect of conventional and burst transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in combination with cryotherapy on pain threshold and tolerance in healthy individuals. Randomised, controlled trial. University laboratory. One hundred and twelve healthy women. Volunteers were allocated at random to seven groups (n=16): (1) control, (2) placebo TENS, (3) conventional TENS, (4) burst TENS, (5) cryotherapy, (6) cryotherapy in combination with burst TENS, and (7) cryotherapy in combination with conventional TENS. Pain threshold and tolerance were measured by applying a pressure algometer at the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, before and after each intervention. The primary outcome measure was pressure pain threshold. A significant increase in pain threshold and tolerance at the 5% level of significance was recorded as follows: burst TENS {pain threshold: mean difference 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4 to 1.2]; pain tolerance: mean difference 3.8 (95% CI 3.9 to 3.7)}, cryotherapy [pain threshold: mean difference 1.3 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.2); pain tolerance: mean difference 1.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 2.0)] and cryotherapy in combination with burst TENS [pain threshold: mean difference 2.6 (95% CI 2.4 to 2.8); pain tolerance: mean difference 4.9 (95% CI 5.0 to 4.8)]. Cryotherapy in combination with burst TENS provided greater analgesia compared with the other groups (P<0.001). These results support the use of cryotherapy in combination with burst TENS to reduce induced pain, and suggest a potentiating effect when these techniques are combined. No such association was found between cryotherapy and conventional TENS. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced analgesic effect of acupuncture-like TENS but not conventional TENS in opioid-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Guillaume; Cloutier, Christian; Marchand, Serge

    2011-02-01

    Evidence from recent animal studies indicates that the analgesic effect of low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is reduced in opioid-tolerant animals. The aim of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of conventional (high frequency) and acupuncture-like (low frequency) TENS between a group of opioid-treated patients and a group of opioid-naive patients in order to determine if this cross-tolerance effect is also present in humans. Twenty-three chronic pain patients (11 who took opioids and 12 who did not) participated in the study. Participants were assigned in a randomized crossover design to receive alternately conventional and acupuncture-like TENS. There was a significant reduction in pain during and after conventional TENS when compared to baseline for both the opioid and nonopioid group (P < .01). For acupuncture-like TENS however, the analgesic effect of TENS was only observed in the nonopioid group (P < .01), with opioid-treated patients showing no change in pain scores during and after TENS when compared to baseline (P > .09). The reduced analgesic effect of acupuncture-like TENS in opioid-treated patients is coherent with previous animal studies and suggests that conventional TENS should be preferred in patients taking opioids on a regular basis. This study shows that patients taking opioids on a regular basis are less susceptible to benefit from acupuncture-like TENS. This phenomenon is probably attributable to the fact that the analgesia induced by acupuncture-like TENS and opioids are mediated by the same receptors (ie, μ opioid receptors). Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli.

  13. Dual Role of Medial A10 Dopamine Neurons in Affective Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  14. Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder Tolerates Misalignments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic shaft-angle encoder measures angle of rotation of shaft with high precision while minimizing effects of eccentricity and other misalignments. Grooves on disk serve as reference marks to locate reading heads and measure increments of rotation of disk. Shaft-angle encoder, resembling optical compact-disk drive, includes two tracking heads illuminating grooves on disk and measures reflections from them.

  15. The Acquisition of Syntactically Encoded Evidentiality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rett, Jessica; Hyams, Nina

    2014-01-01

    This article presents several empirical studies of syntactically encoded evidentiality in English. The first part of our study consists of an adult online experiment that confirms claims in Asudeh & Toivonen (2012) that raised Perception Verb Similatives (PVSs; e.g. "John looks like he is sick") encode direct evidentiality. We then…

  16. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  17. Precision Digital Position Encoding For Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Stanley; Tuchman, Israel

    1984-11-01

    Presented is a versatile precision digital encoding technique for mechanical resonant scanners. Described is it's application to electronic correction of the sinusoidal scan pattern traced. To contrast the flexibility of the electronic encoding technique a number of direct correction methods are described.

  18. The Acquisition of Syntactically Encoded Evidentiality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rett, Jessica; Hyams, Nina

    2014-01-01

    This article presents several empirical studies of syntactically encoded evidentiality in English. The first part of our study consists of an adult online experiment that confirms claims in Asudeh & Toivonen (2012) that raised Perception Verb Similatives (PVSs; e.g. "John looks like he is sick") encode direct evidentiality. We then…

  19. Experiments in encoding multilevel images as quadtrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    Image storage requirements for several encoding methods are investigated and the use of quadtrees with multigray level or multicolor images are explored. The results of encoding a variety of images having up to 256 gray levels using three schemes (full raster, runlength and quadtree) are presented. Although there is considerable literature on the use of quadtrees to store and manipulate binary images, their application to multilevel images is relatively undeveloped. The potential advantage of quadtree encoding is that an entire area with a uniform gray level may be encoded as a unit. A pointerless quadtree encoding scheme is described. Data are presented on the size of the quadtree required to encode selected images and on the relative storage requirements of the three encoding schemes. A segmentation scheme based on the statistical variation of gray levels within a quadtree quadrant is described. This parametric scheme may be used to control the storage required by an encoded image and to preprocess a scene for feature identification. Several sets of black and white and pseudocolor images obtained by varying the segmentation parameter are shown.

  20. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially in young children. Tap water from lead ...

  1. Recent advances on the encoding and selection methods of DNA-encoded chemical library.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingbing; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jianfu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-02-01

    DNA-encoded chemical library (DEL) has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for ligand discovery in chemical biology research and in drug discovery. Encoding and selection methods are two of the most important technological aspects of DEL that can dictate the performance and utilities of DELs. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances on the encoding and selection strategies of DEL and also discussed the latest developments on DNA-encoded dynamic library, a new frontier in DEL research.

  2. Comparison of H.265/HEVC encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochimiuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The H.265/HEVC is the state-of-the-art video compression standard, which allows the bitrate reduction up to 50% compared with its predecessor, H.264/AVC, maintaining equal perceptual video quality. The growth in coding efficiency was achieved by increasing the number of available intra- and inter-frame prediction features and improvements in existing ones, such as entropy encoding and filtering. Nevertheless, to achieve real-time performance of the encoder, simplifications in algorithm are inevitable. Some features and coding modes shall be skipped, to reduce time needed to evaluate modes forwarded to rate-distortion optimisation. Thus, the potential acceleration of the encoding process comes at the expense of coding efficiency. In this paper, a trade-off between video quality and encoding speed of various H.265/HEVC encoders is discussed.

  3. Industrial Applications Of Optical Shaft Encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmister, Brian W.

    1980-11-01

    The development of the microprocessor and mini-computer for industrial process control has made the optical shaft angle encoder a natural choice for a position feedback transducer. Many of these applications, however, require the encoder to operate reliably in extremely hostile environments. In response to this, the encoder manufacturer has been faced with reliability problems which fall into the following general categories: 1. Exposure to weather 2. Wide operating and storage temperature range 3. Exposure to corrosive chemicals 4. Severe shock and vibration 5. High electrical noise levels 6. Severe blows to encoder housing 7. Operation in explosive atmospheres Three of these applications expose the encoder to most of these environmental conditions: 1. A jack-up control position feedback for an offshore oil well drilling rig 2. A depth measurement system for oil well logging instrumentation 3. Elevation and azimuth feedback for a solar power plant heliostat

  4. Evaluation of the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on whole salivary flow rate.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Hersheal; Pal-Singh, Mohit; Mathur, Hemant; Astekar, Sowmya; Gulati, Pranay; Lakhani, Shruta

    2015-02-01

    Saliva plays a critical role in maintaining oral homeostasis; it modulates the ecosystem through lubrication of the alimentary bolus, protection against microorganisms, buffer and repair of the oral mucosa, and helps in dental re-mineralization. Various local and systemic factors such as medications, radiation therapy, systemic conditions, etc. can lead to reduction in salivary flow. A decrease in salivary function, known as Xerostomia, increases a patient's risk for caries and other oral infections. Palliative management of Xerostomia includes wetting agents such as ice chips, drugs and saliva substitutes. Systemic agents stimulate salivary flow but often have unfavorable side effects. Newer modalities like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), which has fewer side effects, have been used to stimulate salivary flow. The aim of the present study was to assess and evaluate the effect of TENS on whole salivary flow rates in healthy adult subjects. A total of 80 healthy adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (using TENS) was collected for 5 minutes and the mean salivary flow rates were calculated. Data obtained was analyzed using the SPSS (Statistical package for social sciences) version 15. Students 't' test was employed for comparative analysis. Sixty-five of the 80 subjects demonstrated an increase in the salivary flow rate on application of TENS. Twelve subjects demonstrated a mild reduction in the salivary flow rates. Seven subjects experienced transient mild twitching of facial musculature as side effects. Significant increase in salivary flow rates was observed on application of TENS with minimal or no side effects. Key words:Stimulated saliva, whole salivary flow, TENS.

  5. Encoder: A Connectionist Model of How Learning to Visually Encode Fixated Text Images Improves Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gale L.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes that visual encoding learning improves reading fluency by widening the span over which letters are recognized from a fixated text image so that fewer fixations are needed to cover a text line. Encoder is a connectionist model that learns to convert images like the fixated text images human readers encode into the…

  6. A model for visual memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  7. Novel selection methods for DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alix I; McGregor, Lynn M; Liu, David R

    2015-06-01

    Driven by the need for new compounds to serve as biological probes and leads for therapeutic development and the growing accessibility of DNA technologies including high-throughput sequencing, many academic and industrial groups have begun to use DNA-encoded chemical libraries as a source of bioactive small molecules. In this review, we describe the technologies that have enabled the selection of compounds with desired activities from these libraries. These methods exploit the sensitivity of in vitro selection coupled with DNA amplification to overcome some of the limitations and costs associated with conventional screening methods. In addition, we highlight newer techniques with the potential to be applied to the high-throughput evaluation of DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

  8. Perceptual implicit memory relies on intentional, load-sensitive processing at encoding.

    PubMed

    Crabb, Brian T; Dark, Veronica J

    2003-10-01

    In two experiments, we examined whether the encoding processes leading to perceptual implicit memory satisfied the intentionality and load insensitivity criteria for automaticity. Whether participants intended to process words or digits, in displays containing both, was manipulated in Experiment 1. Results showed an effect of intention on a subsequent perceptual identification task and a recognition task. Load (one, two, and four words) and exposure duration (1,000, 600, and 200 msec) at encoding were manipulated in Experiment 2. Recognition was affected by both variables, but performance on the perceptual identification task was affected only by load. In both experiments, the results showed that controlled (intentional, load-sensitive) processing of words at encoding is essential for later perceptual implicit memory. That is, the encoding processes leading to perceptual implicit memory fail both criteria of automaticity.

  9. Lead aVR--the neglected lead.

    PubMed

    Chenniappan, M; Sankar, R Uday; Saravanan, K; Karthikeyan

    2013-09-01

    The aVR is often neglected lead. It is an unipolar lead facing the right superior surface. As all the depolarisations are going away from lead aVR, all waves are negative in aVR (P, QRS, T) in normal sinus rhythm. In dextrocardia, (True and technical) the p is upright in aVR. The lead aVR is a very important lead in localisation of Coronary Artery Disease. In the presence of anterior ST elevation, ST elevation in lead aVR and V1 denotes proximal LAD obstruction where ST elevation is more in lead V1, than in aVR. In the presence of anterior ST depression, ST elevation in lead aVR indicates Left Main Coronary Artery (LMCA) Disease where ST elevation is more in aVR than in V1. In wide QRS tachycardia, tall R wave in aVR indicates Ventricular Tachycardia rather than SVT with aberrancy. In the presence of QS complexes in inferior leads, the lead aVR helps to differentiate between inferior wall MI (IWMI) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). Initial R in aVR is suggestive of IWMI and terminal R is suggestive of LAFB. In pericarditis, lead aVR is most often the only lead which shows reciprocal ST depression where as in Acute Infarction, usually a group of leads shows reciprocal depression. In the presence of persistent ST elevation in anterior chest leads, the R in aVR is suggestive of left ventricular aneurysm (Goldburger's sign). In acute pulmonary embolism, ST elevation in lead aVR is a bad prognostic sign. In Tricyclic antidepressant toxicity, R in aVR more than 3 mm is an adverse prognostic sign. So in variety of conditions, the aVR is proved to be a valuable lead not only in diagnosis but also in predicting the prognosis.

  10. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  11. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us As ... and protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Lead Air Pollution Basics How does lead get ...

  12. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Environment . Top of page What are the Health Effects of Lead? Lead can affect almost every organ ... both men and women) Read more on the health effects of lead EPA’s Integrated Science Assessment for Lead ...

  13. EXTREMITY SARCOMA SURGERY IN YOUNGER CHILDREN: TEN YEARS OF PATIENTS TEN YEARS AND UNDER

    PubMed Central

    Israelsen, Ryan B; Ilium, Benjamin E; Crabtree, Susie; Randall, R Lor; Jones, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoma surgeons face unique challenges in younger patients with significant skeletal growth remaining. The heightened concerns regarding radiation in the very young and the drastic changes expected in the lengths and cross-sectional areas of bones affect the decision-making for both soft-tissue and bone sarcomas in this population. Nonetheless, there is sparse literature focused on sarcoma surgery in this age group. The records of one tertiary regional sarcoma treatment program were reviewed to identify all patients ten years old or younger at the time of local control surgery for limb or limb-girdle sarcomas. Demographic information, diagnosis, surgery performed, complications, and general outcomes were gleaned from the medical records. 43 patients were identified, including 15 with osteosarcomas, 11 Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors, five rhabdomyosarcomas, and two synovial sarcomas, among others. Location of tumors varied widely, but demonstrated a predilection for the upper extremity more than is typical in adolescents with the same tumor types. Survival was favorable overall, with only five patients dying from disease. Most patients continued to function well at latest follow-up, but 16 experienced additional surgical interventions following the index procedure. Sarcoma surgery in the younger growing child presents challenges for the surgeon, patient, and parents, but is usually successful in the long-term. PMID:22096434

  14. Orbits of the ten small satellites of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, W.M. Jr.; Synnott, S.P.

    1987-05-01

    Orbital elements are presented for the ten small satellites discovered by Voyager 2 at Uranus. These ten new satellites, whose provisional IAU designations are 1985UI and 1986UI through 1986U9, lie for the most part in equatorial, circular orbits; the most notable exception is 1986U8, the outer epsilon-ring shepherd, whose eccentricity e = 0.0101. Unlike the Voyager discoveries at Saturn, which included two co-orbiting satellites and three librators, the ten small Uranian satellites all have quite different semimajor axes. 11 references.

  15. Orbits of the ten small satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, W. M., Jr.; Synnott, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    Orbital elements are presented for the ten small satellites discovered by Voyager 2 at Uranus. These ten new satellites, whose provisional IAU designations are 1985UI and 1986UI through 1986U9, lie for the most part in equatorial, circular orbits; the most notable exception is 1986U8, the outer epsilon-ring shepherd, whose eccentricity e = 0.0101. Unlike the Voyager discoveries at Saturn, which included two co-orbiting satellites and three librators, the ten small Uranian satellites all have quite different semimajor axes.

  16. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  17. DNA-encoded chemistry: enabling the deeper sampling of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Goodnow, Robert A; Dumelin, Christoph E; Keefe, Anthony D

    2017-02-01

    DNA-encoded chemical library technologies are increasingly being adopted in drug discovery for hit and lead generation. DNA-encoded chemistry enables the exploration of chemical spaces four to five orders of magnitude more deeply than is achievable by traditional high-throughput screening methods. Operation of this technology requires developing a range of capabilities including aqueous synthetic chemistry, building block acquisition, oligonucleotide conjugation, large-scale molecular biological transformations, selection methodologies, PCR, sequencing, sequence data analysis and the analysis of large chemistry spaces. This Review provides an overview of the development and applications of DNA-encoded chemistry, highlighting the challenges and future directions for the use of this technology.

  18. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  19. Bone lead, hypertension, and lead nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P.

    1988-06-01

    There is considerable clinical evidence that excessive lead absorption causes renal failure with hypertension and predisposes individuals to hypertension even in the absence of detectable renal failure. Recent analyses of transiliac bone biopsies indicate that unsuspected elevated bone leads may reflect the cause (or contributing cause) of end-stage renal disease in 5% of the European dialysis population. In these patients, bone lead levels were four times higher than in unexposed cadavers (6 micrograms/g wet weight) and approximated levels found in lead workers (30 micrograms/g). At present, the most reliable index of the body lead burden is the CaNa2 EDTA lead mobilization test. In vivo tibial X-ray-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a more practical noninvasive technique for assessing bone lead, which should find widespread application as a diagnostic tool and for epidemiologic studies.

  20. Encoding entanglement-assisted quantum stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Bai, Bao-Ming; Li, Zhuo; Peng, Jin-Ye; Xiao, He-Ling

    2012-02-01

    We address the problem of encoding entanglement-assisted (EA) quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) and of the corresponding complexity. We present an iterative algorithm from which a quantum circuit composed of CNOT, H, and S gates can be derived directly with complexity O(n2) to encode the qubits being sent. Moreover, we derive the number of each gate consumed in our algorithm according to which we can design EA QECCs with low encoding complexity. Another advantage brought by our algorithm is the easiness and efficiency of programming on classical computers.

  1. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  2. Programmable Pulse-Position-Modulation Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, David; Farr, William

    2006-01-01

    A programmable pulse-position-modulation (PPM) encoder has been designed for use in testing an optical communication link. The encoder includes a programmable state machine and an electronic code book that can be updated to accommodate different PPM coding schemes. The encoder includes a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) that is programmed to step through the stored state machine and code book and that drives a custom high-speed serializer circuit board that is capable of generating subnanosecond pulses. The stored state machine and code book can be updated by means of a simple text interface through the serial port of a personal computer.

  3. VLSI Reed-Solomon Encoder With Interleaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, In-Shek; Deutsch, L. J.; Truong, Trieu-Kie; Reed, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Size, weight, and susceptibility to burst errors reduced. Encoding system built on single very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chip produces (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code with programmable interleaving up to depth of 5. (225,223) RS encoder includes new remainder-and-interleaver unit providing programmable interleaving of code words. Remainder-and-interleaver unit contains shift registers and modulo-2 adders. Signals on "turn" and "no-turn" lines control depth of interleaving. Based on E. R. Berlekamp's bit-serial multiplication algorithm for (225,223) RS encoder over Galois Field (2 to the 8th power).

  4. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  5. Distinct functional specificities are associated with protein isoforms encoded by the Drosophila dorsal-ventral patterning gene pipe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhu, Xianjun; Stevens, Leslie M.; Stein, David

    2009-01-01

    Summary Spatially regulated transcription of the pipe gene in ventral cells of the Drosophila ovary follicle cell epithelium is a key event that specifies progeny embryo dorsal-ventral (DV) polarity. pipe encodes ten putative protein isoforms, all of which exhibit similarity to vertebrate glycosaminoglycan-modifying enzymes. Expression of one of the isoforms, Pipe-ST2, in follicle cells has previously been shown to be essential for DV patterning. pipe is also expressed in the embryonic salivary gland and its expression there is required for normal viability. Here, we show that in addition to Pipe-ST2, seven of the other Pipe isoforms are expressed in the ovary, whereas all Pipe isoforms are abundantly expressed in the embryo. Of the ten isoforms, only Pipe-ST2 can restore ventral and lateral pattern elements to the progeny of otherwise pipe-null mutant females. By contrast, three Pipe isoforms, but not Pipe-ST2, support the production of a novel pipe-dependent epitope present in the embryonic salivary gland. These data indicate that differences in functional specificity, and presumably enzymatic specificity, are associated with several of the Pipe isoforms. In addition, we show that uniform expression of the Pipe-ST2 isoform in the follicle cell layer of females otherwise lacking pipe expression leads to the formation of embryos with a DV axis that is appropriately oriented with respect to the intrinsic polarity of the eggshell. This suggests the existence of a second mechanism that polarizes the Drosophila embryo, in addition to the ventrally restricted transcription of the pipe gene. PMID:19633171

  6. Distinct functional specificities are associated with protein isoforms encoded by the Drosophila dorsal-ventral patterning gene pipe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhu, Xianjun; Stevens, Leslie M; Stein, David

    2009-08-01

    Spatially regulated transcription of the pipe gene in ventral cells of the Drosophila ovary follicle cell epithelium is a key event that specifies progeny embryo dorsal-ventral (DV) polarity. pipe encodes ten putative protein isoforms, all of which exhibit similarity to vertebrate glycosaminoglycan-modifying enzymes. Expression of one of the isoforms, Pipe-ST2, in follicle cells has previously been shown to be essential for DV patterning. pipe is also expressed in the embryonic salivary gland and its expression there is required for normal viability. Here, we show that in addition to Pipe-ST2, seven of the other Pipe isoforms are expressed in the ovary, whereas all Pipe isoforms are abundantly expressed in the embryo. Of the ten isoforms, only Pipe-ST2 can restore ventral and lateral pattern elements to the progeny of otherwise pipe-null mutant females. By contrast, three Pipe isoforms, but not Pipe-ST2, support the production of a novel pipe-dependent epitope present in the embryonic salivary gland. These data indicate that differences in functional specificity, and presumably enzymatic specificity, are associated with several of the Pipe isoforms. In addition, we show that uniform expression of the Pipe-ST2 isoform in the follicle cell layer of females otherwise lacking pipe expression leads to the formation of embryos with a DV axis that is appropriately oriented with respect to the intrinsic polarity of the eggshell. This suggests the existence of a second mechanism that polarizes the Drosophila embryo, in addition to the ventrally restricted transcription of the pipe gene.

  7. IIA/IIB supergravity and ten-forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, E. A.; Hartong, J.; Howe, P. S.; Ortín, T.; Riccioni, F.

    2010-05-01

    We perform a careful investigation of which p-form fields can be introduced consistently with the supersymmetry algebra of IIA and/or IIB ten-dimensional supergravity. In particular the ten-forms, also known as “top-forms”, require a careful analysis since in this case, as we will show, closure of the supersymmetry algebra at the linear level does not imply closure at the non-linear level. Consequently, some of the (IIA and IIB) ten-form potentials introduced in earlier work of some of us are discarded. At the same time we show that new ten-form potentials, consistent with the full non-linear supersymmetry algebra can be introduced. We give a superspace explanation of our work. All of our results are precisely in line with the predictions of the E 11 algebra.

  8. The Teacher and Malpractice: Ten Ways to Invite a Lawsuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex, Nathan L.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the emerging concept in education of teacher malpractice, and identifies ten ways that teachers can be assured of entertaining a lawsuit in situations involving academic injury to students. (NKA)

  9. Ten new species of Daidalotarsonemus (Prostigmata: Tarsonemidae) from Costa Rica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ten new tarsonemid species of the genus Daidalotarsonemus found on native plants in Costa Rica are described herein: Daidalotarsonemus alas sp. n. Ochoa, Rezende & Lofego; Daidalotarsonemus azofeifai sp. n. Ochoa, Rezende & Lofego; Daidalotarsonemus bauchani sp. n. Rezende, Ochoa & Lofego; Daidalota...

  10. Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile River Playground comfort station, looking northwest. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  11. Ten Trends in Marketing Adult and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Julie; Dobmeyer, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Ten trends in marketing adult and continuing education are long-range planning, targeted programs, seasonality, better brochure design, spinoff brochures, tracking, database marketing, alternatives to direct mail, retention, and teachers' image or reputation. (SK)

  12. NASA Maps Typhoon Nock-ten's Lifetime Rainfall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's IMERG or Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM were used to estimate the total amount of rain that Super-typhoon Nock-ten dropped from Dec. 23 through Dec. 27 as it approached and tr...

  13. 6. View northeast of Ten Acre Lot with Joseph Fry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View northeast of Ten Acre Lot with Joseph Fry Farm complex (center) and Beehive House (right)in the background - Joseph Fry Farm Landscape, 2153 South County Trail Road (U.S. Route 2), East Greenwich, Kent County, RI

  14. Managing mountain hardwoods - a ten-year appraisal

    Treesearch

    George R., Jr. Trimble

    1961-01-01

    Ten years ago - in 1949 - four 5-acre plots were established on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia, to show the effects upon mountain hardwoods of each of four management treatments.

  15. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104... INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace periods during which interest may be paid on a deposit without violating § 329.2. (a) During the...

  16. Lead Aprons Are a Lead Exposure Hazard.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kevin M; Shoag, Jamie M; Kahlon, Sukhraj S; Parsons, Patrick J; Bijur, Polly E; Taragin, Benjamin H; Markowitz, Morri

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether lead-containing shields have lead dust on the external surface. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this descriptive study of a convenience sample of 172 shields. Each shield was tested for external lead dust via a qualitative rapid on-site test and a laboratory-based quantitative dust wipe analysis, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The χ(2) test was used to test the association with age, type of shield, lead sheet thickness, storage method, and visual and radiographic appearance. Sixty-three percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56%-70%) of the shields had detectable surface lead by FAAS and 50% (95% CI: 43%-57%) by the qualitative method. Lead dust by FAAS ranged from undetectable to 998 μg/ft(2). The quantitative detection of lead was significantly associated with the following: (1) visual appearance of the shield (1 = best, 3 = worst): 88% of shields that scored 3 had detectable dust lead; (2) type of shield: a greater proportion of the pediatric patient, full-body, and thyroid shields were positive than vests and skirts; (3) use of a hanger for storage: 27% of shields on a hanger were positive versus 67% not on hangers. Radiographic determination of shield intactness, thickness of interior lead sheets, and age of shield were unrelated to presence of surface dust lead. Sixty-three percent of shields had detectable surface lead that was associated with visual appearance, type of shield, and storage method. Lead-containing shields are a newly identified, potentially widespread source of lead exposure in the health industry. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. How repeatable are the physiological effects of TENS?

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Alvarez-Sauco, Maria; Koch, Giacomo; Franca, Michele; Marquez, Gonzalo; Sanchez, Jose A; Acero, Rafael M; Rothwell, John C

    2008-08-01

    Several studies suggest that transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) can have a variety of effects on the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we tried to replicate the physiological effects of TENS and to explore its effects on intracortical circuits. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and spinal reflex testing to examine excitability of intracortical and spinal cord circuits before and after a 30-min period of TENS over the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle. We measured the amplitude of TMS-evoked muscle responses (MEP), short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical antagonist inhibition (CAI) in flexor and extensor carpial radialis (FCR, ECR) muscles as well as spinal reciprocal inhibition (RI) and presynaptic inhibition (PI) from ECR to FCR. TENS had no significant effect on any of these measures apart from a reduction in median nerve induced facilitation of FCR when testing CAI. When compared with previous studies, our results suggest that the effects of TENS are highly variable and unreliable, likely by the difficulty in defining precise parameters of stimulation in individual subjects. Care should be taken in assuming that effects after TENS observed in small populations of subjects will apply equally to a wider population.

  18. Optimal stimulus encoders for natural tasks

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Wilson S.; Najemnik, Jiri; Ing, Almon D.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the features of natural stimuli that are most useful for specific natural tasks is critical for understanding perceptual systems. A new approach is described that involves finding the optimal encoder for the natural task of interest, given a relatively small population of noisy “neurons” between the encoder and decoder. The optimal encoder, which necessarily specifies the most useful features, is found by maximizing accuracy in the natural task, where the decoder is the Bayesian ideal observer operating on the population responses. The approach is illustrated for a patch identification task, where the goal is to identify patches of natural image, and for a foreground identification task, where the goal is to identify which side of a natural surface boundary belongs to the foreground object. The optimal features (receptive fields) are intuitive and perform well in the two tasks. The approach also provides insight into general principles of neural encoding and decoding. PMID:20055550

  19. A multifunctional rotary photoelectric encoder management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin

    2005-11-01

    The rotary photoelectric encoder can be used in many fields, such as robot research, fruit assembly lines, and so on. If there have many photoelectric encoders in one system, it's difficult to manage them and acquire the right pulse number. So it's important to design a multifunctional management system. It includes a powerful microchip with high processing speed, assuring the acquisition precision of rotary pulse. It uses a special method to judge the rotary direction and will be competent for many occasions which rotary direction changes quickly. Considering encoder data transmission, the management system provides a serial port using RS-485 protocol to transmit current pulse data and rotary direction. It allows linking a maximum of 100 management systems using only two communication lines to up-systems and also configing the encoder counting pattern locally (using the keyboard) or remotely (through the computer).

  20. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  1. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  3. Clustering of polarization-encoded images.

    PubMed

    Zallat, Jihad; Collet, Christophe; Takakura, Yoshitate

    2004-01-10

    Polarization-encoded imaging consists of the distributed measurements of polarization parameters for each pixel of an image. We address clustering of multidimensional polarization-encoded images. The spatial coherence of polarization information is considered. Two methods of analysis are proposed: polarization contrast enhancement and a more-sophisticated image-processing algorithm based on a Markovian model. The proposed algorithms are applied and validated with two different Mueller images acquired by a fully polarimetric imaging system.

  4. A Manual for Encoding Probability Distributions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    summary of the most significant information contained in the report. If the report contains a significant bibliography or literature survey, mention it...probability distri- bution. Some terms in the literature that are used synonymously to Encoding: Assessment, Assignment (used for single events in this...sessions conducted as parts of practical decision analyses as well as on experimental evidence in the literature . Probability encoding can be applied

  5. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  6. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  7. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    PubMed Central

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs. PMID:21969921

  8. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    PubMed

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  9. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  10. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Background The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. Conclusions These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment. PMID:21633497

  11. Novel insights into the diversity of catabolic metabolism from ten haloarchaeal genomes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  12. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M.; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Ache, Barry W.; Principe, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal’s ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments—a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  13. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  14. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  15. Mixed noise removal by weighted encoding with sparse nonlocal regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jielin; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian

    2014-06-01

    Mixed noise removal from natural images is a challenging task since the noise distribution usually does not have a parametric model and has a heavy tail. One typical kind of mixed noise is additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) coupled with impulse noise (IN). Many mixed noise removal methods are detection based methods. They first detect the locations of IN pixels and then remove the mixed noise. However, such methods tend to generate many artifacts when the mixed noise is strong. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method, namely weighted encoding with sparse nonlocal regularization (WESNR), for mixed noise removal. In WESNR, there is not an explicit step of impulse pixel detection; instead, soft impulse pixel detection via weighted encoding is used to deal with IN and AWGN simultaneously. Meanwhile, the image sparsity prior and nonlocal self-similarity prior are integrated into a regularization term and introduced into the variational encoding framework. Experimental results show that the proposed WESNR method achieves leading mixed noise removal performance in terms of both quantitative measures and visual quality.

  16. The TL region gene 37 encodes a Qa-1 antigen

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Of all the biochemically defined mouse MHC class I molecules, the Qa-1 antigens are the only ones for which a gene has not been identified. Recent evidence has suggested that Qa-1 antigens are functional class I molecules and can function as restriction elements for gamma/delta T cells. We have examined the relationship between Qa-1 and the product of gene 37, a presumed novel class I antigen encoded within the TL region. Immunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the molecules reactive with anti-Qa-1 and anti-37 sera show that the Qa-1 molecule of Qa-1b (Qa-1.2) mouse strains is identical to the product of gene 37 on the basis of molecular weight, pI, and strain distribution. Immunodepletion, biosynthetic labeling, and tunicamycin treatment confirm that the protein encoded by gene 37 in Qa-1b mice is Qa-1.2. In contrast, the anti-37 serum was unable to recognize the Qa-1 molecule in Qa-1a strains. Given the fact that the only allele to gene 37 thus far identified in a Qa-1a strain (A/J) has a termination codon in the alpha 3 domain, our data lead us to conclude that the Qa-1 molecule expressed in Qa-1a mice is not a true allelic product of the gene 37 encoded antigen of Qa-1b mouse strains. PMID:2258708

  17. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information. PMID:27304526

  18. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information.

  19. Distinctiveness and encoding effects in online sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeister, Philip; Vasishth, Shravan

    2014-01-01

    In explicit memory recall and recognition tasks, elaboration and contextual isolation both facilitate memory performance. Here, we investigate these effects in the context of sentence processing: targets for retrieval during online sentence processing of English object relative clause constructions differ in the amount of elaboration associated with the target noun phrase, or the homogeneity of superficial features (text color). Experiment 1 shows that greater elaboration for targets during the encoding phase reduces reading times at retrieval sites, but elaboration of non-targets has considerably weaker effects. Experiment 2 illustrates that processing isolated superficial features of target noun phrases—here, a green word in a sentence with words colored white—does not lead to enhanced memory performance, despite triggering longer encoding times. These results are interpreted in the light of the memory models of Nairne, 1990, 2001, 2006, which state that encoding remnants contribute to the set of retrieval cues that provide the basis for similarity-based interference effects. PMID:25566105

  20. Recent developments of genetically encoded optical sensors for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bolbat, Andrey; Schultz, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Optical sensors are powerful tools for live cell research as they permit to follow the location, concentration changes or activities of key cellular players such as lipids, ions and enzymes. Most of the current sensor probes are based on fluorescence which provides great spatial and temporal precision provided that high-end microscopy is used and that the timescale of the event of interest fits the response time of the sensor. Many of the sensors developed in the past 20 years are genetically encoded. There is a diversity of designs leading to simple or sometimes complicated applications for the use in live cells. Genetically encoded sensors began to emerge after the discovery of fluorescent proteins, engineering of their improved optical properties and the manipulation of their structure through application of circular permutation. In this review, we will describe a variety of genetically encoded biosensor concepts, including those for intensiometric and ratiometric sensors based on single fluorescent proteins, Forster resonance energy transfer-based sensors, sensors utilising bioluminescence, sensors using self-labelling SNAP- and CLIP-tags, and finally tetracysteine-based sensors. We focus on the newer developments and discuss the current approaches and techniques for design and application. This will demonstrate the power of using optical sensors in cell biology and will help opening the field to more systematic applications in the future. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Heavy metal pollution among autoworkers. I. Lead.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Rastogi, S

    1977-01-01

    Lead pollution was evaluated in 216 individuals working in 10 garages on the Island of Funen, Denmark and related to data from biochemical and medical examinations. Clinical symptoms were recorded by means of a questionnaire. Increased blood test lead levels were foun in 59% with 9% having above 80 microgram lead/100 ml (3-86mumol/1) whole blood. Mechanics in eight out of ten garages had significantly increased blood lead levels. A decrease in delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity was associated with increased blood lead levels but the latter were not related to haematological changes, tobacco consumption or to length of service in the trade. Particulate lead air pollution was not the sole cause of increased blood lead levels. Raised lead values were maximal among diesel engine workers who are exposed to high pressure-resistant lubricants containing lead naphthenate. As these workers complained of skin damage, lead absorption may have occurred through the skin. Assay of lead content showed 9290 ppm in gear oil and 1500-3500 ppm in used motor oils. The data are discussed in relation to the occupational risks in auto repair shops. PMID:911691

  2. Identification of Mitochondrial Genome-Encoded Small RNAs Related to Egg Deterioration Caused by Postovulatory Aging in Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hao; Weber, Gregory M; Wei, Hairong; Yao, Jianbo

    2016-10-01

    Many factors have been reported to affect rainbow trout egg quality, among which, postovulatory aging is one of the most significant causes as reared rainbow trout do not usually volitionally oviposit the ovulated eggs. In order to uncover the genetic regulation underling egg deterioration caused by postovulatory aging in rainbow trout, mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNA (mitosRNAs) were analyzed from unfertilized eggs on Days 1, 7, and 14 postovulation with fertilization rates of 91.8, 73.4, and less than 50 %, respectively. A total of 248 mitosRNAs were identified from Illumina high-throughput sequencing of the small RNA libraries derived from the eggs of ten females. Ninety-eight of the small RNAs exhibited more than a threefold difference in expression between eggs from females exhibiting high fertilization rates at Day 1 and low fertilization rates at Day 14. The differentially expressed mitosRNAs were predominantly derived from mitochondrial D-loop, tRNA, rRNA, COII, and Cytb gene regions. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis was carried out for 14 differentially expressed mitosRNAs, of which, 12 were confirmed to be consistent with the sequencing reads. Further characterization of the differentially expressed mitosRNAs may lead to the development of new biomarkers for egg quality in rainbow trout.

  3. Demonstration of 20-Gbit/s high-speed Bessel beam encoding/decoding link with adaptive turbulence compensation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Li, Shuhui; Zhao, Yifan; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Long; Wang, Andong; Du, Jing; Shen, Li; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-15

    By mapping traditional amplitude modulation to spatial modulation and employing adaptive optics compensation technique, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a high-speed Bessel beam encoding/decoding free-space optical link through atmospheric turbulence. The Bessel beam encoding/decoding speed is not limited by the conventional slow switching response of a spatial light modulator (SLM) but is fully determined by the modulation rate of an intensity modulator, which easily supports tens of gigabits per second modulation and resultant encoding/decoding. We use an SLM loaded with a pseudorandom phase mask to emulate atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory environment. An adaptive optics closed loop is used to sense the phase distortion of an extra probe Gaussian beam and then compensate the distorted Bessel beams. A 20-Gbit/s Bessel beam encoding/decoding link with adaptive turbulence compensation is demonstrated in the experiment, showing favorable operation performance.

  4. Atherosclerotic plaque ultrasound video encoding, wireless transmission, and quality assessment using H.264.

    PubMed

    Panayides, A; Pattichis, M S; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Loizou, C P; Pantziaris, M; Pitsillides, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We propose a unifying framework for efficient encoding, transmission, and quality assessment of atherosclerotic plaque ultrasound video. The approach is based on a spatially varying encoding scheme, where video-slice quantization parameters are varied as a function of diagnostic significance. Video slices are automatically set based on a segmentation algorithm. They are then encoded using a modified version of H.264/AVC flexible macroblock ordering (FMO) technique that allows variable quality slice encoding and redundant slices (RSs) for resilience over error-prone transmission channels. We evaluate our scheme on a representative collection of ten ultrasound videos of the carotid artery for packet loss rates up to 30%. Extensive simulations incorporating three FMO encoding methods, different quantization parameters, and different packet loss scenarios are investigated. Quality assessment is based on a new clinical rating system that provides independent evaluations of the different parts of the video (subjective). We also use objective video-quality assessment metrics and estimate their correlation to the clinical quality assessment of plaque type. We find that some objective quality assessment measures computed over the plaque video slices gave very good correlations to mean opinion scores (MOSs). Here, MOSs were computed using two medical experts. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves enhanced performance in noisy environments, while at the same time achieving significant bandwidth demands reductions, providing transmission over 3G (and beyond) wireless networks.

  5. O-Space Imaging: Highly Efficient Parallel Imaging Using Second-Order Nonlinear Fields as Encoding Gradients with No Phase Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Stockmann, Jason P.; Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Galiana, Gigi; Tam, Leo; Constable, R. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements in parallel imaging have been driven by the use of greater numbers of independent surface coils placed so as to minimize aliasing along the phase encode direction(s). However, gains from increasing the number of coils diminish as coil coupling problems begin to dominate and the ratio of acceleration gain to expense for multiple receiver chains becomes prohibitive. In this work we redesign the spatial encoding strategy in order to gain efficiency, achieving a gradient encoding scheme that is complementary to the spatial encoding provided by the receiver coils. This approach leads to “O-Space” imaging, wherein the gradient shapes are tailored to an existing surface coil array, making more efficient use of the spatial information contained in the coil profiles. In its simplest form, for each acquired echo the Z2 spherical harmonic is used to project the object onto sets of concentric rings, while the X and Y-gradients are used to offset this projection within the imaging plane. The theory is presented, an algorithm is introduced for image reconstruction, and simulations reveal that O-Space encoding achieves high encoding efficiency compared to SENSE, radial projection imaging, and PatLoc imaging, suggesting that O-Space imaging holds great potential for accelerated scanning. PMID:20665789

  6. A ten-year experience with pediatric face grafts.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G; Hinchcliff, Katharine; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L

    2013-01-01

    The authors reviewed their 10-year experience of performing face grafts in children with burns. They sought to compare different methods for aesthetic outcome and need for reconstruction. In addition, they determined the efficacy of using allograft skin or Integra as temporary covers. They performed a review of 160 pediatric patients who underwent acute facial excision and grafting for burns between 2000 and 2010. Of the 160 patients with a mean age of 5.8 ± 4.8 years, 96 were males. The mean burn size was 39.4 ± 24.61%, of which 36.5 ± 25.4% was third degree. Overall length of stay was 72.1 days, intensive care unit length of stay was 44.2 days, and the mortality rate was 13.75%. Ninety patients had their entire face burned, 42 burned half, 15 burned their foreheads, and seven had other combinations. The interval between injury and grafting was 13.9 ± 13.19 days. Sixty-three percent patients required one face graft, 23% had two, 8% had three, and 6% four or more. For their initial procedure, 105 patients underwent autografting, 28 had allografting, and 23 received Integra. The authors performed a two-stage procedure in 20.4% and a 1-day procedure in 79.6%. Ten patients had a contiguous "U-shaped" graft wrapped around the face. At least partial regrafting was performed in 21.1%. Allograft and Integra were used for massive burns (69.9 ± 14.5%, 62.6 ± 18.3%, respectively). Of these, 39% died, 17% developed an Integra infection, and 43% required regrafting before autografting. Overall, 24.5% of patients underwent facial reconstruction during their first admission, and 57.1% during subsequent admissions. No difference in the rate of reconstructive surgery was noted between patients receiving Integra or autografting. Autografting face burns as an initial, one-stage procedure works well. The "wrap-around" autograft leads to excellent cosmetic results. When there is a shortage of autograft, allograft or Integra are good options but Integra does not reduce the need

  7. Avoid costly litigation: ten steps to implementing lawful hiring practices.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    employment-related disputes that lead to costly litigation would never have arisen if the employer had implemented more effective employment practices. Hiring mistakes in particular cause many costly legal battles. This article identifies legal issues that precipitate litigation and suggests ten steps physicians can take to implement lawful hiring practices that will reduce the risk of costly employment suits while improving office efficiency, morale, and productivity. NOTE: This article is intended as an overview of lawful hiring strategies, and is not a substitute for legal advice from experienced employment counsel. Applicable laws vary from state to state and appropriate procedures may depend on specific factual situations. This article is not, and should not be construed as, legal advice.

  8. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  9. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  10. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN): Could Retinoids Play a Causative Role?

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R.; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1–4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression. PMID:25579087

  11. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN): could retinoids play a causative role?

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-12

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1-4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression.

  12. ERP Correlates of Encoding Success and Encoding Selectivity in Attention Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Long-term memory encoding depends critically on effective processing of incoming information. The degree to which participants engage in effective encoding can be indexed in electroencephalographic (EEG) data by studying event-related potential (ERP) subsequent memory effects. The current study investigated ERP correlates of memory success operationalised with two different measures—memory selectivity and global memory—to assess whether previously observed ERP subsequent memory effects reflect focused encoding of task-relevant information (memory selectivity), general encoding success (global memory), or both. Building on previous work, the present study combined an attention switching paradigm—in which participants were presented with compound object-word stimuli and switched between attending to the object or the word across trials—with a later recognition memory test for those stimuli, while recording their EEG. Our results provided clear evidence that subsequent memory effects resulted from selective attentional focusing and effective top-down control (memory selectivity) in contrast to more general encoding success effects (global memory). Further analyses addressed the question of whether successful encoding depended on similar control mechanisms to those involved in attention switching. Interestingly, differences in the ERP correlates of attention switching and successful encoding, particularly during the poststimulus period, indicated that variability in encoding success occurred independently of prestimulus demands for top-down cognitive control. These results suggest that while effects of selective attention and selective encoding co-occur behaviourally their ERP correlates are at least partly dissociable. PMID:27907075

  13. ERP Correlates of Encoding Success and Encoding Selectivity in Attention Switching.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska R; Yeung, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Long-term memory encoding depends critically on effective processing of incoming information. The degree to which participants engage in effective encoding can be indexed in electroencephalographic (EEG) data by studying event-related potential (ERP) subsequent memory effects. The current study investigated ERP correlates of memory success operationalised with two different measures-memory selectivity and global memory-to assess whether previously observed ERP subsequent memory effects reflect focused encoding of task-relevant information (memory selectivity), general encoding success (global memory), or both. Building on previous work, the present study combined an attention switching paradigm-in which participants were presented with compound object-word stimuli and switched between attending to the object or the word across trials-with a later recognition memory test for those stimuli, while recording their EEG. Our results provided clear evidence that subsequent memory effects resulted from selective attentional focusing and effective top-down control (memory selectivity) in contrast to more general encoding success effects (global memory). Further analyses addressed the question of whether successful encoding depended on similar control mechanisms to those involved in attention switching. Interestingly, differences in the ERP correlates of attention switching and successful encoding, particularly during the poststimulus period, indicated that variability in encoding success occurred independently of prestimulus demands for top-down cognitive control. These results suggest that while effects of selective attention and selective encoding co-occur behaviourally their ERP correlates are at least partly dissociable.

  14. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  15. Perspectives on lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lockitch, G

    1993-10-01

    Lead toxicity causes hematological, gastrointestinal, and neurological dysfunction in adults and children. Symptoms are usually noted with blood lead greater than 1.93 mumol/L. Severe or prolonged exposure may also cause chronic nephropathy, hypertension, and reproductive impairment. Lead inhibits enzymes; alters cellular calcium metabolism; stimulates synthesis of binding proteins in kidney, brain, and bone; and slows nerve conduction. Less severe exposure to lead, designated by blood lead levels of 0.48-0.96 mumol/L, has been implicated in poor pregnancy outcome, impaired neurobehavioral development, reduced stature in young children, and higher blood pressure in adults. Biochemical and systemic effects of high and low level lead toxicity are described. Dust, water, and paint chips are still major sources of lead but lead from folk remedies, cosmetics, food supplements, food preparation utensils, and improperly prepared infant formula has caused epidemic and sporadic severe lead toxicity. Screening for pediatric low level lead exposure requires measurement of blood lead.

  16. Performance analysis of ten brands of batteries for hearing aids

    PubMed Central

    Penteado, Silvio Pires; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Comparison of the performance of hearing instrument batteries from various manufacturers can enable otologists, audiologists, or final consumers to select the best products, maximizing the use of these materials. Aim: To analyze the performance of ten brands of batteries for hearing aids available in the Brazilian marketplace. Methods: Hearing aid batteries in four sizes were acquired from ten manufacturers and subjected to the same test conditions in an acoustic laboratory. Results: The results obtained in the laboratory contrasted with the values reported by manufacturers highlighted significant discrepancies, besides the fact that certain brands in certain sizes perform better on some tests, but does not indicate which brand is the best in all sizes. Conclusions: It was possible to investigate the performance of ten brands of hearing aid batteries and describe the procedures to be followed for leakage, accidental intake, and disposal. PMID:25992026

  17. Nonresponse error in mail surveys: top ten problems.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Jones, Julie K; Gereau, Patricia L; Levy, Barcey T

    2011-01-01

    Conducting mail surveys can result in nonresponse error, which occurs when the potential participant is unwilling to participate or impossible to contact. Nonresponse can result in a reduction in precision of the study and may bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe and make readers aware of a top ten list of mailed survey problems affecting the response rate encountered over time with different research projects, while utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service. These ten mishaps can potentiate nonresponse errors, but there are ways to minimize their frequency. Suggestions offered stem from our own experiences during research projects. Our goal is to increase researchers' knowledge of nonresponse error problems and to offer solutions which can decrease nonresponse error in future projects.

  18. Nonresponse Error in Mail Surveys: Top Ten Problems

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Jeanette M.; Jones, Julie K.; Gereau, Patricia L.; Levy, Barcey T.

    2011-01-01

    Conducting mail surveys can result in nonresponse error, which occurs when the potential participant is unwilling to participate or impossible to contact. Nonresponse can result in a reduction in precision of the study and may bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe and make readers aware of a top ten list of mailed survey problems affecting the response rate encountered over time with different research projects, while utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service. These ten mishaps can potentiate nonresponse errors, but there are ways to minimize their frequency. Suggestions offered stem from our own experiences during research projects. Our goal is to increase researchers' knowledge of nonresponse error problems and to offer solutions which can decrease nonresponse error in future projects. PMID:21994846

  19. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  20. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems.

  1. The ENCODE Project at UC Santa Cruz.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daryl J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Clawson, Hiram; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Raney, Brian J; Karolchik, Donna; Barber, Galt P; Harte, Rachel A; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Kuhn, Robert M; Rhead, Brooke L; Smith, Kayla E; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to identify all functional elements in the human genome. The pilot phase is for comparison of existing methods and for the development of new methods to rigorously analyze a defined 1% of the human genome sequence. Experimental datasets are focused on the origin of replication, DNase I hypersensitivity, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter function, gene structure, pseudogenes, non-protein-coding RNAs, transcribed RNAs, multiple sequence alignment and evolutionarily constrained elements. The ENCODE project at UCSC website (http://genome.ucsc.edu/ENCODE) is the primary portal for the sequence-based data produced as part of the ENCODE project. In the pilot phase of the project, over 30 labs provided experimental results for a total of 56 browser tracks supported by 385 database tables. The site provides researchers with a number of tools that allow them to visualize and analyze the data as well as download data for local analyses. This paper describes the portal to the data, highlights the data that has been made available, and presents the tools that have been developed within the ENCODE project. Access to the data and types of interactive analysis that are possible are illustrated through supplemental examples.

  2. Cortical encoding of timbre changes in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fawen; Benson, Chelsea; Cahn, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Most cochlear implant (CI) users describe music as a noise-like and unpleasant sound. Using behavioral tests, most prior studies have shown that perception of pitch-based melody and timbre is poor in CI users. This article will focus on cortical encoding of timbre changes in CI users, which may allow us to find solutions to further improve CI benefits. Furthermore, the value of using objective measures to reveal neural encoding of timbre changes may be reflected in this study. A case-control study of the mismatch negativity (MMN) using electrophysiological technique was conducted. To derive MMNs, three randomly arranged oddball paradigms consisting of standard/deviant instrumental pairs: saxophone/piano, cello/trombone, and flute/French horn, respectively, were presented. Ten CI users and ten normal-hearing (NH) listeners participated in this study. After filtering, epoching, and baseline correction, independent component analysis (ICA) was performed to remove artifacts. The averaged waveforms in response to the standard stimuli (STANDARD waveform) and the deviant stimuli (DEVIANT waveform) in each condition were separately derived. The responses from nine electrodes in the fronto-central area were averaged to form one waveform. The STANDARD waveform was subtracted from the DEVIANT waveform to derive the difference waveform, for which the MMN was judged to be present or absent. The measures used to evaluate the MMN included the MMN peak latency and amplitude as well as MMN duration. The MMN, which reflects the ability to automatically detect acoustic changes, was present in all NH listeners but only approximately half of CI users. In CI users with present MMNs, the MMN peak amplitude and duration were significantly smaller and shorter compared to those in NH listeners. Our electrophysiological results were consistent with prior behavioral results that CI users' performance in timbre perception was significantly poorer than that in NH listeners. Our results may

  3. Leading with simplicity.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    The clinical requirements to deliver safe quality care to patients and the human interactions between and among professional disciplines and agencies are extremely complex. Leaders transform complexity into simplicity. Ten laws of simplicity provide a framework for improving care delivery. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Leading by example.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Clare

    Promoting support for nurse leaders is one of the ten priorities for action identified by Nursing Standard's Care campaign. All nurse leaders need local and national role models and mentorship. In this article we outline the qualities of effective nurse leaders.

  5. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  6. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with uncharacterized encoding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Ding, Yu-Yang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-12-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) is an efficient way to share secrets using untrusted measurement devices. However, the assumption on the characterizations of encoding states is still necessary in this promising protocol, which may lead to unnecessary complexity and potential loopholes in realistic implementations. Here, by using the mismatched-basis statistics, we present the first proof-of-principle experiment of MDI QKD with uncharacterized encoding sources. In this demonstration, the encoded states are only required to be constrained in a two-dimensional Hilbert space, and two distant parties (Alice and Bob) are resistant to state preparation flaws even if they have no idea about the detailed information of their encoding states. The positive final secure key rates of our system exhibit the feasibility of this novel protocol, and demonstrate its value for the application of secure communication with uncharacterized devices.

  7. Fabrication of ten-fold photonic quasicrystalline structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, XiaoHong Wu, YuLong; Liu, Wen; Liu, Wei; Han, Juan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-05-15

    Compared to periodic crystals, quasicrystals have higher point group symmetry and are more favorable in achieving complete band-gaps. In this report, a top-cut prism interferometer is designed to fabricate ten-fold photonic quasicrystalline structures. By optimizing the exposing conditions and material characteristics, appropriate quasicrystals have been obtained in the SU8 photoresist films. Atomic Force Microscopy and laser diffraction are used to characterize the fabricated structures. The measurement results show the consistence between the theoretical design and experiments. This will provide guidance for the large-area and fast production of ten-fold quasicrystalline structures with high quality.

  8. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) for cancer pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Robb, Karen A; Bennett, Michael I; Johnson, Mark I; Simpson, Karen J; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2008-07-16

    Cancer-related pain is complex and multi-dimensional but the mainstay of cancer pain management has predominately used a biomedical approach. There is a need for non-pharmacological and innovative approaches. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) may have a role for a significant number of patients but the effectiveness of TENS is currently unknown. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS for cancer-related pain in adults. We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and PEDRO databases (11/04/08). Only randomised controlled trials (RCTS) investigating the use of TENS for the management of cancer-related pain in adults were included. The search strategy identified 37 possible published studies which were divided between two pairs of review authors that decided on study selection. A study eligibility form was used to screen each abstract and where study eligibility could not be determined from the abstract, the full paper was obtained and assessed by one pair of review authors. A standardised data extraction sheet was used to collect information on the studies and the quality of the studies was assessed independently by two review authors using the validated five-point Oxford Quality Scale. Final scores were discussed and agreed between all four review authors. The small sample sizes and differences in patient study populations of the two included studies prevented meta-analysis. Only two RCTs met the eligibility criteria (64 participants). These studies were heterogenous with respect to study population, sample size, study design, methodological quality, mode of TENS, treatment duration, method of administration and outcome measures used. In one RCT, there were no significant differences between TENS and placebo in women with chronic pain secondary to breast cancer treatment. In the other RCT, there were no significant differences between acupuncture-type TENS and sham in palliative care

  9. An Information Theoretic Characterisation of Auditory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Overath, Tobias; Cusack, Rhodri; Kumar, Sukhbinder; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Warren, Jason D; Grube, Manon; Carlyon, Robert P; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2007-01-01

    The entropy metric derived from information theory provides a means to quantify the amount of information transmitted in acoustic streams like speech or music. By systematically varying the entropy of pitch sequences, we sought brain areas where neural activity and energetic demands increase as a function of entropy. Such a relationship is predicted to occur in an efficient encoding mechanism that uses less computational resource when less information is present in the signal: we specifically tested the hypothesis that such a relationship is present in the planum temporale (PT). In two convergent functional MRI studies, we demonstrated this relationship in PT for encoding, while furthermore showing that a distributed fronto-parietal network for retrieval of acoustic information is independent of entropy. The results establish PT as an efficient neural engine that demands less computational resource to encode redundant signals than those with high information content. PMID:17958472

  10. Quantum repeater with continuous variable encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Albert, Victor V.; Michael, Marios; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Quantum communication enables faithful quantum state transfer between different parties and protocols for cryptographic purposes. However, quantum communication over long distances (>1000km) remains challenging due to optical channel attenuation. This calls for investigation on developing novel encoding schemes that correct photon loss errors efficiently. In this talk, we introduce the generalization of multi-component Schrödinger cat states and propose to encode quantum information in these cat states for ultrafast quantum repeaters. We detail the quantum error correction procedures at each repeater station and characterize the performance of this novel encoding scheme given practical imperfections, such as coupling loss. A comparison with other quantum error correcting codes for bosonic modes will be discussed.

  11. Noise level and MPEG-2 encoder statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo

    1997-01-01

    Most software in the movie and broadcasting industries are still in analog film or tape format, which typically contains random noise that originated from film, CCD camera, and tape recording. The performance of the MPEG-2 encoder may be significantly degraded by the noise. It is also affected by the scene type that includes spatial and temporal activity. The statistical property of noise originating from camera and tape player is analyzed and the models for the two types of noise are developed. The relationship between the noise, the scene type, and encoder statistics of a number of MPEG-2 parameters such as motion vector magnitude, prediction error, and quant scale are discussed. This analysis is intended to be a tool for designing robust MPEG encoding algorithms such as preprocessing and rate control.

  12. Fatal attraction: cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine homologs.

    PubMed

    Saederup, N; Mocarski, E S

    2002-01-01

    Members of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) subfamily of betaherpesviruses infecting primates and rodents encode divergent proteins with sequence characteristics and activities of chemokines, a class of small, secreted proteins that control leukocyte migration and trafficking behavior. Human CMV genes UL146 and UL147 encode proteins with sequence characteristics of CXC chemokines, whereas, murine CMV encodes a CC chemokine homolog (MCK-2). Human CMV UL146 encodes a neutrophil-attracting chemokine denoted viral CXC chemokine-1 (vCXCL1) that is as potent as host IL-8 and functions via the CXCR2 receptor, one of two human IL-8 receptors. Murine CMV MCK-2 is composed of a chemokine domain derived from open reading frame (ORF) m131 (and denoted MCK-1) as well as a domain derived from m129 that does not have sequence similarity to any known class of proteins. A synthetic version of murine CMV m131 (MCK-1) protein carries out many of the activities of a positive-acting chemokine, including transient release of intracellular calcium stores and cell adhesion of peritoneal macrophage populations. In the context of the viral genome and infection of the mouse host, the m131-m129 (MCK-2) gene product confers increased inflammation, higher levels of viremia, and higher titers of virus in salivary glands, consistent with a role in promoting dissemination by attracting an important mononuclear leukocyte population. Other characterized primate CMVs, but not other primate betaherpesviruses, encode gene products similar to human UL146 and UL147. Other characterized rodent CMVs encode a gene product similar to the murine CMV chemokine homolog, although not as a spliced gene product. Thus chemokines, like viral proteins that downmodulate MHC class I expression or have sequence homology to host MHC class I proteins, have evolved in primate and rodent CMVs to carry out an analogous set of immunomodulatory functions during infection of the host even though they arise from distinct origins.

  13. Vector Adaptive/Predictive Encoding Of Speech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Juin-Hwey; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Vector adaptive/predictive technique for digital encoding of speech signals yields decoded speech of very good quality after transmission at coding rate of 9.6 kb/s and of reasonably good quality at 4.8 kb/s. Requires 3 to 4 million multiplications and additions per second. Combines advantages of adaptive/predictive coding, and code-excited linear prediction, yielding speech of high quality but requires 600 million multiplications and additions per second at encoding rate of 4.8 kb/s. Vector adaptive/predictive coding technique bridges gaps in performance and complexity between adaptive/predictive coding and code-excited linear prediction.

  14. Vector Adaptive/Predictive Encoding Of Speech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Juin-Hwey; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Vector adaptive/predictive technique for digital encoding of speech signals yields decoded speech of very good quality after transmission at coding rate of 9.6 kb/s and of reasonably good quality at 4.8 kb/s. Requires 3 to 4 million multiplications and additions per second. Combines advantages of adaptive/predictive coding, and code-excited linear prediction, yielding speech of high quality but requires 600 million multiplications and additions per second at encoding rate of 4.8 kb/s. Vector adaptive/predictive coding technique bridges gaps in performance and complexity between adaptive/predictive coding and code-excited linear prediction.

  15. Saturnine curse: a history of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past ten years there has been increasing recognition of subacute and chronic lead poisoning and a growing awareness of its pathophysiology and clinical effects. Besides the classic manifestations of abdominal colic, seizures, and anemia progressing to gout, renal disease, and neuropathy, more subtle manifestations are now being increasingly recognized, such as the development of hypertension, neurobehavioral changes, reproductive and endocrine abnormalities, a possible role in carcinogenesis, and an overall increase in morbidity and mortality. Lead was one of the seven metals of antiquity, and it has accompanied the Eurasian and American civilizations since their beginnings. Lead is an extremely pernicious metal with a multitude of adverse effects. The recurring nature of lead poisoning throughout the development of civilization can truly be referred to as the saturnine curse. 16 references.

  16. Implementing the Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding in Hospitals Serving Low-Wealth Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Emily C.; Nickel, Nathan C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding is a proven approach to support breastfeeding in maternity settings; however, scant literature exists on the relative impact and interpretation of each step on breastfeeding. We assessed the Ten Steps and their relationship with in-hospital breastfeeding rates at facilities serving low-wealth populations and explored the outcomes to identify step-specific actions. Methods. We present descriptive and nonparametric comparisons and qualitative findings to examine the relationship between the Ten Steps and breastfeeding rates from each hospital using baseline data collection. Results. Some steps (1-policy, 2-training, 4-skin-to-skin, 6-no supplements, and 9-no artificial nipples, followed by 3-prenatal counseling, 7-rooming-in) reflected differences in relative baseline breastfeeding rates between settings. Key informant interviews revealed misunderstanding of some steps. Conclusions. Self-appraisal may be less valid when not all elements of the criteria for evaluating Step implementation may be fully understood. Limited exposure and understanding may lead to self-appraisal errors, resulting in scores that are not reflective of actual practices. Nonetheless, the indication that breastfeeding rates may be better mirrored by a defined subset of steps may provide some constructive insight toward prioritizing implementation activities and simplifying assessment. These issues will be further explored in the next phase of this study. PMID:23078473

  17. Ten Indicators of Vitality in Smaller Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a means of quickly ascertaining the relative health of smaller academic libraries by presenting a top ten list of vitality indicators. The list is based on an observational convenience sampling of thirty smaller academic libraries across the United States. The indicators making the list were those which appeared most often in…

  18. Technical descriptions of ten irrigation technologies for conserving energy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Technical description of ten technologies which were researched to save energy in irrigated agriculture are presented. These technologies are: well design and development ground water supply system optimization, column and pump redesign, variable-speed pumping, pipe network optimization, reduced-pressure center-pivot systems, low-energy precision application, automated gated-pipe system, computerized irrigation scheduling, and instrumented irrigation scheduling. (MHR)

  19. The Texas Ten Percent Plan's Impact on College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Ten Percent Plan (TTP) provides students in the top 10 percent of their high-school class with automatic admission to any public university in the state, including the two flagship schools, the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M. Texas created the policy in 1997 after a federal appellate court ruled that the state's previous…

  20. A Design Taxonomy Utilizing Ten Major Evaluation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Barry

    This paper discusses ten evaluation strategies selected on the basis of their general acceptance and their relatively unique approach to the field: (1) State, "Countenance of Evaluation"; (2) Stufflebeam, "Decision Centered Evaluation (CIPP)"; (3) Provus, "Discrepancy Evaluation"; (4) Scriven, "Goal Free Evaluation"; (5) Scriven, "Formative and…

  1. Ten statistics commandments that almost never should be broken.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Thomas R; Brown, Jean K

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative researchers must choose among a variety of statistical methods when analyzing their data. In this article, the authors identify ten common errors in how statistical techniques are used and reported in clinical research and recommend stronger alternatives. Useful references to the methodological research literature in which such matters are discussed are provided.

  2. The Top Ten Issues Facing America's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomb Community Coll., Warren, MI. Inst. for Future Studies.

    Designed to focus on the implications of change, Macomb Community College has comprised a list of the top ten issues facing America's community colleges today. Diversity is the first issue that community colleges face. Each college should develop a unique mission statement and respond to the changing needs of the community and the marketplace. The…

  3. Identification of Childhood Disability in Jamaica: The Ten Question Screen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorburn, Marigold; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated use of the Ten Question Screen (TQ) to identify disability in a 2-stage population-based survey of 5,478 children aged 2-9 years in Clarendon, Jamaica. Findings indicated varied sensitivity by different subgroups (age, gender, and disability) and an unacceptably high false positive rate. (Author/DB)

  4. Answers to Ten Questions about Implementing Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, George M.; Hall, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    From our experience doing workshops and courses for teachers about cooperative learning, we have chosen ten of the most commonly asked nuts and bolts questions. The suggestions listed below come from our own ESL and EFL classes, ideas from colleagues and from the teacher participants in our cooperative learning workshops and courses, and from…

  5. The Teenage Expertise Network (TEN): An Online Ethnographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicola F.; Humphry, Nicoli

    2012-01-01

    The take-up of digital technology by young people is a well-known phenomenon and has been subject to socio-cultural analysis in areas such as youth studies and cultural studies. The Teenage Expertise Network (TEN) research project investigates how teenagers develop technological expertise in techno-cultural contexts via the use of a purposefully…

  6. 14. UNIDENTIFIED CABLESTAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. UNIDENTIFIED CABLE-STAYED SUSPENSION BRIDGE WITH TIMBER RAILING OF TEN PANELS AND STONE PIER, SHOWING ELEMENTS SIMILAR TO E.E. RUNYON'S SUSPENSION BRIDGE PATENTS, BUT ALTERNATE CABLE PATTERN. 3/4 VIEW FROM BELOW. - Bluff Dale Suspension Bridge, Spanning Paluxy River at County Route 149, Bluff Dale, Erath County, TX

  7. National Wildlife's Readers Rank the Top Ten Environmental Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife, 1977

    1977-01-01

    In a study conducted by the National Wildlife Federation in the fall of 1976, readers were asked to rank ten key environmental issues in order of their importance. Fighting water pollution was regarded as the top overall priority, but encouraging population control received the most first place votes. (BT)

  8. Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The organizers of the Decade for Childhood have formulated Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood as basic requirements for an optimal childhood. The pillars can be used to analyze the quality of childhood in homes and nations, and to guide policies and practices related to the experience of childhood. In this article, the author shall illustrate, pillar…

  9. The Teenage Expertise Network (TEN): An Online Ethnographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicola F.; Humphry, Nicoli

    2012-01-01

    The take-up of digital technology by young people is a well-known phenomenon and has been subject to socio-cultural analysis in areas such as youth studies and cultural studies. The Teenage Expertise Network (TEN) research project investigates how teenagers develop technological expertise in techno-cultural contexts via the use of a purposefully…

  10. The Openhearted Audience: Ten Authors Talk about Writing for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Virginia, Ed.

    This book contains comments by ten authors of children's literature concerning the influences they feel account for the particular qualities that define their books and about creative writing and children's literature in general. In the first article, P. L. Travers stresses the importance of fairy tales, myths, and legends in shaping her work,…

  11. Web Research: Ten Tips for the Techno-Challenged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Most school administrators have a good conceptual grasp of technology and understand its value in education. Yet many are "closet techno-incompetents" when it comes to personal use. In this article, the author presents ten tips for the techno-challenged. The "advanced search" option, among others, is a helpful way to search for information.…

  12. Ten Nonfiction Books (for Adults) to Fall in Love with

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genco, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes ten nonfiction books she recommends for adults: (1) "My Reading Life" (Pat Conroy); (2) "Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea" (Barbara Demick); (3) "Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refuge Boy" (Carlos Eire); (4) "The Perfect Shape + The Perfect Sauce =…

  13. Designing an Educational Game with Ten Steps to Complex Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Few instructional design (ID) models exist which are specific for developing educational games. Moreover, those extant ID models have not been rigorously evaluated. No ID models were found which focus on educational games with complex learning objectives. "Ten Steps to Complex Learning" (TSCL) is based on the four component instructional…

  14. Designing an Educational Game with Ten Steps to Complex Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Few instructional design (ID) models exist which are specific for developing educational games. Moreover, those extant ID models have not been rigorously evaluated. No ID models were found which focus on educational games with complex learning objectives. "Ten Steps to Complex Learning" (TSCL) is based on the four component instructional…

  15. Final Examinations in the Russian Ten-Year School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apanasewicz, Nellie; Rosen, Seymour M.

    In May and June of each year, Soviet students who have completed grades one through ten face a final examination in each of the major subjects which they have studied. The examinations are constructed by the ministries of education in the Soviet republics and are submitted to the individual school district authorities. The type, form, and purpose…

  16. Ten Design Points for the Human Interface to Instructional Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ronald D.

    1995-01-01

    Ten ways to design an effective Human-Computer Interface are explained. Highlights include material delivery that relates to user knowledge; appropriate screen presentations; attention value versus learning and recall; the relationship of packaging and message; the effectiveness of visuals and text; the use of color to enhance communication; the…

  17. Ten simple rules for making research software more robust.

    PubMed

    Taschuk, Morgan; Wilson, Greg

    2017-04-01

    Software produced for research, published and otherwise, suffers from a number of common problems that make it difficult or impossible to run outside the original institution or even off the primary developer's computer. We present ten simple rules to make such software robust enough to be run by anyone, anywhere, and thereby delight your users and collaborators.

  18. Ten Strengths of How Teachers Do Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaocbs, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning involves students in working together with peers to learn, to develop learning skills and to enjoy the learning process. This paper examines ten areas in which the author believes he and other teachers do cooperative learning well. These areas are: (1) keeping group size small, usually four or fewer; (2) encouraging students…

  19. Calocalpe undulata: Contact toxicity of ten insecticides to the larvae

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline L. Roberson; Marion Page; Nancy L. Gillette

    1974-01-01

    Ten insecticides were tested against larvae of Calocalpe undulala (L.). The decreasing order of toxicity at LD50 was: bioethanomethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrins, phoxim, tetrachlorvinfos, mexacarbate, carbaryl, phosmet, DDT, and malathion. At LD90,the decreasing order of toxicity was the same, except that...

  20. Ten Steps to a More Productive Choral Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Christina

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author provides ten strategies to help make choral rehearsals more productive. The strategies, that are described in detail in this article, include: (1) Start on time; (2) Make taking attendance the students' responsibility; (3) Take time to warm up; (4) Include sight-singing; (5) Post the order of music before each…

  1. The First Ten Years. National Sea Grant College Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, E. W. Seabrook

    Detailed are the first ten years of the Sea Grant Program through 1976. The review is divided into three parts. Part I, Sea Grant Origin and Process, traces the historical development of the program and cites the program's philosophy. Part II, Sea Grant in Action, discusses marine resource development, marine technology, research and development,…

  2. OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP RAVINE,LOOKING SOUTH FROM BREAK OVER TOWER LOCATION. A SINGLE ORE BUCKET HANGS FROM THE CABLE AT CENTER. DEATH VALLEY'S FLOOR IS IN THE DISTANCE (TOP). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. Ten-year earnings from two small woodlands

    Treesearch

    Wilfred C. Mitchell; Henry H. Webster

    1961-01-01

    Ten years ago, management was started on two 30-acre demonstration woodlots on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia. These were designated as Farm Woodlots, on the assumption that there was something significantly different between management incentives and opportunities for small holdings owned by farmers and for those owned by non-farmers.

  4. The physiological diversity and similarity of ten Quercus species

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; M.N. Angelov; R.R. Doong; W.R. Harms; Paul P. Kormanik; C.C. Black

    1994-01-01

    Based on anatomical, photosynthetic, and biochemical data, the range of physiological differences and similarities was defined for ten Quercus species. There were no correlations between species' site adaptability, leaf anatomy and photosynthetic rate (A). It is concluded from these data that each oak species must be treated individually when incorporated into...

  5. Ten Years after Columbine: The Tragedy of Youth Deepens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2009-01-01

    For young people it just gets worse. Ten years after the Columbine tragedy, the debate over school safety has clearly shown that educators, parents, politicians, and the mainstream media have created the conditions in which young people have increasingly become the victims of adult mistreatment, indifference, neglect, even violence. The tragic…

  6. Ten Years after Columbine: The Tragedy of Youth Deepens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2009-01-01

    For young people it just gets worse. Ten years after the Columbine tragedy, the debate over school safety has clearly shown that educators, parents, politicians, and the mainstream media have created the conditions in which young people have increasingly become the victims of adult mistreatment, indifference, neglect, even violence. The tragic…

  7. Net Survey: "Top Ten Mistakes" in Academic Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrik, Paula

    2000-01-01

    Highlights the top ten mistakes in academic Web design: (1) bloated graphics; (2) scaling images; (3) dense text; (4) lack of contrast; (5) font size; (6) looping animations; (7) courseware authoring software; (8) scrolling/long pages; (9) excessive download; and (10) the nothing site. Includes resources. (CMK)

  8. Ten Design Points for the Human Interface to Instructional Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ronald D.

    1995-01-01

    Ten ways to design an effective Human-Computer Interface are explained. Highlights include material delivery that relates to user knowledge; appropriate screen presentations; attention value versus learning and recall; the relationship of packaging and message; the effectiveness of visuals and text; the use of color to enhance communication; the…

  9. Ten Immunization-Related Tips in Outpatient Practice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jerome

    2017-04-01

    Keeping up with immunization recommendations and implementing them can be an ongoing challenge for clinicians. Ten tips related to various immunizations given in the outpatient setting are presented, as well as resources useful to the clinician in his or her daily practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Literacy Teacher Preparation: Ten Truths Teacher Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis Lenski, Susan, Ed.; Grisham, Dana L., Ed.; Wold, Linda S., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The quality of teacher preparation is frequently under public scrutiny. In this collection, experts in literacy teacher preparation offer ten truths--based on evidence, not ideology-- that support the ongoing positive efforts of teacher educators. In this book, the reader will find: A review of the existing knowledge base; Evidence of the improved…

  11. Ten Things Faculty Should Know before Stepping into Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settoon, Randy; Juban, Rusty; Budden, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Every year professors leave the ranks of the faculty and become members of the administration. Yes, even jaded faculty sometimes become members of the administration and have to pursue charges and challenges previously unrecognized or unfathomed. It is to these individuals the authors have prepared a list of ten items they feel all potential…

  12. A ten year review of performance of photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.L.; Durand, S.J.; Thomas, M.G.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents data compiled by the Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center at Sandia National Laboratories from more than eighty field tests performed at over thirty-five photovoltaic systems in the United States during the last ten years. The recorded performance histories, failure rates, and degradation of post-Block IV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components are described in detail.

  13. Ten utilities receive acid rain bonus allowances from EPA

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently awarded 1,349 acid rain bonus allowances to ten utilities for energy efficiency and renewable energy measures. An allowance licensesthee emission of one ton of sulfur dioxide. A limited number of allowances are allocated to utilities to ensure that emissions will be cut to less than 9 million tons per year.

  14. Web Research: Ten Tips for the Techno-Challenged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Most school administrators have a good conceptual grasp of technology and understand its value in education. Yet many are "closet techno-incompetents" when it comes to personal use. In this article, the author presents ten tips for the techno-challenged. The "advanced search" option, among others, is a helpful way to search for information.…

  15. Ten Nonfiction Books (for Adults) to Fall in Love with

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genco, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes ten nonfiction books she recommends for adults: (1) "My Reading Life" (Pat Conroy); (2) "Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea" (Barbara Demick); (3) "Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refuge Boy" (Carlos Eire); (4) "The Perfect Shape + The Perfect Sauce =…

  16. The Reality of Comenius Projects in Ten Catalan Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutiérrez Colón-Plana, Mar

    2012-01-01

    This paper submits a qualitative study on different aspects of Comenius projects undertaken in ten educational centres in Catalonia during the academic year 07- 08. The objectives of this paper are to present these projects within the realities of particular school contexts, to emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the projects, the…

  17. Ten Helpful Ideas for Teaching English to Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Joan Kang

    2006-01-01

    This article offers ten suggestions for teaching young learners between the age of 7 and 12 based on language-teaching principles. They include supplementing activities with visuals, realia and movement; involving students in making visuals and realia; moving from activity to activity; teaching in themes; using stories and contexts familiar to…

  18. Ten Steps to a More Productive Choral Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Christina

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author provides ten strategies to help make choral rehearsals more productive. The strategies, that are described in detail in this article, include: (1) Start on time; (2) Make taking attendance the students' responsibility; (3) Take time to warm up; (4) Include sight-singing; (5) Post the order of music before each…

  19. Electrical Resistivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    alloys --* Aluminum Alloys --*Copper alloys --*Gold alloys --*Nickel Alloys --*Silver alloys --*Iron alloys --*Palladium alloys ... aluminum -magnesium, and copper-zinc) are given for 27 compositions: 0 (pure element).* For aluminum -copper, aluninu.-eagnes tur, end copper-zinc alloy ...available data and infor- mation. The ten binary alloy systems selected are the systems of aluminum - copper, aluminum -magnesium, copper-gold,

  20. Transboundary atmospheric lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Erel, Yigal; Axelrod, Tamar; Veron, Alain; Mahrer, Yitzak; Katsafados, Petros; Dayan, Uri

    2002-08-01

    A high-temporal resolution collection technique was applied to refine aerosol sampling in Jerusalem, Israel. Using stable lead isotopes, lead concentrations, synoptic data, and atmospheric modeling, we demonstrate that lead detected in the atmosphere of Jerusalem is not only anthropogenic lead of local origin but also lead emitted in other countries. Fifty-seven percent of the collected samples contained a nontrivial fraction of foreign atmospheric lead and had 206Pb/207Pb values which deviated from the local petrol-lead value (206Pb/207Pb = 1.113) by more than two standard deviations (0.016). Foreign 206Pb/207Pb values were recorded in Jerusalem on several occasions. The synoptic conditions on these dates and reported values of the isotopic composition of lead emitted in various countries around Israel suggest that the foreign lead was transported to Jerusalem from Egypt, Turkey, and East Europe. The average concentration of foreign atmospheric lead in Jerusalem was 23 +/- 17 ng/m3, similar to the average concentration of local atmospheric lead, 21 +/- 18 ng/ m3. Hence, the load of foreign atmospheric lead is similar to the load of local atmospheric lead in Jerusalem.

  1. Matrix Encoding For Correction Of Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Ronald S.

    1991-01-01

    Method of matrix encoding and associated decoding provides for correction of errors in digital data recorded on magnetic tape. Intended specifically for use with commercial control circuit board and associated software making it possible to use video cassette recorder as backup for hard-disk memory of personal computer.

  2. Retrieval during Learning Facilitates Subsequent Memory Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastotter, Bernhard; Schicker, Sabine; Niedernhuber, Julia; Bauml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2011-01-01

    In multiple-list learning, retrieval during learning has been suggested to improve recall of the single lists by enhancing list discrimination and, at test, reducing interference. Using electrophysiological, oscillatory measures of brain activity, we examined to what extent retrieval during learning facilitates list encoding. Subjects studied 5…

  3. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  4. Encoding and Retrieval During Bimanual Rhythmic Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley, Kevin; Turvey, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2 experiments, bimanual 1:1 rhythmic coordination was performed concurrently with encoding or retrieval of word lists. Effects of divided attention (DA) on coordination were indexed by changes in mean relative phase and recurrence measures of shared activity between the 2 limbs. Effects of DA on memory were indexed by deficits in recall…

  5. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  6. An extraordinary retrotransposon family encoding dual endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kenji K.; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2005-01-01

    Retrotransposons commonly encode a reverse transcriptase (RT), but other functional domains are variable. The acquisition of new domains is the dominant evolutionary force that brings structural variety to retrotransposons. Non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons are classified into two groups by their structure. Early branched non-LTR retrotransposons encode a restriction-like endonuclease (RLE), and recently branched non-LTR retrotransposons encode an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-like endonuclease (APE). In this study, we report a novel non-LTR retrotransposon family Dualen, identified from the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome. Dualen encodes two endonucleases, RLE and APE, with RT, ribonuclease H, and cysteine protease. Phylogenetic analyses of the RT domains revealed that Dualen is positioned at the midpoint between the early-branched and the recently branched groups. In the APE tree, Dualen was branched earlier than the I group and the Jockey group. The ribonuclease H domains among the Dualen family and other non-LTR retrotransposons are monophyletic. Phylogenies of three domains revealed the monophyly of the Dualen family members. The domain structure and the phylogeny of each domain imply that Dualen is a retrotransposon conserving the domain structure just after the acquisition of APE. From these observations, we discuss the evolution of domain structure of non-LTR retrotransposons. PMID:16077010

  7. Retrieval during Learning Facilitates Subsequent Memory Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastotter, Bernhard; Schicker, Sabine; Niedernhuber, Julia; Bauml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2011-01-01

    In multiple-list learning, retrieval during learning has been suggested to improve recall of the single lists by enhancing list discrimination and, at test, reducing interference. Using electrophysiological, oscillatory measures of brain activity, we examined to what extent retrieval during learning facilitates list encoding. Subjects studied 5…

  8. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  9. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  10. Encoding of Others' Beliefs without Overt Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam S.; German, Tamsin C.

    2009-01-01

    Under what conditions do people automatically encode and track the mental states of others? A recent investigation showed that when subjects are instructed to track the location of an object but are not instructed to track a belief about that location in a non-verbal false-belief task, they respond more slowly to questions about an agent's belief,…

  11. Design Primer for Reed-Solomon Encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Design and operation of Reed-Solomon (RS) encoders discussed in document prepared as instruction manual for computer designers and others in dataprocessing field. Conventional and Berlekamp architectures compared. Engineers who equip computer memory chips with burst-error and dropout detection and correction find report especially useful.

  12. Design Primer for Reed-Solomon Encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Design and operation of Reed-Solomon (RS) encoders discussed in document prepared as instruction manual for computer designers and others in dataprocessing field. Conventional and Berlekamp architectures compared. Engineers who equip computer memory chips with burst-error and dropout detection and correction find report especially useful.

  13. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  14. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  15. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  16. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  17. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... used for audio messages and at least one input port used for data messages. (3) Outputs. The encoder shall have at least one audio output port and at least one data output port. (4) Calibration. EAS... that complies with the following: (i) Tone Frequencies. The audio tones shall have fundamental...

  18. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... used for audio messages and at least one input port used for data messages. (3) Outputs. The encoder shall have at least one audio output port and at least one data output port. (4) Calibration. EAS... that complies with the following: (i) Tone Frequencies. The audio tones shall have fundamental...

  19. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... used for audio messages and at least one input port used for data messages. (3) Outputs. The encoder shall have at least one audio output port and at least one data output port. (4) Calibration. EAS... that complies with the following: (i) Tone Frequencies. The audio tones shall have fundamental...

  20. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Noga; Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Lerner, Yulia; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ash, Elissa L.

    2016-01-01

    When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, and is evident in regions such as the prefrontal cortex section of the task positive network (TPN), and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a hub of the default mode network (DMN). Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC) levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC). These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the latter increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the prefrontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the prefrontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed relationship between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points

  1. JPEG 2000 Encoding with Perceptual Distortion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Liu, Zhen; Karam, Lina J.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach has been devised for encoding image data in compliance with JPEG 2000, the most recent still-image data-compression standard of the Joint Photographic Experts Group. Heretofore, JPEG 2000 encoding has been implemented by several related schemes classified as rate-based distortion-minimization encoding. In each of these schemes, the end user specifies a desired bit rate and the encoding algorithm strives to attain that rate while minimizing a mean squared error (MSE). While rate-based distortion minimization is appropriate for transmitting data over a limited-bandwidth channel, it is not the best approach for applications in which the perceptual quality of reconstructed images is a major consideration. A better approach for such applications is the present alternative one, denoted perceptual distortion control, in which the encoding algorithm strives to compress data to the lowest bit rate that yields at least a specified level of perceptual image quality. Some additional background information on JPEG 2000 is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of JPEG encoding with perceptual distortion control. The JPEG 2000 encoding process includes two subprocesses known as tier-1 and tier-2 coding. In order to minimize the MSE for the desired bit rate, a rate-distortion- optimization subprocess is introduced between the tier-1 and tier-2 subprocesses. In tier-1 coding, each coding block is independently bit-plane coded from the most-significant-bit (MSB) plane to the least-significant-bit (LSB) plane, using three coding passes (except for the MSB plane, which is coded using only one "clean up" coding pass). For M bit planes, this subprocess involves a total number of (3M - 2) coding passes. An embedded bit stream is then generated for each coding block. Information on the reduction in distortion and the increase in the bit rate associated with each coding pass is collected. This information is then used in a rate-control procedure to determine the

  2. Lead Content of Foodstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Douglas G.; Aldous, Kenneth M.

    1974-01-01

    The lead content of a number of foodstuffs, particularly baby fruit juices and milk, is reported. Samples were analyzed in quadruplicate by using an automated Delves cup atomic absorption procedure. A large proportion of the products examined contained significant amounts of lead. Of 256 metal can examined, the contents of 62% contained a lead level of 100 μg/l. or more, 37% contained 200 μg/l. or more and 12% contained 400 μg/l. lead or more. Of products in glass and aluminum containers, only 1% had lead levels in excess of 200 μg/l. Lead levels of contents also correlate with the seam length/volume ratio of the leaded seam can. A survey of bulk milk showed a mean lead level of 40 μg/l. for 270 samples; for canned evaporated milk the mean level was 202 μg/l. These data indicate a potential health hazard. PMID:4406645

  3. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... metal used in everything from construction materials to batteries, can cause serious health problems, particularly in young ... introduce lead dust into the home. water that flows through old lead pipes or faucets, if the ...

  4. Aquatic Life Criteria - Lead

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    References and documents pertaining to Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Lead. These documents include the safe levels of Lead in water that should protect the majority of species.

  5. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  6. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  7. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Lead.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Lead exposure is a major concern for the developing nervous system. Environmental exposures to lead, predominantly from contaminated water or lead paint chips, account for the majority of exposures to children. In utero and early life exposures to lead have been associated with lower IQ, antisocial and delinquent behaviors, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this review, we will discuss sources of developmental lead exposure and mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity. We will highlight both human epidemiological studies showing associations between lead exposure and behavioral abnormalities as well as experimental data from animal studies. Finally, we will discuss the effects of lead on neurological endpoint past childhood, namely, development of Alzheimer's disease in old age.

  8. Encoding Orientation and the Remembering of Schizophrenic Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Soon D.; Peterson, Rolf A.

    1978-01-01

    This research examines different types of encoding strategies, in addition to semantic and organizational encodings, and their effects on schizophrenics' remembering. Based on Craik and Lockhart (1972), i.e., memory performance is a function of depth of encoding processing, this analysis compares schizophrenics' encoding processing with that of…

  9. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  10. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  11. [Lead content in alginates].

    PubMed

    Castagnola, L; Wirz, J

    1977-03-01

    Alginates containing a high level of lead may lead to health damages in dentists and their personnel. Walter and Söremark have pointed out these hazards. The author's investigations with the Perkin-Elmer absorption-photospectrometer shall show how high the lead content of the 25 brands of alginate sold in this country is. Ca 37, Protex and Algihard S contain sizeable amounts of lead. Recommendations are given towards the protection of dentist and assistant.

  12. Amygdala neurons differentially encode motivation and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tye, Kay M; Janak, Patricia H

    2007-04-11

    Lesion studies demonstrate that the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) is important for assigning motivational significance to sensory stimuli, but little is known about how this information is encoded. We used in vivo electrophysiology procedures to investigate how the amygdala encodes motivating and reinforcing properties of cues that induce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. Two groups of rats were trained to respond to a sucrose reward. The "paired" group was trained with a reward-predictive cue, whereas the "unpaired" group was trained with a randomly presented cue. Both groups underwent identical extinction and reinstatement procedures during which the reward was withheld. The proportion of neurons that were phasically cue responsive during reinstatement was significantly higher in the paired group (46 of 100) than in the unpaired group (8 of 112). Cues that induce reward-seeking behavior can do so by acting as incentives or reinforcers. Distinct populations of neurons responded to the cue in trials in which the cue acted as an incentive, triggering a motivated reward-seeking state, or as a reinforcer, supporting continued instrumental responding. The incentive motivation-encoding population of neurons (34 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 74%) extinguished in temporal agreement with a decrease in the rate of instrumental responding. The conditioned reinforcement-encoding population of neurons (12 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 26%) maintained their response for the duration of cue-reinforced instrumental responding. These data demonstrate that separate populations of cue-responsive neurons in the BLA encode the motivating or reinforcing properties of a cue previously associated with a reward.

  13. Asia Wise, Issues One-Ten, 1990 [and] Asia Wise, Teachers' Section, Issues One-Ten 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia Wise, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Student volumes and teacher guides for 10 issues of an Australian magazine devoted to the study of Asia comprise this document. The subjects of the ten issues are: (1) Trading for Our Future; (2) Korea: Two Nations--One People; (3) Women in Asia--A Confusing Picture; (4) Australia--Indonesia: A Developing Relationship; (5) The Land on the Roof of…

  14. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) for cancer pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Hurlow, Adam; Bennett, Michael I; Robb, Karen A; Johnson, Mark I; Simpson, Karen H; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2012-03-14

    Cancer-related pain is complex and multi-dimensional but the mainstay of cancer pain management has predominantly used a biomedical approach. There is a need for non-pharmacological and innovative approaches. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) may have a role in pain management but the effectiveness of TENS is currently unknown. This is an update of the original review published in Issue 3, 2008. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS for cancer-related pain in adults. The initial review searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and PEDRO databases in April 2008. We performed an updated search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PEDRO databases in November 2011. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTS) investigating the use of TENS for the management of cancer-related pain in adults. The search strategy identified a further two studies for possible inclusion. One of the review authors screened each abstract using a study eligibility tool. Where eligibility could not be determined, a second author assessed the full paper. One author used a standardised data extraction sheet to collect information on the studies and independently assess the quality of the studies using the validated five-point Oxford Quality Scale. The small sample sizes and differences in patient study populations of the three included studies (two from the original review and a third included in this update) prevented meta-analysis. For the original review the search strategy identified 37 possible published studies; we divided these between two pairs of review authors who decided on study selection; all four review authors discussed and agreed final scores. Only one additional RCT met the eligibility criteria (24 participants) for this updated review. Although this was a feasibility study, not designed to investigate intervention effect, it suggested that TENS may improve bone pain on movement in a

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of the gene encoding rat submandibular gland apomucin, Mucsmg.

    PubMed

    Albone, E F; Hagen, F K; Szpirer, C; Tabak, L A

    1996-10-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are a major constituent of salivary secretions and play a primary role in the protection of the oral cavity. Rat submandibular glands (RSMG) synthesize and secrete a low molecular weight (114 kDa) mucin glycoprotein. We have isolated, partially sequenced, and characterized the gene which encodes the RSMG apomucin. The gene is encoded by three exons of 106 nt, 69 nt, and 991 nt, separated by introns of 921 nt and 12.5 kb. CAAT and TATA elements are present, at -68 and -26, respectively, in the 5' flanking sequence of the RSMG apomucin gene. The tandem repeat domain present in exon III consists of ten tandem repeats of 39 nt encoding the consensus sequence PTTDSTTPAPTTK. Sequence comparison and organization of the nucleic acid sequence encoding the tandem repeats of two alleles for this gene suggests that the apomucin gene has undergone recombinational events during its evolution. No significant sequence similarity was found with other mucin genes, or with other known salivary gland-specific genes. The gene was localized to rat chromosome 14 using somatic cell hybrids that segregate rat chromosomes. Since this, to our knowledge, represents the first RSMG mucin gene cloned, we have designated this gene Mucsmg.

  16. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  17. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  18. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  19. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  20. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  1. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  2. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  3. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  4. Effortful Retrieval Reduces Hippocampal Activity and Impairs Incidental Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Reas, Emilie T.; Brewer, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Functional imaging studies frequently report that the hippocampus is engaged by successful episodic memory retrieval. However, considering that concurrent encoding of the background environment occurs during retrieval and influences medial temporal lobe activity, it is plausible that hippocampal encoding functions are reduced with increased attentional engagement during effortful retrieval. Expanding upon evidence that retrieval efforts suppress activity in hippocampal regions implicated in encoding, this study examines the influence of retrieval effort on encoding performance and the interactive effects of encoding and retrieval on hippocampal and neocortical activity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while subjects performed a word recognition task with incidental picture encoding. Both lower memory strength and increased search duration were associated with encoding failure and reduced hippocampal and default network activity. Activity in the anterior hippocampus tracked encoding, which was more strongly deactivated when incidental encoding was unsuccessful. These findings highlight potential contributions from background encoding processes to hippocampal activations during neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval. PMID:23378272

  5. A version of the TEN Test for use with ER-3A insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Creeke, Sarah; Glasberg, Brian R; Stone, Michael A; Sek, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a version of the threshold-equalizing noise (TEN) test for the diagnosis of dead regions for use with Etymotic ER-3A insert earphones. The use of such earphones is helpful when testing clients with asymmetric hearing loss or clients whose ear canals tend to collapse under the pressure of supra-aural headphones. It can also be useful when ambient noise levels are problematic. The spectral shape of the noise required to give equal masked thresholds at all frequencies, when expressed in dB HL, was derived by empirical measurements of the electrical output of audiometers using ER-3A earphones. To reduce the loudness of the noise and to minimize distortion generated in the audiometer or earphone, the noise was band-limited between 354 and 6500 Hz. In addition, the noise was synthesized using a method that leads to a low crest factor (ratio of peak to root mean square value). This further reduced audiometer/earphone distortion, and allowed higher levels per ERBN; ERBN is the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the auditory filter at 1 kHz, as determined using young normally hearing subjects. The test tone frequencies were limited to the range 500 to 4000 Hz. Subjects with normal or near-normal hearing were tested using a noise level of 60 dB HL/ERBN, to assess whether the noise did lead to equal masked thresholds in dB HL for all audiometric frequencies from 500 to 4000 Hz. Thresholds in the TEN were measured using manual audiometry with a 2 dB final step size. The mean-masked thresholds varied by 1.3 dB across frequency when expressed in dB HL, and were close to the noise level per ERBN. This version of the TEN test can be used with ER-3A insert earphones.

  6. Ten pearls every dermatologist should know about the appropriate use of relaxers.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Vanessa; Agidi, Ada T; Eaddy, Erica R; Davis, Loretta S

    2017-03-01

    Chemical relaxers are products marketed to straighten the hair and have been principally used by African Americans since the early twentieth century. They contain alkaline agents that break and reform hydrogen and disulfide bonds, leaving hair permanently straightened. Relaxers cause loss of tensile strength and increased fragility of the hair shaft that lead to increased risk of hair breakage and thinning. When used improperly, they can also cause local irritant contact dermatitis and chemical burns to the scalp and hairline that can potentially lead to a scarring alopecia. After interviewing several cosmetology educators in the field and reviewing the literature, we generated a list of ten pearls that all dermatologists should know about relaxers to provide professional guidance to their patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. C1-Ten is a PTPase of nephrin, regulating podocyte hypertrophy through mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoun; Koh, Ara; Jeong, Heeyoon; Kim, Eui; Ha, Tae-Sun; Saleem, Moin A; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2017-09-27

    Hypertrophy is a prominent feature of damaged podocytes in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). mTORC1 hyperactivation leads to podocyte hypertrophy, but the detailed mechanism of how mTORC1 activation occurs under pathological conditions is not completely known. Moreover, reduced nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation has been observed in podocytes under pathological conditions, but the molecular mechanism linking nephrin phosphorylation and pathology is unclear so far. In this study, we observed a significant increase in C1-Ten level in diabetic kidney and in high glucose-induced damaged podocytes. C1-Ten acts as a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) at the nephrin-PI3K binding site and renders PI3K for IRS-1, thereby activating mTORC1. Furthermore, C1-Ten causes podocyte hypertrophy and proteinuria by increasing mTORC1 activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate the relationship between nephrin dephosphorylation and the mTORC1 pathway, mediated by C1-Ten PTPase activity. We suggest that C1-Ten contributes to the pathogenesis of DKD by inducing podocyte hypertrophy under high glucose conditions.

  8. Law: toxic lead aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, E.A.

    1983-03-01

    The paper describes the events which began with an EPA proposal to weaken the lead-in-gas regulations. Because of the outcry from environmentalists and expert testimony from the medical community, the EPA reversed its policy and issued new standards which would reduce lead emissions between 1983 and 1990 by 34 percent (128,000 tons). Scientific evidence presented showed a clear reduction in blood lead levels from 1976-1980 which paralleled decreases of lead in gasoline. Results from lead poisoning clinics which linked chronic low lead exposures to decreased classroom performance and other learning disabilities were presented. Lawyers from several environmental groups took the agency to court on the related issue of attaining national ambient air quality standards for lead. (JMT)

  9. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John=

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  10. Implement of FGS video encoding based on H.264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiwei; Feng, Gui

    2007-01-01

    In H.264 video coding standard, the combination encoding frame was adopted. It introduces some new algorithms, and modifies several aspects of the encoding scheme. So the encoding scheme improves the encoding efficiency obviously. But the H.264 standard is not supporting FGS encoding. So a H.264 based self-adaptive FGS (Fine Granular Scalable)(H.264-FGS) encoding scheme is proposed in this paper. In this encoding scheme, the base layer of encoder is keeping H.264 encoder architecture, which consists of the motion estimation, motion compensation, intra predictive, integer transformation, loop filtering, content based arithmetic encoding, and etc. In the base layer generated block we obtain base code flux of FGS. Subtracting the original image from the reconstruction image of the base layer, we get the residual error. Then after the DCT transform and the variable length encoding compresses, we obtain the enhanced code flux of FGS. Compared with the original MPEG-4 FGS encoding scheme, the proposed FGS encoding scheme has the feature of increasing encoding efficiency by 1~3 dB and keep the all properties that MPEG-4 FGS encoding technology provided.

  11. A method to engineer phase-encoded photon sieve for intensity pattern generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Li; Gao, Yaru; Liu, Chunxiang; Xu, Shicai; Zhang, Meina; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel type of photon sieve where phases of its sieved waves are encoded as radial positions of the pinholes and use such phase-encoded sieves for generating designed intensity patterns in Fresnel domain. The sieve pinholes are arranged around Fresnel-rings to eliminate the quadratic Fresnel phase factor of diffraction of the sieved waves, leading the wave propagation to be equivalent to Fraunhofer diffraction. The pinholes take constant size in this paper and realize equal amplitude in the multiple sieved waves. Their positions are adjusted radially from corresponding rings to encode wave phases, taking effect by resulting in different optical paths from them to the observation plane origin. Then along with wave propagation, the encoded phases are decoded and the required phase differences are obtained in the discrete waves. We first conduct numerical simulations to show satisfactory performance of such phase-encoded photon sieves in generating arbitrarily designed intensity patterns and describe the quality of the reconstructed patterns. Then for qualitatively verifying the phase-encoding method, we experimentally fabricate three such sieves with relatively small pinhole number and obtain the designed patterns.

  12. FMOE-MR: content-driven multiresolution MPEG-4 fine grained scalable layered video encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Luo, X.; Bhandarkar, S. M.; Li, K.

    2007-01-01

    The MPEG-4 Fine Grained Scalability (FGS) profile aims at scalable layered video encoding, in order to ensure efficient video streaming in networks with fluctuating bandwidths. In this paper, we propose a novel technique, termed as FMOEMR, which delivers significantly improved rate distortion performance compared to existing MPEG-4 Base Layer encoding techniques. The video frames are re-encoded at high resolution at semantically and visually important regions of the video (termed as Features, Motion and Objects) that are defined using a mask (FMO-Mask) and at low resolution in the remaining regions. The multiple-resolution re-rendering step is implemented such that further MPEG-4 compression leads to low bit rate Base Layer video encoding. The Features, Motion and Objects Encoded-Multi- Resolution (FMOE-MR) scheme is an integrated approach that requires only encoder-side modifications, and is transparent to the decoder. Further, since the FMOE-MR scheme incorporates "smart" video preprocessing, it requires no change in existing MPEG-4 codecs. As a result, it is straightforward to use the proposed FMOE-MR scheme with any existing MPEG codec, thus allowing great flexibility in implementation. In this paper, we have described, and implemented, unsupervised and semi-supervised algorithms to create the FMO-Mask from a given video sequence, using state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms.

  13. Clinical alarm hazards: a "top ten" health technology safety concern.

    PubMed

    Keller, James P

    2012-01-01

    For the past several years ECRI Institute has published a list of Top Ten Health Technology Hazards. This list is based on ECRI's extensive research in health technology safety and on data provided to its problemreporting systems. For every year that the Top Ten list has been published, Alarm Hazards have been at or near the top of the list. Improving alarm safety requires a systematic review of a hospital's alarm-based technologies and analysis of alarm management policies like alarm escalation strategies and staffing patterns. It also requires careful selection of alarm setting criteria for each clinical care area. This article will overview the clinical alarm problems that have been identified through ECRI Institute's research and analysis of various problem reporting databases, including those operated by ECRI Institute. It will also highlight suggestions for improvement, particularly from a technology design and technology management perspective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-pharmacological treatments for pain relief: TENS and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Coutaux, Anne

    2017-02-20

    Acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are non-pharmacological methods that have been used for millennia to relieve pain. As with all complementary treatments, efficacy evaluations face two hurdles: the non-feasibility of double-blinding and the difficulty in identifying the optimal control population or treatment. Nevertheless, recent studies of good methodological quality have demonstrated benefits in many types of pain compared to conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action of acupuncture and TENS, which are increasingly well understood, involve endogenous pain control systems, cerebral plasticity, and nonspecific effects (e.g., expectations and placebo effect). No serious adverse effects have been reported. These data support the more widespread use of non-pharmacological pain management, most notably in patients with chronic pain inadequately relieved by medications alone.

  15. Physiological variability within ten strains of Chaetoceros muelleri (bacillariophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, J.R.; Barclay, W.R.; Nagle, N. )

    1990-06-01

    The effects of temperature, ionic composition, and conductivity on growth rates of ten strains of Chaetoceros muelleri Lemmerman (mostly var. subsalsum Johan. Rushf.) were studied. Lipid content of stressed and unstressed cells and fatty acid composition were also determined. Considerable physiological variability was observed in the ten strains, although principal components analysis of physiological data indicated that all strains fell into one of two major groups: C. muelleri (var. muelleri and var. subsalsum) and an undescribed Chaetoceros species morphologically close to C. muelleri var. subsalsum. A high degree of agreement was found among morphological, physiological, and biochemical data sets, indicting that physiological and biochemical data may be helpful in making taxonomic decisions in diatoms, particularly in taxa with few morphological characters. We also conclude that nonmorphological characters such as those employed in the present study can be used to test phylogenetic hypotheses formulated from traditional morphological data.

  16. Ten years of catalyst recycling: A step to the future

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Garretson, G.; Wiewiorowski, E.

    1995-12-31

    The Port Nickel facility in Braithwaite, Louisiana, is known for pioneering hydrometallurgical processes for the separation and recovery of nickel, cobalt and copper. Ten years ago, in 1985, a new CRI-MET process for the recovery of molybdenum, vanadium, nickel, cobalt and alumina from spent catalysts was developed and implemented. Spent catalysts from the petroleum industry constitute the majority of feed. These are not only a valuable source of metals, but due to EPA regulations are frequently classified as hazardous under RCRA. Molybdenum and vanadium are selectively leached in an oxidative hydrothermal step. Alumina is then extracted in a Caustic digestive leach. The unique technology produces four primary commercial products: molybdenum trioxide, vanadium oxide, aluminum trihydrate and nickel-cobalt concentrate. This paper discusses the process, modifications during ten years of operation, and the relationship of these modifications to the future of the catalyst recycling business.

  17. [THE TEN MOST CITED ARTICLES OF THE JOURNAL "NUTRICION HOSPITALARIA"].

    PubMed

    Franco-López, Ángeles; González-Gallego, Javier; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Tuñón, María Jesús; García-De-Lorenzo, Abelardo; Culebras, Jesús M

    2015-12-01

    After 36 years of continued publication of the journal Nutrición Hospitalaria, a list with the ten most cited articles published in it is elaborated. The top ten most cited articles in the world literature and stratification according to language, English or Spanish, subject, or period of time published are also analyzed. Nutr Hosp is the most important Ibero latin American nutrition journal. Nutr Hosp published 369 items in 2014 gaining the fourth position among all the world's journals devoted to nutrition. Article publication in English, or simultaneously in Spanish and English and Open Access policy probably benefit the number of citations. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Top Ten Interaction Challenges in Extreme-Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Chen, Chaomei

    2012-05-31

    The chapter presents ten selected user interfaces and interaction challenges in extreme-scale visual analytics. The study of visual analytics is often referred to as 'the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces' in the literature. The discussion focuses on the issues of applying visual analytics technologies to extreme-scale scientific and non-scientific data ranging from petabyte to exabyte in sizes. The ten challenges are: in situ interactive analysis, user-driven data reduction, scalability and multi-level hierarchy, representation of evidence and uncertainty, heterogeneous data fusion, data summarization and triage for interactive query, analytics of temporally evolving features, the human bottleneck, design and engineering development, and the Renaissance of conventional wisdom. The discussion addresses concerns that arise from different areas of hardware, software, computation, algorithms, and human factors. The chapter also evaluates the likelihood of success in meeting these challenges in the near future.

  19. Team learning in medical education: initial experiences at ten institutions.

    PubMed

    Searle, Nancy S; Haidet, Paul; Kelly, P Adam; Schneider, Virginia F; Seidel, Charles L; Richards, Boyd F

    2003-10-01

    In the midst of curricular reforms that frequently call for reducing lectures and increasing small-group teaching, there is a crisis in faculty time for teaching. This paper describes the initial experiences of ten institutions with team learning (TL), a teaching method which fosters small-group learning in a large-class setting. After initial pilot studies at one institution, nine additional institutions implemented TL in one or more courses. Within 18 months, TL has been used in 40 courses (from.5% to 100% of the time) and all ten institutions will increase its use next year. We surmise that this relatively rapid spread of TL into the medical curriculum is due to the sound pedagogy and efficiency of TL as well as the modest financial resources and support we have provided to partner institutions.

  20. Memory as discrimination: a challenge to the encoding-retrieval match principle.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Marie; Nairne, James S; Morin, Caroline; Zimmermann, Friederike G S; Koutmeridou, Kyriaki; Fowler, James

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments contrasted the predictions of a general encoding-retrieval match hypothesis with those of a view claiming that the distinctiveness of the cue-target relationship is the causal factor in retrieval. In Experiments 1, 2, and 4 participants learned the relationships between 4 targets and trios of cues; in Experiment 3 there were 3 targets, each associated with a pair of cues. A learning phase was followed by a cued-recognition task where the correct target had to be identified based on 1 or more of the cues. The main performance measurement was response time. Learning was designed to lead to high accuracy so effects could be attributed to retrieval efficiency rather than to variations in encoding. The nature of the cues and targets was varied across experiments. The critical factor was whether each cue was uniquely associated with the to-be-recalled target. All experiments orthogonally manipulated (a) how discriminative-or uniquely associated with a target-each cue was and (b) the degree of overlap between the cues present during learning and those present at retrieval. The novel finding reported here is that increasing the encoding-retrieval match can hinder performance if the increase simultaneously reduces how well cues predict a target-that is, a cue's diagnostic value. Encoding-retrieval match was not the factor that determined the effectiveness of retrieval. Our findings suggest that increasing the encoding-retrieval match can lead to no change, an increase, or a decrease in retrieval performance.

  1. Reflections on Ten Years of Network Time Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 1 REFLECTIONS ON TEN YEARS OF NETWORK TIME SERVICE Richard...Schmidt Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC 20392-5420, USA E-mail: res@tuttle.usno.navy.mil Abstract The year...2004 marks the 10th anniversary since the start of U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) time dissemination on the Internet using the Network Time Protocol

  2. The ten advances that have defined modern cardiology.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2014-07-01

    Modern cardiology was born early in the twentieth century. Here I list and review what I believe to be the ten most important advances in the twentieth century in this field. They are as follows: electrocardiography, cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis, cardiac catheterization, cardiovascular surgery, coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary angioplasty, the coronary care unit, the development of new cardiovascular drugs, preventive cardiology, cardiac imaging, and implanted cardiac pacemakers/defibrillators.

  3. Ten lessons for developing a health information website.

    PubMed

    Ottmann, Goetz; Street, Annette F

    2007-11-01

    This paper outlines ten lessons derived from the development of a palliative care website, www.pallcarevic.asn.au. The following program elements contributed to the success of the project: (1) peer and stakeholder participation; (2) response to a significant need; (3) networking skills; (4) administrative skills; (5) mediation of conflicts; (6) project management skills; (7) sourcing of good evidence; (8) iterative evaluation involving users and stakeholders; (9) iterative expert evaluation; and (10) a well thought through sustainability strategy.

  4. Ten facts of life for distant supersoft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Kong, Albert; Primini, Francis A.

    2010-03-01

    First discovered in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Milky Way, the largest pools of luminous supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) now known lie in M31 and in more distant galaxies. Hundreds of newly-discovered SSSs are helping us to test models for Type Ia supernovae and to identify SSSs that may represent a wider range of physical systems, including accreting intermediate-mass black holes. In this short report we list ten intriguing facts about distant SSSs.

  5. Facemask therapy between ages six to ten years may lead to short term improvements for Class III malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Shadrick, Vincent; Walker, Mhairi

    2013-12-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline and Embase databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials of orthodontic treatments to correct prominent lower front teeth. Study screening and data extraction and risk of bias assessment were carried out independently by two reviewers. Meta-analysis was only undertaken when studies of similar comparisons reported comparable outcome measures. Seven RCTs with a total of 339 participants were included in this review. Three studies were at high risk of bias, three unclear and one at low risk. Four studies reported on the use of a facemask, two on the chin cup, one on the tandem traction bow appliance, and one on mandibular headgear. One study reported on both the chin cup and mandibular headgear appliances.One study (n = 73, low quality evidence), comparing a facemask to no treatment, reported a mean difference (MD) in overjet of 4.10 mm (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.04 to 5.16; P value < 0.0001) favouring the facemask treatment. Two studies comparing facemasks to untreated control did not report the outcome of overjet. Three studies (n = 155, low quality evidence) reported ANB (an angular measurement relating the positions of the top and bottom jaws) differences immediately after treatment with a facemask when compared to an untreated control. The pooled data showed a statistically significant MD in ANB in favour of the facemask of 3.93° (95% CI 3.46 to 4.39; P value < 0.0001). There was significant heterogeneity between these studies (I(2) = 82%). This is likely to have been caused by the different populations studied and the different ages at the time of treatment.One study (n = 73, low quality evidence) reported outcomes of the use of the facemask compared to an untreated control at three years follow-up. This study showed that improvements in overjet and ANB were still present three years post-treatment. In this study, adverse effects were reported, but due to the low prevalence of temporomandibular (TMJ) signs and symptoms no analysis was undertaken.Two studies (n = 90, low quality evidence) compared the chin cup with an untreated control. Both studies found a statistically significant improvement in ANB, and one study also found an improvement in the Wits appraisal. Data from these two studies were not suitable for pooling.A single study of the tandem traction bow appliance compared to untreated control (n = 30, very low quality evidence) showed a statistically significant difference in both overjet and ANB favouring the intervention group. There is some evidence that the use of a facemask to correct prominent lower front teeth in children is effective when compared to no treatment on a short-term basis. However, in view of the general poor quality of the included studies, these results should be viewed with caution. Further randomised controlled trials with long follow-up are required.

  6. Six to Ten Digits Multiplication Fun Learning Using Puppet Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamiah Rosli, D.'oria; Ali, Azita; Peng, Lim Soo; Sujardi, Imam; Usodo, Budi; Adie Perdana, Fengky

    2017-01-01

    Logic and technical subjects require students to understand basic knowledge in mathematic. For instance, addition, minus, division and multiplication operations need to be mastered by students due to mathematic complexity as the learning mathematic grows higher. Weak foundation in mathematic also contribute to high failure rate in mathematic subjects in schools. In fact, students in primary schools are struggling to learn mathematic because they need to memorize formulas, multiplication or division operations. To date, this study will develop a puppet prototyping for learning mathematic for six to ten digits multiplication. Ten participants involved in the process of developing the prototype in this study. Students involved in the study were those from the intermediate class students whilst teachers were selected based on their vast knowledge and experiences and have more than five years of experience in teaching mathematic. Close participatory analysis will be used in the prototyping process as to fulfil the requirements of the students and teachers whom will use the puppet in learning six to ten digit multiplication in mathematic. Findings showed that, the students had a great time and fun learning experience in learning multiplication and they able to understand the concept of multiplication using puppet. Colour and materials of the puppet also help to attract student attention during learning. Additionally, students able to visualized and able to calculate accurate multiplication value and the puppet help them to recall in multiplying and adding the digits accordingly.

  7. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices.

    PubMed

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO(®) head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors.

  8. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. Methods: 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO® head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. Results: The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. Conclusions: It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors. PMID:23584925

  9. Glucose response after a ten-week training in swimming.

    PubMed

    Sengoku, Y; Nakamura, K; Takeda, T; Nabekura, Y; Tsubakimoto, S

    2011-11-01

    The present study investigated the difference in blood glucose concentration (Glu) response during an incremental swimming test before and after a ten-week training period and verified whether blood glucose threshold (GT) could be determined in competitive swimmers. 7 elite male university swimmers participated in this study. 2 incremental swimming tests were conducted in a swimming flume before and after a ten-week training period. Blood lactate concentration (Bla) and Glu were measured after each swimming step, and the velocities of the lactate threshold (VLT) and glucose threshold (VGT) were analyzed. VLT increased significantly after training (1.21±0.06 m x s(-1) pre-training, 1.31±0.10 m x s(-1) post-training, p<0.05), while Glu did not increase at the higher swimming intensity steps. GT was not determined at each trial. Our results show that lactate threshold (LT) improved significantly after the ten-week training period, while the Glu response during incremental swimming tests did not change. Therefore, GT could not be determined in elite competitive swimmers before and after training. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Targeting of nucleus-encoded proteins to chloroplasts in plants.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Most chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and synthesized on free, cytosolic ribosomes in precursor form. Each precursor has an amino-terminal extension called a transit peptide, which directs the protein through a post-translational targeting pathway and is removed upon arrival inside the organelle. This 'protein import' process is mediated by the coordinate action of two multiprotein complexes, one in each of the envelope membranes: the TOC and TIC (Translocon at the Outer/ Inner envelope membrane of Chloroplasts) machines. Many components of these complexes have been identified biochemically in pea; these include transit peptide receptors, channel proteins, and molecular chaperones. Intriguingly, the Arabidopsis genome encodes multiple, homologous genes for receptor components of the TOC complex. Careful analysis indicated that the different receptor isoforms operate in different import pathways with distinct precursor recognition specificities. These 'substrate-specific' import pathways might play a role in the differentiation of different plastid types, and/or act to prevent deleterious competition effects between abundant and nonabundant precursors. Until recently, all proteins destined for internal chloroplast compartments were thought to possess a cleavable transit peptide, and to engage the TOC/TIC machinery. New studies using proteomics and other approaches have revealed that this is far from true. Remarkably, a significant number of chloroplast proteins are transported via a pathway that involves the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Other recent reports have elucidated an intriguing array of protein targeting routes leading to the envelope membranes themselves.

  11. Numerical magnitude affects temporal memories but not time encoding.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhenguang G; Wang, Ruiming

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the perception of time is influenced by concurrent magnitude information (e.g., numerical magnitude in digits, spatial distance), but the locus of the effect is unclear, with some findings suggesting that concurrent magnitudes such as space affect temporal memories and others suggesting that numerical magnitudes in digits affect the clock speed during time encoding. The current paper reports 6 experiments in which participants perceived a stimulus duration and then reproduced it. We showed that though a digit of a large magnitude (e.g., 9), relative to a digit of a small magnitude (e.g., 2), led to a longer reproduced duration when the digits were presented during the perception of the stimulus duration, such a magnitude effect disappeared when the digits were presented during the reproduction of the stimulus duration. These findings disconfirm the account that large numerical magnitudes accelerate the speed of an internal clock during time encoding, as such an account incorrectly predicts that a large numerical magnitude should lead to a shorter reproduced duration when presented during reproduction. Instead, the findings suggest that numerical magnitudes, like other magnitudes such as space, affect temporal memories when numerical magnitudes and temporal durations are concurrently held in memory. Under this account, concurrent numerical magnitudes have the chance to influence the memory of the perceived duration when they are presented during perception but not when they are presented at the reproduction stage.

  12. Lead in candle emissions.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Shirley J; Guo, Zhishi; McBrian, Jenia A; Beach, Laura O

    2002-09-16

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulates to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of candles (two or more identical candles) were purchased locally. The criterion for purchase was that the candles must appear to contain a metal-cored wick or be covered by a metallic pigment. Of the candles purchased, 8% contained lead wicks. The wicks were 39-74% lead (the remainder was fabric or paper) and the lead cores (approx. 100% lead) had linear densities of 13-27 mg/cm. Candles were burned to completion in a closed chamber to capture the air emissions, and the candle residue was extracted to assess the lead mass balance. It was found that individual candles emitted lead to the air at average rates that ranged from 100 to 1700 microg/h. Assuming realistic indoor conditions, these emission rates were modeled to project room air concentration, child exposure by inhalation, and indoor deposition. Results showed that burning single candles can easily raise the source room concentration above the ambient air lead concentration limit of 1.5 microg/m3 set by EPA. Burning multiple candles can elevate it above OSHA permissible exposure limits of 50 microg/m3. Although blood lead levels have dropped precipitously in the United States since lead was phased out of gasoline in 1986, nearly 900,000 children still had levels above 10 microg/dl during NHANES III. Considering that candle sales in the US are estimated at $1-2 billion per year, and that children may spend as much as 88% of their time indoors, it is reasonable to suspect that some blood lead elevation in children arises from indoor micro-environments where lead-wick candles are burned.

  13. Development of Columbia Leading Edge Reconstruction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trautwein, John; Wegerif, Dan

    2004-01-01

    After the loss of Columbia in 2003, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and NASA KSC directed personnel at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) to design and build high fidelity mock-ups of Columbia's left wing leading edges. These leading edge segments, constructed of reinforced carbon-carbon, were a major point of inquiry by the investigation team. The LETF engineers developed a concept of building a clear Lexan panel with an aluminum support structure ten percent larger than the original panel. The leading edge debris are attached to the Lexan panels and both the front and back side of each panel are visible for inspection. The entire assembly can be rotated, to provide visual access to the entire panel. Six carts were fabricated to support the thirteen panels. These carts could be set up in order, next to each other, to provide the desired inspection access. The carts and attached debris are currently located in the Vehicle Assembly Building at KSC.

  14. Relational and Item-Specific Encoding (RISE): task development and psychometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ragland, John D; Ranganath, Charan; Barch, Deanna M; Gold, James M; Haley, Brittaney; MacDonald, Angus W; Silverstein, Steven M; Strauss, Milton E; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Carter, Cameron S

    2012-01-01

    The Relational and Item-Specific Encoding task (RISE) was designed to assess contributions of specific encoding and retrieval processes to episodic memory in schizophrenia. This manuscript describes how a cognitive neuroscience functional imaging paradigm was translated for clinical research. The RISE manipulates encoding by requiring participants to decide whether stimuli are "living/nonliving" (item-specific) or whether one stimulus fits inside the other (relational) and estimates familiarity (F) and recollection (R) by examining receiver operator characteristics (ROC) and assessing item and associative recognition. Two studies examined psychometric characteristics and tested the hypothesis that patients have differential deficits in relational vs item-specific encoding and disproportionate impairments in recollection vs familiarity. Study 1, using visual objects, provided support for the encoding hypotheses and revealed good internal consistency and alternate forms reliability, with small differences between test forms. ROC analysis revealed R and F deficits, with F deficits most prominent following relational encoding. Study 2 used word stimuli, which lowered item recognition, but patients had difficulty understanding task demands, and words were less desirable for non-English speaking clinical trials, leading to the decision to proceed with the original task. The RISE is a valid and reliable measure of item-specific and relational memory that is well tolerated, with good psychometric characteristics and equivalent forms to facilitate treatment studies. Results indicate that episodic memory in schizophrenia is most preserved under conditions promoting item-specific encoding that is supported by familiarity-based recognition and is most impaired under relational encoding and recollection-based retrieval conditions.

  15. Relational and Item-Specific Encoding (RISE): Task Development and Psychometric Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ragland, John D.; Ranganath, Charan; Barch, Deanna M.; Gold, James M.; Haley, Brittaney; MacDonald, Angus W.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Strauss, Milton E.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Carter, Cameron S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The Relational and Item-Specific Encoding task (RISE) was designed to assess contributions of specific encoding and retrieval processes to episodic memory in schizophrenia. This manuscript describes how a cognitive neuroscience functional imaging paradigm was translated for clinical research. Methods: The RISE manipulates encoding by requiring participants to decide whether stimuli are “living/nonliving” (item-specific) or whether one stimulus fits inside the other (relational) and estimates familiarity (F) and recollection (R) by examining receiver operator characteristics (ROC) and assessing item and associative recognition. Two studies examined psychometric characteristics and tested the hypothesis that patients have differential deficits in relational vs item-specific encoding and disproportionate impairments in recollection vs familiarity. Results: Study 1, using visual objects, provided support for the encoding hypotheses and revealed good internal consistency and alternate forms reliability, with small differences between test forms. ROC analysis revealed R and F deficits, with F deficits most prominent following relational encoding. Study 2 used word stimuli, which lowered item recognition, but patients had difficulty understanding task demands, and words were less desirable for non-English speaking clinical trials, leading to the decision to proceed with the original task. Conclusions: The RISE is a valid and reliable measure of item-specific and relational memory that is well tolerated, with good psychometric characteristics and equivalent forms to facilitate treatment studies. Results indicate that episodic memory in schizophrenia is most preserved under conditions promoting item-specific encoding that is supported by familiarity-based recognition and is most impaired under relational encoding and recollection-based retrieval conditions. PMID:22124089

  16. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators in Circulation Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Tian, Qinghai; Kaiser, Elisabeth; Xian, Wenying; Müller, Andreas; Oberhofer, Martin; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Sinnecker, Daniel; Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Moretti, Alessandra; Lipp, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potentials display the cellular status of non-excitable cells and mediate communication between excitable cells via action potentials. The use of genetically encoded biosensors employing fluorescent proteins allows a non-invasive biocompatible way to read out the membrane potential in cardiac myocytes and other cells of the circulation system. Although the approaches to design such biosensors date back to the time when the first fluorescent-protein based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors were constructed, it took 15 years before reliable sensors became readily available. Here, we review different developments of genetically encoded membrane potential sensors. Furthermore, it is shown how such sensors can be used in pharmacological screening applications as well as in circulation related basic biomedical research. Potentials and limitations will be discussed and perspectives of possible future developments will be provided. PMID:26370981

  17. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity.

  18. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    PubMed Central

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity. PMID:27562028

  19. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions.

  20. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOEpatents

    Wong; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan P.

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.