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Sample records for encoding ump kinase

  1. Mutational analysis of UMP kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bucurenci, N; Serina, L; Zaharia, C; Landais, S; Danchin, A; Bârzu, O

    1998-02-01

    UMP kinase from Escherichia coli is one of the four regulatory enzymes involved in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. This homohexamer, with no counterpart in eukarya, might serve as a target for new antibacterial drugs. Although the bacterial enzyme does not show sequence similarity with any other known nucleoside monophosphate kinase, two segments between amino acids 35 to 78 and 145 to 194 exhibit 28% identity with phosphoglycerate kinase and 30% identity with aspartokinase, respectively. Based on these similarities, a number of residues of E. coli UMP kinase were selected for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Biochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic analysis of the modified proteins identified residues essential for catalysis (Asp146), binding of UMP (Asp174), and interaction with the allosteric effectors, GTP and UTP (Arg62 and Asp77).

  2. Escherichia coli UMP-kinase, a member of the aspartokinase family, is a hexamer regulated by guanine nucleotides and UTP.

    PubMed

    Serina, L; Blondin, C; Krin, E; Sismeiro, O; Danchin, A; Sakamoto, H; Gilles, A M; Bârzu, O

    1995-04-18

    The pyrH gene, encoding UMP-kinase from Escherichia coli, was cloned using as a genetic probe the property of the carAB operon to be controlled for its expression by the concentration of cytoplasmic UTP. The open reading frame of the pyrH gene of 723 bp was found to be identical to that of the smbA gene [Yamanaka, K., et al. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 7517-7526], previously described as being involved in chromosome partitioning in E. coli. The bacterial UMP-kinase did not display significant sequence similarity to known nucleoside monophosphate kinases. On the contrary, it exhibited similarity with three families of enzymes including aspartokinases, glutamate kinases, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa carbamate kinase. UMP-kinase overproduced in E. coli was purified to homogeneity and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The protein consists of six identical subunits, each of 240 amino acid residues (the N-terminal methionine residue is missing in the expressed protein). Upon excitation at 295 nm, the bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 332 nm which indicates that the single tryptophan residue of the protein (Trp119) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Like other enzymes involved in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides, UMP-kinase of E. coli is subject to regulation by nucleotides: GTP is an allosteric activator, whereas UTP serves as an allosteric inhibitor. UTP and UDP, but none of the other nucleotides tested such as GTP, ATP, and UMP, enhanced the fluorescence of the protein. The sigmoidal shape of the dose-response curve indicated cooperativity in binding of UTP and UDP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Enantioselectivity of human AMP, dTMP and UMP-CMP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Julie A.C.; Roy, Béatrice; Topalis, Dimitri; Pochet, Sylvie; Périgaud, Christian; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    l-Nucleoside analogues such as lamivudine are active for treating viral infections. Like d-nucleosides, the biological activity of the l-enantiomers requires their stepwise phosphorylation by cellular or viral kinases to give the triphosphate. The enantioselectivity of NMP kinases has not been thoroughly studied, unlike that of deoxyribonucleoside kinases. We have therefore investigated the capacity of l-enantiomers of some natural (d)NMP to act as substrates for the recombinant forms of human uridylate-cytidylate kinase, thymidylate kinase and adenylate kinases 1 and 2. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial adenylate kinases were strictly enantioselective, as they phosphorylated only d-(d)AMP. l-dTMP was a substrate for thymidylate kinase, but with an efficiency 150-fold less than d-dTMP. Both l-dUMP and l-(d)CMP were phosphorylated by UMP-CMP kinase although much less efficiently than their natural counterparts. The stereopreference was conserved with the 2′-azido derivatives of dUMP and dUMP while, unexpectedly, the 2′-azido-d-dCMP was a 4-fold better substrate for UMP-CMP kinase than was CMP. Docking simulations showed that the small differences in the binding of d-(d)NMP to their respective kinases could account for the differences in interactions of the l-isomers with the enzymes. This in vitro information was then used to develop the in vivo activation pathway for l-dT. PMID:17626051

  4. Reaction of human UMP-CMP kinase with natural and analog substrates.

    PubMed

    Pasti, Claudia; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Veron, Michel; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2003-04-01

    UMP-CMP kinase catalyses an important step in the phosphorylation of UTP, CTP and dCTP. It is also involved in the necessary phosphorylation by cellular kinases of nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies. The reactivity of human UMP-CMP kinase towards natural substrates and nucleotide analogs was reexamined. The expression of the recombinant enzyme and conditions for stability of the enzyme were improved. Substrate inhibition was observed for UMP and CMP at concentrations higher than 0.2 mm, but not for dCMP. The antiviral analog l-3TCMP was found to be an efficient substrate phosphorylated into l-3TCDP by human UMP-CMP kinase. However, in the reverse reaction, the enzyme did not catalyse the addition of the third phosphate to l-3TCDP, which was rather an inhibitor. By molecular modelling, l-3TCMP was built in the active site of the enzyme from Dictyostelium. Human UMP-CMP kinase has a relaxed enantiospecificity for the nucleoside monophosphate acceptor site, but it is restricted to d-nucleotides at the donor site.

  5. Phosphoryl transfer by a concerted reaction mechanism in UMP/CMP-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, M. C.; Helms, V.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by UMP/CMP-kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum was investigated by semiempirical AM1 molecular orbital computations of an active site model system derived from crystal structures that contain a transition state analog or a bisubstrate inhibitor. The computational results suggest that the nucleoside monophosphate must be protonated for the forward reaction while it is unprotonated in the presence of aluminium fluoride, a popular transition state analog for phosphoryl transfer reactions. Furthermore, a compactification of the active site model system during the reaction and for the corresponding complex containing AlF3 was observed. For the active site residues that are part of the LID domain, conformational flexibility during the reaction proved to be crucial. On the basis of the calculations, a concerted phosphoryl transfer mechanism is suggested that involves the synchronous shift of a proton from the monophosphate to the transferred PO3-group. The proposed mechanism is thus analogous to the phosphoryl transfer mechanism in cAMP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates the hydroxyl groups of serine residues. PMID:11152133

  6. A protein related to prokaryotic UMP kinases is involved in psaA/B transcript accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul; Stöckel, Jana; Bennewitz, Stefan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    Dpt1 (defect in p saA/B transcript accumulation 1) is a novel photosystem (PS) I mutant in Arabidopsis. dpt1 mutants fail to grow photoautotrophically, and are impaired in the accumulation of psaA/B transcripts while the transcript levels for the remaining PSI subunits, for subunits of the PSII, the cyt-b ( 6 )/f-complex, and the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase are comparable to the wild type. In-organello run-on transcription assays demonstrate that the lower psaA/B transcript abundance in dpt1-1 is not caused by the inability to transcribe the psaA/psaB/rps14 operon. psaA/B transcripts in the mutant are associated with polyribosomes and translated. Thus, the mutation affects post-transcriptional processes specific for psaA/B. The dpt1 gene was isolated by map-based cloning. The protein is localized in the stroma of the chloroplast and exhibits striking similarities to UMP kinases of prokaryotic origin. Our results show that the nuclear encoded protein Dpt1 is essential for retaining photosynthetic activity in higher plant chloroplasts and involved in post-transcriptional steps of psaA/B transcript accumulation. We discuss that Dpt1 may be a bifunctional protein that couples the pyrimidine metabolism to the photosynthetic electron transport.

  7. The crystallization of apo-form UMP kinase from Xanthomonas campestris is significantly improved in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Jhe-Le; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2007-05-01

    A bacterial UMP kinase from the plant pathogen X. campestris pathovar campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in a strong magnetic field. The crystals diffracted to 2.35 Å. Bacterial UMP kinases (UMPKs) are crucial enzymes that are responsible for microbial UTP biosynthesis. Interestingly, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells use different enzymes for UMP-phosphorylation reactions. Prokaryotic UMPKs are thus believed to be potential targets for antimicrobial drug development. Here, the cloning, expression and crystallization of SeMet-substituted XC1936, a bacterial UMPK from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris, are reported. The crystallization of the apo-form UMPK was found to be significantly improved in a strong magnetic field; the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.35 Å, a dramatic improvement over the original value of 3.6 Å. Preliminary structural analyses of apo-form XC1936 using crystals grown in a strong magnetic field clearly reveal well defined loop regions involved in substrate-analogue binding that were previously not visible. Crystallization in a strong magnetic field thus was found to be indispensable in determining the flexible region of the XC1936 UMPK structure.

  8. Structural properties of UMP-kinase from Escherichia coli: modulation of protein solubility by pH and UTP.

    PubMed

    Serina, L; Bucurenci, N; Gilles, A M; Surewicz, W K; Fabian, H; Mantsch, H H; Takahashi, M; Petrescu, I; Batelier, G; Bârzu, O

    1996-06-04

    UMP-kinase from Escherichia coli, unlike the analogous enzyme from eukaryotic organisms, is an oligomeric protein subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms in which UTP and GTP act as allosteric effectors. While the enzyme has an unusually low solubility at neutral pH (< or = 0.1 mg of protein/ mL), its solubility increases markedly above pH 8 and below pH 4. Furthermore, the solubility of the bacterial UMP-kinase at neutral pH is greatly enhanced in the presence of Mg-free UTP. Thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that UTP also increases the stability of the protein. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism show that the secondary structure of the protein is the same at neutral and at alkaline pH. These data indicate that variations in enzyme solubility must be related to subtle changes in the tertiary and/or quaternary structure which modulate the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces in the protein molecule. A variant of UMP-kinase, obtained by site-directed mutagenesis (Asp159Asn), which is similar to the wild-type enzyme in its stability and kinetic properties, has a much increased water solubility (> 5 mg protein/mL) even at neutral pH. This suggests that salt bridges may be involved in the equilibrium between the soluble and aggregated forms of the wild-type enzyme, and that conformational changes induced upon binding of UTP increase the protein solubility by disrupting these salt bridges.

  9. The novel fluorescent CDP-analogue (Pbeta)MABA-CDP is a specific probe for the NMP binding site of UMP/CMP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, M. G.; Veit, T. J.; Reinstein, J.

    1999-01-01

    Direct thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of the binding of nucleotides to the nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) site of NMP kinases have not been possible so far because a spectroscopic probe was not available. By coupling a fluorescent N-methylanthraniloyl- (mant) group to the beta-phosphate of CDP via a butyl linker, a CDP analogue [(Pbeta)MABA-CDP] was obtained that still binds specifically to the NMP site of UmpKdicty, because the base and the ribose moieties, which are involved in specific interactions, are not modified. This allows the direct determination of binding constants for its substrates in competition experiments. PMID:10631985

  10. Bacillus halodurans Strain C125 Encodes and Synthesizes Enzymes from Both Known Pathways To Form dUMP Directly from Cytosine Deoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschlæger, Christian Berg; Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Reinauer, Eva; Lehtinen, Emilia; Pind, Marie-Louise Lindberg; Harris, Pernille; Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, Martin

    2015-05-15

    Analysis of the genome of Bacillus halodurans strain C125 indicated that two pathways leading from a cytosine deoxyribonucleotide to dUMP, used for dTMP synthesis, were encoded by the genome of the bacterium. The genes that were responsible, the comEB gene and the dcdB gene, encoding dCMP deaminase and the bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase (DCD:DUT), respectively, were both shown to be expressed in B. halodurans, and both genes were subject to repression by the nucleosides thymidine and deoxycytidine. The latter nucleoside presumably exerts its repression after deamination by cytidine deaminase. Both comEB and dcdB were cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Both enzymes were active and displayed the expected regulatory properties: activation by dCTP for dCMP deaminase and dTTP inhibition for both enzymes. Structurally, the B. halodurans enzyme resembled the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme the most. An investigation of sequenced genomes from other species of the genus Bacillus revealed that not only the genome of B. halodurans but also the genomes of Bacillus pseudofirmus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus hemicellulosilyticus, Bacillus marmarensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus megaterium encode both the dCMP deaminase and the DCD:DUT enzymes. In addition, eight dcdB homologs from Bacillus species within the genus for which the whole genome has not yet been sequenced were registered in the NCBI Entrez database.

  11. Resistance to the nucleotide analogue cidofovir in HPV(+) cells: a multifactorial process involving UMP/CMP kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Topalis, Dimitri; El Amri, Chahrazade; Krečmerová, Marcela; Naesens, Lieve; Balzarini, Jan; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for cervical cancer, and its role in head and neck carcinoma has been reported. No drug is approved for the treatment of HPV-related diseases but cidofovir (CDV) exhibits selective antiproliferative activity. In this study, we analyzed the effects of CDV-resistance (CDVR) in two HPV(+) (SiHaCDV and HeLaCDV) and one HPV(−) (HaCaTCDV) tumor cell lines. Quantification of CDV metabolites and analysis of the sensitivity profile to chemotherapeutics was performed. Transporters expression related to multidrug-resistance (MRP2, P-gp, BCRP) was also investigated. Alterations of CDV metabolism in SiHaCDV and HeLaCDV, but not in HaCaTCDV, emerged via impairment of UMP/CMPK1 activity. Mutations (P64T and R134M) as well as down-regulation of UMP/CMPK1 expression were observed in SiHaCDV and HeLaCDV, respectively. Altered transporters expression in SiHaCDV and/or HeLaCDV, but not in HaCaTCDV, was also noted. Taken together, these results indicate that CDVR in HPV(+) tumor cells is a multifactorial process. PMID:26824416

  12. Molecular cloning of plant transcripts encoding protein kinase homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, M A; Yamamoto, R T; Hanks, S K; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    Oligonucleotides, corresponding to conserved regions of animal protein-serine/threonine kinases, were used to isolate cDNAs encoding plant homologs in the dicot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and the monocot rice (Oryzae sativa L.). The C-terminal regions of the deduced polypeptides encoded by the bean (PVPK-1) and rice (G11A) cDNAs, prepared from mRNAs of suspension cultures and leaves, respectively, contain features characteristic of the catalytic domains of eukaryotic protein-serine/threonine kinases, indicating that these cDNAs encode plant protein kinases. The putative catalytic domains are most closely related to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases and the protein kinase C family, suggesting the plant homologs may likewise transduce extracellular signals. However, outside these domains, PVPK-1 and G11A exhibit no homology either to each other or to regulatory domains of other protein kinases, indicating the plant homologs are modulated by other signals. PVPK-1 corresponds to a 2.4-kb transcript in suspension cultured bean cells. Southern blots of genomic DNA indicate that PVPK-1 and G11A correspond to single copy genes that form part of a family of related plant sequences. Images PMID:2541432

  13. The Leishmania donovani UMP Synthase Is Essential for Promastigote Viability and Has an Unusual Tetrameric Structure That Exhibits Substrate-controlled Oligomerization

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, D.Radika; Boitz, Jan M.; Carter, Nicola S.; Chang, Bailey; Ullman, Buddy; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-08-09

    The final two steps of de novo uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) biosynthesis are catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC). In most prokaryotes and simple eukaryotes these two enzymes are encoded by separate genes, whereas in mammals they are expressed as a bifunctional gene product called UMP synthase (UMPS), with OPRT at the N terminus and OMPDC at the C terminus. Leishmania and some closely related organisms also express a bifunctional enzyme for these two steps, but the domain order is reversed relative to mammalian UMPS. In this work we demonstrate that L. donovani UMPS (LdUMPS) is an essential enzyme in promastigotes and that it is sequestered in the parasite glycosome. We also present the crystal structure of the LdUMPS in complex with its product, UMP. This structure reveals an unusual tetramer with two head to head and two tail to tail interactions, resulting in two dimeric OMPDC and two dimeric OPRT functional domains. In addition, we provide structural and biochemical evidence that oligomerization of LdUMPS is controlled by product binding at the OPRT active site. We propose a model for the assembly of the catalytically relevant LdUMPS tetramer and discuss the implications for the structure of mammalian UMPS.

  14. The Leishmania donovani UMP Synthase Is Essential for Promastigote Viability and Has an Unusual Tetrameric Structure That Exhibits Substrate-controlled Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    French, Jarrod B.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, D. Radika; Boitz, Jan M.; Carter, Nicola S.; Chang, Bailey; Ullman, Buddy; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    The final two steps of de novo uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) biosynthesis are catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC). In most prokaryotes and simple eukaryotes these two enzymes are encoded by separate genes, whereas in mammals they are expressed as a bifunctional gene product called UMP synthase (UMPS), with OPRT at the N terminus and OMPDC at the C terminus. Leishmania and some closely related organisms also express a bifunctional enzyme for these two steps, but the domain order is reversed relative to mammalian UMPS. In this work we demonstrate that L. donovani UMPS (LdUMPS) is an essential enzyme in promastigotes and that it is sequestered in the parasite glycosome. We also present the crystal structure of the LdUMPS in complex with its product, UMP. This structure reveals an unusual tetramer with two head to head and two tail to tail interactions, resulting in two dimeric OMPDC and two dimeric OPRT functional domains. In addition, we provide structural and biochemical evidence that oligomerization of LdUMPS is controlled by product binding at the OPRT active site. We propose a model for the assembly of the catalytically relevant LdUMPS tetramer and discuss the implications for the structure of mammalian UMPS. PMID:21507942

  15. Message from Vice Chancellor, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Ibrahim, Daing

    2012-09-01

    Assalamualaikumwarahmatullahiwabarakatuh and Salam i Malaysia First and foremost, I want to thank the International Conference Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER) organisers for inviting me to address and officiate at this conference. It is a privilege and an honour for me on this momentous occasion to grace the ceremony. The ICMER provides a platform to bring together not only researchers but also postgraduate students in Mechanical Engineering, Automotive Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Biomechanical Engineering, Material Engineering and Industrial Engineering. With this platform, ICMER will embark on a whole process of making new discoveries and then translating them into products and services for the marketplace; this is only made possible by people like all of you. It might be only a starting point but with hard work and perseverance I am sure you will succeed with flying colours. As one of Malaysia's Public Universities, UMP's main challenge is to remain competitive and relevant by offering high quality technical academic programmes and research activities, focusing on its niche areas. New knowledge and findings cannot be generated without research and development (R&D) therefore, Malaysia has had substantial investment in research and development facilities. These efforts will undoubtedly generate lots of interesting results and new knowledge as either further investigation or commercial activities. Therefore, researchers like you must see this as the generator of new knowledge to extend your research outcomes from laboratory experiments to the marketplace and towards commercialisation. Naybe this doesn't appear significant in the short term but it may make a tremendous impact in the future. The Malaysian government has invested a huge sum of Ringgits in R&D over the years. Therefore, public universities such as UMP must produce more quality researchers and graduates to ensure Malaysia reaps the returns from these investments and consequently

  16. Isolation of Drosophila genes encoding G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Cassill, J A; Whitney, M; Joazeiro, C A; Becker, A; Zuker, C S

    1991-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are regulated via phosphorylation by a variety of protein kinases. Recently, termination of the active state of two such receptors, the beta-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin, has been shown to be mediated by agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of the receptor by members of a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases (here referred to as G protein-coupled receptor kinases). We now report the isolation of a family of genes encoding a set of Drosophila protein kinases that appear to code for G protein-coupled receptor kinases. These proteins share a high degree of sequence homology with the bovine beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. The presence of a conserved family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in vertebrates and invertebrates points to the central role of these kinases in signal transduction cascades. Images PMID:1662381

  17. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  18. Separate nuclear genes encode cytosolic and mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Troll, H; Winckler, T; Lascu, I; Müller, N; Saurin, W; Véron, M; Mutzel, R

    1993-12-05

    We have previously isolated cDNA clones for the gip17 gene encoding the cytosolic nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, and partial cDNAs for guk, a second member of the NDP kinase gene family (Wallet, V., Mutzel, R., Troll, H., Barzu, O., Wurster, B., Véron, M., and Lacombe, M. L. (1990) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80, 1199-1202). We now characterize genomic DNA clones for both NDP kinase genes, and we show that guk defines a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial NDP kinase. Isolated D. discoideum mitochondria contain 3% of the total cellular NDP kinase activity. Antibodies which specifically recognize and inhibit the activity of either cytosolic or mitochondrial NDP kinase unambiguously distinguish between these activities. The nascent mitochondrial NDP kinase contains a presequence of 57 amino acids that is removed during import into the organelle as shown by determination of the NH2 terminus of the mature protein from mitochondria. The genes for mitochondrial and cytosolic NDP kinases contain four and two introns, respectively. The positions of the of the introns in the gene for the cytosolic enzyme match exactly the positions of the second and fourth introns in the coding region of its mitochondrial homologue. From these results we conclude that the isozymes diverged from a common ancestor, and we discuss possible phylogenetic pathways for the evolution of cytosolic and organelle NDP kinases.

  19. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the R7 photoreceptor cell. Components of the signal transduction pathway activated by Sev in the R7 precursor include proteins encoded by the gap1, drk, Sos, ras1 and raf loci. In this report we present evidence that a Drosophila MAP kinase, ERK-A, is encoded by the rolled locus and is required downstream of raf in the Sev signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:8157002

  20. Characterization of the Yeast DGK1-encoded CTP-dependent Diacylglycerol Kinase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gil-Soo; O'Hara, Laura; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Carman, George M.

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DGK1 gene encodes a diacylglycerol kinase enzyme that catalyzes the formation of phosphatidate from diacylglycerol. Unlike the diacylglycerol kinases from bacteria, plants, and animals, the yeast enzyme utilizes CTP, instead of ATP, as the phosphate donor in the reaction. Dgk1p contains a CTP transferase domain that is present in the SEC59-encoded dolichol kinase and CDS1-encoded CDP-diacylglycerol synthase enzymes. Deletion analysis showed that the CTP transferase domain was sufficient for diacylglycerol kinase activity. Point mutations (R76A, K77A, D177A, and G184A) of conserved residues within the CTP transferase domain caused a loss of diacylglycerol kinase activity. Analysis of DGK1 alleles showed that the in vivo functions of Dgk1p were specifically due to its diacylglycerol kinase activity. The DGK1-encoded enzyme had a pH optimum at 7.0-7.5, required Ca2+ or Mg2+ ions for activity, was potently inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, and was labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The enzyme exhibited positive cooperative (Hill number = 2.5) kinetics with respect to diacylglycerol (apparent Km = 6.5 mol %) and saturation kinetics with respect to CTP (apparent Km = 0.3 mm). dCTP was both a substrate (apparent Km = 0.4 mm) and competitive inhibitor (apparent Ki = 0.4 mm) of the enzyme. Diacylglycerol kinase activity was stimulated by major membrane phospholipids and was inhibited by CDP-diacylglycerol and sphingoid bases. PMID:18458076

  1. Differential accumulation of transcripts encoding protein kinase homologs in greening pea seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, X; Feng, X H; Watson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotides, corresponding to conserved regions within the catalytic domain of known protein-serine/threonine kinases, were used as primers for the polymerase chain reaction to amplify cDNA synthesized from poly(A)+ RNA purified from the apical buds of 7-day-old pea seedlings. Five partial cDNAs were obtained and designated PsPK1 through PsPK5 (for Pisum sativum protein kinase) in order of decreasing length. The deduced amino acid sequences show that each member of the PsPK series is different in length, and, although their sequences are quite similar overall, each has a unique sequence. Moreover, each member of the PsPK series has structural features typical of members of the protein-serine/threonine kinase family of protein kinases. All are equally similar to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C, suggesting that the pea homologs may be involved in signal transduction. DNA gel blots show that each PsPK cDNA is likely to be encoded by a single gene within the pea genome. RNA blot analyses show that the PsPK transcripts accumulate differentially during greening of etiolated seedlings. PsPK3 and PsPK5 transcripts show a large and rapid decline during deetiolation. In contrast, the level of PsPK4 RNA increases steadily during deetiolation whereas PsPK1 and PsPK2 transcripts show little change during the greening period. Thus light regulates changes in the levels of transcripts encoding putative protein kinases in plants. Images PMID:1714582

  2. Regulation of persistent sodium currents by glycogen synthase kinase 3 encodes daily rhythms of neuronal excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jodi R.; Dewoskin, Daniel; McMeekin, Laura J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Forger, Daniel B.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2016-11-01

    How neurons encode intracellular biochemical signalling cascades into electrical signals is not fully understood. Neurons in the central circadian clock in mammals provide a model system to investigate electrical encoding of biochemical timing signals. Here, using experimental and modelling approaches, we show how the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) contributes to neuronal excitability through regulation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). INaP exhibits a day/night difference in peak magnitude and is regulated by GSK3. Using mathematical modelling, we predict and confirm that GSK3 activation of INaP affects the action potential afterhyperpolarization, which increases the spontaneous firing rate without affecting the resting membrane potential. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial link between the molecular circadian clock and electrical activity, providing examples of kinase regulation of electrical activity and the propagation of intracellular signals in neuronal networks.

  3. Regulation of persistent sodium currents by glycogen synthase kinase 3 encodes daily rhythms of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Jodi R.; DeWoskin, Daniel; McMeekin, Laura J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Forger, Daniel B.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    How neurons encode intracellular biochemical signalling cascades into electrical signals is not fully understood. Neurons in the central circadian clock in mammals provide a model system to investigate electrical encoding of biochemical timing signals. Here, using experimental and modelling approaches, we show how the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) contributes to neuronal excitability through regulation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). INaP exhibits a day/night difference in peak magnitude and is regulated by GSK3. Using mathematical modelling, we predict and confirm that GSK3 activation of INaP affects the action potential afterhyperpolarization, which increases the spontaneous firing rate without affecting the resting membrane potential. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial link between the molecular circadian clock and electrical activity, providing examples of kinase regulation of electrical activity and the propagation of intracellular signals in neuronal networks. PMID:27841351

  4. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    PubMed

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy.

  5. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  6. Effect of halogen substitutions on dUMP to stability of thymidylate synthase/dUMP/mTHF ternary complex using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot

    2013-06-24

    The stability of the thymidylate synthase (TS)/2-deoxyuridine-5-monophosphate (dUMP)/5,10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (mTHF) ternary complex formation and Michael addition are considered as important steps that are involved in the inhibition mechanism of the anticancer prodrug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Here, the effect of three different halogen substitutions on the C-5 position of the dUMP (XdUMPs = FdUMP, CldUMP, and BrdUMP), the normal substrate, on the stability of the TS/dUMP and TS/dUMP/mTHF binary and ternary complexes, respectively, was investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. The simulated results revealed that the stability of all the systems was substantially increased by mTHF binding to the catalytic pocket. In the ternary complex, a much greater stabilization of the dUMP and XdUMPs through electrostatic interactions, including charge-charge and hydrogen bond interactions, was found compared to mTHF. An additional unique hydrogen bond between the substituted fluorine of FdUMP and the hydroxyl group of the TS Y94 residue was observed in both the binary and ternary complexes. The distance between the S(-) atom of the TS C146 residue and the C6 atom of dUMP, at <4 Å in all systems, suggested that a Michael addition with the formation of a S-C6 covalent bond potentially occurred, although the hydrogen atom on C6 of dUMP is substituted by a halogen atom. The MM/PBSA binding free energy revealed the significant role of the bridging waters around the ligands in the increased binding affinity (∼10 kcal/mol) of dUMP/XdUMP, either alone or together with mTHF, toward TS. The order of the averaged binding affinity in the ternary systems was found to be CldUMP ≈ FdUMP > dUMP > BrdUMP, suggesting that CldUMP could be a potent candidate TS inhibitor, the same as FdUMP (the metabolite form of 5-FU).

  7. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, M; Mizuno, H; Kawai, Y; Tsuboi, T; Sumi, S; Okajima, K; Hodgson, M E; Ogawa, H; Wada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a lambdaEMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning approximately 15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5' flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A-to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A (v = .26) and 440Gpoly (v = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9042911

  8. The S-locus receptor kinase gene in a self-incompatible Brassica napus line encodes a functional serine/threonine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Goring, D R; Rothstein, S J

    1992-01-01

    An S-receptor kinase (SRK) cDNA, SRK-910, from the active S-locus in a self-incompatible Brassica napus W1 line has been isolated and characterized. The SRK-910 gene is predominantly expressed in pistils and segregates with the W1 self-incompatibility phenotype in an F2 population derived from a cross between the self-incompatible W1 line and a self-compatible Westar line. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence demonstrated that the extracellular receptor domain is highly homologous to S-locus glycoproteins, whereas the cytoplasmic kinase domain contains conserved amino acids present in serine/threonine kinases. An SRK-910 kinase protein fusion was produced in Escherichia coli and found to contain kinase activity. Phosphoamino acid analysis confirmed that only serine and threonine residues were phosphorylated. Thus, the SRK-910 gene encodes a functional serine/threonine receptor kinase. PMID:1332796

  9. Cloning, sequencing and characterization of a gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii NRRL2547.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Kayingo, Gerald; Blomberg, Anders; Prior, Bernard A

    2002-12-01

    The dihydroxyacetone pathway, an alternative pathway for the dissimilation of glycerol via reduction by glycerol dehydrogenase and subsequent phosphorylation by dihydroxyacetone (DHA) kinase, is activated in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii during osmotic stress. In experiments aimed at investigating the physiological function of the DHA pathway in Z. rouxii, a typical osmotolerant yeast, we cloned and characterized a DAK gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Z. rouxii NRRL 2547. Sequence analysis revealed a 1761 bp open reading frame, encoding a peptide composed of 587 deduced amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 61 664 Da. As the amino acid sequence was most closely homologous (68% identity) to the S. cerevisiae Dak1p, we named the gene and protein ZrDAK1 and ZrDak1p, respectively. A putative ATP binding site was also found but no consensus element associated with osmoregulation was found in the upstream region of the ZrDAK1 gene. The ZrDAK1 gene complemented a S. cerevisiae W303-1A dak1delta dak2 delta strain by improving the growth of the mutant on 50 mmol/l dihydroxyacetone and by increasing the tolerance to dihydroxyacetone in a medium containing 5% sodium chloride, suggesting that it is a functional homologue of the S. cerevisiae DAK1. However, expression of the ZrDAK1 gene in the S. cerevisiae dak1delta dak2 delta strain had no significant effect on glycerol levels during osmotic stress. The ZrDAK1 sequence has been deposited in the public data bases under Accession No. AJ294719; regions upstream and downstream of ZrDAK1are deposited as Accession Nos AJ294739 and AJ294720, respectively.

  10. Myxococcus xanthus sasS encodes a sensor histidine kinase required for early developmental gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C; Kaplan, H B

    1997-01-01

    Initiation of Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development requires integration of information concerning the cells' nutrient status and density. A gain-of-function mutation, sasB7, that bypasses both the starvation and high cell density requirements for developmental expression of the 4521 reporter gene, maps to the sasS gene. The wild-type sasS gene was cloned and sequenced. This gene is predicted to encode a sensor histidine protein kinase that appears to be a key element in the transduction of starvation and cell density inputs. The sasS null mutants express 4521 at a basal level, form defective fruiting bodies, and exhibit reduced sporulation efficiencies. These data indicate that the wild-type sasS gene product functions as a positive regulator of 4521 expression and participates in M. xanthus development. The N terminus of SasS is predicted to contain two transmembrane domains that would locate the protein to the cytoplasmic membrane. The sasB7 mutation, an E139K missense mutation, maps to the predicted N-terminal periplasmic region. The C terminus of SasS contains all of the conserved residues typical of the sensor histidine protein kinases. SasS is predicted to be the sensor protein in a two-component system that integrates information required for M. xanthus developmental gene expression. PMID:9401035

  11. fumble encodes a pantothenate kinase homolog required for proper mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, K; Gönczy, P; DiNardo, S; Wasserman, S A

    2001-01-01

    A number of fundamental processes comprise the cell division cycle, including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. Our current understanding of these processes has benefited from the isolation and analysis of mutants, with the meiotic divisions in the male germline of Drosophila being particularly well suited to the identification of the required genes. We show here that the fumble (fbl) gene is required for cell division in Drosophila. We find that dividing cells in fbl-deficient testes exhibit abnormalities in bipolar spindle organization, chromosome segregation, and contractile ring formation. Cytological analysis of larval neuroblasts from null mutants reveals a reduced mitotic index and the presence of polyploid cells. Molecular analysis demonstrates that fbl encodes three protein isoforms, all of which contain a domain with high similarity to the pantothenate kinases of A. nidulans and mouse. The largest Fumble isoform is dispersed in the cytoplasm during interphase, concentrates around the spindle at metaphase, and localizes to the spindle midbody at telophase. During early embryonic development, the protein localizes to areas of membrane deposition and/or rearrangement, such as the metaphase and cellularization furrows. Given the role of pantothenate kinase in production of Coenzyme A and in phospholipid biosynthesis, this pattern of localization is suggestive of a role for fbl in membrane synthesis. We propose that abnormalities in synthesis and redistribution of membranous structures during the cell division cycle underlie the cell division defects in fbl mutant cells. PMID:11238410

  12. Genetic analysis of rolled, which encodes a Drosophila mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y M; Nishizawa, K; Nishi, Y; Tsuda, L; Inoue, Y H; Nishida, Y

    1999-01-01

    Genetic and molecular characterization of the dominant suppressors of D-raf(C110) on the second chromosome identified two gain-of-function alleles of rolled (rl), which encodes a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in Drosophila. One of the alleles, rl(Su23), was found to bear the same molecular lesion as rl(Sem), which has been reported to be dominant female sterile. However, rl(Su23) and the current stock of rl(Sem) showed only a weak dominant female sterility. Detailed analyses of the rl mutations demonstrated moderate dominant activities of these alleles in the Torso (Tor) signaling pathway, which explains the weak dominant female sterility observed in this study. The dominant rl mutations failed to suppress the terminal class maternal-effect mutations, suggesting that activation of Rl is essential, but not sufficient, for Tor signaling. Involvement of rl in cell proliferation was also demonstrated by clonal analysis. Branching and integration of signals in the MAP kinase cascade is discussed. PMID:10511556

  13. Conserved serine/threonine kinase encoded by CBK1 regulates expression of several hypha-associated transcripts and genes encoding cell wall proteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    McNemar, Mark D; Fonzi, William A

    2002-04-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, is reported to have several potential virulence factors. A potentially significant factor is the ability to undergo morphological transition from yeast to hypha. This alteration of form is accompanied by many changes within the cell, including alterations in gene expression and cell wall composition. We have isolated a gene that encodes a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that appears to be involved in the regulation of proteins associated with the cell wall. We have assigned the designation CBK1 (cell wall biosynthesis kinase 1) to this gene. Mutants lacking CBK1 form large aggregates of round cells under all growth conditions and lack the ability to undergo morphological differentiation. Additionally, these mutants show an altered pattern of expression of several transcripts encoding proteins associated with the cell wall. The results suggest that the kinase encoded by CBK1 plays a general role in the maintenance and alteration of the cell wall of C. albicans in all morphologies.

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the genomic locus encoding the Kiz1 LIM-kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, O.; Burkitt, V.; Webb, G.C.

    1996-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized the mouse gene encoding Kiz1/Limk1, a new member of the zinc-finger LIM family that also has a kinase domain. The gene encompasses 25 kb of the mouse genome, and the organization of its 16 exons does not correlate with its functional domains. The promoter region of Kiz1/Limk1 was identified by cloning a 1.06-kb genomic fragment upstream from the first ATG in a promotorless CAT vector. This construct was demonstrated to drive CAT expression in Jurkat cells. The promoter sequence lacks conventional TATA and CAAT motifs but contains consensus binding sequences for several transcriptional regulators implicated in control of transcription in many different cell types, including Sp1, Ets, and E2A. Analysis of the chromosomal localization of KIZ1/LIMK1 indicates that it lies on human chromosome 17 in the region 17q25 and on mouse Chromosome 5, band G2. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. 5' flanking sequence and structure of a gene encoding rat 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Darville, M I; Crepin, K M; Hue, L; Rousseau, G G

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis and degradation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a ubiquitous stimulator of glycolysis, are catalyzed by 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (EC 2.7.1.105) and fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.46), respectively. In liver, these two activities belong to separate domains of the same 470-residue polypeptide. Various mRNAs have been described for this bifunctional enzyme, which is controlled by hormonal and metabolic signals. To understand the origin and regulation of these mRNAs, we have characterized rat genomic clones encoding the liver isozyme, which is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and the muscle isozyme, which is not. We describe here a 55-kilobase gene that encodes these isozymes by alternative splicing from two promoters. Each of the putative promoters was sequenced over about 3 kilobases and found to include nucleotide motifs for binding regulatory factors. The two isozymes share the same 13 exons and differ only by the first exon that, in the liver but not in the muscle isozyme, contains the serine phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The gene was assigned to the X chromosome. An analysis of the exon limits of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase in relation to its functional domains and to its similarity with other proteins plus its G + C content at the third codon position suggests that this gene originates from several fusion events. Images PMID:2549541

  16. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  17. Steady-state concentrations of mRNA encoding two inhibitors of protein kinase C in ovine luteal tissue.

    PubMed

    Juengel, J L; Melner, M H; Clapper, J A; Turzillo, A M; Moss, G E; Nett, T M; Niswender, G D

    1998-07-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) decreases secretion of progesterone from the corpus luteum in domestic ruminants. However, it is less effective during the early part of the oestrous cycle (Louis et al., 1973) and at the time of maternal recognition of pregnancy (Silvia and Niswender, 1984; Lacroix and Kann, 1986). Decreased luteal responsiveness may be due to failure of PGF2 alpha to activate fully its normal second messenger system, protein kinase C (PKC). Alternatively, increased resistance of the corpus luteum to PGF2 alpha might be attributable to greater concentrations of recently identified biological inhibitors of PKC. These possibilities were addressed by measuring steady-state concentrations of mRNA encoding PGF2 alpha receptor and two inhibitors of PKC, protein kinase C inhibitor-1 (PKCI-1) and kinase C inhibitor protein-1 (KCIP-1, brain 14-3-3 protein), in corpora lutea collected from ewes on days 4, 10 and 15 of the oestrous cycle (n = 5 per day) and day 15 of pregnancy (n = 7). There were no differences in mean concentrations of mRNA encoding PGF2 alpha receptor among the groups. However, concentrations of mRNA encoding both inhibitors of PKC were higher (P < 0.01) on day 4 of the oestrous cycle compared with the other groups. Treatment of ewes with a luteolytic dose of PGF2 alpha, which activates PKC, did not change concentrations of mRNA encoding either PKCI-1 or KCIP-I up to 24 h later. Luteal expression of mRNA encoding the PKC inhibitors and PGF2 alpha receptor was also examined in ewes treated with oestradiol in vivo for 16 h in the midluteal phase. High concentrations of oestradiol in serum (20 and 70 pg ml-1) did not influence quantities of any of the mRNAs examined. Therefore, an increase in PKC inhibitors may be involved in resistance of the corpus luteum to PGF2 alpha during the early part of the oestrous cycle but does not appear to mediate the increased resistance of the corpus luteum to PGF2 alpha during maternal recognition of

  18. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  19. Toward Understanding the Functional Role of Ss-riok-1, a RIO Protein Kinase-Encoding Gene of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wang; Lok, James B.; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Gasser, Robin B.; Fang, Fang; Lei, Wei-Qiang; Fang, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Jun-Long; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs) are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5′-UTR, a 17 bp 3′-UTR and a 1,434 bp ORF encoding a protein of 477 amino acids containing a RIOK-1 signature motif. The genomic sequence of the Ss-riok-1 coding region is 1,636 bp in length and has three exons and two introns. The putative promoter region comprises 4,280 bp and contains conserved promoter elements, including four CAAT boxes, 12 GATA boxes, eight E-boxes (CANNTG) and 38 TATA boxes. The Ss-riok-1 gene is transcribed throughout all developmental stages with the highest transcript abundance in the infective third-stage larva (iL3). Recombinant Ss-RIOK-1 is an active kinase, capable of both phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation. Patterns of transcriptional reporter expression in transgenic S. stercoralis larvae indicated that Ss-RIOK-1 is expressed in neurons of the head, body and tail as well as in pharynx and hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance The characterization of the molecular and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the encoding gene provide first clues as to functions of RIOKs in the biological processes of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25101874

  20. snf1lk encodes a protein kinase that may function in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Angela; Huang, Guo-Ying; Huang, Gui-Yi; Nguyen, Ngoc-Thinh; Reuter, Sean; McBride, Jennifer L; Ruiz, Joseph C

    2004-06-01

    msk, myocardial SNF1-like kinase, was originally isolated in a screen for kinases expressed during early cardiogenesis in the mouse. msk maps to the proximal end of mouse chromosome 17 in a region that is syntenic with human chromosome 21q22.3, where the gene for SNF1LK, a predicted protein that shares 80% identity at the amino acid level with Msk, is located. Accordingly, msk has been redesignated snf1lk. Interestingly, the region encompassing the SNF1LK locus has been implicated in congenital heart defects often observed in patients with Down syndrome. snf1lk is also expressed in skeletal muscle progenitor cells of the somite beginning at 9.5 dpc. These data suggest a more general role for snf1lk in the earliest stages of muscle growth and/or differentiation. Consistent with a role in cell cycling, we observe that Chinese hamster ovary cells that express a tetracycline-inducible SNF1LK kinase domain do not divide, but undergo additional rounds of replication to yield 8N and 16N cells. These data suggest a possible function for SNF1LK in G2/M regulation. We show data that indicate that SNF1LK does not share functional homology with other SNF1-related kinases, but represents a new subclass with novel molecular activities.

  1. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophage-encoded protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-10-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins.

  2. KSHV encoded LANA upregulates Pim-1 and is a substrate for its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Bharat G.; Verma, Subhash C.; Lan, Ke; Cotter, Murray A.; Woodman, Zenda L.; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-07-20

    Pim kinases are proto-oncogenes that are upregulated in a number of B cell cancers, including Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) associated Burkitt's lymphoma. They have also been shown to be upregulated in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) infected primary B cells. Most cells in KSHV-associated tumors are latently infected and express only a small subset of viral genes, with KSHV latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) being constitutively expressed. LANA regulates the transcription of a large number of cellular and viral genes. Here, we show that LANA upregulates transcription from the Pim-1 promoter (pPim-1) and map this activation to a region in the promoter located within the sequence (-681 to +37). We show that LANA expressing cells can proliferate faster and are better protected from drug induced apoptosis. Since transition through cell cycle check points and anti-apoptosis are functions associated with Pim-1, it is likely that higher Pim-1 expression in cells expressing LANA is responsible, at least in part, for this effect. A Pim-1 phosphorylation site was also identified within the amino-terminal domain of LANA. Using in vitro kinase assays, we confirmed that LANA was indeed a Pim-1 substrate, and the failure of Pim-1 to phosphorylate LANA mutated at SS205/6RR identified this site as the specific serine residues phosphorylated by Pim-1. This report provides valuable insight into yet another cellular signaling pathway subverted by KSHV LANA and suggests a contribution to KSHV related oncogenesis.

  3. Welcoming speech from Dean Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Zahari

    2012-09-01

    In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful. It is with great pleasure that I welcome the participants of the International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research 2011. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said 'Acquire knowledge and impart it to the people.' (Al Tirmidhi). The quest for knowledge has been from the beginning of time but knowledge only becomes valuable when it is disseminated and applied to benefit humankind. It is hoped that ICMER 2011 will be a platform to gather and disseminate the latest knowledge in mechanical engineering. Academicians, Scientist, Researchers and practitioners of mechanical engineering will be able to share and discuss new findings and applications of mechanical engineering. It is envisaged that the intellectual discourse will result in future collaborations between universities, research institutions and industry both locally and internationally. In particular it is expected that focus will be given to issues on environmental and energy sustainability. Researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty at UMP have a keen interest in technology to harness energy from the ocean. Lowering vehicle emissions has been a primary goal of researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty and the automotive engineering centre as well including developing vehicles using alternative fuels such as biodiesel and renewable sources such as solar driven electric vehicles. Finally I would like to congratulate the organizing committee for their tremendous efforts in organizing the conference. As I wrote this in the Holy Land of Makkah, I pray to Allah swt that the conference will be a success. Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha CEng, MIED, FASc Dean, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Universiti Malaysia Pahang

  4. Characterization and distribution of a maize cDNA encoding a peptide similar to the catalytic region of second messenger dependent protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, B.; Johnson, E. M.; Feldman, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) roots respond to a variety of environmental stimuli which are perceived by a specialized group of cells, the root cap. We are studying the transduction of extracellular signals by roots, particularly the role of protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation by kinases is an important step in many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. As a first phase of this research we have isolated a cDNA encoding a maize protein similar to fungal and animal protein kinases known to be involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. The deduced sequence of this cDNA encodes a polypeptide containing amino acids corresponding to 33 out of 34 invariant or nearly invariant sequence features characteristic of protein kinase catalytic domains. The maize cDNA gene product is more closely related to the branch of serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic domains composed of the cyclic-nucleotide- and calcium-phospholipid-dependent subfamilies than to other protein kinases. Sequence identity is 35% or more between the deduced maize polypeptide and all members of this branch. The high structural similarity strongly suggests that catalytic activity of the encoded maize protein kinase may be regulated by second messengers, like that of all members of this branch whose regulation has been characterized. Northern hybridization with the maize cDNA clone shows a single 2400 base transcript at roughly similar levels in maize coleoptiles, root meristems, and the zone of root elongation, but the transcript is less abundant in mature leaves. In situ hybridization confirms the presence of the transcript in all regions of primary maize root tissue.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the Rhodobacter capsulatus fruK gene, which encodes fructose-1-phosphate kinase: evidence for a kinase superfamily including both phosphofructokinases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L F; Reizer, A; Reizer, J; Cai, B; Tomich, J M; Saier, M H

    1991-01-01

    The fruK gene encoding fructose-1-phosphate kinase (FruK), located within the fructose (fru)-catabolic operon of Rhodobacter capsulatus, was sequenced. FruK of R. capsulatus (316 amino acids; molecular weight = 31,232) is the same size as and is homologous to FruK of Escherichia coli, phosphofructokinase B (PfkB) of E. coli, phosphotagatokinase of Staphylococcus aureus, and ribokinase of E. coli. These proteins therefore make up a family of homologous proteins, termed the PfkB family. A phylogenetic tree for this new family was constructed. Sequence comparisons plus chemical inactivation studies suggested the lack of involvement of specific residues in catalysis. Although the Rhodobacter FruK differed markedly from the other enzymes within the PfkB family with respect to amino acid composition, these enzymes exhibited similar predicted secondary structural features. A large internal segment of the Rhodobacter FruK was found to be similar in sequence to the domain bearing the sugar bisphosphate-binding region of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of plants and bacteria. Proteins of the PfkB family did not exhibit statistically significant sequence identity with PfkA of E. coli. PfkA, however, is homologous to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic ATP- and PPi-dependent Pfks (the PfkA family). These eukaryotic, ATP-dependent enzymes each consist of a homotetramer (mammalian) or a heterooctamer (yeasts), with each subunit containing an internal duplication of the size of the entire PfkA protein of E. coli. In some of these enzymes, additional domains are present. A phylogenetic tree was constructed for the PfkA family and revealed that the bacterial enzymes closely resemble the N-terminal domains of the eukaryotic enzyme subunits whereas the C-terminal domains have diverged more extensively. The PPi-dependent Pfk of potato is only distantly related to the ATP-dependent enzymes. On the basis of their similar functions, sizes, predicted

  6. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development.

  7. Characterization and expression of the gene encoding En-MAPK1, an intestinal cell kinase (ICK)-like kinase activated by the autocrine pheromone-signaling loop in the Polar Ciliate, Euplotes nobilii.

    PubMed

    Candelori, Annalisa; Luporini, Pierangelo; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-04-03

    In the protozoan ciliate Euplotes, a transduction pathway resulting in a mitogenic cell growth response is activated by autocrine receptor binding of cell type-specific, water-borne signaling protein pheromones. In Euplotes raikovi, a marine species of temperate waters, this transduction pathway was previously shown to involve the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein kinase structurally similar to the intestinal-cell and male germ cell-associated kinases described in mammals. In E. nobilii, which is phylogenetically closely related to E. raikovi but inhabits Antarctic and Arctic waters, we have now characterized a gene encoding a structurally homologous kinase. The expression of this gene requires +1 translational frameshifting and a process of intron splicing for the production of the active protein, designated En-MAPK1, which contains amino acid substitutions of potential significance for cold-adaptation.

  8. CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is structurally related to other nucleoside monophosphate kinases.

    PubMed

    Bucurenci, N; Sakamoto, H; Briozzo, P; Palibroda, N; Serina, L; Sarfati, R S; Labesse, G; Briand, G; Danchin, A; Bărzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1996-02-02

    CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is a monomeric protein of 225 amino acid residues. The protein exhibits little overall sequence similarities with other known NMP kinases. However, residues involved in binding of substrates and/or in catalysis were found conserved, and sequence comparison suggested conservation of the global fold found in adenylate kinases or in several CMP/UMP kinases. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, crystallized, and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(3), have unit cell parameters a = b = 82.3 A and c = 60.7 A, and diffract x-rays to a 1.9 A resolution. The bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 328 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, which suggests that the single tryptophan residue (Trp30) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Substrate specificity studies showed that CMP kinase from E. coli is active with ATP, dATP, or GTP as donors and with CMP, dCMP, and arabinofuranosyl-CMP as acceptors. This is in contrast with CMP/UMP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, an enzyme active on CMP or UMP but much less active on the corresponding deoxynucleotides. Binding of CMP enhanced the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or ADP, a particularity never described in this family of proteins that might explain inhibition of enzyme activity by excess of nucleoside monophosphate.

  9. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK[sub 6] cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys[sup 524] codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with [sup 32]P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified [sup 32]p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  10. A dominant truncation allele identifies a gene, STE20, that encodes a putative protein kinase necessary for mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ramer, S W; Davis, R W

    1993-01-01

    This work reports the identification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of STE20, a newly discovered gene involved in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating response pathway, to date one of the best understood signal transduction pathways. STE20 encodes a putative serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with a predicted molecular mass of 102 kDa. Its expression pattern is similar to that of several other protein kinases in the mating response pathway. Deletion of the kinase domain of STE20 causes sterility in both haploid mating types. This sterility can be partially suppressed by high-level production of STE12 but is not suppressible by high levels of STE4 or a dominant STE11 truncation allele. A truncation allele of STE20 was isolated that can activate the mating response pathway in the absence of exogenous mating pheromone. This allele causes dominant growth arrest that cannot be suppressed by deletions of STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. The allele is able to suppress the mating defect of a strain in which the STE20 kinase domain has been deleted, but not the mating defects of strains carrying mutations in STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, or STE12. Images PMID:8421676

  11. Evidence that oxidative dephosphorylation by the nonheme Fe(II), α-ketoglutarate:UMP oxygenase occurs by stereospecific hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Anwesha; Liu, Xiaodong; Cai, Wenlong; Wyche, Thomas P; Bugni, Tim S; Meurillon, Maïa; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Perigaud, Christian; Nonaka, Koichi; Rohr, Jürgen; Van Lanen, Steven G

    2017-02-01

    LipL and Cpr19 are nonheme, mononuclear Fe(II)-dependent, α-ketoglutarate (αKG):UMP oxygenases that catalyze the formation of CO2 , succinate, phosphate, and uridine-5'-aldehyde, the last of which is a biosynthetic precursor for several nucleoside antibiotics that inhibit bacterial translocase I (MraY). To better understand the chemistry underlying this unusual oxidative dephosphorylation and establish a mechanistic framework for LipL and Cpr19, we report herein the synthesis of two biochemical probes-[1',3',4',5',5'-(2) H]UMP and the phosphonate derivative of UMP-and their activity with both enzymes. The results are consistent with a reaction coordinate that proceeds through the loss of one (2) H atom of [1',3',4',5',5'-(2) H]UMP and stereospecific hydroxylation geminal to the phosphoester to form a cryptic intermediate, (5'R)-5'-hydroxy-UMP. Thus, these enzyme catalysts can additionally be assigned as UMP hydroxylase-phospholyases.

  12. Structures of human thymidylate synthase R163K with dUMP, FdUMP and glutathione show asymmetric ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Lydia M.; Celeste, Lesa R.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2012-02-21

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a well validated target in cancer chemotherapy. Here, a new crystal form of the R163K variant of human TS (hTS) with five subunits per asymmetric part of the unit cell, all with loop 181-197 in the active conformation, is reported. This form allows binding studies by soaking crystals in artificial mother liquors containing ligands that bind in the active site. Using this approach, crystal structures of hTS complexes with FdUMP and dUMP were obtained, indicating that this form should facilitate high-throughput analysis of hTS complexes with drug candidates. Crystal soaking experiments using oxidized glutathione revealed that hTS binds this ligand. Interestingly, the two types of binding observed are both asymmetric. In one subunit of the physiological dimer covalent modification of the catalytic nucleophile Cys195 takes place, while in another dimer a noncovalent adduct with reduced glutathione is formed in one of the active sites.

  13. Replication-dependent irreversible topoisomerase 1 poisoning is responsible for FdUMP[10] anti-leukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Pardee, Timothy S; Gmeiner, William H

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 5-Fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-O-monophosphate 10mer (FdUMP[10]) displays strong antileukemic activity through the dual targeting of thymidylate synthase (TS) and DNA topoisomerase 1 (Top1). The present studies were undertaken to clarify the relationship between the induction of a thymineless state and the formation of Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1CC) for inducing cell death and to clarify the role of DNA replication for induction of lethal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in FdUMP[10]-treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Human promyelocytic (HL60) and AML (KG1a, Molm13, THP-1) cells were synchronized by serum starvation and treated with FdUMP[10] with thymidine (Thy) rescue. Cells were assayed for TS inhibition, DNA DSBs, Top1CC, and apoptosis to clarify the interrelationship of TS inhibition and Top1CC for cell death. FdUMP[10] induced a thymineless state in AML cells and exogenous Thy administered within the first 18 hours of treatment rescued FdUMP[10]-induced Top1CC formation, γH2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis induction. Exogenous Thy was not effective after cells had committed to mitosis and undergone cell division in the presence of FdUMP[10]. FdUMP[10] treatment resulted in Chk1 activation, and Chk1 inhibition enhanced FdUMP[10]-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Jnk-signaling was required for FdUMP[10]-induced apoptosis in promyelocytic HL60 cells and in THP1 cells, but was antiapoptotic in Molm13 and to a lesser extent KG1a AML cells. The results are consistent with FdUMP[10] inducing a thymineless state, leading to misincorporation of FdU into genomic DNA of proliferating cells. Top1CC form in cells upon re-entry into S-phase, resulting in DNA double-strand breaks, and initiating apoptotic signaling that can be either muted or enhanced by Jnk-signaling depending on cell type.

  14. Replication-dependent irreversible topoisomerase 1 poisoning is responsible for FdUMP[10] anti-leukemic activity

    PubMed Central

    Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Pardee, Timothy S.; Gmeiner, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 5-Fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine-5′-O-monophosphate 10mer (FdUMP[10]) displays strong antileukemic activity through the dual targeting of thymidylate synthase (TS) and DNA topoisomerase 1 (Top1). The present studies were undertaken to clarify the relationship between the induction of a thymineless state and the formation of Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1CC) for inducing cell death and to clarify the role of DNA replication for induction of lethal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in FdUMP[10]-treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Human promyelocytic (HL60) and AML (KG1a, Molm13, THP-1) cells were synchronized by serum starvation and treated with FdUMP[10] with thymidine (Thy) rescue. Cells were assayed for TS inhibition, DNA DSBs, Top1CC, and apoptosis to clarify the interrelationship of TS inhibition and Top1CC for cell death. FdUMP[10] induced a thymineless state in AML cells and exogenous Thy administered within the first 18 hours of treatment rescued FdUMP[10]-induced Top1CC formation, γH2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis induction. Exogenous Thy was not effective after cells had committed to mitosis and undergone cell division in the presence of FdUMP[10]. FdUMP[10] treatment resulted in Chk1 activation, and Chk1 inhibition enhanced FdUMP[10]-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Jnk-signaling was required for FdUMP[10]-induced apoptosis in promyelocytic HL60 cells and in THP1 cells, but was antiapoptotic in Molm13 and to a lesser extent KG1a AML cells. The results are consistent with FdUMP[10] inducing a thymineless state, leading to misincorporation of FdU into genomic DNA of proliferating cells. Top1CC form in cells upon re-entry into S-phase, resulting in DNA double-strand breaks, and initiating apoptotic signaling that can be either muted or enhanced by Jnk-signaling depending on cell type. PMID:23085462

  15. The pkI gene encoding pyruvate kinase I links to the luxZ gene which enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lu, H C; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1997-10-09

    Partial 3'-end nucleotide sequence of the pkI gene (GenBank accession No. AF019143) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 has been determined, and the encoded pyruvate kinase I is deduced. Pyruvate kinase I is the key enzyme of glycolysis, which converts phosphoenol pyruvate to pyruvate. Alignment and comparison of pyruvate kinase Is from P. leiognathi, E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium show that they are homologous. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the pkI gene is linked to the luxZ gene that enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi. The gene order of the pkI and luxZ genes is-pk1-ter-->-R&R"-luxZ-ter"-->, whereas ter is transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes, and R&R" is the regulatory region and ter" is transcriptional terminator for the luxZ gene. It clearly elicits that the pkI gene and luxZ gene are divided to two operons. Functional analysis confirms that the potential hairpin loop omega T is the transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes. It infers that the pkI and related genes are simply linked to the luxZ gene in P. leiognathi genome.

  16. DNA-Encoded Library Screening Identifies Benzo[b][1,4]oxazepin-4-ones as Highly Potent and Monoselective Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Philip A; King, Bryan W; Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Berger, Scott B; Campobasso, Nino; Capriotti, Carol A; Cox, Julie A; Dare, Lauren; Dong, Xiaoyang; Finger, Joshua N; Grady, LaShadric C; Hoffman, Sandra J; Jeong, Jae U; Kang, James; Kasparcova, Viera; Lakdawala, Ami S; Lehr, Ruth; McNulty, Dean E; Nagilla, Rakesh; Ouellette, Michael T; Pao, Christina S; Rendina, Alan R; Schaeffer, Michelle C; Summerfield, Jennifer D; Swift, Barbara A; Totoritis, Rachel D; Ward, Paris; Zhang, Aming; Zhang, Daohua; Marquis, Robert W; Bertin, John; Gough, Peter J

    2016-03-10

    The recent discovery of the role of receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated inflammation has led to its emergence as a highly promising target for the treatment of multiple inflammatory diseases. We screened RIP1 against GSK's DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries and identified a novel highly potent benzoxazepinone inhibitor series. We demonstrate that this template possesses complete monokinase selectivity for RIP1 plus unique species selectivity for primate versus nonprimate RIP1. We elucidate the conformation of RIP1 bound to this benzoxazepinone inhibitor driving its high kinase selectivity and design specific mutations in murine RIP1 to restore potency to levels similar to primate RIP1. This series differentiates itself from known RIP1 inhibitors in combining high potency and kinase selectivity with good pharmacokinetic profiles in rodents. The favorable developability profile of this benzoxazepinone template, as exemplified by compound 14 (GSK'481), makes it an excellent starting point for further optimization into a RIP1 clinical candidate.

  17. Characterization of a putative S-locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The major results of our research effort include the determination of the S-Receptor Kinase (SRK) gene structure, the demonstration of S-haplotype-associated SRK polymorphisms and possible co-evolution of SRK and SLG, the characterization of the temporal and spatial expression patterns of SRK, and the demonstration that SRK has intrinsic serine/threonine kinase activity. Our results have indicated that SLG originated from an SRK-like gene by a gene duplication event and suggested a possible molecular basis for leaky S haplotypes. The data have allowed us to develop a model of self-incompatibility based on the interaction of SRK and SLG and the activation of SRK in response to self-pollination. More generally, the information that we have obtained is potentially relevant to understanding mechanisms of signalling inplants. Thus, the interaction of membrane-based receptor protein kinases with secreted forms of their extracellular domains may represent a generalized mechanism by which receptors signal across the plant cell wall.

  18. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase, EBV-PK, but not the thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), is required for ganciclovir and acyclovir inhibition of lytic viral production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiao; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-05-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) and acyclovir (ACV) are guanine nucleoside analogues that inhibit lytic herpesvirus replication. GCV and ACV must be monophosphorylated by virally encoded enzymes to be converted into nucleotides and incorporated into viral DNA. However, whether GCV and/or ACV phosphorylation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells is mediated primarily by the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK), the EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), or both is controversial. To examine this question, we constructed EBV mutants containing stop codons in either the EBV-PK or EBV-TK open reading frame and selected for stable 293T clones latently infected with wild-type EBV or each of the mutant viruses. Cells were induced to the lytic form of viral replication with a BZLF1 expression vector in the presence and absence of various doses of GCV and ACV, and infectious viral titers were determined by a green Raji cell assay. As expected, virus production in wild-type EBV-infected 293T cells was inhibited by both GCV (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 1.5 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 4.1 microM). However, the EBV-PK mutant (which replicates as well as the wild-type (WT) virus in 293T cells) was resistant to both GCV (IC(50) = 19.6 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 36.4 microM). Expression of the EBV-PK protein in trans restored GCV and ACV sensitivity in cells infected with the PK mutant virus. In contrast, in 293T cells infected with the TK mutant virus, viral replication remained sensitive to both GCV (IC(50) = 1.2 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 2.8 microM), although susceptibility to the thymine nucleoside analogue, bromodeoxyuridine, was reduced. Thus, EBV-PK but not EBV-TK mediates ACV and GCV susceptibilities.

  19. Structural and catalytic properties of CMP kinase from Bacillus subtilis: a comparative analysis with the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C P; Ylisastigui-Pons, L; Serina, L; Sakamoto, H; Mantsch, H H; Neuhard, J; Bârzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1997-04-01

    CMP kinases from Bacillus subtilis and from Escherichia coli are encoded by the cmk gene (formerly known as jofC in B. subtilis and as mssA in E. coli). Similar in their primary structure (43% identity and 67% similarity in amino acid sequence), the two proteins exhibit significant differences in nucleotide binding and catalysis. ATP, dATP, and GTP are equally effective as phosphate donors with E. coli CMP kinase whereas GTP is a poor substrate with B. subtilis CMP kinase. While CMP and dCMP are the best phosphate acceptors of both CMP kinases, the specific activity with these substrates and ATP as donor are 7- to 10-fold higher in the E. coli enzyme; the relative Vm values with UMP and CMP are 0.1 for the B. subtilis CMP kinase and 0.01 for the E. coli enzyme. CMP increased the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or for the fluorescent analog 3'-anthraniloyl dATP by one order of magnitude but had no effect on the B. subtilis enzyme. The differences in the catalytic properties of B. subtilis and E. coli CMP kinases might be reflected in the structure of the two proteins as inferred from infrared spectroscopy. Whereas the spectrum of B. subtilis CMP kinase is dominated by a band at 1633 cm-1 (representing beta type structures), the spectrum of the E. coli enzyme is dominated by two bands at 1653 and 1642 cm-1 associated with alpha-helical and unordered structures, respectively. CMP induced similar spectral changes in both proteins with a rearrangement of some of the beta-structures. ATP increases the denaturation temperature of B. subtilis CMP kinase by 9.3 degrees C, whereas in the case of the E. coli enzyme, binding of ATP has only a minor effect.

  20. Crystal structures of the ribonuclease MC1 from bitter gourd seeds, complexed with 2'-UMP or 3'-UMP, reveal structural basis for uridine specificity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Yao, M; Tanaka, I; Numata, T; Kikukawa, S; Yamasaki, N; Kimura, M

    2000-08-28

    Ribonuclease MC1 (RNase MC1) isolated from seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) consists of 190 amino acids and is characterized by a preferential cleavage at the 5'-side of uridine. This uridine specificity distinguishes RNase MC1 from other enzymes belonging to the RNase T2 family. The three-dimensional structures of RNase MC1, in a complex with either 2'-UMP or 3'-UMP, were determined at 1.48 and 1.77 A resolutions, respectively. The side chains of Gln9 and Asn71 interact with O4 and N3, respectively, of the uracil base by hydrogen bondings. In addition, the uracil base is sandwiched by the hydrophobic side chains of Leu73 and Phe80. Compared with these amino acid residues and corresponding residues in RNases in the RNase T2 family, Gln9 and Phe80 are highly conserved in the RNases in T2 family, while Asn71 and Leu73 in RNase MC1 are variant in sequences. It is thus likely that interactions of the side chains of Asn71 and Leu73 with the uracil base are responsible for the absolute uridine specificity of RNase MC1. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that replacement of Asn by Thr decreased both the catalytic efficiency and the binding affinity by 2.3- and 7.0-fold, respectively, and substitution of Leu73 for Ala predominantly decreased the binding affinity by 14. 5-fold, compared with findings in case of wild-type RNase MC1. It is thus demonstrated that Asn71 and Leu73 play an essential role in uridine preference for RNase MC1.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  2. Functional identification of the promoter for the gene encoding the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, N J; Massé, T; Suzuki, T; Chen, J; Alam, D; Kelly, P T

    1995-01-01

    To examine the expression of the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, various 5' flanking genomic sequences were inserted into a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmid and CAT enzyme activities were analyzed in transfected NB2a neuroblastoma cells and mRNA transcription was analyzed by nuclease protection assays. A core promoter was identified which contained an essential TATA element located 162 nt 5' to the transcription start site. Sequences 3' to the transcription start site, as well as 5' to the TATA element, increased levels of CAT activity in transfected cells. The alpha-subunit gene promoter displayed higher CAT activities, relative to a simian virus 40 promoter, in transfected neuronal cell lines than in nonneuronal cell lines. Results also suggested that sequence surrounding the natural alpha-gene transcription initiation site may be important for targeting transcription initiation 162 nt downstream of its TATA element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7878035

  3. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Molecular characterisation of the STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY of genes encoding putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboglu, Banu; Pfister, Karen; Haberer, Georg; Chevalier, David; Fuchs, Angelika; Mayer, Klaus FX; Schneitz, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Background Receptor-like kinases are a prominent class of surface receptors that regulate many aspects of the plant life cycle. Despite recent advances the function of most receptor-like kinases remains elusive. Therefore, it is paramount to investigate these receptors. The task is complicated by the fact that receptor-like kinases belong to a large monophyletic family with many sub-clades. In general, functional analysis of gene family members by reverse genetics is often obscured by several issues, such as redundancy, subtle or difficult to detect phenotypes in mutants, or by decision problems regarding suitable biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, in many cases additional strategies have to be employed to allow inference of hypotheses regarding gene function. Results We approached the function of genes encoding the nine-member STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY (SRF) class of putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. Sequence comparisons show overall conservation but also divergence in predicted functional domains among SRF proteins. Interestingly, SRF1 undergoes differential splicing. As a result, SRF1 is predicted to exist in a standard receptor configuration and in a membrane-anchored receptor-like version that lacks most of the intracellular domain. Furthermore, SRF1 is characterised by a high degree of polymorphism between the Ler and Col accessions. Two independent T-DNA-based srf4 mutants showed smaller leaves while 35S::SRF4 plants displayed enlarged leaves. This is in addition to the strubbelig phenotype which has been described before. Additional single and several key double mutant combinations did not reveal obvious mutant phenotypes. Ectopic expression of several SRF genes, using the 35S promoter, resulted in male sterility. To gain possible insights into SRF gene function we employed a computational analysis of publicly available microarray data. We performed global expression profiling, coexpression analysis, and an analysis of the

  5. The MRE4 gene encodes a novel protein kinase homologue required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Leem, S H; Ogawa, H

    1992-01-01

    The MRE4 gene was cloned by complementation of the defects of meiotic recombination and haploidization in an mre4-1 mutant. Disruption of MRE4 resulted in reduced meiotic recombination and spore inviability. The mre4 spore lethality can be suppressed by spo13, a mutation that causes cells to bypass the reductional division. Analysis of meiotic DNA extracted from the mre4 mutant cells revealed that double-strand breaks occurred at the two sites of the HIS4-LEU2 recombination hot spot, but at a frequency of about 10-20% of the wild type. Northern blot analysis indicated that the MRE4 gene produces four transcripts of 1.63, 3.2, 4.0 and 6.2 kb. All of these transcripts are absent from mitotic cells and are meiotically induced. The DNA sequence of the MRE4 open reading frame predicts a 497-amino acids protein with a molecular mass of 56.8 kDa. The Mre4 protein contains highly conserved amino acid sequences found specifically in serine-threonine protein kinases. These results suggest that protein phosphorylation is required directly or indirectly for meiotic recombination. Images PMID:1741279

  6. Mutations in TBCK, Encoding TBC1-Domain-Containing Kinase, Lead to a Recognizable Syndrome of Intellectual Disability and Hypotonia

    PubMed Central

    Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Li, Dong; Harr, Margaret; Edvardson, Shimon; Elpeleg, Orly; Chisholm, Elizabeth; Juusola, Jane; Douglas, Ganka; Guillen Sacoto, Maria J.; Siquier-Pernet, Karine; Saadi, Abdelkrim; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Narravula, Alekhya; Walke, Maria; Horner, Michele B.; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Jayakar, Parul; Vergano, Samantha A. Schrier; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Hegde, Madhuri; Colleaux, Laurence; Crino, Peter; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    Through an international multi-center collaboration, 13 individuals from nine unrelated families and affected by likely pathogenic biallelic variants in TBC1-domain-containing kinase (TBCK) were identified through whole-exome sequencing. All affected individuals were found to share a core phenotype of intellectual disability and hypotonia, and many had seizures and showed brain atrophy and white-matter changes on neuroimaging. Minor non-specific facial dysmorphism was also noted in some individuals, including multiple older children who developed coarse features similar to those of storage disorders. TBCK has been shown to regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is also stimulated by exogenous leucine supplementation. TBCK was absent in cells from affected individuals, and decreased phosphorylation of phospho-ribosomal protein S6 was also observed, a finding suggestive of downregulation of mTOR signaling. Lastly, we demonstrated that activation of the mTOR pathway in response to L-leucine supplementation was retained, suggesting a possible avenue for directed therapies for this condition. PMID:27040691

  7. Identification and Function of the pdxY Gene, Which Encodes a Novel Pyridoxal Kinase Involved in the Salvage Pathway of Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    1998-01-01

    pdxK encodes a pyridoxine (PN)/pyridoxal (PL)/pyridoxamine (PM) kinase thought to function in the salvage pathway of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme biosynthesis. The observation that pdxK null mutants still contain PL kinase activity led to the hypothesis that Escherichia coli K-12 contains at least one other B6-vitamer kinase. Here we support this hypothesis by identifying the pdxY gene (formally, open reading frame f287b) at 36.92 min, which encodes a novel PL kinase. PdxY was first identified by its homology to PdxK in searches of the complete E. coli genome. Minimal clones of pdxY+ overexpressed PL kinase specific activity about 10-fold. We inserted an omega cassette into pdxY and crossed the resulting pdxY::ΩKanr mutation into the bacterial chromosome of a pdxB mutant, in which de novo PLP biosynthesis is blocked. We then determined the growth characteristics and PL and PN kinase specific activities in extracts of pdxK and pdxY single and double mutants. Significantly, the requirement of the pdxB pdxK pdxY triple mutant for PLP was not satisfied by PL and PN, and the triple mutant had negligible PL and PN kinase specific activities. Our combined results suggest that the PL kinase PdxY and the PN/PL/PM kinase PdxK are the only physiologically important B6 vitamer kinases in E. coli and that their function is confined to the PLP salvage pathway. Last, we show that pdxY is located downstream from pdxH (encoding PNP/PMP oxidase) and essential tyrS (encoding aminoacyl-tRNATyr synthetase) in a multifunctional operon. pdxY is completely cotranscribed with tyrS, but about 92% of tyrS transcripts terminate at a putative Rho-factor-dependent attenuator located in the tyrS-pdxY intercistronic region. PMID:9537380

  8. Unique dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase1 by FdUMP[10] results in high efficacy against AML and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Timothy S; Gomes, Evan; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Caudell, David; Gmeiner, William H

    2012-04-12

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that leads to marrow failure and death. There is a desperate need for new therapies. The novel fluoropyrimidine, FdUMP[10], was highly active against both human AML cell lines, (IC(50) values, 3.4nM-21.5nM) and murine lines (IC(50) values, 123.8pM-131.4pM). In all cases, the IC(50) of FdUMP[10] was lower than for cytarabine and ∼ 1000 times lower than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). FdUMP[10] remained effective against cells expressing the Flt3 internal tandem duplication, BCR-ABL, MN1, and an shRNA against p53. It had activity against patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic cells. FdUMP[10] inhibited thymidylate synthase (TS) and trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1CCs), leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. All cell lines and nearly all primary AML samples examined expressed both TS and Top1. In vivo, FdUMP[10] was active against a syngeneic AML model with a survival advantage equivalent to doxorubicin plus cytarabine. 5-FU treatment was toxic and did not improve survival. FdUMP[10] was better tolerated than 5-FU or cytarabine plus doxorubicin and did not affect normal HSCs, while 5-FU dramatically impaired their ability to engraft. In summary, FdUMP[10] was highly efficacious and better tolerated than standard therapies.

  9. Fission yeast pak1+ encodes a protein kinase that interacts with Cdc42p and is involved in the control of cell polarity and mating.

    PubMed Central

    Ottilie, S; Miller, P J; Johnson, D I; Creasy, C L; Sells, M A; Bagrodia, S; Forsburg, S L; Chernoff, J

    1995-01-01

    A STE20/p65pak homolog was isolated from fission yeast by PCR. The pak1+ gene encodes a 72 kDa protein containing a putative p21-binding domain near its amino-terminus and a serine/threonine kinase domain near its carboxyl-terminus. The Pak1 protein autophosphorylates on serine residues and preferentially binds to activated Cdc42p both in vitro and in vivo. This binding is mediated through the p21 binding domain on Pak1p and the effector domain on Cdc42p. Overexpression of an inactive mutant form of pak1 gives rise to cells with markedly abnormal shape with mislocalized actin staining. Pak1 overexpression does not, however, suppress lethality associated with cdc42-null cells or the morphologic defeat caused by overexpression of mutant cdc42 alleles. Gene disruption of pak1+ establishes that, like cdc42+, pak1+ function is required for cell viability. In budding yeast, pak1+ expression restores mating function to STE20-null cells and, in fission yeast, overexpression of an inactive form of Pak inhibits mating. These results indicate that the Pak1 protein is likely to be an effector for Cdc42p or a related GTPase, and suggest that Pak1p is involved in the maintenance of cell polarity and in mating. Images PMID:8846783

  10. The Role of the Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 (EHV-1) US3-Encoded Protein Kinase in Actin Reorganization and Nuclear Egress

    PubMed Central

    Proft, Alexandra; Spiesschaert, Bart; Izume, Satoko; Taferner, Selina; Lehmann, Maik J.; Azab, Walid

    2016-01-01

    The serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by US3 gene (pUS3) of alphaherpesviruses was shown to modulate actin reorganization, cell-to-cell spread, and virus egress in a number of virus species. However, the role of the US3 orthologues of equine herpesvirus type 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4) has not yet been studied. Here, we show that US3 is not essential for virus replication in vitro. However, growth rates and plaque diameters of a US3-deleted EHV-1 and a mutant in which the catalytic active site was destroyed were significantly reduced when compared with parental and revertant viruses or a virus in which EHV-1 US3 was replaced with the corresponding EHV-4 gene. The reduced plaque sizes were consistent with accumulation of primarily enveloped virions in the perinuclear space of the US3-negative EHV-1, a phenotype that was also rescued by the EHV-4 orthologue. Furthermore, actin stress fiber disassembly was significantly more pronounced in cells infected with parental EHV-1, revertant, or the recombinant EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 US3. Finally, we observed that deletion of US3 in EHV-1 did not affect the expression of adhesion molecules on the surface of infected cells. PMID:27754319

  11. Molecular and biochemical identification of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase encoding mRNA variants in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeju; Saiardi, Adolfo; Greenwood, John S; Bewley, J Derek

    2014-05-01

    During seed development, phytic acid (PA) associated with mineral cations is stored as phytin and mobilized following germination in support of seedling growth. Two parallel biosynthetic pathways for PA have been proposed; yet the pathway is still poorly understood in terms of its regulation and the enzymes involved. Here, the castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) gene for inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (RcIPK1) has been identified. This encodes the enzyme implicated in catalyzing the final reaction in PA biosynthesis, and its expression is enhanced in isolated germinated embryos by application of phosphate and myo-inositol (Ins). Even though only one copy of the RcIPK1 gene is present in the genome, numerous RNA variants are present, most likely due to alternative splicing. These are translated into six closely related protein isoforms according to in silico analysis. Functional analyses using yeast ipk1Δ revealed that only three of the mRNA variants can rescue a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of this strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the synthesized inositol phosphates demonstrated that the ability to complement the missing yeast IPK1 enzyme is associated with the production of enzyme activity. The three active isoforms possess unique conserved motifs important for IPK1 catalytic activity.

  12. The rice nuclear gene, VIRESCENT 2, is essential for chloroplast development and encodes a novel type of guanylate kinase targeted to plastids and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kusumi, Kensuke; Noguchi, Ko; Yano, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Iba, Koh

    2007-11-01

    Guanylate kinase (GK) is a critical enzyme in guanine nucleotide metabolism pathways, catalyzing the phosphorylation of (d)GMP to (d)GDP. Here we show that a novel gene, VIRESCENT 2 (V2), encodes a new type of GK (designated pt/mtGK) that is localized in plastids and mitochondria. We initially identified the V2 gene by positional cloning of the rice v2 mutant. The v2 mutant is temperature-sensitive and develops chlorotic leaves at restrictive temperatures. The v2 mutation causes inhibition of chloroplast differentiation; in particular, it disrupts the chloroplast translation machinery during early leaf development [Sugimoto et al. (2004)Plant Cell Physiol. 45, 985]. In the bacterial and animal species studied to date, GK is localized in the cytoplasm and participates in maintenance of the guanine nucleotide pools required for many fundamental cellular processes. Phenotypic analysis of rice seedlings with RNAi knockdown of cytosolic GK (designated cGK) showed that cGK is indispensable for the growth and development of plants, but not for chloroplast development. Thus, rice has two types of GK, as does Arabidopsis, suggesting that higher plants have two types of GK. Our results suggest that, of the two types of GK, only pt/mtGK is essential for chloroplast differentiation.

  13. Mutations and Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding Regulatory Subunit Type 1-alpha of Protein Kinase A (PRKAR1A): An Update

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Anélia; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Tsang, Kitman; Cazabat, Laure; Libe, Rosella; Remmers, Elaine; René-Corail, Fernande; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Clauser, Eric; Calender, Alain; Bertagna, Xavier; Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2010-01-01

    PRKAR1A encodes the regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (RIα), of the main mediator of the cAMP effects in the eukaryotic cells – cAMP dependant Protein Kinase A (PKA). Inactivating PRKAR1A mutations are known to be responsible for the multiple neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome Carney complex (CNC). To date, at least 117 pathogenic variants in PRKAR1A have been identified. The majority of them are subject to non-sense mediated mRNA decay (NMD), leading to PRKAR1A haploinsufficiency and, as a result, activated cAMP signaling in the affected tissues. In recent years it became apparent that CNC may be caused not only by RIα haploinsufficiency, but also by the expression of altered PRKAR1A protein, as proven by analysis of the relatively small proportion of expressed mutations in the gene, consisting of aminoacid substitutions and in-frame genetic alterations. In addition, a new subgroup of mutations that potentially escape NMD and result in CNC through altered rather than missing protein has been analyzed – frame-shifts in the 3′end of the coding sequence that shift the stop codon downstream of the regular one and result in the expression of longer than the wild type protein. The PRKAR1A mutation detection rate in CNC patients is recently estimated at above 60%; PRKAR1A mutation negative CNC patients are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of all 117 known to date pathogenic PRKAR1A sequence variations, and discuss their molecular context and clinical relevance. PMID:20358582

  14. Unique dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase1 by FdUMP[10] results in high efficacy against AML and low toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evan; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Caudell, David; Gmeiner, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that leads to marrow failure and death. There is a desperate need for new therapies. The novel fluoropyrimidine, FdUMP[10], was highly active against both human AML cell lines, (IC50 values, 3.4nM-21.5nM) and murine lines (IC50 values, 123.8pM-131.4pM). In all cases, the IC50 of FdUMP[10] was lower than for cytarabine and ∼ 1000 times lower than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). FdUMP[10] remained effective against cells expressing the Flt3 internal tandem duplication, BCR-ABL, MN1, and an shRNA against p53. It had activity against patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic cells. FdUMP[10] inhibited thymidylate synthase (TS) and trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1CCs), leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. All cell lines and nearly all primary AML samples examined expressed both TS and Top1. In vivo, FdUMP[10] was active against a syngeneic AML model with a survival advantage equivalent to doxorubicin plus cytarabine. 5-FU treatment was toxic and did not improve survival. FdUMP[10] was better tolerated than 5-FU or cytarabine plus doxorubicin and did not affect normal HSCs, while 5-FU dramatically impaired their ability to engraft. In summary, FdUMP[10] was highly efficacious and better tolerated than standard therapies. PMID:22362039

  15. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility]. Progress report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK{sub 6} cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys{sup 524} codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with {sup 32}P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified {sup 32}p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  16. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

  17. Chemical Synthesis of a 5'-Terminal TMG-Capped Triribonucleotide m(3)(2,2,7)G(5)(')pppAmpUmpA of U1 RNA.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Mitsuo; Kadokura, Michinori; Satoh, Takahiko; Seio, Kohji; Wada, Takeshi; Fischer, Utz; Sumpter, Vicki; Lührmann, Reinhard

    1996-06-26

    The 5'-terminal TMG-capped triribonucleotide, m(3)(2,2,7)G(5)(')pppAmpUmpA, has been synthesized by condensation of an appropriately protected triribonucleotide derivative of ppAmpUmpA with a new TMG-capping reagent. During this total synthesis, it was found that the regioselective 2'-O-methylation of 3',5'-O-(1,1,3,3-tetraisopropyldisiloxane-1,3-diyl)-N-(4-monomethoxytrityl)adenosine was achieved by use of MeI/Ag(2)O without affecting the base moiety. A new route to 2-N,2-N-dimethylguanosine from guanosine via a three-step reaction has also been developed by reductive methylation using paraformaldehyde and sodium cyanoborohydride. These key intermediates were used as starting materials for the construction of a fully protected derivative of pAmpUmpA and a TMG-capping reagent of Im-pm(3)(2,2,7)G. The target TMG-capped tetramer, m(3)(2,2,7)G(5)(')pppAmpUmpA, was synthesized by condensation of a partially protected triribonucleotide 5'-terminal diphosphate species, ppA(MMTr)mpUmpA, with Im-pm(3)(2,2,7)G followed by treatment with 80% acetic acid. The structure of m(3)(2,2,7)G(5)(')pppAmpUmpA was characterized by (1)H and (31)P NMR spectroscopy as well as enzymatic assay using snake venom phosphodiesterase, calf intestinal phosphatase, and nuclease P1.

  18. The genes encoding the Eph-related receptor tyrosine kinase ligands LERK-1 (EPLG1, Epl1), LERK-3 (EPLG3, Epl3), and LERK-4 (EPLG4, Epl4) are clustered on human chromosome 1 and mouse chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cerretti, D.P.; Lyman, S.D.; Kozlosky, C.J.

    1996-04-15

    Hek and elk are members of the eph-related family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, we isolated five cDNAs encoding membrane-bound ligands to hek and elk. Because of the promiscuous nature of their binding, we have termed these proteins ligands of the eph-related kinases or LERKs. The LERKs can be divided into two subgroups by virtue of their sequence identity, binding properties, and mode of cell membrane attachment. For example, LERK-2 (EPLG2, Epl2) and LERK-5 (EPLG5, Epl5) are type 1 transmembrane proteins, while LERK-1 (EPLG4, Epl4) are anchored to the membrane by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Using Southern hybridization analysis of human x rodent somatic cell hybrid DNAs, we have assigned the genes that encode the GPI-anchored LERKs (EPLG1, EPLG3, and EPLG4) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosome preparations using genomic clones from each locus refined this localization to chromosome 1, bands q21-q22. In addition, Southern blot analysis of DNA from interspecific backcross mice indicated that the mouse homologues Epl1, Epl3, and Epl4 map to a homologous region on mouse chromosome 3. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The Crystal Structure of the Leishmania major Deoxyuridine Triphosphate Nucleotidohydrolase in Complex with Nucleotide Analogues, dUMP, and Deoxyuridine*

    PubMed Central

    Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Moroz, Olga V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Scott, Benjamin; Bosch-Navarrete, Cristina; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of the life-threatening disease leishmaniasis. New drugs are being sought due to increasing resistance and adverse side effects with current treatments. The knowledge that dUTPase is an essential enzyme and that the all α-helical dimeric kinetoplastid dUTPases have completely different structures compared with the trimeric β-sheet type dUTPase possessed by most organisms, including humans, make the dimeric enzymes attractive drug targets. Here, we present crystal structures of the Leishmania major dUTPase in complex with substrate analogues, the product dUMP and a substrate fragment, and of the homologous Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase in complex with a triphosphate substrate analogue. The metal-binding properties of both enzymes are shown to be dependent upon the ligand identity, a previously unseen characteristic of this family. Furthermore, structures of the Leishmania enzyme in the presence of dUMP and deoxyuridine coupled with tryptophan fluorescence quenching indicate that occupation of the phosphate binding region is essential for induction of the closed conformation and hence for substrate binding. These findings will aid in the development of dUTPase inhibitors as potential new lead anti-trypanosomal compounds. PMID:21454646

  20. A novel oncogene, v-ryk, encoding a truncated receptor tyrosine kinase is transduced into the RPL30 virus without loss of viral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, R; Mayer, B J; Hanafusa, T; Hanafusa, H

    1992-01-01

    The RPL viruses are acute oncogenic avian retroviruses isolated from chicken tumors. We carried out a genetic analysis of three of the viruses, RPL25, RPL28, and RPL30. While RPL25 and RPL28 were shown to contain the erbB oncogene, RPL30 appeared to contain a novel protein tyrosine kinase oncogene. This gene, v-ryk, was cloned and sequenced. The v-ryk oncogene contains a 1.39-kb nonretroviral sequence that includes a tyrosine kinase domain which was inserted into the viral envelope protein gp37-coding region and fused in frame with upstream gp37 to generate a P69gp37-ryk fusion oncoprotein. Unlike that of other acutely transforming retroviruses, transduction of the v-ryk gene into RPL30 did not result in deletion of viral sequences. Sequence analysis suggested that v-Ryk is more homologous to receptor-type tyrosine kinases than to nonreceptor-type kinases. By reconstitution of a virus from its cDNA, the v-ryk oncogene has been shown to be fully responsible for the transforming activity of the RPL30 virus. Antibodies specific to v-Ryk immunoprecipitated the v-Ryk oncoprotein from cells transformed by the RPL30 virus. The v-Ryk protein was shown to be first synthesized as a 150-kDa precursor and then cleaved into the mature 69-kDa gp37-Ryk fusion protein, both parts of which were found to be localized to the membrane fraction. As expected from the sequence of v-Ryk, immunoprecipitates of v-Ryk from RPL30-transformed cells were found to display a protein tyrosine kinase activity in vitro, and the levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are elevated in v-ryk-transformed cells. Images PMID:1527848

  1. Activating E17K mutation in the gene encoding the protein kinase AKT1 in a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Scrima, Marianna; De Marco, Carmela; Fabiani, Fernanda; De Rosa, Nicla; De Gisi, Silvia; Malara, Natalia; Savino, Rocco; Rocco, Gaetano; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Franco, Renato; Tirino, Virginia; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Somatic mutation (E17K) that constitutively activates the protein kinase AKT1 has been found in human cancer patients. We determined the role of the E17K mutation of AKT1 in lung cancer, through sequencing of AKT1 exon 4 in 105 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer specimens. We detected a missense mutations G-->A transition at nucleotide 49 (that results in the E17K substitution) in two squamous cell carcinoma (2/36) but not in adenocarcinoma (0/53). The activity of the endogenous kinase carrying the E17K mutation immunoprecipitated by tumour tissue was significantly higher compared with the wild-type kinase immunoprecipitated by the adjacent normal tissue as determined both by in vitro kinase assay using a consensus peptide as substrate and by in vivo analysis of the phosphorylation status of AKT1 itself (pT308, pS473) or of known downstream substrates such as GSK3 (pS9/S22) and p27 (T198). Immunostaining or immunoblot analysis on membrane-enriched extracts indicated that the enhanced membrane localization exhibited by the endogenous E17K-AKT1 may account for the observed increased activity of mutant E17K kinase in comparison with the wild-type AKT1 from adjacent normal tissue. In conclusion, this is the first report of AKT1 mutation in lung cancer. Our data provide evidence that, although AKT1 mutations are apparently rare in lung cancer (1.9%), the oncogenic properties of E17K-AKT1 may contribute to the development of a fraction of lung carcinoma with squamous histotype (5.5%).

  2. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  3. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis.

  4. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-01-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme. Images PMID:2869483

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  6. The Gene YALI0E20207g from Yarrowia lipolytica Encodes an N-Acetylglucosamine Kinase Implicated in the Regulated Expression of the Genes from the N-Acetylglucosamine Assimilatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen-Lisset; Gancedo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica possesses an ORF, YALI0E20207g, which encodes a protein with an amino acid sequence similar to hexokinases from different organisms. We have cloned that gene and determined several enzymatic properties of its encoded protein showing that it is an N-acetylglucosamine (NAGA) kinase. This conclusion was supported by the lack of growth in NAGA of a strain carrying a YALI0E20207g deletion. We named this gene YlNAG5. Expression of YlNAG5 as well as that of the genes encoding the enzymes of the NAGA catabolic pathway—identified by a BLAST search—was induced by this sugar. Deletion of YlNAG5 rendered that expression independent of the presence of NAGA in the medium and reintroduction of the gene restored the inducibility, indicating that YlNag5 participates in the transcriptional regulation of the NAGA assimilatory pathway genes. Expression of YlNAG5 was increased during sporulation and homozygous Ylnag5/Ylnag5 diploid strains sporulated very poorly as compared with a wild type isogenic control strain pointing to a participation of the protein in the process. Overexpression of YlNAG5 allowed growth in glucose of an Ylhxk1glk1 double mutant and produced, in a wild type background, aberrant morphologies in different media. Expression of the gene in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae hxk1 hxk2 glk1 triple mutant restored ability to grow in glucose. PMID:25816199

  7. PaCDPK1, a gene encoding calcium-dependent protein kinase from orchid, Phalaenopsis amabilis, is induced by cold, wounding, and pathogen challenge.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Mu; Chen, Ying-Ru; Kao, Tien-Wen; Tsay, Wen-Su; Wu, Chiou-Ping; Huang, Ding-Ding; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Signaling pathways, specifically calcium and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), have been implicated in the regulation of stress and developmental signals in plants. Here, we reported the isolation and characterization of an orchid, Phalaenopsis amabilis, CDPK gene, PaCDPK1, by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR technique. The full length cDNA of 2,310 bp contained an open reading frame for PaCDPK1 consisting of 593 amino acid residues. Sequence alignment indicated that PaCDPK1 shared similarities with other plant CDPKs. PaCDPK1 transcripts were expressed strongly in labellum but not in leaves and roots. In addition, the PaCDPK1 gene was transcriptionally activated in response to low temperature, wounding, and pathogen infection. To identify the regulatory role of the PaCDPK1 promoter, a construct containing the PaCDPK1 promoter fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene was transferred into Arabidopsis by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. GUS staining revealed that PaCDPK1/GUS expression was induced by cold, wounding, and pathogen challenge in leaves and stems of transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggested that this PaCDPK1 gene promoter could be used as an endogenous promoter for biotechnological purposes in orchids.

  8. The Aspergillus nidulans uvsB gene encodes an ATM-related kinase required for multiple facets of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, A F; Harris, S D

    2000-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, uvsB and uvsD belong to the same epistasis group of DNA repair mutants. Recent observations suggest that these genes are likely to control cell cycle checkpoint responses to DNA damage and incomplete replication. Consistent with this notion, we show here that UVSB is a member of the conserved family of ATM-related kinases. Phenotypic characterization of uvsB mutants shows that they possess defects in additional aspects of the DNA damage response besides checkpoint control, including inhibition of septum formation, regulation of gene expression, and induced mutagenesis. The musN227 mutation partially suppresses the poor growth and DNA damage sensitivity of uvsB mutants. Although musN227 partially suppresses several uvsB defects, it does not restore checkpoint function to uvsB mutants. Notably, the failure of uvsB mutants to restrain septum formation in the presence of DNA damage is suppressed by the musN227 mutation. We propose that UVSB functions as the central regulator of the A. nidulans DNA damage response, whereas MUSN promotes recovery by modulating a subset of the response. PMID:10747054

  9. Mutation analysis of the gene encoding Bruton`s tyrosine kinase in a family with a sporadic case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia reveals three female carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, T.L.; Kwan, Sau-Ping; Assa`ad, A.H.

    1995-11-06

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been identified as the protein responsible for the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). We and others have cloned the gene for Btk and recently reported the genomic organization. Nineteen exons were positioned within the 37 kb gene. With the sequence data derived from our genomic map, we have designed a PCR based assay to directly identify mutations of the Btk gene in germline DNA of patients with XLA. In this report, the assay was used to analyze a family with a sporadic case of XLA to determine if other female relatives carry the disease. A four base-pair deletion was found in the DNA of the affected boy and was further traced through three generations. With the direct identification of the mutations responsible for XLA, we can now diagnose conclusively the disease and identify the immunologically normal female carriers. This same technique can easily be applied to prenatal diagnosis in families where the mutation can be identified. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Genes encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of the Triticum/Aegilops complex and the evolutionary history of polyploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaoxing; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Su, Xiujuan; Faris, Justin; Gill, Bikram; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D), genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (Triticum turgidum AABB, and Triticum timopheevii AAGG) and hexaploid (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) species. We analyzed Acc-1 (plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and Pgk-1 (plastid 3-phosphoglycerate kinase) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among Triticum and Aegilops species of the wheat lineage and to establish the timeline of wheat evolution based on gene sequence comparisons. Triticum urartu was confirmed as the A genome donor of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The A genome of polyploid wheat diverged from T. urartu less than half a million years ago (MYA), indicating a relatively recent origin of polyploid wheat. The D genome sequences of T. aestivum and Aegilops tauschii are identical, confirming that T. aestivum arose from hybridization of T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii only 8,000 years ago. The diploid Triticum and Aegilops progenitors of the A, B, D, G, and S genomes all radiated 2.5–4.5 MYA. Our data suggest that the Acc-1 and Pgk-1 loci have different histories in different lineages, indicating genome mosaicity and significant intraspecific differentiation. Some loci of the S genome of Aegilops speltoides and the G genome of T. timophevii are closely related, suggesting the same origin of some parts of their genomes. None of the Aegilops genomes analyzed is a close relative of the B genome, so the diploid progenitor of the B genome remains unknown. PMID:12060759

  11. Expression analysis of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinases in maize provides a key link between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Hao; Wang, Juan; Sun, Hong Wei; Yang, Shu Ke; Sang, Ya Lin; Lu, Xing Bo; Xu, Xiao Hui

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in stress responses and development in plants. Maize (Zea mays), an important cereal crop, is a model plant species for molecular studies. In the last decade, several MAPKs have been identified in maize; however, their functions have not been studied extensively. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of maize MAPK genes could provide valuable information for understanding their functions. In this study, 20 non-redundant maize MAPK genes (ZmMPKs) were identified via a genome-wide survey. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKs from maize, rice (Oryza sativa), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) classified them into four major classes. ZmMPKs in the same class had similar domains, motifs, and genomic structures. Gene duplication investigations suggested that segmental duplications made a large contribution to the expansion of ZmMPKs. A number of cis-acting elements related to plant development and response to stress and hormones were identified in the promoter regions of ZmMPKs. Furthermore, transcript profile analysis in eight tissues and organs at various developmental stages demonstrated that most ZmMPKs were preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues and organs. The transcript abundance of most ZmMPKs changed significantly under salt, drought, cold, or abscisic acid (ABA) treatments, implying that they might participate in abiotic stress and ABA signaling. These expression analyses indicated that ZmMPKs might serve as linkers between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction. Our data will deepen our understanding of the complexity of the maize MAPK gene family and provide new clues to investigate their functions.

  12. c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription of the gene encoding the p27(Kip1) cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Mineva, Nora D; Burke, Brian; Jeay, Sébastien; Wu, Min; Shen, Jian; Yang, William; Hann, Stephen R; Sonenshein, Gail E

    2008-08-15

    The p27(Kip1) (p27) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and c-Myc oncoprotein play essential roles in control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Induction of p27 (CDKN1B) gene transcription by Forkhead box O proteins such as FOXO3a leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. Previously, we observed that B cell receptor (surface IgM) engagement of WEHI 231 immature B lymphoma cells with an anti-IgM antibody results in activation of FOXO3a, growth arrest and apoptosis. As ectopic c-Myc expression in these cells prevented anti-IgM induction of p27 and cell death, we hypothesized that c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription. Here we show that c-Myc inhibits FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 promoter in multiple cell lines. The mechanism of this repression was explored using a combination of co-immunoprecipitation, oligonucleotide precipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The studies demonstrate a functional association of FOXO3a and c-Myc on a proximal Forkhead binding element in the p27 promoter. This association involves the Myc box II domain of c-Myc and the N-terminal DNA-binding portion of FOXO3a. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets showed an inverse pattern of c-MYC and p27 RNA expression in primary acute myeloid leukemia, prostate cancer and tongue squamous cell carcinoma samples. The inhibition of FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 gene by the high aberrant expression of c-Myc in many tumor cells likely contributes to their uncontrolled proliferation and invasive phenotype.

  13. Soluble adenylyl cyclase accounts for high basal cCMP and cUMP concentrations in HEK293 and B103 cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alan; Danker, Kerstin Y; Wolter, Sabine; Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2014-05-30

    Intact HEK293 cells and B103 neuroblastoma cells possess high basal concentrations of the established second messengers cAMP and cGMP and of the emerging second messengers cCMP and cUMP. We asked the question which nucleotidyl cyclase accounts for the high basal cNMP concentrations. Activators and inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase had no major effects on cNMPs, and the activator of membranous adenylyl cyclase forskolin increased only cAMP. Addition of bicarbonate to medium increased, whereas removal of bicarbonate decreased levels of all four cNMPs. The inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase, 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthio)-N'-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) propanehydrazide (KH7), reduced bicarbonate-stimulated cNMPs. In conclusion, bicarbonate-stimulated soluble adenylyl cyclase plays an important role in the regulation of basal cellular cNMP levels, most notably cCMP and cUMP.

  14. The maize (Zea mays L.) nucleoside diphosphate kinase1 (ZmNDPK1) gene encodes a human NM23-H2 homologue that binds and stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Kopylov, Mykhailo; Bass, Hank W; Stroupe, M Elizabeth

    2015-03-10

    Noncanonical forms of DNA like the guanine quadruplex (G4) play important roles in regulating transcription and translation through interactions with their protein partners. Although potential G4 elements have been identified in or near genes from species diverse as bacteria, mammals, and plants, little is known about how they might function as cis-regulatory elements or as binding sites for trans-acting protein partners. In fact, until now no G4 binding partners have been identified in the plant kingdom. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of the first plant-kingdom gene known to encode a G4-binding protein, maize (Zea mays L.) nucleoside diphosphate kinase1 (ZmNDPK1). Structural characterization by X-ray crystallography reveals that it is a homohexamer, akin to other known NDPKs like the human homologue NM23-H2. Further probing into the G4-binding properties of both NDPK homologues suggests that ZmNDPK1 possesses properties distinct from that of NM23-H2, which is known to interact with a G-rich sequence element upstream of the c-myc gene and, in doing so, modulate its expression. Indeed, ZmNDPK1 binds the folded G4 with low nanomolar affinity but corresponding unfolded G-rich DNA more weakly, whereas NM23-H2 binds both folded and unfolded G4 with low nanomolar affinities; nonetheless, both homologues appear to stabilize folded DNAs whether they were prefolded or not. We also demonstrate that the G4-binding activity of ZmNDPK1 is independent of nucleotide binding and kinase activity, suggesting that the G4-binding region and the enzyme active sites are separate. Together, these findings establish a broad evolutionary conservation of some NDPKs as G4-DNA binding enzymes, but with potentially distinct biochemical properties that may reflect divergent evolution or species-specific deployment of these elements in gene regulatory processes.

  15. The localization and concentration of the PDE2-encoded high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Liu, Enkai; Bai, Xiaojia; Zhang, Aili

    2010-03-01

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes two cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, a low-affinity one, Pde1, and a high-affinity one, Pde2. Pde1 has been ascribed a function for downregulating agonist-induced cAMP accumulation in a protein kinase A (PKA)-governed negative feedback loop, whereas Pde2 controls the basal cAMP level in the cell. Here we show that PKA regulates the localization and protein concentration of Pde2. Pde2 is accumulated in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing on glucose, or in strains with hyperactive PKA. In contrast, in derepressed wild-type cells or cells with attenuated PKA activity, Pde2 is distributed over the nucleus and cytoplasm. We also show evidence indicating that the Pde2 protein level is positively correlated with PKA activity. The increase in the Pde2 protein level in high-PKA strains and in cells growing on glucose was due to its increased half-life. These results suggest that, like its low-affinity counterpart, the high-affinity phosphodiesterase may also play an important role in the PKA-controlled feedback inhibition of intracellular cAMP.

  16. Assignment of the gene (EPLG2) encoding a high-affinity binding protein for the receptor tyrosine kinase elk to a 200-kilobasepair region in human chromosome Xq12

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, F.A.; Beckmann, M.P.; Lyman, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Elk is a member of the eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Elk is expressed only in the brain and testes of the developing and adult rat, and the interaction of elk with its ligand(s) has been suggested to play a role in the development or maintenance of the nervous system. The mouse gene Eplg2 encodes a potential elk ligand that is highly conserved among rat, mouse, and human. Eplg2 has been mapped to the central portion of the mouse X chromosome, tightly linked to the androgen receptor (Ar) locus. Linkage conservation between the mouse and the human X chromosomes suggested that the human homologue (EPLG2) would map near human AR, in the interval Xq11-q12. In the present study, we have confirmed this prediction and have localized EPLG2 to a 200-kb interval in Xq12 by somatic cell hybrid analysis, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) hybridization. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Plasmonic Encoding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0291 PLASMONIC ENCODING Chad Mirkin NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Final Report 10/06/2014 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...2014 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE PLASMONIC ENCODING 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0294 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6.  AUTHOR(S) Chad...called Nanoflares. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS plasmonic , encoding 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  18. Efficient heterologous expression and one-step purification of fully active c-terminal histidine-tagged uridine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Penpassakarn, Praweenuch; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has long been recognized as one of the most significant public health problems. Finding novel antituberculous drugs is always a necessary approach for controlling the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrH gene (Rv2883c) encodes for uridine monophosphate kinase (UMK), which is a key enzyme in the uridine nucleotide interconversion pathway. The enzyme is essential for M. tuberculosis to sustain growth and hence is a potential drug target. In this study, we have developed a rapid protocol for production and purification of M. tuberculosis UMK by cloning pyrH (Rv2883c) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv with the addition of 6-histidine residues to the C-terminus of the protein, and expressing in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIPL using an auto-induction medium. The enzyme was efficiently purified by a single-step TALON cobalt affinity chromatography with about 8 fold increase in specific activity, which was determined by a coupled assay with the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular mass of monomeric UMK was 28.2 kDa and that of the native enzyme was 217 kDa. The enzyme uses UMP as a substrate but not CMP and TMP and activity was enhanced by GTP. Measurements of enzyme kinetics revealed the kcat value of 7.6 +/- 0.4 U mg(-1) or 0.127 +/- 0.006 sec(-1).The protocol reported here can be used for expression of M. tuberculosis UMK in large quantity for formulating a high throughput target-based assay for screening anti-tuberculosis UMK compounds.

  19. Conserved herpesvirus protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Conserved herpesviral protein kinases (CHPKs) are a group of enzymes conserved throughout all subfamilies of Herpesviridae. Members of this group are serine/threonine protein kinases that are likely to play a conserved role in viral infection by interacting with common host cellular and viral factors; however along with a conserved role, individual kinases may have unique functions in the context of viral infection in such a way that they are only partially replaceable even by close homologues. Recent studies demonstrated that CHPKs are crucial for viral infection and suggested their involvement in regulation of numerous processes at various infection steps (primary infection, nuclear egress, tegumentation), although the mechanisms of this regulation remain unknown. Notwithstanding, recent advances in discovery of new CHPK targets, and studies of CHPK knockout phenotypes have raised their attractiveness as targets for antiviral therapy. A number of compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded UL97 protein kinase and exhibit a pronounced antiviral effect, although the same compounds are inactive against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase BGLF4, illustrating the fact that low homology between the members of this group complicates development of compounds targeting the whole group, and suggesting that individualized, structure-based inhibitor design will be more effective. Determination of CHPK structures will greatly facilitate this task. PMID:17881303

  20. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  1. Pathway illuminated: visualizing protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Newton, Alexandra C

    2003-12-01

    Protein kinase C has been at the center of cell signaling since the discovery 25 years ago that it transduces signals that promote phospholipid hydrolysis. In recent years, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters has enabled studies of the regulation of protein kinase C signaling in living cells. Advances in imaging techniques have unveiled unprecedented detail of the signal processing mechanics of protein kinase C, from the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol that regulate protein kinase C activity, to the locations and kinetics of different protein kinase C isozymes, to the spatial and temporal dynamics of substrate phosphorylation by this key enzyme. This review discusses how fluorescence imaging studies have illuminated the fidelity with which protein kinase C transduces rapidly changing extracellular information into intracellular phosphorylation signals.

  2. Inactivation of the Carney complex gene 1 (PRKAR1A) alters spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase: a study using genetically encoded FRET-based reporters.

    PubMed

    Cazabat, Laure; Ragazzon, Bruno; Varin, Audrey; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Vandier, Christophe; Vezzosi, Delphine; Risk-Rabin, Marthe; Guellich, Aziz; Schittl, Julia; Lechêne, Patrick; Richter, Wito; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Zhang, Jin; Bertherat, Jérôme; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2014-03-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a hereditary disease associating cardiac myxoma, spotty skin pigmentation and endocrine overactivity. CNC is caused by inactivating mutations in the PRKAR1A gene encoding PKA type I alpha regulatory subunit (RIα). Although PKA activity is enhanced in CNC, the mechanisms linking PKA dysregulation to endocrine tumorigenesis are poorly understood. In this study, we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors for cAMP and PKA activity to define the role of RIα in the spatiotemporal organization of the cAMP/PKA pathway. RIα knockdown in HEK293 cells increased basal as well as forskolin or prostaglandin E1 (PGE1)-stimulated total cellular PKA activity as reported by western blots of endogenous PKA targets and the FRET-based global PKA activity reporter, AKAR3. Using variants of AKAR3 targeted to subcellular compartments, we identified similar increases in the response to PGE1 in the cytoplasm and at the outer mitochondrial membrane. In contrast, at the plasma membrane, the response to PGE1 was decreased along with an increase in basal FRET ratio. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis of basal and PGE1-induced phosphorylation of membrane-associated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. Similar differences were observed between the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane in human adrenal cells carrying a RIα inactivating mutation. RIα inactivation also increased cAMP in the cytoplasm, at the outer mitochondrial membrane and at the plasma membrane, as reported by targeted versions of the cAMP indicator Epac1-camps. These results show that RIα inactivation leads to multiple, compartment-specific alterations of the cAMP/PKA pathway revealing new aspects of signaling dysregulation in tumorigenesis.

  3. Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin; Roach, Peter J.

    2009-12-25

    Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  4. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  6. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-30

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson's group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src-transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src-associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month.

  7. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  8. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  9. Updated rice kinase database RKD 2.0: enabling transcriptome and functional analysis of rice kinase genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of a phosphate moiety from a phosphate donor to the substrate molecule, thus, playing critical roles in cell signaling and metabolism. Although plant genomes contain more than 1,000 genes that encode kinases, knowledge is limited about the precise roles for the...

  10. Dominant Mutations of Drosophila Map Kinase Kinase and Their Activities in Drosophila and Yeast Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. M.; Tsuda, L.; Inoue, Y. H.; Irie, K.; Adachi-Yamada, T.; Hata, M.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Nishida, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Eight alleles of Dsor1 encoding a Drosophila homologue of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase were obtained as dominant suppressors of the MAP kinase kinase kinase D-raf. These Dsor1 alleles themselves showed no obvious phenotypic consequences nor any effect on the viability of the flies, although they were highly sensitive to upstream signals and strongly interacted with gain-of-function mutations of upstream factors. They suppressed mutations for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs); torso (tor), sevenless (sev) and to a lesser extent Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). Furthermore, the Dsor1 alleles showed no significant interaction with gain-of-function mutations of DER. The observed difference in activity of the Dsor1 alleles among the RTK pathways suggests Dsor1 is one of the components of the pathway that regulates signal specificity. Expression of Dsor1 in budding yeast demonstrated that Dsor1 can activate yeast MAP kinase homologues if a proper activator of Dsor1 is coexpressed. Nucleotide sequencing of the Dsor1 mutant genes revealed that most of the mutations are associated with amino acid changes at highly conserved residues in the kinase domain. The results suggest that they function as suppressors due to increased reactivity to upstream factors. PMID:9136016

  11. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Crehuet, Ramon; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-09-01

    Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions) favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  12. Optimized thymidylate kinase assay, based on enzymatically synthesized 5-(/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine monophosphate and its application to an immunological study of herpes simplex virus thymidine-thymidylate kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.G.; Gronowitz, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    The biological synthesis and purification of 5-(/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine monophosphate (IdUMP) are described. The specificity of IdUMP as substrate in the thymidylate monophosphate kinase (TMPK) assay is demonstrated, and a 100-fold gain in sensitivity as compared to the conventional TMPK assay is shown. TMPK measurements of isozymes derived from herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells, uninfected cells, and tumor biopsies were performed. The results showed a significant difference in dependence of phosphate donor concentration present for TMPK activity from HSV-infected cells compared to the corresponding activity from uninfected cells, while only a minor difference in pH optima was observed for these enzyme activities. The increased sensitivity made it possible to detect and quantify HSV TMPK-blocking antibodies (ab) present in human sera. Sera from HSV ab-positive individuals were found to block the two HSV TMPKs to varying degrees and with different specificities. The immunological relationship between the TMPK and thymidine kinase (TK) induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively, was studied by comparing the capacities of different sera to block the two enzymatic activities. The results showed that the capacity to block HSV-1 TK and TMPK was proportional for all of the sera studied, while sera that preferentially blocked only the HSV-2 TMPK or HSV-2 TK were found. It was concluded that the HSV-2 TMPK and TK activities are less related than the corresponding activities for HSV-1 and that the HSV-2 enzyme activities are mediated by different catalytic sites.

  13. Targeting cancer with small-molecular-weight kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Möbitz, Henrik; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Protein and lipid kinases fulfill essential roles in many signaling pathways that regulate normal cell functions. Deregulation of these kinase activities lead to a variety of pathologies ranging from cancer to inflammatory diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cell growth and survival. 518 protein kinases and about 20 lipid-modifying kinases are encoded by the human genome, and a much larger proportion of additional kinases are present in parasite, bacterial, fungal, and viral genomes that are susceptible to exploitation as drug targets. Since many human diseases result from overactivation of protein and lipid kinases due to mutations and/or overexpression, this enzyme class represents an important target for the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately one third of all protein targets under investigation in the pharmaceutical industry are protein or lipid kinases.The kinase inhibitors that have been launched, thus far, are mainly in oncology indications and are directed against a handful of protein and lipid kinases. With one exception, all of these registered kinase inhibitors are directed toward the ATP-site and display different selectivities, potencies, and pharmacokinetic properties. At present, about 150 kinase-targeted drugs are in clinical development and many more in various stages of preclinical development. Kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical trials target all stages of signal transduction from the receptor protein tyrosine kinases that initiate intracellular signaling, through second-messenger-dependent lipid and protein kinases, and protein kinases that regulate the cell cycle.This review provides an insight into protein and lipid kinase drug discovery with respect to achievements, binding modes of inhibitors, and novel avenues for the generation of second-generation kinase inhibitors to treat cancers.

  14. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  15. Homo- and heterodimerization of ROCO kinases: LRRK2 kinase inhibition by the LRRK2 ROCO fragment.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christian L; Rovelli, Giorgio; Springer, Wolfdieter; Schall, Christoph; Gasser, Thomas; Kahle, Philipp J

    2009-11-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant familial and late-onset sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a large multi-domain protein featuring a GTP-binding C-terminal of Ras of complex proteins (ROC) (ROCO) domain combination unique for the ROCO protein family, directly followed by a kinase domain. Dimerization is a well-established phenomenon among protein kinases. Here, we confirm LRRK2 self-interaction, and provide evidence for general homo- and heterodimerization potential among the ROCO kinase family (LRRK2, LRRK1, and death-associated protein kinase 1). The ROCO domain was critically, though not exclusively involved in dimerization, as a LRRK2 deletion mutant lacking the ROCO domain retained dimeric properties. GTP binding did not appear to influence ROCO(LRRK2) self-interaction. Interestingly, ROCO(LRRK2) fragments exerted an inhibitory effect on both wild-type and the elevated G2019S LRRK2 autophosphorylation activity. Insertion of PD mutations into ROCO(LRRK2) reduced self-interaction and led to a reduction of LRRK2 kinase inhibition. Collectively, these results suggest a functional link between ROCO interactions and kinase activity of wild-type and mutant LRRK2. Importantly, our finding of ROCO(LRRK2) fragment-mediated LRRK2 kinase inhibition offers a novel lead for drug design and thus might have important implications for new therapeutic avenues in PD.

  16. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  17. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen.

  18. Characterization of two kinases involved in thiamine pyrophosphate and pyridoxal phosphate biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis: 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2methylpyrimidine kinase and pyridoxal kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Heon; Burns, Kristin; Kinsland, Cynthia; Begley, Tadhg P

    2004-03-01

    Two Bacillus subtilis genes encoding two proteins (currently annotated ThiD and YjbV) were overexpressed and characterized. YjbV has 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate kinase activity and should be reannotated ThiD, and B. subtilis ThiD has pyridoxine, pyridoxal, and pyridoxamine kinase activity and should be reannotated PdxK.

  19. Kinetic mechanism and energetics of binding of phosphoryl group acceptors to Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytidine monophosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jaskulski, Léia; Rosado, Leonardo A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Timmers, Luis F S M; de Souza, Osmar N; Santos, Diogenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2013-08-01

    Cytidine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtCMK) likely plays a role in supplying precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. MtCMK catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphoryl group transfer preferentially to CMP and dCMP. Initial velocity studies and Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements showed that MtCMK follows a random-order mechanism of substrate (CMP and ATP) binding, and an ordered mechanism for product release, in which ADP is released first followed by CDP. The thermodynamic signatures of CMP and CDP binding to MtCMK showed favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy, and ATP binding was characterized by favorable changes in enthalpy and entropy. The contribution of linked protonation events to the energetics of MtCMK:phosphoryl group acceptor binary complex formation suggested a net gain of protons. Values for the pKa of a likely chemical group involved in proton exchange and for the intrinsic binding enthalpy were calculated. The Asp187 side chain of MtCMK is suggested as the likely candidate for the protonation event. Data on thermodynamics of binary complex formation were collected to evaluate the contribution of 2'-OH group to intermolecular interactions. The data are discussed in light of functional and structural comparisons between CMP/dCMP kinases and UMP/CMP ones.

  20. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  1. The Dictyostelium Kinome—Analysis of the Protein Kinases from a Simple Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Allen; Fey, Petra; Pilcher, Karen E; Xu, Yanji; Smith, Janet L

    2006-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum is a widely studied model organism with both unicellular and multicellular forms in its developmental cycle. The Dictyostelium genome encodes 285 predicted protein kinases, similar to the count of the much more advanced Drosophila. It contains members of most kinase classes shared by fungi and metazoans, as well as many previously thought to be metazoan specific, indicating that they have been secondarily lost from the fungal lineage. This includes the entire tyrosine kinase–like (TKL) group, which is expanded in Dictyostelium and includes several novel receptor kinases. Dictyostelium lacks tyrosine kinase group kinases, and most tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be mediated by TKL kinases. About half of Dictyostelium kinases occur in subfamilies not present in yeast or metazoa, suggesting that protein kinases have played key roles in the adaptation of Dictyostelium to its habitat. This study offers insights into kinase evolution and provides a focus for signaling analysis in this system. PMID:16596165

  2. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  3. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  4. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  5. Genetically-encoded Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacoff, Ehud

    2002-03-01

    One of the principle goals of neuroscience has been to understand the cellular basis of information processing and the plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Efforts in this area have mainly relied on electrical recording and optical imaging with chemical dyes. Over the last few years we and others have begun to develop genetically-encoded optical reporter "dyes" which should provide several important advantages over the classical methods for monitoring signal transmission in the nervous system. The advantages are that genetically-encoded reporters can be molecularly targeted a) to specific cell types via cell-specific promoters, and b) to specific subcellular compartments by peptides that are recognized by the protein sorting machinery of the cell. This makes it possible, in principle, to exclude signals from non-neuronal cells and to visualize selectively, in a brain region that contains many cell types with numerous kinds of synaptic connections, the activity of specific types of neurons (e.g. GABAergic interneurons) and specific synaptic elements (e.g. nerve terminals or dendrites), something that has hitherto not been possible. An additional advantage is that protein reporters may be rationally and irrationally "tuned" with mutations in functional domains known to control their dynamic range of operation. The general idea behind genetically-encoded reporters of cell signaling is to encode a protein that is either intrinsically fluorescent, or that can be labeled orthogonally with a fluorescent probe, and where the physiological signal changes fluorescence emission. I will describe recent progress employing both kinds of approaches.

  6. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  7. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  8. Evaluation of the enzyme activity of protozoan protein kinases by using an in vitro kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    The life cycles of parasites are more complicated than those of other biological species. Protein kinases (PKs) encoded by parasites are the main triggers of life stage conversions. Phosphorylation by cellular PKs regulates important cellular processes, and the protozoan genome contains many PKs. Some PK inhibitors inhibit specific parasite life cycle event. In this report, I present a practical approach to expressing and purifying protozoan PKs by using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and I assess the phosphorylation activities of protozoan PKs by using an in vitro kinase assay.

  9. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling.

  10. Design and Synthesis of Biaryl DNA-Encoded Libraries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Franklin, G Joseph; DeLorey, Jennifer L; Centrella, Paolo A; Mataruse, Sibongile; Clark, Matthew A; Skinner, Steven R; Belyanskaya, Svetlana

    2016-10-10

    DNA-encoded library technology (ELT) is a powerful tool for the discovery of new small-molecule ligands to various protein targets. Here we report the design and synthesis of biaryl DNA-encoded libraries based on the scaffold of 5-formyl 3-iodobenzoic acid. Three reactions on DNA template, acylation, Suzuki-Miyaura coupling and reductive amination, were applied in the library synthesis. The three cycle library of 3.5 million diversity has delivered potent hits for phosphoinositide 3-kinase α (PI3Kα).

  11. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  12. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-09-14

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation.

  13. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation. PMID:27624869

  14. Schizosaccharomyces pombe AGC family kinase Gad8p forms a conserved signaling module with TOR and PDK1-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Kubo, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    The TOR protein is a phosphoinositide kinase-related kinase widely conserved among eukaryotes. Fission yeast tor1 encodes an ortholog of TOR, which is required for sexual development and growth under stressed conditions. We isolated gad8, which encodes a Ser/Thr kinase of the AGC family, as a high-copy suppressor of the sterility of a tor1 mutant. Disruption of gad8 caused phenotypes similar to those of tor1 disruption. Gad8p was less phosphorylated and its kinase activity was undetectable in tor1Δ cells. Three amino acid residues corresponding to conserved phosphorylation sites in the AGC family kinases, namely Thr387 in the activation loop, Ser527 in the turn motif and Ser546 in the hydrophobic motif, were important for the kinase activity of Gad8p. Tor1p was responsible for the phosphorylation of Ser527 and Ser546, whereas Ksg1p, a PDK1-like kinase, appeared to phosphorylate Thr387 directly. Altogether, Tor1p, Ksg1p and Gad8p appear to constitute a signaling module for sexual development and growth under stressed conditions in fission yeast, which resembles the mTOR–PDK1–S6K1 system in mammals and may represent a basic signaling module ubiquitous in eukaryotes. PMID:12805221

  15. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  16. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Monika B; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a hereditary progressive disorder and the most frequent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). PKAN patients present with a progressive movement disorder, dysarthria, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. In magnetic resonance imaging, PKAN patients exhibit the pathognonomic "eye of the tiger" sign in the globus pallidus which corresponds to iron accumulation and gliosis as shown in neuropathological examinations. The discovery of the disease causing mutations in PANK2 has linked the disorder to coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. PANK2 is the only one out of four PANK genes encoding an isoform which localizes to mitochondria. At least two other NBIA genes (PLA2G6, C19orf12) encode proteins that share with PANK2 a mitochondrial localization and all are suggested to play a role in lipid homeostasis. With no causal therapy available for PKAN until now, only symptomatic treatment is possible. A multi-centre retrospective study with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with NBIA revealed a significant improvement of dystonia. Recently, studies in the PANK Drosophila model "fumble" revealed improvement by the compound pantethine which is hypothesized to feed an alternate CoA biosynthesis pathway. In addition, pilot studies with the iron chelator deferiprone that crosses the blood brain barrier showed a good safety profile and some indication of efficacy. An adequately powered randomized clinical trial will start in 2012. This review summarizes clinical presentation, neuropathology and pathogenesis of PKAN.

  17. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  18. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  19. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  20. Characterization of cyclin-dependent kinases and Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunits in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Amador, Erick; López-Pacheco, Karla; Morales, Nataly; Coria, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have important roles in regulating key checkpoints between stages of the cell cycle. Their activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including through binding with cyclin proteins and the Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunit (CKS), and their phosphorylation at specific amino acids. Studies of the components involved in cell cycle control in parasitic protozoa are limited. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis in humans and is therefore important in public health; however, some of the basic biological processes used by this organism have not been defined. Here, we characterized proteins potentially involved in cell cycle regulation in T. vaginalis. Three genes encoding protein kinases were identified in the T. vaginalis genome, and the corresponding recombinant proteins (TvCRK1, TvCRK2, TvCRK5) were studied. These proteins displayed similar sequence features to CDKs. Two genes encoding CKSs were also identified, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were found to interact with TvCRK1 and TvCRK2 by a yeast two-hybrid system. One putative cyclin B protein from T. vaginalis was found to bind to and activate the kinase activities of TvCRK1 and TvCRK5, but not TvCRK2. This work is the first characterization of proteins involved in cell cycle control in T. vaginalis.

  1. CZK3, a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog in Cercospora zeae-maydis, regulates cercosporin biosynthesis, fungal development, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Won-Bo; Dunkle, Larry D

    2003-09-01

    The fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis causes gray leaf spot of maize and produces cercosporin, a photosensitizing perylenequinone with toxic activity against a broad spectrum of organisms. However, little is known about the biosynthetic pathway or factors that regulate cercosporin production. Analysis of a cDNA subtraction library comprised of genes that are up-regulated during cercosporin synthesis revealed a sequence highly similar to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in other fungi. Sequencing and conceptual translation of the full-length genomic sequence indicated that the gene, which we designated CZK3, contains a 4,119-bp open reading frame devoid of introns and encodes a 1,373-amino acid sequence that is highly similar to Wis4, a MAP kinase kinase kinase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Targeted disruption of CZK3 suppressed expression of genes predicted to participate in cercosporin biosynthesis and abolished cercosporin production. The disrupted mutants grew faster on agar media than the wild type but were deficient in conidiation and elicited only small chlorotic spots on inoculated maize leaves compared with rectangular necrotic lesions incited by the wild type. Complementation of disruptants with the CZK3 open reading frame and flanking sequences restored wild-type levels of conidiation, growth rate, and virulence as well as the ability to produce cercosporin. The results suggest that cercosporin is a virulence factor in C. zeae-maydis during maize pathogenesis, but the pleiotropic effects of CZK3 disruption precluded definitive conclusions.

  2. Design, synthesis and selection of DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew A; Acharya, Raksha A; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Benjamin, Dennis R; Carlson, Neil R; Centrella, Paolo A; Chiu, Cynthia H; Creaser, Steffen P; Cuozzo, John W; Davie, Christopher P; Ding, Yun; Franklin, G Joseph; Franzen, Kurt D; Gefter, Malcolm L; Hale, Steven P; Hansen, Nils J V; Israel, David I; Jiang, Jinwei; Kavarana, Malcolm J; Kelley, Michael S; Kollmann, Christopher S; Li, Fan; Lind, Kenneth; Mataruse, Sibongile; Medeiros, Patricia F; Messer, Jeffrey A; Myers, Paul; O'Keefe, Heather; Oliff, Matthew C; Rise, Cecil E; Satz, Alexander L; Skinner, Steven R; Svendsen, Jennifer L; Tang, Lujia; van Vloten, Kurt; Wagner, Richard W; Yao, Gang; Zhao, Baoguang; Morgan, Barry A

    2009-09-01

    Biochemical combinatorial techniques such as phage display, RNA display and oligonucleotide aptamers have proven to be reliable methods for generation of ligands to protein targets. Adapting these techniques to small synthetic molecules has been a long-sought goal. We report the synthesis and interrogation of an 800-million-member DNA-encoded library in which small molecules are covalently attached to an encoding oligonucleotide. The library was assembled by a combination of chemical and enzymatic synthesis, and interrogated by affinity selection. We describe methods for the selection and deconvolution of the chemical display library, and the discovery of inhibitors for two enzymes: Aurora A kinase and p38 MAP kinase.

  3. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  5. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  6. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  7. beta-subunits of Snf1 kinase are required for kinase function and substrate definition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M C; McCartney, R R

    2000-09-15

    The Snf1 kinase and its mammalian homolog, the AMP-activated protein kinase, are heterotrimeric enzymes composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit, a regulatory gamma-subunit and a beta-subunit that mediates heterotrimer formation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes three beta-subunit genes, SIP1, SIP2 and GAL83. Earlier studies suggested that these subunits may not be required for Snf1 kinase function. We show here that complete and precise deletion of all three beta-subunit genes inactivates the Snf1 kinase. The sip1Delta sip2Delta gal83Delta strain is unable to derepress invertase, grows poorly on alternative carbon sources and fails to direct the phosphorylation of the Mig1 and Sip4 proteins in vivo. The SIP1 sip2Delta gal83Delta strain manifests a subset of Snf phenotypes (Raf(+), Gly(-)) observed in the snf1Delta 10 strain (Raf(-), Gly(-)), suggesting that individual beta-subunits direct the Snf1 kinase to a subset of its targets in vivo. Indeed, deletion of individual beta-subunit genes causes distinct differences in the induction and phosphorylation of Sip4, strongly suggesting that the beta-subunits play an important role in substrate definition.

  8. STRUBBELIG defines a receptor kinase-mediated signaling pathway regulating organ development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, David; Batoux, Martine; Fulton, Lynette; Pfister, Karen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Schellenberg, Maja; Schneitz, Kay

    2005-01-01

    An open question remains as to what coordinates cell behavior during organogenesis, permitting organs to reach their appropriate size and shape. The Arabidopsis gene STRUBBELIG (SUB) defines a receptor-mediated signaling pathway in plants. SUB encodes a putative leucine-rich repeat transmembrane receptor-like kinase. The mutant sub phenotype suggests that SUB affects the formation and shape of several organs by influencing cell morphogenesis, the orientation of the division plane, and cell proliferation. Mutational analysis suggests that the kinase domain is important for SUB function. Biochemical assays using bacterially expressed fusion proteins indicate that the SUB kinase domain lacks enzymatic phosphotransfer activity. Furthermore, transgenes encoding WT and different mutant variants of SUB were tested for their ability to rescue the mutant sub phenotype. These genetic data also indicate that SUB carries a catalytically inactive kinase domain. The SUB receptor-like kinase may therefore signal in an atypical fashion. PMID:15951420

  9. Prosodic Encoding in Silent Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Deborah

    In silent reading, short-memory tasks, such as semantic and syntactic processing, require a stage of phonetic encoding between visual representation and the actual extraction of meaning, and this encoding includes prosodic as well as segmental features. To test for this suprasegmental coding, an experiment was conducted in which subjects were…

  10. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  11. Cytoskeletal Signaling: Is Memory Encoded in Microtubule Lattices by CaMKII Phosphorylation?

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Hameroff, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Memory is attributed to strengthened synaptic connections among particular brain neurons, yet synaptic membrane components are transient, whereas memories can endure. This suggests synaptic information is encoded and ‘hard-wired’ elsewhere, e.g. at molecular levels within the post-synaptic neuron. In long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular and molecular model for memory, post-synaptic calcium ion (Ca2+) flux activates the hexagonal Ca2+-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII), a dodacameric holoenzyme containing 2 hexagonal sets of 6 kinase domains. Each kinase domain can either phosphorylate substrate proteins, or not (i.e. encoding one bit). Thus each set of extended CaMKII kinases can potentially encode synaptic Ca2+ information via phosphorylation as ordered arrays of binary ‘bits’. Candidate sites for CaMKII phosphorylation-encoded molecular memory include microtubules (MTs), cylindrical organelles whose surfaces represent a regular lattice with a pattern of hexagonal polymers of the protein tubulin. Using molecular mechanics modeling and electrostatic profiling, we find that spatial dimensions and geometry of the extended CaMKII kinase domains precisely match those of MT hexagonal lattices. This suggests sets of six CaMKII kinase domains phosphorylate hexagonal MT lattice neighborhoods collectively, e.g. conveying synaptic information as ordered arrays of six “bits”, and thus “bytes”, with 64 to 5,281 possible bit states per CaMKII-MT byte. Signaling and encoding in MTs and other cytoskeletal structures offer rapid, robust solid-state information processing which may reflect a general code for MT-based memory and information processing within neurons and other eukaryotic cells. PMID:22412364

  12. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals. 32 figs.

  13. Information encoder/decoder using chaotic systems

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Samuel Lee; Miller, William Michael; McWhorter, Paul Jackson

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a chaotic system-based information encoder and decoder that operates according to a relationship defining a chaotic system. Encoder input signals modify the dynamics of the chaotic system comprising the encoder. The modifications result in chaotic, encoder output signals that contain the encoder input signals encoded within them. The encoder output signals are then capable of secure transmissions using conventional transmission techniques. A decoder receives the encoder output signals (i.e., decoder input signals) and inverts the dynamics of the encoding system to directly reconstruct the original encoder input signals.

  14. HDHD1, which is often deleted in X-linked ichthyosis, encodes a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Preumont, Alice; Rzem, Rim; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2010-10-15

    Pseudouridine, the fifth-most abundant nucleoside in RNA, is not metabolized in mammals, but is excreted intact in urine. The purpose of the present work was to search for an enzyme that would dephosphorylate pseudouridine 5'-phosphate, a potential intermediate in RNA degradation. We show that human erythrocytes contain a pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase displaying a Km ≤ 1 μM for its substrate. The activity of the partially purified enzyme was dependent on Mg2+, and was inhibited by Ca2+ and vanadate, suggesting that it belonged to the 'haloacid dehalogenase' family of phosphatases. Its low molecular mass (26 kDa) suggested that this phosphatase could correspond to the protein encoded by the HDHD1 (haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domain-containing 1) gene, present next to the STS (steroid sulfatase) gene on human chromosome Xp22. Purified human recombinant HDHD1 dephosphorylated pseudouridine 5'-phosphate with a kcat of 1.6 s-1, a Km of 0.3 μM and a catalytic efficiency at least 1000-fold higher than that on which it acted on other phosphate esters, including 5'-UMP. The molecular identity of pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase was confirmed by the finding that its activity was negligible (<10% of controls) in extracts of B-cell lymphoblasts or erythrocytes from X-linked ichthyosis patients harbouring a combined deletion of the STS gene (the X-linked ichthyosis gene) and the HDHD1 gene. Furthermore, pseudouridine-5'-phosphatase activity was 1.5-fold higher in erythrocytes from women compared with men, in agreement with the HDHD1 gene undergoing only partial inactivation in females. In conclusion, HDHD1 is a phosphatase specifically involved in dephosphorylation of a modified nucleotide present in RNA.

  15. PNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Zambaldo, Claudio; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-encoded chemical libraries along with DNA-encoded libraries have provided a powerful new paradigm for library synthesis and ligand discovery. PNA-encoding stands out for its compatibility with standard solid phase synthesis and the technology has been used to prepare libraries of peptides, heterocycles and glycoconjugates. Different screening formats have now been reported including selection-based and microarray-based methods that have yielded specific ligands against diverse target classes including membrane receptors, lectins and challenging targets such as Hsp70.

  16. Orphan kinases turn eccentric

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Rainer, Johannes; Geley, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK) are a highly conserved, but poorly characterized, subgroup of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). They are characterized by a conserved catalytic domain flanked by N- and C-terminal extensions that are involved in cyclin binding. Vertebrate genomes contain three highly similar PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK1,2,3, a.k.a., CDK16,17,18), which are most abundant in post-mitotic cells in brain and testis. Consistent with this restricted expression pattern, PCTK1 (CDK16) has recently been shown to be essential for spermatogenesis. PCTAIREs are activated by cyclin Y (CCNY), a highly conserved single cyclin fold protein. By binding to N-myristoylated CCNY, CDK16 is targeted to the plasma membrane. Unlike conventional cyclin-CDK interactions, binding of CCNY to CDK16 not only requires the catalytic domain, but also domains within the N-terminal extension. Interestingly, phosphorylation within this domain blocks CCNY binding, providing a novel means of cyclin-CDK regulation. By using these functional characteristics, we analyzed “PCTAIRE” sequence containing protein kinase genes in genomes of various organisms and found that CCNY and CCNY-dependent kinases are restricted to eumetazoa and possibly evolved along with development of a central nervous system. Here, we focus on the structure and regulation of PCTAIREs and discuss their established functions. PMID:22895054

  17. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  18. Fear conditioning and extinction: emotional states encoded by distinct signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Corcoran, Kevin A.; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Radulovic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Conditioning and extinction of fear have traditionally been viewed as two independent learning processes for encoding representations of contexts or cues (conditioned stimuli, CS), aversive events (unconditioned stimuli, US), and their relationship. Based on the analysis of protein kinase signaling patterns in neurons of the fear circuit, we propose that fear and extinction are best conceptualized as emotional states triggered by a single CS representation with two opposing values: aversive and non-aversive. These values are conferred by the presence or absence of the US and encoded by distinct sets of kinase signaling pathways and their downstream targets. Modulating specific protein kinases thus has the potential to modify emotional states, and hence, may emerge as a promising treatment for anxiety disorders. PMID:22118930

  19. PAK family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo-shen; Manser, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases that are represented by six genes in humans (PAK 1–6), and are found in all eukaryotes sequenced to date. Genetic and knockdown experiments in frogs, fish and mice indicate group I PAKs are widely expressed, required for multiple tissue development, and particularly important for immune and nervous system function in the adult. The group II PAKs (human PAKs 4–6) are more enigmatic, but their restriction to metazoans and presence at cell-cell junctions suggests these kinases emerged to regulate junctional signaling. Studies of protozoa and fungal PAKs show that they regulate cell shape and polarity through phosphorylation of multiple cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule binding proteins, myosins and septins. This chapter discusses what we know about the regulation of PAKs and their physiological role in different model organisms, based primarily on gene knockout studies. PMID:23162738

  20. Computer-assisted combinatorial design of bicyclic thymidine analogs as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis thymidine monophosphate kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frecer, Vladimir; Seneci, Pierfausto; Miertus, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Thymidine monophosphate kinase (TMPKmt) is an essential enzyme for nucleotide metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thus an attractive target for novel antituberculosis agents. In this work, we have explored the chemical space around the 2',3'-bicyclic thymidine nucleus by designing and in silico screening of a virtual focused library selected via structure based methods to identify more potent analogs endowed with favorable ADME-related properties. In all the library members we have exchanged the ribose ring of the template with a cyclopentane moiety that is less prone to enzymatic degradation. In addition, we have replaced the six-membered 2',3'-ring by a number of five-membered and six-membered heterocyclic rings containing alternative proton donor and acceptor groups, to exploit the interaction with the carboxylate groups of Asp9 and Asp163 as well as with several cationic residues present in the vicinity of the TMPKmt binding site. The three-dimensional structure of the TMPKmt complexed with 5-hydroxymethyl-dUMP, an analog of dTMP, was employed to develop a QSAR model, to parameterize a scoring function specific for the TMPKmt target and to select analogues which display the highest predicted binding to the target. As a result, we identified a small highly focused combinatorial subset of bicyclic thymidine analogues as virtual hits that are predicted to inhibit the mycobacterial TMPK in the submicromolar concentration range and to display favorable ADME-related properties.

  1. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  2. Protein kinase C is essential for viability of the rice blast fungus M agnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Tina J.; Wood, Mark E.; Soanes, Darren M.; Csukai, Michael; Corran, Andrew John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein kinase C constitutes a family of serine–threonine kinases found in all eukaryotes and implicated in a wide range of cellular functions, including regulation of cell growth, cellular differentiation and immunity. Here, we present three independent lines of evidence which indicate that protein kinase C is essential for viability of M agnaporthe oryzae. First, all attempts to generate a target deletion of PKC 1, the single copy protein kinase C‐encoding gene, proved unsuccessful. Secondly, conditional gene silencing of PKC 1 by RNA interference led to severely reduced growth of the fungus, which was reversed by targeted deletion of the Dicer2‐encoding gene, MDL 2. Finally, selective kinase inhibition of protein kinase C by targeted allelic replacement with an analogue‐sensitive PKC 1AS allele led to specific loss of fungal viability in the presence of the PP1 inhibitor. Global transcriptional profiling following selective PKC inhibition identified significant changes in gene expression associated with cell wall re‐modelling, autophagy, signal transduction and secondary metabolism. When considered together, these results suggest protein kinase C is essential for growth and development of M . oryzae with extensive downstream targets in addition to the cell integrity pathway. Targeting protein kinase C signalling may therefore prove an effective means of controlling rice blast disease. PMID:26192090

  3. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  4. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  5. Chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase from Euglena gracilis: endosymbiotic gene replacement going against the tide.

    PubMed

    Nowitzki, Ulrich; Gelius-Dietrich, Gabriel; Schwieger, Maike; Henze, Katrin; Martin, William

    2004-10-01

    Two chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase isoforms from the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis were purified to homogeneity, partially sequenced, and subsequently cDNAs encoding phosphoglycerate kinase isoenzymes from both the chloroplast and cytosol of E. gracilis were cloned and sequenced. Chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase, a monomeric enzyme, was encoded as a polyprotein precursor of at least four mature subunits that were separated by conserved tetrapeptides. In a Neighbor-Net analysis of sequence similarity with homologues from numerous prokaryotes and eukaryotes, cytosolic phosphoglycerate kinase of E. gracilis showed the highest similarity to cytosolic and glycosomal homologues from the Kinetoplastida. The chloroplast isoenzyme of E. gracilis did not show a close relationship to sequences from other photosynthetic organisms but was most closely related to cytosolic homologues from animals and fungi.

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7 lacking qseBC encoded quorum sensing system outcompetes the parent strain in colonization of cattle intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The qseBC encoded quorum-sensing system (QS) regulates motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in response to bacterial autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and mammalian stress hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE). The qseC gene encodes a sensory kinase that post-autophosphorylati...

  7. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  8. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  9. Secondary kinase reactions catalyzed by yeast pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Leblond, D J; Robinson, J L

    1976-06-07

    1. Yeast pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) catalyzes, in addition to the primary, physiologically important reaction, three secondary kinase reactions, the ATP-dependent phosphorylations of fluoride (fluorokinase), hydroxylamine (hydroxylamine kinase) and glycolate (glycolate kinase). 2. These reactions are accelerated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the allosteric activator of the primary reaction. Wth Mg2+ as the required divalent cation, none of these reactions are observed in the absence of fructose-biphosphate. With Mn2+, fructose-bisphosphate is required for the glycolate kinase reaction, but merely stimulates the other reactions. 3. The effect of other divalent cations and pH on three secondary kinase reactions was also examined. 4. Results are compared with those obtained from muscle pyruvate kinase and the implications of the results for the mechanism of the yeast enzyme are discussed.

  10. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: insights from a Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihao; Li, Chenghua; Lv, Shan; Zhou, Bing

    2009-10-01

    Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated-Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a devastating disease, resulting from mutations in pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2), one of the four human pantothenate kinase genes (PANK1-4). Interestingly, PanK2 appears to be the only mitochondria-targeted human PanK. It is unknown whether the mitochondria-targeted PanK is associated with any unique function, nor whether PKAN is due solely to the loss of pantothenate kinase activity. Drosophila PANK [fumble (fbl)] encodes several isoforms of pantothenate kinase products, one of which localizes to mitochondria and the others cytosol. fbl flies exhibit many characteristic features reminiscent of PKAN patients. Various forms of Drosophila fbl and human PANK2 were introduced into fbl flies to study their in vivo functions. Only mitochondria-targeted Fbl or human PanK2 was able to rescue fbl mutation, with the rescuing ability sensitive to the expression level of the transgene. Transgenic lines with low expression of normal Fbl or PanK2 displayed similar phenotypes as PANK2 mutant transgenic flies. These PanK2 mutants all showed reduced and phenotype severity-correlated in vitro pantothenate kinase activities. Amazingly, cytosolic PanK3 and PanK4 could mostly, but not fully, rescue fbl defects except the male sterility. Therefore, fbl appears to be the orthologue of human PANK2, and PanK2 is functionally more potent than PanK3 and PanK4 in vivo. We suggest that mitochondria-located pantothenate kinase is required to achieve the maximal enzymatic activity to fulfill the most challenging task such as maintaining male fertility and optimal neuronal functions, and PKAN features are mainly due to the reduction of the total cellular pantothenate kinase activity in the most susceptible regions.

  11. Wall-associated kinase-like polypeptide mediates nutritional status perception and response

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Karr, Stephen

    2014-02-11

    The disclosure relates to methods for modulating plant growth and organogenesis using dominant-negative receptor-like kinases. The disclosure further provides a method for increasing plant yield relative to corresponding wild type plants comprising modulating the expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a Wall-Associated Kinase-like 14 polypeptide or a homolog thereof, and selecting for plants having increased yield or growth on a nutrient deficient substrate.

  12. Protein kinase A contributes to the negative control of Snf1 protein kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barrett, LaKisha; Orlova, Marianna; Maziarz, Marcin; Kuchin, Sergei

    2012-02-01

    Snf1 protein kinase regulates responses to glucose limitation and other stresses. Snf1 activation requires phosphorylation of its T-loop threonine by partially redundant upstream kinases (Sak1, Tos3, and Elm1). Under favorable conditions, Snf1 is turned off by Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase. The reg1 mutation causes increased Snf1 activation and slow growth. To identify new components of the Snf1 pathway, we searched for mutations that, like snf1, suppress reg1 for the slow-growth phenotype. In addition to mutations in genes encoding known pathway components (SNF1, SNF4, and SAK1), we recovered "fast" mutations, designated fst1 and fst2. Unusual morphology of the mutants in the Σ1278b strains employed here helped us identify fst1 and fst2 as mutations in the RasGAP genes IRA1 and IRA2. Cells lacking Ira1, Ira2, or Bcy1, the negative regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), exhibited reduced Snf1 pathway activation. Conversely, Snf1 activation was elevated in cells lacking the Gpr1 sugar receptor, which contributes to PKA signaling. We show that the Snf1-activating kinase Sak1 is phosphorylated in vivo on a conserved serine (Ser1074) within an ideal PKA motif. However, this phosphorylation alone appears to play only a modest role in regulation, and Sak1 is not the only relevant target of the PKA pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that PKA, which integrates multiple regulatory inputs, could contribute to Snf1 regulation under various conditions via a complex mechanism. Our results also support the view that, like its mammalian counterpart, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), yeast Snf1 participates in metabolic checkpoint control that coordinates growth with nutrient availability.

  13. AOP-1 interacts with cardiac-specific protein kinase TNNI3K and down-regulates its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Dong-Qing; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao; Cao, Hui-Qing; Wang, Lai-Yuan; Shi, Na; Meng, Xian-Min

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid screening system was used to identify the interaction partners of cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) that might serve as regulators or targets, and thus in turn to gain some insights on the roles of TNNI3K. After screening the adult heart cDNA library with a bait construct encoding the ANK motif of TNNI3K, antioxidant protein 1 (AOP-1) was isolated. The interaction between TNNI3K and AOP-1 was confirmed by the in vitro binding assay and coexpression experiments in vivo. The colocalization of TNNI3K and AOP-1 was clarified by confocal immunofluorescence. Moreover, coexpression of AOP-1 inhibited TNNI3K kinase activity in the in vitro kinase assay.

  14. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  15. Characterisation of a plant 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 homologue which contains a pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Deak, M; Casamayor, A; Currie, R A; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    1999-05-28

    A plant homologue of mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) has been identified in Arabidopsis and rice which displays 40% overall identity with human 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. Like the mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 and rice 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 possess a kinase domain at N-termini and a pleckstrin homology domain at their C-termini. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 can rescue lethality in Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by disruption of the genes encoding yeast 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 homologues. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 interacts via its pleckstrin homology domain with phosphatidic acid, PtdIns3P, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and PtdIns(3,4)P2 and to a lesser extent with PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns4P. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 is able to activate human protein kinase B alpha (PKB/AKT) in the presence of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Arabidopsis 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 is only the second plant protein reported to possess a pleckstrin homology domain and the first plant protein shown to bind 3-phosphoinositides.

  16. How Infants Encode Spatial Extent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Sean; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Levine, Susan; Duffy, Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how infants encode an object's spatial extent. We habituated 6.5-month-old infants to a dowel inside a container and then tested whether they dishabituate to a change in absolute size when the relation between dowel and container is held constant (by altering the size of both container and dowel) and when the relation changes…

  17. Encoding Knowledge of Commonsense Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Encoding Knowledge of Commonsense Psychology Jerry R. Hobbs Andrew S. Gordon Information Sciences Institute Institute for Creative Technologies...time. Thirty of the representational areas, involving 635 concepts, were concerned with commonsense psychology ; among these are memory, knowledge...management, planning, and so on. This result by itself demonstrates the very great importance of commonsense psychology in the construction of intelligent

  18. Spectrally-encoded color imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a technique for ultraminiature endoscopy that encodes each spatial location on the sample with a different wavelength. One limitation of previous incarnations of SEE is that it inherently creates monochromatic images, since the spectral bandwidth is expended in the spatial encoding process. Here we present a spectrally-encoded imaging system that has color imaging capability. The new imaging system utilizes three distinct red, green, and blue spectral bands that are configured to illuminate the grating at different incident angles. By careful selection of the incident angles, the three spectral bands can be made to overlap on the sample. To demonstrate the method, a bench-top system was built, comprising a 2400-lpmm grating illuminated by three 525-μm-diameter beams with three different spectral bands. Each spectral band had a bandwidth of 75 nm, producing 189 resolvable points. A resolution target, color phantoms, and excised swine small intestine were imaged to validate the system's performance. The color SEE system showed qualitatively and quantitatively similar color imaging performance to that of a conventional digital camera. PMID:19688002

  19. Encoding Ownership Types in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Nicholas; Noble, James

    Ownership types systems organise the heap into a hierarchy which can be used to support encapsulation properties, effects, and invariants. Ownership types have many applications including parallelisation, concurrency, memory management, and security. In this paper, we show that several flavours and extensions of ownership types can be entirely encoded using the standard Java type system.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  11. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  12. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  13. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purification-tagged protein kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald; Dardick, Chris; Canlas, Patrick; Xu, Xia; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2006-04-01

    Forty-one rice cDNAs encoding protein kinases were fused to the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged kinases and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by mass spectrometry. Ninety-five percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were recovered. Fifty-six percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were found to interact with other rice proteins. A number of these interactions were consistent with known protein complexes found in other species, validating the TAP-tag method in rice plants. Phosphorylation sites were identified on four of the kinases that interacted with either 14-3-3 proteins or cyclins.

  14. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  15. Role of dihydroxyacetone kinases I and II in the dha regulon of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Wang, Min; Jiang, Biao; Shi, Jiping; Hao, Jian

    2014-05-10

    Dha regulon is responsible for anaerobic glycerol metabolism and 1,3-propanediol production in Klebsiella pneumoniae. DhaK encodes an ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase I, whereas dhaK123 encodes a dihydroxyacetone kinase II that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as a phosphate donor. The functions of dihydroxyacetone kinases I and II in K. pneumoniae have not been discriminated. In this study, four individual genes of the two kinases were knocked out, and the metabolic characteristics of these mutants were investigated. DhaK1 or dhaK2 mutation inhibited dha regulon expression. DhaK3 mutation reduced glycerol utilization, and the growth was slower than the wild stain. However, dhaK mutation exerted no significant effects on glycerol metabolism. The metabolic characteristics of these mutants showed that the subunits of dihydroxyacetone kinase II were involved in the regulation of dha regulon expression, similar to the dha regulon of E. coli. Dihydroxyacetone kinase II catalyzed dihydroxyacetone conversion to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, whereas dihydroxyacetone kinase I showed no significant contribution to this reaction.

  16. A high-throughput radiometric kinase assay

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  17. Functions of Aurora kinase C in meiosis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Schindler, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes three Aurora kinase protein family members: A, B, and C. While Aurora kinase A (AURKA) and B (AURKB) are found in cells throughout the body, significant protein levels of Aurora kinase C (AURKC) are limited to cells that undergo meiosis (sperm and oocyte). Despite its discovery nearly 20 years ago, we know little about the function of AURKC compared to that of the other 2 Aurora kinases. This lack of understanding can be attributed to the high sequence homology between AURKB and AURKC preventing the use of standard approaches to understand non-overlapping and meiosis I (MI)-specific functions of the two kinases. Recent evidence has revealed distinct functions of AURKC in meiosis and may aid in our understanding of why chromosome segregation during MI often goes awry in oocytes. Many cancers aberrantly express AURKC, but because we do not fully understand AURKC function in its normal cellular context, it is difficult to predict the biological significance of this expression on the disease. Here, we consolidate and update what is known about AURKC signaling in meiotic cells to better understand why it has oncogenic potential.

  18. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  19. Kinase regulation by sulfur and selenium containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Carmen; Plano, Daniel; Font, María; Palop, Juan Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Kinases are enzymes that are involved in a wide-range of cellular targets such as cell proliferation, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. Aberrations in the activity of the kinases have been linked to many human diseases such as diabetes, inflammation and cancer. The discovery of more than 518 kinases encoded by the human genome has spurred the development of rapid screening techniques for potential drugs against these enzymes and these have been identified as interesting targets for medicinal chemistry programs, especially in cancer therapy. On the other hand, sulfur and selenium have been increasingly recognized as essential elements in biology and medicine. Converging data from epidemiological and clinical studies have highlighted these elements as effective chemopreventive agents, particularly against various types of cancer (prostate, lung, breast, leukemia, colon, skin, lymphome, thyroid, pancreas, liver). These elements act through a wide range of potential mechanisms where one identified signal pathway event is kinase modulation, which is common for the two elements and emerges as a valid target. The kinases modulated by sulfur and selenium derivatives include MAP, ERK, JNK, Akt, Cdc2, Cyclin B1 and Cdc25c amongst others. Although both of the elements in question are in the same group in the periodic table and have similar biochemistries, there are relevant differences related to redox potentials, stabilities, oxidation states and anticancer activity. Literature data suggest that the replacement of sulfur by selenium in established cancer chemopreventive agents results in more effective chemopreventive analogs. In view of the multi-target kinase mechanisms in preventing cellular transformation, as well as the differences and similarities between them, in this review we focus on the development of new structures that contain selenium and/or sulfur and discuss our understanding of the regulation of antitumoral effects with emphasis on kinase modulation

  20. Aurora Kinases Throughout Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Annika K; Demidov, Dmitri; Lermontova, Inna; Beeckman, Tom; Van Damme, Daniël

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinases are evolutionarily conserved key mitotic determinants in all eukaryotes. Yeasts contain a single Aurora kinase, whereas multicellular eukaryotes have at least two functionally diverged members. The involvement of Aurora kinases in human cancers has provided an in-depth mechanistic understanding of their roles throughout cell division in animal and yeast models. By contrast, understanding Aurora kinase function in plants is only starting to emerge. Nevertheless, genetic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches have revealed functional diversification between the plant Aurora kinases and suggest a role in formative (asymmetric) divisions, chromatin modification, and genome stability. This review provides an overview of the accumulated knowledge on the function of plant Aurora kinases as well as some major challenges for the future.

  1. Ras, Raf, and MAP kinase in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Solus, Jason F; Kraft, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    A growing understanding of the biology and molecular mechanisms of melanoma has led to the identification of a number of driver mutations for this aggressive tumor. The most common mutations affect signaling of the Ras/Raf/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. This review will focus on mutations in genes encoding proteins that play a role in the MAPK pathway and that have been implicated in melanoma biology, such as BRAF, NRAS, and MEK (MAPK kinase), and detail the current understanding of their role in melanoma progression from a molecular biology perspective. Furthermore, this review will also consider some additional mutations in genes such as KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, which can be seen in certain subtypes of melanoma and whose gene products interact with the MAPK pathway. In addition, the association of these molecular changes with clinical and classical histopathologic characteristics of melanoma will be outlined and their role in diagnosis of melanocytic lesions discussed. Finally, a basic overview of the current targeted therapy landscape, as far as relevant to the pathologist, will be provided.

  2. A specific combination of substrates is involved in signal transduction by the kit-encoded receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lev, S; Givol, D; Yarden, Y

    1991-01-01

    The kit protooncogene encodes a transmembrane tyrosine kinase related to the receptors for the platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-R) and the macrophage growth factor (CSF1-R), and was very recently shown to bind a stem cell factor. To compare signal transduction by the kit kinase with signaling by homologous receptors we constructed a chimeric protein composed of the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of kit. We have previously shown that the chimeric receptor transmits potent mitogenic and transforming signals in response to the heterologous ligand. Here we demonstrate that upon ligand binding, the ligand-receptor complex undergoes endocytosis and degradation and induces short- and long-term cellular effects. Examination of the signal transduction pathway revealed that the activated kit kinase strongly associates with phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase activity and a phosphoprotein of 85 kd. In addition, the ligand-stimulated kit kinase is coupled to modifications of phospholipase C gamma and the Raf1 protein kinase. However, it does not lead to a significant change in the production of inositol phosphate. Comparison of our results with the known signaling pathways of PDGF-R and CSF1-R suggests that each receptor is coupled to a specific combination of signal transducers. Images PMID:1705885

  3. Parallel encoding of sensory history and behavioral preference during Caenorhabditis elegans olfactory learning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Christine E; Brueggemann, Chantal; L'Etoile, Noelle D; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-07-06

    Sensory experience modifies behavior through both associative and non-associative learning. In Caenorhabditis elegans, pairing odor with food deprivation results in aversive olfactory learning, and pairing odor with food results in appetitive learning. Aversive learning requires nuclear translocation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase EGL-4 in AWC olfactory neurons and an insulin signal from AIA interneurons. Here we show that the activity of neurons including AIA is acutely required during aversive, but not appetitive, learning. The AIA circuit and AGE-1, an insulin-regulated PI3 kinase, signal to AWC to drive nuclear enrichment of EGL-4 during conditioning. Odor exposure shifts the AWC dynamic range to higher odor concentrations regardless of food pairing or the AIA circuit, whereas AWC coupling to motor circuits is oppositely regulated by aversive and appetitive learning. These results suggest that non-associative sensory adaptation in AWC encodes odor history, while associative behavioral preference is encoded by altered AWC synaptic activity.

  4. MsERK1: a mitogen-activated protein kinase from a flowering plant.

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, B; Gawienowski, M; Ropp, T; Jacobs, T

    1993-01-01

    The induction of proliferation and differentiation in cultured mammalian cells is mediated by a cascade of protein phosphorylations. A key enzyme in this signaling pathway is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (or ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase). We report the recovery of a full-length cDNA clone encoding a MAP kinase from alfalfa. We have named the 44-kD protein encoded by this clone MsERK1. Recombinant MsERK1 (rMsERK1), when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, is recognized by antibodies raised against MAP kinases from rat, Xenopus, and sea star and by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Site-directed mutagenesis of MsERK1 demonstrated that Tyr-215 is either directly or indirectly responsible for recognition of the protein by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Semipurified rMsERK1 phosphorylated itself and a model substrate, myelin basic protein, in vitro, but the Tyr-215 mutant did neither. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis suggested that the gene that encodes MsERK1 is either a member of a small multigene family or a member of a polymorphic allelic series in alfalfa. Because MAP kinase activation has been associated with mitotic stimulation in animal systems, such an enzyme may play a role in the mitogenic induction of symbiotic root nodules on alfalfa by Rhizobium signal molecules. PMID:8439746

  5. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase associates with an insulin receptor substrate-1 serine kinase distinct from its intrinsic serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, K A; Kason, R E; Freund, G G

    1998-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has been proposed as a counter-regulatory mechanism in insulin and cytokine signalling. Here we report that IRS-1 is phosphorylated by a wortmannin insensitive phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-associated serine kinase (PAS kinase) distinct from PI 3-kinase serine kinase. We found that PI 3-kinase immune complexes contain 5-fold more wortmannin-insensitive serine kinase activity than SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and IRS-1 immune complexes. Affinity chromatography of cell lysates with a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein for the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase showed that PAS kinase associated with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. This interaction required unoccupied SH2 domain(s) but did not require the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit binding domain. In terms of function, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 and, after insulin stimulation, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 in PI 3-kinase-IRS-1 complexes. Phosphopeptide mapping showed that insulin-dependent in vivo sites of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation were comparable to those of PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1. More importantly, PAS kinase-dependent phosphorylation of IRS-1 reduced by 4-fold the ability of IRS-1 to act as an insulin receptor substrate. Taken together, these findings indicate that: (a) PAS kinase is distinct from the intrinsic serine kinase activity of PI 3-kinase, (b) PAS kinase associates with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase through SH2 domain interactions, and (c) PAS kinase is an IRS-1 serine kinase that can reduce the ability of IRS-1 to serve as an insulin receptor substrate. PMID:9761740

  7. Thymidine kinase mutants obtained by random sequence selection.

    PubMed

    Munir, K M; French, D C; Loeb, L A

    1993-05-01

    Knowledge of the catalytic properties and structural information regarding the amino acid residues that comprise the active site of an enzyme allows one, in principle, to use site-specific mutagenesis to construct genes that encode enzymes with altered functions. However, such information about most enzymes is not known and the effects of specific amino acid substitutions are not generally predictable. An alternative approach is to substitute random nucleotides for key codons in a gene and to use genetic selection to identify new and interesting enzyme variants. We describe here the construction, selection, and characterization of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase mutants either with different catalytic properties or with enhanced thermostability. From a library containing 2 x 10(6) plasmid-encoded herpes thymidine kinase genes, each with a different nucleotide sequence at the putative nucleoside binding site, we obtained 1540 active mutants. Using this library and one previously constructed, we identified by secondary selection Escherichia coli harboring thymidine kinase mutant clones that were unable to grow in the presence of concentrations of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) that permits colony formation by E. coli harboring the wild-type plasmid. Two of the mutant enzymes exhibited a reduced Km for AZT, one of which displayed a higher catalytic efficiency for AZT over thymidine relative to that of the wild type. We also identified one mutant with enhanced thermostability. These mutants may have clinical potential as the promise of gene therapy is increasingly becoming a reality.

  8. Understanding the Polo Kinase machine.

    PubMed

    Archambault, V; Lépine, G; Kachaner, D

    2015-09-10

    The Polo Kinase is a central regulator of cell division required for several events of mitosis and cytokinesis. In addition to a kinase domain (KD), Polo-like kinases (Plks) comprise a Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions with targets and regulators of Plks. In all organisms that contain Plks, one Plk family member fulfills several essential functions in the regulation of cell division, and here we refer to this conserved protein as Polo Kinase (Plk1 in humans). The PBD and the KD are capable of both cooperation and mutual inhibition in their functions. Crystal structures of the PBD, the KD and, recently, a PBD-KD complex have helped understanding the inner workings of the Polo Kinase. In parallel, an impressive array of molecular mechanisms has been found to mediate the regulation of the protein. Moreover, the targeting of Polo Kinase in the development of anti-cancer drugs has yielded several molecules with which to chemically modulate Polo Kinase to study its biological functions. Here we review our current understanding of the protein function and regulation of Polo Kinase as a fascinating molecular device in control of cell division.

  9. Schematic driven layout of Reed Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arave, Kari; Canaris, John; Miles, Lowell; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    Two Reed Solomon error correcting encoders are presented. Schematic driven layout tools were used to create the encoder layouts. Special consideration had to be given to the architecture and logic to provide scalability of the encoder designs. Knowledge gained from these projects was used to create a more flexible schematic driven layout system.

  10. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  11. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  12. Global Analysis of Serine-Threonine Protein Kinase Genes in Neurospora crassa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gyungsoon; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Gloria E.; Altamirano, Lorena; Colot, Hildur V.; Collopy, Patrick; Litvinkova, Liubov; Li, Liande; Jones, Carol A.; Diala, Fitz-Gerald; Dunlap, Jay C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Serine/threonine (S/T) protein kinases are crucial components of diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes, including the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. In order to assess the importance of S/T kinases to Neurospora biology, we embarked on a global analysis of 86 S/T kinase genes in Neurospora. We were able to isolate viable mutants for 77 of the 86 kinase genes. Of these, 57% exhibited at least one growth or developmental phenotype, with a relatively large fraction (40%) possessing a defect in more than one trait. S/T kinase knockouts were subjected to chemical screening using a panel of eight chemical treatments, with 25 mutants exhibiting sensitivity or resistance to at least one chemical. This brought the total percentage of S/T mutants with phenotypes in our study to 71%. Mutants lacking apg-1, an S/T kinase required for autophagy in other organisms, possessed the greatest number of phenotypes, with defects in asexual and sexual growth and development and in altered sensitivity to five chemical treatments. We showed that NCU02245/stk-19 is required for chemotropic interactions between female and male cells during mating. Finally, we demonstrated allelism between the S/T kinase gene NCU00406 and velvet (vel), encoding a p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) gene important for asexual and sexual growth and development in Neurospora. PMID:21965514

  13. P21 activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Chetan K; Minden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The p21 activated kinases (Paks) are well known effector proteins for the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac. The Paks contain 6 members, which fall into 2 families of proteins. The first family consists of Paks 1, 2, and 3, and the second consists of Paks 4, 5, and 6. While some of the Paks are ubiquitously expressed, others have more restrictive tissue specificity. All of them are found in the nervous system. Studies using cell culture, transgenic mice, and knockout mice, have revealed important roles for the Paks in cytoskeletal organization and in many aspects of cell growth and development. This review discusses the basic structures of the Paks, and their roles in cell growth, development, and in cancer. PMID:24658305

  14. Sixteen-kinase gene expression identifies luminal breast cancers with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Chabannon, Christian; Charpin, Colette; Chaffanet, Max; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease made of various molecular subtypes with different prognosis. However, evolution remains difficult to predict within some subtypes, such as luminal A, and treatment is not as adapted as it should be. Refinement of prognostic classification and identification of new therapeutic targets are needed. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we profiled 227 breast cancers. We focused our analysis on two major breast cancer subtypes with opposite prognosis, luminal A (n = 80) and basal (n = 58), and on genes encoding protein kinases. Whole-kinome expression separated luminal A and basal tumors. The expression (measured by a kinase score) of 16 genes encoding serine/threonine kinases involved in mitosis distinguished two subgroups of luminal A tumors: Aa, of good prognosis and Ab, of poor prognosis. This classification and its prognostic effect were validated in 276 luminal A cases from three independent series profiled across different microarray platforms. The classification outperformed the current prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analyses in both training and validation sets. The luminal Ab subgroup, characterized by high mitotic activity compared with luminal Aa tumors, displayed clinical characteristics and a kinase score intermediate between the luminal Aa subgroup and the luminal B subtype, suggesting a continuum in luminal tumors. Some of the mitotic kinases of the signature represent therapeutic targets under investigation. The identification of luminal A cases of poor prognosis should help select appropriate treatment, whereas the identification of a relevant kinase set provides potential targets.

  15. Functional and structural characterization of EnvZ, an osmosensing histidine kinase of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Phadtare, Sangita; Inouye, Masayori

    2007-01-01

    EnvZ is an osmosensing histidine kinase located in the inner membrane, and one of the most extensively studied Escherichia coli histidine kinases. Because of its structural complexity, functional and structural studies have been quite challenging. It is a multidomain transmembrane protein consisting of 450 amino acid residues. In addition, it must form a dimer to function as a histidine kinase like all the other histidine kinases. EnvZ consists of the 115-residue periplasmic domain, two transmembrane domains (TM1 and TM2), and the cytoplasmic domain consisting of the 43-residue linker (HAMP) domain and the 228-residue kinase domain. It has been shown that the kinase domain of EnvZ, responsible for its enzymatic activities, contains all of the conserved regions of histidine kinases such as H, F, N, G1, G2, and G3 boxes. Therefore, the 271-residue cytoplasmic domain of EnvZ (termed EnvZc) has been used as a model system to establish fundamental characteristics of histidine kinases. The DNA fragment encoding EnvZc was cloned in pET vector and EnvZc was expressed and purified. It is highly soluble and retains all the enzymatic activities of EnvZ. We demonstrated that it consists of two functional domains, domain A and domain B. NMR spectroscopic studies of these two domains revealed, for the first time, the structure of a histidine kinase. Domain A is responsible for dimerization of EnvZc forming a four-helical bundle containing two alpha-helical hairpin structures, while domain B is a monomer and has an ATP-binding pocket formed by regions conserved among the histidine kinases. In this chapter, we describe functional and structural studies of EnvZc, which can be applied to characterize other histidine kinases.

  16. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  17. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  18. The protooncogene TCL1 is an Akt kinase coactivator.

    PubMed

    Laine, J; Künstle, G; Obata, T; Sha, M; Noguchi, M

    2000-08-01

    Human T cell prolymphocytic leukemia can result from chromosomal translocations involving 14q32.1 or Xq28 regions. The regions encode a family of protooncogenes (TCL1, MTCP1, and TCL1b) of unknown function. In yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that TCL1 interacts with Akt. All TCL1 isoforms bind to the Akt pleckstrin homology domain. Both in vitro and in vivo TCL1 increases Akt kinase activity and as a consequence enhances substrate phosphorylation. In vivo, TCL1 stabilizes the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and enhances cell proliferation and survival. In vivo, TCL1 forms trimers, which associate with Akt. TCL1 facilitates the oligomerization and activation of Akt. Our data show that TCL1 is a novel Akt kinase coactivator, which promotes Akt-induced cell survival and proliferation.

  19. Role of LRRK2 kinase dysfunction in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Azad; Cookson, Mark R

    2011-06-13

    Parkinson disease is a common and usually sporadic neurodegenerative disorder. However, a subset of cases are inherited and, of these, mutations in the gene encoding leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most frequent genetic cause of disease. Here, we will discuss recent progress in understanding how LRRK2 mutations lead to disease and how this might have therapeutic implications. The effect of mutations on LRRK2 enzyme function provides clues as to which functions of the protein are important to disease. Recent work has focused on the kinase and GTP-binding domains of LRRK2, and it is assumed that these will be therapeutically important, although there is a substantial amount of work to be done to address this hypothesis.

  20. A phospholipid kinase regulates actin organization and intercellular bridge formation during germline cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Brill, J A; Hime, G R; Scharer-Schuksz, M; Fuller, M T

    2000-09-01

    The endgame of cytokinesis can follow one of two pathways depending on developmental context: resolution into separate cells or formation of a stable intercellular bridge. Here we show that the four wheel drive (fwd) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for intercellular bridge formation during cytokinesis in male meiosis. In fwd mutant males, contractile rings form and constrict in dividing spermatocytes, but cleavage furrows are unstable and daughter cells fuse together, producing multinucleate spermatids. fwd is shown to encode a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase), a member of a family of proteins that perform the first step in the synthesis of the key regulatory membrane phospholipid PIP2. Wild-type activity of the fwd PI 4-kinase is required for tyrosine phosphorylation in the cleavage furrow and for normal organization of actin filaments in the constricting contractile ring. Our results suggest a critical role for PI 4-kinases and phosphatidylinositol derivatives during the final stages of cytokinesis.

  1. SKK4, a novel activator of stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1/JNK).

    PubMed

    Lawler, S; Cuenda, A; Goedert, M; Cohen, P

    1997-09-01

    A cDNA was cloned and expressed that encodes human stress-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (SKK4), a novel MAP kinase kinase family member whose mRNA is widely expressed in human tissues. SKK4 activated SAPK1/JNK in vitro, but not SAPK2a/p38, SAPK2b/p38beta, SAPK3/ERK6 or SAPK4. It appears to be the mammalian homologue of HEP, an activator of SAPK1/JNK in Drosophila. In human epithelial KB cells SKK4 and SKK1/MKK4 (another activator of SAPK1/JNK) were both activated by stressful stimuli, but only SKK4 was activated by proinflammatory cytokines. The identification of SKK4 explains why the major SAPK1/JNK activator detected in many mammalian cell extracts is chromatographically separable from SKK1/MKK4.

  2. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S L; Aparisio, D I; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    1989-01-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR0) resistant to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [125I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro. Images PMID:2724415

  3. The histidine kinase CusS senses silver ions through direct binding by its sensor domain

    PubMed Central

    Gudipaty, Swapna A.; McEvoy, Megan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cus system of Escherichia coli aids in protection of cells from high concentrations of Ag(I) and Cu(I). The histidine kinase CusS of the CusRS two-component system functions as a Ag(I)/Cu(I)-responsive sensor kinase and is essential for induction of the genes encoding the CusCFBA efflux pump. In this study, we have examined the molecular features of the sensor domain of CusS in order to understand how a metal-responsive histidine kinase senses specific metal ions. We find that the predicted periplasmic sensor domain of CusS directly interacts with Ag(I) ions and undergoes a conformational change upon metal binding. Metal binding also enhances the tendency of the domain to dimerize. These findings suggest a model for activation of the histidine kinase through metal binding events in the periplasmic sensor domain. PMID:24948475

  4. Assignment of the protein kinase C delta polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Huppi, K; Siwarski, D; Goodnight, J; Mischak, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. We now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of backcross mice. We find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p.

  5. Multiple orphan histidine kinases interact directly with Spo0A to control the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Dago, Angel E.; Young, Danielle I.; Heap, John T.; Minton, Nigel P.; Hoch, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorylated Spo0A transcription factor controls the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, but genes encoding key phosphorelay components, Spo0F and Spo0B, are missing in the genome. We hypothesized that the five orphan histidine kinases of C. acetobutylicum interact directly with Spo0A to control its phosphorylation state. Sequential targeted gene disruption and gene expression profiling provided evidence for two pathways for Spo0A activation, one dependent on a histidine kinase encoded by cac0323, the other on both histidine kinases encoded by cac0903 and cac3319. Purified Cac0903 and Cac3319 kinases autophosphorylated and transferred phosphoryl groups to Spo0A in vitro, confirming their role in Spo0A activation in vivo. A cac0437 mutant hyper-sporulated, suggesting that Cac0437 is a modulator that prevents sporulation and maintains cellular Spo0A~P homeostasis during growth. Accordingly, Cac0437 has apparently lost the ability to autophosphorylate in vitro; instead it catalyses the ATP-dependent dephosphorylation of Spo0A~P releasing inorganic phosphate. Direct phosphorylation of Spo0A by histidine kinases and dephosphorylation by kinase-like proteins may be a common feature of the clostridia that may represent the ancestral state before the great oxygen event some 2.4 billion years ago, after which additional phosphorelay proteins were recruited in the evolutionary lineage that led to the bacilli. PMID:21401736

  6. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    PubMed

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  7. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  8. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  9. Baculovirus protein PK2 subverts eIF2α kinase function by mimicry of its kinase domain C-lobe

    PubMed Central

    Li, John J.; Cao, Chune; Fixsen, Sarah M.; Young, Janet M.; Bando, Hisanori; Elde, Nels C.; Katsuma, Susumu; Dever, Thomas E.; Sicheri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by eIF2α family kinases is a conserved mechanism to limit protein synthesis under specific stress conditions. The baculovirus-encoded protein PK2 inhibits eIF2α family kinases in vivo, thereby increasing viral fitness. However, the precise mechanism by which PK2 inhibits eIF2α kinase function remains an enigma. Here, we probed the mechanism by which PK2 inhibits the model eIF2α kinase human RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) as well as native insect eIF2α kinases. Although PK2 structurally mimics the C-lobe of a protein kinase domain and possesses the required docking infrastructure to bind eIF2α, we show that PK2 directly binds the kinase domain of PKR (PKRKD) but not eIF2α. The PKRKD–PK2 interaction requires a 22-residue N-terminal extension preceding the globular PK2 body that we term the “eIF2α kinase C-lobe mimic” (EKCM) domain. The functional insufficiency of the N-terminal extension of PK2 implicates a role for the adjacent EKCM domain in binding and inhibiting PKR. Using a genetic screen in yeast, we isolated PK2-activating mutations that cluster to a surface of the EKCM domain that in bona fide protein kinases forms the catalytic cleft through sandwiching interactions with a kinase N-lobe. Interaction assays revealed that PK2 associates with the N- but not the C-lobe of PKRKD. We propose an inhibitory model whereby PK2 engages the N-lobe of an eIF2α kinase domain to create a nonfunctional pseudokinase domain complex, possibly through a lobe-swapping mechanism. Finally, we show that PK2 enhances baculovirus fitness in insect hosts by targeting the endogenous insect heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)–like eIF2α kinase. PMID:26216977

  10. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  11. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  12. TNF and MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Davis, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to cell surface receptors engages multiple signal transduction pathways, including three groups of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases: extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); the cJun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs); and the p38 MAP kinases. These MAP kinase signalling pathways induce a secondary response by increasing the expression of several inflammatory cytokines (including TNFα) that contribute to the biological activity of TNFα. MAP kinases therefore function both upstream and down-stream of signalling by TNFα receptors. Here we review mechanisms that mediate these actions of MAP kinases during the response to TNFα. PMID:24647229

  13. Crystal Structures of Putative Sugar Kinases from Synechococcus Elongatus PCC 7942 and Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 encodes a putative sugar kinase (SePSK), which shares 44.9% sequence identity with the xylulose kinase-1 (AtXK-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence alignment suggests that both kinases belong to the ribulokinase-like carbohydrate kinases, a sub-family of FGGY family carbohydrate kinases. However, their exact physiological function and real substrates remain unknown. Here we solved the structures of SePSK and AtXK-1 in both their apo forms and in complex with nucleotide substrates. The two kinases exhibit nearly identical overall architecture, with both kinases possessing ATP hydrolysis activity in the absence of substrates. In addition, our enzymatic assays suggested that SePSK has the capability to phosphorylate D-ribulose. In order to understand the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, we solved the structure of SePSK in complex with D-ribulose and found two potential substrate binding pockets in SePSK. Using mutation and activity analysis, we further verified the key residues important for its catalytic activity. Moreover, our structural comparison with other family members suggests that there are major conformational changes in SePSK upon substrate binding, facilitating the catalytic process. Together, these results provide important information for a more detailed understanding of the cofactor and substrate binding mode as well as the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, and possible similarities with its plant homologue AtXK-1. PMID:27223615

  14. Image encoding with triangulation wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, D. J.; Kim, HyungJun

    1995-09-01

    We demonstrate some wavelet-based image processing applications of a class of simplicial grids arising in finite element computations and computer graphics. The cells of a triangular grid form the set of leaves of a binary tree and the nodes of a directed graph consisting of a single cycle. The leaf cycle of a uniform grid forms a pattern for pixel image scanning and for coherent computation of coefficients of splines and wavelets. A simple form of image encoding is accomplished with a 1D quadrature mirror filter whose coefficients represent an expansion of the image in terms of 2D Haar wavelets with triangular support. A combination the leaf cycle and an inherent quadtree structure allow efficient neighbor finding, grid refinement, tree pruning and storage. Pruning of the simplex tree yields a partially compressed image which requires no decoding, but rather may be rendered as a shaded triangulation. This structure and its generalization to n-dimensions form a convenient setting for wavelet analysis and computations based on simplicial grids.

  15. Evaluation of GOES encoder lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Helmold, N.

    1983-01-01

    Aging characteristics and life expectancies of flight quality, tungsten filament, encoder lamps are similar to those of 'commercial' grade gas filled lamps of similar construction, filament material and filament temperature. The aging and final failure by filament burnout are caused by single crystal growth over large portions of the filament with the concomitant development of facets and notches resulting in reduction of cross section and mechanical weakening of the filament. The life expectancy of presently produced lamps is about one year at their nominal operating voltage of five volts dc. At 4.5 volts, it is about two years. These life times are considerably shorter, and the degradation rates of lamp current and light flux are considerably higher, than were observed in the laboratory and in orbit on lamps of the same type manufactured more than a decade ago. It is speculated that the filaments of these earlier lamps contained a crystallization retarding dopant, possibly thorium oxide. To obtain the desired life expectancy of or = to four years in present lamps, operating voltages of or = to four volts dc would be required.

  16. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  17. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  18. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Kenneth; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present two encoding methods for block-circulant LDPC codes. The first is an iterative encoding method based on the erasure decoding algorithm, and the computations required are well organized due to the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. The second method uses block-circulant generator matrices, and the encoders are very similar to those for recursive convolutional codes. Some encoders of the second type have been implemented in a small Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and operate at 100 Msymbols/second.

  19. Unconscious relational encoding depends on hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Duss, Simone B.; Reber, Thomas P.; Hänggi, Jürgen; Schwab, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Müri, René M.; Brugger, Peter; Gutbrod, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Textbooks divide between human memory systems based on consciousness. Hippocampus is thought to support only conscious encoding, while neocortex supports both conscious and unconscious encoding. We tested whether processing modes, not consciousness, divide between memory systems in three neuroimaging experiments with 11 amnesic patients (mean age = 45.55 years, standard deviation = 8.74, range = 23–60) and 11 matched healthy control subjects. Examined processing modes were single item versus relational encoding with only relational encoding hypothesized to depend on hippocampus. Participants encoded and later retrieved either single words or new relations between words. Consciousness of encoding was excluded by subliminal (invisible) word presentation. Amnesic patients and controls performed equally well on the single item task activating prefrontal cortex. But only the controls succeeded on the relational task activating the hippocampus, while amnesic patients failed as a group. Hence, unconscious relational encoding, but not unconscious single item encoding, depended on hippocampus. Yet, three patients performed normally on unconscious relational encoding in spite of amnesia capitalizing on spared hippocampal tissue and connections to language cortex. This pattern of results suggests that processing modes divide between memory systems, while consciousness divides between levels of function within a memory system. PMID:25273998

  20. Role of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases in the development of a pathological state in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Lyudmila; Emelyanova, Valentina; Volotovski, Igor

    2010-07-01

    Amplification and a cloning of fragments of genes of human retina tyrosine kinases, the nucleotide sequences of which feature a high homology to the gene families of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases, and a cloning of the complete coding sequence of the cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase gene of the human lymphocytes have been carried out. It has been established that this sequence contains 1,624 bp and encodes a protein that, with a 99% homology, corresponds to the human tyrosine kinase. A comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the full-size cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase of the lymphocytes of healthy donors and of patients with an eye choroidal melanoma has shown that a risk of development of an eye choroidal melanoma can be estimated by the frequency of occurrence of a mutant allele in the 10th exon.

  1. Evidence for two NAD kinases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, W.; Roth, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The electron-carrying cofactor NADP is formed by phosphorylation of NAD. A strategy for the isolation of NAD kinase mutants revealed two classes of temperature-sensitive mutations, nadF and nadG, mapping at min 13 and 72 of the Salmonella chromosome. Both mutant types grew on nutrient broth at both 30 and 42 degrees C but on minimal medium showed a temperature-sensitive growth defect which was not corrected by any of the single nutritional supplements tested. A nadF deletion mutant grew on nutrient broth but not on minimal medium. A double mutant with the nadF deletion and a nadG(Ts) mutation showed temperature-sensitive growth on all media. We propose that Salmonella typhimurium has two NAD kinases, one encoded by the nadF and one by the nadG gene. This is supported by the fact that temperature-sensitive mutants of both genes produce kinase activity with altered heat stability. Results suggest that either one of two NAD kinases is sufficient for growth on rich medium, but that both are needed for growth on minimal media. Enzyme assays show that the nadF gene is responsible for about 70% of total NAD kinase activity, and that the nadG gene dictates the remaining 30%. While testing nutritional phenotypes of nadF and nadG mutants, we found that the biosynthetic intermediate, quinolinic acid (QA) inhibited growth of nadF mutants on nutrient broth. This suggested that the NadG enzyme might be inhibited by QA. Enzyme assays demonstrated that QA inhibits the NadG but not the NadF enzyme. This suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism which controls NADP levels. PMID:8021211

  2. Counteractive roles of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and a MAP kinase kinase homolog in the osmoregulation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, K; Russell, P

    1995-02-01

    With the goal of discovering the cellular functions of type 2C protein phosphatases, we have cloned and analyzed two ptc (phosphatase two C) genes, ptc2+ and ptc3+, from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Together with the previously identified ptc1+ gene, the enzymes encoded by these genes account for approximately 90% of the measurable PP2C activity in fission yeast cells. No obvious growth defects result from individual disruptions of ptc genes, but a delta ptc1 delta ptc3 double mutant displays aberrant cell morphology and temperature-sensitive cell lysis that is further accentuated in a delta ptc1 delta ptc2 delta ptc3 triple mutant. These phenotypes are almost completely suppressed by the presence of osmotic stabilizers, strongly indicating that PP2C has an important role in osmoregulation. Genetic suppression of delta ptc1 delta ptc3 lethality identified two loci, mutations of which render cells hypersensitive to high-osmolarity media. One locus is identical to wis1+, encoding a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) homolog. The Wis1 sequence is most closely related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEK encoded by PBS2, which is required for osmoregulation. These data indicate that divergent yeasts have functionally conserved MAP kinase pathways, which are required to increase intracellular osmotic concentrations in response to osmotic stress. Moreover, our observations implicate PP2C enzymes as also having an important role in signal transduction processes involved in osmoregulation, probably acting to negatively regulate the osmosensing signal that is transmitted through Wis1 MAP kinase kinase.

  3. Structural basis for the mechanism and substrate specificity of glycocyamine kinase, a phosphagen kinase family member

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kap; Pullalarevu, Sadhana; Surabian, Karen Talin; Howard, Andrew; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Moult, John; Herzberg, Osnat

    2010-03-12

    Glycocyamine kinase (GK), a member of the phosphagen kinase family, catalyzes the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent reversible phosphoryl group transfer of the N-phosphoryl group of phosphoglycocyamine to ADP to yield glycocyamine and ATP. This reaction helps to maintain the energy homeostasis of the cell in some multicelullar organisms that encounter high and variable energy turnover. GK from the marine worm Namalycastis sp. is heterodimeric, with two homologous polypeptide chains, {alpha} and {beta}, derived from a common pre-mRNA by mutually exclusive N-terminal alternative exons. The N-terminal exon of GK{beta} encodes a peptide that is different in sequence and is 16 amino acids longer than that encoded by the N-terminal exon of GK{alpha}. The crystal structures of recombinant GK{alpha}{beta} and GK{beta}{beta} from Namalycastis sp. were determined at 2.6 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In addition, the structure of the GK{beta}{beta} was determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a transition state analogue, Mg{sup 2+}-ADP-NO{sub 3}{sup -}-glycocyamine. Consistent with the sequence homology, the GK subunits adopt the same overall fold as that of other phosphagen kinases of known structure (the homodimeric creatine kinase (CK) and the monomeric arginine kinase (AK)). As with CK, the GK N-termini mediate the dimer interface. In both heterodimeric and homodimeric GK forms, the conformations of the two N-termini are asymmetric, and the asymmetry is different than that reported previously for the homodimeric CKs from several organisms. The entire polypeptide chains of GK{alpha}{beta} are structurally defined, and the longer N-terminus of the {beta} subunit is anchored at the dimer interface. In GK{beta}{beta} the 24 N-terminal residues of one subunit and 11 N-terminal residues of the second subunit are disordered. This observation is consistent with a proposal that the GK{alpha}{beta} amino acids involved in the interface formation were optimized once

  4. Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder Tolerates Misalignments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic shaft-angle encoder measures angle of rotation of shaft with high precision while minimizing effects of eccentricity and other misalignments. Grooves on disk serve as reference marks to locate reading heads and measure increments of rotation of disk. Shaft-angle encoder, resembling optical compact-disk drive, includes two tracking heads illuminating grooves on disk and measures reflections from them.

  5. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  6. Experiments in encoding multilevel images as quadtrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    Image storage requirements for several encoding methods are investigated and the use of quadtrees with multigray level or multicolor images are explored. The results of encoding a variety of images having up to 256 gray levels using three schemes (full raster, runlength and quadtree) are presented. Although there is considerable literature on the use of quadtrees to store and manipulate binary images, their application to multilevel images is relatively undeveloped. The potential advantage of quadtree encoding is that an entire area with a uniform gray level may be encoded as a unit. A pointerless quadtree encoding scheme is described. Data are presented on the size of the quadtree required to encode selected images and on the relative storage requirements of the three encoding schemes. A segmentation scheme based on the statistical variation of gray levels within a quadtree quadrant is described. This parametric scheme may be used to control the storage required by an encoded image and to preprocess a scene for feature identification. Several sets of black and white and pseudocolor images obtained by varying the segmentation parameter are shown.

  7. The Acquisition of Syntactically Encoded Evidentiality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rett, Jessica; Hyams, Nina

    2014-01-01

    This article presents several empirical studies of syntactically encoded evidentiality in English. The first part of our study consists of an adult online experiment that confirms claims in Asudeh & Toivonen (2012) that raised Perception Verb Similatives (PVSs; e.g. "John looks like he is sick") encode direct evidentiality. We then…

  8. Contribution of glucose kinase to glucose repression of xylose utilization in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Späth, C; Kraus, A; Hillen, W

    1997-01-01

    The glk gene from Bacillus megaterium, which encodes glucose kinase, was isolated and analyzed. Disruption by a transcriptional glk-luxAB fusion indicated that glk is the only glucose kinase gene in that strain but did not affect growth of that mutant on glucose. Determination of luciferase activity under various growth conditions revealed constitutive transcription of glk. Expression of a xylA-lacZ fusion was repressed by glucose in the strain with the glk disruption about twofold less efficiently than in the wild type. The potential contribution of glk expression to glucose repression is discussed. PMID:9393732

  9. Recent advances on the encoding and selection methods of DNA-encoded chemical library.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingbing; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jianfu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-02-01

    DNA-encoded chemical library (DEL) has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for ligand discovery in chemical biology research and in drug discovery. Encoding and selection methods are two of the most important technological aspects of DEL that can dictate the performance and utilities of DELs. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances on the encoding and selection strategies of DEL and also discussed the latest developments on DNA-encoded dynamic library, a new frontier in DEL research.

  10. Endothelial Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 Is Critical for Lymphatic Vascular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Danai, Laura V.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Gujja, Sharvari; Edwards, Yvonne J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vascular development and function are not well understood. Recent studies have suggested a role for endothelial cell (EC) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) in developmental angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Here, we show that constitutive loss of EC Map4k4 in mice causes postnatal lethality due to chylothorax, suggesting that Map4k4 is required for normal lymphatic vascular function. Mice constitutively lacking EC Map4k4 displayed dilated lymphatic capillaries, insufficient lymphatic valves, and impaired lymphatic flow; furthermore, primary ECs derived from these animals displayed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Yeast 2-hybrid analyses identified the Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasa1, a known regulator of lymphatic development and lymphatic endothelial cell fate, as a direct interacting partner for Map4k4. Map4k4 silencing in ECs enhanced basal Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activities, and primary ECs lacking Map4k4 displayed enhanced lymphatic EC marker expression. Taken together, these results reveal that EC Map4k4 is critical for lymphatic vascular development by regulating EC quiescence and lymphatic EC fate. PMID:27044870

  11. Comparison of H.265/HEVC encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochimiuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The H.265/HEVC is the state-of-the-art video compression standard, which allows the bitrate reduction up to 50% compared with its predecessor, H.264/AVC, maintaining equal perceptual video quality. The growth in coding efficiency was achieved by increasing the number of available intra- and inter-frame prediction features and improvements in existing ones, such as entropy encoding and filtering. Nevertheless, to achieve real-time performance of the encoder, simplifications in algorithm are inevitable. Some features and coding modes shall be skipped, to reduce time needed to evaluate modes forwarded to rate-distortion optimisation. Thus, the potential acceleration of the encoding process comes at the expense of coding efficiency. In this paper, a trade-off between video quality and encoding speed of various H.265/HEVC encoders is discussed.

  12. Industrial Applications Of Optical Shaft Encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmister, Brian W.

    1980-11-01

    The development of the microprocessor and mini-computer for industrial process control has made the optical shaft angle encoder a natural choice for a position feedback transducer. Many of these applications, however, require the encoder to operate reliably in extremely hostile environments. In response to this, the encoder manufacturer has been faced with reliability problems which fall into the following general categories: 1. Exposure to weather 2. Wide operating and storage temperature range 3. Exposure to corrosive chemicals 4. Severe shock and vibration 5. High electrical noise levels 6. Severe blows to encoder housing 7. Operation in explosive atmospheres Three of these applications expose the encoder to most of these environmental conditions: 1. A jack-up control position feedback for an offshore oil well drilling rig 2. A depth measurement system for oil well logging instrumentation 3. Elevation and azimuth feedback for a solar power plant heliostat

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  14. Encoder: A Connectionist Model of How Learning to Visually Encode Fixated Text Images Improves Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gale L.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes that visual encoding learning improves reading fluency by widening the span over which letters are recognized from a fixated text image so that fewer fixations are needed to cover a text line. Encoder is a connectionist model that learns to convert images like the fixated text images human readers encode into the…

  15. Aurora kinase A in Barrett's carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rugge, Massimo; Fassan, Matteo; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Pizzi, Marco; Giacomelli, Luciano; Battaglia, Giorgio; Rizzetto, Christian; Parente, Paola; Ancona, Ermanno

    2010-10-01

    In Barrett's mucosa, both aneuploidy and TP53 mutations are consistently recognized as markers of an increased risk of Barrett's adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of the mitotic kinase encoding gene (AURKA) results in chromosome instability (assessed from the micronuclei count) and ultimately in aneuploidy. Eighty-seven esophageal biopsy samples representative of all the phenotypic lesions occurring in the multistep process of Barrett's carcinogenesis (gastric metaplasia in 25, intestinal metaplasia in 25, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 16, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 11, and Barrett's adenocarcinoma in 10) were obtained from long segments of Barrett's mucosa. Twenty-five additional biopsy samples of native esophageal mucosa were used for control purposes. In all tissue samples, the immunohistochemical expression of both AURKA and TP53 gene products was scored; and the micronuclei index was calculated. AURKA immunostaining increased progressively and significantly along with dedifferentiation of the histologic phenotype (P < .001). Nine of 10 Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed AURKA immunostaining. AURKA expression correlated significantly with p53 expression and the micronuclei index (both Ps < .001). AURKA overexpression is significantly associated with Barrett's mucosa progressing to Barrett's adenocarcinoma and contributes to esophageal carcinogenesis via chromosome instability. The identification of AURKA as a novel molecular target of cancer progression in Barrett's mucosa provides a lead for the development of new therapeutic approaches in Barrett's mucosa patients.

  16. A novel family of serine/threonine kinases participating in spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kueng, P; Nikolova, Z; Djonov, V; Hemphill, A; Rohrbach, V; Boehlen, D; Zuercher, G; Andres, A C; Ziemiecki, A

    1997-12-29

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the spectacular cytodifferentiation observed during spermiogenesis are poorly understood. We have recently identified a murine testis-specific serine kinase (tssk) 1, constituting a novel subfamily of serine/threonine kinases. Using low stringency screening we have isolated and molecularly characterized a second closely related family member, tssk 2, which is probably the orthologue of the human DGS-G gene. Expression of tssk 1 and tssk 2 was limited to the testis of sexually mature males. Immunohistochemical staining localized both kinases to the cytoplasm of late spermatids and to structures resembling residual bodies. tssk 1 and tssk 2 were absent in released sperms in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules and the epididymis, demonstrating a tight window of expression restricted to the last stages of spermatid maturation. In vitro kinase assays of immunoprecipitates containing either tssk 1 or tssk 2 revealed no autophosphorylation of the kinases, however, they led to serine phosphorylation of a coprecipitating protein of approximately 65 kD. A search for interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system with tssk 1 and tssk 2 cDNA as baits and a prey cDNA library from mouse testis, led to the isolation of a novel cDNA, interacting specifically with both tssk 1 and tssk 2, and encoding the coprecipitated 65-kD protein phosphorylated by both kinases. Interestingly, expression of the interacting clone was also testis specific and paralleled the developmental expression observed for the kinases themselves. These results represent the first demonstration of the involvement of a distinct kinase family, the tssk serine/threonine kinases, together with a substrate in the cytodifferentiation of late spermatids to sperms.

  17. Phosphoregulators: Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphatases of Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Ravasi, Timothy; Taylor, Darrin; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Grimmond, Sean

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of the human and mouse genome sequences, the task now turns to identifying their encoded transcripts and assigning gene function. In this study, we have undertaken a computational approach to identify and classify all of the protein kinases and phosphatases present in the mouse gene complement. A nonredundant set of these sequences was produced by mining Ensembl gene predictions and publicly available cDNA sequences with a panel of InterPro domains. This approach identified 561 candidate protein kinases and 162 candidate protein phosphatases. This cohort was then analyzed using TribeMCL protein sequence similarity clustering followed by CLUSTALV alignment and hierarchical tree generation. This approach allowed us to (1) distinguish between true members of the protein kinase and phosphatase families and enzymes of related biochemistry, (2) determine the structure of the families, and (3) suggest functions for previously uncharacterized members. The classifications obtained by this approach were in good agreement with previous schemes and allowed us to demonstrate domain associations with a number of clusters. Finally, we comment on the complementary nature of cDNA and genome-based gene detection and the impact of the FANTOM2 transcriptome project. PMID:12819143

  18. Structural and functional characterization of human NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, F; Niere, M; Ludwig, A; Ziegler, M

    2001-10-19

    NADP is essential for biosynthetic pathways, energy, and signal transduction. Its synthesis is catalyzed by NAD kinase. Very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of this enzyme from multicellular organisms. We identified a human NAD kinase cDNA and the corresponding gene using available database information. A cDNA was amplified from a human fibroblast cDNA library and functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The obtained cDNA, slightly different from that deposited in the database, encodes a protein of 49 kDa. The gene is expressed in most human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle. Human NAD kinase differs considerably from that of prokaryotes by subunit molecular mass (49 kDa vs 30-35 kDa). The catalytically active homotetramer is highly selective for its substrates, NAD and ATP. It did not phosphorylate the nicotinic acid derivative of NAD (NAAD) suggesting that the potent calcium-mobilizing pyridine nucleotide NAADP is synthesized by an alternative route.

  19. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  20. reduced ocelli encodes the leucine rich repeat protein Pray For Elves in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jason C; Fineberg, Sarah K; Eberl, Daniel F

    2007-01-01

    The ocelli are three simple photoreceptors on the vertex of the fruit fly head. We sought to identify the gene encoded by the classical ocellar mutant, reduced ocelli (rdo). Deficiency and inversion breakpoint mapping and P-element induced male recombination analyses were performed and Pray For Elves (PFE; CG15151; Fbgn0032661) emerged as a promising candidate for the rdo phenotype. The PFE locus maps to polytene region 36E on chromosome 2L between elfless (Fbgn0032660) and Arrestin 1 (Fbgn0000120). FlyBase annotation predicts that PFE encodes a serine/threonine kinase, yet protein prediction programs revealed no kinase domain. These analyses suggest that PFE simply encodes a leucine rich repeat molecule of unknown function, but presumably functions in nervous system protein-protein interaction. Two classical spontaneous alleles of rdo, rdo(1) and rdo(2), were characterized and the underlying mutations result from a small deletion spanning exon 1/intron 1 and a B104/roo insertion into the 3'UTR of PFE, respectively. Transposase-mediated excisions of several P-elements inserted into the PFE locus revert the rdo phenotype and a full-length PFE cDNA is sufficient to rescue rdo. A Gal4 enhancer trap reveals a broad adult neural expression pattern for PFE. Our identification and initial characterization of the rdo locus will contribute to the understanding of neurogenesis and neural development in the simple photoreceptors of the Drosophila visual system.

  1. Cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Li, H; Lohmann, S M; Boss, G R; Pilz, R B

    1998-12-01

    Agents which increase the intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) concentration and cGMP analogs inhibit cell growth in several different cell types, but it is not known which of the intracellular target proteins of cGMP is (are) responsible for the growth-suppressive effects of cGMP. Using baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which are deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase), we show that 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate and 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibit cell growth in cells stably transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector but not in untransfected cells or in cells transfected with a catalytically inactive G-kinase. We found that the cGMP analogs inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear translocation of MAP kinase in G-kinase-expressing cells but not in G-kinase-deficient cells. Ras activation by EGF was not impaired in G-kinase-expressing cells treated with cGMP analogs. We show that activation of G-kinase inhibited c-Raf kinase activation and that G-kinase phosphorylated c-Raf kinase on Ser43, both in vitro and in vivo; phosphorylation of c-Raf kinase on Ser43 uncouples the Ras-Raf kinase interaction. A mutant c-Raf kinase with an Ala substitution for Ser43 was insensitive to inhibition by cGMP and G-kinase, and expression of this mutant kinase protected cells from inhibition of EGF-induced MAP kinase activity by cGMP and G-kinase, suggesting that Ser43 in c-Raf is the major target for regulation by G-kinase. Similarly, B-Raf kinase was not inhibited by G-kinase; the Ser43 phosphorylation site of c-Raf is not conserved in B-Raf. Activation of G-kinase induced MAP kinase phosphatase 1 expression, but this occurred later than the inhibition of MAP kinase activation. Thus, in BHK cells, inhibition of cell growth by cGMP analogs is strictly dependent on G-kinase and G-kinase activation inhibits the Ras/MAP kinase pathway (i) by

  2. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  3. Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Habituation in "Drosophila melanogaster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Erber, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) has many cellular functions in vertebrates and insects that affect complex behaviors such as locomotion and foraging. The "foraging" ("for") gene encodes a PKG in "Drosophila melanogaster." Here, we demonstrate a function for the "for" gene in sensory responsiveness and nonassociative learning. Larvae of the…

  4. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies. PMID:26742849

  5. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  6. Structure of the pseudokinase-kinase domains from protein kinase TYK2 reveals a mechanism for Janus kinase (JAK) autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Lupardus, Patrick J; Ultsch, Mark; Wallweber, Heidi; Bir Kohli, Pawan; Johnson, Adam R; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2014-06-03

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are receptor-associated multidomain tyrosine kinases that act downstream of many cytokines and interferons. JAK kinase activity is regulated by the adjacent pseudokinase domain via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report the 2.8-Å structure of the two-domain pseudokinase-kinase module from the JAK family member TYK2 in its autoinhibited form. We find that the pseudokinase and kinase interact near the kinase active site and that most reported mutations in cancer-associated JAK alleles cluster in or near this interface. Mutation of residues near the TYK2 interface that are analogous to those in cancer-associated JAK alleles, including the V617F and "exon 12" JAK2 mutations, results in increased kinase activity in vitro. These data indicate that JAK pseudokinases are autoinhibitory domains that hold the kinase domain inactive until receptor dimerization stimulates transition to an active state.

  7. Encoding entanglement-assisted quantum stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Bai, Bao-Ming; Li, Zhuo; Peng, Jin-Ye; Xiao, He-Ling

    2012-02-01

    We address the problem of encoding entanglement-assisted (EA) quantum error-correcting codes (QECCs) and of the corresponding complexity. We present an iterative algorithm from which a quantum circuit composed of CNOT, H, and S gates can be derived directly with complexity O(n2) to encode the qubits being sent. Moreover, we derive the number of each gate consumed in our algorithm according to which we can design EA QECCs with low encoding complexity. Another advantage brought by our algorithm is the easiness and efficiency of programming on classical computers.

  8. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  9. A novel bacterial tyrosine kinase essential for cell division and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianguo; Ohta, Noriko; Zhao, Ji-Liang; Newton, Austin

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in the regulation of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell growth, division, and differentiation. The Caulobacter crescentus divL gene encodes a novel bacterial tyrosine kinase essential for cell viability and division. Although the DivL protein is homologous to the ubiquitous bacterial histidine protein kinases (HPKs), it differs from previously studied members of this protein kinase family in that it contains a tyrosine residue (Tyr-550) in the conserved H-box instead of a histidine residue, which is the expected site of autophosphorylation. DivL is autophosphorylated on Tyr-550 in vitro, and this tyrosine residue is essential for cell viability and regulation of the cell division cycle. Purified DivL also catalyzes phosphorylation of CtrA and activates transcription in vitro of the cell cycle-regulated fliF promoter. Suppressor mutations in ctrA bypass the conditional cell division phenotype of cold-sensitive divL mutants, providing genetic evidence that DivL function in cell cycle and developmental regulation is mediated, at least in part, by the global response regulator CtrA. DivL is the only reported HPK homologue whose function has been shown to require autophosphorylation on a tyrosine, and, thus, it represents a new class of kinases within this superfamily of protein kinases. PMID:10557274

  10. Novel receptor-like kinases in cacao contain PR-1 extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Fiorin, Gabriel Lorencini; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches' broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses. We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand.

  11. The Cln3-Cdc28 kinase complex of S. cerevisiae is regulated by proteolysis and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Tyers, M; Tokiwa, G; Nash, R; Futcher, B

    1992-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several of the proteins involved in the Start decision have been identified; these include the Cdc28 protein kinase and three cyclin-like proteins, Cln1, Cln2 and Cln3. We find that Cln3 is a very unstable, low abundance protein. In contrast, the truncated Cln3-1 protein is stable, suggesting that the PEST-rich C-terminal third of Cln3 is necessary for rapid turnover. Cln3 associates with Cdc28 to form an active kinase complex that phosphorylates Cln3 itself and a co-precipitated substrate of 45 kDa. The cdc34-2 allele, which encodes a defective ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, dramatically increases the kinase activity associated with Cln3, but does not affect the half-life of Cln3. The Cln--Cdc28 complex is inactivated by treatment with non-specific phosphatases; prolonged incubation with ATP restores kinase activity to the dephosphorylated kinase complex. It is thus possible that phosphate residues essential for Cln-Cdc28 kinase activity are added autocatalytically. The multiple post-translational controls on Cln3 activity may help Cln3 tether division to growth. Images PMID:1316273

  12. Biochemical properties of human pantothenate kinase 2 isoforms and mutations linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2006-01-06

    The PANK2 gene encodes the human pantothenate kinase 2 protein isoforms, and PANK2 mutations are linked to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Two PanK2 protein forms are proteolytically processed to form a mitochondrially localized, mature PanK2. Another isoform arose from a proposed initiation at a leucine codon and was not processed further. The fifth isoform was postulated to arise from an alternative splicing event and was found to encode an inactive protein. Fourteen mutant PanK2 proteins with single amino acid substitutions, associated with either early or late onset disease, were evaluated for activity. The PanK2(G521R), the most frequent mutation in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, was devoid of activity and did not fold properly. However, nine of the mutant proteins associated with disease possessed catalytic activities that were indistinguishable from wild type, including the frequently encountered PanK2(T528M) missense mutation. PanK2 was extremely sensitive to feedback inhibition by CoA thioesters (IC50 values between 250 and 500 nM), and the regulation of the active PanK2 mutants was comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Coexpression of the PanK2(G521R) and wild-type PanK2 did not interfere with wild-type enzyme activity, arguing against a dominant negative effect of the PanK2(G521R) mutation in heterozygous patients. These data described the unique biochemical features of the PanK2 isoforms and suggested that catalytic defects may not be the sole cause for the neurodegenerative phenotype.

  13. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues.

  14. NGF-induction of the metalloproteinase-transin/stromelysin in PC12 cells: involvement of multiple protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Machida, C M; Scott, J D; Ciment, G

    1991-09-01

    In previous work, we found that nerve growth factor (NGF) induced expression of the mRNA transcript encoding the metalloproteinase transin/stromelysin in PC12 cells. Transin was found, moreover, to be a "late" gene product whose expression correlated with neurites extension. In this study, various aspects of the NGF intracellular signaling pathway in PC12 cells are investigated. We show that the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, but not various other kinase inhibitors, specifically blocked the NGF induction of transin. Preliminary characterization of this staurosporine-sensitive kinase suggest that it does not correspond to a tyrosine kinase, nor various serine kinases, and that it is involved both at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels of transin gene regulation. In contrast to these effects of staurosporine, various activators of protein kinases C and A augmented the NGF induction of transin. Similar effects of these kinase inhibitors and activators were also observed with the expression of various immediate-early genes that have been proposed to mediate the transcriptional effects of NGF, including c-fos and c-jun. These data suggest, therefore, that the NGF induction of transin mRNA expression involves multiple protein kinases acting at a number of postreceptor regulatory steps in the NGF signaling pathway.

  15. Genes encoding a callose synthase and phytochrome A are adjacent to a MAP3Ka-like gene in Beta vulgaris USH20

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MAP3Ka encodes a key conserved protein kinase responsible for orchestrating a rapid cascade of cellular events ultimately leading to localized cell death. Hypersensitive response, as it is termed, enables genetically-resistant plants to limit microbial invasion under the right environmental conditio...

  16. The daf-4 gene encodes a bone morphogenetic protein receptor controlling C. elegans dauer larva development.

    PubMed

    Estevez, M; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Albert, P S; Massagué, J; Riddle, D L

    1993-10-14

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family is a conserved group of signalling molecules within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. This group, including the Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) protein and the mammalian BMPs, mediates cellular interactions and tissue differentiation during development. Here we show that a homologue of human BMPs controls a developmental switch in the life cycle of the free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Starvation and overcrowding induce C. elegans to form a developmentally arrested, third-stage dauer larva. The daf-4 gene, which acts to inhibit dauer larva formation and promote growth, encodes a receptor protein kinase similar to the daf-1, activin and TGF-beta receptor serine/threonine kinases. When expressed in monkey COS cells, the daf-4 receptor binds human BMP-2 and BMP-4. The daf-4 receptor is the first to be identified for any growth factor in the BMP family.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... shape, leading to a reduction of mevalonate kinase enzyme activity. Despite this shortage (deficiency) of mevalonate kinase activity, ... who have less than 1 percent of normal enzyme activity usually develop MVA. Learn more about the gene ...

  18. Kinase signalling in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Kathryn R; Jones, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in numerous signal transduction pathways and aberrant activity of specific kinases have been identified in multiple cell and mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), as well as in human HD brain. The balance and integration of a network of kinase signalling pathways is paramount for the regulation of a wide range of cellular and physiological processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, neuronal plasticity and apoptosis. Unbalanced activity within these pathways provides a potential mechanism for many of the pathological phenotypes associated with HD, such as transcriptional dysregulation, inflammation and ultimately neurodegeneration. The characterisation of aberrant kinase signalling regulation in HD has been inconsistent and may be a result of failure to consider integration between multiple signalling pathways, as well as alterations that may occur over time with both age and disease progression. Collating the information about the effect of mHTT on signalling pathways demonstrates that it has wide ranging effects on multiple pro- and anti-apoptotic kinases, resulting in the dysregulation of numerous complex interactions within a dynamic network.

  19. Case report: pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J M

    1995-09-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. Despite a paucity of reports, splenectomy resulted in successful outcomes for two siblings with this disorder. The sisters were diagnosed at birth with profound jaundice and congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

  20. Chemical Space of DNA-Encoded Libraries.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Raphael M; Randolph, Cassie

    2016-07-28

    In recent years, DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) have attracted considerable attention as a potential discovery tool in drug development. Screening encoded libraries may offer advantages over conventional hit discovery approaches and has the potential to complement such methods in pharmaceutical research. As a result of the increased application of encoded libraries in drug discovery, a growing number of hit compounds are emerging in scientific literature. In this review we evaluate reported encoded library-derived structures and identify general trends of these compounds in relation to library design parameters. We in particular emphasize the combinatorial nature of these libraries. Generally, the reported molecules demonstrate the ability of this technology to afford hits suitable for further lead development, and on the basis of them, we derive guidelines for DECL design.

  1. A multifunctional rotary photoelectric encoder management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin

    2005-11-01

    The rotary photoelectric encoder can be used in many fields, such as robot research, fruit assembly lines, and so on. If there have many photoelectric encoders in one system, it's difficult to manage them and acquire the right pulse number. So it's important to design a multifunctional management system. It includes a powerful microchip with high processing speed, assuring the acquisition precision of rotary pulse. It uses a special method to judge the rotary direction and will be competent for many occasions which rotary direction changes quickly. Considering encoder data transmission, the management system provides a serial port using RS-485 protocol to transmit current pulse data and rotary direction. It allows linking a maximum of 100 management systems using only two communication lines to up-systems and also configing the encoder counting pattern locally (using the keyboard) or remotely (through the computer).

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  3. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  4. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  5. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  6. Inhibitory activity for the interferon-induced protein kinase is associated with the reovirus serotype 1 sigma 3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imani, F; Jacobs, B L

    1988-01-01

    In this report we demonstrate that reovirus serotype 1-infected cells contain an inhibitor of the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase. We provide evidence that suggests that the virus-encoded sigma 3 protein is likely responsible for this kinase inhibitory activity. We could not detect activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated reovirus serotype 1-infected mouse L cells under conditions that led to activation of the kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated, uninfected cells. Extracts from reovirus-infected cells blocked activation of kinase in extracts from interferon-treated cells when the two were mixed prior to assay. The kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of reovirus-infected cells could be overcome by adding approximately 100-fold excess of dsRNA over the amount required to activate kinase in extracts of uninfected cells. Kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of interferon-treated, virus-infected cells could be overcome with somewhat less dsRNA (approximately 10-fold excess). Most of the inhibitory activity in the extracts could be removed by adsorption with immobilized anti-reovirus sigma 3 serum or immobilized dsRNA, suggesting that the dsRNA-binding sigma 3 protein is necessary for kinase inhibitory activity. Purified sigma 3 protein, when added to reaction mixtures containing partially purified kinase, inhibited enzyme activation. Control of activation of this kinase, which can modify eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 2, may be relevant to the sensitivity of reovirus replication to treatment of cells with interferon and to the shutoff of host protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2460857

  7. Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4: structure, function, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Naz, Farha; Anjum, Farah; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2013-11-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) causing their detachment from the microtubules thereby increasing microtubule dynamics and facilitating cell division, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, etc. The MARK4 gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms, L and S that differ in their C-terminal region. These isoforms are differentially regulated in human tissues including central nervous system. MARK4L is a 752-residue-long polypeptide that is divided into three distinct domains: (1) protein kinase domain (59-314), (2) ubiquitin-associated domain (322-369), and (3) kinase-associated domain (703-752) plus 54 residues (649-703) involved in the proper folding and function of the enzyme. In addition, residues 65-73 are considered to be the ATP-binding domain and Lys88 is considered as ATP-binding site. Asp181 has been proposed to be the active site of MARK4 that is activated by phosphorylation of Thr214 side chain. The isoform MARK4S is highly expressed in the normal brain and is presumably involved in neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, the isoform MARK4L is upregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells and gliomas suggesting its involvement in cell cycle. Several biological functions are also associated with MARK4 including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, and positive regulation of programmed cell death. Therefore, MARK4 is considered as the most suitable target for structure-based rational drug design. Our sequence, structure- and function-based analysis should be helpful for better understanding of mechanisms of regulation of microtubule dynamics and MARK4 associated diseases.

  8. Navigating and Mining modENCODE Data

    PubMed Central

    Boley, Nathan; Wan, Kenneth H.; Bickel, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    modENCODE was a 5 yr NHGRI funded project (2007– 2012) to map the function of every base in the genomes of worms and flies characterizing positions of modified histones and other chromatin marks, origins of DNA replication, RNA transcripts and the transcription factor binding sites that control gene expression. Here we describe the Drosophila modENCODE datasets and how best to access and use them for genome wide and individual gene studies. PMID:24636835

  9. A Manual for Encoding Probability Distributions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    summary of the most significant information contained in the report. If the report contains a significant bibliography or literature survey, mention it...probability distri- bution. Some terms in the literature that are used synonymously to Encoding: Assessment, Assignment (used for single events in this...sessions conducted as parts of practical decision analyses as well as on experimental evidence in the literature . Probability encoding can be applied

  10. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  11. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  12. Clustering of polarization-encoded images.

    PubMed

    Zallat, Jihad; Collet, Christophe; Takakura, Yoshitate

    2004-01-10

    Polarization-encoded imaging consists of the distributed measurements of polarization parameters for each pixel of an image. We address clustering of multidimensional polarization-encoded images. The spatial coherence of polarization information is considered. Two methods of analysis are proposed: polarization contrast enhancement and a more-sophisticated image-processing algorithm based on a Markovian model. The proposed algorithms are applied and validated with two different Mueller images acquired by a fully polarimetric imaging system.

  13. Probing activation/deactivation of the BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 receptor kinase by immunoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Sara; Vert, Grégory; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    Summary Brassinosteroids are plant sterol-derived hormones that control plant growth and development. The BR receptor complex is encoded by the BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and members of the SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE family. BR receptor complex activation and deactivation uses different post-translational modifications and recruitment of partner proteins. In this chapter, we describe optimized immunoprecipitation protocols and variants for biochemical analyses of BRI1 post-translational modification and protein-protein interaction. PMID:28124254

  14. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M.; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Ache, Barry W.; Principe, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal’s ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments—a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  15. Giardia lamblia Nek1 and Nek2 kinases affect mitosis and excystation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alias J; Lauwaet, Tineke; Davids, Barbara J; Gillin, Frances D

    2012-04-01

    The NIMA-related serine/threonine kinases (Neks) function in the cell cycle and regulate ciliary and flagellar length. The Giardia lamblia genome encodes 198 Neks, of which 56 are predicted to be active. Here we believe that we report the first functional analysis of two G. lamblia Neks. The GlNek1 and GlNek2 kinase domains share 57% and 43% identity to the kinase domains of human Nek1 and Nek2, respectively. Both GlNeks are active in vitro, have dynamic relocalisation during the cell cycle, and are expressed throughout the life cycle, with GlNek1 being upregulated in cysts. Over-expression of inactive GlNek1 delays disassembly of the parental attachment disc and cytokinesis, whilst over-expression of either wild type GlNek1 or inactive mutant GlNek2 inhibits excystation.

  16. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    González-Vera, Juan A.; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes. PMID:28248276

  17. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  18. MAPK feedback encodes a switch and timer for tunable stress adaptation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    English, Justin G.; Shellhammer, James P.; Malahe, Michael; McCarter, Patrick C.; Elston, Timothy C.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways can behave as switches or rheostats, generating binary or graded responses to a given cell stimulus. We evaluated whether a single signaling pathway can simultaneously encode a switch and a rheostat. We found that the kinase Hog1 mediated a bifurcated cellular response: Activation and commitment to adaptation to osmotic stress are switch-like, whereas protein induction and the resolution of this commitment are graded. Through experimentation, bioinformatics analysis, and computational modeling, we determined that graded recovery is encoded through feedback phosphorylation and a gene induction program that is both temporally staggered and variable across the population. This switch-to-rheostat signaling mechanism represents a versatile stress adaptation system, wherein a broad range of inputs generate an “all-in” response that is later tuned to allow graded recovery of individual cells over time. PMID:25587192

  19. Crystal structure of poxvirus thymidylate kinase: An unexpected dimerization has implications for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caillat, Christophe; Topalis, Dimitri; Agrofoglio, Luigi A.; Pochet, Sylvie; Balzarini, Jan; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Unlike most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate in the cytoplasm of host cells. They encode enzymes needed for genome replication and transcription, including their own thymidine and thymidylate kinases. Some herpes viruses encode only 1 enzyme catalyzing both reactions, a peculiarity used for prodrug activation to obtain maximum specificity. We have solved the crystal structures of vaccinia virus thymidylate kinase bound to TDP or brivudin monophosphate. Although the viral and human enzymes have similar sequences (42% identity), they differ in their homodimeric association and active-site geometry. The vaccinia TMP kinase dimer arrangement is orthogonal and not antiparallel as in human enzyme. This different monomer orientation is related to the presence of a canal connecting the edge of the dimer interface to the TMP base binding pocket. Consequently, the pox enzyme accommodates nucleotides with bulkier bases, like brivudin monophosphate and dGMP; these are efficiently phosphorylated and stabilize the enzyme. The brivudin monophosphate-bound structure explains the structural basis for this specificity, opening the way to the rational development of specific antipox agents that may also be suitable for poxvirus TMP kinase gene-based chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:18971333

  20. Crystal structure of poxvirus thymidylate kinase: an unexpected dimerization has implications for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Caillat, Christophe; Topalis, Dimitri; Agrofoglio, Luigi A; Pochet, Sylvie; Balzarini, Jan; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Meyer, Philippe

    2008-11-04

    Unlike most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate in the cytoplasm of host cells. They encode enzymes needed for genome replication and transcription, including their own thymidine and thymidylate kinases. Some herpes viruses encode only 1 enzyme catalyzing both reactions, a peculiarity used for prodrug activation to obtain maximum specificity. We have solved the crystal structures of vaccinia virus thymidylate kinase bound to TDP or brivudin monophosphate. Although the viral and human enzymes have similar sequences (42% identity), they differ in their homodimeric association and active-site geometry. The vaccinia TMP kinase dimer arrangement is orthogonal and not antiparallel as in human enzyme. This different monomer orientation is related to the presence of a canal connecting the edge of the dimer interface to the TMP base binding pocket. Consequently, the pox enzyme accommodates nucleotides with bulkier bases, like brivudin monophosphate and dGMP; these are efficiently phosphorylated and stabilize the enzyme. The brivudin monophosphate-bound structure explains the structural basis for this specificity, opening the way to the rational development of specific antipox agents that may also be suitable for poxvirus TMP kinase gene-based chemotherapy of cancer.

  1. Dictyostelium discoideum has a single diacylglycerol kinase gene with similarity to mammalian theta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    De La Roche, Marc A; Smith, Janet L; Rico, Maribel; Carrasco, Silvia; Merida, Isabel; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the neutral lipid diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). In mammalian systems DGKs are a complex family of at least nine isoforms that are thought to participate in down-regulation of DG-based signalling pathways and perhaps activation of PA-stimulated signalling events. We report here that the simple protozoan amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum appears to contain a single gene encoding a DGK enzyme. This gene, dgkA, encodes a deduced protein that contains three C1-type cysteine-rich repeats, a DGK catalytic domain most closely related to the theta subtype of mammalian DGKs and a C-terminal segment containing a proline/glutamine-rich region and a large aspargine-repeat region. This gene corresponds to a previously reported myosin II heavy chain kinase designated myosin heavy chain-protein kinase C (MHC-PKC), but our analysis clearly demonstrates that this protein does not, as suggested by earlier data, contain a protein kinase catalytic domain. A FLAG-tagged version of DgkA expressed in Dictyostelium displayed robust DGK activity. Earlier studies indicating that disruption of this locus alters myosin II assembly levels in Dictyostelium raise the intriguing possibility that DG and/or PA metabolism may play a role in controlling myosin II assembly in this system. PMID:12296770

  2. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  3. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  4. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  5. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations. PMID:26795484

  6. Characterization of Genes Encoding for Acquired Bacitracin Resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jalbert, Louis-Alexandre; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Archambault, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC90 (>256 µg/ml) was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml) than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml). Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml) and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens. PMID:22970221

  7. ERP Correlates of Encoding Success and Encoding Selectivity in Attention Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Long-term memory encoding depends critically on effective processing of incoming information. The degree to which participants engage in effective encoding can be indexed in electroencephalographic (EEG) data by studying event-related potential (ERP) subsequent memory effects. The current study investigated ERP correlates of memory success operationalised with two different measures—memory selectivity and global memory—to assess whether previously observed ERP subsequent memory effects reflect focused encoding of task-relevant information (memory selectivity), general encoding success (global memory), or both. Building on previous work, the present study combined an attention switching paradigm—in which participants were presented with compound object-word stimuli and switched between attending to the object or the word across trials—with a later recognition memory test for those stimuli, while recording their EEG. Our results provided clear evidence that subsequent memory effects resulted from selective attentional focusing and effective top-down control (memory selectivity) in contrast to more general encoding success effects (global memory). Further analyses addressed the question of whether successful encoding depended on similar control mechanisms to those involved in attention switching. Interestingly, differences in the ERP correlates of attention switching and successful encoding, particularly during the poststimulus period, indicated that variability in encoding success occurred independently of prestimulus demands for top-down cognitive control. These results suggest that while effects of selective attention and selective encoding co-occur behaviourally their ERP correlates are at least partly dissociable. PMID:27907075

  8. ERP Correlates of Encoding Success and Encoding Selectivity in Attention Switching.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska R; Yeung, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Long-term memory encoding depends critically on effective processing of incoming information. The degree to which participants engage in effective encoding can be indexed in electroencephalographic (EEG) data by studying event-related potential (ERP) subsequent memory effects. The current study investigated ERP correlates of memory success operationalised with two different measures-memory selectivity and global memory-to assess whether previously observed ERP subsequent memory effects reflect focused encoding of task-relevant information (memory selectivity), general encoding success (global memory), or both. Building on previous work, the present study combined an attention switching paradigm-in which participants were presented with compound object-word stimuli and switched between attending to the object or the word across trials-with a later recognition memory test for those stimuli, while recording their EEG. Our results provided clear evidence that subsequent memory effects resulted from selective attentional focusing and effective top-down control (memory selectivity) in contrast to more general encoding success effects (global memory). Further analyses addressed the question of whether successful encoding depended on similar control mechanisms to those involved in attention switching. Interestingly, differences in the ERP correlates of attention switching and successful encoding, particularly during the poststimulus period, indicated that variability in encoding success occurred independently of prestimulus demands for top-down cognitive control. These results suggest that while effects of selective attention and selective encoding co-occur behaviourally their ERP correlates are at least partly dissociable.

  9. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  10. Aurora kinases: novel therapy targets in cancers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anqun; Gao, Keyu; Chu, Laili; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Junnian

    2017-01-29

    Aurora kinases, a family of serine/threonine kinases, consisting of Aurora A (AURKA), Aurora B (AURKB) and Aurora C (AURKC), are essential kinases for cell division via regulating mitosis especially the process of chromosomal segregation. Besides regulating mitosis, Aurora kinases have been implicated in regulating meiosis. The deletion of Aurora kinases could lead to failure of cell division and impair the embryonic development. Overexpression or gene amplification of Aurora kinases has been clarified in a number of cancers. And a growing number of studies have demonstrated that inhibition of Aurora kinases could potentiate the effect of chemotherapies. For the past decades, a series of Aurora kinases inhibitors (AKIs) developed effectively repress the progression and growth of many cancers both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Aurora kinases could be a novel therapeutic target. In this review, we'll first briefly present the structure, localization and physiological functions of Aurora kinases in mitosis, then describe the oncogenic role of Aurora kinases in tumorigenesis, we shall finally discuss the outcomes of AKIs combination with conventional therapy.

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  12. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. The ENCODE Project at UC Santa Cruz.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daryl J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Clawson, Hiram; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Raney, Brian J; Karolchik, Donna; Barber, Galt P; Harte, Rachel A; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Kuhn, Robert M; Rhead, Brooke L; Smith, Kayla E; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to identify all functional elements in the human genome. The pilot phase is for comparison of existing methods and for the development of new methods to rigorously analyze a defined 1% of the human genome sequence. Experimental datasets are focused on the origin of replication, DNase I hypersensitivity, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter function, gene structure, pseudogenes, non-protein-coding RNAs, transcribed RNAs, multiple sequence alignment and evolutionarily constrained elements. The ENCODE project at UCSC website (http://genome.ucsc.edu/ENCODE) is the primary portal for the sequence-based data produced as part of the ENCODE project. In the pilot phase of the project, over 30 labs provided experimental results for a total of 56 browser tracks supported by 385 database tables. The site provides researchers with a number of tools that allow them to visualize and analyze the data as well as download data for local analyses. This paper describes the portal to the data, highlights the data that has been made available, and presents the tools that have been developed within the ENCODE project. Access to the data and types of interactive analysis that are possible are illustrated through supplemental examples.

  14. Biochemical and functional analysis of CTR1, a protein kinase that negatively regulates ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yafan; Li, Hui; Hutchison, Claire E.; Laskey, James; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2003-01-01

    CTR1 encodes a negative regulator of the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. The C-terminal domain of CTR1 is similar to the Raf family of protein kinases, but its first two-thirds encodes a novel protein domain. We used a variety of approaches to investigate the function of these two CTR1 domains. Recombinant CTR1 protein was purified from a baculoviral expression system, and shown to possess intrinsic Ser/Thr protein kinase activity with enzymatic properties similar to Raf-1. Deletion of the N-terminal domain did not elevate the kinase activity of CTR1, indicating that, at least in vitro, this domain does not autoinhibit kinase function. Molecular analysis of loss-of-function ctr1 alleles indicated that several mutations disrupt the kinase catalytic domain, and in vitro studies confirmed that at least one of these eliminates kinase activity, which indicates that kinase activity is required for CTR1 function. One missense mutation, ctr1-8, was found to result from an amino acid substitution within a new conserved motif within the N-terminal domain. Ctr1-8 has no detectable effect on the kinase activity of CTR1 in vitro, but rather disrupts the interaction with the ethylene receptor ETR1. This mutation also disrupts the dominant negative effect that results from overexpression of the CTR1 amino-terminal domain in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that CTR1 interacts with ETR1 in vivo, and that this association is required to turn off the ethylene-signaling pathway.

  15. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  16. Global negative regulation of Streptomyces coelicolor antibiotic synthesis mediated by an absA-encoded putative signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, P; Riggle, P J; Santos, R A; Champness, W C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomycete antibiotic synthesis is coupled to morphological differentiation such that antibiotics are produced as a colony sporulates. Streptomyces coelicolor produces several structurally and genetically distinct antibiotics. The S. coelicolor absA locus was defined by four UV-induced mutations that globally blocked antibiotic biosynthesis without blocking morphological differentiation. We show that the absA locus encodes a putative eubacterial two-component sensor kinase-response regulator system. All four mutations lie within a single open reading frame, designated absA1, which is predicted to encode a sensor histidine kinase. A second gene downstream of absA1, absA2, is predicted to encode the cognate response regulator. In marked contrast to the antibiotic-deficient phenotype of the previously described absA mutants, the phenotype caused by disruption mutations in the absA locus is precocious hyperproduction of the antibiotics actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. Precocious hyperproduction of these antibiotics is correlated with premature expression of XylE activity in a transcriptional fusion to an actinorhodin biosynthetic gene. We propose that the absA locus encodes a signal transduction mechanism that negatively regulates synthesis of the multiple antibiotics produced by S. coelicolor. PMID:8655502

  17. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  18. Noise level and MPEG-2 encoder statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo

    1997-01-01

    Most software in the movie and broadcasting industries are still in analog film or tape format, which typically contains random noise that originated from film, CCD camera, and tape recording. The performance of the MPEG-2 encoder may be significantly degraded by the noise. It is also affected by the scene type that includes spatial and temporal activity. The statistical property of noise originating from camera and tape player is analyzed and the models for the two types of noise are developed. The relationship between the noise, the scene type, and encoder statistics of a number of MPEG-2 parameters such as motion vector magnitude, prediction error, and quant scale are discussed. This analysis is intended to be a tool for designing robust MPEG encoding algorithms such as preprocessing and rate control.

  19. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  20. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  1. Pim-1 ligand-bound structures reveal the mechanism of serine/threonine kinase inhibition by LY294002.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Marc D; Black, James; Futer, Olga; Swenson, Lora; Hare, Brian; Fleming, Mark; Saxena, Kumkum

    2005-04-08

    Pim-1 is an oncogene-encoded serine/threonine kinase primarily expressed in hematopoietic and germ cell lines. Pim-1 kinase was originally identified in Maloney murine leukemia virus-induced T-cell lymphomas and is associated with multiple cellular functions such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis (Wang, Z., Bhattacharya, N., Weaver, M., Petersen, K., Meyer, M., Gapter, L., and Magnuson, N. S. (2001) J. Vet. Sci. 2, 167-179). The crystal structures of Pim-1 complexed with staurosporine and adenosine were determined. Although a typical two-domain serine/threonine protein kinase fold is observed, the inter-domain hinge region is unusual in both sequence and conformation; a two-residue insertion causes the hinge to bulge away from the ATP-binding pocket, and a proline residue in the hinge removes a conserved main chain hydrogen bond donor. Without this hydrogen bond, van der Waals interactions with the hinge serve to position the ligand. The hinge region of Pim-1 resembles that of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase more closely than it does other protein kinases. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 also inhibits Pim-1, the structure of the LY294002.Pim-1 complex reveals a new binding mode that may be general for Ser/Thr kinases.

  2. Vector Adaptive/Predictive Encoding Of Speech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Juin-Hwey; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Vector adaptive/predictive technique for digital encoding of speech signals yields decoded speech of very good quality after transmission at coding rate of 9.6 kb/s and of reasonably good quality at 4.8 kb/s. Requires 3 to 4 million multiplications and additions per second. Combines advantages of adaptive/predictive coding, and code-excited linear prediction, yielding speech of high quality but requires 600 million multiplications and additions per second at encoding rate of 4.8 kb/s. Vector adaptive/predictive coding technique bridges gaps in performance and complexity between adaptive/predictive coding and code-excited linear prediction.

  3. Aurora kinase inhibitors as anticancer molecules.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed at detectable levels in all somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases leads to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Preclinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed.

  4. Aurora Kinase inhibitors as Anticancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed in detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases lead to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Pre-clinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed. PMID:20863917

  5. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  6. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies on the catalytic region of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Fes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnemmi, Ilaria; Scotti, Claudia; Cappelletti, Donata; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Condorelli, Fabrizio; Rosano, Camillo

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic domain of human Fes tyrosine kinase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase c-fps/fes encodes a structurally unique protein (Fes) of the nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) family. Its expression has been demonstrated in myeloid haematopoietic cells, vascular endothelial cells and in neurons. In human-derived and murine-derived cell lines, the activated form of this kinase can induce cellular transformation; moreover, it has been shown that Fes is involved in the regulation of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions mediated by adherens junctions and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of Fes contains the FCH (Fps/Fes/Fer/CIP4 homology) domain, which is unique to the Fes/Fer kinase family. It is followed by three coiled-coil domains and an SH2 (Src-homology 2) domain. The catalytic region (Fes-CR) is located at the C-terminus of the protein. The successful expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic part of Fes (Fes-CR) are described.

  7. Mumps Virus Nucleoprotein Enhances Phosphorylation of the Phosphoprotein by Polo-Like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Zengel, James; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (vRdRps) of nonsegmented, negative-sense viruses (NNSVs) consist of the enzymatic large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). P is heavily phosphorylated, and its phosphorylation plays a critical role in viral RNA synthesis. Since NNSVs do not encode kinases, P is phosphorylated by host kinases. In this study, we investigate the roles that viral proteins play in the phosphorylation of mumps virus (MuV) P. We found that nucleoprotein (NP) enhances the phosphorylation of P. We have identified the serine/threonine kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a host kinase that phosphorylates P and have found that phosphorylation of P by PLK1 is enhanced by NP. The PLK1 binding site in MuV P was mapped to residues 146 to 148 within the S(pS/T)P motif, and the phosphorylation site was identified as residues S292 and S294. IMPORTANCE It has previously been shown that P acts as a chaperone for NP, which encapsidates viral genomic RNA to form the NP-RNA complex, the functional template for viral RNA synthesis. Thus, it is assumed that phosphorylation of P may regulate NP's ability to form the NP-RNA complex, thereby regulating viral RNA synthesis. Our work demonstrates that MuV NP affects phosphorylation of P, suggesting that NP can regulate viral RNA synthesis by regulating phosphorylation of P. PMID:26608325

  8. A transforming mutation enhances the activity of the c-Kit soluble tyrosine kinase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L P; Chow, R Y; Berger, S A

    1999-01-01

    An activating mutation (DY814) located in the catalytic domain of the c-Kit receptor has been found in mastocytomas from human, mouse and rat. We evaluated the enzymic properties of purified wild-type (WT) and DY814 tyrosine kinase domains expressed in Pichia pastoris. A linker encoding the Flag epitope was fused to c-Kit cDNA species, enabling affinity purification of the proteins with anti-Flag antibodies. Yeast lysates expressing DY814 contained multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, whereas WT lysates had no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. Purification of the WT and mutant kinases in the presence of vanadate demonstrated that both enzymes undergo autophosphorylation. Kinetic analyses of WT and DY814 kinases indicated that at 20 nM enzyme concentration the mutation increases the specific activity 10-fold and decreases the apparent Km for ATP 9-fold. WT activity displayed a hyperbolic dependence on enzyme concentration, consistent with a requirement for dimerization or aggregation for activity. This activity was also enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. In contrast, the dependence of DY814 activity on enzyme concentration was primarily linear and only marginally enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. Gel-filtration analysis showed that the WT kinase migrated as a monomer, whereas the DY814 mutant migrated as a dimer. These results indicate that this point mutation promotes dimerization of the c-Kit kinase, potentially contributing to its transforming potential in mast cells. PMID:9931308

  9. Differentially expressed epigenome modifiers, including Aurora kinase A and B, in immune cells of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glant, Tibor T.; Besenyei, Timea; Kádár, András; Kurkó, Júlia; Tryniszewska, Beata; Gál, János; Soós, Györgyi; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Hoffmann, Gyula; Block, Joel A.; Katz, Robert S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Rauch, Tibor A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify epigenetic factors that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to explore the therapeutic potential of the targeted inhibition of these factors. Methods PCR arrays were utilized to investigate the expression profile of genes that encod key epigenetic regulator enzymes. Mononuclear cells from RA patients and mice were monitored for gene expression changes, in association with arthritis development in murine models of RA. Selected genes were further characterized by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot and flow cytometry methods. The targeted inhibition of the upregulated enzymes was studied in arthritic mice. Results A set of genes with arthritis-specific expression was identified by the PCR arrays. Aurora kinase A and B, both of which were highly expressed in arthritic mice and treatment naïve RA patients, were selected for detailed analysis. Elevated Aurora kinase expression was accompanied with an increased phosphorylation of histone H3, which promotes proliferation of T lymphocytes. Treatment with VX-680, a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor, promoted B cell apoptosis, provided significant protection against the onset, and attenuated the inflammatory reactions in arthritic mice. Conclusions Arthritis development is accompanied the changes in the expression of a number of epigenome-modifying enzymes. Drug-induced downregulation of the Aurora kinases, among other targets, seems to be sufficient to treat experimental arthritis. Development of new therapeutics that target the Aurora kinases can potentially improve RA management. PMID:23653330

  10. A murine fer testis-specific transcript (ferT) encodes a truncated Fer protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fischman, K; Edman, J C; Shackleford, G M; Turner, J A; Rutter, W J; Nir, U

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA for a potential tyrosine kinase-encoding mRNA was isolated from a mouse testis cDNA library. In a survey of eight mouse tissues, a transcript of 2.4 kilobases restricted to testis tissue was found. The mRNA encodes a 453-amino-acid protein of 51,383 daltons, the smallest tyrosine kinase protein ever described. RNA synthesized from the cDNA template directs the synthesis of a 51,000-Mr protein in a cell-free translation system. The carboxy-terminal 409 amino acids are 98 and 90% identical to the carboxy halves of the rat and human Fer proteins, respectively. This suggests that the cDNA represents an alternatively spliced testis-specific fer mRNA and is therefore termed by us ferT. On the basis of the appearance time of the fer mRNA in the testis of maturing neonatal mice, we speculate on the role played by this protein in the development of this organ. Images PMID:2294399

  11. Parallel encoding of sensory history and behavioral preference during Caenorhabditis elegans olfactory learning

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Christine E; Brueggemann, Chantal; L'Etoile, Noelle D; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-01-01

    Sensory experience modifies behavior through both associative and non-associative learning. In Caenorhabditis elegans, pairing odor with food deprivation results in aversive olfactory learning, and pairing odor with food results in appetitive learning. Aversive learning requires nuclear translocation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase EGL-4 in AWC olfactory neurons and an insulin signal from AIA interneurons. Here we show that the activity of neurons including AIA is acutely required during aversive, but not appetitive, learning. The AIA circuit and AGE-1, an insulin-regulated PI3 kinase, signal to AWC to drive nuclear enrichment of EGL-4 during conditioning. Odor exposure shifts the AWC dynamic range to higher odor concentrations regardless of food pairing or the AIA circuit, whereas AWC coupling to motor circuits is oppositely regulated by aversive and appetitive learning. These results suggest that non-associative sensory adaptation in AWC encodes odor history, while associative behavioral preference is encoded by altered AWC synaptic activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14000.001 PMID:27383131

  12. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  13. Large-Scale Analysis of Kinase Signaling in Yeast Pseudohyphal Development Identifies Regulation of Ribonucleoprotein Granules.

    PubMed

    Shively, Christian A; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Norman, Kaitlyn L; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Xu, Tao; Sheidy, Daniel T; Dobry, Craig J; Sabath, Ivan; Cosky, Eric E P; Tran, Elizabeth J; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2015-10-01

    Yeast pseudohyphal filamentation is a stress-responsive growth transition relevant to processes required for virulence in pathogenic fungi. Pseudohyphal growth is controlled through a regulatory network encompassing conserved MAPK (Ste20p, Ste11p, Ste7p, Kss1p, and Fus3p), protein kinase A (Tpk2p), Elm1p, and Snf1p kinase pathways; however, the scope of these pathways is not fully understood. Here, we implemented quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify each of these signaling networks, generating a kinase-dead mutant in filamentous S. cerevisiae and surveying for differential phosphorylation. By this approach, we identified 439 phosphoproteins dependent upon pseudohyphal growth kinases. We report novel phosphorylation sites in 543 peptides, including phosphorylated residues in Ras2p and Flo8p required for wild-type filamentous growth. Phosphoproteins in these kinase signaling networks were enriched for ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components, and we observe co-localization of Kss1p, Fus3p, Ste20p, and Tpk2p with the RNP component Igo1p. These kinases localize in puncta with GFP-visualized mRNA, and KSS1 is required for wild-type levels of mRNA localization in RNPs. Kss1p pathway activity is reduced in lsm1Δ/Δ and pat1Δ/Δ strains, and these genes encoding P-body proteins are epistatic to STE7. The P-body protein Dhh1p is also required for hyphal development in Candida albicans. Collectively, this study presents a wealth of data identifying the yeast phosphoproteome in pseudohyphal growth and regulatory interrelationships between pseudohyphal growth kinases and RNPs.

  14. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  15. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  16. Retrieval during Learning Facilitates Subsequent Memory Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastotter, Bernhard; Schicker, Sabine; Niedernhuber, Julia; Bauml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2011-01-01

    In multiple-list learning, retrieval during learning has been suggested to improve recall of the single lists by enhancing list discrimination and, at test, reducing interference. Using electrophysiological, oscillatory measures of brain activity, we examined to what extent retrieval during learning facilitates list encoding. Subjects studied 5…

  17. Encoding and Retrieval During Bimanual Rhythmic Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley, Kevin; Turvey, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2 experiments, bimanual 1:1 rhythmic coordination was performed concurrently with encoding or retrieval of word lists. Effects of divided attention (DA) on coordination were indexed by changes in mean relative phase and recurrence measures of shared activity between the 2 limbs. Effects of DA on memory were indexed by deficits in recall…

  18. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  19. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  20. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  1. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  2. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  3. Design Primer for Reed-Solomon Encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.; Lee, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Design and operation of Reed-Solomon (RS) encoders discussed in document prepared as instruction manual for computer designers and others in dataprocessing field. Conventional and Berlekamp architectures compared. Engineers who equip computer memory chips with burst-error and dropout detection and correction find report especially useful.

  4. Matrix Encoding For Correction Of Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Ronald S.

    1991-01-01

    Method of matrix encoding and associated decoding provides for correction of errors in digital data recorded on magnetic tape. Intended specifically for use with commercial control circuit board and associated software making it possible to use video cassette recorder as backup for hard-disk memory of personal computer.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Chromosome-Encoded Microcins

    PubMed Central

    Poey, María Eloisa; Azpiroz, María F.; Laviña, Magela

    2006-01-01

    Microcins are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics that are produced by enterobacterial strains. Although the first studies concentrated on plasmid-encoded activities, in the last years three chromosome-encoded microcins have been described: H47, E492, and M. Here, a new microcin, I47, is presented as a fourth member of this group. Common features exhibited by chromosome-encoded microcins were searched for. The comparison of the genetic clusters responsible for microcin production revealed a preserved general scheme. The clusters essentially comprise a pair of activity-immunity genes which determine antibiotic specificity and a set of microcin maturation and secretion genes which are invariably present and whose protein products are highly homologous among the different producing strains. A strict functional relationship between the maturation and secretion pathways of microcins H47, I47, and E492 was demonstrated through genetic analyses, which included heterologous complementation assays. The peptide precursors of these microcins share a maturation process which implies the addition of a catecholate siderophore of the salmochelin type. Microcins thus acquire the ability to enter gram-negative cells through the catechol receptors. In addition, they employ a common mode of secretion to reach the external milieu by means of a type I export apparatus. The results presented herein lead us to propose that chromosome-encoded microcins constitute a defined subgroup of peptide antibiotics which are strictly related by their modes of synthesis, secretion, and uptake. PMID:16569859

  6. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Noga; Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Lerner, Yulia; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ash, Elissa L.

    2016-01-01

    When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, and is evident in regions such as the prefrontal cortex section of the task positive network (TPN), and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a hub of the default mode network (DMN). Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC) levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC). These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the latter increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the prefrontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the prefrontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed relationship between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points

  7. JPEG 2000 Encoding with Perceptual Distortion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Liu, Zhen; Karam, Lina J.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach has been devised for encoding image data in compliance with JPEG 2000, the most recent still-image data-compression standard of the Joint Photographic Experts Group. Heretofore, JPEG 2000 encoding has been implemented by several related schemes classified as rate-based distortion-minimization encoding. In each of these schemes, the end user specifies a desired bit rate and the encoding algorithm strives to attain that rate while minimizing a mean squared error (MSE). While rate-based distortion minimization is appropriate for transmitting data over a limited-bandwidth channel, it is not the best approach for applications in which the perceptual quality of reconstructed images is a major consideration. A better approach for such applications is the present alternative one, denoted perceptual distortion control, in which the encoding algorithm strives to compress data to the lowest bit rate that yields at least a specified level of perceptual image quality. Some additional background information on JPEG 2000 is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of JPEG encoding with perceptual distortion control. The JPEG 2000 encoding process includes two subprocesses known as tier-1 and tier-2 coding. In order to minimize the MSE for the desired bit rate, a rate-distortion- optimization subprocess is introduced between the tier-1 and tier-2 subprocesses. In tier-1 coding, each coding block is independently bit-plane coded from the most-significant-bit (MSB) plane to the least-significant-bit (LSB) plane, using three coding passes (except for the MSB plane, which is coded using only one "clean up" coding pass). For M bit planes, this subprocess involves a total number of (3M - 2) coding passes. An embedded bit stream is then generated for each coding block. Information on the reduction in distortion and the increase in the bit rate associated with each coding pass is collected. This information is then used in a rate-control procedure to determine the

  8. Encoding Orientation and the Remembering of Schizophrenic Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Soon D.; Peterson, Rolf A.

    1978-01-01

    This research examines different types of encoding strategies, in addition to semantic and organizational encodings, and their effects on schizophrenics' remembering. Based on Craik and Lockhart (1972), i.e., memory performance is a function of depth of encoding processing, this analysis compares schizophrenics' encoding processing with that of…

  9. Helicobacter pylori cell translocating kinase (CtkA/JHP0940) is pro-apoptotic in mouse macrophages and acts as auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Tenguria, Shivendra; Ansari, Suhail A; Khan, Nooruddin; Ranjan, Amit; Devi, Savita; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Lind, Judith; Backert, Steffen; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2014-11-01

    The Helicobacter pylori gene JHP0940 has been shown to encode a serine/threonine kinase which can induce cytokines in gastric epithelial cells relevant to chronic gastric inflammation. Here we demonstrate that JHP0940 can be secreted by the bacteria, triggers apoptosis in cultured mouse macrophages and acts as an auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase. Recombinant JHP0940 protein was found to decrease the viability of RAW264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line) up to 55% within 24h of co-incubation. The decreased cellular viability was due to apoptosis, which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and Fas expression analysis by flow-cytometry. Further, we found that caspase-1 and IL-1beta were activated upon treatment with JHP0940. These results point towards possible action through the host inflammasome. Our in vitro studies using tyrosine kinase assays further demonstrated that JHP0940 acts as auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinase and induces pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 cells. Upon exposure with JHP0940, these cells secreted IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as detected by ELISA and transcript profiling by q-RT-PCR. The pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and other regulatory responses triggered by JHP0940 lead to the assumption of its possible role in inducing chronic inflammation for enhanced bacterial persistence and escape from host innate immune responses by apoptosis of macrophages.

  10. Amygdala neurons differentially encode motivation and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tye, Kay M; Janak, Patricia H

    2007-04-11

    Lesion studies demonstrate that the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) is important for assigning motivational significance to sensory stimuli, but little is known about how this information is encoded. We used in vivo electrophysiology procedures to investigate how the amygdala encodes motivating and reinforcing properties of cues that induce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. Two groups of rats were trained to respond to a sucrose reward. The "paired" group was trained with a reward-predictive cue, whereas the "unpaired" group was trained with a randomly presented cue. Both groups underwent identical extinction and reinstatement procedures during which the reward was withheld. The proportion of neurons that were phasically cue responsive during reinstatement was significantly higher in the paired group (46 of 100) than in the unpaired group (8 of 112). Cues that induce reward-seeking behavior can do so by acting as incentives or reinforcers. Distinct populations of neurons responded to the cue in trials in which the cue acted as an incentive, triggering a motivated reward-seeking state, or as a reinforcer, supporting continued instrumental responding. The incentive motivation-encoding population of neurons (34 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 74%) extinguished in temporal agreement with a decrease in the rate of instrumental responding. The conditioned reinforcement-encoding population of neurons (12 of 46 cue-responsive neurons; 26%) maintained their response for the duration of cue-reinforced instrumental responding. These data demonstrate that separate populations of cue-responsive neurons in the BLA encode the motivating or reinforcing properties of a cue previously associated with a reward.

  11. Spatial gradients in kinase cascade regulation.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, B; Lipniacki, T

    2010-11-01

    The spatiotemporal kinetics of proteins and other substrates regulate cell fate and signaling. In this study, we consider a reaction-diffusion model of interaction of membrane receptors with a two-step kinase cascade. The receptors activate the 'up-stream' kinase, which may diffuse over cell volume and activate the 'down-stream' kinase, which is also diffusing. Both kinase species and receptors are inactivated by uniformly distributed phosphatases. The positive feedback, key to the considered dynamics, arises since the up-stream kinase activates the receptors. Such a mutual interaction is characteristic for immune cell receptors. Based on the proposed model, we demonstrated that cell sensitivity (measured as a critical value of phosphatase activity at which cell maybe activated) increases with decreasing motility of receptor-interacting kinases and with increasing polarity of receptors distribution. These two effects are cooperating, the effect of receptors localisation close to one pole of the cell grows with the decreasing kinase diffusion and vanishes in the infinite diffusion limit. As the cell sensitivity increases with decreasing diffusion of receptor-interacting kinase, the overall activity of the down-stream kinase increases with its diffusion. In conclusion, the analysis of the proposed model shows that, for the fixed substrate interaction rates, spatial distribution of the surface receptors together with the motility of intracellular kinases control cell signalling and sensitivity to extracellular signals. The increase of the cell sensitivity can be achieved by (i) localisation of receptors in a small subdomain of the cell membrane, (ii) lowering the motility of receptor-interacting kinase, (iii) increasing the motility of down-stream kinases which distribute the signal over the whole cell.

  12. Epigenetic silencing of diacylglycerol kinase gamma in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kai, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Sato, Akiko; Yamano, Hiro-O; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Harada, Taku; Aoki, Hironori; Maruyama, Reo; Toyota, Mutsumi; Hatahira, Tomo; Nakase, Hiroshi; Sugai, Tamotsu; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2017-02-20

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are important regulators of cell signaling and have been implicated in human malignancies. Whether epigenetic alterations are involved in the dysregulation of DGKs in cancer is unknown, however. We therefore analyzed methylation of the promoter CpG islands of DGK genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. We found that DGKG, which encodes DGKγ, was hypermethylated in all CRC cell lines tested (n = 9), but was not methylated in normal colonic tissue. Correspondingly, DGKG expression was suppressed in CRC cell lines but not in normal colonic tissue, and was restored in CRC cells by treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). DGKG methylation was frequently observed in primary CRCs (73/141, 51.8%) and was positively associated with KRAS and BRAF mutations and with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). DGKG methylation was also frequently detected in colorectal adenomas (89 of 177, 50.3%), which suggests it is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Ectopic expression of wild-type DGKγ did not suppress CRC cell proliferation, but did suppress cell migration and invasion. Notably, both constitutively active and kinase-dead DGKγ mutants exerted inhibitory effects on CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and the wild-type and mutant forms of DGKγ all suppressed Rac1 activity in CRC cells. These data suggest DGKG may play a tumor suppressor role in CRC.

  13. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Cantley, Lewis C

    2002-05-31

    Phosphorylated lipids are produced at cellular membranes during signaling events and contribute to the recruitment and activation of various signaling components. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), which catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, in cell survival pathways; the regulation of gene expression and cell metabolism; and cytoskeletal rearrangements are highlighted. The PI3K pathway is implicated in human diseases including diabetes and cancer, and understanding the intricacies of this pathway may provide new avenues for therapuetic intervention.

  14. The Neurospora crassa DCC-1 Protein, a Putative Histidine Kinase, Is Required for Normal Sexual and Asexual Development and Carotenogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Lledías, Fernando; Georgellis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Two-component signaling pathways based on phosphoryl group transfer between histidine kinase and response regulator proteins regulate environmental responses in bacteria, archaea, plants, slime molds, and fungi. Here we characterize a mutant form of DCC-1, a putative histidine kinase encoded by the NCU00939 gene of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that this protein participates in the regulation of processes such as conidiation, perithecial development, and, to a certain degree, carotenogenesis. Furthermore, DCC-1 is suggested to exert its effect by promoting cyclic AMP production, thereby placing this protein within the context of a signaling pathway. PMID:22058142

  15. Arginine kinase from Litopenaeus vannamei: cloning, expression and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Luan; Ji, Pei-Feng; Kong, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a phosphotransferase that plays a critical role in energy metabolism in invertebrates. In this paper, the full-length cDNA of AK was cloned from shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei by using RT-PCR and RACE PCR. It was 1446 bp encoding 356 amino acids, and belongs to the conserved phosphagen kinase family. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed a broad expression of AK with the highest expression in the muscle and the lowest in the skin. The expression of AK after challenge with LPS was tested in hemocytes and muscle, which indicated that the two peak values were 6.2 times (at 3 h) and 10.14 times (at 24 h) in the hemocytes compared with the control values, respectively (P < 0.05), while the highest expression of AK was 41 times (at 24 h) in the muscle compared with the control (P < 0.05). In addition, AK was expressed in Escherichia coli by prokaryotic expression plasmid pGEX-4T-2. The recombinant protein was expressed as glutathione s-transferase (GST) arginine kinase (GST-AK) fusion protein, which was purified by affinity chromatography using Glutathione Sepharose 4B. After cleavage from GST by using a site-specific protease, the recombinant protein was identified by ESI-MS and showed AK activity. After treatment with 10 mM ATP, the enzyme activity significantly increased. However, the enzyme activity was inhibited by 10 mM alpha-ketoglutarate, 50 mM glucose and 200 mM ATP. This research suggested that AK might play an important role in the coupling of energy production and utilization and the immune response in shrimps.

  16. Molecular cloning, purification and characterization of Brugia malayi phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Rathaur, Sushma

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) is a glycolytic enzyme present in many parasites. It has been reported as a candidate molecule for drug and vaccine developments. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the Brugia malayi 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (BmPGK) with an open reading frame of 1.3 kb was isolated and PCR amplified and cloned. The exact size of the BmPGK's ORF is 1377 bps. The BmPGK gene was subcloned into pET-28a (+) expression vector, the expressed enzyme was purified by affinity column and characterized. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed native molecular weight of recombinant Brugia malayi 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (rBmPGK) to be ∼45 kDa. The enzyme was found sensitive to temperature and pH, it showed maximum activity at 25 °C and pH 8.5. The Km values for PGA and ATP were 1.77 and 0.967 mM, respectively. The PGK inhibitor, clorsulon and antifilarial drugs albendazole and ivermectin inhibited the enzyme. The specific inhibitor of PGK, clorsulon, competitively inhibited enzyme with Ki value 1.88 μM. Albendazole also inhibited PGK competitively with Ki value 35.39 μM. Further these inhibitory studies were confirmed by docking and molecular simulation of drugs with enzyme. Clorsulon interacted with substrate binding site with glutamine 37 as well as in hinge regions with aspartic acid 385 and valine 387 at ADP binding site. On the other hand albendazole interacted with asparagine 335 residues. These effects were in good association with binding interactions. Thus current study might help in designing and synthesis of effective inhibitors for this novel drug target and understanding their mode of interaction with the potent anthelmintic drugs.

  17. Identification of pantoate kinase and phosphopantothenate synthetase from Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tokutake, Yuka; Hanada, Satoshi; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate synthetase (PanC) and pantothenate kinase which function in the canonical coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway cannot be found in most archaea. COG1829 and COG1701 intrinsic to archaea were proposed as the candidate proteins for producing 4'-phosphopantothenate instead, and the COG1701 protein from Methanosarcina mazei was assigned as PanC. Meanwhile, the Thermococcus kodakarensis COG1829 and COG1701 proteins were biochemically identified as novel enzymes, i.e., pantoate kinase (PoK) and phosphopantothenate synthetase (PPS). In this study, the functions of Mhun_0831 (COG1829) and Mhun_0832 (COG1701) from Methanospirillum hungatei were identified, and the recombinant enzymes were partially characterized. Plasmids simultaneously possessing the two genes encoding Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 complemented the poor growth of the temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli pantothenate kinase mutant ts9. The recombinant Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 expressed in E. coli cells exhibited PoK and PPS activities, respectively, being in accord with the functions of T. kodakarensis proteins. The PoK activity was most active at pH 8.5 and 40°C, and accepted ATP and UTP as a phosphate donor. Although CoA did not affect the PoK activity, the end product considerably accelerated the PPS activity. The homologs of both proteins are widely conserved in most archaeal genomes. Taken together, our findings indicate that archaea can synthesize CoA through the unique pathway involving PoK and PPS, in addition to the canonical one that the order Thermoplasmatales employs.

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates human glioma cell proliferation through Gi-coupled receptors: role of ERK MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase beta.

    PubMed

    Van Brocklyn, James; Letterle, Catherine; Snyder, Pamela; Prior, Thomas

    2002-07-26

    The regulation of glioma cell proliferation by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was studied using the human glioblastoma cell line U-373 MG. U-373 MG cells responded mitogenically to nanomolar concentrations of S1P, and express mRNA encoding the S1P receptors S1P1/endothelial differentiation gene (EDG)-1, S1P3/EDG-3 and S1P2/EDG-5. S1P-induced proliferation required extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and was partially sensitive to pertussis toxin and wortmannin, indicating involvement of a Gi-coupled receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Moreover, S1P1, S1P3 and S1P2 receptors are expressed in the majority of human glioblastomas as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Thus, S1P signaling through EDG receptors may contribute to glioblastoma growth in vivo.

  19. v-mos proteins encoded by myeloproliferative sarcoma virus and its ts159 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Stocking, C; Walker, R; Yang, Y D; Ostertag, W; Arlinghaus, R B

    1992-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) v-mos protein was predicted to be identical in size to p39c-mos because of an observed one-base deletion in the seventh codon of the env-mos open reading frame, which would allow translation to initiate at the methionine equivalent to codon 32 of the env-mos gene. On the basis of published results, p39c-mos is known to have greatly reduced in vitro protein kinase activity compared with p37env-mos encoded by Moloney murine sarcoma virus. Unexpectedly, the relative activity of the MPSV v-mos protein kinase was comparable to that of p37env-mos. Consistent with this finding, the size of MPSV v-mos protein was found to be similar to the size of p37env-mos. Moreover, the pattern and sizes of phosphorylated bands produced by autophosphorylation of the MPSV v-mos protein were similar to those of p37env-mos. These results were confirmed by in vitro transcription-translation of the MPSV v-mos gene. Resequencing portions of the MPSV mos gene failed to show the deletion within codon 7. Except for the codon 262 deletion, other mutations characteristic of MPSV and temperature-sensitive MPSV v-mos genes were confirmed. A glycine-to-arginine mutation at residue 338 of the MPSV env-mos sequence, previously shown to cause thermosensitivity of the mutant virus (termed ts159) transforming function, yielded a v-mos protein that had significantly reduced protein kinase activity in vitro. These findings indicate that MPSV, like other Moloney murine sarcoma virus strains, also encodes a functional env-mos protein. Images PMID:1309903

  20. Regulation of maltose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by genes of the RAS/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Wanke, V; Vavassori, M; Thevelein, J M; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1997-02-03

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltose utilization requires a functional MAL locus, each composed of three genes: MALR (gene 3) encoding a regulatory protein, MALT (gene 1) encoding maltose permease and MALS (gene 2) encoding maltase. We show that constitutive activation of the RAS/protein kinase A pathway severely reduces growth of MAL1 strains on maltose. This may be a consequence of reduction in MALT mRNA, reduced Vmax and increased catabolite inactivation of the MALT-encoded maltose transporter in the MAL1 strain. Mutations in the GGS1/TPS1 gene, which restricts glucose influx and possibly affects signalling, relieve carbon catabolite repression on both maltase and maltose permease and reduce maltose permease inactivation.

  1. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  2. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  3. Fission yeast LAMMER kinase Lkh1 regulates the cell cycle by phosphorylating the CDK-inhibitor Rum1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Hee; Kang, Won-Hwa; Park, Yun-Hee; Kim, Lila; Park, Hee-Moon

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Deletion of lkh1{sup +} made cells pass the G1/S phase faster than the wild type. ► Lkh1 can interact with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Rum1. ► Lkh1 can phosphorylate Rum1 to activate its CKI activity. ► Thr110 was confirmed as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation site of Rum1. ► Positive acting mechanism for the Rum1 activation is reported for the first time. - Abstract: In eukaryotes, LAMMER kinases are involved in various cellular events, including the cell cycle. However, no attempt has been made to investigate the mechanisms that underlie the involvement of LAMMER kinase. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of LAMMER kinase using the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. FACS analyses revealed that deletion of the gene that encodes the LAMMER kinase Lkh1 made mutant cells pass through the G1/S phase faster than their wild-type counterparts. Co-immunoprecipitation and an in vitro kinase assay also revealed that Lkh1 can interact with and phosphorylate Rum1 to activate this molecule as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which blocks cell cycle progression from the G1 phase to the S phase. Peptide mass fingerprinting and kinase assay with Rum1{sup T110A} confirmed T110 as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation residue. In this report we present for the first time a positive acting mechanism that is responsible for the CKI activity of Rum1, in which the LAMMER kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Rum1 is involved.

  4. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  5. Receptor-like kinases from Arabidopsis form a monophyletic gene family related to animal receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Shin-Han; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are proteins with a predicted signal sequence, single transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic kinase domain. Receptor-like kinases belong to a large gene family with at least 610 members that represent nearly 2.5% of Arabidopsis protein coding genes. We have categorized members of this family into subfamilies based on both the identity of the extracellular domains and the phylogenetic relationships between the kinase domains of subfamily members. Surprisingly, this structurally defined group of genes is monophyletic with respect to kinase domains when compared with the other eukaryotic kinase families. In an extended analysis, animal receptor kinases, Raf kinases, plant RLKs, and animal receptor tyrosine kinases form a well supported group sharing a common origin within the superfamily of serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases. Among animal kinase sequences, Drosophila Pelle and related cytoplasmic kinases fall within the plant RLK clade, which we now define as the RLK/Pelle family. A survey of expressed sequence tag records for land plants reveals that mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants have similar percentages of expressed sequence tags representing RLK/Pelle homologs, suggesting that the size of this gene family may have been close to the present-day level before the diversification of land plant lineages. The distribution pattern of four RLK subfamilies on Arabidopsis chromosomes indicates that the expansion of this gene family is partly a consequence of duplication and reshuffling of the Arabidopsis genome and of the generation of tandem repeats. PMID:11526204

  6. BDNF stimulation of protein synthesis in cortical neurons requires the MAP kinase-interacting kinase MNK1.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Maja; Kenney, Justin W; Johnston, Harvey E; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D; Proud, Christopher G

    2015-01-21

    Although the MAP kinase-interacting kinases (MNKs) have been known for >15 years, their roles in the regulation of protein synthesis have remained obscure. Here, we explore the involvement of the MNKs in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-stimulated protein synthesis in cortical neurons from mice. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that BDNF-induced upregulation of protein synthesis requires MEK/ERK signaling and the downstream kinase, MNK1, which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E. Translation initiation is mediated by the interaction of eIF4E with the m(7)GTP cap of mRNA and with eIF4G. The latter interaction is inhibited by the interactions of eIF4E with partner proteins, such as CYFIP1, which acts as a translational repressor. We find that BDNF induces the release of CYFIP1 from eIF4E, and that this depends on MNK1. Finally, using a novel combination of BONCAT and SILAC, we identify a subset of proteins whose synthesis is upregulated by BDNF signaling via MNK1 in neurons. Interestingly, this subset of MNK1-sensitive proteins is enriched for functions involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Additionally, we find significant overlap between our subset of proteins whose synthesis is regulated by MNK1 and those encoded by known FMRP-binding mRNAs. Together, our data implicate MNK1 as a key component of BDNF-mediated translational regulation in neurons.

  7. Tyrosine kinase activation in breast carcinoma with correlation to HER-2/neu gene amplification and receptor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, R; Naeem, R; Marconi, S; Luszcz, J; Garb, J; Gasparini, R; Otis, C N

    2001-12-01

    The HER-2/neu oncogene encodes a transmembrane receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A pilot study was performed to investigate downstream effects of HER-2/neu (or related growth factor receptor) activation by identifying phosphorylated tyrosine. Fifty-four breast carcinomas were evaluated for HER-2/neu overexpression by the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) and the monoclonal CB11 antibody (Ventana, Tucson, AZ). Phosphotyrosine (an indication of tyrosine kinase activity) was detected by an antiphosphotyrosine mouse monoclonal antibody (Upstate Biotechnology, Lake Placid, NY). The gene amplification status was evaluated in 50 of the 54 cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Ventana gene probe. The HER-2/neu oncogene amplification was detected in 28% (14 of 50) of cases. Of the 14 cases showing oncogene amplification, tyrosine kinase activity was detected in 9 (64.2%) cases. There was moderate agreement between HER-2/neu gene amplification and tyrosine kinase activity (kappa = 0.43). Immunohistochemical staining of 3+ (with both HercepTest and CB11) showed better agreement with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and increased tyrosine kinase activity than 2+ immunohistochemical staining. Overall, oncogene amplification and overexpression correlated with increased tyrosine kinase activity, supporting the mechanism of tyrosine kinase activation by HER-2/neu amplification and overexpression. However, 7 cases showing increased tyrosine kinase activity did not show gene amplification or 3+ receptor expression (by either HercepTest or CB11), raising the possibility of other growth factor receptors operating via the tyrosine kinase pathway. There was no apparent correlation between tyrosine kinase activity and hormone receptor status (estrogen or progesterone). Increased tyrosine kinase activity is more commonly associated with higher-grade tumors and thus may correlate with aggressive biologic behavior in breast carcinoma. The results of

  8. BRO1, a novel gene that interacts with components of the Pkc1p-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Nickas, M E; Yaffe, M P

    1996-01-01

    Yeast cells with mutations in BRO1 display phenotypes similar to those caused by deletion of BCK1, a gene encoding a MEK kinase that functions in a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediating maintenance of cell integrity. bro1 cells exhibit a temperature-sensitive growth defect that is suppressed by the addition of osmotic stabilizers or Ca2+ to the growth medium or by additional copies of the BCK1 gene. At permissive temperatures, bro1 mutants are sensitive to caffeine and respond abnormally to nutrient limitation. A null mutation in BRO1 is synthetically lethal with null mutations in BCK1, MPK1, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase that functions downstream of Bck1p, or PKC1, a gene encoding a protein kinase C homolog that activates Bck1p. Analysis of the isolated BRO1 gene revealed that it encodes a novel, 97-kDa polypeptide which contains a putative SH3 domain-binding motif and is homologous to a protein of unknown function in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:8649366

  9. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    PubMed Central

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity. PMID:27562028

  10. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity.

  11. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions.

  13. Temporal information encoding in dynamic memristive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Chen, Lin; Du, Chao; Lu, Wei D.

    2015-11-09

    We show temporal and frequency information can be effectively encoded in memristive devices with inherent short-term dynamics. Ag/Ag{sub 2}S/Pd based memristive devices with low programming voltage (∼100 mV) were fabricated and tested. At weak programming conditions, the devices exhibit inherent decay due to spontaneous diffusion of the Ag atoms. When the devices were subjected to pulse train inputs emulating different spiking patterns, the switching probability distribution function diverges from the standard Poisson distribution and evolves according to the input pattern. The experimentally observed switching probability distributions and the associated cumulative probability functions can be well-explained using a model accounting for the short-term decay effects. Such devices offer an intriguing opportunity to directly encode neural signals for neural information storage and analysis.

  14. Determination of Laser Tracker Angle Encoder Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, Karim M.; Hughes, Ben; Forbes, Alistair; Lewis, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Errors in the angle encoders of a laser tracker may potentially produce large errors in long range coordinate measurements. To determine the azimuth angle encoder errors and verify their values stored in the tracker's internal error map, several methodologies were evaluated, differing in complexity, measurement time and the need for specialised measuring equipment. These methodologies are: an artefact-based technique developed by NIST; a multi-target network technique developed by NPL; and the classical precision angular indexing table technique. It is shown that the three methodologies agree within their respective measurement uncertainties and that the NPL technique has the advantages of a short measurement time and no reliance on specialised measurement equipment or artefacts.

  15. Encoded Dynamical Recoupling with Shaped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfan; Lidar, Daniel A.; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2008-03-01

    Encoded Dynamical Recoupling is a passive error correction techique which can be used to enhance the performance of a quantum error correction code (QECC) against low-frequency component of the thermal bath. The elements of the stabilizer group are used in the decoupling cycle which makes the encoded logic operations fault-tolerant. We studied the effectiveness of this techique both analytically and numerically for several three- and five-qubit codes, with decoupling sequences utilizing either Gaussian or self-refocusing pulse shapes. When logic pulses are intercalated between the decoupling cycles, the technique may be very effective in cancelling constant perturbation terms, but its performance is much weaker against a time-dependent perturbation simulated as a classical correlated noise. The decoupling accuracy can be substantially improved if logic is applied slowly and concurrently with the decoupling, so that a certain adiabaticity condition is satisfied.

  16. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators in Circulation Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Lars; Tian, Qinghai; Kaiser, Elisabeth; Xian, Wenying; Müller, Andreas; Oberhofer, Martin; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Sinnecker, Daniel; Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Moretti, Alessandra; Lipp, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potentials display the cellular status of non-excitable cells and mediate communication between excitable cells via action potentials. The use of genetically encoded biosensors employing fluorescent proteins allows a non-invasive biocompatible way to read out the membrane potential in cardiac myocytes and other cells of the circulation system. Although the approaches to design such biosensors date back to the time when the first fluorescent-protein based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors were constructed, it took 15 years before reliable sensors became readily available. Here, we review different developments of genetically encoded membrane potential sensors. Furthermore, it is shown how such sensors can be used in pharmacological screening applications as well as in circulation related basic biomedical research. Potentials and limitations will be discussed and perspectives of possible future developments will be provided. PMID:26370981

  17. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOEpatents

    Wong; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan P.

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  18. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  19. Leishmania donovani Encodes a Functional Selenocysteinyl-tRNA Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Manhas, Reetika; Gowri, Venkatraman Subramanian; Madhubala, Rentala

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid, occurs on its transfer RNA (tRNA), tRNASec. tRNASec is initially aminoacylated with serine by seryl-tRNA synthetase and the resulting seryl moiety is converted to phosphoserine by O-phosphoseryl-tRNA kinase (PSTK) in eukaryotes. The selenium donor, selenophosphate is synthesized from selenide and ATP by selenophosphate synthetase. Selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) then uses the O-phosphoseryl-tRNASec and selenophosphate to form Sec-tRNASec in eukaryotes. Here, we report the characterization of selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase from Leishmania donovani. Kinetoplastid SepSecS enzymes are phylogenetically closer to worm SepSecS. LdSepSecS was found to exist as a tetramer. Leishmania SepSecS enzyme was found to be active and able to complement the ΔselA deletion in Escherichia coli JS1 strain only in the presence of archaeal PSTK, indicating the conserved nature of the PSTK-SepSecS pathway. LdSepSecS was found to localize in the cytoplasm of the parasite. Gene deletion studies indicate that Leishmania SepSecS is dispensable for the parasite survival. The parasite was found to encode three selenoproteins, which were only expressed in the presence of SepSecS. Selenoproteins of L. donovani are not required for the growth of the promastigotes. Auranofin, a known inhibitor of selenoprotein synthesis showed the same sensitivity toward the wild-type and null mutants suggesting its effect is not through binding to selenoproteins. The three-dimensional structural comparison indicates that human and Leishmania homologs are structurally highly similar but their association modes leading to tetramerization seem different. PMID:26586914

  20. Roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase in ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor-mediated heregulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vijapurkar, Ulka; Kim, Myong-Soo; Koland, John G

    2003-04-01

    ErbB2/HER2 and ErbB3/HER3, two members of the ErbB/HER family, together constitute a heregulin coreceptor complex that elicits a potent mitogenic and transforming signal. Among known intracellular effectors of the ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptor are mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. Activation of the distinct MAPK and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways by the ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor in response to heregulin and their relative contributions to the mitogenic and transformation potentials of the activated coreceptor were investigated here. To this end, cDNAs encoding the wild-type ErbB3 protein (ErbB3-WT) and ErbB3 proteins with amino acid substitutions in either the Shc-binding site (ErbB3-Y1325F), the six putative PI 3-kinase-binding sites (ErbB3-6F), or both (ErbB3-7F) were generated and expressed in NIH-3T3 cells to form functional ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptors. While the coreceptor incorporating ErbB3-WT activated both the MAPK and the PI 3-kinase signaling pathways, those incorporating ErbB3-Y1325F or ErbB3-6F activated either PI 3-kinase or MAPK, respectively. The ErbB2/ErbB3-7F coreceptor activated neither. Elimination of either signaling pathway lowered basal and eliminated heregulin-dependent expression of cyclin D1, which was in each case accompanied by an attenuated mitogenic response. Selective elimination of the PI 3-kinase pathway severely impaired the ability of heregulin to transform cells expressing the coreceptor, whereas attenuation of the MAPK pathway had a lesser effect. Thus, while both pathways contributed in a roughly additive manner to the mitogenic response elicited by the activated ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor, the PI 3-kinase pathway predominated in the induction of cellular transformation.

  1. Understanding the muscular dystrophy caused by deletion of choline kinase beta in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gengshu; Sher, Roger B; Cox, Gregory A; Vance, Dennis E

    2009-05-01

    Choline kinase in mice is encoded by two genes, Chka and Chkb. Disruption of murine Chka leads to embryonic lethality, whereas a spontaneously occurring genomic deletion in murine Chkb results in neonatal bone deformity and hindlimb muscular dystrophy. We have investigated the mechanism by which a lack of choline kinase beta, encoded by Chkb, causes hindlimb muscular dystrophy. The biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) is impaired in the hindlimbs of Chkb -/- mice, with an accumulation of choline and decreased amount of phosphocholine. The activity of CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase is also decreased in the hindlimb muscle of mutant mice. Concomitantly, the activities of PC phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 are increased. The mitochondria in Chkb -/- mice are abnormally large and exhibit decreased inner membrane potential. Despite the muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice, we observed increased expression of insulin like growth factor 1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. However, regeneration of hindlimb muscles of Chkb -/- mice was impaired when challenged with cardiotoxin. Injection of CDP-choline increased PC content of hindlimb muscle and decreased creatine kinase activity in plasma of Chkb -/- mice. We conclude that the hindlimb muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice is due to attenuated PC biosynthesis and enhanced catabolism of PC.

  2. Genetically Encoded Voltage Indicators: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Helen H.

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding goal in neuroscience is to understand how spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal electrical activity underlie brain function, from sensory representations to decision making. An emerging technology for monitoring electrical dynamics, voltage imaging using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs), couples the power of genetics with the advantages of light. Here, we review the properties that determine indicator performance and applicability, discussing both recent progress and technical limitations. We then consider GEVI applications, highlighting studies that have already deployed GEVIs for biological discovery. We also examine which classes of biological questions GEVIs are primed to address and which ones are beyond their current capabilities. As GEVIs are further developed, we anticipate that they will become more broadly used by the neuroscience community to eavesdrop on brain activity with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Genetically encoded voltage indicators are engineered light-emitting protein sensors that typically report neuronal voltage dynamics as changes in brightness. In this review, we systematically discuss the current state of this emerging method, considering both its advantages and limitations for imaging neural activity. We also present recent applications of this technology and discuss what is feasible now and what we anticipate will become possible with future indicator development. This review will inform neuroscientists of recent progress in the field and help potential users critically evaluate the suitability of genetically encoded voltage indicator imaging to answer their specific biological questions. PMID:27683896

  3. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  4. Encoding and decoding messages with chaotic lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Alsing, P.M.; Gavrielides, A.; Kovanis, V.; Roy, R.; Thornburg, K.S. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    We investigate the structure of the strange attractor of a chaotic loss-modulated solid-state laser utilizing return maps based on a combination of intensity maxima and interspike intervals, as opposed to those utilizing Poincar{acute e} sections defined by the intensity maxima of the laser ({dot I}=0,{umlt I}{lt}0) alone. We find both experimentally and numerically that a simple, intrinsic relationship exists between an intensity maximum and the pair of preceding and succeeding interspike intervals. In addition, we numerically investigate encoding messages on the output of a chaotic transmitter laser and its subsequent decoding by a similar receiver laser. By exploiting the relationship between the intensity maxima and the interspike intervals, we demonstrate that the method utilized to encode the message is vital to the system{close_quote}s ability to hide the signal from unwanted deciphering. In this work alternative methods are studied in order to encode messages by modulating the magnitude of pumping of the transmitter laser and also by driving its loss modulation with more than one frequency. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  6. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  7. Dual-channel spectrally encoded endoscopic probe

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Guy; Genish, Hadar; Rosenbluh, Michael; Yelin, Dvir

    2012-01-01

    High quality imaging through sub-millimeter endoscopic probes provides clinicians with valuable diagnostics capabilities in hard to reach locations within the body. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) has been shown promising for such task; however, challenging probe fabrication and high speckle noise had prevented its testing in in vivo studies. Here we demonstrate a novel miniature SEE probe which incorporates some of the recent progress in spectrally encoded technology into a compact and robust endoscopic system. A high-quality miniature diffraction grating was fabricated using automated femtosecond laser cutting from a large bulk grating. Using one spectrally encoded channel for imaging and a separate channel for incoherent illumination, the new system has large depth of field, negligible back reflections and well controlled speckle noise which depends on the core diameter of the illumination fiber. Moreover, by using a larger imaging channel, higher groove density grating, shorter wavelength and broader spectrum, the new endoscopic system now allow significant improvements in almost all imaging parameter compared to previous systems, through an ultra-miniature endoscopic probe. PMID:22876349

  8. Dual-channel spectrally encoded endoscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Engel, Guy; Genish, Hadar; Rosenbluh, Michael; Yelin, Dvir

    2012-08-01

    High quality imaging through sub-millimeter endoscopic probes provides clinicians with valuable diagnostics capabilities in hard to reach locations within the body. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) has been shown promising for such task; however, challenging probe fabrication and high speckle noise had prevented its testing in in vivo studies. Here we demonstrate a novel miniature SEE probe which incorporates some of the recent progress in spectrally encoded technology into a compact and robust endoscopic system. A high-quality miniature diffraction grating was fabricated using automated femtosecond laser cutting from a large bulk grating. Using one spectrally encoded channel for imaging and a separate channel for incoherent illumination, the new system has large depth of field, negligible back reflections and well controlled speckle noise which depends on the core diameter of the illumination fiber. Moreover, by using a larger imaging channel, higher groove density grating, shorter wavelength and broader spectrum, the new endoscopic system now allow significant improvements in almost all imaging parameter compared to previous systems, through an ultra-miniature endoscopic probe.

  9. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  10. Digital raster timing encoder-decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennetten, E. W.; Gomez, D. A.

    1984-06-01

    The invention presents a digital raster timing encoder/decoder system wherein television raster synchronization pulses and other timing pulses and information data are generated. The invention comprises a digital clock source having coding means which combined with the clock source encodes preselected digital signals containing information on raster synchronization control and timing, and also any other information data that is desired. The encoded signal output is transmitted either directly or via some special transmission link, for example by use of a Manchester Decoder clock multiplier system, to a receiving and decoding means. The received signal is decoded to create timing signals for operation control of the video television scanning system, and to read out other desired digital data that has been also transmitted within the signal. The system takes advantage of the fact that control signals of conventional synchronization pulses contain large deadband areas within which additional data information may be placed. Such additional digital information may be used to add other control pulse capability, or to add information transmission capability. A principle feature of the system is that only a single channel is needed to transmit synchronization pulses and any additional timing pulses or information of interest.

  11. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries.

  12. Identified circuit in rat postrhinal cortex encodes essential information for performing specific visual shape discriminations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Cao, Haiyan; Kong, Lingxin; O'Brien, Jennifer; Baughns, Andrew; Jan, Mary; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Xiaodan; Lu, Xiu-gui; Cook, Robert G; Geller, Alfred I

    2010-08-10

    Learning theories hypothesize specific circuits encode essential information for performance. For simple tasks in invertebrates and mammals, the essential circuits are known, but for cognitive functions, the essential circuits remain unidentified. Here, we show that some essential information for performing a choice task is encoded in a specific circuit in a neocortical area. Rat postrhinal (POR) cortex is required for visual shape discriminations, protein kinase C (PKC) pathways mediate changes in neuronal physiology that support learning, and specific PKC genes are required for multiple learning tasks. We used direct gene transfer of a constitutively active PKC to prime a specific POR cortex circuit for learning visual shape discriminations. In the experiment, rats learned a discrimination, received gene transfer, learned new discriminations, received a small lesion that ablated approximately 21% of POR cortex surrounding the gene transfer site, and were tested for performance for discriminations learned either before or after gene transfer. Lesions of the genetically targeted circuit selectively interfered with performance for discriminations learned after gene transfer. Activity-dependent gene imaging confirmed increased activity in the genetically targeted circuit during learning and showed the essential information was sparse-coded in approximately 500 neurons in the lesioned area. Wild-type rats contained circuits with similar increases in activity during learning, but these circuits were located at unpredictable, different positions in POR cortex. These results establish that some essential information for performing specific visual discriminations can be encoded in a small, identified, neocortical circuit and provide a foundation for characterizing the circuit and essential information.

  13. GABAergic mechanisms regulated by miR-33 encode state-dependent fear

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Yamawaki, Naoki; Guedea, Anita L; Chen, Helen J; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Restricted access to such memories can present a risk for psychiatric disorders and hamper their treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying state-dependent fear, we used a mouse model of contextual fear conditioning. We found that heightened activity of hippocampal extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, believed to impair fear and memory, actually enabled their state-dependent encoding and retrieval. This effect required protein kinase C-βII and was influenced by miR-33, a microRNA that regulates several GABA-related proteins. In the extended hippocampal circuit, extrasynaptic GABAA receptors promoted subcortical, but impaired cortical, activation during memory encoding of context fear. Moreover, suppression of retrosplenial cortical activity, which normally impairs retrieval, had an enhancing effect on the retrieval of state-dependent fear. These mechanisms can serve as treatment targets for managing access to state-dependent memories of stressful experiences. PMID:26280760

  14. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hoc1, a Suppressor of Pkc1, Encodes a Putative Glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, A. M.; Mhaiskar, V.; Manus, V.; Galibert, F.; Dean, N.

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PKC1 encodes a protein kinase C isozyme that regulates cell wall synthesis. Here we describe the characterization of HOC1, a gene identified by its ability to suppress the cell lysis phenotype of pkc1-371 cells. The HOC1 gene (Homologous to OCH1) is predicted to encode a type II integral membrane protein that strongly resembles Och1p, an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase. Immunofluorescence studies localized Hoc1p to the Golgi apparatus. While overexpression of HOC1 rescued the pkc1-371 temperature-sensitive cell lysis phenotype, disruption of HOC1 lowered the restrictive temperature of the pkc1-371 allele. Disruption of HOC1 also resulted in hypersensitivity to Calcofluor White and hygromycin B, phenotypes characteristic of defects in cell wall integrity and protein glycosylation, respectively. The function of HOC1 appears to be distinct from that of OCH1. Taken together, these results suggest that HOC1 encodes a Golgi-localized putative mannosyltransferase required for the proper construction of the cell wall. PMID:9055074

  15. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  16. Fetal anaemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, F; Vega, M A; Gómez-Castillo, E; Ruiz-Balda, J A; Omeñaca, F

    1993-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency was diagnosed in an infant by umbilical vessel sampling at 30 weeks' gestation. Although three previous hydropic siblings had been stillborn or died in the neonatal period, this infant survived with transfusion dependent haemolytic anaemia. Prompt fetal diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency is feasible and allows better management of hydrops fetalis due to this disorder. PMID:8285758

  17. Protein kinase biochemistry and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Murray, Brion W

    2011-12-01

    Protein kinases are fascinating biological catalysts with a rapidly expanding knowledge base, a growing appreciation in cell regulatory control, and an ascendant role in successful therapeutic intervention. To better understand protein kinases, the molecular underpinnings of phosphoryl group transfer, protein phosphorylation, and inhibitor interactions are examined. This analysis begins with a survey of phosphate group and phosphoprotein properties which provide context to the evolutionary selection of phosphorylation as a central mechanism for biological regulation of most cellular processes. Next, the kinetic and catalytic mechanisms of protein kinases are examined with respect to model aqueous systems to define the elements of catalysis. A brief structural biology overview further delves into the molecular basis of catalysis and regulation of catalytic activity. Concomitant with a prominent role in normal physiology, protein kinases have important roles in the disease state. To facilitate effective kinase drug discovery, classic and emerging approaches for characterizing kinase inhibitors are evaluated including biochemical assay design, inhibitor mechanism of action analysis, and proper kinetic treatment of irreversible inhibitors. As the resulting protein kinase inhibitors can modulate intended and unintended targets, profiling methods are discussed which can illuminate a more complete range of an inhibitor's biological activities to enable more meaningful cellular studies and more effective clinical studies. Taken as a whole, a wealth of protein kinase biochemistry knowledge is available, yet it is clear that a substantial extent of our understanding in this field remains to be discovered which should yield many new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Drosophila Wee1 kinase rescues fission yeast from mitotic catastrophe and phosphorylates Drosophila Cdc2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S D; Sprenger, F; Edgar, B A; O'Farrell, P H

    1995-01-01

    Cdc2 kinase activity is required for triggering entry into mitosis in all known eukaryotes. Elaborate mechanisms have evolved for regulating Cdc2 activity so that mitosis occurs in a timely manner, when preparations for its execution are complete. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1 and a related Mik1 kinase are Cdc2-inhibitory kinases that are required for preventing premature activation of the mitotic program. To identify Cdc2-inhibitory kinases in Drosophila, we screened for cDNA clones that rescue S. pombe wee1- mik1- mutants from lethal mitotic catastrophe. One of the genes identified in this screen, Drosophila wee1 (Dwee1), encodes a new Wee1 homologue. Dwee1 kinase is closely related to human and Xenopus Wee1 homologues, and can inhibit Cdc2 activity by phosphorylating a critical tyrosine residue. Dwee1 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos, and is zygotically expressed during the postblastoderm divisions of embryogenesis. Expression remains high in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system well after cells in the rest of the embryo have ceased dividing. The loss of zygotically expressed Dwee1 does not lead to mitotic catastrophe during postblastoderm cycles 14 to 16. This result may indicate that maternally provided Dwee1 is sufficient for regulating Cdc2 during embryogenesis, or it may reflect the presence of a redundant Cdc2 inhibitory kinase, as in fission yeast. Images PMID:8573790

  19. Expression analysis of a novel pyridoxal kinase messenger RNA splice variant, PKL, in oil rape suffering abiotic stress and phytohormones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shunwu; Luo, Lijun

    2008-12-01

    Pyridoxal kinase is key enzyme for the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the biologically active form of vitamin B6, in the salvage pathway. A pyridoxal kinase gene, BnPKL (GenBank accession No. DQ463962), was isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) following water stress through rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends. The results showed that the gene had two splice variants: PKL and PKL2. PKL, the long cDNA, encodes a 334 amino acid protein with a complete ATP-binding site, pyridoxal kinase-binding site and dimer interface site of a pyridoxal kinase, while PKL2, the short cDNA, lacked a partial domain. Southern blot showed that there were two copies in Brassica napus. The expression of BnPKL cDNA could rescue the mutant phenotype of Escherichia coli defective in pyridoxal kinase. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the relative abundance of two transcripts are modulated by development and environmental stresses. Abscisic acid and NaCl were inclined to decrease PKL expression, but H2O2 and cold temperatures induced the PKL expression. In addition, the PKL expression could be transiently induced by jasmonate acid at an early stage, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonate acid enhanced the PKL expression in roots. Our results demonstrated that BnPKL was a pyridoxal kinase involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  20. The PR5K receptor protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is structurally related to a family of plant defense proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zafian, P; Choudhary, M; Lawton, M

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana gene that codes for a receptor related to antifungal pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The PR5K gene codes for a predicted 665-amino acid polypeptide that comprises an extracellular domain related to the PR5 proteins, a central transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular protein-serine/threonine kinase. The extracellular domain of PR5K (PR5-like receptor kinase) is most highly related to acidic PR5 proteins that accumulate in the extracellular spaces of plants challenged with pathogenic microorganisms. The kinase domain of PR5K is related to a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases that are involved in the expression of self-incompatibility and disease resistance. PR5K transcripts accumulate at low levels in all tissues examined, although particularly high levels are present in roots and inflorescence stems. Treatments that induce authentic PR5 proteins had no effect on the level of PR5K transcripts, suggesting that the receptor forms part of a preexisting surveillance system. When the kinase domain of PR5K was expressed in Escherichia coli, the resulting polypeptide underwent autophosphorylation, consistent with its predicted enzyme activity. These results are consistent with PR5K encoding a functional receptor kinase. Moreover, the structural similarity between the extracellular domain of PR5K and the antimicrobial PR5- proteins suggests a possible interaction with common or related microbial targets. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8637920

  1. 4.5S RNA is encoded by hundreds of tandemly linked genes, has a short half-life, and is hydrogen bonded in vivo to poly(A)-terminated RNAs in the cytoplasm of cultured mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeniger, L O; Jelinek, W R

    1986-01-01

    4.5S RNA is a group of RNAs 90 to 94 nucleotides long (length polymorphism due to a varying number of UMP residues at the 3' end) that form hydrogen bonds with poly(A)-terminated RNAs isolated from mouse, hamster, or rat cells (W. R. Jelinek and L. Leinwand, Cell 15:205-214, 1978; F. Harada, N. Kato, and H.-O. Hoshino, Nucleic Acids Res. 7:909-917, 1979). We have cloned a gene that encodes the 4.5S RNA. It is repeated 850 (sigma = 54) times per haploid mouse genome and 690 (sigma = 59) times per haploid rat genome. Most, if not all, of the repeats in both species are arrayed in tandem. The repeat unit is 4,245 base pairs long in mouse DNA (the complete base sequence of one repeat unit is presented) and approximately 5,300 base pairs in rat DNA. This accounts for approximately 3 X 10(6) base pairs of genomic DNA in each species, or 0.1% of the genome. Cultured murine erythroleukemia cells contain 13,000 molecules per cell of the 4.5S RNA, which can be labeled to equilibrium in 90 min by [3H]uridine added to the culture medium. The 4.5S RNA, therefore, has a short half-life. The 4.5S RNA can be cross-linked in vivo by 4'-aminomethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen to murine erythroleukemia cell poly(A)-terminated cytoplasmic RNA contained in ribonucleoprotein particles. Images PMID:2431280

  2. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook.

    PubMed

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions.

  3. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions. PMID:26734566

  4. Protein Kinases in Zucchini (Characterization of Calcium-Requiring Plasma Membrane Kinases).

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, S. D.; Gaiser, J. C.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    Using an in situ phosphorylation assay with zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L. cv Dark Green) seedling tissue, we have identified numerous polypeptides that are capable of acting as protein kinases. Total protein preparations from different organs contain different kinase profiles, but all are within the range of 55 to 70 kD. At least four kinases are associated with highly purified plasma membranes from etiolated zucchini hypocotyls. The major phosphorylated polypeptides from plasma membranes range in apparent molecular mass from 58 to 68 kD. The plasma membrane kinases are activated by micromolar concentrations of calcium and phosphorylate serine, and, to a lesser extent, threonine residues. These characteristics are similar to those of a soluble calcium-dependent protein kinase that has been purified to homogeneity from soybean suspension cultures. Three of the zucchini plasma membrane kinases share antigenic epitopes with the soluble soybean kinase. The presence of kinase activity at different apparent molecular masses may be indicative of separate kinases with similar characteristics. The zucchini hypocotyl protein kinases are not removed from plasma membrane vesicles by 0.5 M NaCl/5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate or by detergent concentrations below the critical micelle concentration of two types of detergent. This indicates that the plasma membrane protein kinases are tightly associated with the membrane in zucchini seedlings. PMID:12231949

  5. KinasePhos: a web tool for identifying protein kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Tzeng, Shih-Wei; Horng, Jorng-Tzong

    2005-07-01

    KinasePhos is a novel web server for computationally identifying catalytic kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. The known phosphorylation sites from public domain data sources are categorized by their annotated protein kinases. Based on the profile hidden Markov model, computational models are learned from the kinase-specific groups of the phosphorylation sites. After evaluating the learned models, the model with highest accuracy was selected from each kinase-specific group, for use in a web-based prediction tool for identifying protein phosphorylation sites. Therefore, this work developed a kinase-specific phosphorylation site prediction tool with both high sensitivity and specificity. The prediction tool is freely available at http://KinasePhos.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/.

  6. Architecture for VLSI design of Reed-Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The logic structure of a universal VLSI chip called the symbol-slice Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder chip is discussed. An RS encoder can be constructed by cascading and properly interconnecting a group of such VLSI chips. As a design example, it is shown that a (255,223) RD encoder requiring around 40 discrete CMOS ICs may be replaced by an RS encoder consisting of four identical interconnected VLSI RS encoder chips. Besides the size advantage, the VLSI RS encoder also has the potential advantages of requiring less power and having a higher reliability.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution, and Co-expression Network Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Zou, Jinwei; Xing, Guangwei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively. Conserved protein motif, exon-intron organization, and splicing intron phase in kinase domains supported the evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis. And gene duplication analysis suggested the chromosomal segment duplication happened before the divergence of the rice and Brachypodium, while all of three tandem duplicated gene pairs happened after their divergence. We further demonstrated that the MAPKKKs have evolved under strong purifying selection, implying the conservation of them. The splicing transcripts expression analysis showed that the splicesome translating longest protein tended to be adopted. Furthermore, the expression analysis of BdMAPKKKs in different organs and development stages as well as heat, virus and drought stresses revealed that the MAPKKK genes were involved in various signaling pathways. And the circadian analysis suggested there were 41 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium showing cycled expression in at least one condition, of which seven MAPKKK genes expressed in all conditions and the promoter analysis indicated these genes possessed many cis-acting regulatory elements involved in circadian and light response. Finally, the co-expression network of MAPK, MAPKK, and MAPKKK in Brachypodium was constructed using 144 microarray and RNA-seq datasets, and ten potential MAPK cascades pathway were predicted. To conclude, our study provided the important information for evolutionary and

  8. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  9. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  10. HCMV pUS28 initiates pro-migratory signaling via activation of Pyk2 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Vomaske, Jennifer; Varnum, Susan M.; Melnychuk, Ryan; Smith, Patricia; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Streblow, Daniel N.

    2010-12-10

    The HCMV-encoded chemokine receptor US28 mediates smooth muscle cell (SMC) and macrophage motility and this activity has been implicated in the acceleration of vascular disease. US28 induced SMC migration involves the activation of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Src and Focal adhesion kinase as well as the small GTPase RhoA. In the current study, we examined the involvement of the PTK Pyk2 in US28-induced cellular motility. Expression of a Pyk2 lacking the autophosphorylation site (Tyr-402) blocks US28-mediated SMC migration in response to RANTES, while the kinase-inactive mutant failed to elicit the same negative effect on migration. US28 stimulation with RANTES results in ligand-dependent and calcium-dependent phosphorylation of Pyk2 Tyr-402 and induced the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex containing several novel Pyk2 binding proteins. Interestingly, expression of the autophosphorylation site mutant Pyk2 F402Y did not abrogate the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex, but instead prevented US28-mediated activation of RhoA. These findings represent the first demonstration that US28 signals through Pyk2 and that this PTK participates in US28-mediated cellular motility via activation of RhoA. Additionally, US28 activated RhoA via Pyk2 in the U373 glioblastoma cells. Interestingly, the Pyk2 kinase complex in U373 contained several proteins known to participate in glioma tumorigenesis. These results provide a potential mechanistic link between HCMV-US28 and glioblastoma cell activation and motility.

  11. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative pyridoxal kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Joseph A.; Das, Sanjan K.; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-10-01

    A putative pyridoxal kinase from B. subtilis has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized and data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Pyridoxal kinases (PdxK) are able to catalyse the phosphorylation of three vitamin B{sub 6} precursors, pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine, to their 5′-phosphates and play an important role in the vitamin B{sub 6} salvage pathway. Recently, the thiD gene of Bacillus subtilis was found to encode an enzyme which has the activity expected of a pyridoxal kinase despite its previous assignment as an HMPP kinase owing to higher sequence similarity. As such, this enzyme would appear to represent a new class of ‘HMPP kinase-like’ pyridoxal kinases. B. subtilis thiD has been cloned and the protein has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and subsequently crystallized in a binary complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+}. X-ray diffraction data have been collected from crystals to 2.8 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belong to a primitive tetragonal system, point group 422, and analysis of the systematic absences suggest that they belong to one of the enantiomorphic pair of space groups P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. Consideration of the space-group symmetry and unit-cell parameters (a = b = 102.9, c = 252.6 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) suggest that the crystals contain between three and six molecules in the asymmetric unit. A full structure determination is under way to provide insights into aspects of the enzyme mechanism and substrate specificity.

  12. The Large Binocular Telescope azimuth and elevation encoder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Rosato, Jerry; Brynnel, Joar G.

    2008-08-01

    A typical high-resolution encoder interpolator relies on careful mechanical alignment of the encoder read-heads and tight electrical tolerances of the signal processing electronics to ensure linearity. As the interpolation factor increases, maintaining these tight mechanical and electrical tolerances becomes impractical. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is designed to utilize strip-type encoders on the main axes. Because of the very large scale of the telescope, the accumulative length of the azimuth and elevation encoder strips exceeds 80 meters, making optical tape prohibitively expensive. Consequently, the designers of the LBT incorporated the far less expensive Farrand Controls Inductosyn® linear strip encoder to encode the positions of the main axes and the instrument rotators. Since the cycle pitch of these encoders is very large compared to that of optical strip encoders, the interpolation factor must also be large in order to achieve the 0.005 arcsecond encoder resolution as specified. The authors present a description of the innovative DSP-based hardware / software solution that adaptively characterizes and removes common systematic cycle-to-cycle encoder interpolation errors. These errors can be caused by mechanical misalignment, encoder manufacturing flaws, variations in electrical gain, signal offset or cross-coupling of the encoder signals. Simulation data are presented to illustrate the performance of the interpolation algorithm, and telemetry data are presented to demonstrate the actual performance of the LBT main-axis encoder system.

  13. Diacylglycerol kinase is phosphorylated in vivo upon stimulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and serine/threonine kinases, including protein kinase C-epsilon.

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, D; van der Wal, J; van Blitterswijk, W J; van der Bend, R L; Ploegh, H L

    1993-01-01

    In signal transduction, diacylglycerol (DG) kinase attenuates levels of the second messenger DG by converting it to phosphatidic acid. A previously cloned full-length human 86 kDa DG kinase cDNA was expressed as fusion protein in Escherichia coli, to aid in the generation of DG-kinase-specific monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunoprecipitation experiments. To investigate whether phosphorylation of DG kinase is a possible mechanism for its regulation, COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with the DG kinase cDNA and phosphorylation of the expressed DG kinase was induced by various stimuli. Activation of both cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) resulted in phosphorylation of DG kinase on serine residues in vivo, and both kinases induced this phosphorylation within the same tryptic phosphopeptide, suggesting that they may exert similar control over DG kinase. No phosphorylation was observed upon ionomycin treatment, intended to activate Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases. Co-transfections of DG kinase with either PKC-alpha or PKC-epsilon cDNA revealed that both protein kinases, when stimulated, are able to phosphorylate DG kinase. For PKC-epsilon, DG kinase is the first in vivo substrate identified. Stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) of COS-7 cells transfected with both DG kinase and EGF-receptor cDNA results mainly in phosphorylation of DG kinase on tyrosine. Since the EGF receptor has an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, this finding implies that DG kinase may be a direct substrate for the activated EGF receptor. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7679574

  14. Characterization of an Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Silaffin Kinase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana*

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vonda; Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The formation of SiO2-based cell walls by diatoms (a large group of unicellular microalgae) is a well established model system for the study of molecular mechanisms of biological mineral morphogenesis (biomineralization). Diatom biomineralization involves highly phosphorylated proteins (silaffins and silacidins), analogous to other biomineralization systems, which also depend on diverse sets of phosphoproteins (e.g. mammalian teeth and bone, mollusk shells, and sponge silica). The phosphate moieties on biomineralization proteins play an essential role in mineral formation, yet the kinases catalyzing the phosphorylation of these proteins have remained poorly characterized. Recent functional genomics studies on the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana have revealed >100 proteins potentially involved in diatom silica formation. Here we have characterized the biochemical properties and biological function of one of these proteins, tpSTK1. Multiple tpSTK1-like proteins are encoded in diatom genomes, all of which exhibit low but significant sequence similarity to kinases from other organisms. We show that tpSTK1 has serine/threonine kinase activity capable of phosphorylating silaffins but not silacidins. Cell biological and biochemical analysis demonstrated that tpSTK1 is an abundant component of the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The present study provides the first molecular structure of a kinase that appears to catalyze phosphorylation of biomineral forming proteins in vivo. PMID:19889629

  15. A kinase-dead allele of Lyn attenuates autoimmune disease normally associated with Lyn deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Anne M; Wallace, Morgan E; Goradia, Ankita; Jones, Sarah A; Croom, Hayley A; Metcalf, Donald; Collinge, Janelle E; Maxwell, Mhairi J; Hibbs, Margaret L; Alexander, Warren S; Hilton, Douglas J; Kile, Benjamin T; Starr, Robyn

    2009-02-15

    Lyn kinase, a member of the Src family of tyrosine kinases, functions as both a positive and negative regulator of B cell activation. In the absence of Lyn, BCR signaling is unregulated, leading to perturbed B cell development, hyperactive B cells, and lethal Ab-mediated autoimmune disease. We have generated a mutant mouse pedigree, termed Mld4, harboring a novel mutation in the gene encoding Lyn, which renders the protein devoid of kinase activity. Despite similarities between the phenotypes of Lyn(Mld4/Mld4) and Lyn(-/-) mice, the spectrum of defects in Lyn(Mld4/Mld4) mice is less severe. In particular, although defects in the B cell compartment are similar, splenomegaly, myeloid expansion, and autoantibody production, characteristic of Lyn(-/-) mice, are absent or mild in Lyn(Mld4/Mld4) mice. Critically, immune complex deposition and complement activation in Lyn(Mld4/Mld4) glomeruli do not result in fulminant glomerulonephritis. Our data suggest that BCR hypersensitivity is insufficient for the development of autoimmune disease in Lyn(-/-) mice and implicate other cell lineages, particularly proinflammatory cells, in autoimmune disease progression. Furthermore, our results provide evidence for an additional role for Lyn kinase, distinct from its catalytic activity, in regulating intracellular signaling pathways.

  16. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of drug resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ryohei

    2017-02-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK is expressed as a fusion gene in a variety of carcinomas. The expression of ALK is nearly undetectable in adults, and its activation is normally regulated by its ligands, FAM150A/B. However, ALK gene rearrangements result in different ALK fusion proteins that are constitutively expressed via the active promoter of fusion partner genes. ALK fusion proteins dimerize in a ligand-independent manner and lead to the dysregulation of cell proliferation via abnormal constitutive activation of ALK tyrosine kinase. Many ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to date, are three of which are currently in clinical use for the treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK TKIs often achieve marked tumor regression in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements; however, ALK TKI-resistant tumors inevitably emerge within a few years in most cases. In this review, we summarize diverse ALK TKI resistance mechanisms identified in NSCLC with ALK rearrangements, and review potential therapeutic strategies to overcome ALK TKI resistance in these patients.

  17. Perspectives for the use of structural information and chemical genetics to develop inhibitors of Janus kinases

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Claude; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding Janus kinases have been discovered in various haematologic diseases. Jaks are composed of a FERM domain, an SH2 domain, a pseudokinase domain and a kinase domain, and a complex interplay of the Jak domains is involved in regulation of catalytic activity and association to cytokine receptors. Most activating mutations are found in the pseudokinase domain. Here we present recently discovered mutations in the context of our structural models of the respective domains. We describe two structural hotspots in the pseudokinase domain of Jak2 that seem to be associated either to myeloproliferation or to lymphoblastic leukaemia, pointing at the involvement of distinct signalling complexes in these disease settings. The different domains of Jaks are discussed as potential drug targets. We present currently available inhibitors targeting Jaks and indicate structural differences in the kinase domains of the different Jaks that may be exploited in the development of specific inhibitors. Moreover, we discuss recent chemical genetic approaches which can be applied to Jaks to better understand the role of these kinases in their biological settings and as drug targets. PMID:20132407

  18. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mohna; Arbet, Scott; Bishop, Clifton P.; Bidwai, Ashok P.

    2016-01-01

    CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase. PMID:28036067

  19. Identification of Novel Focal Adhesion Kinase Substrates: Role for FAK in NFκB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Sheila Figel; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a major signaling molecule which functions downstream of integrins or in conjunction with mitogenic signaling pathways. FAK is overexpressed and/or activated in many types of human tumors, in which it promotes cell adhesion, survival, migration and invasion. In addition to FAK's ability to regulate signaling through its scaffolding activities, FAK encodes an intrinsic kinase activity. Although some FAK substrates have been identified, a more comprehensive analysis of substrates is lacking. In this study, we use a protein microarray to screen the human proteome for FAK substrates. We confirm that several of the proteins identified are bona fide in vitro FAK substrates, including several factors which are known to regulate the NFκB pathway. Finally, we identify a role for FAK's kinase activity in both canonical and non-canonical NFκB signaling. Our screen therefore represents the first high throughput screen for FAK substrates and provides the basis for future in-depth analysis of the role of FAK's kinase activity in the processes of tumorigenesis. PMID:25798060

  20. ATM kinase inhibition in glial cells activates the innate immune response and causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew J; Rimkus, Stacey A; Wassarman, David A

    2012-03-13

    To investigate the mechanistic basis for central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration in the disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), we analyzed flies mutant for the causative gene A-T mutated (ATM). ATM encodes a protein kinase that functions to monitor the genomic integrity of cells and control cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis programs. Mutation of the C-terminal amino acid in Drosophila ATM inhibited the kinase activity and caused neuron and glial cell death in the adult brain and a reduction in mobility and longevity. These data indicate that reduced ATM kinase activity is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration in A-T. ATM kinase mutant flies also had elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells. ATM knockdown in glial cells, but not neurons, was sufficient to cause neuron and glial cell death, a reduction in mobility and longevity, and elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells, indicating that a non-cell-autonomous mechanism contributes to neurodegeneration in A-T. Taken together, these data suggest that early-onset CNS neurodegeneration in A-T is similar to late-onset CNS neurodegeneration in diseases such as Alzheimer's in which uncontrolled inflammatory response mediated by glial cells drives neurodegeneration.

  1. Structure-function relationships of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Pho85.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, R C; Waters, N C; Creasy, C L; Bergman, L W

    1995-01-01

    The PHO85 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a cyclin-dependent kinase involved in both transcriptional regulation and cell cycle progression. Although a great deal is known concerning the structure, function, and regulation of the highly homologous Cdc28 protein kinase, little is known concerning these relationships in regard to Pho85. In this study, we constructed a series of Pho85-Cdc28 chimeras to map the region(s) of the Pho85 molecule that is critical for function of Pho85 in repression of acid phosphatase (PHO5) expression. Using a combination of site-directed and ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutagenesis, we have identified numerous residues critical for either activation of the Pho85 kinase, interaction of Pho85 with the cyclin-like molecule Pho80, or substrate recognition. Finally, analysis of mutations analogous to those previously identified in either Cdc28 or cdc2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe suggested that the inhibition of Pho85-Pho80 activity in mechanistically different from that seen in the other cyclin-dependent kinases. PMID:7565699

  2. Kinase-KCC2 coupling: Cl− rheostasis, disease susceptibility, therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of Cl− ([Cl−]i) in neurons is a highly regulated variable that is established and modulated by the finely tuned activity of the KCC2 cotransporter. Despite the importance of KCC2 for neurophysiology and its role in multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, our knowledge of the transporter's regulatory mechanisms is incomplete. Recent studies suggest that the phosphorylation state of KCC2 at specific residues in its cytoplasmic COOH terminus, such as Ser940 and Thr906/Thr1007, encodes discrete levels of transporter activity that elicit graded changes in neuronal Cl− extrusion to modulate the strength of synaptic inhibition via Cl−-permeable GABAA receptors. In this review, we propose that the functional and physical coupling of KCC2 to Cl−-sensitive kinase(s), such as the WNK1-SPAK kinase complex, constitutes a molecular “rheostat” that regulates [Cl−]i and thereby influences the functional plasticity of GABA. The rapid reversibility of (de)phosphorylation facilitates regulatory precision, and multisite phosphorylation allows for the control of KCC2 activity by different inputs via distinct or partially overlapping upstream signaling cascades that may become more or less important depending on the physiological context. While this adaptation mechanism is highly suited to maintaining homeostasis, its adjustable set points may render it vulnerable to perturbation and dysregulation. Finally, we suggest that pharmacological modulation of this kinase-KCC2 rheostat might be a particularly efficacious strategy to enhance Cl− extrusion and therapeutically restore GABA inhibition. PMID:26510764

  3. Chromosomal localization of two genes encoding human ras exchange factors: SOS1 maps to the 2p22-->p16 region and SOS2 to the 14q21-->q22 region of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Mattei, M G

    1994-01-01

    The human SOS1 and SOS2 genes encode proteins that control GDP-->GTP exchange on ras proteins and are involved in signal transduction by tyrosine kinase receptors. In situ hybridization shows that SOS1 maps to 2p22-->p16 and SOS2 to 14q21-->q22 in the human genome.

  4. Plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Coughter, J P; Johnston, J L

    1986-01-01

    High-level (greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to the antimicrobial agent trimethoprim was found in 17 of 101 (17%) coagulase-negative staphylococci and 5 of 51 (10%) Staphylococcus aureus from a number of different hospitals in the United States. Resistance was plasmid encoded and could be transferred by conjugation in 4 of the 17 (24%) Tpr coagulase-negative staphylococci and 3 of the 5 (60%) Tpr S. aureus. A 1.2-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA from one of the plasmids (pG01) was cloned on a high-copy-number vector in Escherichia coli and expressed high-level Tpr (MIC, 1,025 micrograms/ml) in the gram-negative host. In situ filter hybridization demonstrated homology between the cloned Tpr gene probe and plasmid DNA from each conjugative Tpr plasmid, a single nonconjugative plasmid from a United States Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate, a nonconjugative plasmid from an Australian methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, and chromosomal DNA from three Tpr S. epidermidis isolates that did not contain any plasmid DNA that was homologous with the probe. No homology was seen between the probe and staphylococcal plasmids not mediating Tpr, plasmid DNA from 12 Tpr S. epidermidis isolates not transferring Tpr by conjugation, or plasmid-encoded Tpr genes derived from gram-negative bacteria. Plasmid-encoded Tpr appears to be a relatively new gene in staphylococci and, because it can be transferred by conjugation, could become more prevalent in nonsocomial isolates. Images PMID:3729338

  5. Evaluating standard terminologies for encoding allergy information

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Foster R; Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph M; Broverman, Carol; Robinson, George; Middleton, Blackford; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Allergy documentation and exchange are vital to ensuring patient safety. This study aims to analyze and compare various existing standard terminologies for representing allergy information. Methods Five terminologies were identified, including the Systemized Nomenclature of Medical Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), National Drug File–Reference Terminology (NDF-RT), Medication Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), Unique Ingredient Identifier (UNII), and RxNorm. A qualitative analysis was conducted to compare desirable characteristics of each terminology, including content coverage, concept orientation, formal definitions, multiple granularities, vocabulary structure, subset capability, and maintainability. A quantitative analysis was also performed to compare the content coverage of each terminology for (1) common food, drug, and environmental allergens and (2) descriptive concepts for common drug allergies, adverse reactions (AR), and no known allergies. Results Our qualitative results show that SNOMED CT fulfilled the greatest number of desirable characteristics, followed by NDF-RT, RxNorm, UNII, and MedDRA. Our quantitative results demonstrate that RxNorm had the highest concept coverage for representing drug allergens, followed by UNII, SNOMED CT, NDF-RT, and MedDRA. For food and environmental allergens, UNII demonstrated the highest concept coverage, followed by SNOMED CT. For representing descriptive allergy concepts and adverse reactions, SNOMED CT and NDF-RT showed the highest coverage. Only SNOMED CT was capable of representing unique concepts for encoding no known allergies. Conclusions The proper terminology for encoding a patient's allergy is complex, as multiple elements need to be captured to form a fully structured clinical finding. Our results suggest that while gaps still exist, a combination of SNOMED CT and RxNorm can satisfy most criteria for encoding common allergies and provide sufficient content coverage. PMID:23396542

  6. Using the ENCODE Resource for Functional Annotation of Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    Pazin, Michael J

    2015-03-11

    This article illustrates the use of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) resource to generate or refine hypotheses from genomic data on disease and other phenotypic traits. First, the goals and history of ENCODE and related epigenomics projects are reviewed. Second, the rationale for ENCODE and the major data types used by ENCODE are briefly described, as are some standard heuristics for their interpretation. Third, the use of the ENCODE resource is examined. Standard use cases for ENCODE, accessing the ENCODE resource, and accessing data from related projects are discussed. Although the focus of this article is the use of ENCODE data, some of the same approaches can be used with data from other projects.

  7. NDP kinase reactivity towards 3TC nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kreimeyer, A; Schneider, B; Sarfati, R; Faraj, A; Sommadossi, J P; Veron, M; Deville-Bonne, D

    2001-05-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is usually considered as the enzyme responsible for the last step of the cellular phosphorylation pathway leading to the synthesis of biologically active triphospho-derivatives of nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies and in particular in the treatment of AIDS. NDP kinase lacks specificity for the nucleobase and can use as substrate both ribo- or 2'-deoxyribonucleotides. However, only nucleoside analogs with a sugar moiety in the D-configuration (e.g. 3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T)) have so far been analyzed as substrates of NDP kinase. In contrast, beta-L-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC), also called lamivudine, is a nucleoside analog that is now widely used in AIDS therapy and has a sugar moiety in the L-configuration. Using protein fluorescence to monitor the phosphotransfer between the enzyme and the nucleotide derivative at the presteady state, we have studied the reactivity of 3TC triphosphate and of other L-dideoxynucleotides with NDP kinase. We found that L-dideoxynucleoside triphosphates have a poor affinity for NDP kinase and that the catalytic efficiency of the phosphorylation of L-dideoxyderivatives is very low as compared with their D-enantiomers. We discuss these results using a computer model of 3TC diphosphate bound to the NDP kinase active site. NDP kinase may not seem to be the major enzyme phosphorylating 3TC-DP, in contrast to current opinion.

  8. IGF-1R inhibition sensitizes breast cancer cells to ATM-related kinase (ATR) inhibitor and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    O'Flanagan, Ciara H.; O'shea, Sandra; Lyons, Amy; Fogarty, Fionola M.; McCabe, Nuala; Kennedy, Richard D.; O'Connor, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the IGF-1 signalling axis is clearly a roadblock in targeting this receptor in cancer therapy. Here, we sought to identify mediators of resistance, and potential co-targets for IGF-1R inhibition. By using an siRNA functional screen with the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS-754807 in MCF-7 cells we identified several genes encoding components of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathways as mediators of resistance to IGF-1R kinase inhibition. These included ATM and Ataxia Telangiectasia and RAD3-related kinase (ATR). We also observed a clear induction of DDR in cells that were exposed to IGF-1R TKIs (BMS-754807 and OSI-906) as indicated by accumulation of γ-H2AX, and phosphorylated Chk1. Combination of the IGF-1R/IR TKIs with an ATR kinase inhibitor VE-821 resulted in additive to synergistic cytotoxicity compared to either drug alone. In MCF-7 cells with stably acquired resistance to the IGF-1R TKI (MCF-7-R), DNA damage was also observed, and again, dual inhibition of the ATR kinase and IGF-1R/IR kinase resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity. Interestingly, dual inhibition of ATR and IGF-1R was more effective in MCF-7-R cells than parental cells. IGF-1R TKIs also potentiated the effects of cisplatin in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Overall, our findings identify induction of DDR by IGF-1R kinase inhibition as a rationale for co-targeting the IGF-1R with ATR kinase inhibitors or cisplatin, particularly in cells with acquired resistance to TKIs. PMID:27472395

  9. The ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) Project.

    PubMed

    2004-10-22

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The pilot phase of the Project is focused on a specified 30 megabases (approximately 1%) of the human genome sequence and is organized as an international consortium of computational and laboratory-based scientists working to develop and apply high-throughput approaches for detecting all sequence elements that confer biological function. The results of this pilot phase will guide future efforts to analyze the entire human genome.

  10. Rapidly-Indexing Incremental-Angle Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, Philip R.; Meyer, Wallace W.

    1989-01-01

    Optoelectronic system measures relative angular position of shaft or other device to be turned, also measures absolute angular position after device turned through small angle. Relative angular position measured with fine resolution by optoelectronically counting finely- and uniformly-spaced light and dark areas on encoder disk as disk turns past position-sensing device. Also includes track containing coarsely- and nonuniformly-spaced light and dark areas, angular widths varying in proportion to absolute angular position. This second track provides gating and indexing signal.

  11. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Clark D; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D

    2013-05-28

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting ẑ-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  12. Space Qualified High Speed Reed Solomon Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambles, Jody W.; Winkert, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports a Class S CCSDS recommendation Reed Solomon encoder circuit baselined for several NASA programs. The chip is fabricated using United Technologies Microelectronics Center's UTE-R radiation-hardened gate array family, contains 64,000 p-n transistor pairs, and operates at a sustained output data rate of 200 MBits/s. The chip features a pin selectable message interleave depth of from 1 to 8 and supports output block lengths of 33 to 255 bytes. The UTE-R process is reported to produce parts that are radiation hardened to 16 Rads (Si) total dose and 1.0(exp -10) errors/bit-day.

  13. Subband image encoder using discrete wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Hae Kyung; Rhee, Kang Hyeon

    2004-03-01

    Introduction of digital communication network such as Integrated Services Digital Networks (ISDN) and digital storage media have rapidly developed. Due to a large amount of image data, compression is the key techniques in still image and video using digital signal processing for transmitting and storing. Digital image compression provides solutions for various image applications that represent digital image requiring a large amount of data. In this paper, the proposed DWT (Discrete Wavelet Transform) filter bank is consisted of simple architecture, but it is efficiently designed that a user obtains a wanted compression rate as only input parameter. If it is implemented by FPGA chip, the designed encoder operates in 12 MHz.

  14. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation.

  15. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  16. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  17. Auditory location as an encoding dimension.

    PubMed

    Weeks, R A

    1975-05-01

    In two experiments, subjects were given five successive short-term memory tests. In Experiment 1, recall was not significantly facilitated when memory material in the final test was delivered to the ear opposite to the one that received the memory material in the four preceding tests. In Experiment 2, events were presented from two differentially located speakers rather than through headphones. A shift across speakers on the final test did produce proactive interference release. These findings suggest spatial location as a potential encoding dimension of verbal material.

  18. Digitally encoded all-optical sensor multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Anjum

    1992-01-01

    A digital, all-optical temperature sensor design concept based on optical sampling and digital encoding is presented. The proposed sensor generates 2M binary digital codewords of length M bits. The codewords are generated serially and, therefore, only a single output fiber line is required. A multiplexing scheme, which minimizes the power requirement per sensor array and facilitates a cost-effective digit regeneration for remote monitoring over long distance, is presented. The sensor arrays are used as building blocks to configure large scale sensor networks based on LAN topologies.

  19. Wavelet encoding and variable resolution progressive transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    Progressive transmission is a method of transmitting and displaying imagery in stages of successively improving quality. The subsampled lowpass image representations generated by a wavelet transformation suit this purpose well, but for best results the order of presentation is critical. Candidate data for transmission are best selected using dynamic prioritization criteria generated from image contents and viewer guidance. We show that wavelets are not only suitable but superior when used to encode data for progressive transmission at non-uniform resolutions. This application does not preclude additional compression using quantization of highpass coefficients, which to the contrary results in superior image approximations at low data rates.

  20. Image compression based on GPU encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhaofeng; Qiu, Yuehong

    2015-07-01

    With the rapid development of digital technology, the data increased greatly in both static image and dynamic video image. It is noticeable how to decrease the redundant data in order to save or transmit information more efficiently. So the research on image compression becomes more and more important. Using GPU to achieve higher compression ratio has superiority in interactive remote visualization. Contrast to CPU, GPU may be a good way to accelerate the image compression. Currently, GPU of NIVIDIA has evolved into the eighth generation, which increasingly dominates the high-powered general purpose computer field. This paper explains the way of GPU encoding image. Some experiment results are also presented.

  1. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  2. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purified protein kinases from rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2009-08-19

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex.

  3. Protein-Protein Interactions of Tandem Affinity Purified Protein Kinases from Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rohila, Jai S.; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L.; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex. PMID:19690613

  4. An archaeal ADP-dependent serine kinase involved in cysteine biosynthesis and serine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Yuki; Sato, Takaaki; Kawamura, Hiroki; Hachisuka, Shin-ichi; Takeno, Ryo; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2016-01-01

    Routes for cysteine biosynthesis are still unknown in many archaea. Here we find that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis generates cysteine from serine via O-phosphoserine, in addition to the classical route from 3-phosphoglycerate. The protein responsible for serine phosphorylation is encoded by TK0378, annotated as a chromosome partitioning protein ParB. The TK0378 protein utilizes ADP as the phosphate donor, but in contrast to previously reported ADP-dependent kinases, recognizes a non-sugar substrate. Activity is specific towards free serine, and not observed with threonine, homoserine and serine residues within a peptide. Genetic analyses suggest that TK0378 is involved in serine assimilation and clearly responsible for cysteine biosynthesis from serine. TK0378 homologs, present in Thermococcales and Desulfurococcales, are most likely not ParB proteins and constitute a group of kinases involved in serine utilization. PMID:27857065

  5. Neuronal and intestinal protein kinase d isoforms mediate Na+ (salt taste)-induced learning.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ya; Ren, Min; Feng, Hui; Chen, Lu; Altun, Zeynep F; Rubin, Charles S

    2009-08-11

    Ubiquitously expressed protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are poised to disseminate signals carried by diacylglycerol (DAG). However, the in vivo regulation and functions of PKDs are poorly understood. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, dkf-2, encodes not just DKF-2A, but also a second previously unknown isoform, DKF-2B. Whereas DKF-2A is present mainly in intestine, we show that DKF-2B is found in neurons. Characterization of dkf-2 null mutants and transgenic animals expressing DKF-2B, DKF-2A, or both isoforms revealed that PKDs couple DAG signals to regulation of sodium ion (Na+)-induced learning. EGL-8 (a phospholipase Cbeta4 homolog) and TPA-1 (a protein kinase Cdelta homolog) are upstream regulators of DKF-2 isoforms in vivo. Thus, pathways containing EGL-8-TPA-1-DKF-2 enable learning and behavioral plasticity by receiving, transmitting, and cooperatively integrating environmental signals targeted to both neurons and intestine.

  6. Human Gastric Cancer Kinase Profile and Prognostic Significance of MKK4 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chew-Wun; Li, Anna F.-Y.; Chi, Chin-Wen; Huang, Chen Lung; Shen, King-Han; Liu, Wing-Yiu; Lin, Wen-chang

    2000-01-01

    Alterations of protein tyrosine kinase are often associated with uncontrolled cell growth and tumor progression. Knowledge of the overall expression pattern of tyrosine kinases should prove beneficial in understanding the signaling pathways involved in gastric cancer oncogenesis and in providing possible biomarkers for gastric cancer progression. To establish a general tyrosine-kinase expression profile, degenerated polymerase chain reaction primers designed from the consensus catalytic kinase motifs were used to amplify protein tyrosine kinase molecules from gastric cancer tissues. We observed more than 50 tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases from matching pairs of gastric cancer tissue and normal mucosa. Based on this new kinase profile information, we selected the MKK4 gene for further immunohistochemical studies. Statistical analysis of MKK4 protein expression and clinicopathological features indicated that MKK4 kinase expression could serve as a significant prognostic factor for relapse-free survival and for overall survival. We demonstrated a simple and sensitive method for establishing protein tyrosine-kinase expression profiles of human gastric cancer tissues as well as for discovering novel and useful clinical biomarkers from such kinase expression profiles. PMID:10854223

  7. Polo-like kinase-activating kinases: Aurora A, Aurora B and what else?

    PubMed

    Archambault, Vincent; Carmena, Mar

    2012-04-15

    The events of cell division are regulated by a complex interplay between kinases and phosphatases. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), polo-like kinases (Plks) and Aurora kinases play central roles in this process. Polo kinase (Plk1 in humans) regulates a wide range of events in mitosis and cytokinesis. To ensure the accuracy of these processes, polo activity itself is subject to complex regulation. Phosphorylation of polo in its T loop (or activation loop) increases its kinase activity several-fold. It has been shown that Aurora A kinase, with its co-factor Bora, activates Plk1 in G(2), and that this is essential for recovery from cell cycle arrest induced by DNA damage. In a recent article published in PLoS Biology, we report that Drosophila polo is activated by Aurora B kinase at centromeres, and that this is crucial for polo function in regulating chromosome dynamics in prometaphase. Our results suggest that this regulatory pathway is conserved in humans. Here, we propose a model for the collaboration between Aurora B and polo in the regulation of kinetochore attachment to microtubules in early mitosis. Moreover, we suggest that Aurora B could also function to activate Polo/Plk1 in cytokinesis. Finally, we discuss recent findings and open questions regarding the activation of polo and polo-like kinases by different kinases in mitosis, cytokinesis and other processes.

  8. A genetic screen for modifiers of a kinase suppressor of Ras-dependent rough eye phenotype in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, M; Morrison, D K; Wong, A M; Rubin, G M

    2000-01-01

    kinase suppressor of Ras (ksr) encodes a putative protein kinase that by genetic criteria appears to function downstream of RAS in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways. While biochemical evidence suggests that the role of KSR is closely linked to the signal transduction mechanism of the MAPK cascade, the precise molecular function of KSR remains unresolved. To further elucidate the role of KSR and to identify proteins that may be required for KSR function, we conducted a dominant modifier screen in Drosophila based on a KSR-dependent phenotype. Overexpression of the KSR kinase domain in a subset of cells during Drosophila eye development blocks photoreceptor cell differentiation and results in the external roughening of the adult eye. Therefore, mutations in genes functioning with KSR might modify the KSR-dependent phenotype. We screened approximately 185,000 mutagenized progeny for dominant modifiers of the KSR-dependent rough eye phenotype. A total of 15 complementation groups of Enhancers and four complementation groups of Suppressors were derived. Ten of these complementation groups correspond to mutations in known components of the Ras1 pathway, demonstrating the ability of the screen to specifically identify loci critical for Ras1 signaling and further confirming a role for KSR in Ras1 signaling. In addition, we have identified 4 additional complementation groups. One of them corresponds to the kismet locus, which encodes a putative chromatin remodeling factor. The relevance of these loci with respect to the function of KSR and the Ras1 pathway in general is discussed. PMID:11063697

  9. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries.

  10. Fungal phytopathogens encode functional homologues of plant rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) peptides.

    PubMed

    Thynne, Elisha; Saur, Isabel M L; Simbaqueba, Jaime; Ogilvie, Huw A; Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Mead, Oliver; Taranto, Adam; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; McDonald, Megan C; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Jones, David A; Rathjen, John P; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-06-13

    In this article, we describe the presence of genes encoding close homologues of an endogenous plant peptide, rapid alkalinization factor (RALF), within the genomes of 26 species of phytopathogenic fungi. Members of the RALF family are key growth factors in plants, and the sequence of the RALF active region is well conserved between plant and fungal proteins. RALF1-like sequences were observed in most cases; however, RALF27-like sequences were present in the Sphaerulina musiva and Septoria populicola genomes. These two species are pathogens of poplar and, interestingly, the closest relative to their respective RALF genes is a poplar RALF27-like sequence. RALF peptides control cellular expansion during plant development, but were originally defined on the basis of their ability to induce rapid alkalinization in tobacco cell cultures. To test whether the fungal RALF peptides were biologically active in plants, we synthesized RALF peptides corresponding to those encoded by two sequenced genomes of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. One of these peptides inhibited the growth of tomato seedlings and elicited responses in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana typical of endogenous plant RALF peptides (reactive oxygen species burst, induced alkalinization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation). Gene expression analysis confirmed that a RALF-encoding gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was expressed during infection on tomato. However, a subsequent reverse genetics approach revealed that the RALF peptide was not required by F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici for infection on tomato roots. This study has demonstrated the presence of functionally active RALF peptides encoded within phytopathogens that harbour an as yet undetermined role in plant-pathogen interactions.

  11. Functional analysis of anomeric sugar kinases.

    PubMed

    Conway, Louis P; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-09-02

    Anomeric sugar kinases perform fundamental roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates. Under- or overexpression of these enzymes, or mutations causing functional impairments can give rise to diseases such as galactosaemia and so the study of this class of kinase is of critical importance. In addition, anomeric sugar kinases which are naturally promiscuous, or have been artificially made so, may find application in the synthesis of libraries of drug candidates (for example, antibiotics), and natural or unnatural oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological functions of these enzymes, the tools which have been developed to investigate them, and the current frontiers in their study.

  12. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  13. Visual Encoding Mechanisms and Their Relationship to Text Presentation Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pammer, Kristen; Lavis, Ruth; Cornelissen, Piers

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the importance of spatial encoding in reading, with particular emphasis on visuo-spatial encoding mechanisms. Thirty one school children participated in the first study in which they were measured on their ability to solve a centrally presented spatial encoding task, as well as their sensitivity to the…

  14. Socialization Processes in Encoding and Decoding: Learning Effective Nonverbal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.; Coats, Erik

    This study examined the relationship of nonverbal encoding and decoding skills to the level of exposure to television. Subjects were children in second through sixth grade. Three nonverbal skills (decoding, spontaneous encoding, and posed encoding) were assessed for each of five emotions: anger, disgust, fear or surprise, happiness, and sadness.…

  15. Optical Pseudocolor Encoding Of Gray-Scale Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1990-01-01

    Optical encoding much faster than digital electronic encoding. In optical pseudocolor-encoding apparatus brightness modulation in image from television camera transformed into polarization modulation in LCTV, and then into pseudocolor modulation in image on projection screen. Advantageous for such purposes as thermography, inspection of circuit boards, mammography, and mapping.

  16. Self-encoding resin beads of combinatorial library screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Du; Zhao, Yuandi; Cheng, Tongsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2003-07-01

    The latest self-encoding resin bead is a novel technology for solid phase synthesis combinatorial library screening. A new encode-positional deconvolution strategy which was based on that technology been illustrated compared with positional scanning and iterative strategies. The self-encoding resin beads technology provides an efficient method for improving the high-throughput screening of combinatorial library.

  17. Glycerate kinase of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermoproteus tenax: new insights into the phylogenetic distribution and physiological role of members of the three different glycerate kinase classes

    PubMed Central

    Kehrer, Daniel; Ahmed, Hatim; Brinkmann, Henner; Siebers, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Background The presence of the branched Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway in two hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea, the anaerobe Thermoproteus tenax and the aerobe Sulfolobus solfataricus, was suggested. However, so far no enzymatic information of the non-phosphorylative ED branch and especially its key enzyme – glycerate kinase – was available. In the T. tenax genome, a gene homolog with similarity to putative hydroxypyruvate reductase/glycerate dehydrogenase and glycerate kinase was identified. Results The encoding gene was expressed in E. coli in a recombinant form, the gene product purified and the glycerate kinase activity was confirmed by enzymatic studies. The enzyme was active as a monomer and catalyzed the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of D-glycerate forming exclusively 2-phosphoglycerate. The enzyme was specific for glycerate and highest activity was observed with ATP as phosphoryl donor and Mg2+ as divalent cation. ATP could be partially replaced by GTP, CTP, TTP and UTP. The enzyme showed high affinity for D-glycerate (Km 0.02 ± 0.01 mM, Vmax of 5.05 ± 0.52 U/mg protein) as well as ATP (Km of 0.03 ± 0.01 mM, Vmax of 4.41 ± 0.04 U/mg protein), although at higher glycerate concentrations, substrate inhibition was observed. Furthermore, the enzyme was inhibited by its product ADP via competitive inhibition. Data bank searches revealed that archaeal glycerate kinases are members of the MOFRL (multi-organism fragment with rich leucine) family, and homologs are found in all three domains of life. Conclusion A re-evaluation of available genome sequence information as well as biochemical and phylogenetic studies revealed the presence of the branched ED pathway as common route for sugar degradation in Archaea that utilize the ED pathway. Detailed analyses including phylogenetic studies demonstrate the presence of three distinct glycerate kinase classes in extant organisms that share no common origin. The affiliation of characterized glycerate kinases with the

  18. Dominant-activating germline mutations in the gene encoding the PI(3)K catalytic subunit p110δ result in T cell senescence and human immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carrie L; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Zhao, Fang; Niemela, Julie E; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Avery, Danielle T; Moens, Leen; Cannons, Jennifer L; Biancalana, Matthew; Stoddard, Jennifer; Ouyang, Weiming; Frucht, David M; Rao, V Koneti; Atkinson, T Prescott; Agharahimi, Anahita; Hussey, Ashleigh A; Folio, Les R; Olivier, Kenneth N; Fleisher, Thomas A; Pittaluga, Stefania; Holland, Steven M; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Oliveira, Joao B; Tangye, Stuart G; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Lenardo, Michael J; Uzel, Gulbu

    2014-01-01

    The p110δ subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) is selectively expressed in leukocytes and is critical for lymphocyte biology. Here we report fourteen patients from seven families who were heterozygous for three different germline, gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CD (which encodes p110δ). These patients presented with sinopulmonary infections, lymphadenopathy, nodular lymphoid hyperplasia and viremia due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and/or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Strikingly, they had a substantial deficiency in naive T cells but an over-representation of senescent effector T cells. In vitro, T cells from patients exhibited increased phosphorylation of the kinase Akt and hyperactivation of the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR, enhanced glucose uptake and terminal effector differentiation. Notably, treatment with rapamycin to inhibit mTOR activity in vivo partially restored the abundance of naive T cells, largely 'rescued' the in vitro T cell defects and improved the clinical course.

  19. The First Gene-encoded Amphibian Neurotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    You, Dewen; Hong, Jing; Rong, Mingqiang; Yu, Haining; Liang, Songping; Ma, Yufang; Yang, Hailong; Wu, Jing; Lin, Donghai; Lai, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Many gene-encoded neurotoxins with various functions have been discovered in fish, reptiles, and mammals. A novel 60-residue neurotoxin peptide (anntoxin) that inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) was purified and characterized from the skin secretions of the tree frog Hyla annectans (Jerdon). This is the first gene-encoded neurotoxin found in amphibians. The IC50 of anntoxin for the TTX-S channel was about 3.4 μm. Anntoxin shares sequence homology with Kunitz-type toxins but contains only two of three highly conserved cysteine bridges, which are typically found in these small, basic neurotoxin modules, i.e. snake dendrotoxins. Anntoxin showed an inhibitory ability against trypsin with an inhibitory constant (Ki) of 0.025 μm. Anntoxin was distributed in skin, brain, stomach, and liver with a concentration of 25, 7, 3, and 2 μg/g wet tissue, respectively. H. annectans lives on trees or other plants for its entire life cycle, and its skin contains the largest amount of anntoxin, which possibly helps defend against various aggressors or predators. A low dose of anntoxin was found to induce lethal toxicity for several potential predators, including the insect, snake, bird, and mouse. The tissue distribution and functional properties of the current toxin may provide insights into the ecological adaptation of tree-living amphibians. PMID:19535333

  20. Directed forgetting benefits motor sequence encoding.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Tobias; Frings, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments investigated directed forgetting of newly learned motor sequences. Concurrently with the list method of directed forgetting, participants successively learned two lists of motor sequences. Each sequence consisted of four consecutive finger movements. After a short distractor task, a recall test was given. Both experiments compared a forget group that was instructed to forget list-1 items with a remember group not receiving a forget instruction. We found that the instruction to forget list 1 enhanced recall of subsequently learned motor sequences. This benefit of directed forgetting occurred independently of costs for list 1. A mediation analysis showed that the encoding accuracy of list 2 was a mediator of the recall benefit, that is, the more accurate execution of motor sequences of list 2 after receiving a forget instruction for list 1 accounted for better recall of list 2. Thus, the adaptation of the list method to motor action provided more direct evidence on the effect of directed forgetting on subsequent learning. The results corroborate the assumption of a reset of encoding as a consequence of directed forgetting.

  1. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ducros, Mathieu; Houssen, Yannick Goulam; Bradley, Jonathan; de Sars, Vincent; Charpak, Serge

    2013-01-01

    The advent of scanning two-photon microscopy (2PM) has created a fertile new avenue for noninvasive investigation of brain activity in depth. One principal weakness of this method, however, lies with the limit of scanning speed, which makes optical interrogation of action potential-like activity in a neuronal network problematic. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy (eMS2PM), a scanless method that allows simultaneous imaging of multiple targets in depth with high temporal resolution, addresses this drawback. eMS2PM uses a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to split a high-power femto-laser beam into multiple subbeams. To distinguish them, a digital micromirror device encodes each subbeam with a specific binary amplitude modulation sequence. Fluorescence signals from all independently targeted sites are then collected simultaneously onto a single photodetector and site-specifically decoded. We demonstrate that eMS2PM can be used to image spike-like voltage transients in cultured cells and fluorescence transients (calcium signals in neurons and red blood cells in capillaries from the cortex) in depth in vivo. These results establish eMS2PM as a unique method for simultaneous acquisition of neuronal network activity. PMID:23798397

  2. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Mathieu; Goulam Houssen, Yannick; Bradley, Jonathan; de Sars, Vincent; Charpak, Serge

    2013-08-06

    The advent of scanning two-photon microscopy (2PM) has created a fertile new avenue for noninvasive investigation of brain activity in depth. One principal weakness of this method, however, lies with the limit of scanning speed, which makes optical interrogation of action potential-like activity in a neuronal network problematic. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy (eMS2PM), a scanless method that allows simultaneous imaging of multiple targets in depth with high temporal resolution, addresses this drawback. eMS2PM uses a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to split a high-power femto-laser beam into multiple subbeams. To distinguish them, a digital micromirror device encodes each subbeam with a specific binary amplitude modulation sequence. Fluorescence signals from all independently targeted sites are then collected simultaneously onto a single photodetector and site-specifically decoded. We demonstrate that eMS2PM can be used to image spike-like voltage transients in cultured cells and fluorescence transients (calcium signals in neurons and red blood cells in capillaries from the cortex) in depth in vivo. These results establish eMS2PM as a unique method for simultaneous acquisition of neuronal network activity.

  3. Mutations in PLK4, encoding a master regulator of centriole biogenesis, cause microcephaly, growth failure and retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Ahmad, Ilyas; Klingseisen, Anna; Hussain, Muhammad Sajid; Bicknell, Louise S; Leitch, Andrea; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Murray, Jennie E; Hunt, David; Khan, Fawad; Ali, Zafar; Tinschert, Sigrid; Ding, James; Keith, Charlotte; Harley, Margaret E; Heyn, Patricia; Müller, Rolf; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Daire, Valérie Cormier; Dollfus, Hélène; Dupuis, Lucie; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Kenneth; Kariminejad, Ariana; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Moore, Anthony T; Saggar, Anand; Schlechter, Catie; Weleber, Richard; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Höhne, Wolfgang; Hurles, Matthew E; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Andrew P

    2014-12-01

    Centrioles are essential for ciliogenesis. However, mutations in centriole biogenesis genes have been reported in primary microcephaly and Seckel syndrome, disorders without the hallmark clinical features of ciliopathies. Here we identify mutations in the genes encoding PLK4 kinase, a master regulator of centriole duplication, and its substrate TUBGCP6 in individuals with microcephalic primordial dwarfism and additional congenital anomalies, including retinopathy, thereby extending the human phenotypic spectrum associated with centriole dysfunction. Furthermore, we establish that different levels of impaired PLK4 activity result in growth and cilia phenotypes, providing a mechanism by which microcephaly disorders can occur with or without ciliopathic features.

  4. A Highly Conserved Kinase Is an Essential Component for Stress Tolerance in Yeast and Plant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; van Montagu, Marc; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    1999-05-01

    Osmotic stress (drought, salt stress) is a major limiting factor for crop productivity in the world. Because cellular responses to osmotic stress are thought to be conserved in eukaryotes and because yeast is much more amenable than plants to genetic research, a functional strategy has been performed to identify limiting steps in osmotolerance of plants based on the complementation of yeast with a plant library. A new plant cDNA that encodes a functional homologue of the yeast Dbf2 kinase enhances salt, drought, cold, and heat tolerance upon overexpression in yeast as well as in transgenic plant cells.

  5. The ULTRACURVATA2 Gene of Arabidopsis Encodes an FK506-Binding Protein Involved in Auxin and Brassinosteroid Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    The dwarf ucu (ultracurvata) mutants of Arabidopsis display vegetative leaves that are spirally rolled downwards and show reduced expansion along the longitudinal axis. We have previously determined that the UCU1 gene encodes a SHAGGY/GSK3-like kinase that participates in the signaling pathways of auxins and brassinosteroids. Here, we describe four recessive alleles of the UCU2 gene, whose homozygotes display helical rotation of several organs in addition to other phenotypic traits shared with ucu1 mutants. Following a map-based strategy, we identified the UCU2 gene, which was found to encode a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase of the FK506-binding protein family, whose homologs in metazoans are involved in cell signaling and protein trafficking. Physiological and double mutant analyses suggest that UCU2 is required for growth and development and participates in auxin and brassinosteroid signaling. PMID:14730066

  6. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus encodes a two-component regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, A T; Calzolari, A; Cataldi, A A; Bogni, C; Nagel, R

    1999-08-01

    Sae is a regulatory locus that activates the production of several exoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus. A 3.4-kb fragment of a S. aureus genomic library, screened with a probe adjacent to the transposon insertion of a sae::Tn551 mutant, was cloned into a bifunctional vector. This fragment was shown to carry the sae locus by restoration of exoprotein production in sae mutants. The sae locus was mapped to the SmaI-D fragment of the staphylococcal chromosome by pulse-field electrophoresis. Sequence analysis of the cloned fragment revealed the presence of two genes, designated saeR and saeS, encoding a response regulator and a histidine protein kinase, respectively, with high homology to other bacterial two-component regulatory systems.

  7. Efficient genetic encoding of phosphoserine and its non-hydrolyzable analog

    PubMed Central

    Rogerson, Daniel T.; Sachdeva, Amit; Wang, Kaihang; Haq, Tamanna; Kazlauskaite, Agne; Hancock, Susan M.; Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; Muqit, Miratul M. K.; Fry, Andrew M.; Bayliss, Richard; Chin, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation is a key post-translational modification that regulates diverse biological processes. Powerful analytical methods have identified thousands of phosphorylation sites, but many of their functions remain to be deciphered. A key to understanding the function of protein phosphorylation is access to phosphorylated proteins, but this is often challenging or impossible. Here we evolve an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair that directs the efficient incorporation of phosphoserine into recombinant proteins in E. coli. Moreover, combining the orthogonal pair with a metabolically engineered E. coli enables the site-specific incorporation of a non-hydrolyzable analog of phosphoserine. Our approach enables quantitative decoding of the amber stop codon as phosphoserine and we purify several milligrams-per-liter of proteins bearing biologically relevant phosphorylations that were previously challenging or impossible to access: including phosphorylated ubiquitin and a kinase (Nek7) that is synthetically activated by a genetically encoded phosphorylation in its activation loop. PMID:26030730

  8. Dynamics driven allostery in protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kornev, Alexandr P.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases have very dynamic structures and their functionality strongly depends on their dynamic state. Active kinases reveal a dynamic pattern with residues clustering into semirigid communities that move in µs-ms timescale. Previously detected hydrophobic spines serve as connectors between communities. Communities do not follow the traditional subdomain structure of the kinase core or its secondary structure elements. Instead they are organized around main functional units. Integration of the communities depends on the assembly of the hydrophobic spine and phosphorylation of the activation loop. Single mutations can significantly disrupt the dynamic infrastructure and thereby interfere with long distance allosteric signaling that propagates throughout the whole molecule. Dynamics is proposed to be the underlying mechanism for allosteric regulation in protein kinases. PMID:26481499

  9. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  10. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic Anemia? Educational Resources (7 links) CLIMB National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases: Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency ( ... Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) CLIMB National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for ...

  11. Negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlee, C.; Casasent, D.

    1986-01-01

    In the digital multiplication by analog convolution algorithm, the bits of two encoded numbers are convolved to form the product of the two numbers in mixed binary representation; this output can be easily converted to binary. Attention is presently given to negative base encoding, treating base -2 initially, and then showing that the negative base system can be readily extended to any radix. In general, negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors represents a more efficient technique than either sign magnitude or 2's complement encoding, when the additions of digitally encoded products are performed in parallel.

  12. Fast Huffman encoding algorithms in MPEG-4 advanced audio coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzuchalski, Grzegorz

    2014-11-01

    This paper addresses the optimisation problem of Huffman encoding in MPEG-4 Advanced Audio Coding stan- dard. At first, the Huffman encoding problem and the need of encoding two side info parameters scale factor and Huffman codebook are presented. Next, Two Loop Search, Maximum Noise Mask Ratio and Trellis Based algorithms of bit allocation are briefly described. Further, Huffman encoding optimisation are shown. New methods try to check and change scale factor bands as little as possible to estimate bitrate cost or its change. Finally, the complexity of old and new methods is calculated, compared and measured time of encoding is given.

  13. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  14. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  15. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  16. Novel protein kinase C inhibitors: alpha-terthiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Ashendel, C L; Zhou, Q; Chang, C T; Lee, E S; Chang, C J

    1998-10-06

    A series of alpha-terthiophene derivatives were prepared and their protein kinase C inhibitory activity were evaluated. The aldehyde derivatives were most potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 microM). alpha-Terthiophene monoaldehyde was inactive in the inhibitions of protein kinase A, mitogen activated protein kinase and protein tyrosine kinase.

  17. CAT8, a new zinc cluster-encoding gene necessary for derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, D; Proft, M; Entian, K D

    1995-01-01

    The expression of gluconeogenic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (encoded by the FBP1 gene) depends on the carbon source. Analysis of the FBP1 promoter revealed two upstream activating elements, UAS1FBP1 and UAS2FBP1, which confer carbon source-dependent regulation on a heterologous reporter gene. On glucose media neither element was activated, whereas after transfer to ethanol a 100-fold derepression was observed. This gene activation depended on the previously identified derepression genes CAT1 (SNF1) (encoding a protein kinase) and CAT3 (SNF4) (probably encoding a subunit of Cat1p [Snf1p]). Screening for mutations specifically involved in UAS1FBP1 derepression revealed the new recessive derepression mutation cat8. The cat8 mutants also failed to derepress UAS2FBP1, and these mutants were unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. The CAT8 gene encodes a zinc cluster protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gal4p. Deletion of CAT8 caused a defect in glucose derepression which affected all key gluconeogenic enzymes. Derepression of glucose-repressible invertase and maltase was still normally regulated. A CAT8-lacZ promoter fusion revealed that the CAT8 gene itself is repressed by Cat4p (Mig1p). These results suggest that gluconeogenic genes are derepressed upon binding of Cat8p, whose synthesis depends on the release of Cat4p (Mig1p) from the CAT8 promoter. However, gluconeogenic promoters are still glucose repressed in cat4 mutants, which indicates that in addition to its transcription, the Cat8p protein needs further activation. The observation that multicopy expression of CAT8 reverses the inability of cat1 and cat3 mutants to grow on ethanol indicates that Cat8p might be the substrate of the Cat1p/Cat3p protein kinase. PMID:7891685

  18. A Multi-Encoding Approach for LTL Symbolic Satisfiability Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozier, Kristin Y.; Vardi, Moshe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Formal behavioral specifications written early in the system-design process and communicated across all design phases have been shown to increase the efficiency, consistency, and quality of the system under development. To prevent introducing design or verification errors, it is crucial to test specifications for satisfiability. Our focus here is on specifications expressed in linear temporal logic (LTL). We introduce a novel encoding of symbolic transition-based Buchi automata and a novel, "sloppy," transition encoding, both of which result in improved scalability. We also define novel BDD variable orders based on tree decomposition of formula parse trees. We describe and extensively test a new multi-encoding approach utilizing these novel encoding techniques to create 30 encoding variations. We show that our novel encodings translate to significant, sometimes exponential, improvement over the current standard encoding for symbolic LTL satisfiability checking.

  19. Optically coupled digital altitude encoder for general aviation altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    An optically coupled pressure altitude encoder which can be incorporated into commercially available inexpensive general aviation altimeters was successfully developed. The encoding of pressure altitude is accomplished in 100-ft (30.48-m) increments from -1000 to 20,000ft (-304.8 to 6096 m). The prototype encoders were retrofitted into two different internal altimeter configurations. A prototype encoder was checked for accuracy of transition points and environmental effects. Each altimeter configuration, with the encoder incorporated, was laboratory tested for performance and was subsequently flight-tested over the specified altitude range. With few exceptions, the assembled altimeter-encoder met aeronautical standards for altimeters and encoders. Design changes are suggested to improve performance to meet required standards consistently.

  20. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  1. Identification of mycobacterial GarA as a substrate of protein kinase G from M. tuberculosis using a KESTREL-based proteome wide approach.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Philipp; Pieters, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is generally mediated via two-component systems. These systems depend on the transfer of a phosphate molecule from a donor to an acceptor by histidine kinases, thereby activating the acceptor to allow downstream signaling/activation. Several bacterial genomes, including the genome of M. tuberculosis, were shown to encode eukaryotic-like kinases. To better understand the function of these kinases and the regulatory networks within which they operate, identification of downstream targets is essential. We here present a straightforward approach for the identification of bacterial Ser/Thr-kinase substrates. This approach is based on the KESTREL (Kinase Tracking and Substrate Elucidation) procedure combined with reversed-phase chromatography and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using this method, GarA was identified as one potential substrate for the mycobacterial Ser/Thr-protein kinase G (PknG). These results show that the modified KESTREL approach can be successfully employed for the identification of substrates for bacterial Ser/Thr-kinases.

  2. Structure of the two-domain hexameric APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans: structural basis for the absence of ATP sulfurylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Sean C.; Segel, Irwin H.; Fisher, Andrew J.

    2009-10-01

    APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans contains an inactive N-terminal ATP sulfurylase domain. The structure presented unveils the first hexameric assembly for an APS kinase, and reveals that structural changes in the N-terminal domain disrupt the ATP sulfurylase active site thus prohibiting activity. The Tbd-0210 gene of the chemolithotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans is annotated to encode a 60.5 kDa bifunctional enzyme with ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activity. This putative bifunctional enzyme was cloned, expressed and structurally characterized. The 2.95 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure reported here revealed a hexameric assembly with D{sub 3} symmetry. Each subunit contains a large N-terminal sulfurylase-like domain and a C-terminal APS kinase domain reminiscent of the two-domain fungal ATP sulfurylases of Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which also exhibit a hexameric assembly. However, the T. denitrificans enzyme exhibits numerous structural and sequence differences in the N-terminal domain that render it inactive with respect to ATP sulfurylase activity. Surprisingly, the C-terminal domain does indeed display APS kinase activity, indicating that this gene product is a true APS kinase. Therefore, these results provide the first structural insights into a unique hexameric APS kinase that contains a nonfunctional ATP sulfurylase-like domain of unknown function.

  3. DNA-Encoded Solid-Phase Synthesis: Encoding Language Design and Complex Oligomer Library Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The promise of exploiting combinatorial synthesis for small molecule discovery remains unfulfilled due primarily to the “structure elucidation problem”: the back-end mass spectrometric analysis that significantly restricts one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) library complexity. The very molecular features that confer binding potency and specificity, such as stereochemistry, regiochemistry, and scaffold rigidity, are conspicuously absent from most libraries because isomerism introduces mass redundancy and diverse scaffolds yield uninterpretable MS fragmentation. Here we present DNA-encoded solid-phase synthesis (DESPS), comprising parallel compound synthesis in organic solvent and aqueous enzymatic ligation of unprotected encoding dsDNA oligonucleotides. Computational encoding language design yielded 148 thermodynamically optimized sequences with Hamming string distance ≥ 3 and total read length <100 bases for facile sequencing. Ligation is efficient (70% yield), specific, and directional over 6 encoding positions. A series of isomers served as a testbed for DESPS’s utility in split-and-pool diversification. Single-bead quantitative PCR detected 9 × 104 molecules/bead and sequencing allowed for elucidation of each compound’s synthetic history. We applied DESPS to the combinatorial synthesis of a 75 645-member OBOC library containing scaffold, stereochemical and regiochemical diversity using mixed-scale resin (160-μm quality control beads and 10-μm screening beads). Tandem DNA sequencing/MALDI-TOF MS analysis of 19 quality control beads showed excellent agreement (<1 ppt) between DNA sequence-predicted mass and the observed mass. DESPS synergistically unites the advantages of solid-phase synthesis and DNA encoding, enabling single-bead structural elucidation of complex compounds and synthesis using reactions normally considered incompatible with unprotected DNA. The widespread availability of inexpensive oligonucleotide synthesis, enzymes, DNA sequencing, and

  4. Ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide toxins from mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jonathan D; Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic peptide toxins of poisonous Amanita mushrooms are chemically unique among known natural products. Furthermore, they differ from other fungal cyclic peptides in being synthesized on ribosomes instead of by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Because of their novel structures and biogenic origins, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of the Amanita cyclic peptides presents both challenges and opportunities. In particular, a full understanding of the pathway should lead to the ability to direct synthesis of a large number of novel cyclic peptides based on the Amanita toxin scaffold by genetic engineering of the encoding genes. Here, we highlight some of the principal methods for working with the Amanita cyclic peptides and the known steps in their biosynthesis.

  5. Ultrathin nonlinear metasurface for optical image encoding.

    PubMed

    Walter, Felicitas; Li, Guixin; Meier, Cedrik; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2017-04-14

    Security of optical information is of great importance in modern society. Many cryptography techniques based on classical and quantum optics have been widely explored in the linear optical regime. Nonlinear optical encryption, in which encoding and decoding involve nonlinear frequency conversions, represents a new strategy for securing optical information. Here, we demonstrate that an ultrathin nonlinear photonic metasurface, consisting of meta-atoms with three-fold rotational symmetry, can be used to hide optical images under illumination with a fundamental wave. However, the hidden image can be read out from second harmonic generation (SHG) waves. This is achieved by controlling the destructive and constructive interferences of SHG waves from two neighboring meta-atoms. In addition, we apply this concept to obtain grey-scale SHG imaging. Nonlinear metasurfaces based on space variant optical interference open new avenues for multi-level image encryption, anti-counterfeiting and background free image reconstruction.

  6. Ultrasonically Encoded Photoacoustic Flowgraphy in Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-11-01

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24mm·s-1 was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  7. Schistosome satellite DNA encodes active hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Ferbeyre, G; Smith, J M; Cedergren, R

    1998-07-01

    Using a computer program designed to search for RNA structural motifs in sequence databases, we have found a hammerhead ribozyme domain encoded in the Smalpha repetitive DNA of Schistosoma mansoni. Transcripts of these repeats are expressed as long multimeric precursor RNAs that cleave in vitro and in vivo into unit-length fragments. This RNA domain is able to engage in both cis and trans cleavage typical of the hammerhead ribozyme. Further computer analysis of S. mansoni DNA identified a potential trans cleavage site in the gene coding for a synaptobrevin-like protein, and RNA transcribed from this gene was efficiently cleaved by the Smalpha ribozyme in vitro. Similar families of repeats containing the hammerhead domain were found in the closely related Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosomatium douthitti species but were not present in Schistosoma japonicum or Heterobilharzia americana, suggesting that the hammerhead domain was not acquired from a common schistosome ancestor.

  8. Genetically encoded sensors for calcium and zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Amy E.; Dittmer, Philip; McCombs, Janet E.

    2008-02-01

    Our lab focuses on developing fluorescent biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) so that we can monitor signaling ions in living cells. These sensors are comprised of two fluorescent proteins and a sensing domain that undergoes a conformational change upon binding the target ligand. These sensors can be genetically encoded and hence incorporated into cells by transgenic technologies. Here we discuss the latest developments in our efforts to reengineer calcium sensors as well as develop new sensors for zinc. In these efforts we employ a combination of naturally occurring calcium and zinc binding domains, combined with protein engineering. We are also developing new methodologies to screen and sort sensor libraries using optically-integrated microfluidic devices. Thus far, we have targeted sensors to the ER, mitochondria, Golgi, nucleus, and plasma membrane in order to examine the spatial heterogeneity and localization of signaling processes.

  9. Photoelectrical encoder employing an optical grating

    SciTech Connect

    Kabaya, Y.

    1985-02-12

    A photoelectrical encoder is disclosed wherein a physical quantity is detected from brightness obtained by moving a first and a second scale. Each scale is provided thereon with an optical grating relative to each other. The grating in one of the scales is constructed such that a first signal lead-out material layer made of a light shielding conductive material, a PN semiconductor layer for converting light into electricity, and a second signal lead-out material layer made of a light transmitting conductive material are laminated on a light transmitting base member to form a narrow belt-shaped light receiving portion and a plurality of narrow belt-shaped light receiving portions arranged at regular pitches. Against the light from the light transmitting base member, the light receiving portions function as light shielding slits, and intervals between the light receiving portions are formed into light transmitting slits.

  10. Brain Circuits Encoding Reward from Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Edita; Atcherley, Christopher; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Relief from pain in humans is rewarding and pleasurable. Primary rewards, or reward predictive cues, are encoded in brain reward/motivational circuits. While considerable advances have been made in our understanding of reward circuits underlying positive reinforcement, less is known about the circuits underlying the hedonic and reinforcing actions of pain relief. We review findings from electrophysiological, neuroimaging and behavioral studies supporting the concept that the rewarding effect of pain relief requires opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex, activation of midbrain dopamine neurons and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Understanding of circuits that govern the reward of pain relief may allow the discovery of more effective and satisfying therapies for patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:26603560

  11. Expression of STM4467-encoded arginine deiminase controlled by the STM4463 regulator contributes to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Dongwoo; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-12-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages.

  12. Expression of STM4467-Encoded Arginine Deiminase Controlled by the STM4463 Regulator Contributes to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages. PMID:23006851

  13. The gene encoding proopiomelanocortin in the dog.

    PubMed

    Mol, J A; van Mansfeld, A D; Kwant, M M; van Wolferen, M; Rothuizen, J

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of ACTH in the dog is of interest for studies of the physiology of the pituitary-adrenocortical axis as well as for studies of the pathogenesis of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Despite this broad interest the nucleotide sequence encoding ACTH and its precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is not known, nor is it clear whether there are differences in POMC mRNA from the anterior lobe or the intermediate lobe of the normal pituitary or from pituitary tumours causing ACTH excess. Following the preparation of a cDNA library from the canine intermediate lobe of the pituitary gland, the part of the mRNA that is translated into the proopiomelanocortin prohormone was amplified using a polymerase chain reaction. Sequence analysis revealed the highest homology with the porcine mRNA sequence. Translation in a single reading frame revealed highly homologous areas in the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and ACTH part of the prohormone, whereas a high diversity was noticed at the sequence preceding ACTH and the beginning of beta-lipotropin. Northern blot analysis disclosed the presence of a POMC mRNA of approximately 1300 nucleotides. There were no size differences between the anterior lobe, intermediate lobe, and pituitary tumour derived POMC mRNA. The highest expression levels of POMC mRNA as related to the expression of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were found in the intermediate lobe of the canine pituitary gland. It is concluded that excessive production of ACTH by pituitary tumours is not caused by relatively high expression levels or alterations in the size of mRNA.

  14. Miniature Grating for Spectrally-Encoded Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongkyun; Martinez, Ramses V.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is an ultraminiature endoscopy technology that acquires high-definition images of internal organs through a sub-mm endoscopic probe. In SEE, a grating at the tip of the imaging optics diffracts the broadband light into multiple beams, where each beam with a distinctive wavelength is illuminated on a unique transverse location of the tissue. By encoding one transverse coordinate with the wavelength, SEE can image a line of the tissue at a time without using any beam scanning devices. This feature of the SEE technology allows the SEE probe to be miniaturized to sub-mm dimensions. While previous studies have shown that SEE has the potential to be utilized for various clinical imaging applications, the translation of SEE for medicine has been hampered by challenges in fabricating the miniature grating inherent to SEE probes. This paper describes a new fabrication method for SEE probes. The new method uses a soft lithographic approach to pattern a high-aspect-ratio grating at the tip of the miniature imaging optics. Using this technique, we have constructed a 500-μm-diameter SEE probe. The miniature grating at the tip of the probe had a measured diffraction efficiency of 75%. The new SEE probe was used to image a human finger and formalin fixed mouse embryos, demonstrating the capability of this device to visualize key anatomic features of tissues with high image contrast. In addition to providing high quality imaging SEE optics, the soft lithography method allows cost-effective and reliable fabrication of these miniature endoscopes, which will facilitate the clinical translation of SEE technology. PMID:23503940

  15. Encoding continuous spatial phenomena in GML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, M. E.; Ledoux, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the discussion about how to model and encode geographic information two meta-models of space exist: the 'object' view and the 'field' view. This difference in conceptual view is also reflected in different data models and encoding formats. Among GIS practitioners, ‘fields' (or ‘coverages') are being used almost exclusively in 2D, while in the geoscience community 3D and higher-dimensional fields are widely used. (Note that the dimensions in oceanographic/atmospheric coverages are not necessarily spatial dimensions, as any parameters (e.g. temperature of the air, or density of water) can be considered a dimension.) While standardisation work in ISO and OGC has led to agreement on how to best encode discrete spatial objects, for the modelling and encoding of continuous ‘fields' there are still a number of open issues. In the presentation we will shortly discuss the current standards related to fields, and look at their shortcomings and potential. In ISO 19123 for example a distinction is made between discrete and continuous coverages, but the difference is not very clear and hard to capture for implementers. As far as encoding is concerned: GML 3.x (ISO 19136) has a discrete coverage data type, but no continuous coverage type. We will then present an alternative solution to model fields, and show how it can be implemented using some parts of GML, but not the ISO/GML coverage type. This alternative data model for fields permits us to represent fields in 2D and 3D, although conceptually it can be easily extended to higher dimensions. Unlike current standards where there is a distinction between discrete and continuous fields/coverages, we argue that a field should always have one - and only one! - value for a given attribute at every location in the spatial domain (be this domain the surface of the Earth, a 3D volume, or even a 4D spatio-temporal hypercube). The principal idea behind the proposed model is that two things are needed to have a coverage: 1. a set

  16. Compartmentalization of mammalian pantothenate kinases.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The pantothenate kinases (PanK) catalyze the first and the rate-limiting step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and regulate the amount of CoA in tissues by differential isoform expression and allosteric interaction with metabolic ligands. The four human and mouse PanK proteins share a homologous carboxy-terminal catalytic domain, but differ in their amino-termini. These unique termini direct the isoforms to different subcellular compartments. PanK1α isoforms were exclusively nuclear, with preferential association with the granular component of the nucleolus during interphase. PanK1α also associated with the perichromosomal region in condensing chromosomes during mitosis. The PanK1β and PanK3 isoforms were cytosolic, with a portion of PanK1β associated with clathrin-associated vesicles and recycling endosomes. Human PanK2, known to associate with mitochondria, was specifically localized to the intermembrane space. Human PanK2 was also detected in the nucleus, and functional nuclear localization and export signals were identified and experimentally confirmed. Nuclear PanK2 trafficked from the nucleus to the mitochondria, but not in the other direction, and was absent from the nucleus during G2 phase of the cell cycle. The localization of human PanK2 in these two compartments was in sharp contrast to mouse PanK2, which was exclusively cytosolic. These data demonstrate that PanK isoforms are differentially compartmentalized allowing them to sense CoA homeostasis in different cellular compartments and enable interaction with regulatory ligands produced in these same locations.

  17. Mutational analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1 protein kinase and evidence for functional interaction with the SNF4 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Celenza, J L; Carlson, M

    1989-01-01

    The SNF1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein-serine/threonine kinase that is required for derepression of gene expression in response to glucose limitation. We present evidence that the protein kinase activity is essential for SNF1 function: substitution of Arg for Lys in the putative ATP-binding site results in a mutant phenotype. A polyhistidine tract near the N terminus was found to be dispensable. Deletion of the large region C terminal to the kinase domain only partially impaired SNF1 function, causing expression of invertase to be somewhat reduced but still glucose repressible. The function of the SNF4 gene, another component of the regulatory system, was required for maximal in vitro activity of the SNF1 protein kinase. Increased SNF1 gene dosage partially alleviated the requirement for SNF4. C-terminal deletions of SNF1 also reduced dependence on SNF4. Our findings suggest that SNF4 acts as a positive effector of the kinase but does not serve a regulatory function in signaling glucose availability. Images PMID:2557546

  18. Interaction of phospholipase D1 with a casein-kinase-2-like serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, I G; Walker, S J; Manifava, M; Li, D; Brown, H A; Ktistakis, N T

    2001-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD)1 was phosphorylated in vivo and by an associated kinase in vitro following immunoprecipitation. Both phosphorylation events were greatly reduced in a catalytically inactive point mutant in which the serine residue at position 911 was converted into alanine (S911A). The kinase could be enriched from detergent-extracted brain membranes and bind and phosphorylate PLD1 that was immunoprecipitated from COS-7 cells. Using in-gel kinase assays we determined that the size of the kinase is approximately 40 kDa and that PLD1 is more effective than S911A in binding the kinase. Preliminary analysis of the phosphorylation sites on PLD1 suggested that the kinase belongs to the casein kinase 2 (CK2) family. Consistent with this, we found that the kinase could utilize GTP, and could be inhibited by heparin and 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). Membrane fractions from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that inducibly express PLD1 contained an endogenous kinase activity that phosphorylated PLD1 using GTP and was inhibited by DRB. Direct evidence that the kinase is CK2 came from observations that immunoprecipitates using PLD1 antibodies contained immunoreactive CK2alpha, and immunoprecipitates using CK2alpha antibodies contained immunoreactive PLD1. Co-expression of PLD1 in COS-7 cells with the two recombinant CK2 subunits, alpha or beta, suggests that the association of PLD1 with the kinase is through the beta subunit. Supporting this, phosphorylation of PLD1 by purified recombinant CK2alpha was enhanced by purified recombinant CK2beta. Assays measuring PLD1 catalytic activity following phosphorylation by CK2 suggest that this phosphorylation event does not influence PLD1-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in vitro. PMID:11171116

  19. Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation of Aurora Kinases.

    PubMed

    Lindon, Catherine; Grant, Rhys; Min, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinases are essential regulators of mitosis in eukaryotes. In somatic cell divisions of higher eukaryotes, the paralogs Aurora kinase A (AurA) and Aurora kinase B (AurB) play non-overlapping roles that depend on their distinct spatiotemporal activities. These mitotic roles of Aurora kinases depend on their interactions with different partners that direct them to different mitotic destinations and different substrates: AurB is a component of the chromosome passenger complex that orchestrates the tasks of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, while AurA has many known binding partners and mitotic roles, including a well-characterized interaction with TPX2 that mediates its role in mitotic spindle assembly. Beyond the spatial control conferred by different binding partners, Aurora kinases are subject to temporal control of their activation and inactivation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is a critical route to irreversible inactivation of these kinases, which must occur for ordered transition from mitosis back to interphase. Both AurA and AurB undergo targeted proteolysis after anaphase onset as substrates of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase, even while they continue to regulate steps during mitotic exit. Temporal control of Aurora kinase destruction ensures that AurB remains active at the midbody during cytokinesis long after AurA activity has been largely eliminated from the cell. Differential destruction of Aurora kinases is achieved despite the fact that they are targeted at the same time and by the same ubiquitin ligase, making these substrates an interesting case study for investigating molecular determinants of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in higher eukaryotes. The prevalence of Aurora overexpression in cancers and their potential as therapeutic targets add importance to the task of understanding the molecular determinants of Aurora kinase stability. Here, we review what is known about ubiquitin-mediated targeting

  20. Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation of Aurora Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lindon, Catherine; Grant, Rhys; Min, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    The Aurora kinases are essential regulators of mitosis in eukaryotes. In somatic cell divisions of higher eukaryotes, the paralogs Aurora kinase A (AurA) and Aurora kinase B (AurB) play non-overlapping roles that depend on their distinct spatiotemporal activities. These mitotic roles of Aurora kinases depend on their interactions with different partners that direct them to different mitotic destinations and different substrates: AurB is a component of the chromosome passenger complex that orchestrates the tasks of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, while AurA has many known binding partners and mitotic roles, including a well-characterized interaction with TPX2 that mediates its role in mitotic spindle assembly. Beyond the spatial control conferred by different binding partners, Aurora kinases are subject to temporal control of their activation and inactivation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is a critical route to irreversible inactivation of these kinases, which must occur for ordered transition from mitosis back to interphase. Both AurA and AurB undergo targeted proteolysis after anaphase onset as substrates of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase, even while they continue to regulate steps during mitotic exit. Temporal control of Aurora kinase destruction ensures that AurB remains active at the midbody during cytokinesis long after AurA activity has been largely eliminated from the cell. Differential destruction of Aurora kinases is achieved despite the fact that they are targeted at the same time and by the same ubiquitin ligase, making these substrates an interesting case study for investigating molecular determinants of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in higher eukaryotes. The prevalence of Aurora overexpression in cancers and their potential as therapeutic targets add importance to the task of understanding the molecular determinants of Aurora kinase stability. Here, we review what is known about ubiquitin-mediated targeting