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Sample records for end-cap module prototype

  1. Sensors for the End-cap prototype of the Inner Tracker in the ATLAS Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, V.; Ullán, M.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Fleta, C.; Lozano, M.; Sperlich, D.; Hauser, M.; Wonsak, S.; Parzefall, U.; Mahboubi, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Jakobs, K.; Bernabeu, J.; García, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marco, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.; Ariza, D.; Bloch, I.; Diez, S.; Gregor, I. M.; Keller, J.; Lohwasser, K.; Peschke, R.; Poley, L.; Brenner, R.; Affolder, A.

    2016-10-01

    The new silicon microstrip sensors of the End-cap part of the HL-LHC ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) present a number of challenges due to their complex design features such as the multiple different sensor shapes, the varying strip pitch, or the built-in stereo angle. In order to investigate these specific problems, the ;petalet; prototype was defined as a small End-cap prototype. The sensors for the petalet prototype include several new layout and technological solutions to investigate the issues, they have been tested in detail by the collaboration. The sensor description and detailed test results are presented in this paper. New software tools have been developed for the automatic layout generation of the complex designs. The sensors have been fabricated, characterized and delivered to the institutes in the collaboration for their assembly on petalet prototypes. This paper describes the lessons learnt from the design and tests of the new solutions implemented on these sensors, which are being used for the full petal sensor development. This has resulted in the ITk strip community acquiring the necessary expertise to develop the full End-cap structure, the petal.

  2. Performance of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter end-cap module 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Ballansat, J.; Bazan, A.; Beaugiraud, B.; Boniface, J.; Chollet, F.; Colas, J.; Delebecque, P.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; El Kacimi, M.; Gaumer, O.; Ghez, P.; Girard, C.; Gouanère, M.; Kambara, H.; Jérémie, A.; Jézéquel, S.; Lafaye, R.; Leflour, T.; Le Maner, C.; Lesueur, J.; Massol, N.; Moynot, M.; Neukermans, L.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Poggioli, L.; Prast, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Riccadona, X.; Sauvage, G.; Thion, J.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Zitoun, R.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Chen, H.; Citterio, M.; Farrell, J.; Gordon, H.; Hackenburg, B.; Hoffman, A.; Kierstead, J.; Lanni, F.; Leite, M.; Lissauer, D.; Ma, H.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rescia, S.; Stumer, I.; Takai, H.; Yip, K.; Benchekroun, D.; Driouichi, C.; Hoummada, A.; Hakimi, M.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Beck Hansen, J.; Belymam, A.; Bremer, J.; Chevalley, J. L.; Fassnacht, P.; Gianotti, F.; Hervas, L.; Marin, C. P.; Pailler, P.; Schilly, P.; Seidl, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vuillemin, V.; Clark, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Moneta, L.; Belhorma, B.; Collot, J.; Ferrari, A.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Martin, P.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Saboumazrag, S.; Ban, J.; Cartiglia, N.; Cunitz, H.; Dodd, J.; Gara, A.; Leltchouk, M.; Negroni, S.; Parsons, J. A.; Seman, M.; Simion, S.; Sippach, W.; Willis, W.; Barreiro, F.; Garcia, G.; Labarga, L.; Rodier, S.; del Peso, J.; Alexa, C.; Barrillon, P.; Benchouk, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Dinkespiler, B.; Djama, F.; Duval, P. Y.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hinz, L.; Jevaud, M.; Karst, P.; Le Van Suu, A.; Martin, L.; Martin, O.; Mirea, A.; Monnier, E.; Nagy, E.; Nicod, D.; Olivier, C.; Pralavorio, P.; Repetti, B.; Raymond, M.; Sauvage, D.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Wielers, M.; Battistoni, G.; Carminati, L.; Costa, G.; Delmastro, M.; Fanti, M.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Aulchenko, V.; Kazanin, V.; Kolachev, G.; Malyshev, V.; Maslennikov, A.; Pospelov, G.; Snopkov, R.; Shousharo, A.; Talyshev, A.; Tikhonov, Yu; Augé, E.; Bourdarios, C.; Breton, D.; Bonivento, W.; Cros, P.; de La Taille, C.; Falleau, I.; Fournier, D.; Guilhem, G.; Hassani, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Kordas, K.; Macé, G.; Merkel, B.; Noppe, J. M.; Parrour, G.; Pétroff, P.; Puzo, P.; Richer, J. P.; Rousseau, D.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Serin, L.; Tocut, V.; Veillet, J. J.; Zerwas, D.; Astesan, F.; Bertoli, W.; Camard, A.; Canton, B.; Fichet, S.; Hubaut, F.; Imbault, D.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Martin, D.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Orsini, F.; Rossel, F.; Schwemling, P.; Cleland, W.; McDonald, J.; Abouelouafa, E. M.; Ben Mansour, A.; Cherkaoui, R.; El Mouahhidi, Y.; Ghazlane, H.; Idrissi, A.; Belorgey, J.; Bernard, R.; Chalifour, M.; Le Coroller, A.; Ernwein, J.; Mansoulié, B.; Renardy, J. F.; Schwindling, J.; Taguet, J.-P.; Teiger, J.; Clément, C.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundqvist, J.; Megner, L.; Pearce, M.; Rydstrom, S.; Egdemir, J.; Engelmann, R.; Hoffman, J.; McCarthy, R.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Steffens, J.; This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Dominique Sauvage, actively involved in the detector construction; beam test activities, who died accidentaly on March 16, 2002.

    2003-03-01

    The construction and beam test results of the ATLAS electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter pre-production module 0 are presented. The stochastic term of the energy resolution is between 10% and 12.5% GeV1/2 over the full pseudorapidity range. Position and angular resolutions are found to be in agreement with simulation. A global constant term of 0.6% is obtained in the pseudorapidity range 2.5< η<3.2 (inner wheel).

  3. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ochala, Julien; Gokhin, David S.; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Fowler, Velia M.

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, thick and thin filaments are arranged in a myofibrillar lattice. Tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1) is a pointed-end capping and tropomyosin-binding protein that controls thin-filament assembly, stability, and lengths. It remains unknown whether Tmods have other functional roles, such as regulating muscle contractility. To investigate this, we recorded and analyzed the mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns of single membrane-permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers from mice lacking Tmod1. Results show that absence of Tmod1 and its replacement by Tmod3 and Tmod4 may impair initial tropomyosin movement over actin subunits during thin-filament activation, thus reducing both the fraction of actomyosin crossbridges in the strongly bound state (−29%) and fiber force-generating capacity (−31%). Therefore, Tmods are novel regulators of actomyosin crossbridge formation and muscle contractility, and future investigations and models of skeletal muscle force production must incorporate Tmods.—Ochala, J., Gokhin, D. S., Iwamoto, H., Fowler, V. M. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24072783

  4. Anion induced modulation of self-assembly and optical properties in urea end-capped oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Reji; George, Subi J; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2005-02-07

    The non-emissive supramolecular assembly of urea end-capped oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) flourophores turned strongly emissive in the presence of tetrabutylammonium flouride which has implications in the anion controlled design of supramolecular architectures with tunable emission properties.

  5. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  6. ROTOR END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1959-02-01

    An improved end cap is described for the cylindrical rotor or bowl of a high-speed centrifugal separator adapted to permit free and efficient continuous counter current flow of gas therethrough for isotope separation. The end cap design provides for securely mounting the same to the hollow central shaft and external wall of the centrifuge. Passageways are incorporated and so arranged as to provide for continuous counter current flow of the light and heavy portions of the gas fed to the centrifuge.

  7. Modulating PCBM-Acceptor Crystallinity and Organic Solar Cell Performance by Judiciously Designing Small-Molecule Mainchain End-Capping Units.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Yao, Jiannian; Zhan, Chuanlang

    2016-10-05

    In this article, we report that the bulk-size and electron-donating/electron-accepting nature of moieties, which are end-capping onto small-molecule donor mainchain, not only modulate the donor's absorption, molecular frontier orbitals, and phase ordering, but also effectively tune the PC71BM-acceptor phase crystallinity. Compared to the electron-deficient trifluoromethyl (SM-CF3) units on the diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) small molecule mainchain ends, the electron-rich methoxyl (SM-OCH3) units ending on the same mainchain help improve the PC71BM-acceptor phase short-range ordering. As a result, the -OCH3 capping small-molecule displays larger short-circuit current density (Jsc) when blended with PC71BM (10.72 ± 0.22 vs. 16.15 ± 0.53 mA/cm(2)). However, the electron-donating nature of -OCH3 raises the donor HOMO level, which leads to a quite small open-circuit voltage (Voc) (0.624 vs. 0.881 V). Replacement of the -OCH3 with the large and weak electron-donating aromatic carbazolyl (SM-Cz) ones affords the small molecule of SM-Cz. The SM-Cz:PC71BM system affords a high Voc of 0.846 V and a large Jsc of 13.33 ± 0.34 mA/cm(2) after thermal annealing, and hence gives a larger power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.26 ± 0.13%, which is among the top values achieved so far from the DPP molecules. Taken together, these results demonstrate that engineering the end-capping units on small-molecule donor mainchain can effectively modulate the organic solar cell performance.

  8. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  9. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  10. Radixin, a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein, is concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1991 Sep;114(5):1101-3

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Radixin is a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein which was first identified in isolated cell-to-cell adherens junctions from rat liver (Tsukita, Sa., Y. Hieda, and Sh. Tsukita, 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2369-2382). In the present study, we have analyzed the distribution of radixin in dividing cells. For this purpose, an mAb specific for radixin was obtained using chicken gizzard radixin as an antigen. By immunofluorescence microscopy with this mAb and a polyclonal antibody obtained previously, it was clearly shown in rat fibroblastic cells (3Y1 cells) that radixin was highly concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Radixin appeared to accumulate rapidly at the cleavage furrow at the onset of furrowing, continued to be concentrated at the furrow during anaphase and telophase, and was finally enriched at the midbody. This concentration of radixin at the cleavage furrow was detected in all other cultured cells we examined: bovine epithelial cells (MDBK cells), mouse myeloma cells (P3 cells), rat kangaroo Ptk2 cells, mouse teratocarcinoma cells, and chicken fibroblasts. Furthermore, it became clear that the epitope for the mAb was immunofluorescently masked in the cell-to-cell adherens junctions. Together, these results lead us to conclude that radixin is present in the undercoat of the cell-to-cell adherens junctions and that of the cleavage furrow, although their respective molecular architectures are distinct. The possible roles of radixin at the cleavage furrow are discussed with special reference to the molecular mechanism of the actin filament-plasma membrane interaction at the furrow. PMID:1707055

  11. MARK II end cap calorimeter electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Haggerty, J.S.; Herrup, D.A.; Kirsten, F.A.; Lee, K.L.; Olson, S.R.; Wood, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An end cap calorimeter system has been added to the MARK II detector in preparation for its use at the SLAC Linear Collider. The calorimeter uses 8744 rectangular proportional counter tubes. This paper describes the design features of the data acquisition electronics that has been installed on the calorimeter. The design and use of computer-based test stands for the amplification and signal-shaping components is also covered. A portion of the complete system has been tested in a beam at SLAC. In these initial tests, using only the calibration provided by the test stands, a resolution of 18%/..sqrt..E was achieved.

  12. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  13. End cap versus no end cap in intramedullary nailing for displaced midshaft clavicle fractures: influence on implant-related irritation.

    PubMed

    Frima, H; Hulsmans, M H J; Houwert, R M; Ahmed Ali, U; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Sommer, C; van Heijl, M

    2017-03-17

    Implant-related irritation at the entry site is a known disadvantage of intramedullary nailing for clavicle fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare implant-related irritation rates of intramedullary nailing with or without an end cap for displaced midshaft clavicle fractures. Two cohorts of patients treated with intramedullary nailing with or without an end cap were matched and compared. Primary outcome was patient-reported implant-related irritation. Secondary outcome parameters were complications. A total of 34 patients with an end cap were matched with 68 patients without an end cap. There was no difference in implant-related irritation (41 versus 53%, P = 0.26). Significantly more minor revisions were observed in the group without an end cap (15 versus 0%, P = 0.03). For complications requiring major revision surgery, significantly more implant failures were observed in the end cap group (12 versus 2%, P = 0.04). Regardless of their treatment, patients with complex fractures (AO/OTA B2-B3) reported significantly more medial irritation compared to patients with simple fractures (AO/OTA B1)(P = 0.02). The use of an end cap after intramedullary nailing for displaced midshaft clavicle fractures did not result in lower patient-reported irritation rates. Although less minor revisions were observed, more major revisions were reported in the end cap group. Based on the results of this study, no end caps should be used after intramedullary nailing for displaced midshaft clavicle fractures. However, careful selection of simple fractures might be effective in reducing implant-related problems after intramedullary nailing.

  14. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  15. Functional end-capped conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, V.; Farina, H.; Ortenzi, Marco A.

    2016-05-01

    Methacrylate-terminated Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymers with controlled degree of polymerization were successfully prepared by direct oxidative polycondensation between Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and a cross-linkable methacrylate end-capper monomer, obtained via Friedel Crafts acylation starting from EDOT and Methacryloyl chloride. The new polymer was synthesized in order to overcome the well-known technical problems of PEDOT, i.e. difficult processability and patterning, due to its poor solubility in common organic and inorganic solvents. The chemical structure and the degree of polymerization of the end-capped polymers were determined by 1H NMR spectra. A new synthesis of Methacrylate end-capped PEDOT with controlled degree of polymerization, soluble in common organic and chlorinated solvents and with improved conductivity, 210 S/cm, was performed. This method includes: direct oxidative polycondensation of 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in the presence of a cross-linkable end-capper, i.e. Methacrylate end-capped EDOT prepared via Friedel Crafts acylation with Methacryloyl chloride and oxidant species, i.e. ferric sulfate. Furthermore, the oxidative polycondensation of EDOT monomer and Methacrylate end-capped EDOT in the presence of Sulfonated Polyethersulfone (SPES)- characterized by different degree of Sulfonation (DS)- as dopant agent was performed, leading to functional end-capped conducting PEDOT, easy to process and pattern, with conductivity of 210 S/cm, 50 S/cm higher than the one of commercial PEDOT.

  16. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  17. Processable Polyimides Containing APB and Reactive End Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    Imide copolymers that contain 1,3- bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB) and other diamines and dianhydrides and that are terminated with appropriate amounts of reactive end caps have been invented. The reactive end caps investigated thus far include 4-phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride (PEPA), 3- aminophenoxy-4-phenylethynylbenzop henone (3-APEB), maleic anhydride (MA), and 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic anhydride [also known as nadic anhydride (NA)]. The advantage of these copolyimides terminated with reactive groups, relative to other polyimides terminated with reactive groups, is a combination of (1) higher values of desired mechanical-property parameters and (2) greater ease of processing into useful parts.

  18. Phenylethynyl End-Capping Reagents And Reactive Diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Jensen, Brian J.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    Compounds containing phenylethynyl group serve as thermally reactive polymer end caps and reactive diluents. Useful in preparation of adhesives, composite matrices, and molding compounds. These reagents transform arylene ether oligomers and polymers into readily processable reactive materials that convert thermally to thermosets. Compounds synthesized for subsequent use in making thermoset polymers. Phenylethynyl group found to offer several unexpected advantages over ethynyl-based analog.

  19. Characterization of geometric isomers of Norbornene end-capped imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Three geometric isomers from the thermal isomerization of methylene-4,4' bis(endo-N-phenylbicyclo/2.2.1/hept-2-ene-5,6-di carboximide) (I) were chromatographically separated and isolated in order to investigate the thermal cure of norbornene end-capped imide oligomers, which display considerable promise for use in various aerospace adhesive and composite applications. Endo-endo (I), endo-exo (II), and exo-exo (III) configurations were assigned to each compound based on the results of NMR spectroscopy. Several chromatographic, spectroscopic, and thermal techniques were then used to characterize these three isomers which serve as model compounds for norbornene end-capped polyimides. It was found that each compound thermally isomerized to an equilibrium mixture of all three compounds prior to cure. It is proposed that these compounds react by different mechanisms in air and nitrogen.

  20. A sandwiched piezoelectric transducer with flex end-caps for energy harvesting in large force environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yang; Daniels, Alice; Zhu, Meiling

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a sandwiched piezoelectric transducer (SPT) for energy harvesting in large force environments with increased load capacity and electric power output. The SPT uses (1) flex end-caps to amplify the applied load force so as to increase its power output and (2) a sandwiched piezoelectric-substrate structure to reduce the stress concentration in the piezoelectric material so as to increase the load capacity. A coupled piezoelectric-circuit finite element model (CPC-FEM) was developed, which is able to directly predict the electric power output of the SPT connected to a load resistor. The CPC-FEM was used to study the effects of various parameters of the SPT on the performance to obtain an optimal design. These parameters included the substrate thickness, the end-cap material and thickness, the electrode length, the joint length, the end-cap internal angle and the PZT thickness. A prototype with optimised parameters was tested on a loading machine, and the experimental results were compared with simulation. A good agreement was observed between simulation and experiment. When subjected to a 1 kN 2 Hz sinusoidal force applied by the loading machine, the SPT produced an average power of 4.68 mW. The application of the SPT as a footwear energy harvester was demonstrated by fitting the SPT into a boot and performing the tests on a treadmill, and the SPT generated an average power of 2.5 mW at a walking speed of 4.8 km h-1.

  1. Design studies of the PWO Forward End-cap calorimeter for P¯ANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, H.; Al-Turany, M.; Babai, M.; Biegun, A.; Bondarenko, O.; Götzen, K.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Löhner, H.; Melnychuk, D.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Smit, H. A. J.; Spataro, S.; Veenstra, R.

    2013-11-01

    The P¯ANDA detection system at FAIR, Germany, is designed to study antiproton-proton annihilations, in order to investigate, among others, the realm of charm-meson states and glueballs, which has still much to reveal. The yet unknown properties of this field are to be unraveled through studying QCD phenomena in the non-perturbative regime. The multipurpose P¯ANDA detector will be capable of tracking, calorimetry, and particle identification, and is planned to run at high luminosities providing average reaction rates up to 2 · 107 interactions/s. The envisaged physics program requires measurements of photons and charged particles with excellent energy, position, and time resolutions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will serve as one of the basic components of the detector setup and comprises cooled lead-tungstate (PbWO4) crystals. This paper presents the mechanical design of the Forward End-cap calorimeter and analyzes the response of the Forward End-cap calorimeter in conjunction with the full EMC and the complete P¯ANDA detector. The simulation studies are focused on the performance of the planned EMC with respect to the energy and spatial resolution of the reconstructed photons. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations, excluding very low-energy photons, have been validated by data obtained from a prototype calorimeter and shown to fulfil the requirements imposed by the P¯ANDA physics program.

  2. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  3. Prototyping of hybrids and modules for the forward silicon strip tracking detector for the ATLAS Phase-II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.; Benítez, V.; Fernández-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Lozano, M.; Ullán, M.; Lacker, H.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Ariza, D.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Gregor, I.; Keller, J.; Lohwasser, K.; Poley, L.; Prahl, V.; Zakharchuk, N.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Bernabéu, J.; Lacasta, C.; Marco-Hernandez, R.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz Contell, C.; Soldevila Serrano, U.; Affolder, T.; Greenall, A.; Gallop, B.; Phillips, P. W.

    2017-05-01

    For the High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider an increased instantaneous luminosity of up to 7.5 ṡ 1034 cm-2 s-1, leading to a total integrated luminosity of up to 3000 fb-1, is foreseen. The current silicon and transition radiation tracking detectors of the ATLAS experiment will be unable to cope with the increased track densities and radiation levels, and will need to be replaced. The new tracking detector will consist entirely of silicon pixel and strip detectors. In this paper, results on the development and tests of prototype components for the new silicon strip detector in the forward regions (end-caps) of the ATLAS detector are presented. Flex-printed readout boards with fast readout chips, referred to as hybrids, and silicon detector modules are investigated. The modules consist of a hybrid glued onto a silicon strip sensor. The channels on both are connected via wire-bonds for readout and powering. Measurements of important performance parameters and a comparison of two possible readout schemes are presented. In addition, the assembly procedure is described and recommendations for further prototyping are derived.

  4. Key Role of End-Capping Groups in Optoelectronic Properties of Poly-p-phenylene Cation Radicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly-p-phenylenes (PPs) are prototype systems for understanding the charge transport in π-conjugated polymers. In a combined computational and experimental study, we demonstrate that the smooth evolution of redox and optoelectronic properties of PP cation radicals toward the polymeric limit can be significantly altered by electron-donating iso-alkyl and iso-alkoxy end-capping groups. A multiparabolic model (MPM) developed and validated here rationalizes this unexpected effect by interplay of the two modes of hole stabilization: due to the framework of equivalent p-phenylene units and due to the electron-donating end-capping groups. A symmetric, bell-shaped hole in unsubstituted PPs becomes either slightly skewed and shifted toward an end of the molecule in iso-alkyl-capped PPs or highly deformed and concentrated on a terminal unit in PPs with strongly electron-donating iso-alkoxy capping groups. The MPM shows that the observed linear 1/n evolution of the PP cation radical properties toward the polymer limit originates from the hole stabilization due to the growing chain of p-phenylene units, while shifting of the hole toward electron-donating end-capping groups leads to early breakdown of these 1/n dependencies. These insights, along with the readily applicable and flexible multistate parabolic model, can guide studies of complex donor–spacer–acceptor systems and doped molecular wires to aid the design of the next generation materials for long-range charge transport and photovoltaic applications. PMID:25264475

  5. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  6. A study of the effects of end-cap molecular species on environmental characteristics of polimidesulfones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St.clair, T. L.; Walker, S.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the environmental stability and mechanical properties of polyimidesulfone (PISO2), it was decided to investigate the effects of various types of end caps on its thermo-mechanical and related properties. It was noted that end caps are effective in reducing the environmental damage susceptibility of PISO2 samples, apparently due to their ability to react with free end groups which are believed to be moisture pickup sites. Phthalic anydride, aniline and aminobenzophenone were the end caps used in this study.

  7. Advanced photovoltaic concentrator system low-cost prototype module

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminar, N.R.; McEntee, J.; Curchod, D. )

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the continued development of an extruded lens and the development of a PV receiver, both of which will be used in the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation (SEA) 10X concentrator. These efforts were pare of a pre-Concentrator Initiative Program. The 10X concentrator consists of an inexpensive, extruded linear Fresnel lens which focuses on one-sun cells which are adhesive-bonded to an anodized aluminum heat sink. Module sides are planned to be molded along with the lens and are internally reflective for improved on- and off-track performance. End caps with molded-in bearings complete the module. Ten modules are mounted in a stationary frame for simple, single-axis tracking in the east-west direction. This configuration an array, is shipped completely assembled and requires only setting on a reasonably flat surface, installing 4 fasteners, and hooking up the wires. Development of the 10-inch wide extruded lens involved one new extrusion die and a series of modifications to this die. Over 76% lens transmission was measured which surpassed the program goal of 75%. One-foot long receiver sections were assembled and subjected to evaluation tests at Sandia National Laboratories. A first group had some problem with cell delamination and voids but a second group performed very well, indicating that a full size receiver would pass the full qualification test. Cost information was updated and presented in the report. The cost study indicated that the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation concentrator system can exceed the DOE electricity cost goals of less than 6cents per KW-hr. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. The Prototype Solid State Induction Modulator for SLAC NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, Richard

    2002-08-21

    The Next Linear Collider accelerator proposal at SLAC requires a high efficiency, highly reliable, and low cost pulsed power modulator to drive the X band klystrons. The present NLC envisions a solid-state induction modulator design to drive up to 8 klystrons to 500kV for 3{micro}S at 120 PPS with one modulator (>1,000 megawatt pulse, 500kW average). A prototype modulator is presently under construction, which well power 4 each 5045 SLAC klystron to greater than 380 kV for 3{micro}S (>600 megawatt pulse, >300 kW Ave.). The modulator will be capable of driving the 8 each X band klystrons when they become available. The paper covers the design, construction, fabrication and preliminary testing of the prototype modulator.

  9. Development of engineering prototype of Life Support Module (LSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of an engineering prototype of a life support system is discussed. The module consists of an electrocardiogram, a defibrillator, a resuscitator, and an aspirator, as well as body temperature and blood pressure measuring instruments. A drug kit is included.

  10. Sandwich module prototype progress for space solar power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Paul; Hodkin, Jason; Harrington, Forest; Person, Clark; Nurnberger, Michael; Nguyen, Bang; LaCava, Susie; Scheiman, Dave; Stewart, Grant; Han, Andrew; Hettwer, Ethan; Rhoades, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Space solar power (SSP) has been broadly defined as the collection of solar energy in space and its wireless transmission for use on earth. This approach potentially gives the benefit of provision of baseload power while avoiding the losses due to the day/night cycle and tropospheric effects that are associated with terrestrial solar power. Proponents have contended that the implementation of such systems could offer energy security, environmental, and technological advantages to those who would undertake their development. Among recent implementations commonly proposed for SSP, the modular symmetrical concentrator (MSC) and other modular concepts have received considerable attention. Each employs an array of modules for performing conversion of concentrated sunlight into microwaves or laser beams for transmission to earth. While prototypes of such modules have been designed and developed previously by several groups, none have been subjected to the challenging conditions inherent to the space environment and the possible solar concentration levels in which an array of modules might be required to operate. The research described herein details our team's efforts in the development of photovoltaic arrays, power electronics, microwave conversion electronics, and antennas for microwave-based "sandwich" module prototypes. The implementation status and testing results of the prototypes are reviewed.

  11. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, H.E.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.; Sutton, S.B.; Mitchell, S.; Bass, I.; Honea, E.

    1999-08-10

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focused by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod. 14 figs.

  12. HDU Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) Prototype Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project team constructed an analog prototype lunar surface laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a skunk-works approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the system integration strategies and lessons learned, that allowed the PEM to be brought from paper design to working field prototype using a multi-center team. The system integration process included establishment of design standards, negotiation of interfaces between subsystems, and scheduling fit checks and installation activities. A major tool used in integration was a coordinated effort to accurately model all the subsystems using CAD, so that conflicts were identified before physical components came together. Some of the major conclusions showed that up-front modularity that emerged as an artifact of construction, such as the eight 45 degree "pie slices" making up the module whose steel rib edges defined structural mounting and loading points, dictated much of the configurational interfaces between the major subsystems and workstations. Therefore, 'one of the lessons learned included the need to use modularity as a tool for organization in advance, and to work harder to prevent non-critical aspects of the platform from dictating the modularity that may eventually inform the fight system.

  13. Preparation and applications of a variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroki; Iwaki, Ken-Ichi; Furukuwa, Rika; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2008-04-15

    A variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers were applied to the preparation of fluorinated oligomer/hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites (particle size: 38-356 nm), which exhibit a good dispersibility in water and traditional organic solvents. These fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/HAp composites were easily prepared by the reactions of disodium hydrogen phosphate and calcium chloride in the presence of self-assembled molecular aggregates formed by fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers in aqueous solutions. In these fluorinated HAp composites thus obtained, fluoroalkyl end-capped acrylic acid oligomers and 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomer/HAp nanocomposites afforded transparent colorless solutions toward water; however, fluoroalkyl end-capped N,N-dimethylacrylamide oligomer and acryloylmorpholine oligomer were found to afford transparent colorless solutions with trace amounts of white-colored HAp precipitants under similar conditions. HAp could be encapsulated more effectively into fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomeric aggregate cores to afford colloidal stable fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites, compared to that of fluorinated acrylic acid oligomers. These fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites were applied to the surface modification of glass and PVA to exhibit a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine. HAp formation was newly observed on the modified polyethylene terephthalate film surface treated with fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomers and acrylic acid oligomer/HAp composites by soaking these films into the simulated body fluid.

  14. Cementitious building material incorporating end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    A cementitious composition comprising a cementitious material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the compositions are useful in making pre-formed building materials such as concrete blocks, brick, dry wall and the like or in making poured structures such as walls or floor pads; the glycols can be encapsulated to reduce their tendency to retard set.

  15. Optical Characterization and Guided Wave Loss Measurements for End- Capped 6F-Polybenzoxazole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    AD-A274 586 WL-TR-93-4098 OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND GUIDED WAVE LOSS MEASUREMENTS FOR END-CAPPED 6F- POLYBENZOXAZOLE ANGELA L. MCPHERSON JEFFERY W...MEASUREMENTS FOR END-CAPPED 6F- POLYBENZOXAZOLE PE 61102 PR 2305 6. AUTHOR(S) TA F0 ANGELA L. MCPHERSON WU FJ JEFFERY W. BAUR 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...sopropylidene- polybenzoxazole (6F-PBO), became a primary candidate. Having been synthesized by various methods approximately 25 years ago5 -9

  16. Development and Testing of the NIF Prototype Module

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, J.; Harjes, C.; Mowrer, G.; Wilson, M.

    1999-06-25

    The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) is required to deliver -68 kJ to each of the 3840 flashlamp pairs in the NIF laser in a current pulse with a peak of -500 kA and rise time of- 150 µs. The PCS will consist of 192 modules each of which drive 20 lamp-pairs. Each module will basically be a 6 rnF capacitor bank with a nominal charge voltage of 23.5 kV which is switched by a single pressurized air gas switch to 20 RG-220 cables that are connected to individual lamp loads. In addition each module will have a number of subsystems including; a lamp pre-ionization system, power supplies, isolation circuits, trigger systems, safety dump systems, gas system, and an embedded control system. A module will also include components whose primary function is to limit fault currents and thus minimize collateral damage in faults. In the Prototype Development and Testing effort at Sandia National Laboratories all of these were integrated into a single system and proper fimctionality was demonstrated. Extensive testing was done at nominal operating levels into resistive dummy loads and some testing in fault modes was also done. A description of the system and a summary of testing is given in this paper.

  17. Site-specific multipoint fluorescence measurement system with end-capped optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Woosub; Moon, Sucbei; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Dug Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2011-07-10

    We present the development and implementation of a spatially and spectrally resolved multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system utilizing multiple end-capped optical fibers and an inexpensive laser source. Specially prepared end-capped optical fibers placed in an image plane were used to both collect fluorescence signals from the sample and to deliver signals to the detectors. The placement of independently selected optical fibers on the image plane was done by monitoring the end-capped fiber tips at the focus using a CCD, and fluorescence from specific positions of a sample were collected by an end-capped fiber, which could accurately represent light intensities or spectral data without incurring any disturbance. A fast multipoint spectroscopy system with a time resolution of ∼1.5 ms was then implemented using a prism and an electron multiplying charge coupled device with a pixel binning for the region of interest. The accuracy of our proposed system was subsequently confirmed by experimental results, based on an FCS analysis of microspheres in distilled water. We expect that the proposed multipoint site-specific fluorescence measurement system can be used as an inexpensive fluorescence measurement tool to study many intracellular and molecular dynamics in cell biology. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Identification of a quality-control mechanism for mRNA 5'-end capping.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinfu; Xiang, Song; Oh, Chanseok; Martin, Charles E; Tong, Liang; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2010-09-30

    The 7-methylguanosine cap structure at the 5' end of eukaryotic messenger RNAs is a critical determinant of their stability and translational efficiency. It is generally believed that 5'-end capping is a constitutive process that occurs during mRNA maturation and lacks the need for a quality-control mechanism to ensure its fidelity. We recently reported that the yeast Rai1 protein has pyrophosphohydrolase activity towards mRNAs lacking a 5'-end cap. Here we show that, in vitro as well as in yeast cells, Rai1 possesses a novel decapping endonuclease activity that can also remove the entire cap structure dinucleotide from an mRNA. This activity is targeted preferentially towards mRNAs with unmethylated caps in contrast to the canonical decapping enzyme, Dcp2, which targets mRNAs with a methylated cap. Capped but unmethylated mRNAs generated in yeast cells with a defect in the methyltransferase gene are more stable in a rai1-gene-disrupted background. Moreover, rai1Δ yeast cells with wild-type capping enzymes show significant accumulation of mRNAs with 5'-end capping defects under nutritional stress conditions of glucose starvation or amino acid starvation. These findings provide evidence that 5'-end capping is not a constitutive process that necessarily always proceeds to completion and demonstrates that Rai1 has an essential role in clearing mRNAs with aberrant 5'-end caps. We propose that Rai1 is involved in an as yet uncharacterized quality control process that ensures mRNA 5'-end integrity by an aberrant-cap-mediated mRNA decay mechanism.

  19. Self-Assembly of Telechelic Tyrosine End-Capped PEO and Poly(alanine) Polymers in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Steven; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian William; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bilalis, Panayiotis; Iatrou, Hermis

    2016-03-14

    The self-assembly in aqueous solution of three novel telechelic conjugates comprising a central hydrophilic polymer and short (trimeric or pentameric) tyrosine end-caps has been investigated. Two of the conjugates have a central poly(oxyethylene) (polyethylene oxide, PEO) central block with different molar masses. The other conjugate has a central poly(L-alanine) (PAla) sequence in a purely amino-acid based conjugate. All three conjugates self-assemble into β-sheet based fibrillar structures, although the fibrillar morphology revealed by cryogenic-TEM is distinct for the three polymers--in particular the Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 forms a population of short straight fibrils in contrast to the more diffuse fibril aggregates observed for Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 and Tyr3-PAla-Tyr3. Hydrogel formation was not observed for these samples (in contrast to prior work on related systems) up to quite high concentrations, showing that it is possible to prepare solutions of peptide-polymer-peptide conjugates with hydrophobic end-caps without conformational constraints associated with hydrogelation. The Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 shows significant PEO crystallization upon drying in contrast to the Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 conjugate. Our findings point to the remarkable ability of short hydrophobic peptide end groups to modulate the self-assembly properties of polymers in solution in model peptide-capped "associative polymers". Retention of fluidity at high conjugate concentration may be valuable in potential future applications of these conjugates as bioresponsive or biocompatible materials, for example exploiting the enzyme-responsiveness of the tyrosine end-groups.

  20. Mixture of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol with DSPC liposomal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2015-07-01

    The dynamic of network of self-assembled liposome by end-capped polymer was investigated using dynamic light scattering. The liposome network, physically cross-linked by mixed liposome solutions with three different length scale of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol. The network of liposome is dependent on both the polymer concentration and length scale. In the pure liposome, one motion at low time scale is observed by DLS. In the higher concentration of polymer in liposome, several motion is observed that the fast motion is alpha relaxation and other two slow motion are beta and gamma relaxations. The distance between diffusion coefficient of fast and slow relaxation is increased with increase of length scale of endcapped polymers. The SAXS data is fitted with a Percus-Yevick hard sphere model and it shows that the size of liposome increasing with increase of polymer length scale in the mixture system.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of new spacers for use as dsDNA end-caps.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei-Sze; Laing, Brian M; Balasundarum, Ganesan; Pingle, Maneesh; Friedman, Alan; Bergstrom, Donald E

    2010-08-18

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic spacer molecules designed to cap the ends of DNA duplexes have been synthesized. The spacers were converted into dimethoxytrityl-protected phosphoramidites as synthons for oligonucleotides synthesis. The effect of the spacers on the stability of short DNA duplexes was assessed by melting temperature studies. End-caps containing amide groups were found to be less stabilizing than the hexaethylene glycol spacer. End-caps containing either a terthiophene or a naphthalene tetracarboxylic acid diimide were found to be significantly more stabilizing. The former showed a preference for stacking above an A*T base pair. Spacers containing only methylene (-CH(2)-) and amide (-CONH-) groups interact weakly with DNA and consequently may be optimal for applications that require minimal influence on DNA structure but require a way to hold the ends of double-stranded DNA together.

  2. Lithium-end-capped polylactide thin films influence osteoblast progenitor cell differentiation and mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gomillion, Cheryl T.; Lakhman, Rubinder Kaur; Kasi, Rajeswari M.; Weiss, R. A.; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Goldberg, A. Jon

    2015-01-01

    End-capping by covalently binding functional groups to the ends of polymer chains offers potential advantages for tissue engineering scaffolds, but the ability of such polymers to influence cell behavior has not been studied. As a demonstration, polylactide (PLA) was end-capped with lithium carboxylate ionic groups (hPLA13kLi) and evaluated. Thin films of the hPLA13kLi and PLA homopolymer were prepared with and without surface texturing. Murine osteoblast progenitor cells from collagen 1α1 transgenic reporter mice were used to assess cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. Measurement of green fluorescent protein expressed by these cells and xylenol orange staining for mineral allowed quantitative analysis. The hPLA13kLi was biologically active, increasing initial cell attachment and enhancing differentiation, while reducing proliferation and strongly suppressing mineralization, relative to PLA. These effects of bound lithium ions (Li+) had not been previously reported, and were generally consistent with the literature on soluble additions of lithium. The surface texturing generated here did not influence cell behavior. These results demonstrate that end-capping could be a useful approach in scaffold design, where a wide range of biologically active groups could be employed, while likely retaining the desirable characteristics associated with the unaltered homopolymer backbone. PMID:24733780

  3. Lithium-end-capped polylactide thin films influence osteoblast progenitor cell differentiation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Gomillion, Cheryl T; Lakhman, Rubinder Kaur; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Weiss, R A; Kuhn, Liisa T; Goldberg, A Jon

    2015-02-01

    End-capping by covalently binding functional groups to the ends of polymer chains offers potential advantages for tissue engineering scaffolds, but the ability of such polymers to influence cell behavior has not been studied. As a demonstration, polylactide (PLA) was end-capped with lithium carboxylate ionic groups (hPLA13kLi) and evaluated. Thin films of the hPLA13kLi and PLA homopolymer were prepared with and without surface texturing. Murine osteoblast progenitor cells from collagen 1α1 transgenic reporter mice were used to assess cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. Measurement of green fluorescent protein expressed by these cells and xylenol orange staining for mineral allowed quantitative analysis. The hPLA13kLi was biologically active, increasing initial cell attachment and enhancing differentiation, while reducing proliferation and strongly suppressing mineralization, relative to PLA. These effects of bound lithium ions (Li(+) ) had not been previously reported, and were generally consistent with the literature on soluble additions of lithium. The surface texturing generated here did not influence cell behavior. These results demonstrate that end-capping could be a useful approach in scaffold design, where a wide range of biologically active groups could be employed, while likely retaining the desirable characteristics associated with the unaltered homopolymer backbone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Zefeng; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we present the design, construction, and testing of a monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling applications. The collimator is based on a large-sized fiber end cap and a spherical lens design on the output facet. Values of the spot size and working distance are theoretically analyzed based on Gaussian approximation and ABCD transmission matrix. The free-space fiber-fiber coupling process is also analyzed for different lens curvature radii and coupling distances. In the experiment, a collimated laser beam is obtained with Rayleigh length of about 400 mm. A high-power laser with 1.1 kW output is tested on the end cap collimator, which only heats up by 7°C at the output facet without active cooling. Free-space fiber-fiber coupling between two 20/400 μm fibers is achieved based on these collimators, with measured coupling loss lower than 0.3 dB.

  5. On the Oxidative Degradation of Nadic End-Capped Polyimides. 3; Synthesis and Characterization of Model Compounds for End-Cap Degradation Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Gilinsky-Sharon, Pessia

    1999-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR. Labeling of selected sites in the polymers with C-13 allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. The formation of several degradation products has been proposed to be occurring in the cross-links derived from the nadic end caps on oxidation. Model compounds have been synthesized and characterized by CPMAS NMR with both normal and delayed decoupling to distinguish between protonated and unprotonated carbons. Comparison of these spectra to predicted chemical shifts of proposed products for the aged polymer provides further insight to degradation occurring in the cross-linked moieties.

  6. On the Oxidative Degradation of Nadic End-Capped Polyimides. 3; Synthesis and Characterization of Model Compounds for End-Cap Degradation Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Gilinsky-Sharon, Pessia

    1999-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR. Labeling of selected sites in the polymers with C-13 allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. The formation of several degradation products has been proposed to be occurring in the cross-links derived from the nadic end caps on oxidation. Model compounds have been synthesized and characterized by CPMAS NMR with both normal and delayed decoupling to distinguish between protonated and unprotonated carbons. Comparison of these spectra to predicted chemical shifts of proposed products for the aged polymer provides further insight to degradation occurring in the cross-linked moieties.

  7. Characterization of initial cure reactions in propargyl and nadic end capped model compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Imide model compounds containing propargyl and nadic groups were studied to obtain a fundamental understanding of the reaction of these groups attached to imide oligomers. The initial cure reactions were examined by a variety of characterization techniques including high pressure liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, and mass spectroscopy. The initial step in the cure of propargyl end capped model compounds probably involved the formation of a new terminal acetylenic group. Configurational changes involving endo/exo isomerism was found in the nadimide model compounds. Nadimide compounds heated in air and in nitrogen appeared to cure by different mechanisms.

  8. Smart cymbal transducers with nitinol end caps tunable to multiple operating frequencies.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Andrew; Lucas, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Cymbal flextensional transducers have principally been adopted for sensing and actuation and their performance in higher power applications has only recently been investigated. Nitinol is a shape-memory alloy (SMA) with excellent strain recovery, durability, corrosion resistance, and fatigue strength. Although it has been incorporated in many applications, the implementation of nitinol, or any of the SMAs, in power ultrasonic applications is limited. Nitinol exhibits two phenomena, the first being the superelastic effect and the second being the shape-memory effect (SME). This paper assesses two cymbal transducers, one assembled with superelastic nitinol end caps and the other with shape-memory nitinol end caps. Characterization of the nitinol alloy before the design of such transducers is vital, so that they can be tuned to the desired operating frequencies. It is shown this can be achieved for shape-memory nitinol using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); however, it is also shown that characterizing superelastic nitinol with DSC is problematic. Two transducers are assembled whose two operating frequencies can be tuned, and their dynamic behaviors are compared. Both transducers are shown to be tunable, with limitation for high-power applications largely being associated with the bond layer.

  9. Reevaluation of Tetrahydrophthalic Anhydride as an End Cap for Improved Oxidation Resistance in Addition Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Several substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride end caps - including the 3-phenyl, 3-methoxy, 3-trimethylsilyloxy, and 3,6-diphenyl analogs - were synthesized via the Diels-Alder condensation of the corresponding butadienes and maleic anhydride. These anhydrides, as well as the commercially available 3-hydro and 4-methyl analogs, were each ground together with methylenedianiline in a 2:1 ratio and heated gradually from 204 C to 371 C, with the thermolysis followed by NMR. Generally speaking, a transformation via monoimide to bisimide was observed in the lower temperature range, followed by competition between crosslinking and aromatization. We believe that this competition produces a substantial percentage of aromatic product, with the concomitant lowering of the relative amount of crosslinking and is responsible for improving both thermal oxidative stability of tetrahydrophthalic end capped polyimides and their substantial frangibility. The thermolysis of the tetrahydrophthalimides under inert atmosphere dramatically lowers the amount of aromatization hence, the mechanism for aromatization is an oxidative one.

  10. Double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes: Synthesis, characterization and platelet adhesion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jiehua; Tan, Hong; Fu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing double chains and phosphotidylcholine polar head groups, 2-(10-(2-aminoethylamino)-10-oxodecanamido)-3-(decyloxy)-3-oxopropyl phosphorylcholine (ADDPC), was synthesized and characterized. Two kinds of double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes with different soft segments were prepared. The structure of prepared polyurethanes was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry and atomic force microscope (AFM), which indicated that the double-chain phospholipids enriched onto the top surface of the prepared polyurethane films. The preliminary evaluation of blood compatibility showed that these novel phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes could suppress platelet adhesion and activation effectively. This property did not depend on the chemical structure of polyurethanes. In addition, according to tensile test results, the phospholipid polyurethanes kept good mechanical properties in comparison with original polyurethanes. It is suggested that double-chain phospholipid end-caption has good potential for achieving both hemocompatibility and good mechanical properties simultaneously for polyurethanes.

  11. Synthesis of Hetero-bifunctional, End-Capped Oligo-EDOT Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Christopher D; Booth, Marsilea A; Mawad, Damia; Armgarth, Astrid; Nielsen, Christian B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-01-12

    Conjugated oligomers of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) are attractive materials for tissue engineering applications and as model systems for studying the properties of the widely used polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). We report here the facile synthesis of a series of keto-acid end-capped oligo-EDOT derivatives (n = 2-7) through a combination of a glyoxylation end-capping strategy and iterative direct arylation chain extension. Importantly, these structures not only represent the longest oligo-EDOTs reported but are also bench stable, in contrast to previous reports on such oligomers. The constructs reported here can undergo subsequent derivatization for integration into higher-order architectures, such as those required for tissue engineering applications. The synthesis of hetero-bifunctional constructs, as well as those containing mixed-monomer units, is also reported, allowing further complexity to be installed in a controlled manner. Finally, we describe the optical and electrochemical properties of these oligomers and demonstrate the importance of the keto-acid in determining their characteristics.

  12. Failure Analysis of Cracked FS-85 Tubing and ASTAR-811C End Caps

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek

    2006-02-09

    Failure analyses were performed on cracked FS-85 tubing and ASTAR-811C and caps which had been fabricated as components of biaxial creep specimens meant to support materials testing for the NR Space program. During the failure analyses of cracked FS-85 tubing, it was determined that the failure potentially could be due to two effects: possible copper contamination from the EDM (electro-discharge machined) recast layer and/or an insufficient solution anneal. to prevent similar failures in the future, a more formal analysis should be done after each processing step to ensure the quality of the material before further processing. During machining of the ASTAR-811FC rod to form end caps for biaxial creep specimens, linear defects were observed along the center portion of the end caps. These defects were only found in material that was processed from the top portion of the ingot. The linear defects were attributed to a probable residual ingot pipe that was not removed from the ingot. During the subsequent processing of the ingot to rod, the processing temperatures were not high enough to allow self healing of the ingot's residual pipe defect. To prevent this from occurring in the future, it is necessary to ensure that complete removal of the as-melted ingot pipe is verified by suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE).

  13. Effects of implant diameter, drug loading and end-capping on praziquantel release from PCL implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyan; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yaqiong; Guo, Shengrong; Wu, Weiping

    2010-02-15

    Praziquantel (PZQ)-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) cylindrical implants were fabricated and characterized. Implant diameter (3, 4 and 8mm), drug loading (25% and 50%), and the end-capping were investigated to evaluate their effects on drug release. The evolution of implants with release time was conducted in terms of implant microstructure, crystallinity, drug content and molecular weight of PCL. The results showed that drug release was fastest for the implant with a diameter of 3mm and slowest for the implant with a diameter of 8mm; drug release from the implant with a drug content of 50% was faster than that from the implant with a drug content of 25%; the release of PZQ from the end-capped implants was slightly slower than that from the corresponding end-uncapped implants. The effect of drug loadings on PZQ release was related with diameter of the implants and the effect was weakened as diameter of the implants increased. The drug release data for all the implants were best fitted with Ritger-Peppas model, therefore Fickian diffusion was the predominant release mechanism. The evolution of implants with release time verified that PZQ was gradually released from the exterior to the interior of the implants.

  14. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the ATLAS Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Haug, F.; Junker, S.; Passardi, G.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.

    2004-06-23

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requirements of the magnets in the various operating scenarios.

  15. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The right vertical stabilizer of NASA's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft now sports a green fiberglass end cap. A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted inside the cap showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  16. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The right vertical stabilizer of NASA's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft now sports a green fiberglass end cap. A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted inside the cap showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  17. Final Commissioning of the MICE RF Module Prototype with Production Couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Yagmur; Anderson, Terry; Backfish, Michael; Bowring, Daniel; Freemire, Ben; Hart, Terrence; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey; Lane, Peter; Luo, Tianhuan; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David; Peterson, David; Popovic, Milorad; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2016-06-01

    We report operational experience from the prototype RF module for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) with final production couplers at Fermilab's MuCool Test Area. This is the last step in fully qualifying the RF modules for operation in the experiment at RAL.

  18. Development of Prototype Outcomes-Based Training Modules for Aesthetic Dentistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Maricar Joy T.; Borabo, Milagros L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to know the essential components of Aesthetic Dentistry that will be a basis for prototype Outcomes-based training modules. Using a 5-point Likert scale, the researcher-made questionnaire assessed the different elements of Aesthetic Dentistry which are needed in the designing of the training module, the manner of…

  19. High gain preamplifier module (PAM) engineering prototype for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Braucht, J; Browning, D; Crane, J K; Crawford, J; Deadrick, F J; Hawkins, S; Jones, B; Martinez, M; Penko, F; Skulina, M; Tilley, R; Wing, R

    1998-10-29

    We describe recent results and developments in the preamplifier module (PAM) engineering prototype located in NIF's front end or Optical Pulse Generation (OPG) system. This prototype uses the general laser design developed on a physics testbed and integrates NIP type packaging as well as controls and diagnostics. We will present laser, mechanical and electrical hardware designed and built to date as well as laser energetics measurements.

  20. Amplifiers Module Prototype for the Johnson Noise Thermometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Bull, Nora D; Roberts, Michael

    2013-06-01

    This document is intended to summarize the development and testing of the amplifier module portion of the Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) system developed at ORNL. The proposed system has been presented in an earlier report [1]. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [2].

  1. A Prototype for a Competency Based Proficiency Module. GEM Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearron, Gilbert F.; Johnson, Charles E.

    This document is a draft of a design for a learning tool which is an integral part of the Georgia Educational Model for the Prepartaion of Elementary Teachers (ED 025 491). (The introduction notes that specifications for the model require that all instruction be related to teacher performance behaviors and utilize the proficiency module (PM) as…

  2. High performance asymmetrical push-pull small molecules end-capped with cyanophenyl for solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Li, Yanqin; Wang, Lihui; Ji, Changyan; Wang, Yue; Tian, Wenjing; Yang, Xichuan; Yin, Lunxiang

    2014-09-14

    Two novel asymmetrical push-pull small molecules have been synthesized successfully, consisting of triphenylamine and diketopyrrolopyrrole as a fundamental dipolar D-π-A structure with ethynylbenzene as the π-bridge. TPATDPPCN end-capped with cyanophenyl exhibits a low optical band gap of 1.65 eV, and an impressive PCE of 5.94% has been achieved.

  3. Tetrahydrophthalic Anhydrides as Addition Curing Polyimide End Caps: Thermal Isomerization of Methylendianiline 3,6-Diphenyltetrahydrophthalic Bisimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Gilinsky-Sharon, Pessia; Gottlieb, Hugo E.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    In depth NMR studies confirm that heating a 1:2 mixture of cis, cis, cis 3,6-diphenyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride (end cap 9c) with methylenedianiline at 316 C initially yields the corresponding highly congested cis, cis, cis 3,6-diphenyltetrahydrophthalic bisimide 11, which is converted at this temperature to the observed product, the less hindered trans, cis, trans isomer 12.

  4. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  5. Surface reconstruction and hemocompatibility improvement of a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) coating.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ni; Wang, Yan-Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Shi, Su-Qing; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2014-09-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. In this study, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the surface reconstruction and formation of cell outer membrane mimetic structure on coatings that have significantly increased hemocompatibility. To achieve this, a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) (PBS-PC) was synthesized and dip-coated on coverslips. The surface structure of the amphiphilic PBS-PC film was reconstructed by heating in a vacuum oven to obtain the less hydrophilic surface and by immersing in hot water to obtain the more hydrophilic surface. Significant changes in the surface element concentration were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and changes in surface wettability were measured by sensitive dynamic contact angle technique. Scanning electron microscope images showed different morphologies of the reconstructed surfaces. Interestingly, the reconstruction between the less hydrophilic and more hydrophilic surfaces is reversible. More importantly, both the reconstructed surfaces are stable in room condition for more than 6 months, and both the surfaces show significant improvement in hemocompatibility as revealed by protein adsorption and platelet adhesion measurements. This reversible surface reconstruction strategy and the interesting results may be significant for fabricating stable and hemocompatible surfaces on differently shaped biomedical devices. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Tropomodulins: pointed-end capping proteins that regulate actin filament architecture in diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Gokhin, David S.; Kimura, Sumiko; Nowak, Roberta B.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2012-01-01

    Tropomodulins are a family of four proteins (Tmods 1–4) that cap the pointed ends of actin filaments in actin cytoskeletal structures in a developmentally regulated and tissue-specific manner. Unique among capping proteins, Tmods also bind tropomyosins (TMs), which greatly enhance the actin filament pointed-end capping activity of Tmods. Tmods are defined by a tropomyosin (TM)-regulated/Pointed-End Actin Capping (TM-Cap) domain in their unstructured N-terminal portion, followed by a compact, folded Leucine-Rich Repeat/Pointed-End Actin Capping (LRR-Cap) domain. By inhibiting actin monomer association and dissociation from pointed ends, Tmods regulate regulate actin dynamics and turnover, stabilizing actin filament lengths and cytoskeletal architecture. In this review, we summarize the genes, structural features, molecular and biochemical properties, actin regulatory mechanisms, expression patterns, and cell and tissue functions of Tmods. By understanding Tmods’ functions in the context of their molecular structure, actin regulation, binding partners, and related variants (leiomodins 1–3), we can draw broad conclusions that can explain the diverse morphological and functional phenotypes that arise from Tmod perturbation experiments in vitro and in vivo. Tmod-based stabilization and organization of intracellular actin filament networks provide key insights into how the emergent properties of the actin cytoskeleton drive tissue morphogenesis and physiology. PMID:22488942

  7. Synthesis and characterization of mixed oligoheterocycles based on end-capped oligothiophenes suited for LED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeuerle, Peter; Mitschke, Ullrich; Mena-Osteritz, E.; Sokolowski, M.; Mueller, David C.; Gross, Markus S.; Meerholz, Klaus

    1998-12-01

    Homologous series of mixed oligoheterocycles based on end- capped oligothiophenes ECnT 1 were synthesized by introduction of electronegative heteroatoms like oxygen and nitrogen into the conjugated (pi) -system. This led to novel structures 2-11 in which thiophene units of the parent compounds are substituted by other heterocycles with more pronounced acceptor character. Other moieties like phenylsubstituted thiophenes, benzo(c)thiophene, and spiro- bithiophenes have also been implemented resulting in oligothiophenes 12-16. The characterization of the optical and electrochemical properties clearly reveals the influence of the heteroatoms on the electronic properties. Thus e.g., due to the electron withdrawing character of the central heterocycle oxidation of the oligomer is rendered more difficult while reduction is facilitated. In some cases, a hypsochromic shift of the longest wavelength absorption and emission is observed and additionally a significant enhancement of the fluorescence quantum yield in solution and in the solid state. The HOMO/LUMO energy differences determined from the optical measurement correspond qualitatively well with the values obtained from electrochemical data. First experiments on single layer organic light emitting diodes show that these mixed oliogoheterocycles can be used as emitting materials.

  8. Novel in-situ nanocomposites of phthalonitrile end-capped polyarylene ether nitrile/copper phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lifen; Wei, Renbo; Liu, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    A novel phthalonitrile end-capped polyarylene ether nitrile (PEN-Ph)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) nanocomposites which possesses crosslinking reaction combined with crystallization behaviour were prepared successfully through in-situ reaction and hot-compression. In the presence of copper ion, CuPc were formed through crosslinking reaction among the phthalonitrile at the end of the PEN-Ph main chain and 1, 3, 5-Tri-(3, 4-dicyanophenoxy) benzene (TPh). Besides, the formed CuPc can play the role of nucleating agent to improve the crystallinity of the polymers. The influence of the crosslinking reaction and crystallization behaviour were investigated. The results show that the crystallization and crosslinking coexist in the system at the same time. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the crystals of the PEN-Ph grow after the hot-compressing procedure. Moreover, the glass transition temperature (Tg) increases while the crystallinity declines slightly with the low amount of copper ions. The increase of Tg is mainly caused by the crosslinking reaction, indicating that the copper can be used as a crosslinking agent in this system. Due to formation of the CuPc and the crystallization behaviour, the dielectric constant increased as expected from 3.2 to 4.9 while the dielectric loss decreased. Therefore, the PEN-Ph/CuPc in-situ nanocomposites will have a good prospect for application in electronic field.

  9. Adsorption of hydrophobically end-capped poly(ethylene glycol) on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Holappa, Susanna; Kontturi, Katri S; Salminen, Arto; Seppälä, Jukka; Laine, Janne

    2013-11-12

    Adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol), hydrophobically end-capped with octadecenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA-PEG-OSA), on an ultrathin film of cellulose has been studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Normally, PEG does not adsorb on cellulosic surfaces, but the use of the telechelic hydrophobic modification was found to promote adsorption. The influence of the conformation of the polymer in solution prior to adsorption and the subsequent properties of the adsorbed layer were investigated. The adsorption experiments were done at concentrations below and above the critical association concentration. The adsorption of OSA-PEG-OSA on cellulose was observed to occur in four distinct stages. Because of the amphiphilic nature of cellulose, further adsorption experiments were performed on hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (silica) model substrates to illuminate the contribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic factors in the adsorption phenomenon. As expected, the kinetics and the mechanism of adsorption were strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the substrate.

  10. Studies on GEM modules for a Large Prototype TPC for the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsionou, Dimitra

    2017-02-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a future electron-positron collider with centre of mass energy of 500-1000 GeV. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of two detector concepts at the ILC. Its high precision tracking system consists of Silicon sub-detectors and a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with micro-pattern gas detectors (MPGDs). Within the framework of the LCTPC collaboration, a Large Prototype (LP) TPC has been built as a demonstrator. This prototype has been equipped with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) modules and studied with electron beams of energies 1-6 GeV at the DESY test beam facility. The performance of the prototype detector and the extrapolation to the ILD TPC is presented here. In addition, ongoing optimisation studies and R&D activities in order to prepare the next GEM module iteration are discussed.

  11. Spectroscopic and chromatographic characterisation of a pentafluorophenylpropyl silica phase end-capped in supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent.

    PubMed

    Ashu-Arrah, Benjamin A; Glennon, Jeremy D; Albert, Klaus

    2013-07-12

    This research uses solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterise the nature and amount of different surface species, and chromatography to evaluate phase properties of a pentafluorophenylpropyl (PFPP) bonded silica phase prepared and end-capped using supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a reaction solvent. Under sc-CO2 reaction conditions (at temperature of 100 °C and pressure of 414 bar), a PFPP silica phase was prepared using 3-[(pentafluorophenyl)propyldimethylchlorosilane] within 1h. The bonded PFPP phase was subsequently end-capped with bis-N,O-trimethylsilylacetamide (BSA), hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) within 1h under the same sc-CO2 reaction conditions (100 °C/4141 bar). Elemental microanalysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to provide support data to solid-state NMR and chromatographic evaluation. Results revealed a surface coverage of 2.2 μmol/m(2) for the non-end-capped PFPP silica phase while the PFPP phase end-capped with BSA gave a higher surface coverage (3.9 μmol/m(2)) compared to HMDS (2.9 μmol/m(2)) and TMCS (2.8 μmol/m(2)). (29)Si CP/MAS NMR analysis of the PFPP end-capped with BSA shows a significant decrease in the amount of Q(3) (free silanols) and Q(4) (siloxane groups) species, coupled with the absence of the most reactive Q(2) (geminal silanols) in addition to increased amount of a single resonance peak centred at +13 ppm (MH) corresponding to -Si-O-*Si-CH3 bond. (13)C CP/MAS NMR shows the resonance corresponding to the propyl linkage (CH3CH2CH2-) and methyl groups (Si(CH3)n) confirming successful silanisation and endcapping reactions in sc-CO2. Chromatographic evaluation of the BSA end-capped PFPP phase with Neue text mixture revealed improved chromatographic separation as evidenced in the enhanced retention of hydrophobic markers and decreased retention for basic solutes. Moreover, chromatography revealed a change in

  12. A Prototype Large Area Detector Module for Muon Scattering Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, C.A.; Boakes, J.; Burns, J.; Snow, S.; Stapleton, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Quillin, S.

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) are of concern as some fissile isotopes have low gamma and neutron emission rates. These materials are also easily shielded to the point where their passive emissions are comparable to background. Consequently, shielded SNM is very challenging for passive radiation detection portals which scan cargo containers. One potential solution for this is to utilise the natural cosmic ray muon background and examine how these muons scatter from materials inside the container volume, terms; the muon scattering tomography (MST) technique measures the three-dimensional localised scattering at all points within a cargo container, providing a degree of material discrimination. There is the additional benefit that the MST signal increases with the presence of more high density shielding materials, in contrast to passive radiation detection. Simulations and calculations suggest that the effectiveness of the technique is sensitive to the tracking accuracy amongst other parameters, motivating the need to develop practical detector systems that are capable of tracking cosmic ray muons. To this end, we have constructed and tested a 2 m by 2 m demonstration module based on gaseous drift chambers and triggered by a large area scintillator-based detector, which is readout by wavelength shifting fibres. We discuss its design, construction, characterisation and operational challenges. (authors)

  13. End caps prevent nail migration in elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric femoral fractures: a biomechanical study using synthetic and cadaveric bones.

    PubMed

    Windolf, M; Fischer, M F; Popp, A W; Matthys, R; Schwieger, K; Gueorguiev, B; Hunter, J B; Slongo, T F

    2015-04-01

    End caps are intended to prevent nail migration (push-out) in elastic stable intramedullary nailing. The aim of this study was to investigate the force at failure with and without end caps, and whether different insertion angles of nails and end caps would alter that force at failure. Simulated oblique fractures of the diaphysis were created in 15 artificial paediatric femurs. Titanium Elastic Nails with end caps were inserted at angles of 45°, 55° and 65° in five specimens for each angle to create three study groups. Biomechanical testing was performed with axial compression until failure. An identical fracture was created in four small adult cadaveric femurs harvested from two donors (both female, aged 81 and 85 years, height 149 cm and 156 cm, respectively). All femurs were tested without and subsequently with end caps inserted at 45°. In the artificial femurs, maximum force was not significantly different between the three groups (p = 0.613). Push-out force was significantly higher in the cadaveric specimens with the use of end caps by an up to sixfold load increase (830 N, standard deviation (SD) 280 vs 150 N, SD 120, respectively; p = 0.007). These results indicate that the nail and end cap insertion angle can be varied within 20° without altering construct stability and that the risk of elastic stable intramedullary nailing push-out can be effectively reduced by the use of end caps. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  15. Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew M.; VanWinkle, Daniel; Tantawi, Sami

    2011-01-01

    HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured at 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even greater operation frequency up to 200 GHz. A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been developed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) low-noise InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The compact, scalable module is centered on the 150-GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry. This module is a heterodyne receiver module that is extremely compact, and makes use of 35-nm InP HEMT technology, and which has been shown to have excellent noise temperatures when cooled cryogenically to 30 K. This reduction in system noise over prior art has been demonstrated in commercial mixers (uncooled) at frequencies of 160-180 GHz. The module is expected to achieve a system noise temperature of 60 K when cooled. An MMIC amplifier module has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of expanding heterodyne amplifier technology to the 140 to 170-GHz frequency range for astronomical observations. The miniaturization of many standard components and the refinement of RF interconnect technology have cleared the way to mass-production of heterodyne amplifier receivers, making it a feasible technology for many large-population arrays. This work furthers the recent research efforts in compact coherent receiver modules, including the development of the Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) modules centered at 40 and 90 GHz, and the production of heterodyne module prototypes at 90 GHz.

  16. Performance of the prototype module of the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Leverington, Blake; Lolos, George; Papandreou, Zisis; Hakobyan, Rafael; Huber, Garth; Janzen, Kathryn; Semenov, Andrei; Scott, Eric; Shepherd, Matthew; Carman, Daniel; Lawrence, David; Smith, Elton; Taylor, Simon; Wolin, Elliott; Klein, Franz; Santoro, Joseph; Sober, Daniel; Kourkoumeli, Christina

    2008-11-01

    A photon beam test of the 4 m long prototype lead/scintillating-fibre module for the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter was carried out in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the objective of measuring the energy and timing resolutions of the module as well as the number of photoelectrons generated. Data were collected over an energy range of 150 - â 650 MeV at multiple positions and angles along the module. Details of the analysis at the centre of and perpendicular to the module are shown herein; the results are View the MathML source, View the MathML source ps, and 660 photoelectrons for 1 GeV at each end of the module.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  18. Column selectivity in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. VI. Columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups.

    PubMed

    Wilson, N S; Gilroy, J; Dolan, J W; Snyder, L R

    2004-02-13

    A previous model of column selectivity for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) has been applied to an additional 21 columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups (EPGs). Embedded-polar-group columns exhibit a significantly different selectivity vs. non-EPG, type-B columns, generally showing preferential retention of hydrogen-bond donors, as well as decreased retention for hydrogen-bond acceptors or ionized bases. EPG-columns are also generally less hydrophobic (more polar) than are non-EPG-columns. Interestingly, columns with polar end-capping tend to more closely resemble non-EPG columns, suggesting that the polar group has less effect on column selectivity when used to end-cap the column versus the case of an embedded polar group. Column selectivity data reported here for EPG-columns can be combined with previously reported values for non-EPG columns to provide a database of 154 different columns. This enables a comparison of any two of these columns in terms of selectivity. However, comparisons that involve EPG columns are more approximate.

  19. Elucidation of the Cross-Link Structure of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides Using NMR of C-13-Labeled Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Solid NMR of C-13 isotope-labeled samples of PMR-15 was used to follow the cross-linking reaction of the nadic end cap. Some samples were labeled on one of the carbon atoms of the nadic end cap, and others on the methylene carbon atom of the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer. NMR spectra were run on these samples both before and after cross-linking. In this way, direct evidence of the major products of cross-linking under normal cure conditions is provided. The majority (approximately 85%) of the cross-linking derives from olefin polymerization through the double bond of the end cap. Approximately 15% of the products could come from a pathway involving a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. However, all of the products could be explained by a biradical intermediate without a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Evidence is also presented that the methylene moiety in the methylenedianiline part of the polymer chain also participates in the cross-linking, albeit to a small extent, by a radical transfer reaction. Different cure conditions (higher temperatures, longer times) could change the relative distribution of the products.

  20. DC Potentials Applied to an End-cap Electrode of a 3-D Ion Trap for Enhanced MSn Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Xu, Wei; Ouyang, Zheng; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the application of various DC magnitudes and polarities to an end-cap of a 3-D quadrupole ion trap throughout a mass spectrometry experiment were investigated. Application of a monopolar DC field was achieved by applying a DC potential to the exit end-cap electrode, while maintaining the entrance end-cap electrode at ground potential. Control over the monopolar DC magnitude and polarity during time periods associated with ion accumulation, mass analysis, ion isolation, ion/ion reaction, and ion activation can have various desirable effects. Included amongst these are increased ion capture efficiency, increased ion ejection efficiency during mass analysis, effective isolation of ions using lower AC resonance ejection amplitudes, improved temporal control of the overlap of oppositely charged ion populations, and the performance of “broad-band” collision induced dissociation (CID). These results suggest general means to improve the performance of the 3-D ion trap in a variety of mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. PMID:21927573

  1. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Balasi, K.; Band, H.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; Baron, S.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A. M.; Berkien, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bianucci, S.; Billault, M.; Birbas, A.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bormuth, R.; Bouché, V.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Champion, C.; Château, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Christopoulou, B.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cocimano, R.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; Deniskina, N.; Destelle, J.-J.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Eberl, T.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fermani, P.; Fusco, L. A.; Gajana, D.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Gallo, F.; Garufi, F.; Gebyehu, M.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Habel, R.; van Haren, H.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hevinga, M. A.; van der Hoek, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hugon, C.; Hößl, J.; Imbesi, M.; James, C.; Jansweijer, P.; Jochum, J.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Kappos, E.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Koffeman, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Korporaal, A.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Le Provost, H.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Löhner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Louis, F.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manolopoulos, K.; Margiotta, A.; Mariş, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Moudden, Y.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Petridou, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Popa, V.; Pradier, Th.; Priede, M.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Royon, J.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Sapienza, P.; Savvidis, I.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Solazzo, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Tézier, D.; Théraube, S.; Thompson, L. F.; Timmer, P.; Trapierakis, H. I.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Werneke, P.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; van Wooning, R. H. L.; Yatkin, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Zwart, A.

    2014-09-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  2. Development of a multi-PMT optical module prototype for PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, Lew; Collaboration: IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The multi-PMT digital optical module (mDOM) contains 41 three-inch{sup 2} PMTs in a cylindrical glass vessel. The design is based on the KM3NeT DOM. Among other advantages, this approach offers a significant increase of photocathode area per module and also per string length. As an R and D activity targeted at potential future extensions, this new type of optical modules will be tested in the framework of the PINGU project (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade). PINGU will add denser instrumentation to the IceCube/DeepCore sub-volume aiming at a further decrease of the neutrino energy threshold (to a few GeV). The current status of the development and the prototype construction is presented.

  3. Progress with the Single-Sided Module Prototypes for the ATLAS Tracket Upgrade Stave

    SciTech Connect

    Allport, P.P.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Bates, R. et al.

    2010-06-04

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for the planned luminosity upgrade of the LHC (the super-luminous LHC or sLHC) with a programme of development for tracking able to withstand an order of greater magnitude radiation fluence and much greater hit occupancy rates than the current detector. This has led to the concept of an all-silicon tracker with an enhanced performance pixel-based inner region and short-strips for much of the higher radii. Both sub-systems employ many common technologies, including the proposed 'stave' concept for integrated cooling and support. For the short-strip region, use of this integrated stave concept requires single-sided modules mounted on either side of a thin central lightweight support. Each sensor is divided into four rows of 23.82 mm length strips; within each row, there are 1280 strips of 74.5 {mu}m pitch. Well over a hundred prototype sensors are being delivered by Hamamatsu Photonics (HPK) to Japan, Europe and the US. We present results of the first 20 chip ABCN25 ASIC hybrids for these sensors, results of the first prototype 5120 strip module built with 40 ABCN25 read-out ASICs, and the status of the hybrids and modules being developed for the ATLAS tracker upgradestave programme.

  4. Phase Behavior of Nonionic Microemulsions with Multi-end-capped Polymers and Its Relation to the Mesoscopic Structure.

    PubMed

    de Molina, Paula Malo; Ihlefeldt, Franziska Stefanie; Prévost, Sylvain; Herfurth, Christoph; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Laschewsky, André; Gradzielski, Michael

    2015-05-12

    The polymer architecture of telechelic or associative polymers has a large impact on the bridging of self-assembled structures. This work presents the phase behavior, small angle neutron scattering (SANS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of a nonionic oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion with hydrophobically end-capped multiarm polymers with functionalities f = 2, 3, and 4. For high polymer concentrations and large average interdroplet distance relative to the end-to-end distance of the polymer, d/R(ee), the system phase separates into a dense, highly connected droplet network phase, in equilibrium with a dilute phase. The extent of the two-phase region is larger for polymers with similar length but higher f. The interaction potential between the droplets in the presence of polymer has both a repulsive and an attractive contribution as a result of the counterbalancing effects of the exclusion by polymer chains and bridging between droplets. This study experimentally demonstrates that higher polymer functionalities induce a stronger attractive force between droplets, which is responsible for a more extended phase separation region, and correlate with lower collective droplet diffusivities and higher amplitude of the second relaxation time in DLS. The viscosity and the droplet self-diffusion obtained from FCS, however, are dominated by the end-capped chain concentration.

  5. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Brieher, William M.

    2013-01-01

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell–cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell–cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity. PMID:24322428

  6. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M

    2013-12-09

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell-cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell-cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity.

  7. Development of a 150 GHz MMIC module prototype for large-scale CMB radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew; Church, Sarah E.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Soria, Mary; Gaier, Todd C.; Van Winkle, Dan; Tantawi, Sami

    2010-07-01

    A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been designed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using Monolithic Millimeter- Wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) low noise InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. In the last few decades, astronomical instruments have made state-of-the-art measurements operating over the frequency range of 5-100 GHz, using HEMT amplifiers that offer low noise, low power dissipation, high reliability, and inherently wide bandwidths. Recent advances in low-noise MMIC amplifiers, coupled with industry-driven advances in high frequency signal interconnects and in the miniaturization and integration of many standard components, have improved the frequency range and scalability of receiver modules that are sensitive to a wide (20-25%) simultaneous bandwidth. HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured around 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even higher operation frequency - up to 200 GHz. This paper discusses the design of a compact, scalable module centered on the 150 GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry.

  8. Implementation and initial test result of a prototype solid state modulator for pulsed magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, Vishal; Mangalvedekar, H.A.; Tillu, Abhijit; Dixit, Kavita P.; Sarukte, Hemant

    2014-07-01

    A solid-state modulator rated for 50 kV, 120A, 4μs and 250 Hz has been designed. The discharging circuit of the modulator is being tested at ∼ 33 kV, 40-80A, at a maximum pulse repetition rate of 30 pps. The paper discusses development and testing of prototype discharging circuit on resistive load and magnetron. The technique used for measurement of pulse transformer leakage inductance, distributed capacitance and stray primary circuit series inductance will also be discussed in detail. It is necessary to have Energy Storage Capacitors with low ESL for these applications (ESL < 40 nH). The method used for evaluating the ESL of locally available metalized polypropylene capacitors will also be presented. (author)

  9. HDI flexible front-end hybrid prototype for the PS module of the CMS tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, M.; Blanchot, G.; Gadek, T.; Honma, A.; Koliatos, A.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS tracker upgrade for the HL-LHC relies on different module types, depending on the position of the respective module. They are built with high-density interconnection flexible circuits that are wire bonded to silicon strip and pixel-strip sensors. The Front-End hybrids will contain several flip-chip bonded readout ASICs that are still under development. Mock-up prototypes are used to qualify the advanced flexible circuit technology and the parameters of the hybrids. This paper presents the Pixel-Strip (PS) mock-up hybrid in terms of testing, interconnection, fold-over, thermal properties and layout feasibility. Plans for circuit testing at operating temperature (-30o) are also presented.

  10. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  11. Prototype Development Progress Toward a 500 kV Solid State Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.

    2004-07-27

    Recent advances in IGBT and SiC technology have made possible a range of solid-state modulator concepts that were unthinkable a decade ago. Power densities and speeds of pulsed-power circuits have increased dramatically due to the commercial introduction of fast, multi-kilovolt IGBT silicon and SiC diodes featured in PCB-style packages. A solid-state modulator concept that stands to benefit considerably from recent IGBT and SiC breakthroughs is the Marx configuration--where an array of stacked modules generates high-voltage output pulses directly from a low voltage DC supply. The Marx scheme avoids the large, inefficient and costly magnetic cores inherent in standard modulator designs, resulting in a considerably simpler, cheaper and more compact mechanical solution. The main disadvantage to this approach is that the individual cells in a Marx bank must float at high voltages during the pulse, complicating the distribution of power and timing signals. This paper examines in closer detail the practical advantages and pitfalls of a solid-state Marx configuration, and explores a design approach with emphasis on performance, wall-plug efficiency, cost of manufacture, availability and ease of service. The paper presents electrical diagrams, mechanical CAD layout and preliminary prototype test data.

  12. Free Volume and Swelling in Thin Films of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) End-Capped with n-Butyltrithiocarbonate.

    PubMed

    Harms, S; Rätzke, K; Faupel, F; Egger, W; Ravello, L; Laschewsky, A; Wang, W; Müller-Buschbaum, P

    2010-08-03

    The free volume in thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamid) end-capped with n-butyltriocarbonate (nbc-PNIPAM) is probed with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The PALS measurements are performed as function of energy to obtain depth profiles of the free volume of nbc-PNIPAM films. The range of nbc-PNIPAM films with thicknesses from 40 to 200 nm is focused. With decreasing film thickness the free volume increases in good agreement with an increase in the maximum swelling capability of the nbc-PNIPAM films. Thus in thin hydrogel films the sorption and swelling behavior is governed by free volume. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Enantiopure versus Racemic Naphthalimide End-Capped Helicenic Non-fullerene Electron Acceptors: Impact on Organic Photovoltaics Performance.

    PubMed

    Josse, Pierre; Favereau, Ludovic; Shen, Chengshuo; Dabos-Seignon, Sylvie; Blanchard, Philippe; Cabanetos, Clément; Crassous, Jeanne

    2017-05-05

    Impact of the enantiopurity on organic photovoltaics (OPV) performance was investigated through the synthesis of racemic and enantiomerically pure naphthalimide end-capped helicenes and their application as non-fullerene molecular electron acceptors in OPV devices. A very strong increase of the device performance was observed by simply switching from the racemic to the enantiopure forms of these π-helical non-fullerene acceptors with power conversion efficiencies jumping from 0.4 to about 2.0 % in air-processed poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based devices, thus highlighting the key role of enantiopurity in the photovoltaic properties. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Removal of a femoral nail with osseous overgrowth at the end-cap: A navigated and cannulated minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Marintschev, Ivan; Rausch, Sascha; Fujak, Albert; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O; Gras, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Intramedullary nail removal can be demanding, especially in cases of implant breakage or bony overgrowth at the end-cap, if the exact insertion depth of the nail is neglected in the index surgery. In the presented case, two challenging nail removals were necessary. The first was performed in a re-nailing procedure due to a pseudarthrosis with implant breakage, and the second was performed during hardware removal after fracture healing in a situation where there was deep intramedullary placement of the exchange nail. For the second implant removal a minimally invasive approach based on instrument placements over a navigated guide-wire was used to reduce the iatrogenic morbidity associated with an extensive open approach to the nail and to decrease the radiation exposure for the patient and the operating team.

  15. (Photo)physical Properties of New Molecular Glasses End-Capped with Thiophene Rings Composed of Diimide and Imine Units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New symmetrical arylene bisimide derivatives formed by using electron-donating–electron-accepting systems were synthesized. They consist of a phthalic diimide or naphthalenediimide core and imine linkages and are end-capped with thiophene, bithiophene, and (ethylenedioxy)thiophene units. Moreover, polymers were obtained from a new diamine, N,N′-bis(5-aminonaphthalenyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-dicarboximide and 2,5-thiophenedicarboxaldehyde or 2,2′-bithiophene-5,5′-dicarboxaldehyde. The prepared azomethine diimides exhibited glass-forming properties. The obtained compounds emitted blue light with the emission maximum at 470 nm. The value of the absorption coefficient was determined as a function of the photon energy using spectroscopic ellipsometry. All compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies. They exhibited a low electrochemically (DPV) calculated energy band gap (Eg) from 1.14 to 1.70 eV. The highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and Eg were additionally calculated theoretically by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The photovoltaic properties of two model compounds as the active layer in organic solar cells in the configuration indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/active layer/Al under an illumination of 1.3 mW/cm2 were studied. The device comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) with the compound end-capped with bithiophene rings showed the highest value of Voc (above 1 V). The conversion efficiency of the fabricated solar cell was in the range of 0.69–0.90%. PMID:24966893

  16. (Photo)physical Properties of New Molecular Glasses End-Capped with Thiophene Rings Composed of Diimide and Imine Units.

    PubMed

    Grucela-Zajac, Marzena; Bijak, Katarzyna; Kula, Slawomir; Filapek, Michal; Wiacek, Malgorzata; Janeczek, Henryk; Skorka, Lukasz; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Hingerl, Kurt; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Nosidlak, Natalia; Lewinska, Gabriela; Sanetra, Jerzy; Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa

    2014-06-19

    New symmetrical arylene bisimide derivatives formed by using electron-donating-electron-accepting systems were synthesized. They consist of a phthalic diimide or naphthalenediimide core and imine linkages and are end-capped with thiophene, bithiophene, and (ethylenedioxy)thiophene units. Moreover, polymers were obtained from a new diamine, N,N'-bis(5-aminonaphthalenyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-dicarboximide and 2,5-thiophenedicarboxaldehyde or 2,2'-bithiophene-5,5'-dicarboxaldehyde. The prepared azomethine diimides exhibited glass-forming properties. The obtained compounds emitted blue light with the emission maximum at 470 nm. The value of the absorption coefficient was determined as a function of the photon energy using spectroscopic ellipsometry. All compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies. They exhibited a low electrochemically (DPV) calculated energy band gap (Eg) from 1.14 to 1.70 eV. The highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and Eg were additionally calculated theoretically by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The photovoltaic properties of two model compounds as the active layer in organic solar cells in the configuration indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/active layer/Al under an illumination of 1.3 mW/cm(2) were studied. The device comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) with the compound end-capped with bithiophene rings showed the highest value of Voc (above 1 V). The conversion efficiency of the fabricated solar cell was in the range of 0.69-0.90%.

  17. Assembly and maintenance of full scale NIF amplifiers in the amplifier module prototype laboratory (AMPLAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J. A.

    1998-07-16

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype National Ignition Facility amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate amplifier components in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the National Ignition Facility. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, an d flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly, system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design.

  18. Vibrational characteristics of a superconducting magnetic bearing employed for a prototype polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yuki; Matsumura, Tomotake; Sugai, Hajime; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Terao, Yutaka; Terachi, Yusuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Utsunomiya, Shin; Yamamoto, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    We present the vibrational characteristics of a levitating rotor in a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) system operating at below 10 K. We develop a polarization modulator that requires a continuously rotating optical element, called half-wave plate (HWP), for a cosmic microwave background polarization experiment. The HWP has to operate at the temperature below 10 K, and thus an SMB provides a smooth rotation of the HWP at the cryogenic temperature of about 10 K with minimal heat dissipation. In order to understand the potential interference to the cosmological observations due to the vibration of the HWP, it is essential to characterize the vibrational properties of the levitating rotor of the SMB. We constructed a prototype model that consists of an SMB with an array of high temperature superconductors, YBCO, and a permanent magnet ring, NdFeB. The rotor position is monitored by a laser displacement gauge, and a cryogenic Hall sensor via the magnetic field. In this presentation, we present the measurement results of the vibration characteristics using our prototype SMB system. We characterize the vibrational properties as the spring constant and the damping, and discuss the projected performance of this technology toward the use in future space missions.

  19. PS-module prototypes with MPA-light readout chip for the CMS Tracker Phase 2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J.

    2017-02-01

    During the HL-LHC era an instantaneous luminosity of 5×1034 cm‑2s‑1 will be reached and possibly 3000 fb‑1 integrated luminosity will be delivered. This results in the requirement for a major upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker detector. This contribution briefly reviews the module types and the front end readout electronics foreseen in the preparation program known as phase 2 upgrade. R&D towards the construction of full module prototypes for the Pixel-Strip (PS) module is ongoing. The module combines a macro-pixel sensor and a strip sensor and has pT -discrimination capability at module level. The current experience from module construction with a demonstrator assembly and initial laboratory testing with an alternative module concept for the PS-module is shown. A possible calibration method is introduced.

  20. Individual Differences in Navigation between Sharable Content Objects--An Evaluation Study of a Learning Module Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauss, Boris; Urbas, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Reports the design and evaluation of a prototype for learning modules compliant to the SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) standard for use with hypermedia systems in Web-based instruction. Discusses a study of undergraduates that considered relations between individual differences in learner characteristics, including intrinsic…

  1. Individual Differences in Navigation between Sharable Content Objects--An Evaluation Study of a Learning Module Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauss, Boris; Urbas, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Reports the design and evaluation of a prototype for learning modules compliant to the SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) standard for use with hypermedia systems in Web-based instruction. Discusses a study of undergraduates that considered relations between individual differences in learner characteristics, including intrinsic…

  2. Photocurable biodegradable liquid copolymers: synthesis of acrylate-end-capped trimethylene carbonate-based prepolymers, photocuring, and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takehisa; Kwon, Il Keun; Kidoaki, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    Various photocurable liquid biodegradable trimethylene carbonate (TMC)-based (co)oligomers were prepared by ring-opening (co)polymerization of TMC with or without L-lactide (LL) using low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (mol wt 200, 600, or 1000) or trimethylolpropane (TMP) as an initiator. Resultant (co)oligomers were pastes, viscous liquids, or liquids at room temperature, depending on the monomer composition and monomer/initiator ratio. Liquid (co)oligomers were subsequently end-capped with acrylate groups. Upon visible-light irradiation in the presence of camphorquinone as a radical generator, rapid liquid-to-solid transformation occurred to produce photocured solid. The photocuring yield increased with photoirradiation time, photointensity, and camphorquinone concentration. The photocured polymers derived from low molecular weight PEG (PEG200) and TMP exhibited much reduced hydrolysis potential compared with PEG1000-derived polymers in terms of weight loss, water uptake, and swelling depth. Force-distance curve measurements by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy clearly showed that Young's moduli of the photocured polymer films decreased with increasing hydrolysis time. Their potential biomedical applications are discussed.

  3. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryogenic and Safety Considerations for Moving the South End Cap Calorimeter to the Sidewalk

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1996-09-25

    The south end cap calorimeter (ECS) will need to be moved off of the detector platform to allow for the installation of new central tracking components. This engineering note documents the cryogenic and safety issues associated with the planned move. Because of the difficulty involved in building a temporary vent line out of the building, we plan to vent the ECS condenser flow, 6 scfm N2 into the assembly hall atmosphere. Information contained herein proves that this is safe even for failure/relief conditions. The details regarding the cryogenic and safety aspects of the ECS move have been thought out and planned. The cryogenic operation of the ECS calorimeter will be limited to maintaining it's pressure by keeping it cold and isolated while it is in it's temporary position off the platform. The 4 gph liquid nitrogen flow required for this operation is easily absorbed into the DZero assembly building atmosphere without any safety concerns. Emergency or failure scenarios have been addressed on a conservative basis and also pose little threat. Other safety features built into the system such as the liquid nitrogen excess flow switch, vent line liquid sensor, and monitored ODH heads provide additional assurance that an unexpected hazard would be identified and contained.

  4. Creation of coating surfaces possessing superhydrophobic and superoleophobic characteristics with fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomeric nanocomposites having biphenylene segments.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuki; Takashima, Hiroki; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2011-10-15

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomeric nanocomposites having biphenylene units [R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2)] were prepared by the sol-gel reaction of the corresponding oligomer [R(F)-(VM)(n)-R(F)] with 4,4'-bis(triethoxysilyl)-1,1'-biphenyl [Ar-Si(OEt)(3)] under alkaline conditions. R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites were applied to the surface modification of PMMA to exhibit not only a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine but also a fluorescent emission ability on the surface. Methanol sol solutions of R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites were effective for the surface modification of glass through the dipping technique to exhibit good oleophobicity with superhydrophobicity on the modified glass surface. On the other hand, 1,2-dichloroethane sol solutions enabled R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites to exhibit both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic characteristics on the modified surface through dipping the glass in these sol solutions.

  5. A novel actin barbed-end-capping activity in EPS-8 regulates apical morphogenesis in intestinal cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Croce, Assunta; Cassata, Giuseppe; Disanza, Andrea; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Tacchetti, Carlo; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Carlier, Marie-France; Scita, Giorgio; Baumeister, Ralf; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Redundant gene function frequently hampers investigations of the physiological roles of mammalian proteins. This is the case for Eps8, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) substrate that participates in the activation of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide-exchange function of Sos1 (refs 2-5), thereby regulating actin remodelling by RTKs. EPS8-knockout mice, however, exhibit no evident phenotype, owing to the redundant function of three other EPS8-related genes. Here we show that in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, only one orthologue of the EPS8 gene exists, which gives rise to two alternatively spliced isoforms, EPS-8A and EPS-8B, differing at their carboxyl termini. In the nematode, eps-8 is essential for embryonic development. Furthermore, EPS-8A, but not EPS-8B, is specifically required for proper apical morphogenesis in the intestinal cells. This latter phenotype could be precisely correlated with a previously unknown actin barbed-end-capping activity, which is present in the C terminus of the EPS-8A isoform. Therefore, nematode genetics allowed not only the unmasking of distinct EPS-8-linked phenotypes, but also the definition of a novel function for this molecule in actin dynamics.

  6. Harnessing Hot Electrons from Near IR Light for Hydrogen Production Using Pt-End-Capped-AuNRs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Nathalia; Zoellner, Brandon; Hong, Soung Joung; Ji, Yue; Wang, Tao; Liu, Yang; Maggard, Paul A; Wang, Gufeng

    2017-08-09

    Gold nanorods show great potential in harvesting natural sunlight and generating hot charge carriers that can be employed to produce electrical or chemical energies. We show that photochemical reduction of Pt(IV) to Pt metal mainly takes place at the ends of gold nanorods (AuNRs), suggesting photon-induced hot electrons are localized in a time-averaged manner at AuNR ends. To use these hot electrons efficiently, a novel synthetic method to selectively overgrow Pt at the ends of AuNRs has been developed. These Pt-end-capped AuNRs show relatively high activity for the production of hydrogen gas using artificial white light, natural sunlight, and more importantly, near IR light at 976 nm. Tuning of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength of AuNRs changes the hydrogen gas production rate, indicating that SPR is involved in hot electron generation and photoreduction of hydrogen ions. This study shows that gold nanorods are excellent for converting low-energy photons into high-energy hot electrons, which can be used to drive chemical reactions at their surfaces.

  7. Synthesis, optical properties and explosive sensing performances of a series of novel π-conjugated aromatic end-capped oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taihong; Zhao, Keru; Liu, Ke; Ding, Liping; Yin, Shiwei; Fang, Yu

    2013-02-15

    Four novel terthiophene (3T) derivatives, have been synthesized by employing Grignard coupling reaction via end-capping of naphthyl (NA) or pyrenyl (Py) unit to the one or two ends of 3T. It has been shown that both increasing electron donating strength and extending conjugation are effective approaches to improve the photochemical stability of the oligothiophene. Fluorescence studies demonstrated that the emission of the 3T derivatives is sensitive to the presence of some important nitro-containing explosives in their ethanol solution, in particular, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PA) and 3,5-dinitro-2,6-bispicrylamino pyridine (PYX). As an example, the detection limits of 4 to PA and PYX were determined to be 6.21 × 10(-7)mol/L and 8.95 × 10(-7)mol/L, respectively. Based on the discovery, a colorimetric detection method has been developed. The sensitive and selective response of the modified 3T to the explosives have been tentatively attributed to the adsorptive affinity of the compounds to the explosives, and to the higher probability of the electron transfer from the electron-rich 3T derivatives to the electron-poor nitro-containing explosives. No doubt, present study broadens the family of fluorophores which may be employed for the development of fluorescent sensors.

  8. Experimental measurements of a prototype high concentration Fresnel lens CPV module for the harvesting of diffuse solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Noboru; Okamoto, Kazuya

    2014-01-13

    A prototype concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module with high solar concentration, an added low-cost solar cell, and an adjoining multi-junction solar cell is fabricated and experimentally demonstrated. In the present CPV module, the low cost solar cell captures diffuse solar radiation penetrating the concentrator lens and the multi-junction cell captures concentrated direct solar radiation. On-sun test results show that the electricity generated by a Fresnel lens-based CPV module with an additional crystalline silicon solar cell is greater than that for a conventional CPV module by a factor of 1.44 when the mean ratio of diffuse normal irradiation to global normal irradiation at the module aperture is 0.4. Several fundamental optical characteristics are presented for the present module.

  9. Free-free and fixed base modal survey tests of the Space Station Common Module Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the testing aspects and the problems encountered during the free-free and fixed base modal surveys completed on the original Space Station Common Module Prototype (CMP). The CMP is a 40-ft long by 14.5-ft diameter 'waffle-grid' cylinder built by the Boeing Company and housed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) near Huntsville, AL. The CMP modal survey tests were conducted at MSFC by the Dynamics Test Branch. The free-free modal survey tests (June '90 to Sept. '90) included interface verification tests (IFVT), often referred to as impedance measurements, mass-additive testing and linearity studies. The fixed base modal survey tests (Feb. '91 to April '91), including linearity studies, were conducted in a fixture designed to constrain the CMP in 7 total degrees-of-freedom at five trunnion interfaces (two primary, two secondary, and the keel). The fixture also incorporated an airbag off-load system designed to alleviate the non-linear effects of friction in the primary and secondary trunnion interfaces. Numerous test configurations were performed with the objective of providing a modal data base for evaluating the various testing methodologies to verify dynamic finite element models used for input to coupled load analysis.

  10. Increasing dose gradient and uniformity in small fields using modulation: Theory and prototypes for cone-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Edward T.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the theoretical limits to the tradeoff between dose gradient and uniformity when modulation is used in the context of cone based SRS, and to design a prototype collimation device that allows for steeper dose gradients and/or higher target uniformity as compared to a standard circular collimator. Methods: An inverse planning optimization is performed in the context of idealized phantom geometry to determine the ideal fluence pattern that best approximates a “rect function” dose distribution. Ideal fluence patterns were approximated in a prototype device and radiochromic film dosimetry was utilized to compare the prototype device to a standard circular collimator. Results: For choices of prescription isodose lines above approximately 50%, utilizing modulation allows for an improved tradeoff between dose gradient index and dose heterogeneity index. Compensators placed within the circular collimator can achieve the necessary modulation. Conclusions: Using modulation with features on a submillimeter distance scale, it is possible to increase the dose gradient and/or uniformity in small fields.

  11. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  12. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  13. Computational comparison of tibial diaphyseal fractures fixed with various degrees of prebending of titanium elastic nails and with and without end caps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Han; Chang, Chih-Wei; Ho, Yi-Hung; Li, Chun-Ting; Peng, Yao-Te

    2016-10-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is a treatment strategy for the management of diaphyseal long-bone fractures in adolescents and children, but few studies have investigated the mechanical stability of tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with various degrees of prebending of the elastic nails. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the mechanical stability, including the gap deformation and nail dropping, of a tibia fracture with various fracture sites and fixed with various degrees of prebending of the elastic nails by the finite element method. Furthermore, the contribution of end caps to stability was taken into consideration in the simulation. A tibia model was developed with a transverse fracture at the proximal, middle and distal parts of the diaphysis, and fixed with three degrees of prebending of elastic nails, including those equal to, two times and three times the diameter of the intramedullary canal. The outer diameter of the nail used in the computation was 3.5mm, and the fractured tibia was fixed with two elastic double C-type nails. Furthermore, the proximal end of each nail was set to free or being tied to the surrounding bone by a constraint equation to simulate with or without using end caps. The results indicated that using end caps can prevent the fracture gap from collapsing by stopping the ends of the nails from dropping back in all prebending conditions and fracture patterns, and increasing the prebending of the nails to a degree three times the diameter of the canal reduced the gap shortening and the dropping distance of the nail end in those without using end caps under axial compression and bending. Insufficient prebending of the nails and not using end caps caused the gap to collapse and the nail to drop back at the entry point under loading. Using end caps or increasing the prebending of the nails to three times the diameter of the canal is suggested to stop the nail from dropping back and thus produce a more stable

  14. (3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end-capped poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol)-based multilayer films for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuicui; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Tellier, Liane E; Green, Jordan J

    2013-07-10

    Biodegradable polyelectrolyte surfaces for gene delivery were created through electrospinning of biodegradable polycations combined with iterative solution-based multilayer coating. Poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol) end-capped with 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine was utilized because of its ability to electrostatically interact with anionic molecules like DNA, its biodegradability, and its low cytotoxicity. A new DNA release system was developed for sustained release of DNA over 24 h, accompanied by high exogenous gene expression in primary human glioblastoma (GB) cells. Electrospinning a different PBAE, poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4,4'-trimethylenedipiperidine), and its combination with polyelectrolyte 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end-capped poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol)-based multilayers are promising for DNA release and intracellular delivery from a surface.

  15. SU-E-T-508: End to End Testing of a Prototype Eclipse Module for Planning Modulated Arc Therapy On the Siemens Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L; Sarkar, V; Spiessens, S; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Salter, B; Zhao, H; Szegedi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The latest clinical implementation of the Siemens Artiste linac allows for delivery of modulated arcs (mARC) using full-field flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. The maximum doserate of 2000 MU/min is well suited for high dose treatments such as SBRT. We tested and report on the performance of a prototype Eclipse TPS module supporting mARC capability on the Artiste platform. Method: our spine SBRT patients originally treated with 12/13 field static-gantry IMRT (SGIMRT) were chosen for this study. These plans were designed to satisfy RTOG0631 guidelines with a prescription of 16Gy in a single fraction. The cases were re-planned as mARC plans in the prototype Eclipse module using the 7MV FFF beam and required to satisfy RTOG0631 requirements. All plans were transferred from Eclipse, delivered on a Siemens Artiste linac and dose-validated using the Delta4 system. Results: All treatment plans were straightforwardly developed, in timely fashion, without challenge or inefficiency using the prototype module. Due to the limited number of segments in a single arc, mARC plans required 2-3 full arcs to yield plan quality comparable to SGIMRT plans containing over 250 total segments. The average (3%/3mm) gamma pass-rate for all arcs was 98.5±1.1%, thus demonstrating both excellent dose prediction by the AAA dose algorithm and excellent delivery fidelity. Mean delivery times for the mARC plans(10.5±1.7min) were 50-70% lower than the SGIMRT plans(26±2min), with both delivered at 2000 MU/min. Conclusion: A prototype Eclipse module capable of planning for Burst Mode modulated arc delivery on the Artiste platform has been tested and found to perform efficiently and accurately for treatment plan development and delivered-dose prediction. Further investigation of more treatment sites is being carried out and data will be presented.

  16. Status Update on the Second-Generation ILC Marx Modulator Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.; Benwell, Andrew; Burkhart, Craig; Larsen, Ray; MacNair, David; Nguyen, Minh; Olsen, Jeff; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    This paper is a status update of the SLAC P2 Marx. This Marx-topology klystron modulator is a second-generation modulator which builds upon experience gained from the SLAC P1 Marx. There are several fundamental differences between these modulators including the correction scheme, bus voltages, and the control system architecture. These differences, along with preliminary experimental results and the schedule for further development, are detailed in this paper.

  17. Rapid micro-optical prototyping technology for fabricating optical interconnection modules at the MCM and PCB level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debaes, C.; Vervaeke, M.; Van Erps, J.; Desmet, L.; Ottevaere, H.; Gomez, V.; Vynck, P.; Van Overmeire, S.; Ishii, Y.; Hermanne, A.; Thienpont, H.

    2006-10-01

    One of the remaining challenges to solve the interconnection bottlenecks at the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) and Multi-Chip-Module (MCM) level, is to adequately replace the galvanic interconnects with high-performance, low-cost, compact and reliable micro-photonic alternatives. At our labs of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel we are therefore optimizing and deploying a rapid micro-optical prototyping technology for micro-optical interconnect modules, which we call Deep Proton Writing (DPW). An advantage of the DPW process is that it can create steep micro-optical surfaces, micro-holes, micro-lenses and alignment features in one irradation step. Hence, relative accuracies are very well controlled. In this report, we will address more specifically the following components, made each with the DPW technology: 1) out-of-plane couplers for optical wave-guides embedded in PCB, 2) peripheral fiber ribbons and two dimensional single- and multimode fiber connectors for high-speed parallel optical connections, and 3) intra-MCM level optical interconnections via free-space optical modules. We will give special attention to the optical tolerancing and the opto-mechanical integration of components in their packages. We use both a sensitivity analysis to misalignment errors and Monte-Carlo simulations. It is our aim to investigate the whole component integration chain from the optoelectronic device packaging to the micro-opto-mechanical assembly of the interconnect module.

  18. Five-cell superconducting RF module with a PBG coupler cell: design and cold testing of the copper prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenyev, Sergey Andreyevich; Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Boulware, Chase; Grimm, Terry; Rogacki, Adam

    2015-04-29

    We report the design and experimental data for a copper prototype of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator module. The five-cell module has an incorporated photonic band gap (PBG) cell with couplers. The purpose of the PBG cell is to achieve better higher order mode (HOM) damping, which is vital for preserving the quality of high-current electron beams. Better HOM damping raises the current threshold for beam instabilities in novel SRF accelerators. The PBG design also increases the real-estate gradient of the linac because both HOM damping and the fundamental power coupling can be done through the PBG cell instead of on the beam pipe via complicated end assemblies. First, we will discuss the design and accelerating properties of the structure. The five-cell module was optimized to provide good HOM damping while maintaining the same accelerating properties as conventional elliptical-cell modules. We will then discuss the process of tuning the structure to obtain the desired accelerating gradient profile. Finally, we will list measured quality factors for the accelerating mode and the most dangerous HOMs.

  19. Combatting Ionic Aggregation using Dielectric Forces Combining Modeling/Simulation and Experimental Results to Explain End-capping of Primary Amine Functionalized Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, Jamie M; Goswami, Monojoy; Pickel, Deanna L; Uhrig, David; Sumpter, Bobby G; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    Chain-end functionalization of living poly(styryl)lithium using 1-(3-bromopropyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-aza-2,5-disilacyclo-pentane (BTDP) to generate primary amine end-functionalized polystyrene was investigated using high vacuum anionic polymerization techniques. 13C NMR spectroscopy and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to evaluate polymer end-groups and demonstrated that quantitative amine functionalized polymer was attained under appropriate reaction conditions. In general, the polymerization of styrene was conducted in benzene and the end-capping reaction was performed by adding tetrahydrofuran (THF) to the reaction prior to the addition of BTDP in THF at room temperature. Results indicated that approximately 20% THF by volume is required to obtain 100% end-capping free from side reactions. When too little or no THF was present, side reactions such as lithium halogen exchange followed by Wurtz coupling resulted in unfunctionalized head-to-head dimer as well as other byproducts. Modeling and simulation of the solvent effects using hybrid methods (the so-called QM/MM method) suggest that THF effectively dissociated the anionic chain-end aggregation, thereby resulting in the desired primary amine functionalized polymer. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to develop an understanding of the physics of counterions involved in the end-functionalization process.

  20. Development of prototype PET scanner using dual-sided readout DOI-PET modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Kurei, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.

    2014-12-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a novel design for a gamma-ray detector module capable of measuring the depth of interaction (DOI). In this paper, we further developed DOI-PET detector modules and a data acquisition system, and evaluated its performance. Each detector module was composed of a 3-D scintillator array and two large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays coupled to both ends of the 3-D scintillator array, leading to only 8-ch signal outputs from a module. The 3-D scintillator array was composed of 9 × 9 × 7 matrices of 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals. The detector module showed good energy resolution of 10.6% as measured at 511 keV and a high average peak to valley ratio higher than 8 for each pixel crystal identified in the X-Y-Z directions. Moreover, we evaluated the spatial resolution of a virtual 18-ch PET gantry simulated by using two detector modules that were flexibly controlled using both the X-stage and θ-stage in 20-degree steps. By measuring a 22Na point source (0.25 mm in diameter), we showed that spatial resolution substantially degrades from 1.0 mm to 7.8 mm (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center) with a non-DOI configuration, whereas the corresponding values for the DOI configuration were 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center). This preliminary study confirms that our DOI-PET module is useful for future high spatial resolution and compact small-animal PET scanners without radial image distortions at the peripheral regions of the field of view (FOV).

  1. IBD Selection for the 288kg Prototype SoLid Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D.; SoLid collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The SoLid experiment aims to make a measurement of very short baseline neutrino oscillations using reactor antineutrinos. Key to its sensitivity are the experiment’s high spatial and energy resolution, combined with a very suitable reactor source and excellent background rejection. Placed on the surface at just 5 m from the reactor core, the cosmic flux and reactor output lead to a challenging environment. The fine segmentation of the detector, 5 cm cubes, allows the topology of events to be studied to previously unseen precision. This offers new and unexplored handles for tackling these backgrounds - a key requirement for SoLid physics aims. Using the most recent SoLid prototype (288 kg, 20% scale), we present the first selection to focus on IBD signals. This includes descriptions of SoLid signals and backgrounds, and demonstration that the segmentation can lead to gains in orders of magnitude in background rejection.

  2. A Prototypical Small-Molecule Modulator Uncouples Mitochondria in Response to Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    McQuaker, Stephen J; Quinlan, Casey L; Caldwell, Stuart T; Brand, Martin D; Hartley, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    A high membrane potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane leads to the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) implicated in aging and age-related diseases. A prototypical drug for the correction of this type of mitochondrial dysfunction is presented. MitoDNP-SUM accumulates in mitochondria in response to the membrane potential due to its mitochondria-targeting alkyltriphenylphosphonium (TPP) cation and is uncaged by endogenous hydrogen peroxide to release the mitochondrial uncoupler, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). DNP is known to reduce the high membrane potential responsible for the production of ROS. The approach potentially represents a general method for the delivery of drugs to the mitochondrial matrix through mitochondria targeting and H2O2-induced uncaging. PMID:23640856

  3. Characterization and validation tests on Ecosole C-modules first prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancro, Carmine; Graditi, Giorgio; Fucci, Raffaele; Ciniglio, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Michele; Borriello, Aniello; Romano, Antonio; Carpanelli, Maurizio; Borelli, Gianni; Verdilio, Daniele; De Nardis, Davide; Migali, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    ECOSOLE is an European collaborative Project started in August 2012 that involves several industrial and institutional partners with the aim to develop a complete and innovative concentrating photovoltaic system. During the first two years of activity, several specific components as cells, optics, modules and tracker have been designed and developed. This work reports the description of these devices and the main results of the characterization campaigns carried out to define their technical features.

  4. Design and Implementation of the Calibration Module of the MK 92 Prototype Maintenance Advisor Expert System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    This thesis is the continuation of a software project to develop a diagnostic expert system for the MK92 Fire Control System based on the daily...system operability test (DSOT). The focus of this work is on the design and implementation of the calibration portion of the expert system using the Adept...visual programming expert system shell. The calibration module is designed as a top-down hierarchy of cohesive, loosely coupled procedures. These

  5. Enhanced surface segregation of poly(methyl methacrylate) end-capped with 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacrylate by introduction of a second block.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huagang; Gao, Jie; Li, Xuehua; Hu, Yanyan; Yan, Donghuan; Ye, XiuYun; Wang, Xinping

    2012-01-01

    New fluorinated copolymers of poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(butyl methacrylate) or poly(n-octadecyl methacrylate) end-capped with 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacrylate (PMMA(x)-b-PBMA(y)-ec-PFMA(z) or PMMA(x)-b-PODMA(y)-ec-PFMA(z)) were synthesized by living atom transfer radical polymerization. Thin films made of PMMA(230)-b-PODMA(y)-ec-PFMA(1) were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These films were found to exhibit robust surface segregation of the end groups. Furthermore, the fluorine enrichment factor at the film surface was found to increase linearly with increasing degree of polymerization of poly(n-octadecyl methacrylate) and its increasing fusion enthalpy in the second block, which enhances the segregation of the fluorinated moieties.

  6. Lung counting: comparison of detector performance with a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fibre end caps, and the effect on mda calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2012-08-01

    This study described the performance of an array of high-purity Germanium detectors, designed with two different end cap materials-steel and carbon fibre. The advantages and disadvantages of using this detector type in the estimation of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for different energy peaks of isotope (152)Eu were illustrated. A Monte Carlo model was developed to study the detection efficiency for the detector array. A voxelised Lawrence Livermore torso phantom, equipped with lung, chest plates and overlay plates, was used to mimic a typical lung counting protocol with the array of detectors. The lung of the phantom simulated the volumetric source organ. A significantly low MDA was estimated for energy peaks at 40 keV and at a chest wall thickness of 6.64 cm.

  7. Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer/anatase titanium oxide nanocomposites possessing photocatalytic activity even after calcination at 1000°C.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sujuan; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Kakehi, Hiroshi; Kato, Yoshihiro; Miura, Masashi; Isu, Norifumi; Ameduri, Bruno; Sawada, Hideo

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer [R(F)-(VM)(n)-R(F)] underwent the sol-gel reaction under alkaline conditions in the presence of anatase titanium oxide nanoparticles (an-TiO(2)) in tetrahydrofuran to give the corresponding fluorinated oligomer/anatase titanium oxide nanocomposites [R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/an-TiO(2)]. Crystalline structure of an-TiO(2) in the nanocomposites thus obtained was found to keep completely its structure without phase transformation to rutile even after calcination at 1000°C, although crystalline structure of the original an-TiO(2) nanoparticles underwent a complete phase transformation to the rutile under similar conditions. Interestingly, R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/an-TiO(2) nanocomposites before and after calcination at 1000°C exhibited the similar photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of methylene blue under UV light irradiation.

  8. Modulation calorimetry in diamond anvil cells. II. Joule-heating design and prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Zachary M.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Townley, Andrew; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Part I shows that quantitative measurements of heat capacity are theoretically possible inside diamond anvil cells via high-frequency Joule heating (100 kHz-10 MHz), opening up the possibility of new methods to detect and characterize transformations at high-pressure such as the glass transitions, melting, magnetic orderings, and the onset of superconductivity. Here, we test the possibility outlined in Part I, using prototypes and detailed numerical models. First, a coupled electrical-thermal numerical model shows that specific heat of metals inside diamond cells can be measured directly using ˜1 MHz frequency, with <10 % accuracy. Second, we test physical models of high-pressure experiments, i.e., diamond-cell mock-ups. Metal foils of 2-6 μm-thickness are clamped between glass insulation inside diamond anvil cells. Fitting data from 10 Hz to ˜30 kHz, we infer the specific heat capacities of Fe, Pt, and Ni with ±20%-30% accuracy. The electrical test equipment generates -80 dBc spurious harmonics, which overwhelm the thermally induced harmonics at higher frequencies, disallowing the high precision expected from numerical models. An alternative Joule-heating calorimetry experiment, on the other hand, does allow absolute measurements with <10 % accuracy, despite the -80 dBc spurious harmonics: the measurement of thermal effusivity, √{ρc k } (ρ, c, and k being density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity), of the insulation surrounding a thin-film heater. Using a ˜50 nm-thick Pt heater surrounded by glass and 10 Hz-300 kHz frequency, we measure thermal effusivity with ±6 % accuracy inside the sample chamber of a diamond anvil cell.

  9. The effect of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) group inclusion in p-cyanophenyl end-capped oligothiophene used as a dopant in P3HT:PCBM BHJ solar cells.

    PubMed

    Manninen, V M; Heiskanen, J P; Pankov, D; Kastinen, T; Hukka, T I; Hormi, O E O; Lemmetyinen, H J

    2014-10-01

    In this work, two p-cyanophenyl end-capped oligothiophenes, and , were compared as dopants in the P3HT:PC60BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of inverted organic solar cells. Inclusion of significantly increased the average efficiency of the solar cells, while the increase using doping in the cell efficiency was minor. In the BHJ photoactive layer, the dopant molecules are close to and interact with P3HT and PC60BM molecules. Intra- and intermolecular interactions of the dopant molecules with P3HT and PC60BM were studied in chloroform solutions. Energy or electron transfer from the dopant molecules to PC60BM takes place as the fluorescence emission intensity and lifetime of the dopant molecules decreased in the presence of PC60BM. In the case of doping with , doped cells had higher absorbance than the non-doped reference cell and doping broadens the cell absorption to the near IR-region. Thus, the dopant molecules act as additional light absorbers in the photoactive layer and transfer energy or electrons to PC60BM, which increases the short circuit current and power conversion efficiency of the cell. Also, the emission of the cells doped with decreased when compared to that of the reference cell. In this case, P3HT can give electrons or energy to dopant molecules and the cell current and efficiency are further increased.

  10. Analysis of high mass-to-charge ions in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer via an end-cap quadrupolar direct current downscan.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-09-04

    A method for performing mass-selective instability analysis in a three-dimensional (3-D) quadrupole ion trap is described that involves scanning a direct current (dc) voltage applied to the end-cap electrodes while holding the radio frequency (rf) potential at a fixed value. Rather than eject at the ß(z) = 1 instability line by ramping the amplitude of the drive rf potential applied to the ring electrode, as with the original mass-selective instability scan, this approach effects ion ejection along the ß(z) = 0 instability line in a process identical in principle (though it varies in its method of implementation) to the previously termed "downscan" ( Todd , J. F. J. ; Penman , A. D. ; Smith , R. D. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Processes 1991 , 106 , 117 - 135 ). A linear scan of the dc amplitude results in a nonlinear mass scale, unlike the conventional resonance ejection scan with a linear scan of the rf amplitude, and the ejection of ions in the direction of high mass-to-charge (m/z) to low m/z. However, the downscan offers some advantages over the traditional rf scan for ions of high m/z values. These include a larger scannable mass range, as well as the opportunity for improved resolution at high mass. These characteristics are demonstrated with ions of m/z 10(4)-10(5).

  11. Multielement determination of cadmium and lead in urine by simultaneous electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with an end-capped graphite tube.

    PubMed

    Correia, Paulo R M; Nomura, Cassiana S; Oliveira, Pedro V

    2003-11-01

    A method for the multielement determination of cadmium and lead in urine is proposed by simultaneous electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS) with an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (EC-THGA). The best conditions for cadmium and lead determination were obtained in the presence of NH4H2PO4 as a chemical modifier, using 500 degrees C and 1800 degrees C as the pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, respectively. Urine samples were diluted 1 + 4 directly in autosampler cups with a mixture of 0.125% (w/v) Triton X-100 + 2.5% (v/v) HNO3 + 0.31% (w/v) NH4H2PO4. The optimized heating program was carried out in 57 s, and the instrument calibration was done with aqueous reference solutions. The use of EC-THGA increased the sensitivity of cadmium and lead by 14% and 25%, respectively. The detection limits (n = 20, 3delta) were 0.03 microg L(-1) (0.36 pg) for cadmium and 0.57 microg L(-1) (6.8 pg) for lead. The performance of EC-THGA was acceptable up to 500 heating cycles. The reliability of the entire procedure was checked with the analysis of a lyophilized urine certified reference material. The found concentrations were in agreement with the recommended values (95% confidence level).

  12. Hot slumping glass technology and integration process to manufacture a grazing incidence scaled prototype for the IXO telescope modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Canestrari, R.; Conconi, P.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Dell'Orto, E.; Gallieni, D.; Pareschi, G.; Parodi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Spiga, D.

    2009-08-01

    As for all space missions, the limit imposed on the payload mass budget by the launcher is the main driver that forces the use of very lightweight optics. Considering the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission the present configuration has a mirror collecting area in the order of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV, 0.65 m2 at 6 keV, and 150 cm2 at 30 keV. These large collecting areas could be obtained with a mirror assembly composed of a large number of high quality glass segments each being able to deliver the required angular resolution better or equal to 5 arcsec. These segments will form a X-Ray Optical Unit (XOU), an optical subunit of the telescope, and the XOUs will be assembled to form the whole mirror system. Based on the INAF-OAB experience in the thermal slumping of thin glass optics, a possible approach for the realization of large size and lightweight X-ray mirrors is described in this paper. Moulds made in a suitable material (as for example Silicon Carbide or Fused Silica) and having the suitable (parabolic and hyperbolic) profile are used for the realization of thin glass Mirror Plates (MP), with dimensions in the range of 200- 400 mm. After a thermal cycle the slumped MPs are characterized for acceptation and handled by means of an active support using vacuum suction for the integration phase. In this phase an active optical feedback is used to ensure the correct alignment of the MPs within the XOU. The MPs are then glued in its proper position in the XOU using also suitable glass ribs for the stiffening of the whole module. An investigation in the problems and possible solutions to the slumping, measurement, integration and testing of the glass MPs into the XOU will be given, particularly with respect to a XOU scaled prototype that will be manufactured and used to assess the technology.

  13. Preparation and Surface Property of Fluoroalkyl End-Capped Vinyltrimethoxysilane Oligomer/Talc Composite-Encapsulated Organic Compounds: Application for the Separation of Oil and Water.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yuri; Saito, Tomoya; Yamada, Satoshi; Sugiya, Masashi; Sawada, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer [R(F)-(CH2-CHSi(OMe)3)n-R(F); n = 2, 3; R(F) = CF(CF3)OC3F7 (R(F)-VM oligomer)] can undergo the sol-gel reaction in the presence of talc particles under alkaline conditions at room temperature to provide the corresponding fluorinated oligomeric silica/talc nanocomposites (RF-VM-SiO2/Talc). A variety of guest molecules such as 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (HMB), bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol AF, 3-(hydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (THSP), and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-oxahexanoic acid (R(F)-COOH) are effectively encapsulated into the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composite cores to afford the corresponding fluorinated nanocomposites-encapsulated these guest molecules. The R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composites encapsulated low molecular weight aromatic compounds such as HMB and BPA can exhibit a superoleophilic-superhydrophobic characteristic on the surfaces; however, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composite-encapsulated THSP and R(F)-COOH exhibit a superoleophobic-superhydrophilic characteristic on the modified surfaces. In these nanocomposites, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc/THSP composites are applicable to the surface modification of polyester fabric, and the modified polyester fabric possessing a superoleophobic-superhydrophilic characteristic on the surface can be used for the membrane for oil (dodecane)/water separation. In addition, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composites-encapsulated micrometer-size controlled cross-linked polystyrene particles can be also prepared under similar conditions, and the obtained composite white-colored particle powders are applied to the packing material for the column chromatography to separate water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion.

  14. Photo-polymerized microarchitectural constructs prepared by microstereolithography (muSL) using liquid acrylate-end-capped trimethylene carbonate-based prepolymers.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Il Keun; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2005-05-01

    Precision microarchitectural constructs made of acrylated trimethylene carbonate (TMC)-based liquid prepolymers were photo-polymerized using a custom-designed microstereolithographic apparatus. In this study, three different photo-polymerizable liquid prepolymers were prepared by the polymerization of TMC with a low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (mol. wt. 200 or 1000); designated as PEG200 or PEG1000, respectively or trimethylolpropane (TMP) as an initiator, and subsequently end-capped with an acrylate group. As a result of layer-by-layer photo-irradiation of the prepolymer with a movable ultraviolet light pen driven by computer-aided design, a three-dimensional (3D) micropillar array, a microbank array, a microcone array, and multi-microtunnels formed on a platform plate or a glass plate were precisely fabricated. The PEG-based polymers exhibited a very low cell adhesion potential, whereas the TMP-based hydrophobic polymer exhibited high cell adhesion and proliferation potentials. The microbank array, which consisted of a plate made of the TMP-based polymer and microbanks made of the PEG200-based polymer, caused cell adhesion and proliferation only on the plate. Upon the implantation of microcone arrays under the subcutis of rats, the photo-polymerized construct made of the poorly swellable PEG200-based polymer exhibited only surface erosion and limited drug loading and releasing potentials. On the other hand, the photo-polymerized construct made of the highly swellable PEG1000-based polymer exhibited not only surface erosion but also bulk erosion and high drug loading and releasing potentials. In this paper, we discuss their potential biomedical applications.

  15. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-pT module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-pT track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-pT module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  16. Long-lived charge-separated configuration of a push-pull archetype of Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)fluorene].

    PubMed

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Chen, Yu; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-05-13

    The photoinduced electron-transfer process in Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)-2,7-fluorene], a promising material for electronic and optoelectronic devices, is reported here. The charge-separated configuration was found to be long-lived, with a lifetime of up to 2.2 ms in the polar benzonitrile, as inferred from time-resolved absorption measurements.

  17. Identification of in vitro cytochrome P450 modulators to detect induction by prototype inducers in the mallard duckling (Anas platyrhynchos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renauld, A.E.; Melancon, M.J.; Sordillo, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    Seven modulators of mammalian monooxygenase activity were screened for their ability to selectively stimulate or inhibit in vitro monooxygenase activities of hepatic microsomes from mallard ducklings treated with phenobarbital, β-naphthoflavone, 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl or vehicle. Microsomes were assayed fluorometrically for four monooxygenases: benzyloxy-, ethoxy-, methoxy-, and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, in combination with each of the seven modulators. Four combinations: α-naphthoflavone and 2-methylbenzimidazole with benzyloxyresorufin, and Proadifen with methoxy- and ethoxyresorufin, respectively, were evaluated further. β-Naphthoflavone-treated groups were clearly distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group by all of the assays and by the effects of the modulators in three of the four assay/modulator combinations. Enzyme activities of the phenobarbital and saline groups were statistically similar (P≥0.05) when assayed without modulator added, but each assay/modulator combination distinguished between these groups. The PCB-treated group was distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group only for BROD activity, with or without the presence of modulator. Graphing of per cent modulation of BROD activity versus initial BROD activity provided the clearest distinction between all of the study groups. Identification of these selective in vitro modulators may improve detection and measurement of low level cytochrome P450 induction in avian species. Also, both the monooxygenase activities induced and the impacts of the modulators indicated differences between mammalian and avian cytochromes P450.

  18. Identification of in vitro cytochrome P450 modulators to detect induction by prototype inducers in the mallard duckling (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renauld, A.E.; Melancon, M.J.; Sordillo, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    Seven modulators of mammalian monooxygenase activity were evaluated for their ability to selectively stimulate or inhibit in vitro monooxygenase activities of hepatic microsomes from mallard ducklings treated with phenobarbital, ?-naphthoflavone, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl or vehicle. Microsomes were assayed fluorometrically for four monooxygenases: benzyloxy, ethoxy, methoxy, and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, in combination with each of the seven modulators. Four combinations: ?-naphthoflavone and 2-methylbenzimidazole with benzyloxyresorufin, and Proadifen with methoxy- and ethoxyresorufin, respectively, were evaluated further. ?-naphthoflavone-treated groups were clearly distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group by all of the assays and by the effects of the modulators in three of the four assay/modulator combinations. Enzyme activities of the phenobarbital and saline groups were statistically similar (P ?.05) when assayed without modulator added, but each assay/modulator combination distinguished between these groups. The PCB-treated group was distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group only for BROD activity, with or without the presence of modulator. Graphing of per cent modulation of BROD activity versus initial BROD activity provided the clearest distinction between all of the study groups. Identification of these selective in vitro modulators may improve detection and measurement of low level cytochrome P450 induction in avian species.

  19. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  20. Synthesis and Electrochemical and Photophysical Characterization of New 4,4'-π-Conjugated 2,2'-Bipyridines that are End-Capped with Cyanoacrylic Acid/Ester Groups.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Anja; Wu, Yanlin; Kahnt, Axel; Bachmann, Julien; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2016-04-20

    Two new functionalized 4,4'-disubstituted 2,2'-bipyridines that were end-capped with cyanoacrylic acid or cyanoacrylic acid ester anchoring groups, which might allow their efficient functionalization on TiO2 or other metal-oxide semiconductor surfaces, have been synthesized and characterized by electrochemical, photophysical, and spectroscopic measurements. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these 4,4'-disubstituted 2,2'-bipyridines with extended π systems, in particular their LUMO energies, make them promising candidates to build up inorganic-organic hybrid photosensitizers for the sensitization of metal-oxide semiconductors (e.g., TiO2 nanoparticles and/or nanotubes).

  1. Construction and first beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2017-03-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for the endcap calorimetry upgrade planned to cope with the harsh radiation and pileup environment at the High Luminosity-LHC . The HGCAL is realized as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5–01. cm2 interspersed with absorbers made from tungsten and copper to form a highly compact and granular device. Prototype modules, based on hexagonal silicon pad sensors, with 128 channels, have been constructed and tested in beams at FNAL and at CERN. The modules include many of the features required for this challenging detector, including a PCB glued directly to the sensor, using through-hole wire-bonding for signal readout and 5 mm spacing between layers—including the front-end electronics and all services. Tests in 2016 have used an existing front-end chip —Skiroc2 (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). We present results from first tests of these modules both in the laboratory and with beams of electrons, pions and protons, including noise performance, calibration with mips and electron signals.

  2. Design and the parametric testing of the space station prototype integrated vapor compression distillation water recovery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, W. F.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water for the Space Station Prototype life support system is generated by the vapor compression technique of vacuum distillation. A description of a complete three-man modular vapor compression water renovation loop that was built and tested is presented; included are all of the pumps, tankage, chemical post-treatment, instrumentation, and controls necessary to make the loop representative of an automatic, self-monitoring, null gravity system. The design rationale is given and the evolved configuration is described. Presented next are the results of an extensive parametric test during which distilled water was generated from urine and urinal flush water with concentration of solids in the evaporating liquid increasing progressively to 60 percent. Water quality, quantity and production rate are shown together with measured energy consumption rate in terms of watt-hours per kilogram of distilled water produced.

  3. Design and the parametric testing of the space station prototype integrated vapor compression distillation water recovery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, W. F.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water for the Space Station Prototype life support system is generated by the vapor compression technique of vacuum distillation. A description of a complete three-man modular vapor compression water renovation loop that was built and tested is presented; included are all of the pumps, tankage, chemical post-treatment, instrumentation, and controls necessary to make the loop representative of an automatic, self-monitoring, null gravity system. The design rationale is given and the evolved configuration is described. Presented next are the results of an extensive parametric test during which distilled water was generated from urine and urinal flush water with concentration of solids in the evaporating liquid increasing progressively to 60 percent. Water quality, quantity and production rate are shown together with measured energy consumption rate in terms of watt-hours per kilogram of distilled water produced.

  4. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk.

  5. Cross-linked fluoroalkyl end-capped co-oligomeric nanoparticle-encapsulated fullerenea new approach to the surface modification of traditional organic polymers with fullerene-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mugisawa, Masaki; Kasai, Remi; Sawada, Hideo

    2009-01-06

    Cross-linked fluoroalkyl end-capped co-oligomeric nanoparticle-encapsulated fullerenes, prepared by deprotecting a fluoroalkyl end-capped isocyanatoethyl methacrylate 2-butanone oxime adduct-1-hydroxy-5-adamantylacrylate co-oligomer in the presence of fullerene, were of well-defined size in the nanometer range (28-82 nm) and exhibited good dispersibility in a variety of solvents such as methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and 1,2-dichloroethane. Transmission electron microscopy images also showed that these nanocomposites were particles with a mean diameter of 45 nm and that the fullerenes were tightly encapsulated into fluorinated nanoparticle cores. In methanol, these fluorinated nanoparticles emitted fluorescence related to the presence of fullerene and were applied in the surface modification of traditional organic polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to effect good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine on the modified film surfaces. Interestingly, a higher fluorescent intensity of fullerene was observed on the modified PMMA surfaces, although the reverse side of these film surfaces yielded an extremely weak fluorescent intensity. More interestingly, a fluorescence microscopy image of the cross-section of the modified PMMA film showed that encapsulated fullerene was arranged regularly above the modified PMMA film surface.

  6. Biosphere 2 test module: A ground-based sunlight-driven prototype of a closed ecological life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Leigh, Linda; Alling, Abigail; MacCallum, Taber; Allen, John; Alvarez-Romo, Norberto

    Constructed in 1986, the Biosphere 2 Test Module has been used since the end of that year for closed ecological systems experiments. It is the largest closed ecological facility ever built, with a sealed variable volume of some 480 cubic meters. It is built with a skin of steel spaceframes with double-laminated glass panels admitting about 65 percent Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR). The floor is of welded steel and there is an underground atmospheric connection via an air duct to a variable volume chamber (``lung'') permitting expansion and contraction of the Test Module's air volume caused by changes in temperature and barometric pressure, which causes a slight positive pressure from inside the closed system to the outside thereby insuring that the very small leakage rate is outward. Several series of closed ecological system investigations have been carried out in this facility. One series of experiments investigated the dynamics of higher plants and associated soils with the atmosphere under varying light and temperature conditions. Another series of experiments included one human in the closed system for three, five and twenty-one days. During these experiments the Test Module had subsystems which completely recycled its water and atmosphere; all the human dietary needs were produced within the facility, and all wastes were recycled using a marsh plant/microbe system. Other experiments have examined the capability of individual component systems used, such as the soil bed reactors, to eliminate experimentally introduced trace gases. Analytic systems developed for these experiments include continuous monitors of eleven atmospheric gases in addition to the complete gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) examinations of potable, waste system and irrigation water quality.

  7. Biosphere 2 Test Module: a ground-based sunlight-driven prototype of a closed ecological life support system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M; Leigh, L; Alling, A; MacCallum, T; Allen, J; Alvarez-Romo, N

    1992-01-01

    Constructed in 1986, the Biosphere 2 Test Module has been used since the end of that year for closed ecological systems experiments. It is the largest closed ecological facility ever built, with a sealed variable volume of some 480 cubic meters. It is built with a skin of steel spaceframes with double-laminated glass panels admitting about 65 percent Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR). The floor is of welded steel and there is an underground atmospheric connection via an air duct to a variable volume chamber ("lung") permitting expansion and contraction of the Test Module's air volume caused by changes in temperature and barometric pressure, which causes a slight positive pressure from inside the closed system to the outside thereby insuring that the very small leakage rate is outward. Several series of closed ecological system investigations have been carried out in this facility. One series of experiments investigated the dynamics of higher plants and associated soils with the atmosphere under varying light and temperature conditions. Another series of experiments included one human in the closed system for three, five and twenty-one days. During these experiments the Test Module had subsystems which completely recycled its water and atmosphere; all the human dietary needs were produced within the facility, and all wastes were recycled using a marsh plant/microbe system. Other experiments have examined the capability of individual component systems used, such as the soil bed reactors, to eliminate experimentally introduced trace gases. Analytic systems developed for these experiments include continuous monitors of eleven atmospheric gases in addition to the complete gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) examinations of potable, waste system and irrigation water quality.

  8. Clinical Proof-of-Concept Study With MSDC-0160, a Prototype mTOT-Modulating Insulin Sensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Colca, J R; VanderLugt, J T; Adams, W J; Shashlo, A; McDonald, W G; Liang, J; Zhou, R; Orloff, D G

    2013-01-01

    It may be possible to achieve insulin sensitivity through the recently identified mitochondrial target of thiazolidinediones (mTOT), thereby avoiding peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ)-dependent side effects. In this phase IIb clinical trial, 258 patients with type 2 diabetes completed a 12-week protocol with 50, 100, or 150 mg of MSDC-0160 (an mTOT modulator), 45 mg pioglitazone HCl (a PPAR-γ agonist), or a placebo. The two active treatments lowered fasting glucose levels to the same extent. The decreases in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) observed with the two higher doses of MSDC-0160 were not different from those associated with pioglitazone. By contrast, fluid retention as evidenced by reduction in hematocrit, red blood cells, and total hemoglobin was 50% less in the MSDC-0160–treated groups. There was also a smaller increase in high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin with MSDC-0160 than with pioglitazone (P < 0.0001), suggesting that MSDC-0160 produces less expansion of white adipose tissue. Thus, mTOT modulators may have glucose-lowering effects similar to those of pioglitazone but without the adverse effects associated with PPAR-γ agonists. PMID:23462886

  9. Greenbrier Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-18

    This case study describes a prototype home that is the model home for the Homes at Greenbrier in Oakdale, Connecticut, and demonstrates the builder's concept of “attainable sustainable” of offering high performance homes at mid-market prices.

  10. Coloring-decoloring behavior of amphiphilic fluoroalkyl end-capped N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxobutyl)acrylamide--acryloylmorpholine cooligomer/fluorescein nanocomposites in protic and aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hideo; Izumi, Shunsuke; Sasazawa, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masato

    2012-07-01

    Amphiphilic fluoroalkyl end-capped N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxobutyl)acrylamide-acryloylmorpholine cooligomer/fluorescein nanocomposites afforded brilliant yellow-colored solutions in not only protic solvents such as methanol and ethanol but also protic-like solvents such as dichloromethane and 1,2-dichloroethane, respectively. However, the corresponding non-fluorinated cooligomer/fluorescein composites and parent fluorescein gave the colorless solutions under similar conditions. On the other hand, unexpectedly, such brilliant yellow-colored solutions provided by these fluorinated nanocomposites completely disappeared in aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and tetrahydrofuran. Thus, these fluorinated fluorescein nanocomposites can exhibit a coloring-decoloring behavior through solvatochromic response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Software Prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Hanseler, Haley; Crouch, Barbara Insley; Cummins, Mollie R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Health information exchange (HIE) between Poison Control Centers (PCCs) and Emergency Departments (EDs) could improve care of poisoned patients. However, PCC information systems are not designed to facilitate HIE with EDs; therefore, we are developing specialized software to support HIE within the normal workflow of the PCC using user-centered design and rapid prototyping. Objective To describe the design of an HIE dashboard and the refinement of user requirements through rapid prototyping. Methods Using previously elicited user requirements, we designed low-fidelity sketches of designs on paper with iterative refinement. Next, we designed an interactive high-fidelity prototype and conducted scenario-based usability tests with end users. Users were asked to think aloud while accomplishing tasks related to a case vignette. After testing, the users provided feedback and evaluated the prototype using the System Usability Scale (SUS). Results Survey results from three users provided useful feedback that was then incorporated into the design. After achieving a stable design, we used the prototype itself as the specification for development of the actual software. Benefits of prototyping included having 1) subject-matter experts heavily involved with the design; 2) flexibility to make rapid changes, 3) the ability to minimize software development efforts early in the design stage; 4) rapid finalization of requirements; 5) early visualization of designs; 6) and a powerful vehicle for communication of the design to the programmers. Challenges included 1) time and effort to develop the prototypes and case scenarios; 2) no simulation of system performance; 3) not having all proposed functionality available in the final product; and 4) missing needed data elements in the PCC information system. PMID:27081404

  12. Development of a Structured Design and Programming Methodology for Expert Systems Shells Utilizing a Visual Programming Language; Application of Structured Methodology to the MK92 Maintenance Advisor Expert System, Performance Module Prototype.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    expert system for the MK92 MOD 2 Fire Control System...methodology for the design and implementation of an expert system in an expert system shell utilizing a visual programming language. Guidelines for the...application of the structured methodology in the Adept expert system shell were develop and these guidelines applied to the Performance module prototype of the MK92 MOD 2 FCS Maintenance Advisor Export

  13. Starshade Prototype

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    This image shows the bare bones of the first prototype starshade by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The prototype was shown in technology partner Astro Aerospace/Northrup Grumman's facility in Santa Barbara, California in 2013. In order for the petals of the starshade to diffract starlight away from the camera of a space telescope, they must be deployed with accuracy once the starshade reaches space. The four petals pictured in the image are being measured for this positional accuracy with a laser. As shown by this 66-foot (20-meter) model, starshades can come in many shapes and sizes. This design shows petals that are more extreme in shape which properly diffracts starlight for smaller telescopes. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20903

  14. Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  15. Electronic prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopcroft, J.

    1987-01-01

    The potential benefits of automation in space are significant. The science base needed to support this automation not only will help control costs and reduce lead-time in the earth-based design and construction of space stations, but also will advance the nation's capability for computer design, simulation, testing, and debugging of sophisticated objects electronically. Progress in automation will require the ability to electronically represent, reason about, and manipulate objects. Discussed here is the development of representations, languages, editors, and model-driven simulation systems to support electronic prototyping. In particular, it identifies areas where basic research is needed before further progress can be made.

  16. SmartCard Prototype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    prototype. ............................................................................................. 7 Figure 6 Smart Card Prototype main window...a data explorer. Intervention costs Database with a single instance (i.e. one data set). User help framework Figure 6 Smart Card Prototype

  17. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  18. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  19. The Perils of Prototyping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Christina; Little, Robert

    1985-01-01

    The benefits of prototyping as a basis for system design include better specifications, earlier discovery of omissions and extensions, and the likelihood of salvaging much of the effort expended on the prototype. Risks and methods of prototyping during rapid systems development are also noted. (Author/MLW)

  20. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  1. The ATLAS IBL BOC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN will be upgraded with an Insertable B-Layer (IBL) in 2013. To handle the data readout the currently used VME card pairs consisting of a back of crate card (BOC) and a read out driver (ROD) are being redesigned. This paper presents details of the hardware design of the new BOC prototype, which takes advantage from modern FPGA technology and commercial optical modules and abandons the need for a variety of custom components used on the old card. Also the throughput is four times higher and additional features are implemented.

  2. PyTrilinos Rapid Prototyping Package

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.

    2005-03-01

    PyTrilinos provides access to selected Trilinos packages from the python scripting language. This allows interactive and dynamic creation of Trilinos objects, rapid prototyping that does not require compilation, and "gluing" Trilinos scripts to other python modules, such as plotting, etc. The currently supported packages are Epetra, EpetraExt, and NOX.

  3. Prototype vein contrast enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Vrancken, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    A proof-of-principle prototype Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) has been designed and constructed. The VCE is an instrument that makes vein access easier by capturing an infrared image of peripheral veins, enhancing the vein-contrast using software image processing, and projecting the enhanced vein-image back onto the skin using a modified commercial projector. The prototype uses software alignment to achieve alignment accuracy between the captured infrared image and the projected visible image of better than 0.06 mm. Figure 1 shows the prototype demonstrated in our laboratory.

  4. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2002-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis, design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  5. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2001-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  6. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2002-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis, design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  7. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2001-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  8. Colleyville Eco House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-16

    This case study describes the construction of a prototype high-performance home that includes a high efficiency ground source heat pump, unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation, and supplemental dehumidification.

  9. LENS: Prototyping Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectrometer (LENS) prototyping program is broken into two phases. The first of these is μLENS, a small prototype to study the light transmission in the as built LENS scintillation lattice--- a novel detector method of high segmentation in a large liquid scintillation detector. The μLENS prototype is currently deployed and taking data at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) near Virginia Tech. I will discuss the Scintillation Lattice construction methods and schemes of the μLENS program for running with minimal channels instrumented to date ˜41 compared to full coverage 216). The second phase of prototyping is the miniLENS detector for which construction is under way. I will discuss the overall design from the miniLENS Scintillation Lattice to the shielding.

  10. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  11. A Primer on Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Dylan; Biron, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard mechanical components, such as adapters or mounts, are ubiquitous in research laboratories, C. elegans labs included. Recently, in-house prototyping and fabricating both standard and custom mechanical parts has become simple and cost effective. Here we describe the basic steps, equipment, and considerations required for rapid prototyping of a handful of simple yet useful designs. These examples were chosen for their simplicity, as well as for demonstrating specific practicalities. They are thus appropriate as training exercises.

  12. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  13. Advances in rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, C. L.; McCarty, G. D.; Pardo, B. T.; Bryce, E. A.

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System's QuickCast(trademark) resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast(trademark) resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable first article and small lot size production parts. They use the selective laser sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  14. Power API Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype. The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

  15. Power API Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype. The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

  16. Prototyping the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Advanced Ceramics Research (ACR) of Tucson, Arizona, researches transforming scientific concepts into technological achievement. Through the SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) program, ACR developed a high pressure and temperature fused deposition system, a prototyping system that is known as extrusion freeform fabrication. This system is useful in manufacturing prosthetics. ACR also developed a three-dimensional rapid prototyping process in which physical models are quickly created directly from computer generated models. Marshall Space Flight Center also contracted ACR to fabricate a set of ceramic engines to be appraised for a solar thermal rocket engine test program.

  17. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

    2005-09-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2

  18. Aerospace Numerical Simulation and Digital Prototyping Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yao; Xie, Lijun; Zou, Jianfeng; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Jifa

    2010-05-01

    A High End Digital Prototyping system (HEDP) designed for aerospace numerical simulation is introduced in this paper. This system is a problem solving environment equipped with capability of parallel mesh generation, immersive visual steering, large-scale visualization and parallel computation. All enabling technologies are realized as separate modules and coupled through a software bus, which makes them integrated seamlessly. Detailed design principles and a numerical simulation of turbulent combustion in the HyShot Scramjet whitin the HEDP system is addressed.

  19. MIND performance and prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera-Villanueva, A.

    2008-02-21

    The performance of MIND (Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector) at a neutrino factory has been revisited in a new analysis. In particular, the low neutrino energy region is studied, obtaining an efficiency plateau around 5 GeV for a background level below 10{sup -3}. A first look has been given into the detector optimisation and prototyping.

  20. AGS Booster prototype magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Brodowski, J.; Jablonski, E.; Keohane, G.; McDowell, B.; Rodger, E.

    1987-03-19

    Prototype magnets have been designed and constructed for two half cells of the AGS Booster. The lattice requires 2.4m long dipoles, each curved by 10/sup 0/. The multi-use Booster injector requires several very different standard magnet cycles, capable of instantaneous interchange using computer control from dc up to 10 Hz.

  1. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  2. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  3. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  4. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  5. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  6. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  7. Prototype Facility Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Div. of Professional-Technical Education, Boise.

    This document presents prototypical educational specifications to guide the building and renovation of Idaho vocational schools so they can help communities meet the advanced, professional-technical programs of the future. The specifications start with points to consider when determining school site suitability. The document then sets forth…

  8. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  9. D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-08-02

    The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ports. The EC North vessel was rolled outside of Lab A in preparation for a 5000 gallon liquid nitrogen trailer which arrived July, 10 at 8:00am. Before filling the vessel, the vacuum space pump was valved off. The pressure in the vacuum space was 12 microns at that point. During the next 24 hours of the test, the vacuum space pressure decreased to 5 microns. A plot of the vacuum space pressure with time is included at the end of this note. The liquid nitrogen was pressure transferred from the trailer at 29 psig to the pressure vessel at 1 psig for ten hours. At that time there was sufficient (16-inch) of liquid nitrogen in the vessel to turn the LN2 trailer delivery pump on. Thirteen and one half hours after starting the fill, the vessel had 50-inch of LN2 collected. During the latter part of the filling, about twelve loud metallic bangs were heard. The noises came at random intervals with sometimes five minutes between and other times an hour between. The best way to describe the sound is to imagine the sound made if someone was trapped inside the vessel with a baseball bat and took a good swing. The trailer was disconnected and the the vessel was left overnight for ten hours. Due to the slow LN2 fill rate, the temperature gradient in the pressure vessel shell was not very large, only about 25 kelvin difference was found from a RTD in the warm-up nozzle of the vessel and the resistors of the liquid level probe. A temperature versus time graph is included at the end of this note.

  10. Process of end-capping a polyimide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, T. L.; Burks, H. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process of endcapping a polyimide system with an endcapping agent in order to achieve a controlled decrease in molecular weight and melt viscosity along with predictable fracture resistance of the molded products is disclosed. The uncapped system is formed by combining an equimolar ratio of 4,4'-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA) and 1,-bis (aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) dissolved in bis (2-methoxyethyl)ether. The endcapped system is formed by dissolving APB in bis-(2-methoxyethyl)ether, adding the BDSDA. By varying the amount of endcapping from 0 to 4%, molecular weight is decreased from 13,900 to 8660. At a processing temperature of 250 C, there is a linear relationship between molecular weight and viscosity, with the viscosity decreasing by two orders of magnitude as the molecular weight decreased from 13,900 to 8660.

  11. Fresnel Interferometric Imager: ground-based prototype.

    PubMed

    Serre, Denis; Deba, Paul; Koechlin, Laurent

    2009-05-20

    The Fresnel Interferometric Imager is a space-based astronomical telescope project yielding milli-arcsecond angular resolution and high contrast images with loose manufacturing constraints. This optical concept involves diffractive focusing and formation flying: a first "primary optics" space module holds a large binary Fresnel array, and a second "focal module" holds optical elements and focal instruments that allow for chromatic dispersion correction. We have designed a reduced-size Fresnel Interferometric Imager prototype and made optical tests in our laboratory in order to validate the concept for future space missions. The primary module of this prototype consists of a square, 8 cm side, 23 m focal length Fresnel array. The focal module is composed of a diaphragmed small telescope used as "field lens," a small cophased diverging Fresnel zone lens that cancels the dispersion, and a detector. An additional module collimates the artificial targets of various shapes, sizes, and dynamic ranges to be imaged. We describe the experimental setup, different designs of the primary Fresnel array, and the cophased Fresnel zone lens that achieves rigorous chromatic correction. We give quantitative measurements of the diffraction limited performances and dynamic range on double sources. The tests have been performed in the visible domain, lambda = 400-700 nm. In addition, we present computer simulations of the prototype optics based on Fresnel propagation that corroborate the optical tests. This numerical tool has been used to simulate the large aperture Fresnel arrays that could be sent to space with diameters of 3 to 30 m, foreseen to operate from Lyman alpha (121 nm) to mid IR (25 microm).

  12. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  13. Step Prototype Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehls, C.; Bayart, C.; Bower, J.; Clarke, B.; Cox, C.; Gill, D.; Stricker, D.; Vora, N.; Wang, S.; Zhou, P.; Torii, R.; Worden, P.; Debra, D.; Dittus, H.; Loeffler, F.

    2008-09-01

    STEP, the Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle [1], proposes to test the Equivalence Principle to a part in 1018 by comparing the free-fall acceleration of cylindrical shaped test masses [2] in Earth orbit. Magnetic bearings constrain the test mass motion to their axis of symmetry [3]. The displacement of the test masses is measured using a DC SQUID and superconducting coils [4], enabling a displacement sensitivity as small as 10-15 m. In combination with a small spring stiffness a differential acceleration sensitivity of 10-18 g is achievable. Residual satellite acceleration is reduced to better than 10-14 g by compensating satellite drag forces with thrust provided by helium gas. We report on recent progress in the development of STEP prototype flight accelerometers, in particular the development of the high precision quartz housing for the engineering inner accelerometer and the testing of SQUID and capacitive readout systems using 'brass board' accelerometer prototypes.

  14. The Galileo PPS expert monitoring and diagnostic prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Khosrow

    1989-01-01

    The Galileo PPS Expert Monitoring Module (EMM) is a prototype system implemented on the SUN workstation that will demonstrate a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis for the Galileo spacecraft Power/Pyro subsystems. The prototype will simulate an analysis module functioning within the SFOC Engineering Analysis Subsystem Environment (EASE). This document describes the implementation of a prototype EMM for the Galileo spacecraft Power Pyro Subsystem. Section 2 of this document provides an overview of the issues in monitoring and diagnosis and comparison between traditional and knowledge-based solutions to this problem. Section 3 describes various tradeoffs which must be considered when designing a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis, and section 4 discusses how these issues were resolved in constructing the prototype. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations for constructing a full-scale demonstration of the EMM. A Glossary provides definitions of terms used in this text.

  15. Prototype Slide Stainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prototype slide staining system capable of performing both one-component Wright's staining of blood smears and eight-step Gram staining of heat fixed slides of microorganisms is described. Attention was given to liquid containment, waste handling, absence of contamination from previous staining, and stability of the staining reagents. The unit is self-contained, capable of independent operation under one- or zero-g conditions, and compatible with Skylab A.

  16. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  17. Ghana watershed prototype products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    A number of satellite data sets are available through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for monitoring land surface features. Representative data sets include Landsat, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The Ghana Watershed Prototype Products cover an area within southern Ghana, Africa, and include examples of the aforementioned data sets along with sample SRTM derivative data sets.

  18. Ghana Watershed Prototype Products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Introduction/Background A number of satellite data sets are available through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for monitoring land surface features. Representative data sets include Landsat, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The Ghana Watershed Prototype Products cover an area within southern Ghana, Africa, and include examples of the aforementioned data sets along with sample SRTM derivative data sets.

  19. Common Prototyping Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    1988 17:12 example Lisp, Prolog, SETL, APL, SmallTalk, ML, and others meet many of the requirements. A careful analysis in each case will be helpful...handles unsupplied or incomplete components. A prototype is incomplete if not all procedures, functions, or types are defined or if they are partially...defined. The following are examples of how PC might handle unsupplied or incomplete components: SInvoke a condition handler * Query the user 0 Entering

  20. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  1. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  2. Nightshade Prototype Experiments (Silverleaf)

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, Jeremy; Bauer, Amy L.

    2016-12-23

    The Red Sage campaign is a series of subcritical dynamic plutonium experiments designed to measure ejecta. Nightshade, the first experiments in Red Sage scheduled for fiscal year 2019, will measure the amount of ejecta emission into vacuum from a double-­shocked plutonium surface. To address the major technical risks in Nightshade, a Level 2 milestone was developed for fiscal year 2016. Silverleaf, a series of four experiments, was executed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in July and August 2016 to demonstrate a prototype of the Nightshade package and to satisfy this Level 2 milestone. This report is documentation that Red Sage Level 2 milestone requirements were successfully met.

  3. Furled Starshade Prototype

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    A furled first prototype starshade developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shown in technology partner Astro Aerospace/Northrup Grumman's facility in Santa Barbara, California, in 2013. This design shows petals that are more extreme in shape, which properly diffracts starlight for smaller telescopes. For launch, the petals of the starshade will be wrapped around the spacecraft, then unfurled into the familiar flower-like design once in space. As shown by this 66-foot (20-meter) model, starshades can come in many shapes and sizes. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20905

  4. AMS Prototyping Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the activity around the Asynchronous Message Service (AMS) prototype. An AMS reference implementation has been available since late 2005. It is aimed at supporting message exchange both in on-board environments and over space links. The implementation incoroporates all mandatory elements of the draft recommendation from July 2007: (1) MAMS, AMS, and RAMS protocols. (2) Failover, heartbeats, resync. (3) "Hooks" for security, but no cipher suites included in the distribution. The performance is reviewed, and a Benchmark latency test over VxWorks Message Queues is shown as histograms of a count vs microseconds per 1000-byte message

  5. AMS Prototyping Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the activity around the Asynchronous Message Service (AMS) prototype. An AMS reference implementation has been available since late 2005. It is aimed at supporting message exchange both in on-board environments and over space links. The implementation incoroporates all mandatory elements of the draft recommendation from July 2007: (1) MAMS, AMS, and RAMS protocols. (2) Failover, heartbeats, resync. (3) "Hooks" for security, but no cipher suites included in the distribution. The performance is reviewed, and a Benchmark latency test over VxWorks Message Queues is shown as histograms of a count vs microseconds per 1000-byte message

  6. JINR LHEP photoinjector prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balalykin, N. I.; Minashkin, V. F.; Nozdrin, M. A.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Shirkov, G. D.; Gacheva, E. I.; Katin, E. V.; Khazanov, E. A.; Luchinin, G. A.; Poteomkin, A. K.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Huran, J.

    2016-12-01

    A photoinjector prototype for future electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers (FEL) is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). A 30-keV photogun stand, transmission (backside irradiated) photocathode concept, and stand investigations of such cathodes in collaboration with Institute of Electrical Engineering (IEE SAS) (Bratislava, the Slovak Republic) are described. A progress report on creating the photoinjector at an electron energy of up to 400 keV with a unique 10-ps laser driver is given.

  7. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  8. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  9. OMS FDIR: Initial prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Eric W.; Hanson, Matthew A.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Operations Management System (OMS) will automate major management functions which coordinate the operations of onboard systems, elements and payloads. The objectives of OMS are to improve safety, reliability and productivity while reducing maintenance and operations cost. This will be accomplished by using advanced automation techniques to automate much of the activity currently performed by the flight crew and ground personnel. OMS requirements have been organized into five task groups: (1) Planning, Execution and Replanning; (2) Data Gathering, Preprocessing and Storage; (3) Testing and Training; (4) Resource Management; and (5) Caution and Warning and Fault Management for onboard subsystems. The scope of this prototyping effort falls within the Fault Management requirements group. The prototyping will be performed in two phases. Phase 1 is the development of an onboard communications network fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) system. Phase 2 will incorporate global FDIR for onboard systems. Research into the applicability of expert systems, object-oriented programming, fuzzy sets, neural networks and other advanced techniques will be conducted. The goals and technical approach for this new SSFP research project are discussed here.

  10. MAPMT H7546B anode current response study for ILC SiD muon system prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Blazey, G.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Zutshi, V.; Fisk, H.; Milstene, C.; Abrams, R.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    The proposed Silicon Detector (SiD) concept for the ILC has barrel and end cap muon systems. An SiD scintillator based muon system prototype has 256 strips and was constructed from extruded strips, WLS fibers, clear fibers, and multianode photo multiplier tubes (MAPMT) Hamamatsu H7546B. Six MAPMTs were used. As a first step to understand strip output, the response of every anode to a given brightness of light and applied voltage must be measured. For the test, a custom made light source was used. Each MAPMT output was measured independently. The anode currents were measured at constant (green) input light brightness and the same photocathode to anode voltage (800V). The anode currents have a wide spread; for all tubes the maximum value is 5.23 times larger than the minimum value. The MAPMT cross talk was measured for one of the central inputs. The maximum cross talk value is about 4.9%. The average cross talk for the nearest four neighboring channels is 3.9%, for the farthest four is 1%. To assure the reproducibility and repeatability of the measurements, the double reference method was used.

  11. Experimental prototype of an electric elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiceanu, M.; Epure, S.; Ciuta, S.

    2016-08-01

    The main objective is to achieve an elevator prototype powered by a three-phase voltage system via a bidirectional static power converter ac-ac with regenerating capability. In order to diminish the power size of the electric motor up to 1/3 of rated power, the elevator contains two carriages of the same weight, one serving as the payload, and the other as counterweight. Before proper operation of the static power converter, the capacitor must be charged at rated voltage via a precharge circuit. At the moment of stabilizing the DC voltage at nominal value, the AC-AC power converter can operates in the proper limits. The functions of the control structure are: the load control task, speed and torque controls. System includes transducers for current measuring, voltage sensors and encoder. As reserve power sources the hybrid battery-photovoltaic panels are used. The control voltage is modulated by implementing four types of pulse width modulations: sinusoidal, with reduced commutation, third order harmonic insertion, and the space vector modulation. Therefore, the prototype could operates with an increased efficiency, in spite of the existing ones. The experimental results confirm the well design of the chosen solution. The control solution assures bidirectional power flow control, precharge control, and load control and it is implemented on a digital signal processor. The elevator capacity is between 300-450 kg, and it is driven by using a 1.5 kW three-phase asynchronous machine.

  12. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  13. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  14. Capacitance Flatness Gauge Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Pitas, A.; Angstadt, R.; /Fermilab

    1986-03-20

    The DO calorimeter has within it thousands of large plates. Our ability to construct the detector depends on the flatness of these plates. The performance of the detector depends on the flatness of the plates after they are assembled into a module. It has been proposed that the flatness of the plates before and after assembly could be determined by measuring capacitance. This device demonstrates the viability of using capacitance to measure the flatness of individual plates. No attempt has been made to extrapolate the results to measuring the flatness of the plates once they are in a module.

  15. Rapid Prototyping Roadmapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Kenneth G.

    1998-01-01

    Roadmapping has long been thought of as a process for getting from point A to point B within a single discipline. Roadmapping for Rapid Prototyping has multiple paths of which we will diagram in this meeting. When you consider the dynamic change that the computer has made in both developing as well as manufacturing products, we could only assume that further electronic medium matched with mechanical inventions will continue. This industry roadmap is intended to point and lead us to the promised manufacturing land. We hope to reduce the inherent risk associated with technology development by providing a clear goal of mapping to a manufacturing process. The work of DoE in 1994 was excellent and began a journey that would benefit the decision makers and allow for choices that would be good investment decisions. While this work included government agencies, this map is broader and includes industry and academia input.

  16. Prototype Stilbene Neutron Collar

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M. K.; Shumaker, D.; Snyderman, N.; Verbeke, J.; Wong, J.

    2016-10-26

    A neutron collar using stilbene organic scintillator cells for fast neutron counting is described for the assay of fresh low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies. The prototype stilbene collar has a form factor similar to standard He-3 based collars and uses an AmLi interrogation neutron source. This report describes the simulation of list mode neutron correlation data on various fuel assemblies including some with neutron absorbers (burnable Gd poisons). Calibration curves (doubles vs 235U linear mass density) are presented for both thermal and fast (with Cd lining) modes of operation. It is shown that the stilbene collar meets or exceeds the current capabilities of He-3 based neutron collars. A self-consistent assay methodology, uniquely suited to the stilbene collar, using triples is described which complements traditional assay based on doubles calibration curves.

  17. Structured prototyping as risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda SH.; Gardner, J. A.; Willoughby, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented for integrating the systems-engineering management recommendation of prototyping into the traditional project-management process for developing large-scale systems. The suggested methodology begins with the identification of life-cycle risk areas, outlines the structure and conduct of the prototyping process, and defines the composition of the prototyping team. The methodology includes a step-by-step procedure for creating, executing, and documenting a prototyping test plan to evaluate design alternatives. It is argued that managers who adopt this methodology and apply it rigorously will increase the likelihood that the systems they build will be operationally effective and will be accepted by the intended users.

  18. A Prototype for Modular Cell Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wilbanks, Brandon; Layton, Donovan; Garcia, Sergio; Trinh, Cong

    2017-10-10

    When aiming to produce a target chemical at high yield, titer, and productivity, various combinations of genetic parts available to build the target pathway can generate a large number of strains for characterization. This engineering approach will become increasingly laborious and expensive when seeking to develop desirable strains for optimal production of a large space of biochemicals due to extensive screening. Our recent theoretical development of modular cell (MODCELL) design principles can offer a promising solution for rapid generation of optimal strains by coupling a modular cell and exchangeable production modules in a plug-and-play fashion. In this study, we experimentally validated some designed properties of MODCELL by demonstrating: i) a modular (chassis) cell is required to couple with a production module, a heterologous ethanol pathway, as a testbed, ii) degree of coupling between the modular cell and production modules can be modulated to enhance growth and product synthesis, iii) a modular cell can be used as a host to select an optimal pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) of the ethanol production module and to help identify a hypothetical PDC protein, and iv) adaptive laboratory evolution based on growth selection of the modular cell can enhance growth and product synthesis rates. We envision that the MODCELL design provides a powerful prototype for modular cell engineering to rapidly create optimal strains for synthesis of a large space of biochemicals.

  19. Design of a prototype tri-electrode ion-chamber for megavoltage X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; Jain, Jinesh; Xia, Junyi; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2007-04-01

    High-energy (megavoltage) X-ray imaging is widely used in industry (e.g., aerospace, construction, material sciences) as well as in health care (radiation therapy). One of the fundamental problems with megavoltage imaging is poor contrast and spatial resolution in the detected images due to the dominance of Compton scattering at megavoltage X-ray energies. Therefore, although megavoltage X-rays can be used to image highly attenuating objects that cannot be imaged at kilovoltage energies, the former does not provide the high image quality that is associated with the latter. A high contrast and spatial resolution detector for high-energy X-ray fields called the kinestatic charge detector (KCD) is presented here. The KCD is a tri-electrode ion-chamber based on highly pressurized noble gas. The KCD operates in conjunction with a strip-collimated X-ray beam (for high scatter rejection) to scan across the imaging field. Its thick detector design and unique operating principle provides enhanced charge signal integration for high quality imaging (quantum efficiency ˜50%) despite the unfavorable implications of high-energy X-ray interactions on image quality. The proposed design for a large-field prototype KCD includes a cylindrical pressure chamber along with 576 signal-collecting electrodes capable of resolving at 2 mm -1. The collecting electrodes are routed out of the chamber through the flat end-cap, thereby optimizing the mechanical strength of the chamber. This article highlights the simplified design of the chamber using minimal components for simple assembly. In addition, fundamental imaging measurements and estimates of ion recombination that were performed on a proof-of-principle test chamber are presented. The imaging performance of the prototype KCD was found to be an order-of-magnitude greater than commercial phosphor screen based flat-panel systems, demonstrating the potential for high-quality megavoltage imaging for a variety of industrial applications.

  20. Deep space uplink receiver prototype for optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Birnbaum, K. M.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-03-01

    A hardware prototype of a flight receiver for deep space optical communications has been developed where a single detector array is used for acquisition, tracking, and high-speed data recovery. A counting algorithm accumulates pulses on every pixel in a photon-counting array and extracts signal information encoded with a nested modulation scheme.

  1. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  2. Virtual Prototyping at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Silvano De

    The VENUS (Virtual Environment Navigation in the Underground Sites) project is probably the largest Virtual Reality application to Engineering design in the world. VENUS is just over one year old and offers a fully immersive and stereoscopic "flythru" of the LHC pits for the proposed experiments, including the experimental area equipment and the surface models that are being prepared for a territorial impact study. VENUS' Virtual Prototypes are an ideal replacement for the wooden models traditionally build for the past CERN machines, as they are generated directly from the EUCLID CAD files, therefore they are totally reliable, they can be updated in a matter of minutes, and they allow designers to explore them from inside, in a one-to-one scale. Navigation can be performed on the computer screen, on a stereoscopic large projection screen, or in immersive conditions, with an helmet and 3D mouse. By using specialised collision detection software, the computer can find optimal paths to lower each detector part into the pits and position it to destination, letting us visualize the whole assembly probess. During construction, these paths can be fed to a robot controller, which can operate the bridge cranes and build LHC almost without human intervention. VENUS is currently developing a multiplatform VR browser that will let the whole HEP community access LHC's Virtual Protoypes over the web. Many interesting things took place during the conference on Virtual Reality. For more information please refer to the Virtual Reality section.

  3. Energy-Level Modulation of Small-Molecule Electron Acceptors to Achieve over 12% Efficiency in Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Sunsun; Ye, Long; Zhao, Wenchao; Zhang, Shaoqing; Mukherjee, Subhrangsu; Ade, Harald; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-11-01

    Fine energy-level modulations of small-molecule acceptors (SMAs) are realized via subtle chemical modifications on strong electron-withdrawing end-groups. The two new SMAs (IT-M and IT-DM) end-capped by methyl-modified dicycanovinylindan-1-one exhibit upshifted lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels, and hence higher open-circuit voltages can be observed in the corresponding devices. Finally, a top power conversion efficiency of 12.05% is achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Prototype detection unit for the CHIPS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfützner, Maciej M.

    2017-09-01

    CHIPS (CHerenkov detectors In mine PitS) is an R&D project aiming to develop novel cost-effective neutrino detectors, focused on measuring the CP-violating neutrino mixing phase (δ CP). A single detector module, containing an enclosed volume of purified water, would be submerged in an existing lake, located in a neutrino beam. A staged approach is proposed with first detectors deployed in a flooded mine pit in Northern Minnesota, 7 mrad off-axis from the existing NuMI beam. A small proof-of-principle model (CHIPS-M) has already been tested and the first stage of a fully functional 10 kt module (CHIPS-10) is planned for 2018. One of the instruments submerged on board of CHIPS-M in autumn 2015 was a prototype detection unit, constructed at Nikhef. The unit contains hardware borrowed from the KM3NeT experiment, including 16 3 inch photomultiplier tubes and readout electronics. In addition to testing the mechanical design and data acquisition, the detector was used to record a large sample of cosmic ray muon events. The collected data is valuable for characterising the cosmic muon background and validating a Monte Carlo simulation used to optimise future designs. This paper introduces the CHIPS project, describes the design of the prototype unit, and presents the results of a preliminary data analysis.

  5. Small Thermophotovoltaic Prototype Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisch, Wilhelm; Bitnar, Bernd; von Roth, Fritz; Palfinger, Günther

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper [1], we reported on a small grid-connected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system consisting of an ytterbia mantle emitter and silicon solar cells with 16 % efficiency (under solar irradiance at Standard Test Conditions, STC). The emitter was heated up using a butane burner with a rated thermal power of 1.35 kW (referring to the lower heating value). This system produced an electrical output of 15 W, which corresponds to a thermal to electric (direct current) conversion efficiency of 1.1 %. In the interim, further progress has been made, and significantly higher efficiencies have been achieved. The most important development steps are: 1) The infrared radiation-absorbing water filter between emitter and silicon cells (to protect the cells against overheating and against contact with flue gasses) has been replaced by a suitable glass tube. By doing this, it has been possible to prevent losses of convertible radiation in water. 2) Cell cooling has been significantly improved, in order to reduce cell temperature, and therefore increase conversion efficiency. 3) The shape of the emitter has been changed from spherical to a quasi-cylindrical geometry, in order to obtain a more homogeneous irradiation of the cells. 4) The metallic burner tube, on which the ytterbia emitter was fixed in the initial prototypes, has been replaced by a heat-resistant metallic rod, carrying ceramic discs as emitter holders. This has prevented the oxidation and clogging of the perforated burner tube. 5) Larger reflectors have been used to reduce losses in useful infrared radiation. 6) Smaller cells have been used, to reduce electrical series resistance losses. Applying all these improvements to the basic 1.35 kW prototype, we attained a system efficiency of 1.5 %. By using preheated air for combustion (at approximately 370 °C), 1.8 % was achieved. In a subsequent step, a photocell generator was constructed, consisting of high-efficiency silicon cells (21% STC efficiency). In this

  6. Foraging search: Prototypical intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobus, George

    2000-05-01

    We think because we eat. Or as Descartes might have said, on a little more reflection, "I need to eat, therefore I think." Animals that forage for a living repeatedly face the problem of searching for a sparsely distributed resource in a vast space. Furthermore, the resource may occur sporadically and episodically under conditions of true uncertainty (nonstationary, complex and non-linear dynamics). I assert that this problem is the canonical problem solved by intelligence. It's solution is the basis for the evolution of more advanced intelligence in which the space of search includes that of concepts (objects and relations) encoded in cortical structures. In humans the conscious experience of searching through concept space we call thinking. The foraging search model is based upon a higher-order autopoeitic system (the forager) employing anticipatory processing to enhance its success at finding food while avoiding becoming food or having accidents in a hostile world. I present a semi-formal description of the general foraging search problem and an approach to its solution. The latter is a brain-like structure employing dynamically adaptive neurons. A physical robot, MAVRIC, embodies some principles of foraging. It learns cues that lead to improvements in finding targets in a dynamic and nonstationary environment. This capability is based on a unique learning mechanism that encodes causal relations in the neural-like processing element. An argument is advanced that searching for resources in the physical world, as per the foraging model, is a prototype for generalized search for conceptual resources as when we think. A problem represents a conceptual disturbance in a homeostatic sense. The finding of a solution restores the homeostatic balance. The establishment of links between conceptual cues and solutions (resources) and the later use of those cues to think through to solutions of quasi-isomorphic problems is, essentially, foraging for ideas. It is a quite

  7. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Friedsam, H.; Galt, A.; Hays, S.; Hocker, J.; Kim, M. J.; Kokoska, L.; Koshelev, S.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Pilipenko, R.; Rabehl, R.; Santini, C.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Badgley, K.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Marchevsky, M.

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went through an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.

  8. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went throughmore » an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.« less

  9. Prototyping of Processor Warm Redundancy in Critical Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, O.; Villa, J.; Garcia, G.; Alison, B.; Renault, H.

    2009-05-01

    Reliability of most data handling systems used for space mission is based on redundancy concept. In particular, in order to be robust to one failure, one classical solution is to use two redundant processor modules: One nominal used by default, and one backup used in case of failure of first one. This redundancy may be in cold, warm or hot configuration, each of these configurations presenting specific advantages and drawbacks. For ExoMars Carrier Module critical mission phases (before Descent Module separation), the warm redundancy has been chosen as a compromise between compliance with tight mission time constraints and system simplicity. This concept of warm redundancy had been previously tested and validated by Thales Alenia Space France through the realisation of a prototype in Cannes premises. The purpose of this paper is to present the principles of this warm redundancy prototyping and its main results.

  10. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-08-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  11. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-11-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  12. The ESIS Correlation Environment Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giommi, P.; Ansari, S. G.; Ciarlo, A.; Donzelli, P.; Stokke, H.; Torrente, P.; Walker, S.; Zampognaro, V.

    This paper gives a brief description of the Correlation Environment Prototype currently under development at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy) as part of the European Space Information System (ESIS) project. The prototype consists of a C program that acts as graphical user-interface, as tasks scheduler and as data-handler within the general ESIS system. This program will provide a uniform view to a number of applications that allow the user to retrieve, inspect and compare Astronomy and Space-Physics data. The prototype architecture is object oriented and open so that new packages can easily be included as they become available. The prototype will run on VAX-VMS and on UNIX systems.

  13. Develop Prototype Microwave Interferometry Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J. W.; Converse, M. C.; Kane, R. J.

    2016-11-15

    A prototype microwave interferometer was created at NSTec to characterize moving conductive fronts in upcoming experiments. The interferometer is capable of operation in the ~26-40 GHz band, and interrogating fronts with more than 1 W of power.

  14. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are working jointly to develop a helicopter transportable firefighting module that can shave precious minutes in combating shipboard or harbor fires. The program was undertaken in 1975, after a series of disastrous fires on oil tankers indicated a need for a lightweight, self-contained system that could be moved quickly to the scene of a fire. A prototype module was delivered to the Coast Guard last year and service testing is under way. The compact module weighs little more than a ton but it contains everything needed to fight a fire. The key component is a high output pump, which delivers up to 2,000 gallons of sea water a minute; the pump can be brought up to maximum output in only one minute after turning on the power source, a small Allison gas turbine engine. The module also contains hose, a foam nozzle and a spray nozzle, three sets of protective clothing for firefighters, and fuel for three hours operation. Designed to be assembled without special tools, the module can be set up for operation in less than 20 minutes.

  15. Analysis of Ada as a prototyping language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the suitability of Ada as a language for developing software prototypes. The differences between software prototypes and traditional engineering prototypes are discussed; the approaches to software prototyping are identified. Ada's potential as a language for prototyping is evaluated according to the writability, expressiveness, and flexibility of the language; Ada is found to be inadequate as a prototyping language because it lacks writability and expressiveness. Possible approaches to improving the expressiveness of the language are discussed.

  16. Requirements Elicitation Using Paper Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Jaya; Raju, G.

    Requirements engineering is both the hardest and critical part of software development since errors at this beginning stage propagate through the development process and are the hardest to repair later. This paper proposes an improved approach for requirements elicitation using paper prototype. The paper progresses through an assessment of the new approach using student projects developed for various organizations. The scope of implementation of paper prototype and its advantages are unveiled.

  17. Characterization of Prototype LSST CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    OCONNOR,P.; FRANK, J.; GEARY, J.C.; GILMORE, D.K.; KOTOV, I.; RADEKA, V.; TAKACS, P.; TYSON, J.A.

    2008-06-23

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be achieved in part by a wide-field imager that will achieve a new level of performance in terms of area, speed, and sensitivity. The instrument performance is dominated by the focal plane sensors, which are now in development. These new-generation sensors will make use of advanced semiconductor technology and will be complemented by a highly integrated electronics package located inside the cryostat. A test laboratory has been set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to characterize prototype sensors and to develop test and assembly techniques for eventual integration of production sensors and electronics into modules that will form the final focal plane. As described in [1], the key requirements for LSST sensors are wideband quantum efficiency (QE) extending beyond lpm in the red, control of point spread function (PSF), and fast readout using multiple amplifiers per chip operated in parallel. In addition, LSST's fast optical system (f71.25) places severe constraints on focal plane flatness. At the chip level this involves packaging techniques to minimize warpage of the silicon die, and at the mosaic level careful assembly and metrology to achieve a high coplanarity of the sensor tiles. In view of the long lead time to develop the needed sensor technology, LSST undertook a study program with several vendors to fabricate and test devices which address the most critical performance features [2]. The remainder of this paper presents key results of this study program. Section 2 summarizes the sensor requirements and the results of design optimization studies, and Section 3 presents the sensor development plan. In Section 4 we describe the test bench at BNL. Section 5 reports measurement results obtained to date oh devices fabricated by several vendors. Section 6 presents a summary of the paper and an outlook for the future work. We present characterization methods and results on a

  18. Fuelcell Prototype Locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Barnes

    2007-09-28

    An international industry-government consortium is developing a fuelcell hybrid switcher locomotive for commercial railway applications and power-to-grid generation applications. The current phase of this on-going project addresses the practicalities of on-board hydrogen storage, fuelcell technology, and hybridity, all with an emphasis on commercially available products. Through practical evaluation using designs from Vehicle Projects’ Fuelcell-Powered Underground Mine Loader Project, the configuration of the fuelcell switcher locomotive changed from using metal-hydride hydrogen storage and a pure fuelcell power plant to using compressed hydrogen storage, a fuelcell-battery hybrid power plant, and fuelcell stack modules from Ballard Power Systems that have been extensively used in the Citaro bus program in Europe. The new overall design will now use a RailPower battery hybrid Green Goat™ as the locomotive platform. Keeping the existing lead-acid batteries, we will replace the 205 kW diesel gen-set with 225 kW of net fuelcell power, remove the diesel fuel tank, and place 14 compressed hydrogen cylinders, capable of storing 70 kg of hydrogen at 350 bar, on the roof. A detailed design with associated CAD models will allow a complete build of the fuelcell-battery hybrid switcher locomotive in the next funded phase.

  19. Bubble memory module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohning, O. D.; Becker, F. J.

    1980-12-01

    Design, fabrication and test of partially populated prototype recorder using 100 kilobit serial chips is described. Electrical interface, operating modes, and mechanical design of several module configurations are discussed. Fabrication and test of the module demonstrated the practicality of multiplexing resulting in lower power, weight, and volume. This effort resulted in the completion of a module consisting of a fully engineered printed circuit storage board populated with 5 of 8 possible cells and a wire wrapped electronics board. Interface of the module is 16 bits parallel at a maximum of 1.33 megabits per second data rate on either of two interface buses.

  20. Bubble memory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohning, O. D.; Becker, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Design, fabrication and test of partially populated prototype recorder using 100 kilobit serial chips is described. Electrical interface, operating modes, and mechanical design of several module configurations are discussed. Fabrication and test of the module demonstrated the practicality of multiplexing resulting in lower power, weight, and volume. This effort resulted in the completion of a module consisting of a fully engineered printed circuit storage board populated with 5 of 8 possible cells and a wire wrapped electronics board. Interface of the module is 16 bits parallel at a maximum of 1.33 megabits per second data rate on either of two interface buses.

  1. Final prototype of magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.; Zmood, R. B.; Pang, D.; Lashley, C.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype of a 500 Wh magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system was designed, built, and tested. The authors present the work done and include the following: (1) a final design of the magnetic bearing, control system, and motor/generator, (2) construction of a prototype system consisting of the magnetic bearing stack, flywheel, motor, container, and display module, and (3) experimental results for the magnetic bearings, motor, and the entire system. The successful completion of the prototype system has achieved: (1) manufacture of tight tolerance bearings, (2) stability and spin above the first critical frequency, (3) use of inside sensors to eliminate runout problems, and (4) integration of the motor and magnetic bearings.

  2. Final prototype of magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.; Zmood, R. B.; Pang, D.; Lashley, C.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype of a 500 Wh magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system was designed, built, and tested. The authors present the work done and include the following: (1) a final design of the magnetic bearing, control system, and motor/generator, (2) construction of a prototype system consisting of the magnetic bearing stack, flywheel, motor, container, and display module, and (3) experimental results for the magnetic bearings, motor, and the entire system. The successful completion of the prototype system has achieved: (1) manufacture of tight tolerance bearings, (2) stability and spin above the first critical frequency, (3) use of inside sensors to eliminate runout problems, and (4) integration of the motor and magnetic bearings.

  3. An ASSERT Proposal for Development of Advanced EO Modulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-31

    The primary objective of this contract was to develop processible nonlinear optical materials and processing protocols that permit fabrication of prototype electrooptic modulator devices and integrated optoelectronic circuits.

  4. The MANIFEST prototyping design study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jonathan S.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brown, David M.; Brown, Rebecca A.; Case, Scott; Chapman, Steve; Churilov, Vladimir; Colless, Matthew; Content, Robert; Depoy, Darren; Evans, Ian; Farrell, Tony; Goodwin, Michael; Jacoby, George; Klauser, Urs; Kuehn, Kyler; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Mali, Slavko; Marshall, Jennifer; Muller, Rolf; Nichani, Vijay; Pai, Naveen; Prochaska, Travis; Saunders, Will; Schmidt, Luke; Shortridge, Keith; Staszak, Nicholas F.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Tims, Julia; Vuong, Minh V.; Waller, Lewis G.; Zhelem, Ross

    2016-08-01

    MANIFEST is a facility multi-object fibre system for the Giant Magellan Telescope, which uses `Starbug' fibre positioning robots. MANIFEST, when coupled to the telescope's planned seeing-limited instruments, GMACS, and G-CLEF, offers access to: larger fields of view; higher multiplex gains; versatile reformatting of the focal plane via IFUs; image-slicers; and in some cases higher spatial and spectral resolution. The Prototyping Design Study phase for MANIFEST, nearing completion, has focused on developing a working prototype of a Starbugs system, called TAIPAN, for the UK Schmidt Telescope, which will conduct a stellar and galaxy survey of the Southern sky. The Prototyping Design Study has also included work on the GMT instrument interfaces. In this paper, we outline the instrument design features of TAIPAN, highlight the modifications that will be necessary for the MANIFEST implementation, and provide an update on the MANIFEST/instrument interfaces.

  5. Fiber Optic Sensing: Prototype Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Martin, Jesus; Gonzalez Torres, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Airbus DS Crisa has been developing an interrogator of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors [1], aimed at measuring, mainly, temperature and strain by means of fiber optic links. This activity, funded by Airbus DS Crisa, ESA and HBM Fibersensing, finalizes with the manufacturing of a prototype. The present paper describes in detail the main outcomes of the testing activities of this prototype. At the moment of writing the paper all the functional tests have been concluded. The environmental tests, thermal and mechanical, will be conducted with the FOS interrogator forming part of the RTU2015, described in [2].

  6. Prototyping a genetics deductive database

    SciTech Connect

    Hearne, C.; Cui, Zhan; Parsons, S.; Hajnal, S.

    1994-12-31

    We are developing a laboratory notebook system known as the Genetics Deductive Database. Currently our prototype provides storage for biological facts and rules with flexible access via an interactive graphical display. We have introduced a formal basis for the representation and reasoning necessary to order genome map data and handle the uncertainty inherent in biological data. We aim to support laboratory activities by introducing an experiment planner into our prototype. The Genetics Deductive Database is built using new database technology which provides an object-oriented conceptual model, a declarative rule language, and a procedural update language. This combination of features allows the implementation of consistency maintenance, automated reasoning, and data verification.

  7. Pressure pulsation in Kaplan turbines: Prototype-CFD comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, A.; Lucino1, C.; Liscia, S.; Muguerza, D.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Pressure pulsation phenomena in a large Kaplan turbine are investigated by means of numerical simulations (CFD) and prototype measurements in order to study the dynamic behavior of flow due to the blade passage and its interaction with other components of the turbine. Numerical simulations are performed with the commercial software Ansys CFX code, solving the incompressible Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes equations under a finite volume scheme. The computational domain involves the entire machine at prototype scale. Special care is taken in the discretization of the wicket gate overhang and runner blade gap. Prototype measurements are performed using pressure transducers at different locations among the wicket gate outlet and the draft tube inlet. Then, CFD results are compared with temporary signals of prototype measurements at identical locations to validate the numerical model. A detailed analysis was focused on the tip gap flow and the pressure field at the discharge ring. From a rotating reference frame perspective, it is found that the mean pressure fluctuates accordingly the wicket gate passage. Moreover, in prototype measurements the pressure frequency that reveals the presence of modulated cavitation at the discharge ring is distinguished, as also verified from the shape of erosion patches in concordance with the number of wicket gates.

  8. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications.

  9. Thermal stability of the prototypical Mn porphyrin-based superoxide dismutase mimic and potent oxidative-stress redox modulator Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride, MnTE-2-PyP5+

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Victor H. A.; CarvalhoDa-Silva, Dayse; Santos, Jonas L. M. S.; Weitner, Tin; Fonseca, Maria Gardênnia; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Idemori, Ynara M.; Batinić-Haberle, Ines; Rebouças, Júlio S.

    2012-01-01

    Cationic Mn porphyrins are among the most potent catalytic antioxidants and/or cellular redox modulators. Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE-2-PyPCl5) is the Mn porphyrin most studied in vivo and has successfully rescued animal models of a variety of oxidative stress-related diseases. The stability of an authentic MnTE-2-PyPCl5 sample was investigated hereon by thermogravimetric, derivative thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analyses (TG/DTG/DTA), under dynamic air, followed by studies at selected temperatures to evaluate the decomposition path and appropriate conditions for storage and handling of these materials. All residues were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Three thermal processes were observed by TG/DTG. The first event (endothermic) corresponded to dehydration, and did not alter the MnTE-2-PyPCl5 moiety. The second event (endothermic) corresponded to the loss of EtCl (dealkylation), which was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The residue at 279 °C had UV-vis and TLC data consistent with those of the authentic, completely dealkylated analogue, MnT-2-PyPCl. The final, multi-step event corresponded to the loss of the remaining organic matter to yield Mn3O4 which was characterized by IR spectroscopy. Isothermal treatment at 188 °C under static air for 3 h yielded a mixture of partially dealkylated MnPs and traces of the free-base, dealkylated ligand, H2T-2-PyP, which reveals that dealkylation is accompanied by thermal demetallation under static air conditions. Dealkylation was not observed if the sample was heated as a solid or in aqueous solution up to ∼100 °C. Whereas moderate heating changes sample composition by loss of H2O, the dehydrated sample is indistinguishable from the original sample upon dissolution in water, which indicates that catalytic activity (on Mn basis) remains unaltered. Evidently, dealkylation at high temperature compromises sample

  10. Thermal stability of the prototypical Mn porphyrin-based superoxide dismutase mimic and potent oxidative-stress redox modulator Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride, MnTE-2-PyP(5+).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Victor H A; Carvalhoda-Silva, Dayse; Santos, Jonas L M S; Weitner, Tin; Fonseca, Maria Gardênnia; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Idemori, Ynara M; Batinić-Haberle, Ines; Rebouças, Júlio S

    2013-01-25

    Cationic Mn porphyrins are among the most potent catalytic antioxidants and/or cellular redox modulators. Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE-2-PyPCl(5)) is the Mn porphyrin most studied in vivo and has successfully rescued animal models of a variety of oxidative stress-related diseases. The stability of an authentic MnTE-2-PyPCl(5) sample was investigated hereon by thermogravimetric, derivative thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analyses (TG/DTG/DTA), under dynamic air, followed by studies at selected temperatures to evaluate the decomposition path and appropriate conditions for storage and handling of these materials. All residues were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Three thermal processes were observed by TG/DTG. The first event (endothermic) corresponded to dehydration, and did not alter the MnTE-2-PyPCl(5) moiety. The second event (endothermic) corresponded to the loss of EtCl (dealkylation), which was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The residue at 279°C had UV-vis and TLC data consistent with those of the authentic, completely dealkylated analog, MnT-2-PyPCl. The final, multi-step event corresponded to the loss of the remaining organic matter to yield Mn(3)O(4) which was characterized by IR spectroscopy. Isothermal treatment at 188°C under static air for 3h yielded a mixture of partially dealkylated MnPs and traces of the free-base, dealkylated ligand, H(2)T-2-PyP, which reveals that dealkylation is accompanied by thermal demetallation under static air conditions. Dealkylation was not observed if the sample was heated as a solid or in aqueous solution up to ∼100°C. Whereas moderate heating changes sample composition by loss of H(2)O, the dehydrated sample is indistinguishable from the original sample upon dissolution in water, which indicates that catalytic activity (on Mn basis) remains unaltered. Evidently, dealkylation at high temperature

  11. Prototype testing of a solar dryer of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The results of testing a two module prototype solar convection dryer are presented. Collected data showed that the 540 square foot dryer can evaporate up to 900 pounds of water from a wet granular material over a 24 hour period in the Philadelphia climate. Testing included experimentation with different materials handling systems to determine the best method of moving each wet material through the dryer.

  12. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  13. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  14. Prototype operational earthquake prediction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, Henry

    1986-01-01

    An objective if the U.S. Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 is to introduce into all regions of the country that are subject to large and moderate earthquakes, systems for predicting earthquakes and assessing earthquake risk. In 1985, the USGS developed for the Secretary of the Interior a program for implementation of a prototype operational earthquake prediction system in southern California.

  15. SIRTF Science Planning Tool Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, M.; Ebert, R.; Nguyen, P.

    1996-12-01

    The SIRTF project is developing a science planning tool to help the observers scope and plan their observations in preparation for submission of their proposals for observing time on the SIRTF Observatory. Its primary focus is to help the scientist design feasible astronomical observations, such as estimating overall execution time, determine the appropriate SNR or exposure time, provide the required parameters and format for their observation. The tool will be web based and will be capable of interfacing with other tools used as part of a science tool set as well as scheduling and modeling tools used as part of preparation for uplink to the observatory for observation execution. The SIRTF project has been working on a first prototype of the science planning tool. The scope of the current prototype is limited, but does provide insight into the possible ways of using the telescope by allowing a choice of seven modes of operation (will be eight in the future) and gives rough estimates of the sensitivity and wall clock calculations. The modes available through this prototype are the IRAC deep survey, the IRS spectral map mode and staring mode, and the MIPS scan map mode, photometry mode, spectral energy distribution mode and super-resolution mode. The demonstration of the early science planning prototype will give the user the opportunity to see and "feel" the instrument sensitivity capabilities, the spacecraft wall clock estimates as well as the web interface. In addition valuable input will be obtained from the astronomy community for future development.

  16. OTF Mission Operations Prototype Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Walter F.; Lucord, Steven A.; Stevens, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Reports on the progress of the JSC/OTF prototype of a CCSDS SM&C protocol based communications link between two space flight operations control centers. Varied implementations using software architectures from current web enterprise venues are presented. The AMS protocol (CCSDS Blue Book standard 735.1) was used for messaging and link communications.

  17. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  18. A failure management prototype: DR/Rx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

  19. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  20. Rapid mask prototyping for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, B G C; Honegger, T; Cordeiro, J; Lecarme, O; Thiry, T; Fuard, D; Berton, K; Picard, E; Zelsmann, M; Peyrade, D

    2016-03-01

    With the rise of microfluidics for the past decade, there has come an ever more pressing need for a low-cost and rapid prototyping technology, especially for research and education purposes. In this article, we report a rapid prototyping process of chromed masks for various microfluidic applications. The process takes place out of a clean room, uses a commercially available video-projector, and can be completed in less than half an hour. We quantify the ranges of fields of view and of resolutions accessible through this video-projection system and report the fabrication of critical microfluidic components (junctions, straight channels, and curved channels). To exemplify the process, three common devices are produced using this method: a droplet generation device, a gradient generation device, and a neuro-engineering oriented device. The neuro-engineering oriented device is a compartmentalized microfluidic chip, and therefore, required the production and the precise alignment of two different masks.

  1. JUNO PMT system and prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin; JUNO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multi-purpose underground experiment and the largest liquid scintillator (LS) detector going for neutrino mass hierarchy, precise neutrino oscillation parameter measurement and studies of other rare processes, including but not limited to, solar neutrino, geo-neutrino, supernova neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrinos background. The 20” PMT system with ∼17000 high quantum efficiency tubes, including Hamamatsu 20” and newly developed MCP 20” tubes, is one of the keys of JUNO experiment for better energy resolution, good detector response etc. We are doing prototypes for PMTs, detectors to study/understand more detailed characteristics of the future detector. Here plans to give you a full view about the JUNO PMT system and its prototyping, including the PMT system layout, PMT testing system design, PMT water proof potting with electronics, installation ideas and the basics PMT performance.

  2. Prototype of sun projector device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  3. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  4. Test report -- Prototype core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Linschooten, C.G.

    1995-01-17

    The purpose of this test is to determine the adequacy of the prototype sampler, provided to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by DOE-RL. The sampler was fabricated for DOE-RL by the Concord Company by request of DOE-RL. This prototype sampler was introduced as a technology that can be easily deployed (similar to the current auger system) and will reliably collect representative samples. The sampler is similar to the Universal Sampler i.e., smooth core barrel and piston with an O-ring seal, but lacks a rotary valve near the throat of the sampler. This makes the sampler inappropriate for liquid sampling, but reduces the outside diameter of the sampler considerably, which should improve sample recovery. Recovery testing was performed with the supplied sampler in three different consistencies of Kaolin sludge simulants.

  5. Agile Development of Advanced Prototypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    sound experience that emphasizes the progression of cochlear implant technology. A guest observes and listens to a virtual environment. They are able to...transition their environment through history as well as the simulated fidelity of a contemporary cochlear implant . A visual experience that...patient with a cochlear implant was interviewed. Outcomes of this research guided the design of the first prototype. The technical design was

  6. Glatz Prototype Seat Impact Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-03

    from design drawings. A Pure Horizontal test was also conducted to determine structural strength of the Glatz prototype seat. Biodynamic response...Aerospace Biodynamics and Performance Research Team of the Applied Neuroscience Branch of the Human Effectiveness Directorate (711HPW/RHCP), under Workunit...test methodology. This testing focuses solely on the survivability of the seat and occupant biodynamics during primary aircraft impact. Secondary

  7. Competitive Prototyping: A PMO Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    24p9.6 in width. The second paragraph will revert to the body text style, and the bio text aligns with this text block. giam vullaor sustissed eum ...doloreros nostrud ero ero dio ent euipit, venisse dionsendre dunt at, volenis eum iriure feu feum vel et volutat. Agnis alit aut aut volore eu faccums...prototyping process during a program’s Technology Development ( TD ) phase. Our specific example is the Joint and Allied Threat Aware- ness System (JATAS–AN

  8. Prototype Morphing Fan Nozzle Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gang-Bing

    2004-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for aeropropulsion structural components has resulted in the design of the prototype morphing fan nozzle shown in the photograph. This prototype exploits the potential of smart materials to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines by introducing new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. The novel design employs two different smart materials, a shape-memory alloy and magnetorheological fluids, to reduce the nozzle area by up to 30 percent. The prototype of the variable-area fan nozzle implements an overlapping spring leaf assembly to simplify the initial design and to provide ease of structural control. A single bundle of shape memory alloy wire actuators is used to reduce the nozzle geometry. The nozzle is subsequently held in the reduced-area configuration by using magnetorheological fluid brakes. This prototype uses the inherent advantages of shape memory alloys in providing large induced strains and of magnetorheological fluids in generating large resistive forces. In addition, the spring leaf design also functions as a return spring, once the magnetorheological fluid brakes are released, to help force the shape memory alloy wires to return to their original position. A computerized real-time control system uses the derivative-gain and proportional-gain algorithms to operate the system. This design represents a novel approach to the active control of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Researchers have estimated that such engines will reduce thrust specific fuel consumption by 9 percent over that of fixed-geometry fan nozzles. This research was conducted under a cooperative agreement (NCC3-839) at the University of Akron.

  9. Robotic Lander Prototype Completes Initial Tests

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Robotic Lunar Lander Development Project at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., completed an initial series of integrated tests on a new lander prototype. The prototype lander ...

  10. Iteration and Prototyping in Creating Technical Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynt, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Claims that the development process for computer software can be greatly aided by the writers of specifications if they employ basic iteration and prototyping techniques. Asserts that computer software configuration management practices provide ready models for iteration and prototyping. (HB)

  11. The Prototype of GAMMA-400 Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Kheymits, M. D.; Runtso, M. F.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu. T.

    Scientific project GAMMA-400 (Gamma-Astronomy Multifunction Modules Apparatus) relates to the new generation of space observatories for investigation of cosmic γ-emission in the energy band from ∼20 MeV up to several TeV, electron/positron fluxes from ∼1 GeV up to ∼10 TeV and cosmic-ray nuclei fluxes with energies up to ∼1015 eV by means of GAMMA-400 gamma-telescope represents the core of the scientific complex. The investigation of gamma ray bursts in the energy band of 10 keV-15 MeV are possible too by means of KONUS-FG apparatus included in the complex. For γ-rays in the energy region from 10 to 100 GeV expected energy resolution changes from ∼3% to ∼1% and angular resolution from ∼0.1% to ∼ 0.01% respectively, γ/protons rejection factor is ∼5·105. The GAMMA-400 satellite will be launched at the beginning of the next decade on the high apogee orbit with following initial parameters: apogee altitude ∼300000 km, perigee altitude ∼500 km, rotation period ∼7 days, inclination to the equator plane 51.4°. The active functioning interval will be 7-10 years. The scientific complex will have next main technical parameters: total weight ∼4100 kg, power consumption ∼2000 W, information quote 100 GByte/day. During the project development, the prototype of apparatus was created for working-off of the main apparatus construction units in laboratory conditions. The main distinctive features of the prototype are presented.

  12. Solid state fluorometer: Prototype development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnaski, Joseph; Foster, Karen; Hardgrove, John; Oprison, Richard; Hickman, James

    1994-03-01

    The development of new detectors for chemical and biological warfare agents is of interest to the DOD. One way to detect these agents is by fluorescent labeling of one of the species involved in a binding event. The U.S. Air Force has developed a system that combines a biological assay with a fluorescent molecule tag. The binding event is quantified by measuring the ratio of red to green fluorescence. With a solid state fluorometer fast binding detection is possible in a small, lightweight package that could easily be interfaced to a microprocessor with readout. We have begun the development of a solid state microfluorometer. The development has been divided into three phases: (1) prototype development, (2) device operational parameter investigation, and (3) design and construction. This report details the construction of the prototype device. The prototype has a 488-nm laser for excitation, and red and green detectors for fluorescent emission. The calibration of the detectors and the computer interface construction is described. It can be used as a fluorescent imaging system as well.

  13. Rapid prototyping applications for manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software, we experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible using this technology to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable first article and small lot size production parts. We use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This report will focus on our successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  14. An approach for assessing software prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, V. E.; Card, D. N.; Agresti, W. W.; Jordan, Q. L.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating a software prototype is presented. The need to assess the prototype itself arises from the use of prototyping to demonstrate the feasibility of a design or development stategy. The assessment procedure can also be of use in deciding whether to evolve a prototype into a complete system. The procedure consists of identifying evaluations criteria, defining alterative design approaches, and ranking the alternatives according to the criteria.

  15. Engineering evaluation of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. G.; Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of thermal energy storage prototypes was performed in order to assess the development status of latent heat storage media. The testing and the evaluation of a prototype sodium hydroxide module is described. This module stored off-peak electrical energy as heat for later conversion to domestic hot water needs.

  16. Universal stowage module for future space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Hussey, M. W.; Garber, P.; Mandras, W.; Mckinney, D.

    1974-01-01

    The design effort to develop, design, and fabricate a prototype Universal Stowage Module with universal restraints that are readily adaptable for most sizes and shapes of items that would be launched into space and returned aboard shuttle payloads is presented.

  17. Spreadsheet Applications: Prototyping an Innovative Blended Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. Howard

    2004-01-01

    After teaching the advanced spreadsheet course at a major university in Louisiana as a traditional classroom course for a number of years, it was decided to create a prototype-blended course, with a considerable portion offered via distance education. This research, which uses a prototyping methodology, is exploratory in nature. Prototyping can…

  18. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  19. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  20. Rapid Prototyping in the Instructional Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Elizabeth Krick; Lee, Doris

    2001-01-01

    Discusses instructional design models and examines rapid prototyping, a model that combines computer design strategies, constructivist learning theory, and cognitive psychology. Highlights include limitations of linear models; instructional problems appropriate and those not appropriate for rapid prototyping; and rapid prototyping as a paradigm…

  1. Prototyping of Computer-Based Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, D. E.; Black, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Defines prototyping as an original version or model on which a completed software system for computer-based training is formed; examines the development process of a prototype; describes how prototyping can assist in facilitating communication between educational technology, software engineering, and project management; and discusses why…

  2. Implicit face prototype learning from geometric information.

    PubMed

    Or, Charles C-F; Wilson, Hugh R

    2013-04-19

    There is evidence that humans implicitly learn an average or prototype of previously studied faces, as the unseen face prototype is falsely recognized as having been learned (Solso & McCarthy, 1981). Here we investigated the extent and nature of face prototype formation where observers' memory was tested after they studied synthetic faces defined purely in geometric terms in a multidimensional face space. We found a strong prototype effect: The basic results showed that the unseen prototype averaged from the studied faces was falsely identified as learned at a rate of 86.3%, whereas individual studied faces were identified correctly 66.3% of the time and the distractors were incorrectly identified as having been learned only 32.4% of the time. This prototype learning lasted at least 1 week. Face prototype learning occurred even when the studied faces were further from the unseen prototype than the median variation in the population. Prototype memory formation was evident in addition to memory formation of studied face exemplars as demonstrated in our models. Additional studies showed that the prototype effect can be generalized across viewpoints, and head shape and internal features separately contribute to prototype formation. Thus, implicit face prototype extraction in a multidimensional space is a very general aspect of geometric face learning.

  3. Prototyping of Computer-Based Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, D. E.; Black, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Defines prototyping as an original version or model on which a completed software system for computer-based training is formed; examines the development process of a prototype; describes how prototyping can assist in facilitating communication between educational technology, software engineering, and project management; and discusses why…

  4. Development of a prototype of the ME readout electronics onboard the HXMT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ze-Hao; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cao, Xue-Lei; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Yang, Jia-Wei; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Min; Peng, Wen-Xi

    2010-02-01

    A prototype of the ME readout electronics onboard the Hard X-ray Modulate Telescope (HXMT) satellite is developed. Application Specific Integrated Chip (ASIC) is used to construct the front end electronics due to a large number of detectors. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is connected to the ASIC as a state machine controller and data FIFO in the DAQ system. A USB board is designed to communicate between the DAQ system and the computer. The design goals and features, the operation of the system and the preliminary performance of the prototype are described. The testing results show that the design goals of the prototype system have been achieved.

  5. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. Application Evaluation of Air-Sparging and Aerobic Bioremediation in PAM(Physical Aquifer Model) with Advanced and Integrated Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, U.; Ko, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Kwon, S.; Ha, J.; Lim, J.; Han, K.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally difficult for a single process to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated with various organic compounds such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) because those contaminants show different chemical properties in two phases (e.g. soil and groundwater). Therefore, it is necessary to design an in-situ remediation system which can remove various contaminants simultaneously. For the purpose, we constructed integrated well module which can apply several remediation process such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, and bioventing. The advanced integrated module consisted of three main parts such as head, body, and end cap. First of all, head part has three 3.6-cm-diameter stainless lines and can simultaneously inject air or extract NAPL, respectively. Secondly, body part has two 10-cm-height screen intervals with 100-mesh stainless inserts for unsaturated and smear zone. Lastly, we constructed three different sizes of end caps for injection and extraction from a saturated zone. We assumed that the integrated module can play bioremediation, air sparging, cometabolic sparging, chemical oxidation. In this study, we examined application of air sparing and aerobic bioremediation of toluene in Physical Aquifer Model (PAM) with an integrated well module. During air sparging experiments, toluene concentration decreased by injection of air. In addition, we accomplished bioremediation experiment to evaluate removal of toluene by indigenous microbes in PAM with continuous air injection. From the two experiments result, we confirmed that air sparging and aerobic bioremediation processes can be simultaneously carried out by an intergrated well module.

  7. Results on the spaghetti calorimeter projective prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, B.; Contin, A.; DeSalvo, R.; Hao, W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Lundin, M.; Mondardini, R.; Xu, C.; You, K.

    1992-12-01

    The performances of a projective lead/scintillating fibres ("spaghetti") calorimeter made out of rectangular cross-section (32 × 32 mm 2) straight modules alternated with tapering modules at 2.5° are described. Beam test results on energy resolution, constant term suppression, lineshape, uniformity of response, shower position resolution, and electron-pion discrimination are presented. The readout of the fibres in the straight modules, which are sensitive to most of the electromagnetic showers and to part of the hadronic showers, is kept separate from the readout of the fibres of the wedged sections, which are sensitive only to hadronic showers. The lead-to-fibre volume ratio is kept at about 4 to 1 in order to obtain an equal-amplitude response from electrons and hadrons (usually called "compensation"). The origin of the energy resolution constant term has been better understood. This allowed the reduction of the constant term to 0.5%, down from 1.2% measured in older prototypes. The probability of faking abnormally large signals because of channelling effects is also discussed. The position resolution has been measured to range from 0.5 to 1 mm depending on the hit position of the particle. A comparison with the larger hexagonal module design is also made. The efficiency of a hardware thresholding of the wedges' signal as a level one trigger pion veto is discussed along with off-line electron/pion discrimination performances. Since the wedges start at 26 X0 from the calorimeter front face they should show no signal for electromagnetic showers. It was found that electromagnetic showers of 50 GeV generate wedge signals of a maximum of a few tens of MeV. It was also found that the discriminating power is angle dependent, mainly because at small particle-to-fibre angles (≤ 1°) some electrons can penetrate the calorimeter through channeling, thus exciting a signal in the wedges. At slightly higher tilt angle it is possible to use a lower wedge threshold without

  8. Rapid prototyping of pulse oximeter.

    PubMed

    Jalan, P; Bracio, B R; Rider, P J; Toniolo, H

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of oxygen saturation levels in blood is a vital activity during most medical treatments. A pulse oximeter is a device most commonly used to perform this measurement. It provides convenient, non-invasive and continuous monitoring of oxygen levels in a human body. However, it is often a tedious task to select the appropriate hardware and software components to manufacture a pulse oximeter that gives accurate results. This paper describes a student project, which had the goals to expose the student to this important technique of applying rapid prototyping methods to the design of a state of the art pulse oximeter.

  9. Mechanical Prototyping and Manufacturing Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The internship was located at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Innovation Design Center (IDC), which is a facility where the JSC workforce can meet and conduct hands-on innovative design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of ideas and concepts relevant to NASA's mission. The tasks of the internship included mechanical prototyping design and manufacturing projects in service of research and development as well as assisting the users of the IDC in completing their manufacturing projects. The first project was to manufacture hatch mechanisms for a team in the Systems Engineering and Project Advancement Program (SETMAP) hexacopter competition. These mechanisms were intended to improve the performance of the servomotors and offer an access point that would also seal to prevent cross-contamination. I also assisted other teams as they were constructing and modifying their hexacopters. The success of this competition demonstrated a proof of concept for aerial reconnaissance and sample return to be potentially used in future NASA missions. I also worked with Dr. Kumar Krishen to prototype an improved thermos and a novel, portable solar array. Computer-aided design (CAD) software was used to model the parts for both of these projects. Then, 3D printing as well as conventional techniques were used to produce the parts. These prototypes were then subjected to trials to determine the success of the designs. The solar array is intended to work in a cluster that is easy to set up and take down and doesn't require powered servomechanisms. It could be used terrestrially in areas not serviced by power grids. Both projects improve planetary exploration capabilities to future astronauts. Other projects included manufacturing custom rail brackets for EG-2, assisting engineers working on underwater instrument and tool cases for the NEEMO project, and helping to create mock-up parts for Space Center Houston. The use of the IDC enabled efficient completion of these projects at

  10. Engineering Prototype for a Compact Medical Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zografos, Anthony; Hening, Andy; Joshkin, Vladimir; Leung, Kevin; Pearson, Dave; Pearce-Percy, Henry; Rougieri, Mario; Parker, Yoko; Weir, John; Blackfield, Donald; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Poole, Brian; Hamm, Robert W.; Becker, Reinard

    2011-12-01

    A compact accelerator system architecture based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) for medical proton beam therapy has been developed by the Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC). The major subsystems are a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) injector linac, a pulsed kicker to select the desired proton bunches, and a DWA linear accelerator incorporating a high gradient insulator (HGI) with stacked Blumleins to produce the required acceleration energy. The Blumleins are switched with solid state laser-driven optical switches integrated into the Blumlein assemblies. Other subsystems include a high power pulsed laser, fiber optic distribution system, electrical charging system, and beam diagnostics. An engineering prototype has been constructed and characterized, and these results will be used within the next three years to develop an extremely compact 150 MeV system capable of modulating energy, beam current, and spot size on a shot-to-shot basis. This paper presents the details the engineering prototype, experimental results, and commercialization plans.

  11. Engineering Prototype for a Compact Medical Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Zografos, Anthony; Hening, Andy; Joshkin, Vladimir; Leung, Kevin; Pearson, Dave; Pearce-Percy, Henry; Rougieri, Mario; Parker, Yoko; Weir, John; Blackfield, Donald; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Poole, Brian; Hamm, Robert W.; Becker, Reinard

    2011-12-13

    A compact accelerator system architecture based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) for medical proton beam therapy has been developed by the Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC). The major subsystems are a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) injector linac, a pulsed kicker to select the desired proton bunches, and a DWA linear accelerator incorporating a high gradient insulator (HGI) with stacked Blumleins to produce the required acceleration energy. The Blumleins are switched with solid state laser-driven optical switches integrated into the Blumlein assemblies. Other subsystems include a high power pulsed laser, fiber optic distribution system, electrical charging system, and beam diagnostics. An engineering prototype has been constructed and characterized, and these results will be used within the next three years to develop an extremely compact 150 MeV system capable of modulating energy, beam current, and spot size on a shot-to-shot basis. This paper presents the details the engineering prototype, experimental results, and commercialization plans.

  12. [Nursing care planning: proposal for a software prototype].

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Dircelene Jussara; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to develop a software prototype to help hospital nurses plan nursing care, and carry out nursing interventions and all documentation in a computerized way. The methodology is based on the life cycle of system development, particularly the prototype concept, involving two phases: definition and development. The definition phase began with the planning stage, followed by the definition and analysis of requirements for the construction, and culminated with the specification of the software requirements. The development phase translated the group of requirements into a computerized model, structured in 10 modules, regarding the nursing care system process. The performance of this innovative resource in the different stages of the nursing care system process will be analyzed in future studies.

  13. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  14. The MARX Modulator Development Program for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2006-06-12

    The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC is working towards developing a full-scale ILC Marx ''Reference Design'' modulator prototype, with the goal of significantly reducing the size and cost of the ILC modulator while improving overall modulator efficiency and availability. The ILC Reference Design prototype will provide a proof-of-concept model to industry in advance of Phase II SBIR funding, and also allow operation of the new 10MW L-Band Klystron prototypes immediately upon their arrival at SLAC.

  15. Development of a prototype regeneration carbon dioxide absorber. [for use in EVA conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, P. S.; Baker, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber was developed to maintain the environmental quality of the portable life support system. The absorber works on the alkali metal carbonate-bicarbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The prototype sorber module was designed, fabricated, and tested at simulated extravehicular activity conditions to arrive at optimum design. The unit maintains sorber outlet concentration below 5 mm Hg. An optimization study was made with respect to heat transfer, temperature control, sorbent utilization, sorber life and regenerability, and final size of the module. Important parameters influencing the capacity of the final absorber unit were identified and recommendations for improvement were made.

  16. Virtual Prototyping of RF Weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Keith

    2002-08-01

    We are attempting to perform virtual prototyping of RF systems, from pulse power through to antennas, with the ICEPIC (Improved Concurrent Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell) HPC software that we have developed over the past several years with funding from AFOSR. This code simulates from first principles (Maxwell's equations and Lorenz's force law) the electrodynamics and charged particle dynamics of the RF-producing part of the system. Such simulations require major computational resources. In the past, we have simulated GigaWatt-class sources that have already been built in the laboratory including the relativistic klystron oscillator (RKO) and the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). Our simulations have uncovered undesirable features of these sources, and have led us to suggest ways to improve them. We are now taking the next step in our evolution towards true virtual prototyping. We have begun to simulate the relativistic magnetron before it is been built at our lab. The details of the device that will eventually be built, including the geometric structure and the externally generated magnetic field distribution, will be based on our simulations. In this paper, we present results from ICEPIC simulations that lead to the improvement of the RKO and MILO as well as predicted characteristics the relativistic magnetron that we plan to build in the fall of 2002.

  17. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  18. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Gascón, M.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Bloch, T.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Durán, I.; Fiori, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; González, D.; Kröll, T.; Le Bleis, T.; Montes, N.; Nácher, E.; Robles, M.; Perea, A.; Vilán, J. A.; Winkel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R3B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ∼300 MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator - photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma-ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations.

  19. Building a prototype expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmus, D.; Hutchinson, M.; Hall, D.

    1988-07-01

    In the past few years expert system technology has been gaining increasing respect within the world of computer science as it offers practical solutions to problems which have previously defied computerization. This paper is the culmination of a years investigation into how LBL can practically make use of this technology to solve some of the problems being faced by its scientists. To establish this and gain a greater understanding of expert system technology we attempted to build a prototype expert system using a commercially available expert system shell. The application we chose was to troubleshoot the hardware of the TPC particle detector (used by high energy physicists at LBL) using Neuron Data's expert system shell, Nexpert. This paper gives some brief overviews of the theoretical and practical work done by other people in fields relevant to this project. It includes: expert systems, their development, diagnostic expert systems, and examples of expert systems built to troubleshoot electronic devices. We describe how we selected our prototype expert system and then how we went about designing and building it. For this we have detailed the knowledge necessary to start troubleshooting the TPC and the methods used to represent that knowledge within the expert system shell. Finally we discuss the understanding of expert system technology which we have gained during this project and why we believe that this technology has a place in the future of problem solving at LBL. 31 refs.

  20. Results from the FDIRC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Arnaud, N.; Dey, B.; Borsato, M.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Nishimura, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Varner, G.; Va'vra, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment, and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage with partial electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking with an angular resolution of 1.5 mrad, track position resolution of 5-6 mm, start time resolution of 70 ps, and a muon low-energy cutoff of 2 GeV provided by an iron range stack. The quartz focusing photon camera couples to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and is read out by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 MaPMTs providing 768 pixels. We used IRS2 waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that the new optics design works very well, including: (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) S/N ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which consists primarily of ambiguities in possible photon paths to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOPmeasured-TOPexpected resolutions, and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds. We also describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance.

  1. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  2. Prototype of time digitizing system for BESIII endcap TOF upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ping; Sun, Wei-Jia; Ji, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Huan-Huan; Wang, Si-Yu; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The prototype of a time digitizing system for the BESIII endcap TOF (ETOF) upgrade is introduced in this paper. The ETOF readout electronics has a distributed architecture. Hit signals from the multi-gap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) are signaled as LVDS by front-end electronics (FEE) and are then sent to the back-end time digitizing system via long shield differential twisted pair cables. The ETOF digitizing system consists of two VME crates, each of which contains modules for time digitization, clock, trigger, fast control, etc. The time digitizing module (TDIG) of this prototype can support up to 72 electrical channels for hit information measurement. The fast control (FCTL) module can operate in barrel or endcap mode. The barrel FCTL fans out fast control signals from the trigger system to the endcap FCTLs, merges data from the endcaps and then transfers to the trigger system. Without modifying the barrel TOF (BTOF) structure, this time digitizing architecture benefits from improved ETOF performance without degrading the BTOF performance. Lab experiments show that the time resolution of this digitizing system can be lower than 20 ps, and the data throughput to the DAQ can be about 92 Mbps. Beam experiments show that the total time resolution can be lower than 45 ps.

  3. Indoor Free Space Optic: a new prototype, realization and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Olivier; Besnard, Pascal; Mihaescu, Adrian

    2008-08-01

    The Free Space Optic (FSO) communication is a daily reality used by an increasing number of companies. For indoor environment, optical wireless communication becomes a good alternative with respect to radio proposals. For both technologies, the architecture is similar: emission/reception base station (Gateway or Bridge) are installed to cover zones, which are defined to ensure a quality of service. The customers may be connected to the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) with an adapter or module that emits and receives on this network. But due to its specific characteristics, wireless optical technology could present important advantages such as: Transmitted data security, medical immunity, high data rate, etc... Nevertheless, the optical system may have a limit on the network management aspect and link budget. The scope of this paper is to present a proposal at crossroads between optical fibre telecom system and data processing. In this document, we will present a prototype developed in Brittany during a regional collaborative project (Techim@ges). In order to answer to the management aspect and the link budget, this prototype uses an optical multiplexing technique in 1550 nm band: the Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA). Moreover it also proposes a new class 1 high power emission solution. This full duplex system transmits these various wavelengths in free space, by using optical Multiplexer/Demultiplexer and optical modules. Each module has a defined and personal wavelength associated to the terminal identification (addresses MAC or IP). This approach permits a data rate at a minimum of a ten's Mbit/s per customer and potentially hundred Mbps for a line of sight system. The application field for the achieved and proposed prototype is potentially investigated from WLAN to WPAN.

  4. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components. PMID:23824127

  5. The EUROMEDIES EDI prototype system.

    PubMed

    Pramataris, K; Doukidis, G; Giaglis, G; Raptakis, J

    1996-01-01

    EDI is expected to be the dominant form of business communication between organisations moving to the Electronic Commerce era of 2000. The healthcare sector is already using EDI in the hospital supply function as well as in the clinical area and the reimbursement process. In this paper, we examine the use of EDI in the healthcare administration sector and move specifically its application to the Medical Devices Vigilance System. At a first place, the potential of this approach is examined, after an initial brief presentation of the EDI concept and its application in healthcare. This presentation is followed by an overall description of the EDI prototype system, which was developed in the context of the EUROMEDIES Concerted Action, in order to facilitate the requirements definition phase.

  6. PEP-II prototype klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Wright, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    A 540-kW continuous-wave (cw) klystron operating at 476 MHz was developed for use as a power source for testing PEP-II rf accelerating cavities and rf windows. It also serves as a prototype for a 1.2 MW cw klystron presently being developed as a potential rf source for asymmetric colliding ring use. The design incorporates the concepts and many of the parts used in the original 353 MHz PEP klystron developed sixteen years ago. The superior computer simulation codes available today result in improved performance with the cavity frequencies, drift lengths, and output circuit optimized for the higher frequency.The design and operating results of this tube are described with particular emphasis on the factors which affect efficiency and stability.

  7. First Starshade Prototype at JPL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-09

    The first prototype starshade developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shown in technology partner Astro Aerospace/Northrup Grumman's facility in Santa Barbara, California, in 2013. As shown by this 66 foot (20-meter) model, starshades can come in many shapes and sizes. This design shows petals that are more extreme in shape which properly diffracts starlight for smaller telescopes. Each petal is covered in a high-performance plastic film that resembles gold foil. On a starshade ready for launch, the thermal gold foil will only cover the side of the petals facing away from the telescope, with black on the other, so as not to reflect other light sources such as the Earth into its camera. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20906

  8. MMT adaptive secondary prototype development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele

    1998-09-01

    We designed and manufacture dan 'Adaptive Secondary Mirror 30 Actuators Prototype' that represents as much as possible the final MMT adaptive optics unit for what concerns mechanical, electronic and cooling system issues. Moreover, different actuator designs have been tested by using the same test bench. The adaptive secondary is based on a thin continuous facesheet mirror moved by electromagnetic actuators. Permanent magnets are glued on the mirror, while voice coils are connected to the support structure by cold fingers. A capacitive sensor co-located with each actuator measures the local gap between the mirror and a reference back plate. Voice coil motors allow to perform chopping and tip-tilt correction by using directly the deformable mirror. Actuators pitch is set to achieve high order correction in the visible wavelength.

  9. Prototype casting fabrication by stereolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cromwell, W.E.

    1990-11-01

    A new product development technology is emerging which could have a major impact on the investment casting industry. It's identified by several names, the most common of which is STEREOLITHOGRAPHY.'' This technology involves a three-dimensional printing process which will yield plastic parts (polymer models) from solid, surface, or wireframe CAD files. The concept links a CAD database to a process which guides a laser beam to solidify liquid photo-curable polymer into a programmed shaped. The process can produce models in far less time and at far less cost than can be done by other known (conventional) model producing methods. Parts that would normally require weeks or months to prototype with conventional processes can be produced in a matter of hours by Stereolithography. The Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division, is engaged in a development project (funded by the Department of Energy) which is aimed at establishing this process as a practical, expedient, and cost-effective method fabricating prototype investment castings. The early phases of the project include procurement of a special designed test unit for several companies (Service Centers) involved in fabrication of models. These models are produced in various materials and used in experimental casting programs being conducted with four casting suppliers (two ferrous and two non-ferrous). This presentation will cover the objectives of the project and the results obtained up to this time. We will also briefly review future plans for the continuation of the project, until this new technology has been proven as a viable process for rapid development of investment castings.

  10. Thermal Oscar Design Test Report and Prototype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    1 UNCLAS | CG-926 RDC | D. Decker | Public | Sep 2010 Thermal Oscar Design Test Report and Prototype Distribution Statement...A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. September 2010 Report No: CG-D-05-11 Thermal Oscar Design Test Report and Prototype...06320 Thermal Oscar Design Test Report and Prototype iii UNCLAS | CG-926 RDC | D. Decker | Public | Sep 2010 Technical Report

  11. IMMR Phase 1 Prototyping Plan Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vowell, C. W.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Smith, Bryon; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the phase I plan of the prototype of the IMMR by the Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP) Medical Informatics & Technology (MIT) Working Group. It reviews the Purpose of IMMR Prototype Phase 1 (IPP1); the IPP1 Plan Overview, the IMMR Prototype Phase 1 Plan for PDDs and MIC and MIC-DDs, Plan for MICs, a nd the IPP1 objectives

  12. Prototype readout electronics for the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewicz, K. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, J.; Giubilato, P.; Rossewij, M. J.; Schambach, J.; Vanat, T.

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade to the experimental apparatus. A key element of the upgrade is the construction of a new silicon-based Inner Tracking System containing 12 Gpixels in an area of 10 m2. Its readout system consists of 192 readout units that control the pixel sensors and the power units, and deliver the sensor data to the counting room. A prototype readout board has been designed to test: the interface between the sensor modules and the readout electronics, the signal integrity and reliability of data transfer, the interface to the ALICE DAQ and trigger, and the susceptibility of the system to the expected radiation level.

  13. The prototype detector for MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon Collaboration; Nakamura, H.; Ogama, T.; Shimada, Y.; Sugaya, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos), as an extension of ELEGANT V, is a hybrid ββ and solar neutrino experiment with 100Mo. It aims at measuring neutrino-less ββ decay with sensitivity to the Majorana mass of the order of 50 meV and charged current interactions of 7Be solar neutrinos. One detector option of MOON is a super-module with one ton of 100Mo foils and fiber-plate scintillator planes. A prototype detector, MOON-1 with ˜ 0.5 kg of Mo foils, is being constructed. Simulation studies, test experiments and the status of MOON are discussed.

  14. Testing and firmware development for the ATLAS IBL BOC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensing, M.

    2012-12-01

    For the coming upgrade pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider a redesign of the current data readout is necessary. To communicate with the additional 448 front-end chips assembled in the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) new FPGA based readout cards consisting of a Back of Crate card (BOC) and a Read Out Driver (ROD) have been developed. This paper describes the firmware and hardware development of the new BOC prototype. Firmware tests, like electrical and optical loopback and communication tests with the new IBL front-end modules and the ROD will also be presented.

  15. Tracking the Galileo spacecraft with the DSCC Galileo Telemetry prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Shambayati, S.; Hardi, D. E.; Finley, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    On day of the year 062, 1994, a prototype of the Deep Space Communications Complex Galileo Telemetry subsystem successfully tracked and processed signals from the Galileo spacecraft, under fully suppressed-carrier modulation. The demonstration took place at Goldstone, employing the 70-m antenna and the 34-m high-efficiency antenna. This article presents the findings from that demonstration. Specific issues are the system performance in terms of signal-to-noise (SNR) degradation and the arraying gain. Validation of the test results is via symbol-error-rate measurement and the standard symbol SNR. The analysis is also extended to include characterization of the signal received from Galileo.

  16. A translational platform for prototyping closed-loop neuromodulation systems.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Pedram; Khambhati, Ankit; Stanslaski, Scott; Carlson, David; Jensen, Randy; Linde, Dave; Dani, Siddharth; Lazarewicz, Maciej; Cong, Peng; Giftakis, Jon; Stypulkowski, Paul; Denison, Tim

    2012-01-01

    While modulating neural activity through stimulation is an effective treatment for neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, an opportunity for improving neuromodulation therapy remains in automatically adjusting therapy to continuously optimize patient outcomes. Practical issues associated with achieving this include the paucity of human data related to disease states, poorly validated estimators of patient state, and unknown dynamic mappings of optimal stimulation parameters based on estimated states. To overcome these challenges, we present an investigational platform including: an implanted sensing and stimulation device to collect data and run automated closed-loop algorithms; an external tool to prototype classifier and control-policy algorithms; and real-time telemetry to update the implanted device firmware and monitor its state. The prototyping system was demonstrated in a chronic large animal model studying hippocampal dynamics. We used the platform to find biomarkers of the observed states and transfer functions of different stimulation amplitudes. Data showed that moderate levels of stimulation suppress hippocampal beta activity, while high levels of stimulation produce seizure-like after-discharge activity. The biomarker and transfer function observations were mapped into classifier and control-policy algorithms, which were downloaded to the implanted device to continuously titrate stimulation amplitude for the desired network effect. The platform is designed to be a flexible prototyping tool and could be used to develop improved mechanistic models and automated closed-loop systems for a variety of neurological disorders.

  17. Development of prototype polychromator system for KSTAR Thomson scattering diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, S. H.; Son, S. H.; Ko, W. H.; Seo, D. C.; Yamada, I.; Her, K. H.; Jeon, J. S.; Bog, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    A polychromator is widely used by the Thomson scattering system for measuring the electron temperature and density. This type of spectrometer includes optic elements such as band-pass filters, focusing lens, collimating lens, and avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The characteristics of band-pass filters in the polychromator are determined by the measuring range of the Thomson system. KSTAR edge polychromators were developed by co-works at NIFS in Japan, and the KSTAR core polychromators were developed by NFRI in Korea. The power supply system of these polychromators is connected only to one power supply module and can manually control the APD's voltage at the front side of the power supply by using a potentiometer. In this paper, a prototype polychromator is introduced at the KSTAR. The prototype polychromator system has a built-in power supply unit that includes high voltage for the APD and ± 5 V for an op-amp IC. The high voltage for the APD is finely controlled and monitored using a PC with the LabView software. One out of the six band pass-filters has a center wavelength of 523.5 nm with 2-nm bandwidth, which can measure Zeff, and the other five band-pass filters can simultaneously measure the Thomson signal. In addition, we will show the test result of this prototype polychromator system during the KSTAR experiment campaign (2015).

  18. Prototype Combined Heater/Thermoelectric Power Generator for Remote Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champier, D.; Favarel, C.; Bédécarrats, J. P.; Kousksou, T.; Rozis, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a prototype thermoelectric generator (TEG) developed for remote applications in villages that are not connected to the electrical power grid. For ecological and economic reasons, there is growing interest in harvesting waste heat from biomass stoves to produce some electricity. Because regular maintenance is not required, TEGs are an attractive choice for small-scale power generation in inaccessible areas. The prototype developed in our laboratory is especially designed to be implemented in stoves that are also used for domestic hot water heating. The aim of this system is to provide a few watts to householders, so they have the ability to charge cellular phones and radios, and to get some light at night. A complete prototype TEG using commercial (bismuth telluride) thermoelectric modules has been built, including system integration with an electric DC/DC converter. The DC/DC converter has a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) driven by an MC9SO8 microcontroller, which optimizes the electrical energy stored in a valve-regulated lead-acid battery. Physical models were used to study the behavior of the thermoelectric system and to optimize the performance of the MPPT. Experiments using a hot gas generator to simulate the exhaust of the combustion chamber of a stove are used to evaluate the system. Additionally, potential uses of such generators are presented.

  19. A Comparison of Two Prototype Laser-Optical Firing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg L. Morelli; Michelle R. Bright

    2008-08-11

    The design and characterization of small, ruggedized laser-optical subsystems is required for the continued development of robust laser-optical firing systems. Typically, these subsystems must be capable of generating the needed laser optical energy, delivering that energy via fiber-optical cables while taking up occupying a volume as small as possible. A novel beam splitting and fiber injection scheme has been proposed which utilizes two diffractive optical components. These components were utilized to reduce the volume of a previously designed system. A laser-optical prototype system was assembled and tested which utilized this beam splitting and fiber injection scheme along other modifications to the laser module and the power supply. This prototype was based on earlier designs that utilized environmentally proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies. The system was tested to characterize the laser performance, the splitter-coupler transmission efficiency, channel-to-channel energy balance and fiber interchangeability. The results obtained for this design will be compared to the performance of a prototype system based on a more traditional beam splitting and fiber injection scheme. The traditional design utilized partially reflecting mirrors for beam splitting and plano-convex lenses for fiber injection. These results will be discussed as will their ultimate impact on future designs and packaging strategies.

  20. A prototype for the PASS Permanent All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, H. J.; Alonso, R.; Belmonte, J. A.; Horne, K.; Alsubai, K.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, L. R.

    2004-10-01

    A prototype system for the Permanent All Sky Survey (PASS) project is presented. PASS is a continuous photometric survey of the entire celestial sphere with a high temporal resolution. Its major objectives are the detection of all giant-planet transits (with periods up to some weeks) across stars up to mag 10.5, and to deliver continuously photometry that is useful for the study of any variable stars. The prototype is based on CCD cameras with short focal length optics on a fixed mount. A small dome to house it at Teide Observatory, Tenerife, is currently being constructed. A placement at the antarctic Dome C is also being considered. The prototype will be used for a feasibility study of PASS, to define the best observing strategies, and to perform a detailed characterization of the capabilities and scope of the survey. Afterwards, a first partial sky surveying will be started with it. That first survey may be able to detect transiting planets during its first few hundred hours of operation. It will also deliver a data set around which software modules dealing with the various scientific objectives of PASS will be developed. The PASS project is still in its early phase and teams interested in specific scientific objectives, in providing technical expertise, or in participating with own observations are invited to collaborate.

  1. Development of a prototype self-configuring building block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the concept and construction of a prototype self-configuring building block for potential application in smart dynamic structure. The design contains several modular self-configuring blocks with integrated controllers, gear trains, extending arms and magnetic latches. The structure could be reconfigured via the connection and disconnection of magnetic latch between the modules. Through the coordination of the individual cubes themselves, the entire structure can reassemble via pushing and pulling the individual components into almost any desired shape. Information as to the current location or the next necessary movement could be passed from cube to cube by a physical connection between the cubes or remotely through broadcast signals. To provide the hardware strategy, we present the mechanical design of the self-configure modules and their latch mechanism of Halbach array. In the end, we will discuss our proposed application in dynamic building structure and storage management.

  2. dE/dx prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Rust, D.

    1980-10-01

    A small prototype of a multiwire dE/dx detector was tested in SLAC's test beam. The basic concept of the detector was similar to the JADE drift cell design. The purpose of the test was to decide on some design parameters for a full size prototype, which is now in construction.

  3. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  4. Software Prototyping: Designing Systems for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spies, Phyllis Bova

    1983-01-01

    Reports on major change in computer software development process--the prototype model, i.e., implementation of skeletal system that is enhanced during interaction with users. Expensive and unreliable software, software design errors, traditional development approach, resources required for prototyping, success stories, and systems designer's role…

  5. Rapid Prototyping of Mobile Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federley, Maija; Sorsa, Timo; Paavilainen, Janne; Boissonnier, Kimo; Seisto, Anu

    2014-01-01

    This position paper presents the first results of an on-going project, in which we explore rapid prototyping method to efficiently produce digital learning solutions that are commercially viable. In this first phase, rapid game prototyping and an iterative approach was tested as a quick and efficient way to create learning games and to evaluate…

  6. Rapid Prototyping in Instructional Design: Creating Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Carolyn D.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional designers working in rapid prototyping environments currently do not have a list of competencies that help to identify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) required in these workplaces. This qualitative case study used multiple cases in an attempt to identify rapid prototyping competencies required in a rapid prototyping…

  7. Experiences with Prototype InfiniBand Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    SCHUTT, JAMES A.

    2001-11-01

    This report describes testing of prototype InfiniBand{trademark} host channel adapters from Intel Corporation, using the Linux(reg sign) operating system. Three generations of prototype hardware were obtained, and Linux device drivers were written which exercised the data movement capabilities of the cards. Latency and throughput results obtained were similar to other SAN technologies, but not significantly better.

  8. Software Prototyping: Designing Systems for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spies, Phyllis Bova

    1983-01-01

    Reports on major change in computer software development process--the prototype model, i.e., implementation of skeletal system that is enhanced during interaction with users. Expensive and unreliable software, software design errors, traditional development approach, resources required for prototyping, success stories, and systems designer's role…

  9. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  10. A prototype for cartographic human body analysis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Elizabeth; Marcos, Adérito; Santos, Maribel Yasmina; Espregueira-Mendes, João

    2008-01-01

    A cartographic-oriented model uses algebraic map operations to perform spatial analysis of medical data relative to the human body. A prototype system uses 3D visualization techniques to deliver analysis results. A prototype implementation suggests the model might provide the basis for a medical application tool that introduces new information insight.

  11. Nearly steady flows in GONG prototype data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler velocity images obtained with the GONG prototype instrument were analyzed to measure the nearly steady photospheric flows. The data consists of 88 images each of velocity, intensity, and modulation obtained at 20:00 UT on 88 days from July 1992 to February 1994. Each velocity image was temporally filtered to remove the p-mode oscillations, masked to exclude active regions, and then analyzed using spherical harmonics and orthogonal functions as described by Hathaway (1992). The spectral coefficients show very consistent results for the entire time interval with some evidence of year-to-year variations. The rotation profile agrees well with previous results and exhibits a north-south asymmetry that reverses sign during the 20 month interval. The residual rotation velocities exhibit structures with amplitudes of approximately 5 m/s that may be related to torsional oscillations. The meridional circulation is directed from the equator toward the poles with a peak velocity in the photosphere of approximately 50 m/s. The higher order components are very weak but indicate a divergent flow from the mid-latitudes (opposite that found for the June 1989 data). The convective limb shift is well fit by a 3rd order polynomial. The convection spectrum has a prominent peak at spherical harmonic degrees of l approximately 150 with very little signal in the low degree modes. Analysis of this signal shows that there is no evidence for giant cell convection at the level of approximately 10 m/s for all modes up to l = 32.

  12. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  13. Calibration of the MEGA Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andritschke, R.; Zoglauer, A.; Kanbach, G.; Schönfelder, V.; Schrey, F.; Schopper, F.; Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Macri, J.; Miller, R. S.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Pinayev, I. V.

    2004-10-01

    Calibration measurements of the MEGA (Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy) prototype have been performed with radioactive lab sources and at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at the Free Electron Laser Laboratory (FELL) of Duke University, Durham, NC. MEGA is a combined Compton scatter and pair creation telescope. It con- sists of two main detector units, the tracker and the calorimeter. Doublesided Silicon strip detectors form the tracker, which is surrounded by the pixelated CsI(Tl) blocks of the calorimeter. A prerequisite for successful data analysis is a calibration of each indi- vidual readout channel. This work is still ongoing. The performance of the detector units will be there- fore presented as currently known. The encountered problems and the resulting (single detector) calibra- tion methods will be described briefly. Since we aim at an energy range of 0.3 50 MeV, the HIGS — a Compton back-scattering source — with beams of mono-energetic, fully linearly polarized photons in the range of 0.7 50 MeV was a good match for the MEGA calibration. Measurements at various ener- gies and for different incidence angles have been per- formed. Some preliminary results will be presented. Key words: Compton telescope; pair telescope; Si strip detector; CsI calorimeter; γ-ray; HIGS.

  14. Mars Spark Source Prototype Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware was developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample, and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma to identify and quantify them. Trace metal measurements are vital in assessing whether or not the Martian environment will be toxic to human explorers. The current method of x-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations of major species only. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The new instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but it would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated the development of the MSSP as part of Glenn's Director's Discretionary Fund project for the Spark Analysis Detection of Trace Metal Species in Martian Dusts and Soils. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, sensitive optical instrument for the detection of trace hazardous metals in Martian dusts and soils.

  15. 6000 x 2000 display prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuishi, Tetsuya; Small, David; MacNeil, Ronald L.

    1992-07-01

    While electronic technology has evolved enormously, there are no displays which are both very large and of high resolution. This paper describes our 6 K X 2 K, 60 inch by 20 inch, display prototype which consists of three 2 K X 2 K CRT displays connected seamlessly. Using a custom frame and a half-silvered mirror, the three images are joined by reflecting the center display image from above and transmitting the two side display images directly. Two problems must be solved to achieve a truly seamless effect. First, viewers can still see seams between regular screen images even if the displays are strictly aligned. Second, each physical display has a different geometrical space, and the center display image must be drawn in reverse because it will be reflected by the mirror. We developed a seamless window system to solve these problems. The window system displays overlapping images with translucent borders to enable better blending of the three display screens. Custom application software treats the system as a single 6 K X 2 K area. A concept named ''virtual framebuffer architecture'' enables us to implement the two kinds of seamlessness easily. To evaluate the visual effects, we developed some application systems which include video in a window, stereo sound and a high speed channel to the Connection Machine II for image processing.

  16. Dissipative Prototyping Methods: A Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesley, P.

    Taking a designer's unique perspective using examples of practice in experimental installation and digital protoyping, this manifesto acts as provocation for change and unlocking new potential by encouraging changes of perspective about the material realm. Diffusive form-language is proposed as a paradigm for architectural design. This method of design is applied through 3D printing and related digital fabrication methods, offering new qualities that can be implemented in design of realms including present earth and future interplanetary environments. A paradigm shift is encouraged by questioning conventional notions of geometry that minimize interfaces and by proposing the alternatives of maximized interfaces formed by effusive kinds of formal composition. A series of projects from the Canadian research studio of the Hylozoic Architecture group are described, providing examples of component design methods employing diffusive forms within combinations of tension-integrity structural systems integrated with hybrid metabolisms employing synthetic biology. Cultural implications are also discussed, drawing from architectural theory and natural philosophy. The conclusion of this paper suggests that the practice of diffusive prototyping can offer formative strategies contributing to design of future living systems.

  17. RAMGEN ROTOR CARTRIDGE FOR THE PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron Koopman

    2003-09-01

    The research and development of a unique combustion engine is presented. The engine converts the thrust from ramjet modules located on the rim of a disk into shaft torque, which in turn can be used for electrical power generation or mechanical drive applications. A test program was undertaken that included evaluation of the pre-prototype engine and incorporation of improvements to the thrust modules and supporting systems. Fuel mixing studies with vortex generators and bluff body flame holders demonstrated the importance of increasing the shear-layer area and spreading angle to augment flame volume. Evaluation of flame-holding configurations (with variable fuel injection methods) concluded that the heat release zone, and therefore combustion efficiency, could be manipulated by judicious selection of bluff body geometry, and is less influenced by fuel injection distribution. Finally, successful operation of novel fuel and cooling air delivery systems have resolved issues of gas (fuel and air) delivery to the individual rotor segments. The lessons learned from the pre-prototype engine are currently being applied to the development of a 2.8MW engine.

  18. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  19. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; Evbota, D.; Farinon, S.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Musenich, R.; Wands, R.; Masullo, G.

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils to the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.

  20. Laboratory prototype of cochlear implant: design and techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussnain; Ahmad, Talha J; Ajaz, Asim; Khan, Shoab A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents design overview of a low cost prototype of Cochlear Implant developed from commercial off-the-shelf components. Design scope includes speech processing module implemented on a commercial digital signal processor, transcutaneous data and power transceiver developed from a single pair of inductive coils and finally a stimulator circuitry for cochlear stimulation. Different speech processing strategies such as CIS, SMSP and F0/F1 have been implemented and tested using a novel, indigenously developed speech processing research module which evaluates the performance of speech processing strategies in software, hardware and practical scenarios. Design overview, simulations and practical results of an optimized inductive link using Class E Power Amplifier are presented. Link was designed at a carrier frequency of 2.5MHz for 100mW output power. Receiver logic design and stimulator circuitry was implemented using a PIC microcontroller and off-the-shelf electronic components. Results indicate 40% link efficiency with 128kbps data transfer rate. This low cost prototype can be used for undertaking cochlear implant research in laboratories.

  1. Development and operation of a hybrid lighting-CPV prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, R.; Antón, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-09-01

    The first results of a Hybrid lighting-CPV prototype are presented. This new concept mixes a classical CPV module with the production of light for illumination without a double conversion (solar energy to electricity and electricity to light) allowing a higher efficiency to the whole system. At the same time the need of concentration and tracking required by a fiber-based illumination system is fully covered by the infrastructure of the CPV system. In this work, it is found that the higher the f-number of the concentrating lens, the fewer losses but this value is also limited by the compactness of the receptor, the f-number of cell lens and the optical efficiency of the lens. PMMA softening at 85 °C limits maximum concentration to 100X. Taking into account these constraints, a prototype has been assembled using a commercial CPV module as a host. Results show that with a minimal loss in the electrical part, a luminous flux can be obtained with a lumen per watt ratio higher than by electrical means, and maintaining quality lighting parameters as good as high standard light sources.

  2. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils tomore » the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.« less

  3. Artificial lung: progress and prototypes.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, Brittany A; Clemson, Lindsey A; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2006-07-01

    Lung disease is the fourth leading cause of death (one in seven deaths) in the USA. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) affects approximately 150,000 patients a year in the USA, and an estimated 16 million Americans are afflicted with chronic lung disease, accounting for 100,000 deaths per year. Medical management is the standard of care for initial therapy, but is limited by the progression of disease. Chronic mechanical ventilation is readily available, but is cumbersome, expensive and often requires tracheotomy with loss of upper airway defense mechanisms and normal speech. Lung transplantation is an option for less than 1100 patients per year since demand has steadily outgrown supply. For the last 15 years, the authors' group has studied ARDS in order to develop viable alternative treatments. Both extracorporeal gas exchange techniques, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, extracorporeal and arteriovenous CO(2) removal, and intravenous oxygenation, aim to allow for a less injurious ventilatory strategy during lung recovery while maintaining near-normal arterial blood gases, but precludes ambulation. The paracorporeal artificial lung (PAL), however, redefines the treatment of both acute and chronic respiratory failure with the goal of ambulatory total respiratory support. PAL prototypes tested on both normal sheep and the absolute lethal dose smoke/burn-induced ARDS sheep model have demonstrated initial success in achieving total gas exchange. Still, clinical trials cannot begin until bio- and hemodynamic compatibility challenges are reconciled. The PAL initial design goals are for a short-term (weeks) bridge to recovery or transplant, but eventually, for long-term support (months).

  4. Review on CNC-Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, M. Nafis O.; Y, Nafrizuan M.; A, Munira M.; J, Kartina

    2012-09-01

    This article reviewed developments of Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) technology in rapid prototyping process. Rapid prototyping (RP) can be classified into three major groups; subtractive, additive and virtual. CNC rapid prototyping is grouped under the subtractive category which involves material removal from the workpiece that is larger than the final part. Richard Wysk established the use of CNC machines for rapid prototyping using sets of 2½-D tool paths from various orientations about a rotary axis to machine parts without refixturing. Since then, there are few developments on this process mainly aimed to optimized the operation and increase the process capabilities to stand equal with common additive type of RP. These developments include the integration between machining and deposition process (hybrid RP), adoption of RP to the conventional machine and optimization of the CNC rapid prototyping process based on controlled parameters. The article ended by concluding that the CNC rapid prototyping research area has a vast space for improvement as in the conventional machining processes. Further developments and findings will enhance the usage of this method and minimize the limitation of current approach in building a prototype.

  5. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena.

  6. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  7. Microchannel spatial light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warde, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Microchannel Spatial Light Modulator (MSLM), a versatile, highly sensitive, and optically addressed device being developed for real time optical information processing is discussed. The MSLM operates by converting an input optical image into a charge distribution at the surface of an electro-optic crystal. The charge distribution generates an electric field which modulates the refractive index of the crystal and thereby the phase or intensity of an image readout beam. Prototype devices employing 250 micron thick crystals exhibited a spatial resolution of 5 cycles/mm at 50% contrast, an exposure sensitivity of 2.2 nJ/cu cm and framing rates of 40 Hz with full modulation depth. The image processing operations that have been achieved using the internal processing mode of the MSLM include contrast reversal, contrast enhancement, edge enhancement, image addition and subtraction, analog and digital intensity thresholding, and binary level logic operations such as AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, and NOR.

  8. Development of shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter prototype for SoLID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, D.; Han, D.; Zou, Z.; Li, Y.; Zheng, X.; Chen, J.

    2017-03-01

    A shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter will be produced in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory for Solenoidal large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the energy deposition of electrons and hadrons, and to provide particle identification after the energy of the accelerator was upgraded to 12 GeV. Tsinghua University is the member of Hall A collaboration in charge of development and production of the large shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter of SoLID. One module of that calorimeter is composed by 194 layers. Each layer consists of a 1.5 mm thick plastic scintillator put on top of a 0.5 mm thick lead plate. Scintillation light is read out by wave-length shifter fibers penetrating through the calorimeter modules longitudinally along the direction of flight of the impact particle. This paper describes the design and construction of that module, as well as a few optimization studies meant to improve its performance. A detailed Geant4 simulation also shows that an energy resolution of 5%/√ E (GeV) and a good containment for electromagnetic showers can be achieved, as well as some basic electron identification. A prototype of that module will be tested soon with an electron beam at JLab.

  9. Universal stowage module for future space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seccamp, V. A.; Hussex, M. W.; Garber, P.; Mandras, W.; Mckinney, D.

    1973-01-01

    The development, design, and fabrication of a prototype storage module, with internal restraints, for the stowage of items that are normally launched to support a space mission are discussed. The primary design criteria was that the storage module be universal in accomodating most sizes and shapes of items that could be launched and returned in a shuttle payload. Mechanical drawings of various types of storage modules are provided.

  10. [Rapid prototyping: a very promising method].

    PubMed

    Haverman, T M; Karagozoglu, K H; Prins, H-J; Schulten, E A J M; Forouzanfar, T

    2013-03-01

    Rapid prototyping is a method which makes it possible to produce a three-dimensional model based on two-dimensional imaging. Various rapid prototyping methods are available for modelling, such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, direct laser metal sintering, two-photon polymerization, laminated object manufacturing, three-dimensional printing, three-dimensional plotting, polyjet inkjet technology,fused deposition modelling, vacuum casting and milling. The various methods currently being used in the biomedical sector differ in production, materials and properties of the three-dimensional model which is produced. Rapid prototyping is mainly usedforpreoperative planning, simulation, education, and research into and development of bioengineering possibilities.

  11. Prototype expert system for infusion pump maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mataban, B A

    1994-01-01

    With today's object-oriented software, knowledge-base building becomes simple. Using ServiceSoft's Service Power tools, an IMED PC-1 infusion pump prototype expert system was built. Approximately three man-weeks of work was expended to build the prototype expert system providing advice on repair to the board level. The prototype was demonstrated to the Department of Defense, and they are considering the inclusion of expert systems technology in medical equipment maintenance as one facet of their consolidation of logistic and administrative functions of the four military services' health care delivery.

  12. Prototype testing for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kalia, H.N.; Oliver, R.D.; Girdley, W.A.

    1990-02-01

    The US Department of Energy, through its Yucca Mountain Project Office, has been conducting prototype activities in welded and non-welded tuff. These activities are in preparation for characterization of the Yucca Mountain area, which is under consideration as a site for a geologic repository in which high-level nuclear waste could be safely stored. Investigators from organizations that will conduct the site investigation have been afforded opportunity, through the prototype program, to test, evaluate, and develop instruments, equipment, and methods. The Exploratory Shaft Facility will be used to collect significant amounts of underground site characterization data. The prototype tests are conducted under similar conditions. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  13. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  14. A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer for near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyang; Lu, Dan-feng; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2015-09-01

    A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) was constructed with a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LiNbO3) waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) for the purpose of rapid on-site spectroscopy of biological and chemical measurands. The MZI contains push-pull electrodes for electro-optic modulation, and its interferogram as a plot of intensity against voltage was obtained by scanning the modulating voltage from -60 to +60 V in 50 ms. The power spectrum of input signal was retrieved by Fourier transform processing of the interferogram combined with the wavelength dispersion of half-wave voltage determined for the MZI used. The prototype FTS operates in the single-mode wavelength range from 1200 to 1700 nm and allows for reproducible spectroscopy. A linear concentration dependence of the absorbance at λmax = 1451 nm for water in ethanolic solution was obtained using the prototype FTS. The near-infrared spectroscopy of solid samples was also implemented, and the different spectra obtained with different materials evidenced the chemical recognition capability of the prototype FTS. To make this prototype FTS practically applicable, work on improving its spectral resolution by increasing the maximum optical path length difference is in progress.

  15. Optoelectronic parallel-matching architecture: architecture description, performance estimation, and prototype demonstration.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, K; Nitta, K; Ogura, Y; Tanida, J; Ichioka, Y

    2001-01-10

    We propose an optoelectronic parallel-matching architecture (PMA) that provides powerful processing capabilities in global processing compared with conventional parallel-computing architectures. The PMA is composed of a global processor called a parallel-matching (PM) module and multiple processing elements (PE's). The PM module is implemented by a large-fan-out free-space optical interconnection and a PM smart-pixel array (PM-SPA). In the proposed architecture, by means of the PM module each PE can monitor the other PE's by use of several kinds of global data matching as well as interprocessor communication. Theoretical evaluation of the performance shows that the proposed PMA provides tremendous improvement in global processing. A prototype demonstrator of the PM module is constructed on the basis of state-of-the-art optoelectronic devices and a diffractive optical element. The prototype is assumed for use in a multiple-processor system composed of 4 x 4 PE's that are completely connected through bit-serial optical communication channels. The PM-SPA is emulated by a complex programmable device and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor photodetector array. On the prototype demonstrator the fundamental operations of the PM module were verified at 15 MHz.

  16. A prototype of wireless power and data acquisition system for large detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lurgio, P.; Djurcic, Z.; Drake, G.; Hashemian, R.; Kreps, A.; Oberling, M.; Pearson, T.; Sahoo, H.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a prototype detector and data acquisition module that incorporates wireless power and wireless data transmission techniques. The module has no electrical connections. It receives power using photovoltaic devices, and communicates control, timing, trigger, and data using the 802.11n wireless communication standard. The work is part of a study for building a large detector having many readout channels, where it is desirable to reduce the cable plant and infrastructure. The system could also be deployed in smaller detectors that require mobility or are difficult to cable due to extreme conditions. We describe the design and operation of the prototype module, including benchmark performance measurements, and discuss aspect and issues in extrapolating to a large detector system.

  17. SIDRA instrument for measurements of particle fluxes at satellite altitudes. Laboratory prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Prieto, M.; Kurbatov, E. V.; Sanchez, S.; Timakova, T. G.; Spassky, A. V.; Dubina, V. N.; Parra, P.

    2013-01-01

    The design concept and first set of results are presented for electronic modules of a laboratory prototype of the small-size satellite instrument SIDRA intended for measurements of charged particle fluxes in outer space. The working prototype consists of a detector assembly based on high-purity silicon and fast scintillation detectors, modules of analogue and digital processing, and a secondary power supply module. The first results are discussed of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the instrument with the use of the GEANT4 toolkit and of measurements of the main parameters of charge-sensitive pre-amplifiers, shapers, and peak detectors. Results of calibration measurements with the use of radioactive sources and beams of accelerated charged particles are presented.

  18. Prototyping manufacturing in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciortea, E. M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper attempts a theoretical approach to cloud systems with impacts on production systems. I call systems as cloud computing because form a relatively new concept in the field of informatics, representing an overall distributed computing services, applications, access to information and data storage without the user to know the physical location and configuration of systems. The advantages of this approach are especially computing speed and storage capacity without investment in additional configurations, synchronizing user data, data processing using web applications. The disadvantage is that it wants to identify a solution for data security, leading to mistrust users. The case study is applied to a module of the system of production, because the system is complex.

  19. VO for Education: Archive Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella, M.; Iafrate, G.; De Marco, M.; Molinaro, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.; Cepparo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The number of remote control telescopes dedicated to education is increasing in many countries, leading to correspondingly larger and larger amount of stored educational data that are usually available only to local observers. Here we present the project for a new infrastructure that will allow teachers using educational telescopes to archive their data and easily publish them within the Virtual Observatory (VO) avoiding the complexity of professional tools. Students and teachers anywhere will be able to access these data with obvious benefits for the realization of grander scale collaborative projects. Educational VO data will also be an important resource for teachers not having direct access to any educational telescopes. We will use the educational telescope at our observatory in Trieste as a prototype for the future VO educational data archive resource. The publishing infrastructure will include: user authentication, content and curation validation, data validation and ingestion, VO compliant resource generation. All of these parts will be performed by means of server side applications accessible through a web graphical user interface (web GUI). Apart from user registration, that will be validated by a natural person responsible for the archive (after having verified the reliability of the user and inspected one or more test files), all the subsequent steps will be automated. This means that at the very first data submission through the webGUI, a complete resource including archive and published VO service will be generated, ready to be registered to the VO. The efforts required to the registered user will consist only in describing herself/himself at registration step and submitting the data she/he selects for publishing after each observation sessions. The infrastructure will be file format independent and the underlying data model will use a minimal set of standard VO keywords, some of which will be specific for outreach and education, possibly including VO

  20. Laser-Controlled Rapid Prototyping of Photonic Integrated Circuits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    1994-01-01

    Photonic integrated circuits offer important cost and environmental advantages over circuits composed of discrete components. However, the design and fabrication of complex, large-area photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is severely limited by the lack of prototyping tools as well as the appropriate device structures. This thesis describes the use of a novel laser fabrication process for the rapid prototyping of integrated optical circuits in compound semiconductor substrates. The fabrication is based on a type of laser direct photoelectrochemical etching process that uses a focused laser beam which is scanned under computer control to form micrometer-scale grooves, thereby patterning rib-like optical waveguide structures. The computer-controlled apparatus can be programmed with any desired circuit pattern, and prototype waveguide circuits can be produced within a day. The technique does not require the use of a mask; thus, the etching can be done in a single step. In the first part of this thesis, the technique of micrometer-scale photoelectrochemical etching of GaAs is described. The use of this technique for the fabrication of several passive integrated optical devices in GaAs is then presented. These "building block" devices include linear waveguides, bends, Y-branches, and tapers. From these, we were able to form simple passive devices such as splitters and directional couplers. These devices have low optical loss, are single-mode, and can be accurately modeled using effective index calculations. The usefulness of this technique as a prototyping tool is then demonstrated by its use in the fabrication of the first sub-Angstrom integrated channel-dropping filter. After the presentation of the passive devices results, the use of this technique to fabricate several active devices is discussed. These electrooptic devices include a polarization modulator, an integrated amplitude modulator consisting of a polarization modulator and an on-chip polarizer, and an

  1. GreenCraft Greenspoint House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    This case study describes a prototype house demonstrating energy efficiency and durability upgrades including an unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation and supplemental dehumidification, along with high performance windows and HVAC system.

  2. Rapid Production of Composite Prototype Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, T. K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to provide a mechanism to cost-effectively produce composite hardware prototypes. The task was to take a hands-on approach to developing new technologies that could benefit multiple future programs.

  3. SpaceX Test Fires Engine Prototype

    NASA Image and Video Library

    One of NASA's industry partners, SpaceX, fires its new SuperDraco engine prototype in preparation for the ninth milestone to be completed under SpaceX's funded Space Act Agreement (SAA) with NASA's...

  4. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  5. Summary Scientific Performance of EUCLID Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) plan to partner to build the EUCLID mission. EUCLID is a mission concept for studying the Dark Energy that is hypothesized to account for the accelerating cosmic expansion. For the past year, NASA has been building detector prototypes at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. This talk will summarize the measured scientific performance of these detector prototypes for astrophysical and cosmological applications.

  6. Rapid Prototyping: State of the Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-23

    Inkjet and 3D Printing • Lamination Stereolithography was the first type of rapid prototyping technology to be introduced commercially and it...includes processes such as stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, laser sintering, and 3D inkjet printing. RP systems produce models, prototype...Process. 5 A final example, inkjet printing, is shown in Figure 5. Unlike the previous examples, the laser is replaced with an inkjet head that deposits a

  7. Preliminary Component Integration Using Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Salvail, Pat; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rapid prototyping is a very important tool that should be used by both design and manufacturing disciplines during the development of elements for the aerospace industry. It helps prevent lack of adequate communication between design and manufacturing engineers (which could lead to costly errors) through mutual consideration of functional models generated from drawings. Rapid prototyping techniques are used to test hardware for design and material compatibility at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  8. Preliminary test of the prototype modular cryostat for a 10 MW offshore superconducting wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiuce; Ramalingam, R.; Sanz, Santiago; Neumann, Holger

    2017-02-01

    The SUPerconducting Reliable lightweight And more POWERful offshore wind turbine (SUPRAPOWER), an EU FP7 funded research project, are under development for an innovative superconducting 10 MW class offshore wind turbine. Due to the requirements of handling, maintenance, reliability of long term and offshore operation, the cryostats are divided in two major parts: the modular cryostat able to accommodate a single coil and a thermal collector that links all the modules. The prototype modular cryostat was designed, manufactured and assembled in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The paper reports preliminary test results of proto-type modular cryostat with a two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler.

  9. Characterization of HIRF Susceptibility Threshold for a Prototype Implementation of an Onboard Data Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to characterize the effects of HIRF-induced upsets on a prototype onboard data network. The experiment was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center s High Intensity Radiation Field Laboratory and used a generic distributed system prototyping platform to realize the data network. This report presents the results of the hardware susceptibility threshold characterization which examined the dependence of measured susceptibility on factors like the frequency and modulation of the radiation, layout of the physical nodes and position of the nodes in the test chamber. The report also includes lessons learned during the development and execution of the experiment.

  10. Performance evaluation of a serially powered pixel detector prototype for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, L.; Filimonov, V.; Hügging, F.; Hemperek, T.; Janssen, J.; Krüger, H.; Pohl, D.-L.; Wermes, N.

    2017-03-01

    Efficient and low mass power distribution presents a challenge for vertex and tracking detectors at the HL-LHC . Different approaches have been considered to transmit power at low current and high voltage. This paper presents the serial powering scheme proposed as baseline for the ATLAS and CMS pixel detectors at the HL-LHC . A serially powered detector prototype with six pixel modules has been built, featuring all elements needed for current distribution, redundancy, data transmission, and sensor biasing. Results of the characterisation of the prototype in standard operating conditions as well as in more challenging scenarios including increased digital activity are presented.

  11. Results and simulation of the prototype detection unit of KM3NeT-ARCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugon, C. M. F.

    2017-03-01

    KM3NeT-ARCA is a deep sea high energy neutrino detector. A detection unit prototype was deployed in the future KM3NeT-ARCA deep-sea site, off of the Sicilian coast. This detection unit is composed of a line of 3 digital optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes on each one. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. The results of the calibration of this detection unit and its simulation are presented and discussed.

  12. Field evaluation of prototype electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, W.D.; Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.

    1982-09-30

    New prototype electrofibrous filters were designed, built and evaluated in laboratory tests and in field installations. Two prototypes were designed for use in nuclear ventilation ducts as prefilters to HEPA filters. One prototype is designed to be a permanent component of the ventilation system while the other is a disposable unit. The disposable electrofibrous prefilter was installed in the exhaust stream of a glove box in which barrels of uranium turnings are burned. Preliminary tests show the disposal prefilter is effectively prolonging the HEPA filter life. An earlier prototype of the rolling prefilter was upgraded to meet the increased requirements for installation in a nuclear facility. This upgraded prototype was evaluated in the fire test facility at LLNL and shown to be effective in protecting HEPA filters from plugging under the most severe smoke conditions. The last prototype described in this report is a recirculating air filter. After demonstrating a high performance in laboratory tests the unit was shipped to Savannah River where it is awaiting installation in a Pu fuel fabrication facility. An analysis of the particulate problem in Savannah River indicates that four recirculating air filter will save $172,000 per year in maintenance costs.

  13. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Prototype Development

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Chichester; S.A. Pozzi; J.L. Dolan; M.T. Kinlaw; S.J. Thompson; A.C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J.T. Johnson; S.M. Watson

    2013-09-01

    This document serves as both an FY2103 End-of-Year and End-of-Project report on efforts that resulted in the design of a prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter leveraged upon the findings of previous project efforts. The prototype design includes 32 liquid scintillator detectors with cubic volumes 7.62 cm in dimension configured into 4 stacked rings of 8 detectors. Detector signal collection for the system is handled with a pair of Struck Innovative Systeme 16-channel digitizers controlled by in-house developed software with built-in multiplicity analysis algorithms. Initial testing and familiarization of the currently obtained prototype components is underway, however full prototype construction is required for further optimization. Monte Carlo models of the prototype system were performed to estimate die-away and efficiency values. Analysis of these models resulted in the development of a software package capable of determining the effects of nearest-neighbor rejection methods for elimination of detector cross talk. A parameter study was performed using previously developed analytical methods for the estimation of assay mass variance for use as a figure-of-merit for system performance. A software package was developed to automate these calculations and ensure accuracy. The results of the parameter study show that the prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter design is very nearly optimized under the restraints of the parameter space.

  14. The Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. T.; Mozurkewich, D.; Rickard, L. J.; Hutter, D. J.; Benson, J. A.; Bowers, P. F.; Elias, N. M., II; Hummel, C. A.; Johnston, K. J.; Buscher, D. F.; Clark, J. H., III; Ha, L.; Ling, L.-C.; White, N. M.; Simon, R. S.

    1998-03-01

    We describe the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), a joint project of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the US Naval Observatory (USNO) in cooperation with Lowell Observatory. The NPOI has recently begun operations at the Lowell Observatory site near Flagstaff, Arizona, obtaining its first images, of a binary star, in 1996 May and June and its first limb-darkening observations during 1996 November to 1997 February. This paper gives an overview of the NPOI, including the characteristics of optical interferometry that affect its design. The NPOI includes subarrays for imaging and for astrometry. The imaging subarray consists of six moveable 50 cm siderostats feeding 12 cm apertures, with baseline lengths from 2.0 to 437 m. The astrometric subarray consists of four fixed 50 cm siderostats feeding 12 cm apertures (35 cm apertures to be installed in 1998), with baseline lengths from 19 m to 38 m. The shared back end covers 450-850 nm in 32 channels. The NPOI features vacuum feed and delay systems, active group-delay fringe tracking, and a high degree of automation. The astrometric subarray also includes an extensive site laser metrology system to measure the motions of the siderostats with respect to one another and to the bedrock. For imaging stellar surfaces, arrays with equal spacing between elements are superior to arrays that have been laid out to optimize (u, v) coverage and that therefore have unequal spacing. The imaging subarray of the NPOI provides a number of equally spaced configurations with linear scales at ratios of ~1.64. Unequally spaced configurations are available for a variety of other imaging programs. Coherence across either type of imaging configuration is maintained by ``phase bootstrapping'': the phases on the longest baselines, on which fringes may be too weak to track, are stabilized by tracking fringes on the shortest baselines. In principle, the four elements of the astrometric subarray provide enough independent baselines

  15. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  16. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  17. A prototype superconducting gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    van Kann, F.J.; Buckingham, M.J.; Edwards, C.; Penny, R.D.

    1985-03-01

    We report the successful laboratory test of a single-axis gradiometer designed to measure a diagonal component of the earth's gravitational gradient tensor. It consists of a pair of accelerometers mounted with their sensitive axes vertical and in line. The difference in displacement of the accelerometers is proportional to the component of the tensor gradient and is sensed via the modulated inductance of a superconducting coil coupled by a superconducting transformer into an RF biased SHE SQUID with energy sensitivity 4 x 10/sup -29/ J/Hz. Rejection of in-line common mode accelerations is achieved by trimming the natural resonant frequency of each accelerometer: the restoring force acting on an accelerometer test mass is partly magnetic and can be trimmed by adjusting the persistent currents in a pair of force coils. A common mode rejection ratio exceeding 95 dB has been achieved in the presence of linear accelerations about 10/sup -3/ ms/sup -2/, and a laboratory generated gradient of 30 Eo rms has been detected with a signal to noise ratio of about 100. The dependence of this signal on the distance between source and detector has the expected Newtonian form. Under quiet conditions the background noise level of the instrument is at present 3 Eo/..sqrt..Hz. (1 Eo = 10/sup -9/ s/sup -2/.) This is close to the practical limit achievable for such a single axis configuration: a three axis instrument for geophysical application is under development.

  18. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  19. Development Status of The ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-}0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  20. Development Status of the ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2008-06-16

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-} 0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  1. 20 Gbit/s transmission experiments using an integrated MQW modulator/DFB laser module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Hagimoto, K.; Sato, K.; Kotaka, I.; Wakita, K.

    1994-05-01

    An integrated MQW electroabsorption modulator/DFB laser module that operates at 2V was developed. It offers a 22dB extinction ratio and 15GHz bandwidth. 100km transmission experiments at 20 Gbit/s are carried out using a prototype module. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report where 20 Gbit/s transmission has been achieved with a monolithically integrated light source.

  2. Prototyping FM data demodulation in free-space optical communication systems using discrete wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Lan; El-Araby, Esam; Namazi, Nader

    2013-09-01

    Free-Space Optical (FSO) communications is a vital area of research due to its important advantages of providing a very large bandwidth and relatively low cost of implementation. One of the inherent limitations on the quality of an FSO communication link is the degradation of the received beam due to atmospheric turbulence. This paper is concerned with prototyping a wavelet-based algorithm to remove or reduce the effect of the scintillation noise and other unwanted signal on an FSO link that uses analog frequency modulation. The applicability of these concepts will be demonstrated by providing a real-time prototype using reconfigurable hardware, namely Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), and high-level design tools such as System Generator for DSP from Xilinx. Our proposed prototype was realized on the Virtex-6 FPGA ML605 board using the XC6VLX240T-1FFG1156 device.

  3. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlusty, David; Ruan, Lijuan

    2008-04-01

    A large area of muon telescope detector is proposed to measure muons of momentum at a few GeV/c at mid-rapidity, allowing for the detection of di-muon pairs from QGP thermal radiation, quarkonia, light vector mesons, possible correlations of quarks and gluons as resonances in QGP, and Drell-Yan production as well as the measurement of heavy flavor hadrons through their semi-leptonic decays into single muons. The R&D research has been carried out for this large area Muon Telescope Detector (MTD). The multi-gap resistive plate chamber technology with large module, long strips and two-end readout (Long-MRPC) was used for this research. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for Long-MRPC. Besides, a single prototype of MTD was installed in STAR during the 200 GeV Au+Au run in spring 2007. The detector consists of a long-MRPC layer between two layers of scintillator planes. They are placed outside of the magnet yoke that serves as hadron absorber. We will present results from this prototype run. Muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution will be reported. We also discuss the implication of these tests on the physics performance and capabilities of full scale detector.

  4. Prototype of a rectal wall ultrasound image analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Ng, Wan S.; Abeyratne, Udantha R.; Tsang, Charles B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a software system prototype for rectal wall ultrasound image processing, image display and 3D reconstruction and visualization of the rectal wall structure, which is aimed to help surgeons cope with large quantities of rectal wall ultrasound images. On the core image processing algorithm part, a novel multigradient field active contour model proposed by authors is used to complete the multi-layer boundary detection of the rectal wall. A novel unifying active contour model, which combines region information, gradient information and contour's internal constraint, is developed for tumor boundary detection. The region statistical information is described accurately by Gaussian Mixture Model, whose parameter solution is computed by Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The whole system is set up on Java platform. Java JAI technology is used for 2D image display, Java3D technology is employed for 3D reconstruction and visualization. The system prototype is currently composed of three main modules: image processing, image display and 3D visualization.

  5. Wine Traceability: A Data Model and Prototype in Albanian Context.

    PubMed

    Vukatana, Kreshnik; Sevrani, Kozeta; Hoxha, Elira

    2016-02-17

    Vine traceability is a critical issue that has gained interest internationally. Quality control programs and schemes are mandatory in many countries including EU members and the USA. Albania has transformed most of the EU regulations on food into laws. Regarding the vine sector, the obligation of wine producers to keep traceability data is part of the legislation. The analysis on the interviews conducted with Albanian winemakers show that these data are actually recorded only in hard copy. Another fact that emerges from the interviews is that only two producers have implemented the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards on food. The purpose of this paper is to develop an agile and automated traceability system based on these standards. We propose a data model and system prototype that are described in the second and third section of this work. The data model is an adaption along the lines of the GS1 (Global Standards One) specifications for a wine supply chain. The proposed prototype has a key component that is mobile access to the information about wine through barcode technology. By using this mechanism the consumer obtains transparency on his expectations concerning the quality criteria. Another important component of the proposed system in this paper is a real-time notification module that works as an alert system when a risk is identified. This can help producers and authorities to have a rapid identification of a contaminated product. It is important in cases when recalling the product from the market or preventing it from reaching the consumer.

  6. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Crawford et al.

    2003-10-02

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10{sup -4} rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R&D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated measurement system, capable of measuring small transverse field components, while the system's measurement errors are analyzed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains measured field distributions of individual elements of the cooling section as well as an evaluation of the magnetic shielding efficiency. An algorithm of field adjustments for providing lowest possible electron trajectory perturbations is proposed in Chapter 6; also, this chapter shows the results of our first attempts of implementing the algorithm.

  7. Prototype pipeline for LSST wavefront sensing and reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claver, Charles F.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Liang, Ming; Xin, Bo; Alagoz, Enver; Arndt, Kirk; Shipsey, Ian P.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses an Active Optics System (AOS) to maintain system alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from 4 curvature based wavefront sensors located on the corners of the inscribed square within the 3.5 degree field of view. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1mm on either side of focus. In this paper we describe the development of the Active Optics Pipeline prototype that simulates processing the raw image data from the wavefront sensors through to wavefront estimation on to the active optics corrective actions. We also describe various wavefront estimation algorithms under development for the LSST active optics system. The algorithms proposed are comprised of the Zernike compensation routine which improve the accuracy of the wavefront estimate. Algorithm development has been aided by a bench top optical simulator which we also describe. The current software prototype combines MATLAB modules for image processing, tomographic reconstruction, atmospheric turbulence and Zemax for optical ray-tracing to simulate the closed loop behavior of the LSST AOS. We describe the overall simulation model and results for image processing using simulated images and initial results of the wavefront estimation algorithms.

  8. Development of a compressive sampling hyperspectral imager prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, Alessandro; Guzzi, Donatella; Lastri, Cinzia; Nardino, Vanni; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a new technology that investigates the chance to sample signals at a lower rate than the traditional sampling theory. The main advantage of CS is that compression takes place during the sampling phase, making possible significant savings in terms of the ADC, data storage memory, down-link bandwidth, and electrical power absorption. The CS technology could have primary importance for spaceborne missions and technology, paving the way to noteworthy reductions of payload mass, volume, and cost. On the contrary, the main CS disadvantage is made by the intensive off-line data processing necessary to obtain the desired source estimation. In this paper we summarize the CS architecture and its possible implementations for Earth observation, giving evidence of possible bottlenecks hindering this technology. CS necessarily employs a multiplexing scheme, which should produce some SNR disadvantage. Moreover, this approach would necessitate optical light modulators and 2-dim detector arrays of high frame rate. This paper describes the development of a sensor prototype at laboratory level that will be utilized for the experimental assessment of CS performance and the related reconstruction errors. The experimental test-bed adopts a push-broom imaging spectrometer, a liquid crystal plate, a standard CCD camera and a Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) matrix. The prototype is being developed within the framework of the ESA ITI-B Project titled "Hyperspectral Passive Satellite Imaging via Compressive Sensing".

  9. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Androulakis, G. C.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Avgitas, T.; Balasi, K.; Band, H.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; Baron, S.; Barrios, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A. M.; Berkien, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Bianucci, S.; Billault, M.; Birbas, A.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bormuth, R.; Bouché, V.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Champion, C.; Château, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Christopoulou, B.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cocimano, R.; Coleiro, A.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; Deniskina, N.; Destelle, J.-J.; Distefano, C.; Di Capua, F.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Eberl, T.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fermani, P.; Fusco, L. A.; Gajanana, D.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Garufi, F.; Gebyehu, M.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Habel, R.; van Haren, H.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hevinga, M. A.; van der Hoek, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hugon, C.; Hößl, J.; Imbesi, M.; James, C. W.; Jansweijer, P.; Jochum, J.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Kappos, E.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Koffeman, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Korporaal, A.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Le Provost, H.; Leismüller, K. P.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Löhner, H.; Lonardo, A.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manolopoulos, K.; Margiotta, A.; Mariş, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Melis, K. W.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Moudden, Y.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Popa, V.; Pradier, Th.; Priede, M.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sciacca, V.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Tézier, D.; Théraube, S.; Thompson, L. F.; Timmer, P.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Vernin, P.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Werneke, P.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; van Wooning, R. H. L.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Zwart, A.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80 km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is described. This procedure is based on the measured coincidences produced in the sea by the ^{40}K background light and can easily be expanded to a detector with several thousands of optical modules. The time offsets between the different optical modules are obtained using LED nanobeacons mounted inside them. A set of data corresponding to 600 h of livetime was analysed. The results show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the expected optical background and the signal from atmospheric muons. An almost background-free sample of muons was selected by filtering the time correlated signals on all the three optical modules. The zenith angle of the selected muons was reconstructed with a precision of about 3°.

  10. Weighted vowel prototypes in Finnish and German.

    PubMed

    Savela, Janne; Eerola, Osmo; Aaltonen, Olli

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the perceptual vowel space of the Finnish and German languages, which have a similar vowel system with eight vowels, /ɑ/ /e/ /i/ /o/ /u/ /y/ /æ∼ε/ /ø/. Three different prototypicality measures are used for describing the internal structuring of the vowel categories in terms of the F1 and F2 formant frequencies: The arithmetic mean (centroid) of the F1-F2 space of the category (Pc), the absolute prototype of the category (Pa), and the weighted prototype of the category (Pω), in which the stimulus formant values are weighted by their goodness rating values. The study gave the following main results: (1) in both languages, the inter-subject differences were the smallest in Pω, and on the order of Difference Limen (DL) of F1-F2 frequencies for all of the three measures, (2) the Pa and Pω differed significantly from the centroid, with the absolute prototypes being the most peripheric, (3) the vowel systems of the two languages were similar (Euclidean distances in Pω of Finnish and German 7-34 mels) although minor differences were found in /e/, / ø/, and /u/, and (4) the mean difference of the prototypes from some earlier published production data was 100-150 mels.

  11. Prototyping for surgical and prosthetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Murillo Rezende; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Moreno, Amália; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Haddad, Marcela Filié

    2011-05-01

    Techniques of rapid prototyping were introduced in the 1980s in the field of engineering for the fabrication of a solid model based on a computed file. After its introduction in the biomedical field, several applications were raised for the fabrication of models to ease surgical planning and simulation in implantology, neurosurgery, and orthopedics, as well as for the fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. Hence, the literature has described the evolution of rapid prototyping technique in health care, which allowed easier technique, improved surgical results, and fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. Accordingly, a literature review on MEDLINE (PubMed) database was conducted using the keywords rapid prototyping, surgical planning, and maxillofacial prostheses and based on articles published from 1981 to 2010. After reading the titles and abstracts of the articles, 50 studies were selected owing to their correlations with the aim of the current study. Several studies show that the prototypes have been used in different dental-medical areas such as maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery; implantology; neurosurgery; orthopedics; scaffolds of ceramic, polymeric, and metallic materials; and fabrication of personalized maxillofacial prostheses. Therefore, prototyping has been an indispensable tool in several studies and helpful for surgical planning and fabrication of prostheses and implants.

  12. The energy performance of prototype holographic glazings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Furler, R.; Lee, E. S.; Selkowitz, S.; Rubin, M.

    1993-02-01

    We report on the simulation of the energy performance of prototype holographic glazings in commercial office buildings in a California climate. These prototype glazings, installed above conventional side windows, are designed to diffract the transmitted solar radiation and reflect it off the ceiling, providing adequate daylight illumination for typical office tasks up to 10m from the window. In this study, we experimentally determined a comprehensive set of solar-optical properties and characterized the contribution of the prototype holographic glazings to workplane illuminance in a scale model of a typical office space. We then used the scale model measurements to simulate the energy performance of the holographic glazings over the course of an entire year for four window orientations (North, East, South and West) for the inland Los Angeles climate, using the DOE-2.lD building energy analysis computer program. The results of our experimental analyses indicate that these prototype holographic glazings diffract only a small fraction of the incident light. The results of this study indicate that these prototype holographic glazings will not save energy in commercial office buildings. Their performance is very similar to that of clear glass, which, through side windows, cannot efficiently illuminate more than a 4-6 m depth of a building's perimeter, because the cooling penalties due to solar heat gain are greater than the electric lighting savings due to daylighting.

  13. Heterogeneous face recognition using kernel prototype similarities.

    PubMed

    Klare, Brendan F; Jain, Anil K

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous face recognition (HFR) involves matching two face images from alternate imaging modalities, such as an infrared image to a photograph or a sketch to a photograph. Accurate HFR systems are of great value in various applications (e.g., forensics and surveillance), where the gallery databases are populated with photographs (e.g., mug shot or passport photographs) but the probe images are often limited to some alternate modality. A generic HFR framework is proposed in which both probe and gallery images are represented in terms of nonlinear similarities to a collection of prototype face images. The prototype subjects (i.e., the training set) have an image in each modality (probe and gallery), and the similarity of an image is measured against the prototype images from the corresponding modality. The accuracy of this nonlinear prototype representation is improved by projecting the features into a linear discriminant subspace. Random sampling is introduced into the HFR framework to better handle challenges arising from the small sample size problem. The merits of the proposed approach, called prototype random subspace (P-RS), are demonstrated on four different heterogeneous scenarios: 1) near infrared (NIR) to photograph, 2) thermal to photograph, 3) viewed sketch to photograph, and 4) forensic sketch to photograph.

  14. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A new 'Smart Skin' antenna, shown here on top of the right vertical stabilizer of an F/A-18 research aircraft, showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  15. F-18 SRA in flight with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this modified F/A-18 aircraft as a testbed to validate a number of technical innovations in aircraft control and data systems. A recent experiment flown aboard Dryden's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) involved a new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted in the tip of the right vertical fin of the highly-modified aircraft (shown here). The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  16. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The vertical stabilizers in NASA's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft are no longer mirror images of each other. A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted on the tip of the right vertical fin of the modified F/A-18 aircraft showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on Dryden's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  17. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted on the tip of the right vertical fin of an F/A-18 aircraft showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  18. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Bob Cummings, a technician at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, checks out a new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted on the tip of the right vertical fin of Dryden's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft. Recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  19. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  20. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  1. Azomethine diimides end-capped with anthracene moieties: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa; Grucela, Marzena; Malecki, Grzegorz; Kotowicz, Sonia; Siwy, Mariola; Janeczek, Henryk; Golba, Sylwia; Praski, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    New arylene bisimide derivatives containing imine linkages and anthracene units were synthesized. Azomethine diimides were prepared via condensation reaction of 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and diamines with phthalic diimide or naphthalene diimide core and Schiff base linkers. They were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesized compounds exhibited high resistance against thermal decomposition up to 400 °C. Investigated compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry studies. The photoluminescence measurements of synthesized compounds in solid state as thin film on glass substrate revealed their ability to emission of the blue light with quantum yield efficiency about 2%. The electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of prepared azomethine diimides were also calculated by the density functional theory (DFT). The electrical properties of the diimide derivatives were preliminary investigated by current-voltage measurements.

  2. Phosphorescent platinum(ii) alkynyls end-capped with benzothiazole units.

    PubMed

    Lara, Rebeca; Lalinde, Elena; Moreno, M Teresa

    2017-03-22

    Symmetric trans-bis(alkynyl)bis(phosphine) Pt(II) complexes based on the 2-phenylbenzothiazole (pbt) unit [trans-Pt(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-pbt)2L2] [L = PPh31, PEt32, 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) 3] and the mixed alkynyl-cyanide anionic complex (NBu4)2[trans-Pt(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-pbt)2(CN)2] (4) were synthesized. The complexes have been fully characterized including X-ray crystallography for 2 and 4. All complexes display long-lived emission with moderate quantum yields (ϕ 6.8-22.6%) in doped PMMA films at 298 K and complex 4 is also emissive in DMSO fluid and in rigid media (solid, glass at 77 K). Complex 4 displays a negative solvatochromic behavior. Absorption and emission energies have been analyzed by means of linear solvation energy based on Kamlet-Taft solvatochromism parameters and the Gutmann's acceptor numbers. The study indicates that solvatochromism is due to the contribution of solvent-to-cyanide hydrogen bonding and increased solvent dipolarity-polarizability. TD and TD-DFT calculations were performed on the ground and excited states of two different conformers of 2 and 4 to provide insight into the structural, electronic and optical properties of these systems.

  3. Fluorine End-Capped Optical Fibers for Photosensitizer Release and Singlet Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Bartusik, Dorota; Aebisher, David; Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Greer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The usefulness of a fiber optic technique for generating singlet oxygen and releasing the pheophorbide photosensitizer has been increased by the fluorination of the porous Vycor glass tip. Singlet oxygen emerges through the fiber tip with 669-nm light and oxygen, releasing the sensitizer molecules upon a [2 + 2] addition of singlet oxygen with the ethene spacer and scission of a dioxetane intermediate. Switching from a non-fluorinated to a fluorinated glass tip led to a clear reduction of the adsorbtive affinity of the departing sensitizer with improved release into homogeneous toluene solution and bovine tissue. But no difference was found in water since the sensitizer was insoluble. High surface coverage of the nonafluorohexylsilane enhanced the cleavage efficiency by 15% at the ethene site. The fluorosilane groups also caused crowding and seemed to reduce access of 1O2 to the ethene site, which attenuated the total quenching rate constant kT, although there was less wasted 1O2 (from surface physical quenching) at the fluorosilane-coated than the native SiOH silica. The observations support a quenching mechanism that the replacement of the SiOH groups for the fluorosilane C-H and C-F groups enhanced the 1O2 lifetime at the fiber tip interface due to less efficient electronic-to-vibronic energy transfer. PMID:22546013

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Naphthalene End-Capped Divinylbenzene for OTFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Jin; Kim, Sul Ong; Jung, Sung Ouk; Yi, Mi-Hye; Kim, Yun-Hi; Kwon, Soon-Ki

    2009-09-01

    An organic field-effect transistor was fabricated based on a thin film of 1,4-bis-(2-naphthalen-2-ylvinyl)benzene (BNDV). The organic semiconductor was deposited via thermal evaporation on a chemically modified silicon dioxide surface. The thermal, optical, electronic, and surface properties of the BNDV compound were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption, photoluminescence spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. The BNDV had good oxidation stability and exhibited a field-effect performance with a mobility of 0.062 cm2/V s, a subthreshold slope of 0.4 V, and an on/off ratio of 2.45 × 105.

  5. Tropomodulin isoforms regulate thin filament pointed-end capping and skeletal muscle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Lewis, Raymond A.; McKeown, Caroline R.; Nowak, Roberta B.; Kim, Nancy E.; Littlefield, Ryan S.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    During myofibril assembly, thin filament lengths are precisely specified to optimize skeletal muscle function. Tropomodulins (Tmods) are capping proteins that specify thin filament lengths by controlling actin dynamics at pointed ends. In this study, we use a genetic targeting approach to explore the effects of deleting Tmod1 from skeletal muscle. Myofibril assembly, skeletal muscle structure, and thin filament lengths are normal in the absence of Tmod1. Tmod4 localizes to thin filament pointed ends in Tmod1-null embryonic muscle, whereas both Tmod3 and -4 localize to pointed ends in Tmod1-null adult muscle. Substitution by Tmod3 and -4 occurs despite their weaker interactions with striated muscle tropomyosins. However, the absence of Tmod1 results in depressed isometric stress production during muscle contraction, systemic locomotor deficits, and a shift to a faster fiber type distribution. Thus, Tmod3 and -4 compensate for the absence of Tmod1 structurally but not functionally. We conclude that Tmod1 is a novel regulator of skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:20368620

  6. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The vertical stabilizers in NASA's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft are no longer mirror images of each other. A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted on the tip of the right vertical fin of the modified F/A-18 aircraft showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on Dryden's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  7. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1997-12-01

    A capsule is described containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  8. Prototyping virtual cancer therapist (VCT): a software engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Gaudiot, J-L; Cristini, V

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes the virtual cancer therapist (VCT), a scalable and robust cancer expert system that makes cancer diagnosis, recommends therapy plans, and simulates therapy plans in silico. This system consists of an evaluation core that makes prognosis and chemotherapy simulations, a biomedical database that supports therapy planning, and an optimizer module that makes cancer diagnosis and produces queries for the optimal therapy plans. With the support of its patient record database and simulation core, VCT can also be used to establish an in silico drug discovery standard that dramatically reduces the drug discovery timeline and cost. The prototype of VCT presented in this paper has not only demonstrated the capability of VCT but also identified problems that need to be addressed in the next cycle of development.

  9. Prototype sector production for the STAR inner TPC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is upgrading the Inner TPC sectors (iTPC). By increasing the number of inner pad rows from 13 to 40 and renewing the inner sector wires, this major detector upgrade will improve the rapidity coverage from |η| < 1 to |η| < 1.5, provide better momentum resolution, and better energy loss (dE/dx) resolution. The iTPC upgrade is crucial to STAR Beam Energy Scan Phase II (BES- II) program, which will provide in-depth understanding on QCD phase diagram and in-medium modification. In this paper we report on progress on the iTPC sector construction. The iTPC module fabrication techniques and testing results from the first full size prototype are presented.

  10. Design of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.

    1995-10-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  11. Design of a relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.; Houck, T.; Yu, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Henestroza, E.; Li, H.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1995-04-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  12. An FPGA-based rapid prototyping platform for wavelet coprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Alonzo; Meyer-Baese, Uwe; Pattichis, Marios

    2007-04-01

    MatLab/Simulink-based design flows are being used by DSP designers to improve time-to-market of FPGA implementations. 1 Commonly, digital signal processing cores are integrated in an embedded system as coprocessors. Existing CAD tools do not fully address the integration of a DSP coprocessor into an embedded system design. This integration might prove to be time consuming and error prone. It also requires that the DSP designer has an excellent knowledge of embedded systems and computer architecture details. We present a prototyping platform and design flow that allows rapid integration of embedded systems with a wavelet coprocessor. The platform comprises of software and hardware modules that allow a DSP designer a painless integration of a coprocessor with a PowerPC-based embedded system. The platform has a wide range of applications, from industrial to educational environments.

  13. Prototype Focal-Plane-Array Optoelectronic Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Shaw, Timothy; Yu, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    Prototype very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) planar array of optoelectronic processing elements combines speed of optical input and output with flexibility of reconfiguration (programmability) of electronic processing medium. Basic concept of processor described in "Optical-Input, Optical-Output Morphological Processor" (NPO-18174). Performs binary operations on binary (black and white) images. Each processing element corresponds to one picture element of image and located at that picture element. Includes input-plane photodetector in form of parasitic phototransistor part of processing circuit. Output of each processing circuit used to modulate one picture element in output-plane liquid-crystal display device. Intended to implement morphological processing algorithms that transform image into set of features suitable for high-level processing; e.g., recognition.

  14. e-Health prototype system for cardiac telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Vargas Escobar, Laura Juliana; Salinas, Sergio Alexander

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the approach of an e-health system for cardiac telemonitoring which uses the development board LinkIt ONE as a monitoring system. Such board was adapted to measure the cardiac pulse, analyze it and determine whether a person is having a cardiac arrhythmia or not. When an arrhythmia appears, the prototype activates an alarm in order to report the patient's condition and its location to a caregiver or a close healthcare center. The data of the cardiac pulse is originated in an e-health sensor platform connected to an Arduino. Location data comes from a GPS module in the aforementioned board which is connected by WiFi with the virtual platform UBIDOTS. It provides visual information about the variables measured, the patient's location and the alarms; keeping the patient's caregiver or the healthcare center constantly informed.

  15. 16 CFR 1633.4 - Prototype testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prototype testing requirements. 1633.4... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS The Standard § 1633.4 Prototype testing... prototype, unless the manufacturer complies with the prototype pooling and confirmation testing...

  16. Acemind new indoor full duplex optical wireless communication prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Olivier; Perrufel, Micheline; Topsu, Suat; Guan, Hongyu

    2016-09-01

    For over a century and Mr. Guglielmo Marconi invention, systems using radio waves have controlled over wireless telecommunication solutions; from Amplitude Modulation (AM) radio products to satellite communications for instance. But beyond an increasingly negative opinion face to radio waves and radio spectrum availability more and more reduced; there is an unprecedented opportunity with LED installation in displays and lighting to provide optical wireless communication solutions. As a result, technologically mature solutions are already commercially available for services such as Location Based Services (LBS), broadcast diffusion or Intelligent Transport Services (ITS). Pending finalization of the standard review process IEEE 802.15.7 r1, our paper presents the results of the European collaborative project named "ACEMIND". It offers an indoor bilateral optical wireless communication prototype having the following characteristics: use of the existing electrical infrastructure, through judicious combination with Light Fidelity (LiFi), Power Line Communication (PLC) and Ethernet to reduce the implementation cost. We propose a bilateral optical wireless communication even when the light is switched off by using Visible Light Communication (VLC) and Infra-Red Communication (IRC) combined to a remote optical switch. Dimensionally optimized LiFi module is presented in order to offer the possibility for integration inside a laptop. Finally, there is operational mechanism implementation such as OFDM/DMT to increase throughput. After the introduction, we will present the results of a market study from Orange Labs customers about their opinion on LiFi components. Then we will detail the LiFi prototype, from the physical layer aspect to MAC layer before concluding on commercial development prospects.

  17. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  18. Advance prototype silver ion water bactericide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Allen, E. T.

    1974-01-01

    An advance prototype unit was designed and fabricated to treat anticipated fuel cell water. The unit is a single canister that contains a membrane-type prefilter and a silver bromide contacting bed. A seven day baseline simulated mission test was performed; the performance was satisfactory and the effluent water was within all specifications for potability. After random vibrations another seven day simulated mission test was performed, and results indicate that simulated launch vibrations have no effects on the design and performance of the advanced prototype. Bench tests and accelerated breadboard tests were conducted to define the characteristics of an upgraded model of the advance prototype unit which would have 30 days of operating capability. A preliminary design of a silver ion generator for the shuttle orbiter was also prepared.

  19. NASA DFRC Practices for Prototype Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the practices that Dryden uses for qualification of the prototypes of aircraft. There are many views of aircraft that Dryden has worked with. Included is a discussion of basic considerations for strength, a listing of standards and references, a discussion of typical safety of flight approaches, a discussion of the prototype design, using the X-29A as an example, and requirements for new shapes (i.e., the DAST-ARW1 , F-8 Super Critical Wing, AFTI/F-111 MAW), new control laws (i.e., AAW F-18), new operating envelope (i.e., F-18 HARV), limited sope add-on or substitute structure (i.e., SR-71 LASRE, ECLIPSE, F-16XL SLFC), and extensively modified or replaced structure (i.e., SOFIA, B747SP). There is a listing of causes for the failure of the prototype.

  20. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  1. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jokstad, Håkon; McDonald, Rob

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  2. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper.

  3. Preliminary test results of LAr prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei-Xian; Guan, Meng-Yun; Yang, Chang-Gen; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Chang; Zhang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Cong; Wang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Liquid argon (LAr) is an attractive target for the direct detection of WIMPs. A LAr prototype detector was designed to study the technology and properties of LAr detectors. The prototype detector had an active volume containing 0.65 kg of liquid argon. A liquid nitrogen (LN) cooling system allowed the temperature fluctuation of the liquid argon to be controlled within less than 0.1 K during a one month run. In the 22Na calibration run, the LAr prototype obtained 1.59±0.02 p.e./keV light yield for 511 keV gamma rays using a domestic-made argon purification system. Supported by China Ministry of Science and Technology (2010CB833003), National Nature Science Foundation of China, Youth Science Found (11305188)

  4. Performance of the SDHCAL technological prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, G.

    2016-07-01

    The SDHCAL technological prototype is a 1 × 1 × 1.3 m3 high-granularity Semi-Digital Hadronic CALorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chambers as sensitive medium. It is one of the two HCAL options considered by the ILD Collaboration to be proposed for the detector of the future International Linear Collider project. The prototype is made of up to 50 GRPC detectors of 1 m2 size and 3 mm thickness each with an embedded semi-digital electronics readout that is autotriggering and power-pulsed. The GRPC readout is finely segmented into pads of 1 cm2. This proceeding describes the prototype, its operation and its performance in energy reconstruction. Aspects of the GRPC readout modelling and comparisons with simulations are also presented.

  5. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  6. Modulated Elliptical Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel modulated slot design has been proposed and tested. The proposed slot is aimed to replace the inefficient small dipoles used in conventional MST-based imaging systems. The developed slot is very attractive as MST array element due to its small size and high efficiency/modulation depth. In fact, the developed slot has been successfully used to implement the first prototype of a microwave camera operating at 24 GHZ. It is also being used in the design of the second generation of the camera. Finally, the designed elliptical slot can be used as an electronically controlled waveguide iris for many other purposes (for instance in constructing waveguide reflective phase shifters and multiplexers/switches).

  7. Design Considerations for Lightweight Space Radiators Based on Fabrication and Test Experience with a Carbon-Carbon Composite Prototype Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    This report discusses the design implications for spacecraft radiators made possible by the successful fabrication and Proof-of-concept testing of a graphite-fiber-carbon-matrix composite (i.e., carbon-carbon (C-C)) heat pipe. The proto-type heat pipe, or space radiator element, consists of a C-C composite shell with integrally woven fins. It has a thin-walled furnace-brazed metallic (Nb-1%Zr) liner with end caps for containment of the potassium working fluid. A short extension of this liner, at increased wall thickness beyond the C-C shell, forms the heat pipe evaporator section which is in thermal contact with the radiator fluid that needs to be cooled. From geometric and thermal transport properties of the C-C composite heat pipe tested, a specific radiator mass of 1.45 kg/m2 can be derived. This is less than one-fourth the specific mass of present day satellite radiators. The report also discusses the advantage of segmented space radiator designs utilizing heat pipe elements, or segments, in their survivability to micro-meteoroid damage. This survivability is further raised by the use of condenser sections with attached fins, which also improve the radiation heat transfer rate. Since the problem of heat radiation from a fin does not lend itself to a closed analytical solution, a derivation of the governing differential equation and boundary conditions is given in appendix A, along with solutions for rectangular and parabolic fin profile geometries obtained by use of a finite difference computer code written by the author.

  8. Design Considerations for Lightweight Space Radiators Based on Fabrication and Test Experience With a Carbon-Carbon Composite Prototype Heat Pipe. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    This report discusses the design implications for spacecraft radiators made possible by the successful fabrication and proof-of-concept testing of a graphite-fiber-carbon-matrix composite (i.e., carbon-carbon (C-C)) heat pipe. The prototype heat pipe, or space radiator element, consists of a C-C composite shell with integrally woven fins. It has a thin-walled furnace-brazed metallic (Nb-1%Zr) liner with end caps for containment of the potassium working fluid. A short extension of this liner, at increased wall thickness beyond the C-C shell, forms the heat pipe evaporator section which is in thermal contact with the radiator fluid that needs to be cooled. From geometric and thermal transport properties of the C-C composite heat pipe tested, a specific radiator mass of 1.45 kg/sq m can be derived. This is less than one-fourth the specific mass of present day satellite radiators. The report also discusses the advantage of segmented space radiator designs utilizing heat pipe elements, or segments, in their survivability to micrometeoroid damage. This survivability is further raised by the use of condenser sections with attached fins, which also improve the radiation heat transfer rate. Since the problem of heat radiation from a fin does not lend itself to a closed analytical solution, a derivation of the governing differential equation and boundary conditions is given in appendix A, along with solutions for rectangular and parabolic fin profile geometries obtained by use of a finite difference computer code written by the author.

  9. Prototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Zimmerman successfully operated a point-Contact Nb SQUID on a four- stage stirling cycle cryocooler with a mechanical drive power of approxi- mately 15...AD-ADL2 622 LAKE SHORE CRYOTRONICS INC WESTERVILLE OH F/6 13/1 PROTOTYPE LOW TEMPERATURE LOW POWER CRYOCOOLER ,(U) FE13 82 W G P IERC E N0001INROC...pPrototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler // It by Warren G. Pierce February 1982 Prepared under Contract No. N00014-80-C-0825 by LAKE SHORE

  10. Design and prototyping of micro centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuki, Shimpei; Minorikawa, Gaku; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Asaga, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naoki; Ohta, Yutaka; Outa, Eisuke

    2003-02-01

    In order to establish the design methodology of ultra micro centrifugal compressor, which is the most important component of ultra micro gas turbine unit, a 10 times of the final target size model was designed, prototyped and tested. The problems to be solved for downsizing were examined and 2-dimensional impeller was chosen as the first model due to its productivity. The conventional 1D prediction method, CFD and the inverse design were attempted. The prototyped compressor was driven by using a turbocharger and the performance characteristics were measured.

  11. RK-TBA prototype RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.; Anderson, D.; Giordano, G.

    1996-04-11

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Specific details of the induction core tests and pulsed power system are presented. The 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction is also described in detail.

  12. Accelerator Tests of the KLEM Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Baranova, N.; Christl, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Chupin, I.; Derrickson, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) device is planned for direct measurement of the elemental energy spectra of high-energy (10(exp 11)-10(exp 16) eV) cosmic rays. The first KLEM prototype has been tested at CERN with 180 GeV pion beam in 2001. A modified KLEM prototype will be tested in proton and heavy ion beams to give more experimental data on energy resolution and charge resolution with KLEM method. The first test results are presented and compared with simulations.

  13. From research plots to prototype biomass plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, W.A.; Vanstone, B.J.; Gambles, R.L.; Zsuffa, L.

    1993-12-31

    The development of biomass energy plantations is now expanding from the research plot phase into the next level of development at larger scale plantings. This is necessary to provide: more accurate information on biomass yields, realistic production cost figures, venues to test harvesting equipment, demonstration sites for potential producers, and a supply of feedstock for prototype conversion facilities. The paper will discuss some of these objectives and some of the challenges encountered in the scale-up process associated with a willow prototype plantation project currently under development in Eastern Canada.

  14. Operational prototyping a tool for delivering value.

    PubMed

    Flink, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Operational prototyping is a disciplined approach to developing best practices that enable an organization to enhance value through improved quality of care and reduced costs. The aim of operational prototyping is to fine-tune performance to the level of best practices by considering every element involved in a care process, including the design of the facilities required to support the process. The broad goal of this approach is to be able to standardize and replicate the identified best practices in every location across a health system.

  15. Evaluation of the Oxygen Concentrator Prototypes: Pressure Swing Adsorption Prototype and Electrochemical Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilkey, Kelly M.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    An oxygen concentrator is needed to provide enriched oxygen in support of medical contingency operations for future exploration human spaceflight programs. It would provide continuous oxygen to an ill or injured crew member in a closed cabin environment. Oxygen concentration technology is being pursued to concentrate oxygen from the ambient environment so oxygen as a consumable resource can be reduced. Because oxygen is a critical resource in manned spaceflight, using an oxygen concentrator to pull oxygen out of the ambient environment instead of using compressed oxygen can provide better optimization of resources. The overall goal of this project is to develop an oxygen concentrator module that minimizes the hardware mass, volume, and power footprint while still performing at the required clinical capabilities. Should a medical event occur that requires patient oxygenation, the release of 100 percent oxygen into a small closed cabin environment can rapidly raise oxygen levels to the vehicles fire limit. The use of an oxygen concentrator to enrich oxygen from the ambient air and concentrate it to the point where it can be used for medical purposes means no oxygen is needed from the ultra-high purity (99.5+% O2) oxygen reserve tanks. By not adding oxygen from compressed tanks to the cabin environment, oxygen levels can be kept below the vehicle fire limit thereby extending the duration of care provided to an oxygenated patient without environmental control system intervention to keep the cabin oxygen levels below the fire limits. The oxygen concentrator will be a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearable device. A demonstration unit for the International Space Station (ISS) is planned to verify the technology and provide oxygen capability. For the ISS, the demonstration unit should not exceed 10 kg (approximately 22 lb), which is the soft stowage mass limit for launch on resupply vehicles for the ISS. The unit's size should allow for transport within the

  16. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. ); Hutchison, G. ); Nowlan, M.J. )

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Analysis of quench in the NHMFL REBCO prototype coils for the 32 T Magnet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, M.; Cavallucci, L.; Ribani, P. L.; Gavrilin, A. V.; Weijers, H. W.

    2016-05-01

    A 32 T all-superconductive magnet with high field REBCO inner coils is under development at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. As part of the development activity, two prototype coils with full scale radial dimensions and final design features, but with reduced axial length were constructed. The prototype coils consist of six dry-wound double pancakes modules with uninsulated conductor and insulated stainless steel cowind. Quench studies on one of the prototype coils at 4.2 K in self-field and in a background magnetic field of 15 T were performed by activating a set of quench protection heaters. In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the experimental results of the quench tests of one of the prototype coils. The numerical analysis was carried out through a coupled electro-thermal FEM model developed at the University of Bologna. The model is based on the coupling with distributed contact resistances of the coil pancakes described as 2D elements. A homogenization procedure of the REBCO tape and other coil materials is presented, which allows reducing the number of degrees of freedom and the computational effort. The model is applied to the analysis of the current and voltage evolutions during the experimental quench tests on the prototype coil.

  18. The prototype readout electronics system for the External Target Experiment in CSR of HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Kang, L.; Li, M.; Liu, S.; Zhou, J.; An, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A prototype readout electronics system was designed for the External Target Experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The kernel parts include the 128-channel 100 ps high-resolution time digitization module, the 16-channel 25 ps high-resolution time and charge measurement module, and the trigger electronics, as well as the clock generation circuits, which are all integrated within the PXI-6U crate. The laboratory test results indicate that a good resolution is achieved, better than the requirement. We also have conducted initial commissioning tests with the detectors to confirm the functions of the system. Through the research of this prototype electronics, preparation for the future extended system is made.

  19. A novel low-cost sensor prototype for monitoring temperature during wine fermentation in tanks.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Beatriz; Antolín, Jonathan; López-Coronado, Miguel; de Castro, Carlos

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents a multipurpose and low cost sensor for temperature control over the wine fermentation process, in order to steadily communicate data through wireless modules in real time to a viticulturist's mobile or fixed device. The advantage of our prototype is due to the fact that it will be used by small winemakers in the "Ribera del Duero" area, and as it is a cheaper sensor and easy to use for the control and monitoring of the grape fermentation process, it will probably be used by other business men with the same necessities in the region. The microcontroller MSP430G2553 is among the components that make up the sensor, that are integrated onto a motherboard. It communicates with the RN-42 Bluetooth module through an UART interface. After verifying that all elements are working correctly, the parts are assembled to form the final prototype. This device has been tested in a winery in the region, fulfilling the initial project specifications.

  20. Modulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth efficient digital modulation techniques, proposed for use on and/or applied to satellite channels, are reviewed. In a survey of recent works on digital modulation techniques, the performance of several schemes operating in various environments are compared. Topics covered include: (1) quadrature phase shift keying; (2) offset - QPSK and MSK; (3) combined modulation and coding; and (4) spectrally efficient modulation techniques.

  1. Single waveguide silicon-organic hybrid modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Niklas; Rothe, Christian; Celik, Arda; Félix Rosa, María; Vogel, Wolfgang; Widmann, Daniel; Rathgeber, Lotte; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Villacampa, Belén; Ludwigs, Sabine; Berroth, Manfred

    2017-09-01

    We present a novel silicon-organic hybrid modulator based on an integrated dual-mode interferometer. The modulator offers a compact, simplified design and enhanced robustness to on-chip fluctuations of temperature compared to conventional Mach-Zehnder based systems. A prototype modulator showing a voltage dependent transmission spectrum is obtained by cladding a dual-mode waveguide in a 250 nm silicon-on-insulator technology with a customized organic electro-optic layer. Estimated phase shifts and corresponding figures of merit are discussed in this contribution. The used organic layer is based on the guest-host approach with customized donor-π-acceptor chromophore embedded and poled in a poly(methylmethacrylate) matrix. The presented prototype is to the best of the authors' knowledge the first integrated single waveguide silicon-organic hybrid modulator.

  2. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports are given on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacturing, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  3. Design data brochure: SIMS prototype system 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information is provided on the design and performance of the IBM SIMS Prototype System 2, solar domestic hot water system, for single family residences. The document provides sufficient data to permit procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance by qualified architectural engineers or contractors.

  4. A Prototype Expert System for Fishway Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Michael J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the development of a prototype expert system to recommend the most suitable type of fishway for given design conditions. Recommendations are provided on the basis of fishway hydraulics, fish passage performance, and cost requirements. An appendix provides an example consultation. (MDH)

  5. Automatic TLI recognition system beta prototype testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the beta prototype automatic target recognition system ATR3, and some performance tests done with this system. This is a fully operational system, with a high computational speed. It is useful for findings any kind of target in digitized image data, and as a general purpose image analysis tool.

  6. Desktop Prototyping of Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.

    2000-03-30

    It has been shown possible to prepare nanoscale nickel oxide by the NRC plasma process. Dispersion were successfully made from the nickel oxide that could be ink-jetted using Sanders International ModelMaker equipment. Ink-jetted layers were sintered to nickel metal thus demonstrating the feasibility of desktop prototyping of metal and alloy miniature components.

  7. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  8. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  9. Conceptual Design of a Prototype LSST Database

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Cook, K H; Abdulla, G; Brase, J

    2004-10-07

    This document describes a preliminary design for Prototype LSST Database (LSST DB). They identify key components and data structures and provide an expandable conceptual schema for the database. The authors discuss the potential user applications and post-processing algorithm to interact with the database, and give a set of example queries.

  10. Prototype air flat-plate solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Four reports trace development from preliminary design through delivery of hardware. Developmental test, including airflow, air temperature, and efficiency are discussed in reports, as are qualification tests on prototypes and final acceptance tests. Qualification test program includes measurements tests, and structural analysis.

  11. Web tools for rapid experimental visualization prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jonathan W.; Livingstion, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Quite often a researcher finds themselves looking at spreadsheets of high-dimensional data generated by experimental models and user studies. We can use analysis to challenge or confirm hypothesis, but unexpected results can easily be lost in the shuffle. For this reason, it would be useful to visualize the results so we can explore our data and make new discoveries. Web browsers have become increasingly capable for creating complex, multi-view applications. Javascript is quickly becoming a de facto standard for scripting, online and offline. This work demonstrates the use of web technologies as a powerful tool for rapid visualization prototyping. We have developed two prototypes: One for high-dimensional results of the abELICIT - multi-agent version of the ELICIT platform tasked with collaborating to identify the parameters of a pending attack. Another prototype displays responses to a user study on the effectiveness of multi-layer visualization techniques. We created coordinated multiple views prototypes in the Google Chrome web browser written in Javascript, CSS and HTML. We will discuss the benefits and shortcomings of this approach.

  12. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  13. Marine Natural Products as Prototype Agrochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Xiaoyu; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Dunbar, D. C Harles; Perry, Tony L.; Wilkins, Scott P.; Hamann, Mark T.; Bobzin, Steve; Huesing, Joseph; Camp, Robin; Prinsen, Mike; Krupa, Dan; Wideman, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of identifying new leads that could serve as prototype agrochemical agents, 18 structurally diverse marine-derived compounds were examined for insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal activities. Several new classes of compounds have been shown to be insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal, which suggests that marine natural products represent an intriguing source for the discovery of new agrochemical agents. PMID:12670165

  14. Classroom Evaluation of a Rapid Prototyping System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Stephen A.; Krueger, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces rapid prototyping which creates virtual models through a variety of automated material additive processes. Relates experiences using JP System 5 in freshman and sophomore engineering design graphics courses. Analyzes strengths and limitations of the JP System 5 and discusses how to use it effectively. (Contains 15 references.)…

  15. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  16. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  17. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  18. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  19. Installation package - SIMS prototype system 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This report consists of details for the installation, operation and maintenance of a prototype heating and hot water system, designed for residential or light commercial applications. This system consists of the following subsystems: air type collectors, pebble bed thermal storage, air handling unit, air to water heat exchanger, hot water preheat tank, auxiliary energy, ducting system.

  20. NASA's Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agan, Martin; Voisinet, Leeann; Devereaux, Ann

    1998-01-01

    The objective of Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) effort is to develop and integrate advanced technologies for real-time personal display of information relevant to the health and safety of space station/shuttle personnel. The WARP effort will develop and demonstrate technologies that will ultimately be incorporated into operational Space Station systems and that have potential earth applications such as aircraft pilot alertness monitoring and in various medical and consumer environments where augmented reality is required. To this end a two phase effort will be undertaken to rapidly develop a prototype (Phase I) and an advanced prototype (Phase II) to demonstrate the following key technology features that could be applied to astronaut internal vehicle activity (IVA) and potentially external vehicle activity (EVA) as well: 1) mobile visualization, and 2) distributed information system access. Specifically, Phase I will integrate a low power, miniature wireless communication link and a commercial biosensor with a head mounted display. The Phase I design will emphasize the development of a relatively small, lightweight, and unobtrusive body worn prototype system. Phase II will put increased effort on miniaturization, power consumption reduction, increased throughput, higher resolution, and ``wire removal'' of the subsystems developed in Phase I.

  1. Rapid prototyping applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, C. L.; McCarty, G. D.; Pardo, B. T.; Bryce, E. A.

    In an effort to reduce the cycle time for producing prototypical mechanical and electro-mechanical components, Sandia National Laboratories has integrated rapid prototyping processes into the design and manufacturing process. The processes currently in operation within the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory are Stereolithography (SL), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), and Direct Shell Production Casting (DSPC). These emerging technologies have proven to be valuable tools for reducing lead times and fabrication costs. Sandia uses the SL and SLS processes to support internal product development efforts. Their primary use is to fabricate patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia-managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. The DSPC process is currently being developed as a method of fabricating ceramic investment casting molds directly from a CAD solid model. Sandia is an Alpha machine test site for this process. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. It will also provide a lead-in for a tour of the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, where these processes will be demonstrated.

  2. LSST data pipeline prototyping plans and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulla, G M; Brase, J; Cook, K; Miller, M

    2004-05-27

    In this document we describe our approach and strategy for building the prototype for the image-stream analysis data pipeline. We start by describing the main research areas upon which we will be focusing; we then describe our plans on how to carry these research ideas to implement the data pipeline.

  3. Prototype Schools Project. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    The Prototype Schools Project endeavored to design and disseminate an inservice program to expedite and facilitate desegregation in the Houston Independent School District. A ratio of 35 percent Negro to 65 percent white teachers was accomplished, or vice versa, as the individual school situation indicated. The six pilot schools in the program…

  4. Expert System Prototype for False Event Discrimination.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-14

    This report discusses a prototype expert system for event discrimination. We wanted to determine whether applying an expert system to handle and...other potential sources of erroneous information. The expert system is an apt vehicle for growth of systems knowledge, for quick decision making, and

  5. Prototyping: Increasing the Pace of Innovation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    CNC ) machines quickly mill, cut and build up material components. Combined with Field Programmable Gate Array integrated circuits, these tools...Systems Division (APSD) exemplifies the new breed of rapid prototyping labs. Outfitted with design tools and CNC machines , APSD responded to a request

  6. Prototype wood chunker used on Populus 'Tristis'

    Treesearch

    Rodger A. Arola; Roger C. Radcliffe; Sharon A. Winsauer

    1983-01-01

    Populus 'Tristis' trees grown under short-rotation, intensive culture were sampled and chunked in a prototype experimental wood chunking machine. Data presented describe the character of the trees chunked, the energy and power requirements for chunking, and the chunking rates Specific energy requirements for chunking Populus 'Tristis...

  7. Rapid prototyping applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1994-02-01

    In an effort to reduce the cycle time for producing prototypical mechanical and electro-mechanical components, Sandia National Laboratories has integrated rapid prototyping processes into the design and manufacturing process. The processes currently in operation within the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory are Stereolithography (SL), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), and Direct Shell Production Casting (DSPC). These emerging technologies have proven to be valuable tools for reducing lead times and fabrication costs. Sandia uses the SL and SLS processes to support internal product development efforts. Their primary use is to fabricate patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia-managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. The DSPC process is currently being developed as a method of fabricating ceramic investment casting molds directly from a CAD solid model. Sandia is an Alpha machine test site for this process. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. It will also provide a lead-in for a tour of the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, where these processes will be demonstrated.

  8. A Prototype Grammar Kit in Prolog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Kenneth M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a prototype of a computerized grammar kit written in PROLOG and designed for children interested in exploring language. PROLOG's advantages for building parsers, generators, translators, and question-answering systems are discussed, and a scenario of a child working on a grammar project using the kit and implementation issues are…

  9. Hazard Communication and Training. A Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a prototype hazard communication and training program for manufacturers. Discusses the necessary ingredients of such a program, including chemical inventorying, labeling hazardous chemicals, maintaining a current file of material safety data sheets, and written training programs. Includes samples of material safety data sheets, labeling…

  10. Integration of rapid prototyping into product development

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is a vertically multi-disciplined research and development laboratory with a long history of designing and developing d electro-mechanical products in the national interest. Integrating new technologies into the prototyping phase of our development cycle is necessary to reduce the cycle time from initial design to finished product. The introduction of rapid prototyping machines into the marketplace promises to revolutionize the process of producing prototype parts with relative speed and production-like quality. Issues of accuracy, feature definition, and surface finish continue to drive research and development of these processes. Sandia uses Stereolithography (SL) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) capabilities to support internal product development efforts. The primary use of SL and SLS is to produce patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. Also presented will be several examples of prototype parts manufactured using SL and SLS with a focus on application, accuracy, surface and feature definition.

  11. Operational test of the prototype peewee yarder.

    Treesearch

    Charles N. Mann; Ronald W. Mifflin

    1979-01-01

    An operational test of a small, prototype running skyline yarder was conducted early in 1978. Test results indicate that this yarder concept promises a low cost, high performance system for harvesting small logs where skyline methods are indicated. Timber harvest by thinning took place on 12 uphill and 2 downhill skyline roads, and clearcut harvesting was performed on...

  12. Acquiring Financial Management Software: A Prototyping Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John H.

    1990-01-01

    When the Smithsonian Institution recently acquired a new financial management system, the concept of prototyping was used throughout the process, but in a broader sense than in software development. It was used to refine requirements, establish software management techniques, test a logistical system, and implement and apply the package. (MSE)

  13. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Waterman, Robert D.; Oostdyk, Rebecca Lynn; Ossenfort, John P.; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The automation of pre-launch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits: improving safety, reducing cost, and reducing launch delays. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype demonstrated anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage Thrust Vector Control and for the associated ground hydraulics while the vehicle was in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and while it was on the launch pad. The prototype combines three existing tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool from Qualtech Systems Inc. for fault isolation and diagnostics. The second tool, SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine), is a rule-based expert system that was developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification, and used the outputs of SHINE as inputs to TEAMS. The third tool, IMS (Inductive Monitoring System), is an anomaly detection tool that was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The three tools were integrated and deployed to KSC, where they were interfaced with live data. This paper describes how the prototype performed during the period of time before the launch, including accuracy and computer resource usage. The paper concludes with some of the lessons that we learned from the experience of developing and deploying the prototype.

  14. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Martin, Rodney; Waterman, Robert; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Ossenfort, John; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Automating prelaunch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits. First, it potentially improves safety by detecting faults that might otherwise have been missed so that they can be corrected before launch. Second, it potentially reduces launch delays by more quickly diagnosing the cause of anomalies that occur during prelaunch processing. Reducing launch delays will be critical to the success of NASA's planned future missions that require in-orbit rendezvous. Third, it potentially reduces costs by reducing both launch delays and the number of people needed to monitor the prelaunch process. NASA is currently developing the Ares I launch vehicle to bring the Orion capsule and its crew of four astronauts to low-earth orbit on their way to the moon. Ares I-X will be the first unmanned test flight of Ares I. It is scheduled to launch on October 27, 2009. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype is a prototype ground diagnostic system that will provide anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage thrust vector control (TVC) and for the associated ground hydraulics while it is in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and on the launch pad. It will serve as a prototype for a future operational ground diagnostic system for Ares I. The prototype combines three existing diagnostic tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool that is commercially produced by Qualtech Systems, Inc. It uses a qualitative model of failure propagation to perform fault isolation and diagnostics. We adapted an existing TEAMS model of the TVC to use for diagnostics and developed a TEAMS model of the ground hydraulics. The second tool, Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE), is a rule-based expert system developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification. The prototype

  15. Illuminance and luminance distributions of a prototype ambient illumination system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullican, R. C.; Hayes, B. C.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of research conducted in the late 1970's indicate that perceptual qualities of an enclosure can be influenced by the distribution of illumination within the enclosure. Subjective impressions such as spaciousness, perceptual clarity, and relaxation or tenseness, among others, appear to be related to different combinations of surface luminance. A prototype indirect ambient illumination system was developed which will allow crew members to alter surface luminance distributions within an enclosed module, thus modifying perceptual cues to match crew preferences. A traditional lensed direct lighting system was compared to the prototype utilizing the full-scale mockup of Space Station Freedom developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. The direct lensed system was installed in the habitation module with the indirect prototype deployed in the U.S. laboratory module. Analysis centered on the illuminance and luminance distributions resultant from these systems and the implications of various luminaire spacing options. All test configurations were evaluated for compliance with NASA Standard 3000, Man-System Integration Standards.

  16. Operation and results of the prototype KM3NeT detection unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Simone

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT will be a km3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The detector will consist of blocks of about one hundred detection units. Each detection unit will host 18 digital optical modules, connected along a 700 m-long vertical structure. Electro-optical cables allow for data transmission and power supply to the optical modules. The optical module comprises 31 photomultiplier tubes of 3'', instruments to monitor environmental variables and electronic boards to communicate onshore and operate the photomultipliers. A prototype detection unit has been deployed in May 2014 at the KM3NeT-It installation site 80 km SE offshore of Capo Passero, Sicily. This prototype allowed to test the deployment procedures, the mechanics and the electronic of the apparatus, the data taking and analysis procedures. A general description of the detector and some results of the prototype are presented. The first detection unit of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be deployed and become operative by the end of 2015.

  17. SOAR telescope control system: a rapid prototype and development in LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashe, Michael C.; Schumacher, German

    2000-06-01

    A Rapid Prototype and full development plan of the SOAR TCS is reviewed to show advances in: (1) Prototyping speed, which makes implementation and test of features faster than specification under older methods. This allows the development environment and prototype modules to become partners with and part of the specification documents. (2) Real-Time performance and reliability through use of RT Linux. (3) Visually Rich GUI development that allows an emphasis on `seeing' versus `reading'. (4) Long-Term DataLogging and Internet subscription service of all desired variables with instant recall of historical trend data. (5) A `plug-in' software architecture which enables rapid reconfiguration and reuse of the system and/or plug-ins utilizing LabVIEW graphical modules, a scripting language engine (in LabVIEW) and encapsulation of interfaces in `instrument-driver' style `plug-in' modules. (6) A platform- independent development environment and distributed architecture allowing secure internet observation and control via every major OS and hardware platform.

  18. Construction and Design of a full size sTGC prototype for the ATLAS New Small Wheel upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    For the forthcoming Phase-I upgrade to the LHC (2018/19), the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system, Small Wheel, will need to be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have to operate in a high background radiation region while reconstructing muon tracks with high precision as well as furnishing information for the Level-1 trigger. In particular, the precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm, and the Level-1 trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The NSW will have two chamber technologies, one primarily devoted to the Level-1 trigger function the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) and one dedicated to precision tracking, Micromegas detectors, (MM). The single sTGC planes of a quadruplet consists of an anode layer of 50 μm gold plated tungsten wire sandwiched between two resistive cathode layers. Behind one of the resistive cathode layers, a PCB with precise machined strips (thus the name sTGC's) spaced every 3.2 mm allows to achieve the position resolution that ranges from 70 to 150 μm, depending on the incident particle angle. Behind the second cathode, a PCB that contains an arrangement of pads, allows for a fast coincidence between successive sTGC layers to tag the passage of a track and reads only the corresponding strips for triggering. To be able to profit from the high accuracy of each of the sTGC planes for trigger purposes, their relative geometrical position between planes has to be controlled to within a precision of about 40 μm in their parallelism, as well (due to the various incident angles), to within a precision of 80 μm in the relative distance between the planes to achieve the overall angular resolution of 1 mrad. The needed accuracy in the position and parallelism of the strips is achieved by machining brass inserts together when machining the strip patterns into the cathode boards in a single step. The inserts can then be used

  19. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  20. Module for transmission of biomedical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirecki, Maciej; Zabolotny, Wojciech

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes the conception of The Module for Transmission of Biomedical Data (MTBD). The prototype will acquire and process human vital signs and transmit collected information to a remote telemedicine centre for further analysis, taking advantage of GSM cellular infrastructure. The intention of MTBD prototype is providing care at the point and time of need without limiting of users' mobility. This should enhance the quality of life of patients. The article presents the conception of hardware platform designed for acquiring, processing and transmitting biomedical parameters using SMS, CSD, HSCD, GPRS services, provided by the GSM operators. Detailed analysis of prototype requirements is presented, taking into consideration GSM security aspects. The paper describes the main idea of MTBD in telemedicine system and basic conception of hardware and software solutions used in prototype device.

  1. Prototyping artificial jaws for the robotic dental testing simulator.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, K; Raabe, D

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a robot periphery prototyped for the six-degrees-of-freedom robotic dental testing simulator, simulating the wear of materials on dental components, such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, or a full set of teeth. The robot periphery consists of the artificial jaws and compliance module. The jaws have been reverse engineered and represent a human-like mandible and maxilla with artificial teeth. Each clinically fabricated tooth consists of a crown and glass ceramic roots which are connected using resin cement. Normal clinical occlusion of the artificial jaws assembly was emulated by a dental articulator based on 'Andrew's six keys to occlusion'. The radii of the von Spee curve, the Monson curve, and the Wilson curve were also measured as important jaw characteristic indicators to aid normal occlusion. A compliance module had to be built between the lower jaw and the robot platform to sustain the fluctuating forces that occur during normal chewing in the occlusal contact areas, where these high bite forces are major causes of dental component failure. A strain gauge force transducer has been integrated into the machined lower jaw, underneath the second molars, to measure axial biting forces applied to the posterior teeth. The experiments conducted have shown that the sensor is able to sense small changes in the compression force satisfactorily, when applied perpendicular to the occlusal surfaces of the teeth.

  2. Full parabolic trough qualification from prototype to demonstration loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotte, Nicole; Lüpfert, Eckhard; Pottler, Klaus; Schmitz, Mark

    2017-06-01

    On the example of the HelioTrough® collector development the full accompanying and supporting qualification program for large-scale parabolic trough collectors for solar thermal power plants is described from prototype to demonstration loop scale. In the evaluation process the actual state and the optimization potential are assessed. This includes the optical and geometrical performance determined by concentrator shape, deformation, assembly quality and local intercept factor values. Furthermore, its mechanical performance in terms of tracking accuracy and torsional stiffness and its thermal system performance on the basis of the overall thermal output and heat loss are evaluated. Demonstration loop tests deliver results of collector modules statistical slope deviation of 1.9 to 2.6 mrad, intercept factor above 98%, peak optical performance of 81.6% and heat loss coefficients from field tests. The benefit of such a closely monitored development lies in prompt feedback on strengths, weaknesses and potential improvements on the new product at any development stage from first module tests until demonstration loop evaluation. The product developer takes advantage of the achieved technical maturity, already before the implementation in a commercial power plant. The well-understood performance characteristics allow the reduction of safety margins making the new HelioTrough collector competitive from the start.

  3. Nanosatellite optical downlink experiment: design, simulation, and prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Emily; Aniceto, Raichelle; Barnes, Derek; Caplan, David; Clark, James; Portillo, Iñigo del; Haughwout, Christian; Khatsenko, Maxim; Kingsbury, Ryan; Lee, Myron; Morgan, Rachel; Twichell, Jonathan; Riesing, Kathleen; Yoon, Hyosang; Ziegler, Caleb; Cahoy, Kerri

    2016-11-01

    The nanosatellite optical downlink experiment (NODE) implements a free-space optical communications (lasercom) capability on a CubeSat platform that can support low earth orbit (LEO) to ground downlink rates>10 Mbps. A primary goal of NODE is to leverage commercially available technologies to provide a scalable and cost-effective alternative to radio-frequency-based communications. The NODE transmitter uses a 200-mW 1550-nm master-oscillator power-amplifier design using power-efficient M-ary pulse position modulation. To facilitate pointing the 0.12-deg downlink beam, NODE augments spacecraft body pointing with a microelectromechanical fast steering mirror (FSM) and uses an 850-nm uplink beacon to an onboard CCD camera. The 30-cm aperture ground telescope uses an infrared camera and FSM for tracking to an avalanche photodiode detector-based receiver. Here, we describe our approach to transition prototype transmitter and receiver designs to a full end-to-end CubeSat-scale system. This includes link budget refinement, drive electronics miniaturization, packaging reduction, improvements to pointing and attitude estimation, implementation of modulation, coding, and interleaving, and ground station receiver design. We capture trades and technology development needs and outline plans for integrated system ground testing.

  4. Zero Power Warming (ZPW) Chamber Prototype Measurements, Barrow, Alaska, 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shawn Serbin; Alistair Rogers; Kim Ely

    2017-02-10

    Data were collected during one season of prototyping associated with the development of a passive warming technology. An experimental chamber, the Zero Power Warming (ZPW) chamber, was fitted with apparatus to modulate venting of a field enclosure and enhance elevation of air temperature by solar radiation. The ZPW chamber was compared with a control chamber (Control) and an ambient open air plot (Ambient). The control chamber was identical to the ZPW chamber but lacked the apparatus necessary to modulate venting, the chamber vents in the control chamber were fixed open for the majority of the trial period. The three plots were located over Carex aquatilis growing in an area of moderately degraded permafrost. Chambers were placed on the same footprints that were used for a similar exercise in 2015 (no data) and therefore those plots had experienced some thaw and degradation prior to 2016. The following data were collected for 80 days at 1 minute intervals from within two chambers and an ambient plot: solar input, chamber venting, air temperature, relative humidity, soil temperature (at 5, 10 and 15 cm), soil moisture, downward and upward NIR.

  5. "Smart" Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    An assembly that contains a sensor, sensor-signal-conditioning circuitry, a sensor-readout analog-to-digital converter (ADC), data-storage circuitry, and a microprocessor that runs special-purpose software and communicates with one or more external computer(s) has been developed as a prototype of "smart" sensor modules for monitoring the integrity and functionality (the "health") of engineering systems. Although these modules are now being designed specifically for use on rocket-engine test stands, it is anticipated that they could also readily be designed to be incorporated into health-monitoring subsystems of such diverse engineering systems as spacecraft, aircraft, land vehicles, bridges, buildings, power plants, oilrigs, and defense installations. The figure is a simplified block diagram of the "smart" sensor module. The analog sensor readout signal is processed by the ADC, the digital output of which is fed to the microprocessor. By means of a standard RS-232 cable, the microprocessor is connected to a local personal computer (PC), from which software is downloaded into a randomaccess memory in the microprocessor. The local PC is also used to debug the software. Once the software is running, the local PC is disconnected and the module is controlled by, and all output data from the module are collected by, a remote PC via an Ethernet bus. Several smart sensor modules like this one could be connected to the same Ethernet bus and controlled by the single remote PC. The software running in the microprocessor includes driver programs for operation of the sensor, programs that implement self-assessment algorithms, programs that implement protocols for communication with the external computer( s), and programs that implement evolutionary methodologies to enable the module to improve its performance over time. The design of the module and of the health-monitoring system of which it is a part reflects the understanding that the main purpose of a health

  6. End effector monitoring system: An illustrated case of operational prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Land, Sherry A.; Thronesbery, Carroll

    1994-01-01

    Operational prototyping is introduced to help developers apply software innovations to real-world problems, to help users articulate requirements, and to help develop more usable software. Operational prototyping has been applied to an expert system development project. The expert system supports fault detection and management during grappling operations of the Space Shuttle payload bay arm. The dynamic exchanges among operational prototyping team members are illustrated in a specific prototyping session. We discuss the requirements for operational prototyping technology, types of projects for which operational prototyping is best suited and when it should be applied to those projects.

  7. Kranc: Cactus modules from Mathematica equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husa, Sascha; Hinder, Ian; Lechner, Christiane; Schnetter, Erik; Wardell, Barry

    2016-09-01

    Kranc turns a tensorial description of a time dependent partial differential equation into a module for the Cactus Computational Toolkit (ascl:1102.013). This Mathematica application takes a simple continuum description of a problem and generates highly efficient and portable code, and can be used both for rapid prototyping of evolution systems and for high performance supercomputing.

  8. Joint Program on Rapid Prototyping. RaPIER (Rapid Prototyping to Investigate End-User Requirements).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-28

    Prototype System Description Language," ISSI Technical Report, unnumbered, January 30,198 6 ., . [JONES84] T. Capers Jones. "Reusability in Programming: A...Systems, Inc.. "PSDL: Prototype System * Description Language," ISSI Technical Report, unnumbered, January 30, 1986. T. Capers Jones. "Reusability in...Game Design," IEEE Software, Vol. 1, No. 4, October 1984, pp. 28-38. -[LISKOV5] -5. Barbara H. Liskov, Stephen N. Zilles. "Specification Techniques for j

  9. Prototype Real-Time Monitor: Ada Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Internal_1o 85 package body ConvertEnumerations 89 package Internallo 89 package TypesManager 93 package body Types-Manager 96 package Rtm_Reals 98...Module Name: / TypesManager o -- I -/Module Type: -,I Package Specification -- I Module Purpose: -- / This package is the interface to...Use the type "address". package TypesManager is -- Type identifier, used externally to refer to a named type. -- type Valid_RtmType is private

  10. SU-E-T-66: A Prototype for Couch Based Real-Time Dosimetry in External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to design a prototype for couch-based based real time dosimetry system in external beam radiotherapy Methods: A prototype of 100 ionization chambers was designed on a printed circuit board by etching the copper layer and each ionization chamber was wired to a 50 pin connector. The signals from the two 50 pin connectors collected from the ionization chambers were then transferred to a PXI module from National Instruments. The PXI module houses a current amplifier that amplifies the charge collected from the ionization chamber. The amplified signal is then sent to a digital multimeter module for converting the analog signal to digital signal. A software was designed in labview to read and display the signals obtained from the PXI module. A couch attachment frame was designed to house the 100 ionization chamber module. The frame was fixed underneath the treatment couch for measuring the dose during treatment. Resutls: The ionization chamber based prototype dosimetry was tested for simple radiotherapy treatment fields and found to be a useful device for measuring real time dosimetry at the treatment couch plane. This information could be used to assess the delivered dose to a patient during radiotherapy. It could be used as an invivo dosimeter during radiotherapy. Conclusion: In this study, a prototype for couch based real time dosimetry system was designed and tested. The prototype forms a basis for the development of large scale couch based real time dosimetry system that could be used to perform morning QA prior to treatment, assess real time doses delivered to patient and as a device to monitor the output of the treatment beam. Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation.

  11. Widefield heterodyne interferometry using a custom CMOS modulated light camera.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rikesh; Achamfuo-Yeboah, Samuel; Light, Roger; Clark, Matt

    2011-11-21

    In this paper a method of taking widefield heterodyne interferograms using a prototype modulated light camera is described. This custom CMOS modulated light camera (MLC) uses analogue quadrature demodulation at each pixel to output the phase and amplitude of the modulated light as DC voltages. The heterodyne interference fringe patterns are generated using an acousto-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) in an arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Widefield images of fringe patterns acquired using the prototype MLC are presented. The phase can be measured to an accuracy of ±6.6°. The added value of this method to acquire widefield images are discussed along with the advantages.

  12. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-06-15

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses.

  13. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  14. SIMS prototype system 4: Design data brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A pre-package prototype unit having domestic hot water and room solar heating capability that uses air as the collector fluid is described. This system is designed to be used with a small single-family dwelling where a roof mounted collector array is not feasible. The prototype unit is an assemble containing 203 square feet of effective collector surface with 113 cubic feet of rock storage. The design of structure and storage is modular, which permits expansion and reduction of the collector array and storage bed in 68 square feet and 37 cubic feet increments respectively. The system is designed to be transportable. This permitted assemble and certification testing in one area and installation in another area without tear down and reassemble. Design, installation, operation, performance and maintenance of this system are described.

  15. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  16. Babar On-Line Prototype Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, G. S.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Lewis, S. A.; Ogren, Z.; Glanzman, T.; Weinstein, A.; White, J. L.

    The BaBar On-line system has begun construction of a prototype which will serve as a test bench and beam test system. The system architecture is based on single board computers running VxWorks, linked to Unix workstations via ethernet (as well as tests with FDDI). This early system is based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System, which provides both control of state transitions and monitoring facilities. This functionality is achieved with no software investment: native EPICS utilities are used to develop screen displays and control panels. Emphasis at this time is on the incorporation of reusable code. The first application of this prototype is the creation of a testbed for the BaBar dataflow research and development.

  17. Everyday conceptions of modesty: a prototype analysis.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Aiden P; Hart, Claire M; Sedikides, Constantine; Kumashiro, Madoka

    2008-07-01

    Good theoretical definitions of psychological phenomena not only are rigorously formulated but also provide ample conceptual coverage. To assess the latter, we empirically surveyed everyday conceptions of modesty in a combined U.S./U.K. sample. In Study 1, participants freely generated multiple exemplars of modesty that judges subsequently sorted into superordinate categories. Exemplar frequency and priority served, respectively, as primary and secondary indices of category prototypicality that enabled central, peripheral, and marginal clusters to be identified. Follow-up studies then confirmed the ordinal prototypicality of these clusters with the aid of both explicit (Studies 2 and 3) and implicit (Study 3) methodologies. Modest people emerged centrally as humble, shy, solicitous, and not boastful and peripherally as honest, likeable, not arrogant, attention-avoiding, plain, and gracious. Everyday conceptions of modesty also spanned both mind and behavior, emphasized agreeableness and introversion, and predictably incorporated an element of humility.

  18. The NASA Langley Mars Tumbleweed Rover Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Chattin, Richard L.; Copeland, Benjamin M.; Krizann, Shawn A.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Tumbleweed is a concept for an autonomous rover that would achieve mobility through use of the natural winds on Mars. The wind-blown nature of this vehicle make it an ideal platform for conducting random surveys of the surface, scouting for signs of past or present life as well as examining the potential habitability of sites for future human exploration. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been studying the dynamics, aerodynamics, and mission concepts of Tumbleweed rovers and has recently developed a prototype Mars Tumbleweed Rover for demonstrating mission concepts and science measurement techniques. This paper will provide an overview of the prototype design, instrumentation to be accommodated, preliminary test results, and plans for future development and testing of the vehicle.

  19. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses. PMID:27314359

  20. Modification and prototype test of staple gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Kuang-Yih; Wu, Gwo-Jen

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents how to design a staple gun and verify its data through simulation. The staple gun was estimated and analyzed using 'ANSYS' software and the results were compared with those obtained through experiments. In this research, a supporting position for the spring inside the staple gun was damaged after hundreds of loads, and there was no data about the impact force when staples were shot into the targets. Therefore, a prototype test system is developed to validate the data through simulation. In this case, the results are quite close to each other before they can be used to help the manufacturer to improve its structure. This prototype test system is completed through PC-based automation software. The simulation model was modified to develop the next new products for saving costs and time. Because the impact force, coming out from the staple gun is pretty large, it should be restricted within a certain limit to keep the user safe.