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Sample records for endcap ee dee

  1. Dee-Mack Intermediate School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Frank Reliford, the Principal at Dee-Mack Intermediate since 2005, is familiar to almost every child in the community. 260 Students attend Reliford's school, and their status is a point of pride: Dee-Mack Intermediate is consistently one of the highest performing schools in the state. The change in student performance correlates to the…

  2. Cooled turbine vane with endcaps

    DOEpatents

    Cunha, Frank J.; Schiavo, Jr., Anthony L.; Nordlund, Raymond Scott; Malow, Thomas; McKinley, Barry L.

    2002-01-01

    A turbine vane assembly which includes an outer endcap having a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough, an inner endcap having a plurality of passages and passage segments therethrough, and a vane assembly having an outer shroud, an airfoil body, and an inner shroud. The outer shroud, airfoil body and inner shroud each have a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough as well. The outer endcap is coupled to the outer shroud so that outer endcap passages and said outer shroud passages form a fluid circuit. The inner endcap is coupled to the inner shroud so that the inner end cap passages and the inner shroud passages from a fluid circuit. Passages in the vane casting are in fluid communication with both the outer shroud passages and the inner shroud passages. Passages in the outer endcap may be coupled to a cooling system that supplies a coolant and takes away the heated exhaust.

  3. 33 CFR 117.933 - Pee Dee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pee Dee River. 117.933 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.933 Pee Dee River. The draws of the Seaboard System Railroad bridges, mile 72.6 near Poston and mile 107.2 near Pee Dee, need not...

  4. Ceramic pressure housing with metal endcaps

    DOEpatents

    Downing, J.P. Jr.; DeRoos, B.G.; Hackman, D.J.

    1995-06-27

    A housing is disclosed for the containment of instrumentation in a high pressure fluid environment that consists of a metallic endcap and ceramic cylinder bonded together. The improvement comprises a structure which results in the improved sealing of said housing as the fluid pressure increases. The cylindrical ceramic tube and endcap are dimensioned such that mechanical failure does not occur when exposed to the desired external operating pressures which includes up to 36,000 feet of water. The housing is designed to withstand the external operating pressures without being subject to mechanical failure or excessive deformation which results in the loss of pressure housing integrity via cracking or deformation of the ceramic tube, deformation of the endcap, or from failure of the bonding agent. 9 figs.

  5. Ceramic pressure housing with metal endcaps

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Jr., John P.; DeRoos, Bradley G.; Hackman, Donald J.

    1995-01-01

    A housing for the containment of instrumentation in a high pressure fluid environment that consists of a metallic endcap and ceramic cylinder bonded together. The improvement comprises a structure which results in the improved sealing of said housing as the fluid pressure increases. The cylindrical ceramic tube and endcap are dimensioned such that mechanical failure does not occur when exposed to the desired external operating pressures which includes up to 36,000 feet of water. The housing is designed to withstand the external operating pressures without being subject to mechanical failure or excessive deformation which results in the loss of pressure housing integrity via cracking or deformation of the ceramic tube, deformation of the endcap, or from failure of the bonding agent.

  6. Lower temperature curing thermoset polyimides utilizing a substituted norbornene endcap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, John F.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Kennedy, Vance O.; Livneh, Mordechai; Youngs, Wiley J.; Sutter, James K.; Meador, Mary A. B.; Burke, Luke A.; Ahn, Myong K.

    1992-01-01

    Methoxycarbonyl bridgehead substituted nadic diacid monomethyl ester, when used as an endcapping monomer, lowered the cure temperature of thermoset PMR polyimides without seriously affecting other desirable properties, such as glass transition temperature and thermal oxidative stability. The C-13 CP/MAS NMR of model compounds was used to follow the cure of resin systems using both the unmodified nadic endcap and the methoxycarbonyl-substituted endcap. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry DSC also provided evidence for the lower curing nature of the substituted endcap. Two regioisomers of the bridgehead-substituted endcap were isolated, and their chemical structures were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The model compound and molecular modeling studies conducted ruled out the possibility of regioisomeric imide formation in the substituted endcaps.

  7. New Horizons for Learning: An Interview with Dee Dickinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Scott; Dickinson, Dee

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dee Dickinson, founder and chief learning officer of New Horizons for Learning, a nonprofit international education network whose mission is to identify, communicate, and help implement effective teaching and learning strategies. Founded in 1980 and now operating largely through its Web site, New Horizons…

  8. Design of a dee vacuum vessel for Doublet III

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The Big Dee modification project has completed the basic physics design and conceptual engineering design phase and is beginning detailed engineering. The project is funded in FY83 for completing most of the detailed design and placing orders for long lead components and systems. This paper summarizes the conceptual engineering design, especially of the vessel itself.

  9. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  10. New Endcaps for Improved Oxidation Resistance in PMR Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2003-01-01

    A polyimide is a polymer composed of alternating units of diamine and dianhydride, linked to each other via an imide bond. PMR polyimides, commonly used in the aerospace industry, are generally capped at each end by an endcap (such as the nadic endcap used in PMR 15) which serves a double function: (1) it limits the number of repeating units and, hence, the average molecular weight of the various polymer chains (oligomers), thereby improving processibility; (2) Upon further treatment (curing), the endcap crosslinks the various oligomer strands into a tough heat-resistant piece. It is this very endcap, so important to processing, that accounts for much of the weight loss in the polymer on aging in air at elevated temperatures. Understanding this degradation provides clues for designing new endcaps to slow down degradation, and prolong the lifetime of the material.

  11. Corpectomy cage subsidence with rectangular versus round endcaps.

    PubMed

    Deukmedjian, Armen R; Manwaring, Jotham; Le, Tien V; Turner, Alexander W L; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-09-01

    Corpectomy cages with rectangular endcaps utilize the stronger peripheral part of the endplate, potentially decreasing subsidence risk. The authors evaluated cage subsidence during cyclic biomechanical testing, comparing rectangular versus round endcaps. Fourteen cadaveric spinal segments (T12-L2) were dissected and potted at T12 and L2, then assigned to a rectangular (n=7) or round (n=7) endcap group. An L1 corpectomy was performed and under uniform conditions a cage/plate construct was cyclically tested in a servo-hydraulic frame with increasing load magnitude. Testing was terminated if the test machine actuator displacement exceeded 6mm, or the specimen completed cyclic loading at 2400 N. Number of cycles, compressive force and force-cycles product at test completion were all greater in the rectangular endcap group compared with the round endcap group (cycles: 3027 versus 2092 cycles; force: 1943 N versus 1533 N; force-cycles product: 6162kN·cycles versus 3973 kN·cycles), however these differences were not statistically significant (p ⩾ 0.076). After normalizing for individual specimen bone mineral density, the same measures increased to a greater extent with the rectangular endcaps (cycles: 3014 versus 1855 cycles; force: 1944 N versus 1444 N; force-cycles product: 6040 kN·cycles versus 2980 kN·cycles), and all differences were significant (p⩽0.030). The rectangular endcap expandable corpectomy cage displayed increased resistance to subsidence over the round endcap cage under cyclic loading as demonstrated by the larger number of cycles, maximum load and force-cycles product at test completion. This suggests rectangular endcaps will be less susceptible to subsidence than the round endcap design.

  12. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  13. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  14. Process of end-capping a polyimide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, T. L.; Burks, H. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process of endcapping a polyimide system with an endcapping agent in order to achieve a controlled decrease in molecular weight and melt viscosity along with predictable fracture resistance of the molded products is disclosed. The uncapped system is formed by combining an equimolar ratio of 4,4'-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA) and 1,-bis (aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) dissolved in bis (2-methoxyethyl)ether. The endcapped system is formed by dissolving APB in bis-(2-methoxyethyl)ether, adding the BDSDA. By varying the amount of endcapping from 0 to 4%, molecular weight is decreased from 13,900 to 8660. At a processing temperature of 250 C, there is a linear relationship between molecular weight and viscosity, with the viscosity decreasing by two orders of magnitude as the molecular weight decreased from 13,900 to 8660.

  15. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  16. Astronauts Thuot and Ivins work with the Dexterous End Effector (DEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This view, photographed on the aft flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, captures crew activity with the Dexterous End Effector (DEE) on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). Astronauts Pierre J. Thuot and Marsha S. Ivins communicate with ground controllers during operations and observations with DEE.

  17. Functional end-capped conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, V.; Farina, H.; Ortenzi, Marco A.

    2016-05-01

    Methacrylate-terminated Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymers with controlled degree of polymerization were successfully prepared by direct oxidative polycondensation between Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and a cross-linkable methacrylate end-capper monomer, obtained via Friedel Crafts acylation starting from EDOT and Methacryloyl chloride. The new polymer was synthesized in order to overcome the well-known technical problems of PEDOT, i.e. difficult processability and patterning, due to its poor solubility in common organic and inorganic solvents. The chemical structure and the degree of polymerization of the end-capped polymers were determined by 1H NMR spectra. A new synthesis of Methacrylate end-capped PEDOT with controlled degree of polymerization, soluble in common organic and chlorinated solvents and with improved conductivity, 210 S/cm, was performed. This method includes: direct oxidative polycondensation of 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in the presence of a cross-linkable end-capper, i.e. Methacrylate end-capped EDOT prepared via Friedel Crafts acylation with Methacryloyl chloride and oxidant species, i.e. ferric sulfate. Furthermore, the oxidative polycondensation of EDOT monomer and Methacrylate end-capped EDOT in the presence of Sulfonated Polyethersulfone (SPES)- characterized by different degree of Sulfonation (DS)- as dopant agent was performed, leading to functional end-capped conducting PEDOT, easy to process and pattern, with conductivity of 210 S/cm, 50 S/cm higher than the one of commercial PEDOT.

  18. All "chick-a-dee" calls are not created equally. Part I. Open-ended categorization of chick-a-dee calls by sympatric and allopatric chickadees.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Laurie L; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2008-01-01

    Researchers trained 24 black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and 12 mountain (P. gambeli) chickadees in an operant conditioning task to determine if they use open-ended categorization to classify "chick-a-dee" calls, and whether black-capped chickadees that had experience with mountain chick-a-dee calls (sympatric group) would perform this task differently than inexperienced black-capped chickadees (allopatric group). All experimental birds learned to discriminate between species' call categories faster than within a category (Experiment 1), and subsequently classified novel and original between-category chick-a-dee calls in Experiments 2 and 3 following a change in the category contingency. These results suggest that regardless of previous experience, black-capped and mountain chickadees classify their own and the other species' calls into two distinct, yet open-ended, species-level categories.

  19. Prototype of time digitizing system for BESIII endcap TOF upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ping; Sun, Wei-Jia; Ji, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Huan-Huan; Wang, Si-Yu; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The prototype of a time digitizing system for the BESIII endcap TOF (ETOF) upgrade is introduced in this paper. The ETOF readout electronics has a distributed architecture. Hit signals from the multi-gap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) are signaled as LVDS by front-end electronics (FEE) and are then sent to the back-end time digitizing system via long shield differential twisted pair cables. The ETOF digitizing system consists of two VME crates, each of which contains modules for time digitization, clock, trigger, fast control, etc. The time digitizing module (TDIG) of this prototype can support up to 72 electrical channels for hit information measurement. The fast control (FCTL) module can operate in barrel or endcap mode. The barrel FCTL fans out fast control signals from the trigger system to the endcap FCTLs, merges data from the endcaps and then transfers to the trigger system. Without modifying the barrel TOF (BTOF) structure, this time digitizing architecture benefits from improved ETOF performance without degrading the BTOF performance. Lab experiments show that the time resolution of this digitizing system can be lower than 20 ps, and the data throughput to the DAQ can be about 92 Mbps. Beam experiments show that the total time resolution can be lower than 45 ps.

  20. Controlled molecular weight poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s endcapped with benzimidazole and acetylene groups

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.G. Jr.; Connell, J.W.; Hergenrother, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    As a continuation of work on poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBIs), a series of controlled molecular weight polymers endcapped with benzimidazole, ethynyl, and phenylethynyl groups were prepared at stoichiometric imbalances of 7 and 10 mole percent and characterized. Earlier work with benzimidazole endcapped PAEBIs prepared at stoichiometric imbalances as high as 7 mole percent has shown very good retention of thin film properties up to 232{degrees}C. Ethynyl and phenylethynyl endcapped PAEBIs, air cured to 330{degrees}C, exhibited increases in Tgs of {approximately}20-30{degrees}C with respect to benzimidazole endcapped PAEBIs. Thin film properties for the ethynyl and phenylethynyl endcapped PAEBIs were similar to benzimidazole endcapped PAEBIs up to 232{degrees}C. Ethynyl and phenylethynyl endcapped PAEBI films tested at 250{degrees}C exhibited good retention of tensile properties.

  1. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilki, Burak; CMS HCAL Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1, the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm × 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R&D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  2. Tests and developments of the PANDA Endcap Disc DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelmüller, E.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-04-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) requires excellent particle identification. Two different DIRC detectors will utilize internally reflected Cherenkov light of charged particles to enable the separation of pions and kaons up to momenta of 4 GeV/c. The Endcap Disc DIRC will be placed in the forward endcap of PANDA's central spectrometer covering polar angles between 5° and 22°. Its final design is based on MCP-PMTs for the photon detection and an optical system made of fused silica. A new prototype has been investigated during a test beam at CERN in May 2015 and first results will be presented. In addition a new synthetic fused silica material by Nikon has been tested and was found to be radiation hard.

  3. Characterization of geometric isomers of Norbornene end-capped imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Three geometric isomers from the thermal isomerization of methylene-4,4' bis(endo-N-phenylbicyclo/2.2.1/hept-2-ene-5,6-di carboximide) (I) were chromatographically separated and isolated in order to investigate the thermal cure of norbornene end-capped imide oligomers, which display considerable promise for use in various aerospace adhesive and composite applications. Endo-endo (I), endo-exo (II), and exo-exo (III) configurations were assigned to each compound based on the results of NMR spectroscopy. Several chromatographic, spectroscopic, and thermal techniques were then used to characterize these three isomers which serve as model compounds for norbornene end-capped polyimides. It was found that each compound thermally isomerized to an equilibrium mixture of all three compounds prior to cure. It is proposed that these compounds react by different mechanisms in air and nitrogen.

  4. Thin gap gas chambers for the DELPHI endcaps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Hrubec, J.

    1996-12-31

    Thin Gap Gas Chambers have been proposed for an upgrade of the endcaps of the DELPHI detector at LEP. Two full size chambers have been built and a study of the optimal operating conditions has been carried out. In this paper the main construction parameters are discussed and test results will be given. Tests of the electronic readout were performed and the general feasibility of the detector is demonstrated.

  5. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  6. Preparation and properties of silane-endcapped polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Silane-endcapped polyimide high temperature adhesive formulations were prepared by reacting anhydride-terminated poly(amic acid), obtained from benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (3,3'-, 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 3,3', 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminobenzophenone) with varying amounts of gama-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in dimethylacetamide. Resin properties were evaluated by torsional braid analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Lap shear strengths of some of the adhesive bonds were determined at room temperature and at 177 C before and after ageing at 200 C for 2500 h and after boiling in water for 72 h.

  7. Substituted Cyclohexene Endcaps for Polymers with Thermal-Oxidative Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This invention relates to polyimides having improved thermal-oxidative stability, to the process of preparing said polyimides, and the use of polyimide prepolymers in the preparation of prepregs and composites. The polyimides are particularly usefull in the preparation of fiber-reinforced, high-temperature composites for use in various engine parts including inlets, fan ducts, exit flaps and other parts of high speed aircraft. The polyimides are derived from the polymerization of effective amounts of at least one tetracarboxylic dianhydride, at least one polyamine and a novel dicarboxylic endcap having the formula presented.

  8. View of payload bay of STS-62 Columbia and Dexterous End Effector (DEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This 70mm frame, photographed through the aft flight deck windows of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, features activity with the Dexterous End Effector (DEE) on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). This scene also provides an overview of many of the United States Microgravity Payload 2 (USMP) elements as well as OAST-2 experiments.

  9. How Can We Explain Poverty? Case Study of Dee Reveals the Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Many theories have been offered to explain why people are impoverished. This article by Karen Seccombe uses the case study of "Dee," a newly single mother, to explore four of the most common: individualism, social structuralism, the culture of poverty, and fatalism. She concludes that poverty is a highly complex phenomenon, and it is likely that…

  10. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  11. NMR Guided Design of Endcaps With Improved Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2002-01-01

    A polyimide is a polymer composed of alternating units of diamine and dianhydride, linked to each other via an imide bond. PMR polyimides, commonly used in the aerospace industry, are generally capped at each end by a norbornene endcap which serves a double function: (1) It limits the number of repeating units and, hence, the average molecular weight of the various polymer chains (oligomers), thereby improving processibility; (2) Upon further treatment (curing), the endcap crosslinks the various oligomer strands into a tough heat-resistant piece. Norbornenyl-end capped PMR polyimide resins' are widely used as polymer matrix composite materials for aircraft engine applications,2 since they combine ease of processing with good oxidative stability up to 300 C. PMR resins are prepared by a twestep approach involving the initial formation of oligomeric pre-polymers capped at both ends by a latent reactive end cap. The end cap undergoes cross-linking during higher temperature processing, producing the desired low density, high specific strength materials, as shown for PMR-15.

  12. Imide Oligomers Endcapped with Phenylethynl Phthalic Anhydrides and Polymers Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Controlled molecular weight phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers (PETIs) have been prepared by the cyclodehydration of precursor phenylethynyl terminated amic acid oligomers. Amino terminated amic acid oligomers are prepared from the reaction of dianhydride(s) with an excess of diamine(s) and subsequently endcapped with phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride(s) (PEPA). The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N.N-dimethylacetamide under nitrogen at room temperature. The amic acid oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated either thermally or cheznicauy to the corresponding imide oligomers. Direct preparation of PETIs from the reaction of dianhydxide(s) with an excess of diamine(s) and endcapped with phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride(s) has been performed in m-cresol. Phenylethynyl phthalic anhydrides are synthesized by the palladium catalyzed reaction of phenylacetylene with bromo substituted phthalic anhydrides in triethylamine. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  13. Imide oligomers endcapped with phenylethynyl phthalic anhydrides and polymers therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Controlled molecular weight phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers (PETIs) have been prepared by the cyclodehydration of precursor phenylethynyl terminated amic acid oligomers. Amino terminated amic acid oligomers are prepared from the reaction of dianhydride(s) with an excess of diamine(s) and subsequently endcapped with phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride(s) (PEPA). The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide under nitrogen at room temperature. The amic acid oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated either thermally or chemically to the corresponding imide oligomers. Direct preparation of PETIs from the reaction of dianhydride(s) with an excess of diamine(s) and endcapped with phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride(s) has been performed in m-cresol. Phenylethynyl phthalic anhydrides are synthesized by the palladium catalyzed reaction of phenylacetylene with bromo substituted phthalic anhydrides in triethylamine. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  14. Recent Results From The ATLAS Endcap Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schacht, Peter

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN is entering the last phase of construction, with the ATLAS calorimeter passing already the first steps of commissioning. The endcap region in the range of pseudorapidity 2.4 < |{eta}| < 4.0 is a particular complex one, with the electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. In a dedicated beam run this region has been studied using the individual calorimeter modules. The set-up was as close as possible to the real ATLAS calorimeter, including all details like inactive support material structures. The goal is to validate the MC simulation for the different regions and to cross check the intercalibration of the various calorimeters. Electron and pion data have been taken in an energy range 6 < E < 200 GeV with special emphasis on lateral and vertical scans to study the transition regions in detail.

  15. CMS HCAL Endcap Simulations for the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The long-term high luminosity upgrade to the LHC will increase the levels of radiation affecting the CMS calorimeters. By the end of Phase 2, parts of the electromagnetic and hadronic endcap calorimeters could receive up to 10 MRad of radiation. A model of the radiation damage to HCAL, which has been implemented in the CMS fast simulation, will be described. The effects of radiation on physics capabilities with jets will be presented, with the most important effect coming from scaling of photodetector noise due to recalibration. In addition, a standalone Geant4 simulation with a simplified geometry can be used to test configurations with new radiation-hard ECALs. Results for pion response and resolution with new configurations will be shown.

  16. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  17. All "chick-a-dee" calls are not created equally. Part II. Mechanisms for discrimination by sympatric and allopatric chickadees.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, L L; Farrell, T M; Sturdy, C B

    2008-01-01

    The 'chick-a-dee' call, common to all members of the genus Poecile, is used by both sexes throughout the year to putatively co-ordinate flock movements and register alarm. In some regions, two or more chickadee species occupy overlapping territories, and therefore it is essential that these sympatric species learn to discriminate between the acoustically similar calls of the species. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that black-capped (P. atricapillus) and mountain chickadees (P. gambeli) discriminate between the species' calls and treat each species' calls as belonging to separate open-ended categories. In the current set of experiments we use an operant conditioning paradigm to gain an understanding of (1) how the birds perform this discrimination and (2) whether birds with different levels of experience with heterospecific calls perform this task differently. We use natural recordings of chick-a-dee calls and perform several manipulations to test the importance of the introductory 'chick-a' portion and the terminal 'dee' portion for discriminating among the calls of the two species. Evidence suggests that birds mainly use the terminal 'dee' portion, as all groups of birds responded similarly to these probe stimuli and control chick-a-dee calls. We propose that the terminal 'dee' portion, consisting of lower frequency notes, is more likely to be resistant to degradation, and therefore a more reliable species-specific marker.

  18. EE-3A Logging Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David W.

    1993-12-15

    Two logs of EE-3A were performed during the last couple of weeks. The first of which, was a Temperature/Casing-Collar Locator (CCL) log, which took place on Friday, December 10th., 1993. The second log was a Caliper log which was done in cooperation with the Dia-Log Company, of Odessa, TX. on Monday, December, 13th., 1993.

  19. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, H.E.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.; Sutton, S.B.; Mitchell, S.; Bass, I.; Honea, E.

    1999-08-10

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focused by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod. 14 figs.

  20. Redrilling Plan for EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.

    1984-11-14

    Attached is the 3rd draft copy of the EE-3 redrilling plan. We believe that we have taken the document as far as we can and feel that it is ready for distribution as soon as the trajectory question is resolved and necessary changes in wording that result are made. The figures are presently being redrawn by John Paskiewicz and should be ready in about one week.

  1. Conceptual design summary for modifying Doublet III to a large dee-shaped configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.G.; Gallix, R.; Luxon, J.L.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Puhn, F.A.; Rock, P.J.; Wesley, J.C.

    1983-05-01

    The Doublet III tokamak is to be reconfigured by replacing its indented (doublet) vacuum vessel with a larger one of a dee-shaped cross section. This change will permit significantly larger elongated plasmas than is presently possible and will allow higher plasma current (up to 5 MA) and anticipated longer confinement time. Reactor relevant values of stable beta and plasma pressure are predicted. This modification, while resulting in a significant change in capability, utilizes most of the existing coils, structure, systems and facility.

  2. Preparation and applications of a variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroki; Iwaki, Ken-Ichi; Furukuwa, Rika; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2008-04-15

    A variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers were applied to the preparation of fluorinated oligomer/hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites (particle size: 38-356 nm), which exhibit a good dispersibility in water and traditional organic solvents. These fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/HAp composites were easily prepared by the reactions of disodium hydrogen phosphate and calcium chloride in the presence of self-assembled molecular aggregates formed by fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers in aqueous solutions. In these fluorinated HAp composites thus obtained, fluoroalkyl end-capped acrylic acid oligomers and 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomer/HAp nanocomposites afforded transparent colorless solutions toward water; however, fluoroalkyl end-capped N,N-dimethylacrylamide oligomer and acryloylmorpholine oligomer were found to afford transparent colorless solutions with trace amounts of white-colored HAp precipitants under similar conditions. HAp could be encapsulated more effectively into fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomeric aggregate cores to afford colloidal stable fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites, compared to that of fluorinated acrylic acid oligomers. These fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites were applied to the surface modification of glass and PVA to exhibit a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine. HAp formation was newly observed on the modified polyethylene terephthalate film surface treated with fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomers and acrylic acid oligomer/HAp composites by soaking these films into the simulated body fluid.

  3. Hydraulic model and flood-inundation maps developed for the Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Douglas G.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2016-04-08

    A series of digital flood-inundation maps were developed on the basis of the water-surface profiles produced by the model. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Program Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels at the USGS streamgage Pee Dee River at Pee Dee Refuge near Ansonville, N.C. These maps, when combined with real-time water-level information from USGS streamgages, provide managers with critical information to help plan flood-response activities and resource protection efforts.

  4. Information theoretical approaches to chick-a-dee calls of Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis).

    PubMed

    Freeberg, Todd M; Lucas, Jeffrey R

    2012-02-01

    One aim of this study was to apply information theoretical analyses to understanding the structural complexity of chick-a-dee calls of Carolina chickadees, Poecile carolinensis. A second aim of this study was to compare this structural complexity to that of the calls of black-capped chickadees, P. atricapillus, described in an earlier published report (Hailman, Ficken, & Ficken, 1985). Chick-a-dee calls were recorded from Carolina chickadees in a naturalistic observation study in eastern Tennessee. Calls were analyzed using approaches from information theory, including transition probability matrices, Zipf's rules, entropies, and information coding capacities of calls and notes of calls. As described for black-capped chickadees, calls of Carolina chickadees exhibited considerable structural complexity. Most results suggested that the call of Carolina chickadees is more structurally complex than that of black-capped chickadees. These findings add support to the growing literature on the complexity of this call system in Paridae species. Furthermore, these results point to the feasibility of detailed cross-species comparative analyses that may allow strong testing of hypotheses regarding signal evolution.

  5. Addition Curing Thermosets Endcapped with 4-Amino (2.2) Paracyclophane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, John F.; Sutter, James K.; Meador, Mary A. B.; Baldwin, Larry J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    A new family of addition curing polyimides were prepared that contained 4-amino (2.2)-paracyclophane as the endcap. An improved synthesis of the endcap 4-amino-(2.2) cyclophane was accomplished increasing the yield to 60 percent and simplifying the procedure. DSC and rheological analysis of endcapped polyimide oligomers confirmed that the onset for polymerization of the ethylene bridge was 250 C. C-13 CP/MAS NMR was used to determine the structural changes of the oligomers after thermal treatment. The cyclophane capped polyimides were successfully compression molded to form void free neat resin specimens. Tg's as high as 353 C were obtained by thermomechanical analysis for postcured samples. Preliminary thermal stability studies suggest that these resins have a high onset of decomposition ranging from 549 to 567 C.

  6. Mixture of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol with DSPC liposomal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2015-07-01

    The dynamic of network of self-assembled liposome by end-capped polymer was investigated using dynamic light scattering. The liposome network, physically cross-linked by mixed liposome solutions with three different length scale of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol. The network of liposome is dependent on both the polymer concentration and length scale. In the pure liposome, one motion at low time scale is observed by DLS. In the higher concentration of polymer in liposome, several motion is observed that the fast motion is alpha relaxation and other two slow motion are beta and gamma relaxations. The distance between diffusion coefficient of fast and slow relaxation is increased with increase of length scale of endcapped polymers. The SAXS data is fitted with a Percus-Yevick hard sphere model and it shows that the size of liposome increasing with increase of polymer length scale in the mixture system.

  7. Cementitious building material incorporating end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    A cementitious composition comprising a cementitious material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the compositions are useful in making pre-formed building materials such as concrete blocks, brick, dry wall and the like or in making poured structures such as walls or floor pads; the glycols can be encapsulated to reduce their tendency to retard set.

  8. Variation in chick-a-dee calls of tufted titmice, Baeolophus bicolor: note type and individual distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jessica L; Freeberg, Todd M

    2007-08-01

    The chick-a-dee call of chickadee species (genus Poecile) has been the focus of much research. A great deal is known about the structural complexity and the meaning of variation in notes making up calls in these species. However, little is known about the likely homologous "chick-a-dee" call of the closely related tufted titmouse, Baeolophus bicolor. Tufted titmice are a prime candidate for comparative analyses of the call, because their vocal and social systems share many characteristics with those of chickadees. To address the paucity of data on the structure of chick-a-dee calls of tufted titmice, we recorded birds in field and aviary settings. Four main note types were identified in the call: Z, A, D(h), and D notes. Several acoustic parameters of each note type were measured, and statistical analyses revealed that the note types are acoustically distinct from one another. Furthermore, note types vary in the extent of individual distinctiveness reflected in their acoustic parameters. This first step towards understanding the chick-a-dee call of tufted titmice indicates that the call is comparable in structure and complexity to the calls of chickadees.

  9. An investigation of sex differences in acoustic features in black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) chick-a-dee calls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kimberley A; Hahn, Allison H; Congdon, Jenna V; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2016-09-01

    Sex differences have been identified in a number of black-capped chickadee vocalizations and in the chick-a-dee calls of other chickadee species [i.e., Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis)]. In the current study, 12 acoustic features in black-capped chickadee chick-a-dee calls were investigated, including both frequency and duration measurements. Using permuted discriminant function analyses, these features were examined to determine if any features could be used to identify the sex of the caller. Only one note type (A notes) classified male and female calls at levels approaching significance. In particular, a permuted discriminant function analysis revealed that the start frequency of A notes best allowed for categorization between the sexes compared to any other acoustic parameter. This finding is consistent with previous research on Carolina chickadee chick-a-dee calls that found that the starting frequency differed between male- and female-produced A notes [Freeberg, Lucas, and Clucas (2003). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2127-2136]. Taken together, these results and the results of studies with other chickadee species suggest that sex differences likely exist in the chick-a-dee call, specifically acoustic features in A notes, but that more complex features than those addressed here may be associated with the sex of the caller.

  10. Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Ann Hutchinson (as subject), Dr. Joan Vernikos (R), Dee O'Hara (L), J. Evans and E. Lowe pose for pictures in the NASA Magazine aritcle 'How it Feels to be a Human Test Subject' as they prepare for a bed rest study to simulate the efects of microgravity on the human body.

  11. Note types and coding in Parid vocalizations: the chick-a-dee call of the boreal chickadee (Poecile hudsonicus).

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Michele K; Hoeschele, Marisa; Bloomfield, Laurie L; Modanu, Maria; Charrier, Isabelle; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2011-05-01

    An important first step in characterizing a vocalization is to classify, describe, and measure the elements of that vocalization. Here, this methodology is employed to study the chick-a-dee call of the boreal chickadee (Poecile hudsonicus). The note types (A, B, C, D, and D(h)) in a sample of boreal chickadee calls are identified and described, spectral and temporal features of each note type are analyzed, and production phenomena in each note type are identified and quantified. Acoustic variability is compared across note types and individuals to determine potential features used for note-type and individual discrimination. Frequency measures appear to be the most useful features for identifying note types and individuals, though total duration may also be useful. Call syntax reveals that boreal chick-a-dee calls follow a general rule of note-type order, namely A-B-C-D(h)-D, and that any note type in this sequence may be repeated or omitted. This work provides a thorough description of the boreal chickadee chick-a-dee call and will serve as a foundation for future studies aimed at elucidating this call's functional significance within this species, as well as for studies comparing chick-a-dee calls across Poecile species.

  12. Categorization and discrimination of "chick-a-dee" calls by wild-caught and hand-reared chickadees.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Laurie L; Farrell, Tara M; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2008-02-01

    Bloomfield and Sturdy [Bloomfield, L.L., Sturdy, C.B. All chick-a-dee calls are not created equally. Part I. Open-ended categorization by sympatric and allopatric chickadees. Behav. Proc., in press] previously reported that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) discriminate conspecific from heterospecific (mountain chickadee, P. gambeli) 'chick-a-dee' calls, and their ability to accurately discriminate and classify the calls as belonging to separate species' defined categories was largely unaffected by their prior experience with mountain chickadees and their calls. To further examine the potential influence of experience on discrimination and categorization, we compare wild-caught black-capped chickadees, wild-caught mountain chickadees, and black-capped chickadees hand-reared among either adult laboratory-housed black-capped chickadees or adult laboratory-housed mountain chickadees on a true category/pseudo category chick-a-dee call discrimination task. Irrespective of group assignment, hand-reared birds performed as well as wild-caught birds and did not show a conspecific- or rearing-specific advantage in discrimination, categorization or memorization of chick-a-dee calls. While vocal learning is under the influence of ontogenetic experience, the results derived from the current methods suggest that experience (or a lack thereof) does not affect categorization and memorization abilities.

  13. 78 FR 38028 - Duke Energy Progress, Inc.; Notice of Video Conference To Discuss Yadkin-Pee Dee Hydroelectric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Progress, Inc.; Notice of Video Conference To Discuss Yadkin-Pee Dee Hydroelectric Project Biological Opinion On April 29, 2013, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) of the National Oceanic...

  14. Job Prospects for E/E Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the trends in employment in the electrical/electronics (E/E) engineering industry. States that although the number of E/E graduates grew at a rate of over 11 percent from 1985 to 1986, the economy continues to be the major determinant in the job outlook in the field. (TW)

  15. Job Prospects for E/E Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Reviews job prospects for electrical/electronic E/E engineers, indicating that 1985 was not a banner year due to problems in the semiconductor manufacturing industries and in telecommunications. Also indicates that an upturn is expected for 1986 E/E graduates. (JN)

  16. Exploring the effect of conducting endcaps on the Princeton MRI Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, Kyle; Gilson, Erik; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; Sloboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is believed to be the primary mechanism which generates the turbulence required to explain the rapid accretion rates observed in some magnetized accretion disks. The Princeton MRI experiment is a modified Taylor-Couette device which uses GaInSn eutectic as a working fluid to study rotating MHD Flows. Diagnostics include Ultrasound Doppler Velocimetry (UDV) for flow profile measurements and an array of magnetic Hall sensors located on the inner and outer cylinders. Results are presented from experiments with conducting endcaps which were installed in order to increase the saturation amplitude of the MRI signal and the angular momentum coupling to the fluid. The effect of conducting endcaps on Shercliff layer instabilities is examined with a comparison to previous results with insulating endcaps. With sufficient velocity shear and magnetic field strength, the fluid exerts a torque on the conducting endcaps due to a coupling via the magnetic field. The onset criterion of this torque is currently under investigation. Motivated by results from the spectral/finite-element code SFEMaNS, the inner ring speed was varied in order to minimize the contribution to the radial magnetic field measurements from non-MRI sources such as Ekman flows.

  17. Establishment and characterization of duck embryo epithelial (DEE) cell line and its use as a new approach toward DHAV-1 propagation and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxiu; Said, Abdelrahman; Wang, Yan; Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Yueqiang; Lv, Sufang; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-02

    The primary cell culture was derived from duck embryonic tissue, digested with collagenase type I. The existence of cell colonies with epithelial-like morphology, named duck embryo epithelial (DEE), were purified and optimally maintained at 37°C in M199 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum. The purified cells were identified as epithelial cell line by detecting Keratin-18 expression using immunofluorescence assay. Our findings demonstrated that DEE cell line can be propagated in culture with (i) a great capacity to adhere, (ii) a great proliferation activity, and (iii) a population doubling time of approximately 18h. Chromosomal features of the DEE cell line were remained constant after the 50th passage. Further characterizations of DEE cell line showed that cell line can normally be grown even after several passages and never converted to tumorigenic cells either in vitro or in vivo study. Susceptibility of DEE cell line was determined for transfection and duck hepatitis A type 1 virus (DHAV-1)-infection. Interestingly, the 50% egg lethal dose (ELD50) of the propagated virus in DEE cell line was higher than ELD50 of the propagated virus in embryonated eggs. Finally, DEE cell line was evaluated to be used as a candidate for DHAV-1 vaccine development. Our results showed that the propagated DHAV-1 vaccine strain SDE in DEE cell line was able to protect ducklings against DHAV-1 challenge. Taken together, our findings suggest that the DEE cell line can serve as a valuable tool for DHAV-1 propagation and vaccine production.

  18. Synthesis and Electronic Structure of Ru2(Xap)4(Y-gem-DEE) Type Compounds: Effect of Cross-Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Forrest, William P; Choudhuri, Mohommad M R; Kilyanek, Stefan M; Natoli, Sean N; Prentice, Boone M; Fanwick, Phillip E; Crutchley, Robert J; Ren, Tong

    2015-08-03

    Reported in this Article are the preparation and characterization of a series of new Ru2(II,III) compounds bearing one cross-conjugated σ-geminal-diethynylethene ligand (gem-DEE), namely, Ru2(Xap)4(Y-gem-DEE) (Xap = N,N'-anilinopyridinate (ap) or 2-(3,5-dimethoxy)anilinopyridinate (DiMeOap), and Y = Si(i)Pr3 (1) or H (2)) and [Ru2(ap)4]2(μ-gem-DEE) (3). Compounds 1-3 were characterized by spectroscopic and voltammetric techniques as well as the single crystal X-ray diffraction study of 2a. The X-ray structural data of 2a and the spectroscopic/voltammetric data of compounds 1 and 2 indicate that the gem-DEE ligands are similar to simple alkynyls in their effects on the molecular and electronic structures of the Ru2(Xap)4 moiety. Similar to the previously studied [Ru2(ap)4]2(μ-C2n) type compounds, dimer 3 exhibits pairwise 1e(-) oxidations and reductions, albeit the potential splits within the pair (ΔE1/2) are significantly smaller than those of [Ru2(ap)4]2(μ-C4). The electronic absorption spectra of the reduced and oxidized derivatives of 1a and 3 were determined using spectroelectrochemistry methods. No discernible intervalence charge transfer transition (IVCT) was detected in the near-IR spectrum for either 3(-) or 3(+), suggesting that the Ru2-Ru2 coupling in these mixed-valence states is weak. DFT calculations on a model compound of 3 yielded six singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMOs), which have Ru2 contributions similar to those previously calculated for the [Ru2(ap)4]2(μ-C2n) type compounds. Among six SOMOs, SOMO-2 is the only one containing substantial dπ-π(gem-DEE) character across the entire Ru2-μ-gem-DEE-Ru2 linkage, which explains the weakened Ru2-Ru2 coupling.

  19. Experimental Study of the Thermodynamic Properties of Diethyl Ether (DEE) at Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikhronidi, N. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.; Batyrova, R. G.; Stepanov, G. V.; Ustuzhanin, E. E.; Wu, J. T.

    2011-03-01

    The isochoric heat capacities {({C_{V1}^' ,{C_{V1}^'',{C_{V2}^',{C_{V2}^'')}, saturation densities ({ρ _S^' and ({ρ_S^'')}), vapor pressures ( P S), thermal-pressure coefficients {γ_V=left({partial P/partial T}right)_V}, and first temperature derivatives of the vapor pressure γ S = (d P S/d T) of diethyl ether (DEE) on the liquid-gas coexistence curve near the critical point have been measured with a high-temperature and high-pressure nearly constant-volume adiabatic piezo-calorimeter. The measurements of {({C_{V1}^' ,{C_{V1}^'',{C_{V2}^',{C_{V2}^'')} were made in the liquid and vapor one- and two-phase regions along the coexistence curve. The calorimeter was additionally supplied with a calibrated extensometer to accurately and simultaneously measure the PVT, C V VT, and thermal-pressure coefficient, γ V , along the saturation curve. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 416 K to 466.845 K (the critical temperature) for 17 liquid and vapor densities from 212.6 kg · m-3 to 534.6 kg · m-3. The quasi-static thermo- (reading of PRT, T - τ plot) and baro-gram (readings of the tensotransducer, P - τ plot) techniques were used to accurately measure the phase-transition parameters ( P S , ρ S , T S) and γ V . The total experimental uncertainty of density ( ρ S), pressure ( P S), temperature ( T S), isochoric heat capacities {({C_{V1}^' ,{C_{V1}^'',{C_{V2}^',{C_{V2}^'')}, and thermal-pressure coefficient, γ V , were estimated to be 0.02 % to 0.05 %, 0.05 %, 15 mK, 2 % to 3 %, and 0.12 % to 1.5 %, respectively. The measured values of saturated caloric {({C_{V1}^' ,{C_{V1}^'',{C_{V2}^',{C_{V2}^'')} and saturated thermal ( P S, ρ S, T S) properties were used to calculate other derived thermodynamic properties C P , C S, W, K T , P int, Δ H vap, and {left({partial V/partial T}right)_P^' of DEE near the critical point. The second temperature derivatives of the vapor pressure, (d2 P S/d T 2), and chemical potential, (d2 μ/d T 2), were

  20. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  1. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  2. Effect of the endcapping of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography adsorbents on the adsorption isotherm

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The retention mechanisms of n-propylbenzoate, 4-t ert-butylphenol, and caffeine on the endcapped Symmetry-C{sub 18} and the non-endcapped Resolve-C{sub 18} are compared. The adsorption isotherms were measured by frontal analysis (FA), using as the mobile phase mixtures of methanol or acetonitrile and water of various compositions. The isotherm data were modeled and the adsorption energy distributions calculated. The surface heterogeneity increases faster with decreasing methanol concentration on the non-endcapped than on the endcapped adsorbent. For instance, for methanol concentrations exceeding 30% (v/v), the adsorption of caffeine is accounted for by assuming three and two different types of adsorption sites on Resolve-C{sub 18} and Symmetry-C{sub 18}, respectively. This is explained by the effect of the mobile phase composition on the structure of the C{sub 18}-bonded layer. The bare surface of bonded silica appears more accessible to solute molecules at high water contents in the mobile phase. On the other hand, replacing methanol by a stronger organic modifier like acetonitrile dampens the differences between non-endcapped and endcapped stationary phase and decreases the degree of surface heterogeneity of the adsorbent. For instance, at acetonitrile concentrations exceeding 20%, the surface appears nearly homogeneous for the adsorption of caffeine.

  3. Acoustic Mechanisms of a Species-Based Discrimination of the chick-a-dee Call in Sympatric Black-Capped (Poecile atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadees (P. gambeli)

    PubMed Central

    Guillette, Lauren M.; Farrell, Tara M.; Hoeschele, Marisa; Sturdy, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Previous perceptual research with black-capped and mountain chickadees has demonstrated that these species treat each other's namesake chick-a-dee calls as belonging to separate, open-ended categories. Further, the terminal dee portion of the call has been implicated as the most prominent species marker. However, statistical classification using acoustic summary features suggests that all note-types contained within the chick-a-dee call should be sufficient for species classification. The current study seeks to better understand the note-type based mechanisms underlying species-based classification of the chick-a-dee call by black-capped and mountain chickadees. In two, complementary, operant discrimination experiments, both species were trained to discriminate the species of the signaler using either entire chick-a-dee calls, or individual note-types from chick-a-dee calls. In agreement with previous perceptual work we find that the D note had significant stimulus control over species-based discrimination. However, in line with statistical classifications, we find that all note-types carry species information. We discuss reasons why the most easily discriminated note-types are likely candidates to carry species-based cues. PMID:21833284

  4. Acoustic Mechanisms of a Species-Based Discrimination of the chick-a-dee Call in Sympatric Black-Capped (Poecile atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadees (P. gambeli).

    PubMed

    Guillette, Lauren M; Farrell, Tara M; Hoeschele, Marisa; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2010-01-01

    Previous perceptual research with black-capped and mountain chickadees has demonstrated that these species treat each other's namesake chick-a-dee calls as belonging to separate, open-ended categories. Further, the terminal dee portion of the call has been implicated as the most prominent species marker. However, statistical classification using acoustic summary features suggests that all note-types contained within the chick-a-dee call should be sufficient for species classification. The current study seeks to better understand the note-type based mechanisms underlying species-based classification of the chick-a-dee call by black-capped and mountain chickadees. In two, complementary, operant discrimination experiments, both species were trained to discriminate the species of the signaler using either entire chick-a-dee calls, or individual note-types from chick-a-dee calls. In agreement with previous perceptual work we find that the D note had significant stimulus control over species-based discrimination. However, in line with statistical classifications, we find that all note-types carry species information. We discuss reasons why the most easily discriminated note-types are likely candidates to carry species-based cues.

  5. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Series EE bonds are issued at a discount. The... Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351)....

  6. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353.30... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Series EE bonds are issued at a discount. The... Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351)....

  7. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Definitive Series EE bonds were issued... values is found in Department of the Treasury Circular, Fiscal Service Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351)....

  8. Separation of e+e- → e+e- and e+e- → π+π- events using SND detector calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Beloborodov, K. I.; Kupich, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The technique of discrimination of the e+e- → e+e- and e+e- → π+π- events in energy range 0.5 < √s < 1 GeV by energy deposition in the calorimeter of SND detector was developed by applying machine learning method. Identification efficiency for e+e- → e+e- and e+e- → π+π- events in the range from 99.3 to 99.8% has been achived.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of new spacers for use as dsDNA endcaps

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Pei-Sze; Laing, Brian M.; Balasundarum, Ganesan; Pingle, Maneesh; Friedman, Alan; Bergstrom, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic spacer molecules designed to cap the ends of DNA duplexes have been synthesized. The spacers were converted into dimethoxytrityl protected phosphoramidites as synthons for oligonucleotides synthesis. The effect of the spacers on the stability of short DNA duplexes was assessed by melting temperature studies. Endcaps containing amide groups were found to be less stabilizing than the hexaethylene glycol spacer. Endcaps containing either a terthiophene or a naphthalene tetracarboxylic acid dimide were found to be significantly more stabilizing. The former showed a preference for stacking above an A•T base pair. Spacers containing only methylene (-CH2-) and amide (-CONH-) groups interact weakly with DNA and consequently may be optimal for applications that require minimal influence on DNA structure but require a way to hold the ends of double-stranded DNA together. PMID:20715857

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of new spacers for use as dsDNA end-caps.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei-Sze; Laing, Brian M; Balasundarum, Ganesan; Pingle, Maneesh; Friedman, Alan; Bergstrom, Donald E

    2010-08-18

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic spacer molecules designed to cap the ends of DNA duplexes have been synthesized. The spacers were converted into dimethoxytrityl-protected phosphoramidites as synthons for oligonucleotides synthesis. The effect of the spacers on the stability of short DNA duplexes was assessed by melting temperature studies. End-caps containing amide groups were found to be less stabilizing than the hexaethylene glycol spacer. End-caps containing either a terthiophene or a naphthalene tetracarboxylic acid diimide were found to be significantly more stabilizing. The former showed a preference for stacking above an A*T base pair. Spacers containing only methylene (-CH(2)-) and amide (-CONH-) groups interact weakly with DNA and consequently may be optimal for applications that require minimal influence on DNA structure but require a way to hold the ends of double-stranded DNA together.

  11. Nephrotoxic effects of aquoeus extract U & Dee Sweet Bitter (a Nigerian herbal remedy) in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ezejiofor, N A; Maduagwuna, N; Igwebuike, Onyiaorah Victor; Hussaini, D C; Orisakwe, O E

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the extract of U & Dee Sweet Bitter, a Nigerian herbal remedy on the kidney was investigated in matured Wistar albino rats. Twenty male albino rats were allocated into four dose groups of five rats each, namely 0.00, 539, 1077, 1616 mg/kg of the herbal product orally for 90 days. Animals had access to deionized water and were fed ad libitum with rat chow for 90 days. The feed and fluid consumption of the animals were measured on daily basis, and the body weight was measured weekly. After 90 days, the animals were anaesthetized with ether, bled, sacrificed, kidney excised, and weighed. The parameters measured included food and fluid intake, body weight, absolute and relative weight of the kidney. A nonsignificant increase (p > .05) in feed and fluid intake occurred in all treated animals and a significant decrease (p < .05) in absolute weight of the kidney in all the treated animals when compared with the control. The administration of 539, 1077, and 1616mg/kg of U & Dee Sweet Bitter caused a significant (p < .05) dose-dependent increase in creatinine, whereas a significant dose-dependent decrease for urea was noted compared with the control. Histological study showed that U & Dee Sweet Bitter at all doses caused renal pathologic changes that include tubular necrosis, inflammation of the interstitial and glomerulus, and disorganization of the entire architecture. The results are indicative of nephrotoxicity.

  12. Performance of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter end-cap module 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Ballansat, J.; Bazan, A.; Beaugiraud, B.; Boniface, J.; Chollet, F.; Colas, J.; Delebecque, P.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; El Kacimi, M.; Gaumer, O.; Ghez, P.; Girard, C.; Gouanère, M.; Kambara, H.; Jérémie, A.; Jézéquel, S.; Lafaye, R.; Leflour, T.; Le Maner, C.; Lesueur, J.; Massol, N.; Moynot, M.; Neukermans, L.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Poggioli, L.; Prast, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Riccadona, X.; Sauvage, G.; Thion, J.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Zitoun, R.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Chen, H.; Citterio, M.; Farrell, J.; Gordon, H.; Hackenburg, B.; Hoffman, A.; Kierstead, J.; Lanni, F.; Leite, M.; Lissauer, D.; Ma, H.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rescia, S.; Stumer, I.; Takai, H.; Yip, K.; Benchekroun, D.; Driouichi, C.; Hoummada, A.; Hakimi, M.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Beck Hansen, J.; Belymam, A.; Bremer, J.; Chevalley, J. L.; Fassnacht, P.; Gianotti, F.; Hervas, L.; Marin, C. P.; Pailler, P.; Schilly, P.; Seidl, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vuillemin, V.; Clark, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Moneta, L.; Belhorma, B.; Collot, J.; Ferrari, A.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Martin, P.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Saboumazrag, S.; Ban, J.; Cartiglia, N.; Cunitz, H.; Dodd, J.; Gara, A.; Leltchouk, M.; Negroni, S.; Parsons, J. A.; Seman, M.; Simion, S.; Sippach, W.; Willis, W.; Barreiro, F.; Garcia, G.; Labarga, L.; Rodier, S.; del Peso, J.; Alexa, C.; Barrillon, P.; Benchouk, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Dinkespiler, B.; Djama, F.; Duval, P. Y.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hinz, L.; Jevaud, M.; Karst, P.; Le Van Suu, A.; Martin, L.; Martin, O.; Mirea, A.; Monnier, E.; Nagy, E.; Nicod, D.; Olivier, C.; Pralavorio, P.; Repetti, B.; Raymond, M.; Sauvage, D.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Wielers, M.; Battistoni, G.; Carminati, L.; Costa, G.; Delmastro, M.; Fanti, M.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Aulchenko, V.; Kazanin, V.; Kolachev, G.; Malyshev, V.; Maslennikov, A.; Pospelov, G.; Snopkov, R.; Shousharo, A.; Talyshev, A.; Tikhonov, Yu; Augé, E.; Bourdarios, C.; Breton, D.; Bonivento, W.; Cros, P.; de La Taille, C.; Falleau, I.; Fournier, D.; Guilhem, G.; Hassani, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Kordas, K.; Macé, G.; Merkel, B.; Noppe, J. M.; Parrour, G.; Pétroff, P.; Puzo, P.; Richer, J. P.; Rousseau, D.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Serin, L.; Tocut, V.; Veillet, J. J.; Zerwas, D.; Astesan, F.; Bertoli, W.; Camard, A.; Canton, B.; Fichet, S.; Hubaut, F.; Imbault, D.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Martin, D.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Orsini, F.; Rossel, F.; Schwemling, P.; Cleland, W.; McDonald, J.; Abouelouafa, E. M.; Ben Mansour, A.; Cherkaoui, R.; El Mouahhidi, Y.; Ghazlane, H.; Idrissi, A.; Belorgey, J.; Bernard, R.; Chalifour, M.; Le Coroller, A.; Ernwein, J.; Mansoulié, B.; Renardy, J. F.; Schwindling, J.; Taguet, J.-P.; Teiger, J.; Clément, C.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundqvist, J.; Megner, L.; Pearce, M.; Rydstrom, S.; Egdemir, J.; Engelmann, R.; Hoffman, J.; McCarthy, R.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Steffens, J.; This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Dominique Sauvage, actively involved in the detector construction; beam test activities, who died accidentaly on March 16, 2002.

    2003-03-01

    The construction and beam test results of the ATLAS electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter pre-production module 0 are presented. The stochastic term of the energy resolution is between 10% and 12.5% GeV1/2 over the full pseudorapidity range. Position and angular resolutions are found to be in agreement with simulation. A global constant term of 0.6% is obtained in the pseudorapidity range 2.5< η<3.2 (inner wheel).

  13. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  14. Sensors for the End-cap prototype of the Inner Tracker in the ATLAS Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, V.; Ullán, M.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Fleta, C.; Lozano, M.; Sperlich, D.; Hauser, M.; Wonsak, S.; Parzefall, U.; Mahboubi, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Jakobs, K.; Bernabeu, J.; García, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marco, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.; Ariza, D.; Bloch, I.; Diez, S.; Gregor, I. M.; Keller, J.; Lohwasser, K.; Peschke, R.; Poley, L.; Brenner, R.; Affolder, A.

    2016-10-01

    The new silicon microstrip sensors of the End-cap part of the HL-LHC ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) present a number of challenges due to their complex design features such as the multiple different sensor shapes, the varying strip pitch, or the built-in stereo angle. In order to investigate these specific problems, the "petalet" prototype was defined as a small End-cap prototype. The sensors for the petalet prototype include several new layout and technological solutions to investigate the issues, they have been tested in detail by the collaboration. The sensor description and detailed test results are presented in this paper. New software tools have been developed for the automatic layout generation of the complex designs. The sensors have been fabricated, characterized and delivered to the institutes in the collaboration for their assembly on petalet prototypes. This paper describes the lessons learnt from the design and tests of the new solutions implemented on these sensors, which are being used for the full petal sensor development. This has resulted in the ITk strip community acquiring the necessary expertise to develop the full End-cap structure, the petal.

  15. John Dee and the alchemists: Practising and promoting English alchemy in the Holy Roman Empire

    PubMed Central

    Rampling, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates John Dee’s relationship with two kinds of alchemist: the authorities whose works he read, and the contemporary practitioners with whom he exchanged texts and ideas. Both strands coincide in the reception of works attributed to the famous English alchemist, George Ripley (d. c. 1490). Dee’s keen interest in Ripley appears from the number of transcriptions he made of ‘Ripleian’ writings, including the Bosome book, a manuscript discovered in 1574 and believed to have been written in Ripley’s own hand. In 1583, Dee and his associate Edward Kelley left England for East Central Europe, taking with them a proportion of Dee’s vast library, including alchemical books—the contents of which would soon pique the interest of continental practitioners. Kelley used Ripley’s works, including the Bosome book, not only as sources of practical information, but as a means of furthering his own relationships with colleagues and patrons: transactions that in turn influenced Ripley’s posthumous continental reception. The resulting circulation of texts allows us to trace, with unusual precision, the spread of English alchemical ideas in the Holy Roman Empire from the late sixteenth century.

  16. Validating Experimental Bedform Dynamics on Cohesive Sand-Mud Beds in the Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Jaco H.; Baker, Megan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Rocha, Renata

    2014-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that small quantities of cohesive clay, and in particular 'sticky' biological polymers, within a sandy substrate dramatically reduce the development rate of sedimentary bedforms, with major implications for sediment transport rate calculations and process interpretations from the sedimentary record. FURTHER INFORMATION Flow and sediment transport predictions from sedimentary structures found in modern estuaries and within estuarine geological systems are impeded by an almost complete lack of process-based knowledge of the behaviour of natural sediments that consist of mixtures of cohesionless sand and biologically-active cohesive mud. Indeed, existing predictive models are largely based on non-organic cohesionless sands, despite the fact that mud, in pure form or mixed with sand, is the most common sediment on Earth and also the most biologically active interface across a range of Earth-surface environments, including rivers and shallow seas. The multidisciplinary COHBED project uses state-of-the-art laboratory and field technologies to measure the erosional properties of mixed cohesive sediment beds and the formation and stability of sedimentary bedforms on these beds, integrating the key physical and biological processes that govern bed evolution. The development of current ripples on cohesive mixed sediment beds was investigated as a function of physical control on bed cohesion versus biological control on bed cohesion. These investigations included laboratory flume experiments in the Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Bangor University) and field experiments in the Dee estuary (at West Kirby near Liverpool). The flume experiments showed that winnowing of fine-grained cohesive sediment, including biological stabilisers, is an important process affecting the development rate, size and shape of the cohesive bedforms. The ripples developed progressively slower as the kaolin clay fraction in the sandy substrate

  17. EE Certification: Making Best Practice Standard Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Joanne M. Lozar

    2006-01-01

    Pursuing environmental education certification is difficult, so why do it? What does it mean to be certified? Who benefits? How? These are just a few of the compelling questions addressed in "EE Certification: Making Best Practice Standard Practice," a new article exploring advancements and challenges in state and national EE…

  18. Rhodes University EE and Sustainability Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisitka, Heila Lotz; Schudel, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    In the early 1990s, in response to the emphasis laid on environment and development issues by the new South African Constitution, Rhodes University undertook several initiatives such as establishing the first Chair of Environmental Education (EE) in Africa. Another important initiative was the introduction of an open-entry participatory course for…

  19. The synthesis, characterization and thermal chemistry of modified norbornenyl PMR endcaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukenik, C. N.; Ritchey, W. M.; Malhotra, V.; Varde, U.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a program to further the understanding of the polymerization of Nadic-Endcapped PMR systems, a series of model Norbornenyl-Imides has been synthesized and their thermal behavior explored. Their syntheses and characterizations as well as their rearrangement and polymerization chemistry are described. Monomer isomerization at temperatures as low as 125 C and oligomer formation at somewhat higher temperatures are observed. Approximate relative rates for competing isomerization pathways are established and some information is obtained about the details of oligomer formation. The relationship of this data to current PMR systems is briefly discussed.

  20. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353.30... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Definitive Series EE bonds were issued at a... found in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351)....

  1. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353.30... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Definitive Series EE bonds were issued at a... found in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351)....

  2. The biogeochemical reactivity of suspended particulate matter at nested sites in the Dee basin, NE Scotland.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J J C; Adhikari, Y R; Soulsby, C; Stutter, M I

    2012-09-15

    Variation in the organic matter content associated with suspended particulate matter (SPM) is an often overlooked component of carbon cycling within freshwater riverine systems. The potential biogeochemical reactivity of particulate organic carbon (POC) that affect its interactions and fate, i.e. respired and lost to the atmosphere along river continua or ultimately exported to estuarine and oceanic pools was assessed. Eleven contrasting sites draining nested catchments (5-1837 km(2)) in the River Dee basin, NE Scotland were sampled during summer 2008 to evaluate spatio-temporal variations in quantity and quality (biogeochemical reactivity) of SPM during relatively low flow conditions. Mean SPM concentrations increased from 0.21 to 1.22 mg L(-1) between the uppermost and lowest mainstem sites. Individually, POC concentrations ranged from 0.08 to 0.55 mg L(-1) and accounted for ca. 3-15% of total aqueous organic carbon transported. The POC content was partitioned into autotrophic (2.78-73.0 mg C g(-1) SPM) and detrital (119-388 mg C g(-1) SPM) biomass carbon content. The particulate respired CO(2)-C as a % of the total carbon associated with SPM, measured by MicroResp™ over 18 h, varied in recalcitrance from 0.49% at peat-dominated sites to 3.20% at the lowermost mainstem site. Significant (p<0.05) relationships were observed between SPM biogeochemical reactivity measures (% respired CO(2)-C; chlorophyll α; bioavailable-phosphorus) and arable and improved grassland area, associated with increasing biological productivity downstream. Compositional characteristics and in-stream processing of SPM appear to be related to contributory land use pressures, that influence SPM characteristics and biogeochemistry (C:N:P stoichiometry) of its surrounding aqueous environment. As moorland influences declined, nutrient inputs from arable and improved grasslands increasingly affected the biogeochemical content and reactivity of both dissolved and particulate matter. This

  3. Water resources of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, Robert Eugene; LeGrand, H.E.; Billingsley, G.A.

    1957-01-01

    Sufficient water is available in the basin of the Yadkin and Pee Dee Rivers to meet present requirements and those for many years to come if water use increases at about the present rate. Data presented in this report show that the average annual streamflow from approximately 82 percent of the basin area during the 25-year period, 1929-53, was about 6,200 mgd, representing essentially the total available water supply. Comparison of the available water supply to the estimated withdrawal use (excluding water power) of both surface and ground water of 600 mgd indicates the relative utilization of the water resources of the basin at present. If proper pollution controls are observed and practiced so that water in the various streams may be reused several times, the potential water available is even greater than indicated by the above comparison. Preliminary studies indicate that the quantity of water now being withdrawn from ground-water reservoirs in the basin is only a fraction of the total that may be obtained from this source. Twenty-eight of the 64 municipalities having public water-supply systems use surface water; however, as the largest cities in the area use surface supplies, about 85 percent of the water used for public supplies is from surface sources. Of the 20 complete-record stream-gaging stations now in operation in this area 7 have been in operation for 24 years or longer. Periodic measurements of the rate of flow have been made at 31 additional sites on streams scattered widely over the basin. All available streamflow data including those for 1953 are summarized in either graphic or tabular form, or both. Because of the critically low flows occurring during the drought of 1954, several illustrations include data for 1954 and the early months of 1955 for comparison with the minima of previous years. Adequate water for domestic use is available from wells throughout the basin. The consolidated rocks of the Piedmont furnish water for small industries and

  4. Design studies of the PWO Forward End-cap calorimeter for P¯ANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, H.; Al-Turany, M.; Babai, M.; Biegun, A.; Bondarenko, O.; Götzen, K.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Löhner, H.; Melnychuk, D.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Smit, H. A. J.; Spataro, S.; Veenstra, R.

    2013-11-01

    The P¯ANDA detection system at FAIR, Germany, is designed to study antiproton-proton annihilations, in order to investigate, among others, the realm of charm-meson states and glueballs, which has still much to reveal. The yet unknown properties of this field are to be unraveled through studying QCD phenomena in the non-perturbative regime. The multipurpose P¯ANDA detector will be capable of tracking, calorimetry, and particle identification, and is planned to run at high luminosities providing average reaction rates up to 2 · 107 interactions/s. The envisaged physics program requires measurements of photons and charged particles with excellent energy, position, and time resolutions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will serve as one of the basic components of the detector setup and comprises cooled lead-tungstate (PbWO4) crystals. This paper presents the mechanical design of the Forward End-cap calorimeter and analyzes the response of the Forward End-cap calorimeter in conjunction with the full EMC and the complete P¯ANDA detector. The simulation studies are focused on the performance of the planned EMC with respect to the energy and spatial resolution of the reconstructed photons. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations, excluding very low-energy photons, have been validated by data obtained from a prototype calorimeter and shown to fulfil the requirements imposed by the P¯ANDA physics program.

  5. Effects of implant diameter, drug loading and end-capping on praziquantel release from PCL implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyan; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yaqiong; Guo, Shengrong; Wu, Weiping

    2010-02-15

    Praziquantel (PZQ)-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) cylindrical implants were fabricated and characterized. Implant diameter (3, 4 and 8mm), drug loading (25% and 50%), and the end-capping were investigated to evaluate their effects on drug release. The evolution of implants with release time was conducted in terms of implant microstructure, crystallinity, drug content and molecular weight of PCL. The results showed that drug release was fastest for the implant with a diameter of 3mm and slowest for the implant with a diameter of 8mm; drug release from the implant with a drug content of 50% was faster than that from the implant with a drug content of 25%; the release of PZQ from the end-capped implants was slightly slower than that from the corresponding end-uncapped implants. The effect of drug loadings on PZQ release was related with diameter of the implants and the effect was weakened as diameter of the implants increased. The drug release data for all the implants were best fitted with Ritger-Peppas model, therefore Fickian diffusion was the predominant release mechanism. The evolution of implants with release time verified that PZQ was gradually released from the exterior to the interior of the implants.

  6. R&D Studies on Radiation Hard Wavelength Shifting Fiber for CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, John

    2009-11-01

    The Hadronic Endcap (HE) calorimeters of the CMS experiment cover the pseudorapidity range of 1.4 to 3 on both sides of the CMS detector, contributing to superior jet and missing transverse energy resolutions. As the integrated luminosity of the LHC increases, the scintillator tiles used in the CMS Hadronic Endcap calorimeter will lose their efficiency. Here, we propose to replace the scintillator tiles in high radiation area with ``radiation hard'' quartz plates. To increase the light collection efficiency, the generated Cerenkov photons are collected by UV absorbing wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers. Our previous study has shown that quartz plates and plastic wavelength shifting fibers can be used as an effective calorimeter. However there is no radiation hard WLS fiber commercially available. Here we summarize the R&D studies on constructing a radiation hard WLS fiber prototype in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. The results from the tests performed on quartz fibers treated with p-Terphenyl, as well as the Geant4 simulations of this prototype are presented.

  7. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the ATLAS Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Haug, F.; Junker, S.; Passardi, G.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.

    2004-06-23

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requirements of the magnets in the various operating scenarios.

  8. Synthesis of Hetero-bifunctional, End-Capped Oligo-EDOT Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Christopher D; Booth, Marsilea A; Mawad, Damia; Armgarth, Astrid; Nielsen, Christian B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-01-12

    Conjugated oligomers of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) are attractive materials for tissue engineering applications and as model systems for studying the properties of the widely used polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). We report here the facile synthesis of a series of keto-acid end-capped oligo-EDOT derivatives (n = 2-7) through a combination of a glyoxylation end-capping strategy and iterative direct arylation chain extension. Importantly, these structures not only represent the longest oligo-EDOTs reported but are also bench stable, in contrast to previous reports on such oligomers. The constructs reported here can undergo subsequent derivatization for integration into higher-order architectures, such as those required for tissue engineering applications. The synthesis of hetero-bifunctional constructs, as well as those containing mixed-monomer units, is also reported, allowing further complexity to be installed in a controlled manner. Finally, we describe the optical and electrochemical properties of these oligomers and demonstrate the importance of the keto-acid in determining their characteristics.

  9. Double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes: Synthesis, characterization and platelet adhesion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jiehua; Tan, Hong; Fu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing double chains and phosphotidylcholine polar head groups, 2-(10-(2-aminoethylamino)-10-oxodecanamido)-3-(decyloxy)-3-oxopropyl phosphorylcholine (ADDPC), was synthesized and characterized. Two kinds of double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes with different soft segments were prepared. The structure of prepared polyurethanes was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry and atomic force microscope (AFM), which indicated that the double-chain phospholipids enriched onto the top surface of the prepared polyurethane films. The preliminary evaluation of blood compatibility showed that these novel phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes could suppress platelet adhesion and activation effectively. This property did not depend on the chemical structure of polyurethanes. In addition, according to tensile test results, the phospholipid polyurethanes kept good mechanical properties in comparison with original polyurethanes. It is suggested that double-chain phospholipid end-caption has good potential for achieving both hemocompatibility and good mechanical properties simultaneously for polyurethanes.

  10. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  11. High performance asymmetrical push-pull small molecules end-capped with cyanophenyl for solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Li, Yanqin; Wang, Lihui; Ji, Changyan; Wang, Yue; Tian, Wenjing; Yang, Xichuan; Yin, Lunxiang

    2014-09-14

    Two novel asymmetrical push-pull small molecules have been synthesized successfully, consisting of triphenylamine and diketopyrrolopyrrole as a fundamental dipolar D-π-A structure with ethynylbenzene as the π-bridge. TPATDPPCN end-capped with cyanophenyl exhibits a low optical band gap of 1.65 eV, and an impressive PCE of 5.94% has been achieved.

  12. Audre's daughter: Black lesbian steganography in Dee Rees' Pariah and Audre Lorde's Zami: A New Spelling of My Name.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that African-American director Dee Rees' critically acclaimed debut Pariah (2011) is a rewriting of lesbian poet-activist Audre Lorde's iconic "bio-mythography" Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982). The article examines how Rees' work creatively and subtly re-envisions Lorde's Zami by way of deeply rooted and often cleverly camouflaged patterns, resonances, and contrasts. Shared topics include naming, mother-daughter bonds, the role of clothing in identity formation, domestic abuse, queer time, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender legacy discourse construction. What emerges between the visual and written texts is a hidden language of connection--what may be termed Black lesbian steganography--which proves thought-provoking to viewers and readers alike.

  13. Performance of the Prototype Readout System for the CMS Endcap Hadron Calorimeter Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverin, Nate; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Pastika, Nathaniel; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will upgrade the photodetectors and readout systems of the endcap hadron calorimeter during the technical stop scheduled for late 2016 and early 2017. A major milestone for this project was a highly successful testbeam run at CERN in August 2015. The testbeam run served as a full integration test of the electronics, allowing a study of the response of the preproduction electronics to the true detector light profile, as well as a test of the light yield of various new plastic scintillator materials. We present implications for the performance of the hadron calorimeter front-end electronics based on testbeam data, and we report on the production status of various components of the system in preparation for the upgrade.

  14. Stability of the Gains of the STAR Endcap Calorimeter from 2006 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Kayla

    2012-10-01

    The Solenoid Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment, based at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), uses polarized-proton collisions to investigate sea quark and gluon contributions to the known proton spin. The STAR detector's Endcap Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EEMC) measures the energy of particles produced by those collisions using a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter, consisting of several layers that include pre-shower, shower maximum, tower, and post-shower detectors. In these detectors, the energy gains, which convert a measured pulse into an energy deposition, have been determined using data taken from the years, 2006, 2009 and 2011. Changes in the gains over time may result from known high voltage changes or deterioration of the detector, such as from radiation damage. A comparison of the gains from the three years will be presented.

  15. Inclusive 0̂ Production in Polarized pp Collisions using the STAR Endcap Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Jason

    2007-10-01

    The two-spin helicity asymmetry for inclusive 0̂ production in polarized pp collisions can provide constraints on the gluon contribution to the spin of the proton with sensitivity comparable to that attainable with full jet reconstruction [1]. In 2006, the STAR experiment accumulated 6 pb-1 of data with beams longitudinally polarized (P 60%) at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Measurements of ALL(0̂) in the range 1 < η< 2 provide information about a different mix of partonic subprocesses and are subject to different experimental uncertainties than mid-rapidity jet measurements, providing an important cross check. Status of the analysis of ALL(0̂) measured using the STAR Endcap Calorimeter [2] is discussed. [1] B. Jager, M. Stratmann and W. Vogelsang, Phys. Rev. D 70, 034010 (2004) [arXiv:hep-ph/0404057]. [2] K. H. Ackermann et al. [STAR Collaboration], Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 499, 624 (2003).

  16. Experimental Study of the Isochoric Heat Capacity of Diethyl Ether (DEE) in the Critical and Supercritical Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikhronidi, N. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.; Batyrova, R. G.; Stepanov, G. V.; Wu, J. T.; Ustuzhanin, E. E.

    2012-02-01

    Two- and one-phase liquid and vapor isochoric heat capacities ( C V ρ T relationship) of diethyl ether (DEE) in the critical and supercritical regions have been measured with a high-temperature and high-pressure nearly constant-volume adiabatic calorimeter. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 347 K to 575 K for 12 liquid and 5 vapor densities from 212.6 kg·m-3 to 534.6 kg·m-3. The expanded uncertainties (coverage factor k = 2, two-standard deviation estimate) for values of the heat capacity were 2% to 3% in the near-critical region, 1.0% to 1.5% for the liquid isochores, and 3% to 4% for the vapor isochores. The uncertainties of density ( ρ) and temperature ( T) measurements were 0.02% and 15 mK, respectively. The values of the internal energy, U( T, V), and second temperature derivative of pressure, (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ , were derived using the measured C V data near the critical point. The critical anomaly of the measured C V and derived values of U( T, V) and (∂2 P/∂ T 2) ρ in the critical and supercritical regions were interpreted in terms of the scaling theory of critical phenomena. The asymptotic critical amplitudes {({A_0^+} and {A_0^- )}} of the scaling power laws along the critical isochore for one- and two-phase C V were calculated from the measured values of C V . Experimentally derived values of the critical amplitude ratio for {CV left({A_0^+ /A_0^- = 0.521}right)} are in good agreement with the values predicted by scaling theory. The measured C V data for DEE were analyzed to study the behavior of loci of isothermal and isochoric C V maxima and minima in the critical and supercritical regions.

  17. ATLAS Liquid Argon Endcap Calorimeter R&D for sLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schacht, P.

    2010-04-01

    The performance of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap has been studied for luminosities as expected for the operation at sLHC. The increase of integrated luminosity by a factor of ten has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the forward liquid argon calorimeters. The response has been studied with small modules of the type as built for ATLAS in a very high intensity beam at IHEP/Protvino. The highest intensity obtained was well above the level of energy impact expected for ATLAS at sLHC. The signal processing of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter employs the concept of 'active pads' which keep the detector capacities at the input of the amplifiers small and thereby achieves a fast rise time of the signal. This concept is realized using highly integrated amplifier and summing chips in GaAs technology. With an increase of luminosity by a factor of ten the safety factor for the radiation hardness is essentially eliminated. Therefore new, more radiation hard technologies have been studied: SiGe bipolar, Si CMOS FET and GaAs FET transistors have been irradiated with neutrons up to an integrated fluence of 2.2 × 1016n/cm2. All technologies exceed the limit required for the radiation hardness for the operation at sLHC of 2 × 1015n/cm2. The temperature dependence of the gain has been studied as well. Here the bipolar technologies - in contrast to CMOS - need an adjustment of the operation point when going from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature.

  18. The Co-Evolution of ESD and EE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    William B. Stapp, a major author of the founding documents of environmental education (EE), foreshadowed the triple concerns of education for sustainable development (ESD) with environment, social justice and economic health. Yet EE in the USA tended to follow the advocacy orientation of the environmental movement of the 1970s and later, following…

  19. Some Historical Thoughts on the ee-Learning Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilles, Jack M.

    2007-01-01

    Jack Nilles surveys the evolution of ee-learning at the University of Southern California, together with the first formal telecommuting demonstration program, from its beginnings in the early 1970s to the relevant trends in 2006. Although the basic technologies of telecommuting and ee-learning were in evidence in the 1970s, subsequent…

  20. Column selectivity in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. VI. Columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups.

    PubMed

    Wilson, N S; Gilroy, J; Dolan, J W; Snyder, L R

    2004-02-13

    A previous model of column selectivity for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) has been applied to an additional 21 columns with embedded or end-capping polar groups (EPGs). Embedded-polar-group columns exhibit a significantly different selectivity vs. non-EPG, type-B columns, generally showing preferential retention of hydrogen-bond donors, as well as decreased retention for hydrogen-bond acceptors or ionized bases. EPG-columns are also generally less hydrophobic (more polar) than are non-EPG-columns. Interestingly, columns with polar end-capping tend to more closely resemble non-EPG columns, suggesting that the polar group has less effect on column selectivity when used to end-cap the column versus the case of an embedded polar group. Column selectivity data reported here for EPG-columns can be combined with previously reported values for non-EPG columns to provide a database of 154 different columns. This enables a comparison of any two of these columns in terms of selectivity. However, comparisons that involve EPG columns are more approximate.

  1. DC Potentials Applied to an End-cap Electrode of a 3-D Ion Trap for Enhanced MSn Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Xu, Wei; Ouyang, Zheng; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the application of various DC magnitudes and polarities to an end-cap of a 3-D quadrupole ion trap throughout a mass spectrometry experiment were investigated. Application of a monopolar DC field was achieved by applying a DC potential to the exit end-cap electrode, while maintaining the entrance end-cap electrode at ground potential. Control over the monopolar DC magnitude and polarity during time periods associated with ion accumulation, mass analysis, ion isolation, ion/ion reaction, and ion activation can have various desirable effects. Included amongst these are increased ion capture efficiency, increased ion ejection efficiency during mass analysis, effective isolation of ions using lower AC resonance ejection amplitudes, improved temporal control of the overlap of oppositely charged ion populations, and the performance of “broad-band” collision induced dissociation (CID). These results suggest general means to improve the performance of the 3-D ion trap in a variety of mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. PMID:21927573

  2. Key Role of End-Capping Groups in Optoelectronic Properties of Poly-p-phenylene Cation Radicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly-p-phenylenes (PPs) are prototype systems for understanding the charge transport in π-conjugated polymers. In a combined computational and experimental study, we demonstrate that the smooth evolution of redox and optoelectronic properties of PP cation radicals toward the polymeric limit can be significantly altered by electron-donating iso-alkyl and iso-alkoxy end-capping groups. A multiparabolic model (MPM) developed and validated here rationalizes this unexpected effect by interplay of the two modes of hole stabilization: due to the framework of equivalent p-phenylene units and due to the electron-donating end-capping groups. A symmetric, bell-shaped hole in unsubstituted PPs becomes either slightly skewed and shifted toward an end of the molecule in iso-alkyl-capped PPs or highly deformed and concentrated on a terminal unit in PPs with strongly electron-donating iso-alkoxy capping groups. The MPM shows that the observed linear 1/n evolution of the PP cation radical properties toward the polymer limit originates from the hole stabilization due to the growing chain of p-phenylene units, while shifting of the hole toward electron-donating end-capping groups leads to early breakdown of these 1/n dependencies. These insights, along with the readily applicable and flexible multistate parabolic model, can guide studies of complex donor–spacer–acceptor systems and doped molecular wires to aid the design of the next generation materials for long-range charge transport and photovoltaic applications. PMID:25264475

  3. Dependence of ripple dimensions on cohesive and non-cohesive bed properties in the intertidal Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtman, Ian; Thorne, Peter; Baas, Jacobus; O'Boyle, Louise; Cooke, Richard; Amoudry, Laurent; Bell, Paul; Aspden, Rebecca; Bass, Sarah; Davies, Alan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Manning, Andrew; Parsons, Daniel; Paterson, David; Peakall, Jeffrey; Schindler, Robert; Ye, Leiping

    2014-05-01

    There is a need to better understand the effects of cohesive and mixed sediments on coastal processes, to improve sediment transport models for the management of coastal erosion, siltation of navigation channels and habitat change. Although reasonable sediment transport predictors are available for pure sands, it still is not the case for mixed cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Existing predictors mostly relate ripple dimensions to hydrodynamic conditions and median sediment grain diameter, assuming a narrow unimodal particle size distribution. Properties typical of mixed conditions, such as composition and cohesion for example, are not usually taken into account. This presents severe shortcomings to predictors' abilities. Indeed, laboratory experiments using mixed cohesive sediments have shown that bedform dimensions decrease with increasing bed mud content. In the field, one may expect current predictors to match data for well-sorted sands closely, but poorly for mixed sediments. Our work is part of the COHBED project and aims to: (1) examine, in field conditions, if ripple dimensions are significantly different for mixed cohesive sediment beds compared to beds with pure sand; (2) compare the field data with laboratory results that showed reduced ripple length due to cohesive mud content; and (3) assess the performance of a selection of ripple predictors for mixed sediment data. The COHBED project was set up to undertake laboratory experiments and fieldwork to study how physical and biological processes influence bedform development in a mixed cohesive-cohesionless sediment environment. As part of COHBED, a suite of instruments was deployed on tidal flats in the Dee Estuary (on the NW coast of England), collecting co-located measurements of the hydrodynamics, suspended sediment properties and bed morphology. The instruments occupied three sites collecting data over different bed compositions during a two week period (21 May to 4 June 2013). One site was

  4. On the effect of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) injection upon the cold starting of a biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clenci, Adrian; Niculescu, Rodica; Iorga-Simǎn, Victor; Tricǎ, Alina; Danlos, Amélie

    2017-02-01

    The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. This paper is a consequence of a study on assessing the cold-starting performance of a compression ignition engine fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Through experimental investigations, it was found that the engine starting at -20°C was no longer possible in the case of using B50 (50% diesel + 50% biofuel made from sunflower oil). In order to "force" the engine starting in this particular situation, Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) was injected into the intake manifold. DEE being a highly flammable substance, the result was a sudden and explosive engine starting, the peak pressure in the monitored cylinder in the first successful engine cycle being almost twice the one which is usually considered as normal. Thus, to explain the observed phenomena, we launched this work relying on the analysis of the in-cylinder instantaneous pressure evolution, which was acquired during cranking, stabilizing and idling phases. Moreover, since the cause of the sudden and explosive engine starting was the DEE, by using a CFD approach, we also obtained results regarding the inter-cylinder distribution of the injected DEE.

  5. Migration of the Pee Dee River system inferred from ancestral paleochannels underlying the South Carolina Grand Strand and Long Bay inner shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, W.E.; Morton, R.A.; Putney, T.R.; Katuna, M.P.; Harris, M.S.; Gayes, P.T.; Driscoll, N.W.; Denny, J.F.; Schwab, W.C.

    2006-01-01

    Several generations of the ancestral Pee Dee River system have been mapped beneath the South Carolina Grand Strand coastline and adjacent Long Bay inner shelf. Deep boreholes onshore and high-resolution seismic-reflection data offshore allow for reconstruction of these paleochannels, which formed during glacial lowstands, when the Pee Dee River system incised subaerially exposed coastal-plain and continental-shelf strata. Paleochannel groups, representing different generations of the system, decrease in age to the southwest, where the modern Pee Dee River merges with several coastal-plain tributaries at Winyah Bay, the southern terminus of Long Bay. Positions of the successive generational groups record a regional, southwestward migration of the river system that may have initiated during the late Pliocene. The migration was primarily driven by barrier-island deposition, resulting from the interaction of fluvial and shoreline processes during eustatic highstands. Structurally driven, subsurface paleotopography associated with the Mid-Carolina Platform High has also indirectly assisted in forcing this migration. These results provide a better understanding of the evolution of the region and help explain the lack of mobile sediment on the Long Bay inner shelf. Migration of the river system caused a profound change in sediment supply during the late Pleistocene. The abundant fluvial source that once fed sand-rich barrier islands was cut off and replaced with a limited source, supplied by erosion and reworking of former coastal deposits exposed at the shore and on the inner shelf.

  6. Stability of the Tower Gains of the STAR Endcap Calorimeter in 2012 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Chamindu; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Solenoid Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment, based at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), uses polarized-proton collisions to investigate sea quark and gluon contributions to the proton spin. The STAR detector's Endcap Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EEMC) is of particular interest in this experiment because it covers a kinematic region that is sensitive to gluons carrying a low fraction of the proton momentum, where the gluon's contribution to the spin of the proton is poorly constrained. The EEMC is located in the intermediate pseudorapidity range, 1 < η <2, and as a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter, measures the electromagnetic energy of particles produced in the polarized-proton collisions. The calorimeter consists of several layers that include pre-shower, shower maximum, tower, and post-shower detectors. In these detectors, the energy gains, which convert a measured signal into an energy deposition, have been determined using data taken from the year 2012. The sensitivities of the tower energy gains to beam intensity and running time were studied. The results from these sensitivity studies will be reported. Funded by the US Department of Energy.

  7. Adsorption of hydrophobically end-capped poly(ethylene glycol) on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Holappa, Susanna; Kontturi, Katri S; Salminen, Arto; Seppälä, Jukka; Laine, Janne

    2013-11-12

    Adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol), hydrophobically end-capped with octadecenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA-PEG-OSA), on an ultrathin film of cellulose has been studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Normally, PEG does not adsorb on cellulosic surfaces, but the use of the telechelic hydrophobic modification was found to promote adsorption. The influence of the conformation of the polymer in solution prior to adsorption and the subsequent properties of the adsorbed layer were investigated. The adsorption experiments were done at concentrations below and above the critical association concentration. The adsorption of OSA-PEG-OSA on cellulose was observed to occur in four distinct stages. Because of the amphiphilic nature of cellulose, further adsorption experiments were performed on hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (silica) model substrates to illuminate the contribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic factors in the adsorption phenomenon. As expected, the kinetics and the mechanism of adsorption were strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the substrate.

  8. Surface reconstruction and hemocompatibility improvement of a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) coating.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ni; Wang, Yan-Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Shi, Su-Qing; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2014-09-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. In this study, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the surface reconstruction and formation of cell outer membrane mimetic structure on coatings that have significantly increased hemocompatibility. To achieve this, a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) (PBS-PC) was synthesized and dip-coated on coverslips. The surface structure of the amphiphilic PBS-PC film was reconstructed by heating in a vacuum oven to obtain the less hydrophilic surface and by immersing in hot water to obtain the more hydrophilic surface. Significant changes in the surface element concentration were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and changes in surface wettability were measured by sensitive dynamic contact angle technique. Scanning electron microscope images showed different morphologies of the reconstructed surfaces. Interestingly, the reconstruction between the less hydrophilic and more hydrophilic surfaces is reversible. More importantly, both the reconstructed surfaces are stable in room condition for more than 6 months, and both the surfaces show significant improvement in hemocompatibility as revealed by protein adsorption and platelet adhesion measurements. This reversible surface reconstruction strategy and the interesting results may be significant for fabricating stable and hemocompatible surfaces on differently shaped biomedical devices.

  9. Inhibition of diethyl ether degradation in Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5151 by glutaraldehyde and ethyl vinyl ether.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich

    2005-02-15

    Alkyl ether-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5151, isolated from activated sewage sludge, has an activity for the oxidation of a variety of alkyl ethers, aralkyl ethers and dibenzyl ether. The whole cell activity for diethyl ether oxidation was effectively inhibited by 2,3-dihydrofurane, ethyl vinyl ether and glutaraldehyde. Glutaraldehyde of less than 30 microM inhibited the activity by a competitive manner with the inhibition constant, K(I) of 7.07+/-1.36 microM. The inhibition type became mixed at higher glutaraldehyde concentrations >30 microM, probably due to the inactivation of the cell activity by the Schiff-base formation. Structurally analogous ethyl vinyl ether inhibited the diethyl ether oxidation activity in a mixed manner with decreasing the apparent maximum oxidation rate, v(max)(app), and increasing the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M)(app). The mixed type inhibition by ethyl vinyl ether seemed to be introduced not only by the structure similarity with diethyl ether, but also by the reactivity of the vinyl ether with cellular components in the whole cell system.

  10. Modelling of tidally affected river reaches with data assimilation for flood warning purposes: An example on the River Dee, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. J.; Beven, K.; Horsburgh, K.; Cullen, J.

    2012-04-01

    On rivers where the flow regime is influenced by a tidal signal the provision of accurate forecasts requires the careful coupling of predictive models for both the tidal signal and the rainfall driven river system. This paper discusses such a coupled modelling system constructed for the River Dee (UK). A series of parsimonious, physically interpretable time series models are used to represent the dynamics of the river water level at several gauging sites on the flood plain. These gauges are used operationally to help in determining the issuing of flood warnings. The simplified models are coupled and cast into a state space form. The assimilation of the observed water levels at the gauge sites to inform future forecasts is then a non-linear filter a solution to which is readily approximated. Assessment of the model forecasts against the observed data is carried out using a number of existing metrics. These suggest the model forecasts are a useful guide to the future water level. The representation of the forecast and its uncertainty to the operational staff is considered. A prototype of the sequential decision making process; based on the relative cost of 'true' or 'false' warnings; and designed to help guide the catchment manager in issuing warnings is presented.

  11. High Energy Polarized e+e- Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatunov, Yu.; Koop, I.; Otboev, A.; Mane, S.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the wide discussion about Higgs-factory design again returns to problem of high energy polarized electrons and positrons. It’s good known the radiative beam polarization at LEP-collider. It was obtained after spin resonance suppression at Z0 pick, but didn’t appear at energies above 70 GeV due to an enhancement of unavoidable depolarization effects. We examine in this paper various ideas for radiative polarization at TLEP/FCC-ee and formulate some estimates for the polarization buildup time and the asymptotic polarization. Using wigglers, a useful degree of polarization (for energy calibration), with a time constant of about 1 h, may be possible up to the threshold of W pair production. At higher energies such as the threshold of Higgs production, attaining a useful level of polarization may be difficult in a planar ring. With Siberian Snakes, wigglers and some imagination, polarization of reasonable magnitude, with a reasonable time constant (of not more than about 1 h), may be achievable at very high energies.

  12. Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) (high altitude pressure garment) life preserver unit (LPU) on forward port side of middeck above potable water tank. Fullerton also adjusts lapbelt fitting and helmet holddown strap.

  13. Identification of American shad spawning sites and habitat use in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined spawning site selection and habitat use by American shad Alosa sapidissima in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina and South Carolina, to inform future management in this flow-regulated river. American shad eggs were collected in plankton tows, and the origin (spawning site) of each egg was estimated; relocations of radio-tagged adults on spawning grounds illustrated habitat use and movement in relation to changes in water discharge rates. Most spawning was estimated to occur in the Piedmont physiographic region within a 25-river-kilometer (rkm) section just below the lowermost dam in the system; however, some spawning also occurred downstream in the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region has a higher gradient and is predicted to have slightly higher current velocities and shallower depths, on average, than the Coastal Plain. The Piedmont region is dominated by large substrates (e.g., boulders and gravel), whereas the Coastal Plain is dominated by sand. Sampling at night (the primary spawning period) resulted in the collection of young eggs (≤1.5 h old) that more precisely identified the spawning sites. In the Piedmont region, most radio-tagged American shad remained in discrete areas (average linear range = 3.6 rkm) during the spawning season and generally occupied water velocities between 0.20 and 0.69 m/s, depths between 1.0 and 2.9 m, and substrates dominated by boulder or bedrock and gravel. Tagged adults made only small-scale movements with changes in water discharge rates. Our results demonstrate that the upstream extent of migration and an area of concentrated spawning occur just below the lowermost dam. If upstream areas have similar habitat, facilitating upstream access for American shad could increase the spawning habitat available and increase the population's size.

  14. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... before January 1, 2003. You may redeem your Series EE savings bond at any time beginning six months after... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings...

  15. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued? A definitive bond is validly issued when it is...

  16. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued? A definitive bond is validly issued when it is...

  17. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in book-entry form. Effective January 1, 2012, Treasury...

  18. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in either book-entry or definitive form....

  19. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued? A definitive bond is validly issued when it is...

  20. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations govern Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.1 What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds? (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have...

  1. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.8 When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? Interest on a bond...

  2. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  3. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued? A definitive bond is validly issued when it is...

  4. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  5. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations govern Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.1 What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds? (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have...

  6. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  7. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  8. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in book-entry form. Effective January 1, 2012, Treasury...

  9. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  10. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  11. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  12. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  13. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in book-entry form. Effective January 1, 2012, Treasury...

  14. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations govern Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.1 What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds? (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have...

  15. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued? A definitive bond is validly issued when it is...

  16. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  17. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  18. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  19. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  20. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations govern Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.1 What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds? (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have...

  1. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  2. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  3. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations govern Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.1 What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds? (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have...

  4. Exploration of Energy Metabolism in the Mouse Using Indirect Calorimetry: Measurement of Daily Energy Expenditure (DEE) and Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carola W; Reitmeir, Peter; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2015-09-01

    Current comprehensive mouse metabolic phenotyping involves studying energy balance in cohorts of mice via indirect calorimetry, which determines heat release from changes in respiratory air composition. Here, we describe the measurement of daily energy expenditure (DEE) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) in mice. These well-defined metabolic descriptors serve as meaningful first-line read-outs for metabolic phenotyping and should be reported when exploring energy expenditure in mice. For further guidance, the issue of appropriate sample sizes and the frequency of sampling of metabolic measurements is also discussed.

  5. Proposed Injection into “Thief” Zone in EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Robert M.; Grigsby, Charles O.

    1983-08-18

    This report seeks to understand the nature of the "thief" zone inside the EE-3 by pumping 150-200K gallons of heated water into that zone. The questions they seek to answer are; does the thief zone represent a potential danger to future operations in the form of earthquakes, aquifers, damage to equipment or tubulars, or require that it be sealed; is a connection into the the thief zone from EE-2 a disaster point; could the connection into the thief zone provide a low back-pressure condition.

  6. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.64 Section 351.64 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  7. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.64 Section 351.64 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  8. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-entry Series EE savings bond? 351.64 Section 351.64 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  9. A chromatographic estimate of the degree of surface heterogeneity of reversed-phase liquid chromatography packing materials II-Endcapped monomeric C18-bonded stationary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-01-01

    In a previous report, the heterogeneity of a non-endcapped C{sub 30}-bonded stationary phase was investigated, based on the results of the measurements of the adsorption isotherms of two neutral compounds (phenol and caffeine) and two ionizable compounds (sodium naphthalene sulfonate and propranololium chloride) by frontal analysis (FA). The same method is applied here for the characterization of the surface heterogeneity of two new brands of endcapped C{sub 18}-bonded stationary phases (Gemini and Sunfire). The adsorption isotherms of the same four chemicals were measured by FA and the results confirmed by the independent calculation of the adsorption energy distribution (AED), using the expectation-maximization (EM) method. The effect of the length of the bonded alkyl chain was investigated. Shorter alkyl-bonded-chains (C{sub 18} versus C{sub 30}) and the end-capping of the silica surface contribute to decrease the surface heterogeneity under the same experimental conditions (30% methanol, 25 mM NaCl). The AEDs of phenol and caffeine are bimodal with the C{sub 18}-bonded columns while they are trimodal and quadrimodal, respectively, with a non-endcapped C{sub 30}-bonded column. The 'supersites' (adsorption energy >20 kJ/mol) found on the C{sub 30}-Prontosil column and attributed to a cation exchange mechanism completely disappear on the C{sub 18}-Gemini and C{sub 18}-Sunfire, probably because the end-capping of the silica surface eliminates most if not all the ionic interactions.

  10. Research Trends in the United States: EE to ESD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    2007-01-01

    Research on education for sustainable development (ESD) is not a unified body of work and, much like the literature for environmental education (EE), research is published in many arenas. The trends, however, capture some of the major foci of the research that is emerging on ESD, especially in the early years of the Decade of Education for…

  11. e+e- → charm cross sections via ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhlova, Galina

    2010-06-01

    We discuss recent measurements of exclusive e+e- cross sections for charmed hadron final states near threshold performed by Belle and BABAR. The results are based on a study of events with initial-state-radiation photons in a large data sample collected with the Belle and BABAR detectors at the γ(4S) resonance and nearby continuum.

  12. EE and ESD: Two Paradigms, One Crucial Goal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rosalyn; Hopkins, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    The launch of the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (UNDESD) gives the education community opportunity to reflect on and discuss major issues that will affect the future well-being of the world. The goals and dreams of environmental education (EE) are similar to those of educators involved in education for sustainable…

  13. 32. SECTIONS AA, BB, CC, DD, AND EE WASTE CALCINATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECTIONS A-A, B-B, C-C, D-D, AND E-E WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING RELATIONSHIPS OF DIFFERENT FLOOR LEVELS TO ONE ANOTHER. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106353. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Algorithm and implementation of muon trigger and data transmission system for barrel-endcap overlap region of the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A.

    2016-03-01

    The CMS experiment Level-1 trigger system is undergoing an upgrade. In the barrel-endcap transition region, it is necessary to merge data from 3 types of muon detectors—RPC, DT and CSC. The Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) uses the novel approach to concentrate and process those data in a uniform manner to identify muons and their transversal momentum. The paper presents the algorithm and FPGA firmware implementation of the OMTF and its data transmission system in CMS. It is foreseen that the OMTF will be subject to significant changes resulting from optimization which will be done with the aid of physics simulations. Therefore, a special, high-level, parameterized HDL implementation is necessary.

  15. Neutron and Proton Tests of Different Technologies for the Upgrade of Cold Readout Electronics of the Atlas Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, M.

    2012-08-01

    The expected increase of total integrated luminosity by a factor of ten at the HL-LHC compared to the design goals for LHC essentially eliminates the safety factor for radiation hardness realized at the current cold amplifiers of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC). New more radiation hard technologies have been studied: SiGe bipolar, Si CMOS FET and GaAs FET transistors have been irradiated with neutrons up to an integrated fluence of 2.2 · 1016 n/cm2 and with 200 MeV protons up to an integrated fluence of 2.6 · 1014 p/cm2. Comparisons of transistor parameters such as the gain for both types of irradiations are presented.

  16. Removal of a femoral nail with osseous overgrowth at the end-cap: A navigated and cannulated minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Marintschev, Ivan; Rausch, Sascha; Fujak, Albert; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O; Gras, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Intramedullary nail removal can be demanding, especially in cases of implant breakage or bony overgrowth at the end-cap, if the exact insertion depth of the nail is neglected in the index surgery. In the presented case, two challenging nail removals were necessary. The first was performed in a re-nailing procedure due to a pseudarthrosis with implant breakage, and the second was performed during hardware removal after fracture healing in a situation where there was deep intramedullary placement of the exchange nail. For the second implant removal a minimally invasive approach based on instrument placements over a navigated guide-wire was used to reduce the iatrogenic morbidity associated with an extensive open approach to the nail and to decrease the radiation exposure for the patient and the operating team.

  17. ER-2 #809 on the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) with pilot Dee Porter prepari

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Lockheed Martin pilot Dee Porter climbs up the ladder wearing a heavy tan pressure suit, preparing to board NASA ER-2 #809 at Kiruna, Sweden, for the third flight in the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment. Assisting him is Jim Sokolik, a Lockheed Martin life support technician. Number 809, one of Dryden's two high-flying ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft, a civilian variant of Lockheed's U-2, and another NASA flying laboratory, Dryden's DC-8, were based north of the Arctic Circle in Kiruna, Sweden during the winter of 2000 to study ozone depletion as part of the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). A large hangar built especially for research, 'Arena Arctica' housed the instrumented aircraft and the scientists. Scientists have observed unusually low levels of ozone over the Arctic during recent winters, raising concerns that ozone depletion there could become more widespread as in the Antarctic ozone hole. The NASA-sponsored international mission took place between November 1999 and March 2000 and was divided into three phases. The DC-8 was involved in all three phases returning to Dryden between each phase. The ER-2 flew sample collection flights between January and March, remaining in Sweden from Jan. 9 through March 16. 'The collaborative campaign will provide an immense new body of information about the Arctic stratosphere,' said program scientist Dr. Michael Kurylo, NASA Headquarters. 'Our understanding of the Earth's ozone will be greatly enhanced by this research.' ER-2s bearing tail numbers 806 and 809 are used as airborne science platforms by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main

  18. Self-Assembly of Telechelic Tyrosine End-Capped PEO and Poly(alanine) Polymers in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Steven; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian William; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bilalis, Panayiotis; Iatrou, Hermis

    2016-03-14

    The self-assembly in aqueous solution of three novel telechelic conjugates comprising a central hydrophilic polymer and short (trimeric or pentameric) tyrosine end-caps has been investigated. Two of the conjugates have a central poly(oxyethylene) (polyethylene oxide, PEO) central block with different molar masses. The other conjugate has a central poly(L-alanine) (PAla) sequence in a purely amino-acid based conjugate. All three conjugates self-assemble into β-sheet based fibrillar structures, although the fibrillar morphology revealed by cryogenic-TEM is distinct for the three polymers--in particular the Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 forms a population of short straight fibrils in contrast to the more diffuse fibril aggregates observed for Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 and Tyr3-PAla-Tyr3. Hydrogel formation was not observed for these samples (in contrast to prior work on related systems) up to quite high concentrations, showing that it is possible to prepare solutions of peptide-polymer-peptide conjugates with hydrophobic end-caps without conformational constraints associated with hydrogelation. The Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 shows significant PEO crystallization upon drying in contrast to the Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 conjugate. Our findings point to the remarkable ability of short hydrophobic peptide end groups to modulate the self-assembly properties of polymers in solution in model peptide-capped "associative polymers". Retention of fluidity at high conjugate concentration may be valuable in potential future applications of these conjugates as bioresponsive or biocompatible materials, for example exploiting the enzyme-responsiveness of the tyrosine end-groups.

  19. (Photo)physical Properties of New Molecular Glasses End-Capped with Thiophene Rings Composed of Diimide and Imine Units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New symmetrical arylene bisimide derivatives formed by using electron-donating–electron-accepting systems were synthesized. They consist of a phthalic diimide or naphthalenediimide core and imine linkages and are end-capped with thiophene, bithiophene, and (ethylenedioxy)thiophene units. Moreover, polymers were obtained from a new diamine, N,N′-bis(5-aminonaphthalenyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-dicarboximide and 2,5-thiophenedicarboxaldehyde or 2,2′-bithiophene-5,5′-dicarboxaldehyde. The prepared azomethine diimides exhibited glass-forming properties. The obtained compounds emitted blue light with the emission maximum at 470 nm. The value of the absorption coefficient was determined as a function of the photon energy using spectroscopic ellipsometry. All compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies. They exhibited a low electrochemically (DPV) calculated energy band gap (Eg) from 1.14 to 1.70 eV. The highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and Eg were additionally calculated theoretically by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The photovoltaic properties of two model compounds as the active layer in organic solar cells in the configuration indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/active layer/Al under an illumination of 1.3 mW/cm2 were studied. The device comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) with the compound end-capped with bithiophene rings showed the highest value of Voc (above 1 V). The conversion efficiency of the fabricated solar cell was in the range of 0.69–0.90%. PMID:24966893

  20. A chromatographic estimate of the degree of surface heterogeneity of RPLC packing materials. III. Endcapped amido-embedded reversed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-01-01

    The difference in adsorption behavior between a conventional monomeric endcapped C{sub 18} stationary phase (3.43 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}) and an endcapped polymeric RP-Amide phase (3.31 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}) was investigated. The adsorption isotherms of four compounds (phenol, caffeine, sodium 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and propranololium chloride) were measured by frontal analysis (FA) and the degree of heterogeneity of each phase for each solute was characterized by their adsorption energy distributions (AED), derived using the Expectation-Maximization method. The results show that only certain analytes (phenol and 2-naphthalene sulfonate) are sensitive to the presence of the polar embedded amide groups within the RP phase. Their binding constants on the amide-bonded phase are significantly higher than on conventional RPLC phases. Furthermore, an additional type of adsorption sites was observed for these two compounds. However, these sites having a low density, their presence does not affect much the retention factors of the two analytes. On the other hand, the adsorption behavior of the other two analytes (caffeine and propranololium chloride) is almost unaffected by the presence of the amide group in the bonded layer. Strong selective interactions may explain these observations. For example, hydrogen-bond interactions between an analyte (e.g., phenol or naphthalene sulfonate) and the carbonyl group (acceptor) or the nitrogen (donor) of the amido-embedded group may take place. No such interactions may take place with either caffeine or the cation propranololium chloride. This study confirms the hypothesis that analytes have ready access to locations deep inside the bonded layer, where the amide groups are present.

  1. Pilot Fullerton dons EES anti-gravity suit lower torso on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit lower torso on forward port side middeck above potable water tank. Anti-g suit is an olive drab inner garment that complements EES.

  2. An improved limit for Γee of X (3872) and Γee measurement of ψ (3686)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    Using the data sets taken at center-of-mass energies above 4 GeV by the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring, we search for the reaction e+e- →γISR X (3872) →γISRπ+π- J / ψ via the Initial State Radiation technique. The production of a resonance with quantum numbers JPC =1++ such as the X (3872) via single photon e+e- annihilation is forbidden, but is allowed by a next-to-leading order box diagram. We do not observe a significant signal of X (3872), and therefore give an upper limit for the electronic width times the branching fraction ΓeeX (3872) B (X (3872) →π+π- J / ψ) < 0.13 eV at the 90% confidence level. This measurement improves upon existing limits by a factor of 46. Using the same final state, we also measure the electronic width of the ψ (3686) to be Γeeψ (3686) = 2213 ±18stat ±99sys eV.

  3. Bathymetric, Velocity, Streamflow, and Dissolved Oxygen Data on the Pee Dee River near Bostick Boat Landing, Florence County, South Carolina, May-August 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Santee Cooper is planning to construct an electricity generating station in southeastern Florence County near the Kingsburg community. As part of this project, a water-intake structure will be constructed on the Pee Dee River near the Bostick Boat Landing, which is located east of the intersection of State secondary roads S-21-57 and S-21-66. Velocity, bathymetric, and dissolved oxygen data are needed to help determine the location for the water-intake structure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Santee Cooper, collected these data at three different flow regimes during the period of May through August 2007. Data were collected along 15 transects located at 50-foot intervals starting 400 feet upstream from the boat landing and continuing to 300 feet downstream from the boat landing. All data were geographically referenced using a differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS).

  4. Ultralow thermal conductivity in Electrolessly Etched (EE) Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Chen, Renkun; Budaev, Bair; Tang, Jinyao; Andrews, Sean; Murphy, Padraig; Mukerjee, Subroto; Moore, Joel; Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arun

    2009-03-01

    EE process produces single-crystalline Silicon nanowires with rough walls. We use suspended structures to directly compute the heat transfer through single nanowires. Nanowires with diameters less than the mean free path of phonons impede transport by boundary scattering. The roughness acts as a secondary scattering mechanism to further reduce phonon transport. By controlling the amount of roughness it is possible to push limits to the extent that nanowire conductance close to quanta of thermal conductance,πkB^2 T / πkB^2 T 6 . - 6 is observed. Traditionally, the lower limit of conductivity is amorphous Silicon at 1 W/mK at room temperature. The measured conductivity of our nanostructures challenges even this amorphous limit pointing towards previously unstudied mechanisms of thermal resistance. We measure thermal conductivity of ˜150nm diameter EE wires to be ˜1 W/mK.

  5. EE-3A Logging Report for Feb. 28th., 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David W.

    1994-03-14

    A Temperature/Casing-Collar Locator (CCL) log of EE-3A was performed on Monday, February 28th, 1994. This log was the first of two, (the other to be run on March 31st.), in an attempt to investigate a temperature anomaly occurring between 10,000 to 11,435 ft. The thermal recovery of this zone is slower than expected, which is believed to be caused by either; flow through the cemented zone of the 5 1/2" liner, or an upward flow through the reservoir itself. Now that the first log is over, the annulus of EE-3A will be shut-in for a period of approximately one month, at which time the log will be repeated. If the temperature of this zone shows signs of recovery after the shut-in period, the integrity of the cement will be in question. No sign of recovery will point to upward reservoir flow theory.

  6. Experiment 2003 – First Pressurization of EE-2

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.; Matsunaga, Isao; Kuriyagawa, Michio

    1982-01-07

    Water was pumped into EE-2 at a nominal rate of 9gpm, to a final pressure of 2070 psi. The wellbore was exceptionally tight we might just have well pumped into a steel pressure vessel not only was there no evidence of breakdown, but only a total of about 30 gallons of water permeated the rock during the 2-1/2 hour-long pressurization.

  7. Observation of η'→ω e+e-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Based on a sample of η' mesons produced in the radiative decay J /ψ →γ η' in 1.31 ×109 J /ψ events collected with the BESIII detector, the decay η'→ω e+e- is observed for the first time, with a statistical significance of 8 σ . The branching fraction is measured to be B (η'→ω e+e-)=(1.97 ±0.34 (stat)±0.17 (syst))×10-4 , which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. The branching fraction of η'→ω γ is also measured to be (2.55 ±0.03 (stat)±0.16 (syst))×10-2 , which is the most precise measurement to date, and the relative branching fraction B/(η'→ω e+e-) B (η'→ω γ ) is determined to be (7.71 ±1.34 (stat)±0.54 (syst))×10-3 .

  8. (3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end-capped poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol)-based multilayer films for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuicui; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Tellier, Liane E; Green, Jordan J

    2013-07-10

    Biodegradable polyelectrolyte surfaces for gene delivery were created through electrospinning of biodegradable polycations combined with iterative solution-based multilayer coating. Poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol) end-capped with 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine was utilized because of its ability to electrostatically interact with anionic molecules like DNA, its biodegradability, and its low cytotoxicity. A new DNA release system was developed for sustained release of DNA over 24 h, accompanied by high exogenous gene expression in primary human glioblastoma (GB) cells. Electrospinning a different PBAE, poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4,4'-trimethylenedipiperidine), and its combination with polyelectrolyte 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end-capped poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol)-based multilayers are promising for DNA release and intracellular delivery from a surface.

  9. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  10. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  11. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  12. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  13. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  14. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  15. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  16. 31 CFR 351.66 - What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What book-entry Series EE savings... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.66 What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation? (a) We include all bonds...

  17. 31 CFR 351.66 - What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What book-entry Series EE savings... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.66 What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation? (a) We include all bonds...

  18. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  19. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  20. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.50 How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? (a) Payment in general....

  1. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates from January 1, 1980... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates Prior to May 1, 1995 § 351.20 What is...

  2. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  3. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?...

  4. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  5. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definitive series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  6. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  7. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  8. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  9. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  10. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  11. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.50 How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? (a) Payment in general....

  12. 31 CFR 351.40 - What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury... FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? Prior to...

  13. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? You may purchase definitive bonds...

  14. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  15. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.50 How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? (a) Payment in general....

  16. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  17. 31 CFR 351.44 - What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of definitive Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.44 What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year? The principal amount...

  18. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates from January 1, 1980... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates Prior to May 1, 1995 § 351.20 What is...

  19. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? You may purchase definitive bonds...

  20. 31 CFR 351.40 - What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? Prior to January 1,...

  1. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? Effective January 1, 2012,...

  2. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  3. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  4. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  5. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.50 How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? (a) Payment in general....

  6. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  7. 31 CFR 351.21 - How are redemption values determined during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995? 351... BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series... during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995?...

  8. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  9. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  10. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? Effective January 1, 2012,...

  11. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan? You may...

  12. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  13. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  14. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  15. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  16. 31 CFR 351.40 - What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What were the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? Prior to January 1,...

  17. 31 CFR 351.40 - What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? We issue definitive...

  18. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  19. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? Effective January 1, 2012,...

  20. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.50 How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? (a) Payment in general....

  1. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?...

  2. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  3. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  4. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  5. 31 CFR 351.21 - How are redemption values determined during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995? 351... BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series... during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995?...

  6. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  7. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We...

  8. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  9. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  10. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  11. 31 CFR 351.40 - What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? We issue definitive...

  12. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  13. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  14. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  15. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?...

  16. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?...

  17. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  18. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  19. 31 CFR 351.44 - What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of definitive Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.44 What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year? The principal amount...

  20. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  1. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  2. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  3. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  4. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  5. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  6. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity? The Secretary of the Treasury may not call Series EE bonds for...

  7. Study of radiation damage to the CMS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter and investigation into new physics using multi-boson measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, Alberto

    2016-03-31

    This document is the final report for the U.S. D.O.E. Grant No. DE-SC0014088, which covers the period from May 15, 2015 to March 31, 2016. The funded research covered the study of multi-boson final states, culminated in the measurement of the W±γγ and, for the first time at an hadronic collider, of the Zγγ production cross sections. These processes, among the rarest multi-boson final states measurable by LHC experiments, allow us to investigate the possibility of new physics in a model-independent way, by looking for anomalies in the standard model couplings among electroweak bosons. In particular, these 3-boson final states access quartic gauge couplings; the W±γγ analysis performed as a part of this proposal sets limits on anomalies in the WWγγ quartic gauge coupling. The award also covered R&D activities to define a radiation-tolerant material to be used in the incoming upgrade of the CMS hadronic endcap calorimeter. In particular, the usage of a liquid-scintillator-based detector was investigated. The research work performed in this direction has been collected in a paper recently submitted for publication in the Journal of Instrumentation (JINST).

  8. Synthesis, optical properties and explosive sensing performances of a series of novel π-conjugated aromatic end-capped oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taihong; Zhao, Keru; Liu, Ke; Ding, Liping; Yin, Shiwei; Fang, Yu

    2013-02-15

    Four novel terthiophene (3T) derivatives, have been synthesized by employing Grignard coupling reaction via end-capping of naphthyl (NA) or pyrenyl (Py) unit to the one or two ends of 3T. It has been shown that both increasing electron donating strength and extending conjugation are effective approaches to improve the photochemical stability of the oligothiophene. Fluorescence studies demonstrated that the emission of the 3T derivatives is sensitive to the presence of some important nitro-containing explosives in their ethanol solution, in particular, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PA) and 3,5-dinitro-2,6-bispicrylamino pyridine (PYX). As an example, the detection limits of 4 to PA and PYX were determined to be 6.21 × 10(-7)mol/L and 8.95 × 10(-7)mol/L, respectively. Based on the discovery, a colorimetric detection method has been developed. The sensitive and selective response of the modified 3T to the explosives have been tentatively attributed to the adsorptive affinity of the compounds to the explosives, and to the higher probability of the electron transfer from the electron-rich 3T derivatives to the electron-poor nitro-containing explosives. No doubt, present study broadens the family of fluorophores which may be employed for the development of fluorescent sensors.

  9. Creation of coating surfaces possessing superhydrophobic and superoleophobic characteristics with fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomeric nanocomposites having biphenylene segments.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuki; Takashima, Hiroki; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2011-10-15

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomeric nanocomposites having biphenylene units [R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2)] were prepared by the sol-gel reaction of the corresponding oligomer [R(F)-(VM)(n)-R(F)] with 4,4'-bis(triethoxysilyl)-1,1'-biphenyl [Ar-Si(OEt)(3)] under alkaline conditions. R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites were applied to the surface modification of PMMA to exhibit not only a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine but also a fluorescent emission ability on the surface. Methanol sol solutions of R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites were effective for the surface modification of glass through the dipping technique to exhibit good oleophobicity with superhydrophobicity on the modified glass surface. On the other hand, 1,2-dichloroethane sol solutions enabled R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/Ar-SiO(2) nanocomposites to exhibit both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic characteristics on the modified surface through dipping the glass in these sol solutions.

  10. Constraints on axions from π0 --> e+e- decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massó, Eduard

    1986-12-01

    The contribution of axions to π0 --> e+e- decay is considered. It is found that a recently proposed short-lived axion with a mass of 1.8 MeV induces a decay rate inconsistent with experimental observations. More generally, upper limits are placed on the mass of an axion that couples to first-generations fermions. On leave of absence from Department de Física Teòrica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain.

  11. Two-particle distributions in e+e- jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, Dennis E.

    1980-04-01

    We apply the "jet calculus" of Konishi, Ukawa, and Veneziano (KUV) to the two-particle spectra of e+e- jets. This computation uses single-particle fragmentation functions and the KUV analysis of leading logarithms to predict the multiparticle spectra entirely from the single-particle data. The effects of charm and heavier flavors are discussed and a simple prescription for inverting the necessary double moments is given. The double-differential cross section dσdx1dx2 is displayed for various combinations of mesons and the antiproton.

  12. Direct photon production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Moss, L. J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H. N.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, H. Y.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-01-01

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e+e- annihilation has been studied at √s =29 GeV with use of the MAC detector at the PEP storage ring. A charge asymmetry A=(-12.3+/-3.5)% is observed in the final-state jets. The cross section and the charge asymmetry are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Both the charge asymmetry and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons.

  13. Procedure for an EE-3 Vent Experiment, Experiment No. 2045

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Zora V.; Cocks, George G.

    1984-07-23

    During Experiment 2042 approximately 2 million gallons of water were injected in the EE-3 wellbore. This caused seismic activity from the bottom of the well to a region well above the casing shoe (3900 m TVD to 2800 m TVD). Thus water was injected into both the lower high pressure zone and the upper low pressure zone just below the casing shoe. Later experiments have shown that these two zones are connected. In the past the upper zone has often been considered to be a water loss zone (thief zone).

  14. Double Higgs Boson Production via WW Fusion in TeV e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, V.; Han, T.

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e+e- → bar ve ve HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e+e- →ZHH and would give significant event rates for mH ≲ 1/2 MZ at high luminosity e+e- colliders. We evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  15. A Search for Point Sources of EeV Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Auger Collaboration102, The Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of air showers made using the hybrid technique developed with the fluorescence and surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory allow a sensitive search for point sources of EeV photons anywhere in the exposed sky. A multivariate analysis reduces the background of hadronic cosmic rays. The search is sensitive to a declination band from -85° to +20°, in an energy range from 1017.3 eV to 1018.5 eV. No photon point source has been detected. An upper limit on the photon flux has been derived for every direction. The mean value of the energy flux limit that results from this, assuming a photon spectral index of -2, is 0.06 eV cm-2 s-1, and no celestial direction exceeds 0.25 eV cm-2 s-1. These upper limits constrain scenarios in which EeV cosmic ray protons are emitted by non-transient sources in the Galaxy.

  16. Signal of doubly charged Higgs at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, L. T.; Huong, D. T.; Long, H. N.; Hung, H. T.; Thao, N. H.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and signals of the production of doubly charged Higgses (DCH) in the framework of the supersymmetric reduced minimal 3-3-1 model are investigated. In the DCH sector, we prove that there always exists a region of the parameter space where the mass of the lightest DCH is of the order of O(100) GeV even when all other new particles are very heavy. The lightest DCH mainly decays to two same-sign leptons while the dominant decay channels of the heavy DCHs are those decaying to heavy particles. We analyze each production cross section for e^+e^- ⇒ H^{++} H^{-} as a function of a few kinematic variables, which are useful to discuss the creation of DCHs in e^+e^- colliders as an indicator of new physics beyond the Standard Model. A numerical study shows that the cross sections for creating the lightest DCH can reach values of a few pb. The other two DCHs are too heavy, beyond the observable range of experiments. The lightest DCH may be detected by the International Linear Collider or the Compact Linear Collider by searching for its decay to a same-sign charged lepton pair.

  17. A search for point sources of EeV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Arqueros, F.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration102; and others

    2014-07-10

    Measurements of air showers made using the hybrid technique developed with the fluorescence and surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory allow a sensitive search for point sources of EeV photons anywhere in the exposed sky. A multivariate analysis reduces the background of hadronic cosmic rays. The search is sensitive to a declination band from –85° to +20°, in an energy range from 10{sup 17.3} eV to 10{sup 18.5} eV. No photon point source has been detected. An upper limit on the photon flux has been derived for every direction. The mean value of the energy flux limit that results from this, assuming a photon spectral index of –2, is 0.06 eV cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, and no celestial direction exceeds 0.25 eV cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. These upper limits constrain scenarios in which EeV cosmic ray protons are emitted by non-transient sources in the Galaxy.

  18. Well completion and operations for MHF of Fenton Hill HDR Well EE-2

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Previous attempts to connect Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site Wells EE-2 and EE-3 by pumping 150 thousand to 1.3 million gallons of water had not achieved a detectable hydraulic fracture connection. Therefore, preparations were made to conduct, in December 1983, a 4 to 6 million gallon, 50 BPM water injection in EE-2. The objective was to enlarge the previously created reservoir in EE-2 using massive hydraulic facturing (MHF). The planning, preparations, operations and results of the MHF are presented here. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Riparian zone influence on stream water chemistry at different spatial scales: a GIS-based modelling approach, an example for the Dee, NE Scotland.

    PubMed

    Smart, R P; Soulsby, C; Cresser, M S; Wade, A J; Townend, J; Billett, M F; Langan, S

    2001-12-03

    A geographical information system (GIS-ARC/INFO) was used to collate existing spatial data sets on catchment characteristics to predict stream water quality using simple empirical models. The study, based on the river Dee catchment in NE Scotland, found that geological maps and associated geochemical information provided a suitable framework for predicting chemical parameters associated with acidification sensitivity (including alkalinity and base cation concentrations). In particular, it was found that in relatively undisturbed catchments, the parent material and geochemistry of the riparian zone, when combined with a simple hydrological flow path model, could be used to accurately predict stream water chemistry at a range of flows (Q95 to > Q5) and spatial scales (1-1000 km2). This probably reflects the importance of the riparian zone as an area where hydrological inputs to stream systems occur via flow paths in the soil and groundwater zones. Thus, evolution of drainage water chemistry appears to retain the geochemical characteristics of the riparian area as it enters the channel network. In more intensively managed catchments, riparian land use is a further influential factor, which can be incorporated into models to improve predictions for certain base cations. The utility in providing simple hydrochemical models, based on readily available data sets, to assist environmental managers in planning land use in catchment systems is discussed.

  20. Experiment 2059: Second Packer Stimulation of EE-3A

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1985-05-09

    By late Thursday, 5-9-85, EE-3A should be at a depth of about 12,200 feet. We plan to stop drilling at this point and pressurize the bottom 600 to 700 feet of the open hole using a Lynes packer. The Lynes packer would be set somewhere in the interval of very competent, slow-drilling, and only slightly altered biotite granodiorite from 11,460 ft to 11,590 ft. This would place the packer below the two fractures (at 10,880 ft and 11,000 ft) stimulated during Expt. 2057, and also below the producing fracture at 11,440 ft as reported on 5-2-85.

  1. A Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antiči'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90° to +15° in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (1018 eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  2. The three-jet rate in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett-Turner, C. N.

    1994-06-01

    Progress has been made on the calculation of R3, the three-jet rate in e+e- annihilation, in the k⊥ (Durham) scheme. Using the coherent branching formalism [A.H. Mueller, Phys. Lett. B 104 (1981) 161; B.I. Ermolaev and V.S. Fadin, JETP Lett. 33 (1981) 285; Yu.L. Dokshitzer, V.S. Fadin and V.A. Khoze, Z. Phys. C 15 (1982) 325; C 18 (1983) 37; A. Bassetto, M. Ciafaloni and G. Marchesini, Phys. Rep. 100 (1983) 202; Yu.L. Dokshitzer and S. Troyan, Leningrad Report LNPI-922 (1984); Yu.L. Dokshitzer, V.A. Khoze and S. Troyan, in: Perturbative QCD, ed. A.H. Mueller (World Scientific, Singapore, 1989)], an explicit expression for R3 is calculated. In this, leading and next-to-leading large logarithms (LL and NLL) are resummed to all orders in QCD perturbation theory. In addition to exponentials an error function is involved.

  3. A SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 Degree-Sign to +15 Degree-Sign in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (10{sup 18} eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  4. 76 FR 66855 - United States Savings Bonds, Series EE, HH and I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service 31 CFR Parts 351, 353, 359, and 360 United States Savings Bonds, Series EE, HH and I... DEFINITIVE UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH 0 9. The authority citation for part 353...

  5. Reschooling Society and the Promise of ee-Learning: An Interview with Steve Eskow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitte, Chad; Eskow, Steve

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Chad Trevitte interviews "Innovate" guest editor Steve Eskow about the concept of ee-learning and the promise it holds for revitalizing higher education. Eskow defines ee-learning as a combination of the electronic technologies employed in online learning ("e-learning 1") and a pedagogy of experiential learning rooted in real-life…

  6. Improvements to an Electrical Engineering Skill Audit Exam to Improve Student Mastery of Core EE Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    The San Jose State University Electrical Engineering (EE) Department implemented a skill audit exam for graduating seniors in 1999 with the purpose of assessing the teaching and the students' mastery of core concepts in EE. However, consistent low scores for the first years in which the test was administered suggested that students had little…

  7. Experiment 2018, First Fracturing Attempt Below Casing Shoe in EE-2 (1982-7-19/20)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffers, Bernard

    1983-03-15

    The purpose of Experiment 2018 was to achieve a hydraulic connection between EE-2 and EE-3 in the region just below their respective casing shoes. To protect the cassing of EE-2, the fracturing fluid had to be pumped down a 3-1/2 inch drill string to an Otis casing packer set 240 ft above the casing shoe of EE-2. Pumping started at 16:23 of July 19, 1982, and was terminated at 2:02 on July 20, 1982, due to hardware failure, after some trouble with the setting of the casing packer had delayed the beginning of the experiment for approximately two days. Prior to the experiment, a sand plug in EE-2 had been set, with its top at 11,910 ft (all depths referenced her are cable depths). A total of 5,698 bbls had been pumped. No hydraulic connection appeared at the end of Experiment 2018.

  8. The research and scheme of RBAC using J2EE security mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangzhou; Sheng, Xiaoyu; Niu, Yingying; Wang, Fengpin; Zhang, Han

    2006-10-01

    Access control based on RBAC makes the system suitable to the security strategy for special application, relieves burden of system administrators and can adapt itself to the adjustment of the system structure flexibly. But all the existing security mechanisms of the middleware technology can't support the RBAC model very well. The method using J2EE security mechanisms to support RBAC is showed in this paper. First, the configuration of J2EE security systems is given in the paper and the algorithm of J2EE authorization decision is designed. Then, the language of J2EE security description is used to define RBAC, and realization of the requirement of J2EE security service is given. It has achieved the anticipative effect in virtue of deployment and application on the platform of the national science technology infrastructure.

  9. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced.

  10. A simple method for the synthesis of a polar-embedded and polar-endcapped reversed-phase chromatographic packing with low activity of residue silanols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-yan; Li, Zhi-yong; Liu, Dan; Xue, Ying-wen; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-04-22

    Octadecyl bonded silica (ODS) is the most popular packing for reversed-phase chromatography. However, it generally demonstrates bad resolution for polar analytes because of the residue silanols and its poor stability in aqueous mobile phase. To address the problem, a new reversed-phase packing containing both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties was proposed. It was prepared by a very simple method, in which the epoxide addition reaction of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane with 1-octadecanethiol proceeded simultaneously with the reaction of silane coupling onto silica particles. By controlling the molecular ratio of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to 1-octadecanethiol higher than 1.0 (1.56 for the present study), both polar-embedded and polar-endcapped moieties were achieved onto the packing. The performance of the packing was evaluated in detail. The results demonstrated that neutral, acidic and basic analytes were well separated on the packing. The column efficiency for phenanthrene was 34,200 theoretical plates per meter. In addition, four nucleotides can be separated in 100% phosphate buffered saline solution with good reproducibility, which indicates the packing has good stability in aqueous mobile phase. Amitriptyline, a typical basic analytes, was eluted out with relatively symmetric peak shape (asymmetry factor of 1.36), which implies that the packing has not suffered from the negative effect of residue silanols significantly. Good stability in buffer solution of pH ranging from 2.0 to 10.0 was also documented for the packing.

  11. Combatting Ionic Aggregation using Dielectric Forces Combining Modeling/Simulation and Experimental Results to Explain End-capping of Primary Amine Functionalized Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, Jamie M; Goswami, Monojoy; Pickel, Deanna L; Uhrig, David; Sumpter, Bobby G; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    Chain-end functionalization of living poly(styryl)lithium using 1-(3-bromopropyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-aza-2,5-disilacyclo-pentane (BTDP) to generate primary amine end-functionalized polystyrene was investigated using high vacuum anionic polymerization techniques. 13C NMR spectroscopy and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to evaluate polymer end-groups and demonstrated that quantitative amine functionalized polymer was attained under appropriate reaction conditions. In general, the polymerization of styrene was conducted in benzene and the end-capping reaction was performed by adding tetrahydrofuran (THF) to the reaction prior to the addition of BTDP in THF at room temperature. Results indicated that approximately 20% THF by volume is required to obtain 100% end-capping free from side reactions. When too little or no THF was present, side reactions such as lithium halogen exchange followed by Wurtz coupling resulted in unfunctionalized head-to-head dimer as well as other byproducts. Modeling and simulation of the solvent effects using hybrid methods (the so-called QM/MM method) suggest that THF effectively dissociated the anionic chain-end aggregation, thereby resulting in the desired primary amine functionalized polymer. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to develop an understanding of the physics of counterions involved in the end-functionalization process.

  12. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the issue date of a book-entry... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  13. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is posted...

  14. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the issue date of a book... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  15. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is...

  16. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is...

  17. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is posted...

  18. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is posted...

  19. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Ee of... - States With Approved State Implementation Plan Revisions Concerning Allocations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Implementation Plan Revisions Concerning Allocations A Appendix A to Subpart EE of Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations Pt. 97, Subpt. EE, App. A Appendix A to Subpart EE of Part 97—States With Approved State Implementation Plan Revisions...

  1. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements...

  2. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Fiscal Service make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury... FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Fiscal Service make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject...

  3. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.9 When will I receive the redemption value...

  4. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? You may be able to exclude from...

  5. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? You may be able to exclude from...

  6. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any application...

  7. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... apply to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury... FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements...

  8. 31 CFR 351.83 - May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May Public Debt issue Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.83 May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form? We reserve the right to issue bonds only...

  9. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.9 When will I receive the redemption value...

  10. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.9 When will I receive the redemption value...

  11. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements that apply...

  12. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.9 When will I receive the redemption value...

  13. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.9 When will I receive the redemption value...

  14. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any application...

  15. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any...

  16. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? You may be able to exclude from...

  17. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any application...

  18. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements that apply...

  19. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... EE Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required...

  20. Lower bound on e+e- decay of massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsik, R.; Schramm, D. N.; Hoflicn, P

    1988-01-01

    Astronomical observations of SN1987A, such as the light curve, spectral intensities of lines, the X-ray emissions, etc., constrain the lifetime for the decay of a heavy neutrino 1 MeV less than or equivalent to m sub nu H less than or equal to 50 MeV through nu sub H yields nu sub 1+e(+)+e(-) exceeds 4 x 10 to the 15th exp(-m sub nuH/5MeV) seconds. Otherwise. resulting ionization energy deposits and stronger X-ray emission would have been observed. This coupled with traditional cosmological considerations argues that the lifetime of tau-neutrinos probably exceeds the age of the universe. This in turn would imply the standard cosmological mass bound does apply to nu sub tau, namely m sub nu sub tau less than or equivalent to 100 h squared eV (where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km/sec/mpc). The only significant loophole for these latter arguments would be if nu sub tau primarily decays rapidly into particles having very weak interactions.

  1. Search for EeV protons of galactic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, T.; Shibata, F.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tirone, A. H.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic rays in the energy range 1018.0-1018.5 eV are thought to have a light, probably protonic, composition. To study their origin one can search for anisotropy in their arrival directions. Extragalactic cosmic rays should be isotropic, but galactic cosmic rays of this type should be seen mostly along the galactic plane, and there should be a shortage of events coming from directions near the galactic anticenter. This is due to the fact that, under the influence of the galactic magnetic field, the transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior is well advanced, and this qualitative picture persists over the whole energy range. Guided by models of the galactic magnetic field that indicate that the enhancement along the galactic plane should have a standard deviation of about 20° in galactic latitude, and the deficit in the galactic anticenter direction should have a standard deviation of about 50° in galactic longitude, we use the data of the Telescope Array surface detector in 1018.0 to 1018.5 eV energy range to search for these effects. The data are isotropic. Neither an enhancement along the galactic plane nor a deficit in the galactic anticenter direction is found. Using these data we place an upper limit on the fraction of EeV cosmic rays of galactic origin at 1.3% at 95% confidence level.

  2. Optimization of a ligand immobilization and azide group endcapping concept via "Click-Chemistry" for the preparation of adsorbents for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Horak, Jeannie; Hofer, Stefan; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-12-15

    This report describes and compares different strategies to deactivate (endcap) epoxide groups and azide groups on bio-chromatographic support surfaces, before and after ligand attachment. Adsorbents possessing epoxide groups were deactivated using acidic hydrolysis or were endcapped with 2-mercaptoethanol or 2-ethanolamine. The influence of surface-bound 2-ethanolamine was demonstrated for the triazine-type affinity adsorbent B14-2LP-FractoAIMs-1, which was tested in combination with the weak anion exchange material 3-aminoquinuclidine-FractoAIMs-3 (AQ-FA3). Azide groups were modified with 2-propargylalcohol using Click-Chemistry. Besides the conventional one-pot Click reaction, an alternative approach was introduced. This optimized Click protocol was employed (i) for the preparation of the weak anion exchange material AdQ-triazole-Fractogel (AdQ-TRZ-FG) and (ii) for the endcapping of residual azide groups with 3-propargyl alcohol. Using the new Click reaction protocol the ligand immobilization rate was doubled from 250 to 500 μmol/g dry adsorbent. Furthermore, the modified support surface was proven to be inert towards the binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) as well as feed impurities. A thorough evaluation of modified surfaces and adsorbents was performed with dynamic binding experiments using cell culture supernatant containing monoclonal human immunoglobulin G (h-IgG-1). Besides SDS-Page, a recently introduced Protein A-size exclusion HPLC method (PSEC-HPLC) was used to visualize the feed impurity composition and the IgG content of all collected sample fractions in simple PSEC-Plots. A surprising outcome of this study was the irreversible binding of IgG to azide modified surfaces. It was found that organic azide compounds, e.g. 1-azide-3-(2-propen-1-yloxy)-2-propanol (AGE-N3) promote antibody aggregation to a slightly higher extent than the inorganic sodium azide. The possibility that the Hofmeister Series of salt anions may be applicable to predict the

  3. Experiment 2035: Investigation of the EE-2 Casing Shoe and Openhole Interval

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Dennis, Bert R.; Murphy, Hugh D.

    1983-11-09

    The primary objectives for Expt. 2035 are to determine the amount and distribution of the postulated flow behind the EE-2 casing and determine the flow split between the several openhole fracture entrances.

  4. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  5. Preferential acceleration and magnetic field enhancement in plasmas with e+/e- beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Cong Tuan; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of current filaments predicting preferential acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement in a plasma with e+/e- beam injection is presented. When the e+/e- beams are injected into a plasma, current filaments are formed. The beam particles are accelerated or decelerated depending on the types of current filaments in which they are trapped. It is found that in the electron/ion ambient plasma, the e+ beam particles are preferentially accelerated, while the e- beam particles are preferentially decelerated. The preferential particle acceleration/deceleration is absent when the ambient plasma is the e+/e- plasma. We also find that the particle momentum decrease can explain the magnetic field increase during the development of Weibel/filamentation instability. Supporting simulation results of particle acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement are presented. Our findings can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical plasmas with the e+/e- beam injection.

  6. Enhanced surface segregation of poly(methyl methacrylate) end-capped with 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacrylate by introduction of a second block.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huagang; Gao, Jie; Li, Xuehua; Hu, Yanyan; Yan, Donghuan; Ye, XiuYun; Wang, Xinping

    2012-01-01

    New fluorinated copolymers of poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(butyl methacrylate) or poly(n-octadecyl methacrylate) end-capped with 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacrylate (PMMA(x)-b-PBMA(y)-ec-PFMA(z) or PMMA(x)-b-PODMA(y)-ec-PFMA(z)) were synthesized by living atom transfer radical polymerization. Thin films made of PMMA(230)-b-PODMA(y)-ec-PFMA(1) were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These films were found to exhibit robust surface segregation of the end groups. Furthermore, the fluorine enrichment factor at the film surface was found to increase linearly with increasing degree of polymerization of poly(n-octadecyl methacrylate) and its increasing fusion enthalpy in the second block, which enhances the segregation of the fluorinated moieties.

  7. Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer/anatase titanium oxide nanocomposites possessing photocatalytic activity even after calcination at 1000°C.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sujuan; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Kakehi, Hiroshi; Kato, Yoshihiro; Miura, Masashi; Isu, Norifumi; Ameduri, Bruno; Sawada, Hideo

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer [R(F)-(VM)(n)-R(F)] underwent the sol-gel reaction under alkaline conditions in the presence of anatase titanium oxide nanoparticles (an-TiO(2)) in tetrahydrofuran to give the corresponding fluorinated oligomer/anatase titanium oxide nanocomposites [R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/an-TiO(2)]. Crystalline structure of an-TiO(2) in the nanocomposites thus obtained was found to keep completely its structure without phase transformation to rutile even after calcination at 1000°C, although crystalline structure of the original an-TiO(2) nanoparticles underwent a complete phase transformation to the rutile under similar conditions. Interestingly, R(F)-(VM-SiO(2))(n)-R(F)/an-TiO(2) nanocomposites before and after calcination at 1000°C exhibited the similar photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of methylene blue under UV light irradiation.

  8. Dee, John (1527-1608)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Navigator, mathematician, traveler, polymath, mystic, charlatan, astrologer, model for Shakespeare's Prospero and King Lear, and court intriguer. Born in London, he became a navigation instructor, applying Euclidean geometry to navigation and building the instruments to do so. He advised expeditions seeking the Northwest passage to the Pacific via Canada. He cast horoscopes for Elizabeth I, recei...

  9. 2014 Pee Dee germplasm releases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 05035, PD 05041, PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, PD 05071, PD 06001, and PD 06078 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. These ...

  10. 31 CFR 351.32 - How are redemption values calculated for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through April 1, 2005? 351.32 Section 351.32..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds...

  11. 31 CFR 351.19 - What are maturity periods of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are maturity periods of Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates Prior to May 1,...

  12. 31 CFR 351.34 - What are the maturity periods of Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter? 351.34 Section 351.34 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates of...

  13. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.71 Section 351.71 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  14. 31 CFR 351.32 - How are redemption values calculated for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through April 1, 2005? 351.32 Section 351.32..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds...

  15. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.71 Section 351.71 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  16. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.71 Section 351.71 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  17. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.71 Section 351.71 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You...

  18. 31 CFR 351.34 - What are the maturity periods of Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter? 351.34 Section 351.34 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates of...

  19. 31 CFR 351.34 - What are the maturity periods of Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 2005, or thereafter? 351.34 Section 351.34 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates of...

  20. 31 CFR 351.32 - How are redemption values calculated for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997, through April 1, 2005? 351.32 Section 351.32..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds...

  1. 31 CFR 351.19 - What are maturity periods of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are maturity periods of Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates Prior to May 1,...

  2. Low-flow frequency and flow duration of selected South Carolina streams in the Pee Dee River basin through March 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.

    2009-01-01

    Part of the mission of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is to protect and preserve South Carolina's water resources. Doing so requires an ongoing understanding of streamflow characteristics of the rivers and streams in South Carolina. A particular need is information concerning the low-flow characteristics of streams; this information is especially important for effectively managing the State's water resources during critical flow periods such as the severe drought that occurred between 1998 and 2002 and the most recent drought that occurred between 2006 and 2009. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, initiated a study to update low-flow statistics at continuous-record streamgaging stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in South Carolina. Under this agreement, the low-flow characteristics at continuous-record streamgaging stations will be updated in a systematic manner during the monitoring and assessment of the eight major basins in South Carolina as defined and grouped according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control's Watershed Water Quality Management Strategy. Depending on the length of record available at the continuous-record streamgaging stations, low-flow frequency characteristics are estimated for annual minimum 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, 30-, 60-, and 90-day average flows with recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 years. Low-flow statistics are presented for 18 streamgaging stations in the Pee Dee River basin. In addition, daily flow durations for the 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 75-, 90-, and 95-percent probability of exceedance also are presented for the stations. The low-flow characteristics were computed from records available through March 31, 2007. The last systematic update of low-flow characteristics in South Carolina occurred more than 20 years

  3. Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    I summarize our recent works on using differential observables to explore the physics potential of future e+e- colliders in the framework of Higgs effective field theory. This proceeding is based upon Refs. 1 and 2. We study angular observables in the e+e-→ ZHℓ+ℓ-bb¯ channel at future circular e+e- colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy s = 240 GeV and 5 (30) ab-1 integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for the Higgsstrahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners. We also discuss the possibility of using ZZ-fusion at e+e- machines at different energies to probe new operators.

  4. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Craig; Horowitz, Scott; Maguire, Jeff; Velasco, Paulo Tabrares; Springer, David; Coates, Peter; Bell, Christy; Price, Snuller; Sreedharan, Priya; Pickrell, Katie

    2014-04-01

    This project targeted the development of a software tool, BEopt-CA (Ex) (Building Energy Optimization Tool for California Existing Homes), that aims to facilitate balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and photovoltaics (PV) in the residential retrofit1 market. The intent is to provide utility program managers and contractors in the EE/DR/PV marketplace with a means of balancing the integration of EE, DR, and PV

  5. Evaluation and improvement of the properties of the novel cystine-knot microprotein McoEeTI for oral administration.

    PubMed

    Werle, M; Kafedjiiski, K; Kolmar, H; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2007-03-06

    Cystine-knot microproteins exhibit several properties that make them highly interesting as scaffolds for oral peptide drug delivery. It was therefore the aim of the study to evaluate the novel clinically relevant cystine-knot microprotein McoEeTI regarding its potential for oral delivery. Additionally, based on the gained results, important features of McoEeTI were improved. Enzymatic degradation was caused by chymotrypsin, trypsin and porcine small intestinal juice whereas McoEeTI was stable towards elastase, membrane bound proteases, pepsin and porcine gastric juice. Only minor McoEeTI degradation was observed during a 24h incubation period in rat plasma. In the presence of various physiological ions about 50% of McoEeTI formed di- and/or trimers. P(app) value of McoEeTI was determined to be (7.4+/-0.4)x10(-6)cm/s. Sodium caprate and polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) had no beneficial effect on McoEeTI permeation, whereas the utilization of a chitosan-thiobutylamidine (Chito-TBA) system improved McoEeTI permeation 3-fold. Enzymatic stability could be strongly improved by the utilization of Bowman-Birk-Inhibitor (BBI) as well as PCP-Cys. In conclusion, this study indicates that McoEeTI represents a promising candidate as a novel scaffold for oral peptide drug delivery.

  6. Occurrence of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in the environment and effect on exposed biota: a review.

    PubMed

    Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Shamsuddin, Aida Soraya; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

    2014-08-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic hormone, which is a derivative of the natural hormone, estradiol (E2). EE2 is an orally bio-active estrogen, and is one of the most commonly used medications for humans as well as livestock and aquaculture activity. EE2 has become a widespread problem in the environment due to its high resistance to the process of degradation and its tendency to (i) absorb organic matter, (ii) accumulate in sediment and (iii) concentrate in biota. Numerous studies have reported the ability of EE2 to alter sex determination, delay sexual maturity, and decrease the secondary sexual characteristics of exposed organisms even at a low concentration (ng/L) by mimicking its natural analogue, 17β-estradiol (E2). Thus, the aim of this review is to provide an overview of the science regarding EE2, the concentration levels in the environment (water, sediment and biota) and summarize the effects of this compound on exposed biota at various concentrations, stage life, sex, and species. The challenges in respect of EE2 include the extension of the limited database on the EE2 pollution profile in the environment, its fate and transport mechanism, as well as the exposure level of EE2 for better prediction and definition revision of EE2 toxicity end points, notably for the purpose of environmental risk assessment.

  7. Long-lived charge-separated configuration of a push-pull archetype of Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)fluorene].

    PubMed

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Chen, Yu; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-05-13

    The photoinduced electron-transfer process in Disperse Red 1 end-capped poly[9,9-bis(4-diphenylaminophenyl)-2,7-fluorene], a promising material for electronic and optoelectronic devices, is reported here. The charge-separated configuration was found to be long-lived, with a lifetime of up to 2.2 ms in the polar benzonitrile, as inferred from time-resolved absorption measurements.

  8. eeDAP: an evaluation environment for digital and analog pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, Brandon D.; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Ivansky, Adam; Keay, Tyler; Wunderlich, Adam; Hipp, Jason; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to present a platform for designing and executing studies that compare pathologists interpreting histopathology of whole slide images (WSI) on a computer display to pathologists interpreting glass slides on an optical microscope. Methods: Here we present eeDAP, an evaluation environment for digital and analog pathology. The key element in eeDAP is the registration of theWSI to the glass slide. Registration is accomplished through computer control of the microscope stage and a camera mounted on the microscope that acquires images of the real time microscope view. Registration allows for the evaluation of the same regions of interest (ROIs) in both domains. This can reduce or eliminate disagreements that arise from pathologists interpreting different areas and focuses the comparison on image quality. Results: We reduced the pathologist interpretation area from an entire glass slide (≈10-30 mm)2 to small ROIs <(50 um)2. We also made possible the evaluation of individual cells. Conclusions: We summarize eeDAP's software and hardware and provide calculations and corresponding images of the microscope field of view and the ROIs extracted from the WSIs. These calculations help provide a sense of eeDAP's functionality and operating principles, while the images provide a sense of the look and feel of studies that can be conducted in the digital and analog domains. The eeDAP software can be downloaded from code.google.com (project: eeDAP) as Matlab source or as a precompiled stand-alone license-free application.

  9. e+e- collisions in the multi-TeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-05-01

    A leading role in the elucidation of the Standard Model during the last few years has been played by e+e- colliding beam experiments. The e+e- discoveries have been made possible by the cleanliness of the experimental conditions and the ability to tune the centre-of-mass energy with precision to the desired value, thus avoiding less interesting background events. We expect history to repeat itself in the next step of elucidating physics beyond the Standard Model. Just as past e+e- machines such as SPEAR, DORIS and CESR have uncovered physics inaccessible to hadron-hadron collisions with a centre-of-mass energy several times higher, so we feel that future e+e- colliders will provide information that could not be duplicated by hadron colliders with much larger centre-of-mass energies. There is a general consensus that the next interesting energy range is likely to be in the TeV range. It is in this energy range that whatever physics provides and stabilizes the masses of the intermediate vector bosons must be revealed. Unravelling this mass generation mechanism takes us beyond the gauge principle of the Standard Model which has been so triumphantly vindicated in recent months. Therefore we discuss here the capabilities and attributes of an e+e- collider with at least 1 TeV energy per beam. We believe that by enabling an important new energy domain to be explored in detail, such an e+e- collider provides physics opportunities which cannot be paralled by hadron-hadron colliding rings with centre-of-mass energies several times higher. (WHK)

  10. The 2009 Eclipse of EE Cephei: An Educational and Collaborative Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John; Elder, Lauren; Hopkins, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    In December 2008 Jeff Hopkins of the Hopkins Phoenix Observatory (HPO) put out a request for assistance in extracting data from images taken by the AAVSO SRO (Sonoita Research Observatory) of EE Cephei, an 11th magnitude (V) long period (5.6 years) eclipsing binary star system that was due to eclipse in January of 2009. The Hopkins Phoenix Observatory originally planned to do BVRI CCD photometry of EE Cephei for the 2009 eclipse, but equipment and logistical changes at HPO meant the EE Cephei project would not be possible. However, in the fall of 2008 Arne Henden of the AAVSO announced the availability of a remote robotic 16" telescope (the Sonoita Research Observatory) in southern Arizona for use by members of the AAVSO. Jeff Hopkins contacted Arne Henden and arrangements were made to have the EE Cephei star system imaged with BVRI filters beginning in November 2008 and running through February 2009. Image files were archived on the AAVSO web site. Soon after his initial request went out, Jeff Hopkins was contacted by John Pye from Maui Community College, who agreed to help with the project by having one of his students, Lauren Elder, examine the image files and extract EE Cephei and 3 comparison stars flux (ADU) counts for each band. The resulting data were then sent to the Hopkins Phoenix Observatory for data reduction and analysis. The project was a successful joint collaboration with 40 nights of observations for over 300 BVRI data points from 20 November 2008 to 17 February 2009. Light curves for each band as well as color indices were plotted and eclipse contact points were determined. The data were also contributed to the EE Cephei Campaign organized by Cezary Galan at the Centre for Astronomy at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun (Poland). Our results are plotted along with those of several dozen other observers from around the world.

  11. Study of the Process e+e- → K+K-π+π- With the CMD-3 Detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, R. R.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Barkov, L. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Gromov, E. M.; Ignatov, F. V.; Karpov, S. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Khazin, B. I.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Lysenko, A. P.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Popov, A. S.; Popov, Yu. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Rogovsky, Yu. A.; Romanov, A. L.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Solodov, E. P.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Zharinov, Yu. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report preliminary results on the measurement of the cross section of the process e+e- → K+K-π+π- in the c.m. energy range from 1.5 GeV to 2 GeV. It is shown that the cross section is dominated by the contributions of several intermediate states K+K-ρ, K*Kπ, ϕπ+π- and K*K*.

  12. Beam-beam and electron cloud effects in CEPC/FCC-ee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    We discuss beam dynamics issues in CEPC/FCC-ee, especially focusing on the beam-beam and electron cloud effects. Beamstrahlung is strong in extreme high energy collision such as Higgs and top factory. Beam-beam simulations considering beamstrahlung are now ready. Several points of beam-beam effects for FCC-ee are presented. Electron cloud effects are serious for high current positron machine, especially in Z factory that many bunches are stored. Analytical estimate for threshold of electron density and electron build-up for CEPC are presented.

  13. Are “normal hips” being labeled as femoroacetabular impingement due to EE angle?

    PubMed Central

    You, Tian; Yang, Bei; Zhang, Xin-tao; Jiang, Xiao-cheng; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a clinical syndrome characterized by gait abnormality and limb dysfunction, as well as secondary deformities of pelvis and femur. Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) typically could be diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) such as the equatorial-edge angle (EE angle), but it did not work well in GMC patients. In this study, we retrospected all image data and found small EE angles in GMCs, which meant retroverted acetabulum; however, none of them showed no symptoms and signs of FAI. Therefore, we had reasons to think that, some normal hips with unbalanced hip myodynamia as same as GMCs, may be incorrectly diagnosed as FAI through measuring EE angle only. In consequence, the paper was designed to assess the use of the EE angle in the assessment of FAI in the diagnosis, as described by Werner. Twenty-three patients (46 hips) were collected and calculated with the “equatorial-edge angle” (EE angle) by CT scans. All of them were excluded from FAI. Review of the hips showed a mean EE angle was 12.93°, with a minimum of -3.42° and a maximum of 24.08°. The mean value for males and females were 13.52° and 12.40°, respectively, without statistical significance, although the mean value of left hips and right sides reached 13.32° and 12.54° individually, not having statistical differences neither. There were not any symptoms or signs of FAI in all patients. Thus, the reduced EE angle could suggest the local excessive coverage of the femoral head by the anterior acetabular edge, but might not be a reasonably good predictor of FAI. GMC patient's acetabular deformity mainly manifests as increased retroversion, which may be the anatomical basis for FAI and lead to high risks of the acetabular impingement. However, all patients in this study showed no symptoms and signs of FAI, suggesting that the measurement of EE angle can only be applied to assessing those people with normal hip myodynamia, and the bone

  14. Low-flow characteristics and profiles for the Rocky River in the Yadkin-Pee Dee River basin, North Carolina, through 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Fine, Jason M.

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the magnitude and frequency of low-flow discharges is an important part of protecting surface-water resources and planning for municipal and industrial economic expansion. Low-flow characteristics are summarized for 12 continuous-record gaging stations and 44 partial-record measuring sites in the Rocky River basin in North Carolina. Records of discharge collected through the 2002 water year at continuous-record gaging stations and through the 2001 water year at partial-record measuring sites were used. Flow characteristics included in the summary are (1) average annual unit flow; (2) 7Q10 low-flow discharge, the minimum average discharge for a 7-consecutive-day period occurring, on average, once in 10 years; (3) 30Q2 low-flow discharge; (4) W7Q10 low-flow discharge, which is similar to 7Q10 discharge but is based only on flow during the winter months of November through March; and (5) 7Q2 low-flow discharge. The Rocky River basin drains 1,413 square miles (mi2) of the southern Piedmont Province in North Carolina. The Rocky River is about 91 miles long and merges with the Yadkin River in eastern Stanly County to form the Pee Dee River, which discharges into the Atlantic Ocean in South Carolina. Low-flow characteristics compiled for selected sites in the Rocky River basin indicated that the potential for sustained base flows in the upper half of the basin is relatively higher than for streams in the lower half of the basin. The upper half of the basin is underlain by the Charlotte Belt, where streams have been identified as having moderate potentials for sustained base flows. In the lower half of the basin, many streams were noted as having little to no potential for sustained base flows. Much of the decrease in base-flow potential is attributed to the underlying rock types of the Carolina Slate Belt. Of the 19 sites in the basin having minimal (defined as less than 0.05 cubic foot per second) or zero 7Q10 discharges, 18 sites are located in the

  15. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exchange are: (1) Series EE bonds bearing issue dates of January 1, 2003, or earlier, presented no earlier than six months from their issue dates; (2) Series EE bonds bearing issue dates of February 1, 2003, or... redemption-exchange. An agent shall not accept and redeem eligible securities on exchange unless: (1)...

  16. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE... STATES SAVINGS NOTES (FREEDOM SHARES) Scope of Authority § 321.8 Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE... payment of eligible securities presented for redemption in exchange for Series HH bonds....

  17. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE... STATES SAVINGS NOTES (FREEDOM SHARES) Scope of Authority § 321.8 Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE... payment of eligible securities presented for redemption in exchange for Series HH bonds....

  18. A coordinated set of ecosystem research platforms open to international research in ecotoxicology, AnaEE-France.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Christian; Azam, Didier; Caquet, Thierry; Cheviron, Nathalie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Guillaume, Olivier; Houot, Sabine; Lacroix, Gérard; Lafolie, François; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Michniewicz, Radika; Pichot, Christian; Ranjard, Lionel; Roy, Jacques; Zeller, Bernd; Clobert, Jean; Chanzy, André

    2015-10-01

    The infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE-France) is an integrated network of the major French experimental, analytical, and modeling platforms dedicated to the biological study of continental ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial). This infrastructure aims at understanding and predicting ecosystem dynamics under global change. AnaEE-France comprises complementary nodes offering access to the best experimental facilities and associated biological resources and data: Ecotrons, seminatural experimental platforms to manipulate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, in natura sites equipped for large-scale and long-term experiments. AnaEE-France also provides shared instruments and analytical platforms dedicated to environmental (micro) biology. Finally, AnaEE-France provides users with data bases and modeling tools designed to represent ecosystem dynamics and to go further in coupling ecological, agronomical, and evolutionary approaches. In particular, AnaEE-France offers adequate services to tackle the new challenges of research in ecotoxicology, positioning its various types of platforms in an ecologically advanced ecotoxicology approach. AnaEE-France is a leading international infrastructure, and it is pioneering the construction of AnaEE (Europe) infrastructure in the field of ecosystem research. AnaEE-France infrastructure is already open to the international community of scientists in the field of continental ecotoxicology.

  19. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  20. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  1. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  2. Analysis of high mass-to-charge ions in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer via an end-cap quadrupolar direct current downscan.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-09-04

    A method for performing mass-selective instability analysis in a three-dimensional (3-D) quadrupole ion trap is described that involves scanning a direct current (dc) voltage applied to the end-cap electrodes while holding the radio frequency (rf) potential at a fixed value. Rather than eject at the ß(z) = 1 instability line by ramping the amplitude of the drive rf potential applied to the ring electrode, as with the original mass-selective instability scan, this approach effects ion ejection along the ß(z) = 0 instability line in a process identical in principle (though it varies in its method of implementation) to the previously termed "downscan" ( Todd , J. F. J. ; Penman , A. D. ; Smith , R. D. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Processes 1991 , 106 , 117 - 135 ). A linear scan of the dc amplitude results in a nonlinear mass scale, unlike the conventional resonance ejection scan with a linear scan of the rf amplitude, and the ejection of ions in the direction of high mass-to-charge (m/z) to low m/z. However, the downscan offers some advantages over the traditional rf scan for ions of high m/z values. These include a larger scannable mass range, as well as the opportunity for improved resolution at high mass. These characteristics are demonstrated with ions of m/z 10(4)-10(5).

  3. Multielement determination of cadmium and lead in urine by simultaneous electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with an end-capped graphite tube.

    PubMed

    Correia, Paulo R M; Nomura, Cassiana S; Oliveira, Pedro V

    2003-11-01

    A method for the multielement determination of cadmium and lead in urine is proposed by simultaneous electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS) with an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (EC-THGA). The best conditions for cadmium and lead determination were obtained in the presence of NH4H2PO4 as a chemical modifier, using 500 degrees C and 1800 degrees C as the pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, respectively. Urine samples were diluted 1 + 4 directly in autosampler cups with a mixture of 0.125% (w/v) Triton X-100 + 2.5% (v/v) HNO3 + 0.31% (w/v) NH4H2PO4. The optimized heating program was carried out in 57 s, and the instrument calibration was done with aqueous reference solutions. The use of EC-THGA increased the sensitivity of cadmium and lead by 14% and 25%, respectively. The detection limits (n = 20, 3delta) were 0.03 microg L(-1) (0.36 pg) for cadmium and 0.57 microg L(-1) (6.8 pg) for lead. The performance of EC-THGA was acceptable up to 500 heating cycles. The reliability of the entire procedure was checked with the analysis of a lyophilized urine certified reference material. The found concentrations were in agreement with the recommended values (95% confidence level).

  4. Effect of solvent strength and temperature on retention for a polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phase with methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Poole, Colin F; Koziol, Wladyslaw W

    2004-12-10

    Synergi Hydro-RP is a new type of polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica packing for reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its retention properties as a function of solvent strength and temperature are evaluated from the change in retention factors over the composition range (0-70% v/v methanol) and temperature range (25-65 degrees C) using the solvation parameter model and response surface methodologies. The main factors that affect retention are solute size and hydrogen-bond basicity, with minor contributions from solute hydrogen-bond acidity, dipole-type and electron lone pair interactions. Within the easily accessible range for both temperature and solvent strength, the ability to change selectivity is much greater for solvent strength than temperature. Also, a significant portion of the effect of increasing temperature is to reduce retention without changing selectivity. Response surfaces for the system constants are smooth and non-linear, except for cavity formation and dispersion interactions (v system constant), which is linear. Modeling of the response surfaces suggests that solvent strength and temperature are not independent factors for the b, s and e system constants and for the model intercept (c term).

  5. Self-assemblies of γ-CDs with pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA and endcapping via atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Kong, Tao; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ai-Ying; Feng, Zeng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were self-assembled with varying amounts of γ-CDs to prepare poly(pseudorotaxanes) (PPRs). When the concentration of γ-CDs was lower, the central PEO segment served as a shell of the micelles and was preferentially bent to pass through the γ-CD cavity to construct double-chain-stranded tight-fit PPRs characterized by a channel-like crystal structure. With an increase in the amount of γ-CDs added, they began to accommodate the poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) segments dissociated from the core of the micelles. When more γ-CDs were threaded and slipped over the segments, the γ-CDs were randomly distributed along the pentablock copolymer chain to generate single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs and showed no characteristic channel-like crystal structure. All the self-assembly processes of the pentablock copolymers resulted in the formation of hydrogels. After endcapping via in situ ATRP of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), these single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs were transformed into conformational identical polyrotaxanes (PRs). The structures of the PPRs and PRs were characterized by means of (1)H NMR, GPC, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, 2D (1)H NOESY NMR, FTIR, WXRD, TGA and DSC analyses.

  6. The effect of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) group inclusion in p-cyanophenyl end-capped oligothiophene used as a dopant in P3HT:PCBM BHJ solar cells.

    PubMed

    Manninen, V M; Heiskanen, J P; Pankov, D; Kastinen, T; Hukka, T I; Hormi, O E O; Lemmetyinen, H J

    2014-10-01

    In this work, two p-cyanophenyl end-capped oligothiophenes, and , were compared as dopants in the P3HT:PC60BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of inverted organic solar cells. Inclusion of significantly increased the average efficiency of the solar cells, while the increase using doping in the cell efficiency was minor. In the BHJ photoactive layer, the dopant molecules are close to and interact with P3HT and PC60BM molecules. Intra- and intermolecular interactions of the dopant molecules with P3HT and PC60BM were studied in chloroform solutions. Energy or electron transfer from the dopant molecules to PC60BM takes place as the fluorescence emission intensity and lifetime of the dopant molecules decreased in the presence of PC60BM. In the case of doping with , doped cells had higher absorbance than the non-doped reference cell and doping broadens the cell absorption to the near IR-region. Thus, the dopant molecules act as additional light absorbers in the photoactive layer and transfer energy or electrons to PC60BM, which increases the short circuit current and power conversion efficiency of the cell. Also, the emission of the cells doped with decreased when compared to that of the reference cell. In this case, P3HT can give electrons or energy to dopant molecules and the cell current and efficiency are further increased.

  7. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring. PMID:27007817

  8. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring.

  9. Correction to ATel 10128: Spectral Comparison Object SN 1999em -> SN 1999ee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    We report a correction to the spectroscopic classification announced in ATel #10128. The spectral comparison shows that SN 2017bke is similar to type Ia supernova SN 1999ee (which was incorrectly typed as SN 1999em) at t = -7 days from the maximum light. We apologize for any confusion caused by this typo error.

  10. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? 351.4 Section 351.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED...

  11. Standards Setting and Federal Information Policy: The Escrowed Encryption Standard (EES).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gegner, Karen E.; Veeder, Stacy B.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the standards process used for developing the Escrowed Encryption Standard (EES) and its possible impact on national communication and information policies. Discusses the balance between national security and law enforcement concerns versus privacy rights and economic competitiveness in the area of foreign trade and export controls. (67…

  12. Perspectives from Emerging Researchers: What Next in EE/SE Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguayo, Claudio; Higgins, Blanche; Field, Ellen; Nicholls, Jennifer; Pudin, Susan; Tiu, Sangion Appiee; Osborn, Maia; Hashemzadeh, Farshad; Lubuulwa, Kevin Kezabu; Boulet, Mark; Christie, Belinda A.; Mah, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Following the inaugural Australian Association for Environmental Education (AAEE) research symposium in November 2014, we--a group of emerging researchers in Environmental Education/Sustainability Education (EE/SE)--commenced an online collaboration to identify and articulate our responses to the main themes of the symposium. Identifying as…

  13. Transforming e-Learning into ee-Learning: The Centrality of Sociocultural Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Sandra B.; Evans, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional e-learning efforts use information communication technologies to create and support educational opportunities that are not constrained by temporal and spatial considerations. The focus of ee-learning is to couple e-learning's approach with experiential education models that employ service-learning methodologies and with…

  14. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? 351.8 Section 351.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... and becomes part of the redemption value. Interest earnings are payable upon redemption....

  15. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? 351.8 Section 351.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... and becomes part of the redemption value. Interest earnings are payable upon redemption....

  16. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? 351.8 Section 351.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... and becomes part of the redemption value. Interest earnings are payable upon redemption....

  17. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? 351.8 Section 351.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... and becomes part of the redemption value. Interest earnings are payable upon redemption....

  18. 77 FR 213 - United States Savings Bonds, Series EE and I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the..., Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule increases the amount of book-entry... the amount of book- entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds a person may acquire each year....

  19. Resource Materials To Support Your Environmental Education Efforts. EE-TIPS (Environmental Education Technical Information Packages).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North American Association for Environmental Education, Troy, OH.

    This collection gathers together over 50 high-quality materials to support environmental education (EE) curricula. Because each community has unique environmental and educational needs, the guide includes a broad set of educational materials that can be adapted to a variety of settings. The materials can be used to supplement educational…

  20. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  1. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kid to a pediatric cardiologist (say: pee-dee-AT-rik kar-dee-AHL-uh-jist), a doctor who treats heart ... tests, like an echocardiogram (say: ek-oh-KAR-dee-uh-gram) and an electrocardiogram (say: ee-LEK- ...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1126 Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from... the insect pheromone codlure, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, on all raw agricultural commodities...

  3. 31 CFR 351.19 - What are maturity periods of Series EE savings bonds with issue dates prior to May 1, 1995?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are maturity periods of Series... BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds Series Ee Savings Bonds with Issue Dates...

  4. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  5. 31 CFR 363.52 - What is the principal amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money... of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? (a) The principal... Series EE savings bonds and $10,000 for Series I savings bonds. (b) Bonds purchased or transferred...

  6. 31 CFR 363.52 - What is the principal amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money... of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? (a) The principal... Series EE savings bonds and $10,000 for Series I savings bonds. (b) Bonds purchased or transferred...

  7. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  8. 31 CFR 363.52 - What is the principal amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money... of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds that I may acquire in one year? (a) The principal... Series EE savings bonds and $10,000 for Series I savings bonds. (b) Bonds purchased or transferred...

  9. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  10. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Fiscal Service prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Fiscal Service prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter...

  11. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in the presence of TiO2-doped zeolite.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong; Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Cho, Hong Je; Fan, Wei; LeBlanc, Lawrence A; Patterson, Howard H; Amirbahman, Aria

    2014-08-30

    Current design limitations and ineffective remediation techniques in wastewater treatment plants have led to concerns about the prevalence of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in receiving waters. A novel photocatalyst, TiO2-doped low-silica X zeolite (TiO2-LSX), was used to study the degradation of the pharmaceutical compound, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). The catalyst was synthesized and characterized using XRD, BET surface analysis, SEM-EDAX, and ICP-OES. The effects of different UV light intensities, initial EE2 concentrations, and catalyst dosages on the EE2 removal efficiency were studied. A higher EE2 removal efficiency was attained with UV-TiO2-LSX when compared with UV-TiO2 or UV alone. The EE2 degradation process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A comprehensive empirical model was developed to describe the EE2 degradation kinetics under different conditions using multiple linear regression analysis. The EE2 degradation mechanism was proposed based on molecular calculations, identification of photoproducts using HPLC-MS/MS, and reactive species quenching experiments; the results showed that oxidative degradation pathways initiated by hydroxyl radicals were predominant. This novel TiO2-doped zeolite system provides a promising application for the UV disinfection process in wastewater treatment plants.

  13. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Photons with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlín, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wirtz, M.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of air showers with the fluorescence and surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory allow a sensitive search for EeV photon point sources. Several Galactic and extragalactic candidate objects are grouped in classes to reduce the statistical penalty of many trials from that of a blind search and are analyzed for a significant excess above the background expectation. The presented search does not find any evidence for photon emission at candidate sources, and combined p-values for every class are reported. Particle and energy flux upper limits are given for selected candidate sources. These limits significantly constrain predictions of EeV proton emission models from non-transient Galactic and nearby extragalactic sources, as illustrated for the particular case of the Galactic center region.

  14. Search for the rare decay K(L)-->pi(0)e(+)e(-).

    PubMed

    Alavi-Harati, A; Alexopoulos, T; Arenton, M; Barbosa, R F; Barker, A R; Barrio, M; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Bown, C; Bright, S; Cheu, E; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Cox, B; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Ford, R; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Gomes, R A; Gouffon, P; Graham, J; Hamm, J; Hanagaki, K; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, H; Jejer, V; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kobrak, H G E; Kotera, K; LaDue, J; Lai, N; Ledovskoy, A; McBride, P L; Monnier, E; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; Ping, H; Prasad, V; Qi, X R; Quinn, B; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Ronquest, M; Santos, E; Senyo, K; Shanahan, P; Shields, J; Slater, W; Smith, D E; Solomey, N; Swallow, E C; Taegar, S A; Tesarek, R J; Toale, P A; Tschirhart, R; Velissaris, C; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wilking, M; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Worcester, E T; Yamanaka, T; Zukanovich, R F

    2004-07-09

    The KTeV/E799 experiment at Fermilab has searched for the rare kaon decay K(L)-->pi(0)e(+)e(-). This mode is expected to have a significant CP violating component. The measurement of its branching ratio could support the standard model or could indicate the existence of new physics. This Letter reports new results from the 1999-2000 data set. One event is observed with an expected background at 0.99+/-0.35 events. We set a limit on the branching ratio of 3.5x10(-10) at the 90% confidence level. Combining with the previous result based on the data set taken in 1997 yields the final KTeV result: BR(K(L)-->pi(0)e(+)e(-))<2.8x10(-10) at 90% C.L.

  15. Slow down of a globally neutral relativistic e-e+ beam shearing the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Silveirinha, M. G.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    The microphysics of relativistic collisionless shear flows is investigated in a configuration consisting of a globally neutral, relativistic {{e}-}{{e}+} beam streaming through a hollow plasma/dielectric channel. We show through multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations that this scenario excites the mushroom instability (MI), a transverse shear instability on the electron-scale, when there is no overlap (no contact) between the {{e}-}{{e}+} beam and the walls of the hollow plasma channel. The onset of the MI leads to the conversion of the beam’s kinetic energy into magnetic (and electric) field energy, effectively slowing down a globally neutral body in the absence of contact. The collisionless shear physics explored in this configuration may operate in astrophysical environments, particularly in highly relativistic and supersonic settings where macroscopic shear processes are stable.

  16. Anisotropy studies around the galactic centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J. C.; Aramo, C.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bacelar, J.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Barkhausen, M.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boghrat, P.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brunet, J. M.; Buchholz, P.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Capdevielle, J. N.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Claes, D.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Clay, S. B.; Connolly, B.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Quang, T. Dang; Darriulat, P.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Carvalho, L. A.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, M. A. L.; de Souza, V.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Ewers, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazio, D.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fokitis, E.; Fonte, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrard, L.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Geranios, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gobbi, F.; Gold, M. S.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gongora, J. P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Grupen, C.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kalashev, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kolotaev, Y.; Kopmann, A.; Krömer, O.; Kuhlman, S.; Kuijpers, J.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Longo, G.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lucero, A.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Maltezos, S.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martinez, N.; Martínez, J.; Martínez, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurin, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, G.; Medina, M. C.; Medina Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Thi, T. Nguyen; Nichol, R.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nogima, H.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, L. F. A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pham Ngoc, D.; Pham Thi, T. N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pisanti, O.; Porter, T. A.; Pouryamout, J.; Prado, L.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reis, H. C.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Řídký, J.; Risi, A.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robbins, S.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roucelle, C.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santos, E. M.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Semikoz, D.; Sequeiros, G.; Shellard, R. C.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Skelton, P.; Slater, W.; de Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Ticona, R.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vo van, T.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zha, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ‘hybrid’ data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  17. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  18. DATA REVIEW: A compilation of data on hadronic total cross sections in e+e- interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in, and retrieved from, the Durham HEP Databases on the World Wide Web http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA.

  19. Beyond Higgs couplings: Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Nathaniel; Gu, Jiayin; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Kechen

    2016-03-09

    Here, we study angular observables in the $ {e}^{+}{e}^{-}\\to ZH\\to {\\ell}^{+}{\\ell}^{-}b\\overline{b} $ channel at future circular e$^{+}$ e$^{-}$ colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy $ \\sqrt{s}=240 $ GeV and 5 (30) ab$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for he Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the HZγ coupling and constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.

  20. Production of the spin partner of the X (3872) in e+e- collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We study the production of the spin partner of the X (3872), which is a D*Dbar* bound state with quantum numbers JPC =2++ and named X2 (4012) here, with the associated emission of a photon in electron-positron collisions. The results show that the ideal energy region to observe the X2 (4012) in e+e- annihilations is from 4.4 GeV to 4.5 GeV, due to the presence of the S-wave Dbar*D1 (2420) and Dbar*D2 (2460) thresholds, respectively. We also point out that it will be difficult to observe the γX (4012) at the e+e- center-of-mass energy around 4.26 GeV.

  1. Repair, sidetrack, drilling, and completion of EE-2A for Phase 2 reservoir production service

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.S.; Cocks, G.G.; Nicholson, R.W.; Thomson, J.C.

    1989-08-01

    Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy well EE-2 at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was sidetracked and redrilled into the HDR Phase II reservoir after two unsuccessful attempts to repair damage in the lower wellbore. Before sidetracking was begun, six cement slurries were pumped to plug the abandoned lower wellbore and to support the production casing where drilling wear was predicted and where sidetracking was to occur. This work and the redrill of EE-2A were completed in November 1987. Specifications were prepared for a state-of-the-art tie-back casing, which was procured, manufactured, and delivered to Fenton Hill in May 1988. The well was then completed in June 1988 for hot-water production service by cementing in a liner and the upper section of production casing and installing and cementing a tie-back casing string. 24 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Synthesis and Electrochemical and Photophysical Characterization of New 4,4'-π-Conjugated 2,2'-Bipyridines that are End-Capped with Cyanoacrylic Acid/Ester Groups.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Anja; Wu, Yanlin; Kahnt, Axel; Bachmann, Julien; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2016-04-20

    Two new functionalized 4,4'-disubstituted 2,2'-bipyridines that were end-capped with cyanoacrylic acid or cyanoacrylic acid ester anchoring groups, which might allow their efficient functionalization on TiO2 or other metal-oxide semiconductor surfaces, have been synthesized and characterized by electrochemical, photophysical, and spectroscopic measurements. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these 4,4'-disubstituted 2,2'-bipyridines with extended π systems, in particular their LUMO energies, make them promising candidates to build up inorganic-organic hybrid photosensitizers for the sensitization of metal-oxide semiconductors (e.g., TiO2 nanoparticles and/or nanotubes).

  3. Sex Pheromones: (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol in the Codling Moth.

    PubMed

    Beroza, M; Bierl, B A; Moffitt, H R

    1974-01-11

    Although (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-l-ol was reported to be a sex pheromone of the codling moth [Laspeyresia pomonella (L.)], its presence in the moth was questioned, mainly because it has not been isolated. A computerized search of data from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of a partially purified extract equivalent to 45 abdominal tips of female moths produced a mass spectrum that matched that of the authentic coinpound. Other data also confirmed the presence of the compound.

  4. Extracting the kaon Collins function from e+e- hadron pair production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Hernandez, J. O. Gonzalez; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.; Prokudin, A.

    2016-02-01

    The latest data released by the BABAR Collaboration on azimuthal correlations measured for pion-kaon and kaon-kaon pairs produced in e+e- annihilations allow, for the first time, a direct extraction of the kaon Collins functions. These functions are then used to compute the kaon Collins asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes, which result in good agreement with the measurements performed by the HERMES and COMPASS collaborations.

  5. Measurements of the Collins asymmetries for kaons and pions in e+e- annihilations at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, A.

    2016-07-01

    New measurements of the Collins asymmetries were performed by BABAR exploiting inclusive e+e- → h1h2 X annihilations (with h1,2 = π and/or K) mainly at the energy of the ϒ(4S), which corresponds to a squared transferred momentum Q2 ~ 110 GeV2c4. For the first time asymmetries following strange quarks fragmentation could be derived as a function of the fractional energy carried out by inclusively emitted hadron pairs.

  6. CO2 Flow in the EE-3 Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad

    1985-05-10

    Don Brown asked me to look at how much CO2 would be required to produce a 600 psi pressure change in the EE-3 annulus. If a column of water were replaced by a column of CO2, at 500 psi and 50°C, 1583 feet would be required to produce a 600 psi change in the static head.

  7. The MUNU experiment on low energy overlineνee- scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broggini, C.; MUNU Collaboration

    2002-07-01

    We built a low background detector to measure the overlineνee- elastic cross section at low energy. The detector has been installed close to a nuclear reactor in Bugey and it is running since almost 2 years. After having reduced the electron background by more than three orders of magnitude we have now the evidence, for the first time, of the overlineνe peak from the reactor.

  8. Photocopy of a photograph showing a woman (not E.E. Lape, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of a photograph showing a woman (not E.E. Lape, but possibly E.F. Read) seated outside of southwest corner of Murdock House (circa 1930s?). (Photo found in Lape-Read House, located at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Murdock Hill, Murdock House, South side of Old Clinton Road (U.S. Route 1), 1 mile east of Horse Hill Road, Westbrook, Middlesex County, CT

  9. CAPS markers specific to Eb, Ee, and R genomes in the tribe Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Li, X-M; Lee, B S; Mammadov, A C; Koo, B-C; Mott, I W; Wang, R R-C

    2007-04-01

    Wild Triticeae grasses serve as important gene pools for forage and cereal crops. Understanding their genome compositions is pivotal for efficient use of this vast gene pool in germplasm-enhancement programs. Several cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers were developed to distinguish the Eb, Ee, and R genomes. With the aid of disomic addition lines of wheat, it was confirmed that all 7 chromosomes of Eb, Ee, and R genomes carry these genome-specific CAPS markers. Thus, the identified CAPS markers are useful in detecting and monitoring the chromosomes of these 3 genomes. This study also provides evidence suggesting that some Purdue and Chinese germplasm lines developed for barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) resistance are different from those developed in Australia. Furthermore, Thinopyrum intermedium and Thinopyrum ponticum were shown to have different genome constitutions. Sequence analyses of the 1272 bp sequences, containing Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, from the Eb, Ee, and R genomes also shed light on the evolution of these 3 genomes.

  10. Leistungsmessungen zum Einsatz der J2EE Technologie für Feldbussimulationen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garreis, Thorsten; Jürgens, Hendrik; Schmidtmann, Uwe; von Cölin, Gerd

    Die Flexibilisierung der Fertigung und kurze Produktzyklen setzen einen beschleunigten, möglichst fehlerfreien Entwicklungsprozess voraus. Dieses Ziel kann jedoch nur erreicht werden, wenn bereits parallel zur Hardwareentwicklung die Software mit Hilfe einer Simulation der Hardware entwickelt und getestet werden kann. Darüber hinaus können mit Simulationen alternative Lösungen studiert werden, die zu optimierten Verfahren führen. In dieser Arbeit werden Leistungstests an der Simulationsumgebung drd-Simulator präsentiert, die auf der J2EE-Technologie1 basiert. Für die Messungen wird eine Soft-SPS eingesetzt, deren Feldbus vom Typ ModbusTCP simuliert wird. Erste Messungen zeigen, dass J2EE eine leistungsstarke und skalierbare Plattform für die Realisierung von Feldbussimulationen ist. In einem Zyklusbereich ab 100 ms ist das E/A-Verhalten echtzeitfähig, wobei meherere Steuerungen auf den Bus zugreifen können. Die J2EE-Technologie zeichnet sich zudem durch eine gute Ausfallsicherheit und dynamische Rekonfigurier-barkeit aus, so dass Tests dynamisch zur Laufzeit ergänzt oder verändert werden können.

  11. Endmember extraction from hyperspectral image based on discrete firefly algorithm (EE-DFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengye; Qin, Qiming; Zhang, Tianyuan; Sun, Yuanheng; Chen, Chao

    2017-04-01

    This study proposed a novel method to extract endmembers from hyperspectral image based on discrete firefly algorithm (EE-DFA). Endmembers are the input of many spectral unmixing algorithms. Hence, in this paper, endmember extraction from hyperspectral image is regarded as a combinational optimization problem to get best spectral unmixing results, which can be solved by the discrete firefly algorithm. Two series of experiments were conducted on the synthetic hyperspectral datasets with different SNR and the AVIRIS Cuprite dataset, respectively. The experimental results were compared with the endmembers extracted by four popular methods: the sequential maximum angle convex cone (SMACC), N-FINDR, Vertex Component Analysis (VCA), and Minimum Volume Constrained Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (MVC-NMF). What's more, the effect of the parameters in the proposed method was tested on both synthetic hyperspectral datasets and AVIRIS Cuprite dataset, and the recommended parameters setting was proposed. The results in this study demonstrated that the proposed EE-DFA method showed better performance than the existing popular methods. Moreover, EE-DFA is robust under different SNR conditions.

  12. Search for Long-Lived Particles in e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the ϒ (4 S ) , ϒ (3 S ) , and ϒ (2 S ) resonances and just below the ϒ (4 S ) . Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B (B →XsL ) , where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  13. Characterizing invisible electroweak particles through single-photon processes at high energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Youl; Han, Tao; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, the masses of which are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1 /2 Higgsino SU(2 ) L doublets, (b) a spin-1 /2 wino SU(2 ) L triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2 ) L doublet. Due to the mass degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the e+e- collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy e+e- collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at e+e- colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy of the associated hard photon and to determine the spin of the nearly invisible particles unambiguously through the threshold behavior in the photon energy distribution.

  14. CN-GELFrEE - Clear Native Gel-eluted Liquid Fraction Entrapment Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Melani, Rafael D; Seckler, Henrique S; Skinner, Owen S; Do Vale, Luis H F; Catherman, Adam D; Havugimana, Pierre C; Valle de Sousa, Marcelo; Domont, Gilberto B; Kelleher, Neil L; Compton, Philip D

    2016-02-29

    Protein complexes perform an array of crucial cellular functions. Elucidating their non-covalent interactions and dynamics is paramount for understanding the role of complexes in biological systems. While the direct characterization of biomolecular assemblies has become increasingly important in recent years, native fractionation techniques that are compatible with downstream analysis techniques, including mass spectrometry, are necessary to further expand these studies. Nevertheless, the field lacks a high-throughput, wide-range, high-recovery separation method for native protein assemblies. Here, we present clear native gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (CN-GELFrEE), which is a novel separation modality for non-covalent protein assemblies. CN-GELFrEE separation performance was demonstrated by fractionating complexes extracted from mouse heart. Fractions were collected over 2 hr and displayed discrete bands ranging from ~30 to 500 kDa. A consistent pattern of increasing molecular weight bandwidths was observed, each ranging ~100 kDa. Further, subsequent reanalysis of native fractions via SDS-PAGE showed molecular-weight shifts consistent with the denaturation of protein complexes. Therefore, CN-GELFrEE was proved to offer the ability to perform high-resolution and high-recovery native separations on protein complexes from a large molecular weight range, providing fractions that are compatible with downstream protein analyses.

  15. Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program: Environmental contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarkers in fish from the Mobile, Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint, Savannah, and Pee Dee River Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Blazer, Vicki; Denslow, Nancy D.; Echols, Kathy R.; Gale, Robert W.; May, Tom W.; Claunch, Rachael; Wieser, Carla; Anderson, Patrick J.; Coyle, James J.; Gross, Timothy S.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2007-01-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were collected from 13 sites in 4 river basins in the southeastern United States to document spatial trends in accumulative contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarkers. Organochlorine residues, 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ), and elemental contaminants were measured in composite samples of whole fish, grouped by species and gender, from each site. Fish were field-examined for external and internal anomalies, selected organs were weighed to compute somatic indices, and tissue and fluid samples were preserved for fish health and reproductive biomarker analyses. Mercury concentrations in bass samples from all sites exceeded toxicity thresholds for mammals [>0.1 micrograms per gram wet weight (ug/g ww)], fish (>0.2 ug/g ww), and birds (>0.3 ug/g ww) and were greatest (>0.5 ug/g ww) in samples from the Alabama River at Eureka Landing, Alabama; the Mobile River at Bucks, Alabama; the Apalachicola River at Blountstown, Florida; the Savannah River at Sylvania, Georgia; and the Pee Dee River at Bucksport, South Carolina. Selenium concentrations were relatively high (>0.75 ug/g ww) in fish from the Tombigbee River at Lavaca, Alabama; the Mobile River at Bucks; and the Chattahoochee River at Omaha, Georgia compared to those from other sites. Concentrations of 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)- 1,1-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) were high in fish from the Chattahoochee River at Omaha and the Mobile River near Bucks, which was near a 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-1,1- dichloroethylene (DDT) formulating facility that historically discharged into the lower Mobile River. Toxaphene concentrations in fish from the Flint River near Albany, Georgia (60-100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) ww) may pose a risk to fish. Concentrations of other formerly used (total chlordanes, dieldrin, endrin, aldrin, mirex, and hexachlorobenzene) and currently used (pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole

  16. Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Leptons at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Karadeniz, H.; Sultansoy, S.; Yildiz, H. Duran

    2007-04-23

    Possible single productions of fourth SM family charged and neutral leptons via anomalous interactions at the future e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are studied. Signatures of such anomalous processes are argued at above colliders comparatively.

  17. Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Quarks at Future e+e-, ep, and pp Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Sultansoy, S.; Yildiz, H. Duran

    2007-04-23

    Possible single productions of fourth SM family u4 and d4 quarks via anomalous interactions at the e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are investigated. Signatures of such anomalous processes are discussed at above colliders comparatively.

  18. ON THE SPIN CORRELATIONS OF MUONS AND TAU LEPTONS GENERATED IN THE ANNIHILATION PROCESSES e+e- → μ+μ-, e+e- → τ+τ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuboshitz, Valery V.; Lyuboshitz, Vladimir L.

    2014-12-01

    Using the technique of helicity amplitudes, the electromagnetic process e+e- → μ+μ-(τ+τ-) is theoretically studied in the one-photon approximation. The structure of the triplet states of the final (μ+μ-) system is analyzed. It is shown that in the case of unpolarized electron and positron the final muons are also unpolarized, but their spins are strongly correlated. Explicit expressions for the components of the correlation tensor of the (μ+μ-) system are derived. The formula for the angular correlation at the decays of final muons μ+ and μ- is obtained. It is demonstrated that spin correlations of muons in the considered process have the purely quantum character, since one of the Bell-type incoherence inequalities for the correlation tensor components is always violated.

  19. Cross-linked fluoroalkyl end-capped co-oligomeric nanoparticle-encapsulated fullerenea new approach to the surface modification of traditional organic polymers with fullerene-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mugisawa, Masaki; Kasai, Remi; Sawada, Hideo

    2009-01-06

    Cross-linked fluoroalkyl end-capped co-oligomeric nanoparticle-encapsulated fullerenes, prepared by deprotecting a fluoroalkyl end-capped isocyanatoethyl methacrylate 2-butanone oxime adduct-1-hydroxy-5-adamantylacrylate co-oligomer in the presence of fullerene, were of well-defined size in the nanometer range (28-82 nm) and exhibited good dispersibility in a variety of solvents such as methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and 1,2-dichloroethane. Transmission electron microscopy images also showed that these nanocomposites were particles with a mean diameter of 45 nm and that the fullerenes were tightly encapsulated into fluorinated nanoparticle cores. In methanol, these fluorinated nanoparticles emitted fluorescence related to the presence of fullerene and were applied in the surface modification of traditional organic polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to effect good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine on the modified film surfaces. Interestingly, a higher fluorescent intensity of fullerene was observed on the modified PMMA surfaces, although the reverse side of these film surfaces yielded an extremely weak fluorescent intensity. More interestingly, a fluorescence microscopy image of the cross-section of the modified PMMA film showed that encapsulated fullerene was arranged regularly above the modified PMMA film surface.

  20. A chromatographic estimate of the degree of heterogeneity of RPLC packing materials. 1. Non-endcapped polymeric C30-bonded stationary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-01-01

    -exchange interactions between the non-endcapped ionized silanols and the propranololium ion. No such strong interactions are observed with the anionic compound.

  1. QCD compositeness as revealed in exclusive vector boson reactions through double-photon annihilation: e+e- → γγ* → γV0 and e+e- → γ*γ* → V0V0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Lebed, Richard F.; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2017-01-01

    We study the exclusive double-photon annihilation processes, e+e- → γγ* → γV0 and e+e- →γ*γ* → Va0 Vb0, where the Vi0 is a neutral vector meson produced in the forward kinematical region: s ≫ - t and - t ≫ ΛQCD2. We show how the differential cross sections dσ/dt, as predicted by QCD, have additional falloff in the momentum transfer squared t due to the QCD compositeness of the hadrons, consistent with the leading-twist fixed-θCM scaling laws, both in terms of conventional Feynman diagrams and by using the AdS/QCD holographic model to obtain the results more transparently. However, even though they are exclusive channels and not associated with the conventional electron-positron annihilation process e+e- →γ* → q q bar , these total cross sections σ (e+e- → γV0) and σ (e+e- → Va0 Vb0), integrated over the dominant forward- and backward-θCM angular domains, scale as 1 / s, and thus contribute to the leading-twist scaling behavior of the ratio Re+e-. We generalize these results to exclusive double-electroweak vector-boson annihilation processes accompanied by the forward production of hadrons, such as e+e- →Z0V0 and e+e- →W-ρ+. These results can also be applied to the exclusive production of exotic hadrons such as tetraquarks, where the cross-section scaling behavior can reveal their multiquark nature.

  2. International observational campaigns of the last two eclipses in EE Cephei: 2003 and 2008/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewski, M.; Tomov, T.; Graczyk, D.; Apostolovska, G.; Barzova, I.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Bilkina, B.; Blake, R. M.; Bolton, C. T.; Bondar, A.; Brát, L.; Brożek, T.; Budzisz, B.; Cikała, M.; Csák, B.; Dapergolas, A.; Dimitrov, D.; Dobierski, P.; Drahus, M.; Dróżdż, M.; Dvorak, S.; Elder, L.; Frąckowiak, S.; Galazutdinov, G.; Gazeas, K.; Georgiev, L.; Gere, B.; Goździewski, K.; Grinin, V. P.; Gromadzki, M.; Hajduk, M.; Heras, T. A.; Hopkins, J.; Iliev, I.; Janowski, J.; Kocián, R.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Kolev, D.; Kopacki, G.; Krzesiński, J.; Kučáková, H.; Kuligowska, E.; Kundera, T.; Kurpińska-Winiarska, M.; Kuźmicz, A.; Liakos, A.; Lister, T. A.; Maciejewski, G.; Majcher, A.; Majewska, A.; Marrese, P. M.; Michalska, G.; Migaszewski, C.; Miller, I.; Munari, U.; Musaev, F.; Myers, G.; Narwid, A.; Németh, P.; Niarchos, P.; Niemczura, E.; Ogłoza, W.; Öǧmen, Y.; Oksanen, A.; Osiwała, J.; Peneva, S.; Pigulski, A.; Popov, V.; Pych, W.; Pye, J.; Ragan, E.; Roukema, B. F.; Różański, P. T.; Semkov, E.; Siwak, M.; Staels, B.; Stateva, I.; Stempels, H. C.; Stȩślicki, M.; Świerczyński, E.; Szymański, T.; Tomov, N.; Waniak, W.; Wiȩcek, M.; Winiarski, M.; Wychudzki, P.; Zajczyk, A.; Zoła, S.; Zwitter, T.

    2012-08-01

    Context. EE Cep is an unusual long-period (5.6 yr) eclipsing binary discovered during the mid-twentieth century. It undergoes almost-grey eclipses that vary in terms of both depth and duration at different epochs. The system consists of a Be type star and a dark dusty disk around an invisible companion. EE Cep together with the widely studied ɛ Aur are the only two known cases of long-period eclipsing binaries with a dark, dusty disk component responsible for periodic obscurations. Aims: Two observational campaigns were carried out during the eclipses of EE Cep in 2003 and 2008/9 to verify whether the eclipsing body in the system is indeed a dark disk and to understand the observed changes in the depths and durations of the eclipses. Methods: Multicolour photometric data and spectroscopic observations performed at both low and high resolutions were collected with several dozen instruments located in Europe and North America. We numerically modelled the variations in brightness and colour during the eclipses. We tested models with different disk structure, taking into consideration the inhomogeneous surface brightness of the Be star. We considered the possibility of disk precession. Results: The complete set of observational data collected during the last three eclipses are made available to the astronomical community. The 2003 and 2008/9 eclipses of EE Cep were very shallow. The latter is the shallowest among all observed. The very high quality photometric data illustrate in detail the colour evolution during the eclipses for the first time. Two blue maxima in the colour indices were detected during these two eclipses, one before and one after the photometric minimum. The first (stronger) blue maximum is simultaneous with a "bump" that is very clear in all the UBV(RI)C light curves. A temporary increase in the I-band brightness at the orbital phase ~0.2 was observed after each of the last three eclipses. Variations in the spectral line profiles seem to be

  3. Rotational Splitting and Asteroseismic Modeling of the δ Scuti Star EE Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinghao; Li, Yan

    2017-03-01

    According to the rotational splitting law of g modes, the frequency spectra of EE Cam can be disentangled only with oscillation modes of ℓ = 0, 1, and 2. Fifteen sets of rotational splits were found, and they contain five sets of ℓ = 1 multiplets and 10 sets of ℓ = 2 multiplets. The rotational period of EE Cam is deduced to be {P}{rot}={1.84}-0.05+0.07 days. When we do model fittings, we use two nonradial oscillation modes (f 11 and f 32), and the fundamental radial mode f 1. The fitting results show that {χ }2 of the best-fitting model is much smaller than those of other theoretical models. The physical parameters of the best-fitting model are M = 2.04 M ⊙, Z = 0.028, T eff = 6433 K, {log}L/{L}ȯ =1.416, R = 4.12 R ⊙, {log}g=3.518, and {χ }2=0.00035. Furthermore, we find that f 11 and f 32 are mixed modes, which mainly characterize the features of the helium core. The fundamental radial mode f 1 mainly restricts the features of the stellar envelope. Finally, the acoustic radius {τ }0 and the period separation Π0 are determined to be 5.80 hr and 463.7 s, respectively, and the size of the helium core of EE Cam is estimated to be M He = 0.181 M ⊙ and R He = 0.0796 R ⊙.

  4. Multiple production of MSSM neutral Higgs bosons at high-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, A.; Haber, H. E.; Zerwas, P. M.

    1996-02-01

    The cross sections for the multiple production of the lightest neutral Higgs boson at high-energy e+e- colliders are presented in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). We consider production through Higgs-strahlung, associated production of the scalar and the pseudoscalar bosons, and the fusion mechanisms for which we use the effective longitudinal vector-boson approximation. These cross sections allow one to determine trilinear Higgs couplings λHhh and λhhh, which are theoretically determined by the Higgs potential.

  5. Packaging and environment in Europe (EUREKA PACK-EE): Automated sorting of aluminum from domestic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaud, Y.; Guillermet, R.; Lemaire, H.; Cael, J.; Nijhof, G.; Rossel, H.

    1996-10-01

    A large European research project named EUREKA PACK-EE (for Packaging Environment in Europe) has been started in June 1993. The project carries out research and innovation into collection, sorting and valorization of types of packaging, with improvements to sorting procedures capable of meeting the needs of the recovery and recycling industries. The project includes studies of consumer behavior concerning waste, which will influence the choice of sorting techniques. The results are presented for automated sorting by different eddy current (EC) engineering and in two other papers for thermal separation and purification.

  6. Study of the e+e- to hadrons via ISR at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, E. P.

    2010-06-01

    Experimental data from the PEP-II B-factory at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass (c.m.) energy, obtained via initial-state radiation (ISR) with the BABAR detector, are presented. The cross sections for many hadronic processes have been measured from the production threshold to 4-5 GeV of the e+e- c.m. energy. The obtained data allow to study a number of intermediate states and determine the parameters of known resonances and their branching fractions. The exclusive cross section for some number of hadronic sub-processes are presented.

  7. Design and Implementation of Harmful Algal Bloom Diagnosis System Based on J2EE Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chunfeng; Zheng, Haiyong; Ji, Guangrong; Lv, Liang

    According to the shortcomings which are time consuming and laborious of the traditional HAB (Harmful Algal Bloom) diagnosis by the experienced experts using microscope, all kinds of methods and technologies to identify HAB emerged such as microscopic images, molecular biology, characteristics of pigments analysis, fluorescence spectra, inherent optical properties, etc. This paper proposes the design and implementation of a web-based diagnosis system integrating the popular methods for HAB identification. This system is designed with J2EE platform based on MVC (Model-View-Controller) model as well as technologies such as JSP, Servlets, EJB and JDBC.

  8. A new measurement of the overlineνee - elastic cross section at very low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Daraktchieva, Z.; Gervasio, G.; Jeanneret, P.; Jonkmans, G.; Koang, D. H.; Lamblin, J.; Lebrun, D.; Link, O.; Ould-Saada, F.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J. L.

    2002-10-01

    We have built a low background detector, a time projection chamber surrounded by an active anti-Compton, to measure the overlineνee - elastic cross section down to the antineutrino energy of 900 keV. With our detector, running at 18 m from the core of a nuclear reactor in Bugey, we could detect reactor antineutrinos by measuring both the energy and the direction of the recoiling electrons. We report here on a first analysis of the data using an automatic scanning procedure. The results we obtain are 1.5 σ higher than the ones predicted by the standard model.

  9. V-ATPase-activity in the TGN/EE is required for exocytosis and recycling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Irani, Niloufer G.; Rubbo, Simone Di; Neumetzler, Lutz; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Mylle, Evelien; Bischoff, Volker; Vernhettes, Samantha; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    In plants, vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity acidifies both the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE) and the vacuole. This dual V-ATPase function has impeded our understanding in how the pH homeostasis within the plant TGN/EE controls exo- and endocytosis. Here, we show that the weak V-ATPase mutant deetiolated3 (det3) displayed a pH increase in the TGN/EE, but not in the vacuole, strongly impairing secretion and recycling of the brassinosteroid receptor and the cellulose synthase complexes to the plasma membrane, in contrast to mutants lacking tonoplast-localized V-ATPase activity only. The brassinosteroid insensitivity and the cellulose deficiency defects in det3 were tightly correlated with reduced Golgi and TGN/EE motility. Thus, our results provide strong evidence that acidification of the TGN/EE, but not of the vacuole, is indispensable for functional secretion and recycling in plants. PMID:27250258

  10. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How can I find out what my book-entry... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  11. Study of the process e+e- → KS0 KL0 in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, E. A.; Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The e+e- →KS0 KLl0l cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV at 25 energy points using 6.1 ×105 events with KS0 →π+π- decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb-1 of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. To obtain ϕ (1020) meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the ρ , ω , ϕ-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the e+e- →KS0 KL0 cross section with a 1.8% systematic uncertainty.

  12. Probing dark forces and light hidden sectors at low-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia

    2009-07-01

    A dark sector—a new non-Abelian gauge group Higgsed or confined near the GeV scale—can be spectacularly probed in low-energy e+e- collisions. A low-mass dark sector can explain the annual modulation signal reported by DAMA/LIBRA and the PAMELA, ATIC, and INTEGRAL observations by generating small mass splittings and new interactions for weak-scale dark matter. Some of these observations may be the first signs of a low-mass dark sector that collider searches can definitively confirm. Production and decay of O(GeV)-mass dark states is mediated by a Higgsed Abelian gauge boson that mixes kinetically with hypercharge. Existing data from BABAR, BELLE, CLEO-c, and KLOE may contain thousands of striking dark-sector events with a high multiplicity of leptons that reconstruct mass resonances and possibly displaced vertices. We discuss the production and decay phenomenology of Higgsed and confined dark sectors and propose e+e- collider search strategies. We also use the DAMA/LIBRA signal to estimate the production cross sections and decay lifetimes for dark-sector states.

  13. Studies of charmonium production in e+e- annihilation and B decays at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzia, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    In an e+e- B factory, charmonium states can be produced through different mechanisms, e.g. direct production in e+e- annihilation, double charmonium production, and in B-meson decays. Prompt production of J/ψ or ψ(2S) in association with a second charmonium states has been observed by both the BABAR and the Belle experiments. These processes provide an opportunity to study both perturbative and non perturbative effects in QCD and to search for new charmonium states recoiling against the reconstructed J/ψ or ψ(2S). Using the full BABAR data set collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance, we measure the absolute branching fractions of the two-body decays of B mesons (B → KXc), where Xc is a charmonium state. For events in which a B is fully reconstructed, the charmonium spectrum can be observed in an unbiased way by looking at the distribution of the K momentum in the rest frame of the recoiling B. We present also Dalitz plot analysis for the decays of B mesons to D- D0 K+ and D¯ 0 D0 K+, and we report about the observation of the Ds1 * (2700)+ resonance in these two channels, and obtain measurements of the mass and width.

  14. Phenomenology from SIDIS and e+e- multiplicities: multiplicities and phenomenology - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Echevarria, Miguel G.; Radici, Marco; Signori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study is part of a project to investigate the transverse momentum dependence in parton distribution and fragmentation functions, analyzing (semi-)inclusive high-energy processes within a proper QCD framework. We calculate the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) multiplicities for e+e- annihilation into two hadrons (considering different combinations of pions and kaons) aiming to investigate the impact of intrinsic and radiative partonic transverse momentum and their mixing with flavor. Different descriptions of the non-perturbative evolution kernel (see, e.g., Refs. [1-5]) are available on the market and there are 200 sets of flavor configurations for the unpolarized TMD fragmentation functions (FFs) resulting from a Monte Carlo fit of Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) data at Hermes (see Ref. [6]). We build our predictions of e+e- multiplicities relying on this rich phenomenology. The comparison of these calculations with future experimental data (from Belle and BaBar collaborations) will shed light on non-perturbative aspects of hadron structure, opening important insights into the physics of spin, flavor and momentum structure of hadrons.

  15. Beyond Higgs couplings: Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e$$^{+}$$e$$^{-}$$ colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Craig, Nathaniel; Gu, Jiayin; Liu, Zhen; ...

    2016-03-09

    Here, we study angular observables in themore » $$ {e}^{+}{e}^{-}\\to ZH\\to {\\ell}^{+}{\\ell}^{-}b\\overline{b} $$ channel at future circular e$$^{+}$$ e$$^{-}$$ colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy $$ \\sqrt{s}=240 $$ GeV and 5 (30) ab$$^{-1}$$ integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for he Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the HZγ coupling and constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.« less

  16. Absence of Change in Total Daily Energy Expenditure (EE(sub TD)) in Young and Mature Rats During 14 Days of Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Fuller, P.; Fuller, C. A.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Effect of age on the response of EE(sub TD) to an increase in gravity was assessed in young (Y; 1.5 month old) and mature (M; 8 month old) Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were implanted with transmitters to monitor activity, and metabolism was determined by the double labeled water technique. Daily food intake was measured. For each age, rats (n=8 per treatment) were exposed to centrifugation at 2G, or remained at 1G. There was a difference in EE(sub TD) between age groups, 182 plus or minus 11 and 143 plus or minus 5 kcal/kg/day in Y and M, respectively. This difference was attributed in part to a lower activity level in M animals, 48% of Y rats. After day 6 there was no effect on EE(sub TD) of exposure to 2G, or on food intake per 100g BW. Prior studies show a 20% increase in resting EE with hypergravity. In our study the level of activity was reduced to 41% of 1G in both age groups during 2G. For Y at 1G resting EE accounted for 78% of the EE(sub TD) and activity 22%, while at 2G resting EE was 96% of EE(sub TD) and activity 4%. M rats had similar changes. Independent of age, with exposure to hypergravity EE(sub TD) is maintained by behavioral changes.

  17. Determination of estrogenic steroids and microbial and photochemical degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in lake surface water, a case study.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yuegang; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Si

    2013-08-01

    In this study, a GC-MS technique was applied to determine 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), an active ingredient of oral contraceptives, and its fate in Lake Quinsigamond, Massachusetts, USA. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study of EE2 and its microbial and photochemical degradation in a lake ecosystem. EE2 was detected at a concentration up to 11.1 ng L(-1). At this concentration EE2 may affect the reproduction of fish and other aquatic organisms in the lake due to its high estrogenic activity. EE2 was persistent to the biodegradation by the microorganisms in the lake. Under aerobic conditions a long lag phase (42 days) was observed before the biodegradation of EE2 and a half-life of 108 days was estimated. Under anaerobic conditions, EE2 experienced even a longer acclimation stage (63 days) and a slower microbial degradation in the lake water. The photodegradation of EE2 was rapid in the lake surface water under natural sunlight, with a half-life of less than 2 days in summer sunny days. Compared to biodegradation, photodegradation may represent a predominant removal mechanism for EE2 in natural surface waters.

  18. Upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction at EeV energies from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiró, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; H˙Ague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Mueller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smetniansky de Grande, N.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcaǧu, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-07-01

    From direct observations of the longitudinal development of ultra-high energy air showers performed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, upper limits of 3.8%, 2.4%, 3.5% and 11.7% (at 95% c.l.) are obtained on the fraction of cosmic-ray photons above 2, 3, 5 and 10 EeV (1EeV≡1018eV), respectively. These are the first experimental limits on ultra-high energy photons at energies below 10 EeV. The results complement previous constraints on top-down models from array data and they reduce systematic uncertainties in the interpretation of shower data in terms of primary flux, nuclear composition and proton-air cross-section.

  19. Evaluation of the local hadronic calibration with combined beam-test data for the endcap and forward calorimeters of ATLAS in the pseudorapidity region 2.5<|η|<4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J.; Soukup, J.; Archambault, J. P.; Cojocaru, C.; Khakzad, M.; Oakham, G.; Schram, M.; Vincter, M. G.; Datskov, V.; Drobin, V.; Fedorov, A.; Golubykh, S.; Javadov, N.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kakurin, S.; Kazarinov, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Ladygin, E.; Lazarev, A.; Neganov, A.; Petrova, L.; Pisarev, I.; Rousakovitch, N.; Serochkin, E.; Shilov, S.; Shalyugin, A.; Usov, Yu.; Pecsy, M.; Stavina, P.; Strizenec, P.; Barreiro, F.; Gabaldon, C.; Labarga, F.; Nebot, E.; Oliver, C.; Rodier, S.; Del Peso, J.; Belkin, A.; Heldmann, M.; Koepke, L.; Othegraven, R.; Schliephake, T.; Schroff, D.; Secker, H.; Thomas, J.; Benchouk, C.; Djama, F.; Hubaut, F.; Monnier, E.; Niess, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Raymond, M.; Resende, B.; Sauvage, D.; Serfon, C.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Azuelos, G.; Delsart, P.; Leroy, C.; Mehdiyev, R.; Akimov, A.; Blagov, M.; Komar, A.; Snesarev, A.; Speransky, M.; Sulin, V.; Yakimenko, M.; Epshtein, V.; Khovansky, V.; Shatalov, P.; Barillari, T.; Erdmann, J.; Kiryunin, A.; Kurchaninov, L.; Menke, S.; Nagel, M.; Oberlack, H.; Pospelov, G.; Salihagic, D.; Schacht, P.; Chen, T.; Ping, J.; Qi, M.; Maslennikov, A.; Soukharev, A.; Talyshev, A.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Cavalleri, P.; Schwemling, P.; Chekulaev, S.; Denisov, S.; Evdokimov, V.; Levitsky, M.; Minaenko, A.; Mitrofanov, G.; Moiseev, A.; Pleskatch, A.; Stoyanova, D.; Zakamsky, L.; Bieri, M.; Rani, J.; Schouten, D.; Vetterli, M.; Loch, P.; Rutherfoord, J.; Savin, A.; Shaver, L.; Shupe, M.; Galt, C.; Gorbounov, P.; Knecht, N.; Krieger, P.; Ma, L.; Mazini, R.; Orr, R.; Losty, M.; Oram, C. J.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Hughes, T.; Kanaya, N.; Keeler, R. K.; Langstaff, R.; Lefebvre, M.; McPherson, R.; Shaw, W.; Wielers, M.; Braun, H. M.; Thadome, J.; Zeitnitz, Ch.; Atlas Liquid Argon Endcap Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The local hadronic calibration scheme developed for the reconstruction and calibration of jets and missing transverse energy in ATLAS has been evaluated using data obtained during combined beam tests of modules of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap and forward calorimeters. These tests covered the pseudorapidity range of 2.5<|η|<4.0. The analysis has been performed using special sets of calibration weights and corrections obtained with the GEANT4 simulation of a detailed beam-test setup. The evaluation itself has been performed through the careful study of specific calorimeter performance parameters such as e.g. energy response and resolution, shower shapes, as well as different physics lists of the GEANT4 simulation.

  20. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated

  1. Two-Jet Rate in e+e- at Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Logarithmic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfi, Andrea; McAslan, Heather; Monni, Pier Francesco; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-10-01

    We present the first next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic resummation for the two-jet rate in e+e- annihilation in the Durham and Cambridge algorithms. The results are obtained by extending the ares method to observables involving any global, recursively infrared and collinear safe jet algorithm in e+e- collisions. As opposed to other methods, this approach does not require a factorization theorem for the observables. We present predictions matched to next-to-next-to-leading order and a comparison to LEP data.

  2. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) SUB-GRADE EE/CA EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES A NEW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2007-06-08

    An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was performed at the Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The purpose of the EVCA was to identify the sub-grade items to be evaluated; determine the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) hazardous substances through process history and available data; evaluate these hazards; and as necessary, identify the available alternatives to reduce the risk associated with the contaminants. The sub-grade EWCA considered four alternatives for an interim removal action: (1) No Action; (2) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); (3) Stabilize and Leave in Place (Stabilization); and (4) Remove, Treat and Dispose (RTD). Each alternative was evaluated against the CERCLA criteria for effectiveness, implementability, and cost.

  3. Observation of D0-D¯0 Mixing in e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, B. R.; Won, E.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bala, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Higuchi, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Klucar, J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peng, T.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; (Belle Collaboration)

    2014-03-01

    We observe D0-D ¯0 mixing in the decay D0→K+π- using a data sample of integrated luminosity 976 fb-1 collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB e+e- asymmetric-energy collider. We measure the mixing parameters x'2=(0.09±0.22)×10-3 and y'=(4.6±3.4)×10-3 and the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates RD=(3.53±0.13)×10-3, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic combined. Our measurement excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at the 5.1 standard deviation level.

  4. ORBITAL SOLUTIONS AND ABSOLUTE ELEMENTS OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY EE AQUARII

    SciTech Connect

    Wronka, Marissa Diehl; Gold, Caitlin; Sowell, James R.; Williamon, Richard M. E-mail: rwilliamon@physics.emory.edu

    2010-04-15

    EE Aqr is a 7.9 mag Algol variable with a 12 hr orbital period. The Wilson-Devinney program is used to simultaneously solve 11 previously published light curves together with two existing radial velocity curves. The resulting masses are M {sub 1} = 2.24 {+-} 0.13 M {sub sun} and M {sub 2} = 0.72 {+-} 0.04 M {sub sun}, and the radii are R {sub 1} = 1.76 {+-} 0.03 R {sub sun} and R {sub 2} = 1.10 {+-} 0.02 R {sub sun}. The system has the lower-mass component completely filling its Roche lobe. Its distance from Hipparcos observations is 112 {+-} 10 pc. An improved ephemeris is derived, and no deviations in the period over time were seen. Light and velocity curve parameters, orbital elements, and absolute dimensions are presented, plus a comparison is made with previous solutions.

  5. Estimates of Hadronic Backgrounds in Future e+e- LinearColliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, Tomomi

    1998-05-01

    We have estimated hadronic backgrounds for an e+e- linear collider at a center- of-mass energy of 5 TeV. In order to achieve a required luminosity in TeV e+ e- colliders, the high beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon}, such as several thousands, is caused. In the high {Upsilon} regime, the {gamma}{gamma} luminosities due to the collision of beamstrahlung photons are calculated by using the CAIN code. According to the {gamma}{gamma} luminosity distribution, we have estimated the hadronic backgrounds of {gamma}{gamma} {yields} minijets based on the parton distributions of the Drees and Grassie model by the PYTHIA 5.7 code. The Japan Linear Collider (J LC-1) detector simulator is applied for selection performances in the detector.

  6. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to paired Bc production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K.; Onishchenko, A. I.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    We present theoretical analysis of paired Bc mesons production in e+e- annihilation at different energy scales taking into account full next-to-leading order QCD corrections. Both possible electroweak channels are considered: production via virtual photon and via virtual Z-boson. We study in detail the role of radiative QCD corrections, which were found to be significant especially at low energies. It is shown that the contribution from Z-boson is significant at high energies (√{ s} >MZ / 2) especially in the case of paired production of pseudo-scalar and vector (Bc +Bc*) mesons. Azimuthal asymmetry induced by a P-violating weak interaction with Z-boson is also analyzed.

  7. Deuteron and anti-deuteron production in ee collisions at the Z resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Sloan, T.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2006-08-01

    Deuteron and anti-deuteron production in Z decays has been observed in the ALEPH experiment at LEP. The production rate of anti-deuterons is measured to be (5.9±1.8±0.5)×10 per hadronic Z decay in the anti-deuteron momentum range from 0.62 to 1.03 GeV/c. The coalescence parameter B, which characterizes the likelihood of anti-deuteron production, is measured to be 0.0033±0.0013 GeV in Z decays. These measurements indicate that the production of anti-deuterons is suppressed in ee collisions compared to that in pp and photoproduction collisions.

  8. Study of isospin violating phi excitation in e+e- → ωπ0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Yuan-Jiang; Zhao, Qiang

    2009-08-01

    We study the reaction e+e- → ωπ0 in the vicinity of the phi mass region. The isospin-violating phi excitation is accounted for by two major mechanisms. One is electromagnetic transition and the other is strong isospin violations. For the latter, we consider contributions from the intermediate hadronic meson loops and phi-ρ0 mixing as the major mechanisms via the t- and s-channel transitions, respectively. By fitting the recent KLOE data, we succeed in constraining the model parameters and extracting the phi → ωπ0 branching ratio. It shows that the branching ratio is sensitive to the phi excitation line shape and background contributions. Some crucial insights into the correlation between isospin violation and Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule evading transitions are also learned.

  9. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  10. Stellar dynamics in E+E pairs of galaxies. 2: Simulations and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.; Rampazzo, R.; Bonfanti, P. P.; Prugniel, P.; Sulentic, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    We have presented in a companion article a kinematic study of three E+E galaxy pairs, NGC741/742, 1587/1588 (CPG 99) and 2672/2673 (CPG 175). We find some evidence for perturbed velocity dispersion profiles. These perturbation features are now reported for 14 galaxies in the literature. They occur, or require observations for detection, at large radii where the S/N in the data is low. While observations of individual galaxies are sometimes uncertain, the large number of objects where such features are suspected gives confidence that they are real. These perturbations can be attributed to projection effects contamination along the line of sight, or directly to the tidal interaction. We report the results of several self-gravitating simulations of unbound pairs in an effort to better understand these perturbations another generic features of close E+E pairs reported in the literature. The models frequently show off-center envelopes created by the asymmetry of tidal forces during interpenetrating encounters. The envelopes last for a few 108 yrs, which explains the frequency of such features in observed pairs. This phenomenon is stronger in the self-gravitating simulations than in the MTBA runs. U-shaped (and an equal number of inverse U shaped velocity profiles are seen in the simulations, a result of ablation in the outer envelopes. Simulations including inner galaxy rotation also preserve this feature, irrespective of the spin vector direction in each galaxy. U-shape velocity structure is found to be a robust indicator of the ongoing interaction. All simulations show evidence for enhanced velocity dispersion between the galaxies even in the case of simple superposition of two non interacting objects. We therefore conclude that this cannot be considered an unambiguous indicator of the interaction.

  11. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  12. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  13. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  14. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  15. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  16. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When are rate announcements that apply... Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements that apply...

  17. 77 FR 29331 - Publication of the Petition for Waiver From Sanyo E&E Corporation From the Department of Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Publication of the Petition for Waiver From Sanyo E&E... AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of re... and Renewable Energy. BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 In the Matter...

  18. 31 CFR 351.83 - May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... savings bonds only in book-entry form? 351.83 Section 351.83 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form? We reserve the right to issue bonds only in book-entry form....

  19. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Is the Education Savings Bond...

  20. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Is the Education Savings Bond...

  1. The HLS approach to (g - 2)μ : A Solution to the "τ versus e+e-" Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benayoun, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    The Hidden Local Symmetry (HLS) Model provides a framework able to encompass several physical processes and gives a unfied description of these in an energy range extending up to the ø mass. Supplied with appropriate symmetry breaking schemes, the HLS Model gives a broken Effective Lagrangian (BHLS). The BHLS Lagrangian gives rise to a fit procedure in which a simultaneous description of the e+e- annihilations to π+π-, π0γ, ηγ, π+π-π0, K+K-, KLKS and of the dipion spectrum in the decay τ±→π± π0v can be performed. Supplemented with a few pieces of information on the ρ0 - ω - ø system, the τ dipion spectrum is shown to predict accurately the pion form factor in e+e- annihilations. Physics results derived from global fits involving or excluding the τ dipion spectra are found consistent with each others. Therefore, no obvious mismatch between the τ and e+e- physics properties arises and the τ - e+e- puzzle vanishes within the broken HLS Model.

  2. A Test in Context: E/A and E/e' to Assess Diastolic Dysfunction and LV Filling Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mitter, Sumeet S; Shah, Sanjiv J; Thomas, James D

    2017-03-21

    Diastolic dysfunction represents a combination of impaired left ventricular (LV) relaxation, restoration forces, myocyte lengthening load, and atrial function, culminating in increased LV filling pressures. Current Doppler echocardiography guidelines recommend using early to late diastolic transmitral flow velocity (E/A) to assess diastolic function, and E to early diastolic mitral annular tissue velocity (E/e') to estimate LV filling pressures. Although both parameters have important diagnostic and prognostic implications, they should be interpreted in the context of a patient's age and the rest of the echocardiogram to describe diastolic function and guide patient management. This review discusses: 1) the physiological basis for the E/A and E/e' ratios; 2) their roles in diagnosing diastolic dysfunction; 3) prognostic implications of abnormalities in E/A and E/e'; 4) special scenarios of the E/A and E/e' ratios that are either useful or challenging when evaluating diastolic function clinically; and 5) their usefulness in guiding therapeutic decision making.

  3. Evolution or Revolution in EE/SE Research? A Collaborative Dialogue from First-Year PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasy, Kim; Page, Leah; Emery, Sherridan; Ayre, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The AAEE 2014 research symposium in Hobart provided a privileged space for researchers and practitioners within environmental education and sustainability education (EE/SE) to come together and create dialogues about education for sustainability research. This essay is a critical reflection from postgraduate researchers about the symposium and the…

  4. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... eligible for exchange are: (1) Series EE bonds bearing issue dates of January 1, 2003, or earlier... February 1, 2003, or thereafter, presented no earlier than 12 months from their issue dates; and (3) Series... securities on exchange unless: (1) The securities are accompanied by a completed exchange subscription...

  5. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Extraocular Cranial Nerves during Expanded Endonasal Surgery (EES) of the Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of extraocular cranial nerves (EOCN) III, IV, and VI during expanded endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base in reducing iatrogenic cranial nerve (CN) deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 200 patients out of 990 who had at least one EOCN monitored during EES. We further separated patients into groups according to the specific CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as Group I and those who did not as Group II. Results A total of 696 EOCNs were monitored. The number of muscles supplied by EOCNs that had SG f-EMG activity was 88, including CN III = 46, CN IV = 21, and CN VI = 21. There were two deficits involving CN VI in patients who had SG f-EMG activity during surgery. There were 14 deficits observed, including CN III = 3, CN IV = 2, and CN VI = 9 in patients who did not have SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG monitoring of EOCN during EES can be useful in identifying the location of the nerve. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of EOCN during EES need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  6. BEEC: An event generator for simulating the Bc meson production at an e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Xian-You

    2013-12-01

    The Bc meson is a doubly heavy quark-antiquark bound state and carries flavors explicitly, which provides a fruitful laboratory for testing potential models and understanding the weak decay mechanisms for heavy flavors. In view of the prospects in Bc physics at the hadronic colliders such as Tevatron and LHC, Bc physics is attracting more and more attention. It has been shown that a high luminosity e+e- collider running around the Z0-peak is also helpful for studying the properties of Bc meson and has its own advantages. For this purpose, we write down an event generator for simulating Bc meson production through e+e- annihilation according to relevant publications. We name it BEEC, in which the color-singlet S-wave and P-wave (cb¯)-quarkonium states together with the color-octet S-wave (cb¯)-quarkonium states can be generated. BEEC can also be adopted to generate the similar charmonium and bottomonium states via the semi-exclusive channels e++e-→|(QQ¯)[n]>+Q+Q¯ with Q=b and c respectively. To increase the simulation efficiency, we simplify the amplitude as compact as possible by using the improved trace technology. BEEC is a Fortran program written in a PYTHIA-compatible format and is written in a modular structure, one may apply it to various situations or experimental environments conveniently by using the GNU C compiler make. A method to improve the efficiency of generating unweighted events within PYTHIA environment is proposed. Moreover, BEEC will generate a standard Les Houches Event data file that contains useful information of the meson and its accompanying partons, which can be conveniently imported into PYTHIA to do further hadronization and decay simulation. Catalogue identifier: AEQC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in

  7. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e+e- collider rings

    DOE PAGES

    Oide, Katsunobu; Aiba, M.; Aumon, S.; ...

    2016-11-21

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider- e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles,more » by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called “tapering” of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC’16, 9–13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016).] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA) has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2% has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this study is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. Finally, a number of issues have

  8. Economic and Ethical Consequences of Natural Hazards in Alpine Valleys (EE-Con)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Florian; Brantl, Dirk; Meyer, Lukas; Steininger, Karl; Sass, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The Alps and their population are particularly vulnerable to geomorphological and hydrological hazards and this problem might be amplified by ongoing climate change. Natural disasters cause severe monetary damage which often leads to the difficult question whether it socially pays to protect settlements at high costs or whether alternatively settlement areas should better be abandoned. By investigations in the Johnsbachtal and the Kleinsölktal (Styria), the interdisciplinary project "Economic and Ethical Consequences of Natural Hazards in Alpine Valleys" (EE-Con), funded by the Austrian Academy of Sciences, seeks to answer the following questions: (1) Are natural hazards and associated damages in fact increasing, and is this due to meteorological triggers, to anthropogenic factors or to internal process dynamics? (2) What is the perception and knowledge of local people, how is risk and risk prevention communicated? (3) What is the respective cost ratio between protection infrastructure, soft measures of adaptation and other options (e.g. reduction of settlement area)? (4) What legitimate claims to compensation do people have, how far does societal responsibility go and where does individual responsibility start if parts of the settlement area had to be abandoned? These questions will be tackled in an interdisciplinary cooperation between geography, economics and normative theory (philosophy). EE-Con will follow broadly the path of risk analysis and risk assessment, focusing on the temporal dimension (past - present - future) with the aim to unravel the history of natural hazards in the areas and to analyse the economic values involved. In the following, natural hazard scenarios for the future (2050 and 2100) will be developed considering the economic consequences. Besides this, the project deals with local knowledge, risk perception and risk communication, which will be investigated via group interviews and stakeholder workshops and be integrated into a human

  9. Identification of the sex of a wide range of Carinatae birds by PCR using primer sets selected from chicken EE0.6 and its related sequences.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Suzuki, M; Ogawa, A; Munechika, I; Murata, K; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    A 0.6 kb EcoRI fragment (EE0.6), cloned from the W chromosome of chickens, is a nonrepetitive sequence and contains an exonlike sequence, ET15, which is likely a part of a pseudogene. The EE0.6 sequence is conserved in all species of birds examined both in Carinatae and Ratitae. A counterpart sequence of EE0.6 is present on the Z chromosome. The extent of diversity between the W- and Z-linked sequences are variable among species. The W- and Z-linked EE0.6 sequences, cloned from 12 different species, were compared and four forward and three reverse primers were selected to amplify parts of the EE0.6 sequence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By choosing a suitable combination of primers for EE0.6 and a set of primers for a Z/W-common sequence, as an internal control, the sex of 36 species belonging to 16 different orders of Carinatae could be determined clearly by PCR. The sex of two other species representing different orders could be determined by Southern blot hybridization using ET15 as a probe. For the two Ratitae species, emu and ostrich, EE0.6 sequences on W and Z chromosomes could not be distinguished either by PCR or Southern blotting.

  10. Diffusion of cosmic rays at EeV energies in inhomogeneous extragalactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Sigl, Günter E-mail: guenter.sigl@desy.de

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays can propagate diffusively in cosmic magnetic fields. When their propagation time is comparable to the age of the universe, a suppression in the flux relative to the case in the absence of magnetic fields will occur. In this work we find an approximate parametrization for this suppression for energies below ∼ Z EeV using several magnetic field distributions obtained from cosmological simulations of the magnetized cosmic web. We assume that the magnetic fields have a Kolmogorov power spectrum with the field strengths distributed according to these simulations. We show that, if magnetic fields are coupled to the matter distribution, low field strengths will fill most of the volume, making the suppression milder compared to the case of a constant magnetic field with strength equal to the mean value of this distribution. We also derive upper limits for this suppression to occur for some models of extragalactic magnetic fields, as a function of the coherence length of these fields.

  11. Determination of color-octet matrix elements from e+e- processes at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Feng; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Chao, Kuang-Ta

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis of the preliminary experimental data of direct J/ψ production in e+e- processes at low energies. We find that the color-octet contributions are crucially important to the cross section in this energy region, and their inclusion produces a good description of the data. By fitting to the data, we extract the individual values of two color-octet matrix elements: ~1.1×10-2 GeV3; /m2c~7.4×10-3 GeV3. We discuss the allowed range of the two matrix elements constrained by the theoretical uncertainties. We find that is poorly determined because it is sensitive to the variation of the choice of mc, αs and . However, /m2c is quite stable [about (6-9)×10-3 GeV3] when the parameters vary in reasonable ranges. The uncertainties due to large experimental errors are also discussed.

  12. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q. D.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Auger Collaboration101, The Pierre

    2014-07-01

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine "target sets," in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  13. Recent results from the JADE collaboration at PETRA on e+e- annihilation to multihadrons

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, L.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A search for production of a new quark flavor in multihadronic states from e+e- annihilation has been made up to an energy of 35.8 GeV in the center of mass. No evidence is seen for such production. A new statistical analysis by the JADE collaboration of the combined data of four PETRA experiments from a fine energy scan in the region 29.90 to 31.46 GeV in the center of mass sets new upper limits on the integrated cross section for a bound state consisting of a new flavor quark and antiquark. The ability of the JADE detector to measure dE/dx provides new upper bounds on the production of fractionally charged particles such as free quarks, or of heavy, integrally charged states such as long-lived B mesons. Finally the fractions of the final state energy carried by gamma rays and by neutral particles of all kinds are measured at center of mass energies from 12 to 35 GeV. The gamma ray and neutral energy fractions are approximately 26% and 38% respectively, while the fractional energy carried by neutrinos is less than 15%.

  14. Degradation of gestodene (GES)-17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) mixture by electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Aguilar, Hugo Alejandro; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rubén Fernando; González de Los Santos, Rocío; García-Lara, Carlos; Méndez-Novelo, Roger; Rojas-Valencia, María Neftalí

    2016-12-01

    Evidence of the negative effects of several pharmaceutical molecules, such as hormones and steroids, on the environment can be observed throughout the world. This paper presents the results of the anodic oxidation of the mixture of gestodene steroid hormones and 17 α-ethinylestradiol present in aqueous medium. The tests were conducted in an undivided cell containing a working volume of 50 mL, using a Na2SO4 solution as support electrolyte and boron-doped diamond electrodes. The experiments were adjusted to the structure of a 3(3) factorial design. The evaluated factors were: support electrolyte concentration (0.02, 0.05, and 0.10 M), pH of the reaction media (2, 3, and 4), and current density (16, 32, and 48 mA cm(-2)). Under the optimum conditions (0.02 M Na2SO4, pH 4, and current density of 32 mA cm(-2)), the degradation of at least 93% of the initial concentration of gestodene and 17α-ethinylestradiol was reached in a reaction time of 5 and 10 min, respectively. The complete degradation of both molecules required 15 min of reaction. Under these conditions, the degradation profile of the pharmaceutical mixture as each one of the active ingredients, followed a pseudo-first order kinetic behavior (kmix = 0.0321, kGES = 0.4206, and kEE2 = 0.3209 min(-1)).

  15. Measurement of the W boson mass and width in e+e- collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Sloan, T.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2006-08-01

    The mass of the W boson is determined from the direct reconstruction of W decays in WW→qq¯qq¯ and WW→ℓνqq¯ events in e+e- collisions at LEP. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 683 pb-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. To minimise any effect from colour reconnection a new procedure is adopted in which low energy particles are not considered in the mass determination from the qq¯qq¯ channel. The combined result from all channels is m_{text{W}}=80.440 ±0.043{text{(stat.)}} ±0.024{text{(syst.)}} ±0.009{text{(FSI)}} ±0.009{text{(LEP)}} text{GeV/}c^2, where FSI represents the possible effects of final state interactions in the qq¯qq¯ channel and LEP indicates the uncertainty in the beam energy. From two-parameter fits to the W mass and width, the W width is found to be Γ_{text{W}} = 2.14 ±0.09{text{(stat.)}} ±0.04{text{(syst.)}} ±0.05{text{(FSI)}} ±0.01{text{(LEP)}} text{GeV}.

  16. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially

  17. A TARGETED SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Arqueros, F.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration101; and others

    2014-07-10

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine ''target sets'', in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  18. e+/e- discrimination in liquid scintillator and its usage to suppress 8He/9Li backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya-Ping; Wen, Liang-Jian; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xing-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Reactor neutrino experiments build large-scale detector systems to detect neutrinos. In liquid scintillator, a neutral bound state of a positron and an electron, named positronium, can be formed. The spin triplet state is called ortho-positronium (o-Ps). In this article, an experiment is designed to measure the lifetime of o-Ps, giving a result of 3.1 ns. A PSD parameter based on photon emission time distribution (PETD) was constructed to discriminate e+/e-. Finally, the application of e+/e- discrimination in the JUNO experiment is shown. It helps suppress 8He/9Li backgrounds and improves the sensitivity by 0.6 in χ 2 analysis with an assumption of σ = 1 ns PMT Transit Time Spread, which will bring a smearing effect to the PETD. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575226, 11475197, 11205183)

  19. Observation of e(+)e(-) annihilation into the C = +1 hadronic final states rho(0)rho(0) and phirho(0).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-09-15

    We report the first observation of e(+)e(-) annihilation into states of positive C parity, namely, rho(0)rho(0) and phirho(0). The two states are observed in the pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) and K(+)K(-)pi(+)pi(-) final states, respectively, in a data sample of 225 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR experiment at the Positron-Electron Project II e(+)e(-) storage rings at energies near sqrt[s]=10.58 GeV. The distributions of costheta(*), where theta(*) is the center-of-mass polar angle of the phi meson or the forward rho(0) meson, suggest production by two-virtual-photon annihilation. We measure cross sections within the range |costheta(*)|<0.8 of sigma(e(+)e(-)-->rho(0)rho(0))=20.7+/-0.7(stat)+/-2.7(syst) fb and sigma(e(+)e(-)-->phirho(0))=5.7+/-0.5(stat)+/-0.8(syst) fb.

  20. Parametrization of Bose-Einstein Correlations in e+e- Annihilation and Reconstruction of the Source Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, W. J.; Novák, T.; Csörgő, T.; Kittel, W.

    A short review of Bose-Einstein correlations in hadronic e+e- annihilation is presented. Bose-Einstein correlations of pairs of identical charged pions in hadronic Z-boson decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. A good description is achieved using a Lévy stable distribution in conjunction with a hadronization model having highly correlated configuration and momentum space, the τ-model. Using these results, the source function is reconstructed.

  1. Production of protons and Λ's in e+e- jets from jet calculus and the recombination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migneron, R.; Jones, L. M.; Lassila, K. E.

    1982-11-01

    We compute the expected yields of protons and Λ's in e+e- annihilation, using the Konishi-Ukawa-Veneziano jet calculus and the recombination model. Our results have many features in common with the data, including their approximate size. We derive a differential equation for baryon production, and show that the terms we have calculated are one of three physically different contributions.

  2. Geology and geochemistry of samples from Los Alamos National Laboratory HDR Well EE-2, Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Petrologic, geochemical, and structural analyses of cores and cuttings obtained from 3000 to 4389-m true vertical depth in drill hole EE-2 indicate that this deeper part of the Precambrian section at Fenton Hill, New Mexico is composed primarily of a very heterogeneous and structurally anisotropic metamorphic complex, locally intruded by dikes and sills of granodioritic and monzogranitic composition. In this borehole none of these igneous bodies approach in size the 335-m-thick biotite-granodiorite body encountered at 2591-m depth beneath Fenton Hill in the other two drill holes. Contacts between the igneous and metamorphic rocks range from sharp and discordant to gradational. Analysis of cuttings indicates that clay-rich alteration zones are relatively common in the openhole portion of EE-2. These zones average about 20 m in thickness. Fracture sets in the Precambrian basement rock intersected by the EE-2 well bore mostly trend northeast and are steeply dipping to vertical; however, one of the sets dips gently to the northwest. Slickensided fault planes are present in a core (No.5) taken from a true vertical depth of 4195 m. Available core orientation data and geologic inference suggest that the faults dip steeply and trend between N.42/sup 0/ and 59/sup 0/E.

  3. Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming e-e, and e-p plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanalilu, M.; Sadegzadeh, S.; Ghaderi, Z.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-05-15

    The existence of Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming electron-electron (e-e), and electron-positron (e-p) plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy is investigated. The temperature anisotropy is included in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the streaming direction. It is shown that the beam mean speed changes the instability mode, for a streaming electron beam, from the classic Weibel to the Weibel-like mode. The analytical and numerical solutions approved that Weibel-like modes are excited for both counterstreaming e-e and e-p plasmas. The growth rates of the instabilities in e-e and e-p plasmas are compared. The growth rate is larger for e-p plasmas if the thermal anisotropy is small and the opposite is true for large thermal anisotropies. The analytical and numerical solutions are in good agreement only in the small parallel temperature and wave number limits, when the instability growth rate increases linearly with normalized wave number kc∕ω{sub p}.

  4. Neutral Higgs boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the complex MSSM: a full one-loop analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemeyer, S.; Schappacher, C.

    2016-04-01

    For the search for additional Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as for future precision analyses in the Higgs sector precise knowledge of their production properties is mandatory. We evaluate the cross sections for the neutral Higgs boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The evaluation is based on a full one-loop calculation of the production mechanism e^+e^- → h_i Z, h_i γ , h_i h_j (i,j = 1,2,3), including soft and hard QED radiation. The dependence of the Higgs boson production cross sections on the relevant cMSSM parameters is analyzed numerically. We find sizable contributions to many cross sections. They are, depending on the production channel, roughly of 10-20 % of the tree-level results, but can go up to 50 % or higher. The full one-loop contributions are important for a future linear e^+e^- collider such as the ILC or CLIC. There are plans to implement the evaluation of the Higgs boson production cross sections into the code FeynHiggs.

  5. Experiment 2008 – A Two Station Re-Measurement of the Geometry of the EE-3 Near Casing Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Robert M.; Pearson, Christopher F.

    1982-03-10

    Analysis of the accelerometer system response to 11 microseismic events created in Experiment 2007 indicates that they are located in an ellipsoidal volume whose major axis direction is N 48° E and dips 47° to the SW. The intermediate axis is essentially horizontal and whose direction N 42° W is the strike of the plane containing the two major axes. The dimensions of the three axes are 315,100 and 65 m respectively. The relationship of this seismic feature to the downhole wellbore map is shown in Figures 1 and 2. It will be noted that the ellipsoid is tangent to the injection point in EE-3 and descends at a 45 angle. The plan view shown in Figure 1 indicates that the zone of seismic activity nearly cut the EE-2 wellbore at a depth of 11500 ft (TVD). Examination of the EE-2 wellbore geology and drilling history shows a well defined zone from 11450-11550 ft TVD with a very fast drilling rate (30 ft/hr) and extensive alteration. Laney labels it as a fault zone. This then coudl be an unpressurized part of the planar feature described above.

  6. Overlapping but distinct effects of genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in female Sprague-Dawley rats in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, K. Barry; Weis, Constance C.; Bucci, Thomas J.; Olson, Greg; Mellick, Paul; Sadovova, Natalya; Latendresse, John R.; Thorn, Brett; Newbold, Retha R.

    2009-01-01

    Genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) were examined in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies that had different treatment intervals among generations. Sprague-Dawley rats received genistein (0, 5, 100, or 500 ppm) or EE2 (0, 2, 10, or 50 ppb) in a low phytoestrogen diet. Nonneoplastic effects in females are summarized here. Genistein at 500 ppm and EE2 at 50 ppb produced similar effects in continuously exposed rats, including decreased body weights, accelerated vaginal opening, and altered estrous cycles in young animals. At the high dose, anogenital distance was subtly affected by both compounds, and a reduction in litter size was evident in genistein-treated animals. Genistein at 500 ppm induced an early onset of aberrant cycles relative to controls in the chronic studies. EE2 significantly increased the incidence of uterine lesions (atypical focal hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia). These compound-specific effects appeared to be enhanced in the offspring of prior exposed generations. PMID:19159674

  7. Fighting Nemo: Effect of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on aggressive behavior and social hierarchy of the false clown anemonefish Amphiprion ocellaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Hao; Hsieh, Chun-Yu

    2016-12-26

    Aggressive behavior is crucial for maintaining social hierarchy in anemonefish. Endocrine disrupting chemicals such as EE2 may affect fish social hierarchy via disrupting their aggression. In this study, we aimed to characterize the effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on aggressive behavior and social hierarchy in the false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris). In the laboratory experiment, juvenile anemonefish were randomly distributed to separated tanks to form small colonies of three individuals and were fed with EE2-dosed diet (100ng/g food) or a control diet for 90d. Through the experiment, each tank was videotaped and behavioral indicators of social status, including aggressive behavior, submissive response, and shelter utilization, were quantitatively analyzed from the videos. The EE2 exposure caused a higher frequency of intra-colonial aggressive interactions and a less stable social hierarchy. Our findings demonstrate the importance of examining the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the social behavior of coral reef fish.

  8. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Floerke

    2007-02-05

    will be protective of human health and the environment. Decommissioning the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is consistent with the joint DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which establishes the CERCLA NTCRA process as the preferred approach for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities. Under this policy, a NTCRA may be taken when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to human health and/or the environment. When DOE determines that a CERCLA NTCRA is necessary, DOE is authorized to evaluate, select, and implement the removal action that DOE determines is most appropriate to address the potential risk posed by the release or threat of release. This action is taken in accordance with applicable authorities and in conjunction with EPA and the State of Idaho pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. In keeping with the joint policy, this engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was developed in accordance with CERCLA as amended by the ''Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986'' and in accordance with the ''National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.'' This EE/CA is consistent with the remedial action objectives (RAOs) of the Final Record of Decision, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10 and supports the overall remediation goals established through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for Waste Area Group 1. Waste Area Group 1 is located at TAN.

  9. Production du baryon Sigma+ dans les collisions e+e- au LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Andre

    Les mécanismes de production des baryons dans les interactions e+e- font l'objet de nombreuses études. De plus, les modes de production des baryons étranges semblent faire appel A des processus spécifiques, qui sont encore mal compris. Notre étude de la production des baryons Σ+ dans les interactions e+e- nous permet de formuler certaines remarques sur l'état des connaîssances acquises sur le sujet. Une methode de reconstruction originale et des critères de sélection spécifiques ont été développés afin d'identifier des baryons Σ+ de haute Energie ( ES+ > 5 GeV), partir de leur canal de désintégration en un proton et un π0 (S+-->p+p0 ). Trois mesures principales sont réalisées à partir de notre échantillon de baryons reconstruits. Le nombre mesuré de baryons Σ+ produits par événement e +e- à 91 GeV est de: =0.102+/-0.006(stat.) +/-0.008(syst.) +/-0.003(extrap.) où les erreurs sont dues à la statistique, aux systématiques et à la procédure d'extrapolation. Ce résultat est en accord avec ceux obtenus précédemment, mais avec des erreurs réduites. La section efficace différentielle en fonction de l'energie est mesurée et comparée aux prédictions des principaux générateurs Monte-Carlo (JETSET7.4(MOPS), JETSET7.4 et HERWIG5.9). A haute énergie, HERWIG ne semble pas reproduire les mesures, aussi bien que les deux versions de JETSET. Enfin, la position du maximum de la section efficace différentielle de production des baryons Σ+ en fonction de l'impulsion est mesurée. On trouve: overlinexoverlineS+=2.32+/- 0.47 Une étude spécifique du générateur JETSET7.4(MOPS) est réalisee, afin de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de production de l'étrangeté et du spin dans la production des baryons. Aucun générateur ne semble capable de décrire de manière simultanée la production du spin et de l'étrangeté.

  10. 31 CFR 363.52 - What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money and Finance... Bonds Purchased Through TreasuryDirect General § 363.52 What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series...

  11. 31 CFR 363.52 - What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money and Finance... Bonds Purchased Through TreasuryDirect General § 363.52 What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series...

  12. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e+e- collider rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oide, K.; Aiba, M.; Aumon, S.; Benedikt, M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Boscolo, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Cai, Y.; Doblhammer, A.; Haerer, B.; Holzer, B.; Jowett, J. M.; Koop, I.; Koratzinos, M.; Levichev, E.; Medina, L.; Ohmi, K.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; Sinyatkin, S.; Sullivan, M.; Wenninger, J.; Wienands, U.; Zhou, D.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-11-01

    A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e+e- (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called "tapering" of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC'16, 9-13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016).] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA) has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2 % has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues have been identified for further

  13. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    DOE PAGES

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; ...

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electronmore » beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.« less

  14. Search for the C-violating meson decay η → π0e+e- with WASA-at-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmich, Kay; Bergmann, Florian; Hüsken, Nils; Khoukaz, Alfons

    2016-11-01

    TheWASA-at-COSY experiment is, besides meson production processes, dedicated to studies on rare and forbidden decays of light mesons. In extensive η-production beam times, a high-statistics data set have been collected by means of proton-proton scattering which opens the door to studies on forbidden decays like the C-parity violating process η → π0e+e-. In this article, an optimized detector calibration leading to a significantly improved missing mass resolution and a preliminary decay analysis are presented.

  15. Radixin, a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein, is concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1991 Sep;114(5):1101-3

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Radixin is a barbed end-capping actin-modulating protein which was first identified in isolated cell-to-cell adherens junctions from rat liver (Tsukita, Sa., Y. Hieda, and Sh. Tsukita, 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2369-2382). In the present study, we have analyzed the distribution of radixin in dividing cells. For this purpose, an mAb specific for radixin was obtained using chicken gizzard radixin as an antigen. By immunofluorescence microscopy with this mAb and a polyclonal antibody obtained previously, it was clearly shown in rat fibroblastic cells (3Y1 cells) that radixin was highly concentrated at the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Radixin appeared to accumulate rapidly at the cleavage furrow at the onset of furrowing, continued to be concentrated at the furrow during anaphase and telophase, and was finally enriched at the midbody. This concentration of radixin at the cleavage furrow was detected in all other cultured cells we examined: bovine epithelial cells (MDBK cells), mouse myeloma cells (P3 cells), rat kangaroo Ptk2 cells, mouse teratocarcinoma cells, and chicken fibroblasts. Furthermore, it became clear that the epitope for the mAb was immunofluorescently masked in the cell-to-cell adherens junctions. Together, these results lead us to conclude that radixin is present in the undercoat of the cell-to-cell adherens junctions and that of the cleavage furrow, although their respective molecular architectures are distinct. The possible roles of radixin at the cleavage furrow are discussed with special reference to the molecular mechanism of the actin filament-plasma membrane interaction at the furrow. PMID:1707055

  16. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, CHIEN-MIN; SYU, JHIH-PU; WAY, TZONG-DER; HUANG, LI-JIAU; KUO, SHENG-CHU; LIN, CHUNG-TIEN; LIN, CHIH-LI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti-glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti-proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell-cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy-mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B-induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug-resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ. PMID:26329365

  17. Transition formfactors γ* → γf2 (1270) and γ* → γa2 (1320) in the e+e- collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, N. N.; Kiselev, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Transition form factors γ* → γf2 (1270) and γ* → γa2 (1320) and corresponding e+e- → γ* → f2γ and e+e- → γ* → a2γ cross sections are considered up to high energies. It is shown that the QCD asymptotics of the amplitudes of the e+e- → γ* → f2γ and e+e- → γ* → a2γ reactions can be reached only by taking into account a compensation of contributions of ρ(770), ω(782) with contributions of their radial excitations. Recent BABAR measurement of the e+e- → f2γ → π+π-γ cross section at 10.58 GeV gives hope for detailed investigation of the γ*(s) → f2γ and γ*(s) → a2γ transition form factors at high energy region. Recent Belle data on the γ*(Q2)γ → f2 transition up to Q2 = 30 GeV2 are taken into account.

  18. Design and implementation of a distributed large-scale spatial database system based on J2EE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianya; Chen, Nengcheng; Zhu, Xinyan; Zhang, Xia

    2003-03-01

    With the increasing maturity of distributed object technology, CORBA, .NET and EJB are universally used in traditional IT field. However, theories and practices of distributed spatial database need farther improvement in virtue of contradictions between large scale spatial data and limited network bandwidth or between transitory session and long transaction processing. Differences and trends among of CORBA, .NET and EJB are discussed in details, afterwards the concept, architecture and characteristic of distributed large-scale seamless spatial database system based on J2EE is provided, which contains GIS client application, web server, GIS application server and spatial data server. Moreover the design and implementation of components of GIS client application based on JavaBeans, the GIS engine based on servlet, the GIS Application server based on GIS enterprise JavaBeans(contains session bean and entity bean) are explained.Besides, the experiments of relation of spatial data and response time under different conditions are conducted, which proves that distributed spatial database system based on J2EE can be used to manage, distribute and share large scale spatial data on Internet. Lastly, a distributed large-scale seamless image database based on Internet is presented.

  19. Measuring the trilinear couplings of MSSM neutral Higgs bosons at high-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osland, P.; Pandita, P. N.

    1999-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of multiple production of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson (h) of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at high-energy e+e- colliders. We consider the production of the heavier CP-even Higgs boson (H) via Higgs-strahlung e+e--->ZH, in association with the CP-odd Higgs boson (A) in e+e--->AH, or via the fusion mechanism e+e--->νeν¯eH, with H subsequently decaying through H-->hh, thereby resulting in a pair of lighter Higgs bosons (h) in the final state. These processes can enable one to measure the trilinear Higgs couplings λHhh and λhhh, which can be used to theoretically reconstruct the Higgs potential. We delineate the regions of the MSSM parameter space in which these trilinear Higgs couplings could be measured at a future e+e- collider. In our calculations, we include in detail the radiative corrections to the Higgs sector of the MSSM, especially the mixing in the squark sector.

  20. Exotic Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson at Future $e^+e^-$ Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang, Hao

    2016-12-29

    Discovery of unexpected properties of the Higgs boson offers an intriguing opportunity of shedding light on some of the most profound puzzles in particle physics. The Beyond Standard Model (BSM) decays of the Higgs boson could reveal new physics in a direct manner. Future electron-positron lepton colliders operating as Higgs factories, including CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC, with the advantages of a clean collider environment and large statistics, could greatly enhance the sensitivity in searching for these BSM decays. In this work, we perform a general study of Higgs exotic decays at future $e^+e^-$ lepton colliders, focusing on the Higgs decays with hadronic final states and/or missing energy, which are very challenging for the High-Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). We show that with simple selection cuts, $O(10^{-3}\\sim10^{-5})$ limits on the Higgs exotic decay branching fractions can be achieved using the leptonic decaying spectator $Z$ boson in the associated production mode $e^+e^-\\rightarrow Z H$. We further discuss the interplay between the detector performance and Higgs exotic decay, and other possibilities of exotic decays. Our work is a first step in a comprehensive study of Higgs exotic decays at future lepton colliders, which is a key ingredient of Higgs physics that deserves further investigation.

  1. Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-04

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10).

  2. SPIN CORRELATIONS OF THE FINAL LEPTONS IN THE TWO-PHOTON PROCESSES γγ → e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuboshitz, Valery V.; Lyuboshitz, Vladimir L.

    2014-12-01

    The spin structure of the process γγ → e+e- is theoretically investigated. It is shown that, if the primary photons are unpolarized, the final electron and positron are unpolarized as well but their spins are strongly correlated. For the final (e+e-) system, explicit expressions for the components of the correlation tensor are derived, and the relative fractions of singlet and triplet states are found. It is demonstrated that in the process γγ → e+e- one of the Bell-type incoherence inequalities for the correlation tensor components is always violated and, thus, spin correlations of the electron and positron in this process have the strongly pronounced quantum character. Analogous consideration can be wholly applied as well to the two-photon processes γγ → μ+μ- and γγ → τ+τ-, which become possible at considerably higher energies.

  3. Comparison of the reliability of E/E' to estimate pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction versus those with reduced ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Minamishima, Toshinori; Goda, Ayumi; Ishiguro, Haruhisa; Kosho, Hideyasu; Sakata, Konomi; Satoh, Toru; Yoshino, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is essential for physicians to effectively manage patients with acute decompensated heart failure. The ratio of early transmittal velocity to tissue Doppler mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/E') is used to estimate PCWP noninvasively in a wide range of cardiac patients. However, it remains contentious as to whether mitral E/E' is a reliable predictor of PCWP. In the present study, acute heart failure patients were divided into two groups on the basis of left ventricular (LV) systolic function: those with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and those with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The usefulness of mitral E/E' in estimating PCWP was compared between the two groups. Fifty consecutive patients who were admitted with acute decompensated heart failure and underwent both right-sided cardiac catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization were analyzed retrospectively. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate associations between Doppler parameters and PCWP. E/E' was positively correlated with PCWP (r = 0.56, P = 0.01) in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction group. However, no significant relationship was observed between PCWP and mitral E/E' (P = 0.85) in the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction group. There were no significant correlations between any of the conventional parameters considered (LVEF, left atrial dimension, E/A, IVRT, and DT) with PCWP in either group. In conclusion, mitral E/E' is useful for estimating PCWP in patients with acute heart failure with preserved ejection fraction but may not in those with reduced ejection fraction.

  4. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) treatment of wild roach (Rutilus rutilus) during early life development disrupts expression of genes directly involved in the feedback cycle of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Nikoleris, Lina; Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Hansson, Maria C

    2016-02-01

    Fish are more sensitive to introduced disturbances from synthetic endocrine disrupting compounds during early life phases compared with mature stages. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2), which is the active compound in human oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapies, is today ever present in the effluents from sewage treatment plants. EE2 targets and interacts with the endogenous biological systems of exposed vertebrates resulting in to large extents unknown short- and long-term effects. We investigated how EE2 exposure affects expression profiles of a large number of target genes during early life of roach (Rutilus rutilus). We exposed fertilized roach eggs collected from a lake in Southern Sweden to EE2 for 12weeks together with 1+-year-old roach in aquaria. We measured the gene expression of the estrogen receptor (esr)1/2a/2b, androgen receptor (ar), vitellogenin, cytochrome P450 (cyp)19a1a/1b in fertilized eggs; newly hatched larvae; 12-week-old fry; and juvenile wild roach (1+-year-old). Results shows that an EE2 concentration as low as 0.5ng/L significantly affects gene expression during early development. Gene expression responses vary both among life stages and molecular receptors. We also show that the gene profile of the estrogen feedback cycle to a large extent depends on the relationship between the three esr genes and the two cyp19a1 genes, which are all up-regulated with age. Results indicate that a disruption of the natural activity of the dominant esr gene could lead to detrimental biological effects if EE2 exposure occurs during development, even if this exposure occurred for only a short period.

  5. Comprehensive Energy Assessment: EE and RE Project Optimization Modeling for United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Brigantic, Robert T.; Papatyi, Anthony F.; Perkins, Casey J.

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes a study and corresponding model development conducted in support of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) as part of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA). This research was aimed at developing a mathematical programming framework and accompanying optimization methodology in order to simultaneously evaluate energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) opportunities. Once developed, this research then demonstrated this methodology at a USPACOM installation - Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii. We believe this is the first time such an integrated, joint EE and RE optimization methodology has been constructed and demonstrated.

  6. Pair Production of the Doubly Charged Leptons Associated with a Gauge Boson γ or Z in e+e- and γγ Collisions at Future Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qing-Guo; Ji, Li; Yang, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the production of a pair of doubly charged leptons associated with a gauge boson V(γ or Z) at future linear colliders via e+e- and γγ collisions. The numerical results show that the possible signals of the doubly charged leptons may be detected via the processes e+e- → VX++X-- and γγ → VX++X-- at future ILC or CLIC experiments. Supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grants Nos. 11275088, 11205023, 11375248 and the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. LJQ2014135

  7. Fermion pair production in e+e- collisions at 189 209 GeV and constraints on physics beyond the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cross sections, angular distributions and forward-backward asymmetries are presented, of two-fermion events produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 189 to 209 GeV at LEP, measured with the ALEPH detector. Results for e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-, qq¯, bb¯ and cc¯ production are in agreement with the standard model predictions. Constraints are set on scenarios of new physics such as four-fermion contact interactions, leptoquarks, Z‧ bosons, TeV-scale quantum gravity and R-parity violating squarks and sneutrinos.

  8. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

    International Advisory Board

    G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
    J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
    H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
    G. Gratta

  9. Measurement of the Inclusive $Z \\to ee$ Production Cross Section in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7TeV and $Z \\to ee$ Decays as Standard Candles for Luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This thesis comprises a precision measurement of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section in proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV and the absolute luminosity based on \\Zee decays. The data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector near Geneva, Switzerland during the year of 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\int\\mathcal{L}dt = 35.9\\pm 1.4$~pb$^{-1}$. Electronic decays of $Z$ bosons allow one of the first electroweak measurements at the LHC, making the cross section measurement a benchmark of physics performance after the first year of CMS detector and LHC machine operations. It is the first systematic uncertainty limited \\Zee cross section measurement performed at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The measured cross section pertaining to the invariant mass window $M_{ee}\\in (60,120)$~GeV is reported as: $\\sigma(pp\\to Z+X) \\times \\mathcal{B}( Z\\to ee ) = 997 \\pm 11 \\mathrm{(sta t)} \\pm 19 \\mathrm{(syst)} \\pm 40 \\mathrm{(lumi)} \\textrm{ pb}$, which agrees with the theoretical prediction calculated to NNLO in QCD. Leveraging \\Zee decays as ``standard candles'' for measuring the absolute luminosity at the LHC is examined; they are produced copiously, are well understood, and have clean detector signatures. Thus the consistency of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section measurement with the theoretical prediction motivates inverting the measurement to instead use the \\Zee signal yield to measure the luminosity. The result, which agrees with the primary relative CMS luminosity measurement calibrated using Van der Meer separation scans, is not only the most precise absolute luminosity measurement performed to date at a hadron collider, but also the first one based on a physics signal at the LHC.

  10. Collins asymmetries in inclusive charged K K and K π pairs produced in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of Collins asymmetries in the inclusive process e+e- →h1h2X , h1h2=K K , K π , π π , at the center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV, using a data sample of 468 fb-1 collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC National Accelerator Center. Considering hadrons in opposite thrust hemispheres of hadronic events, we observe clear azimuthal asymmetries in the ratio of unlike sign to like sign, and unlike sign to all charged h1h2 pairs, which increase with hadron energies. The K π asymmetries are similar to those measured for the π π pairs, whereas those measured for high-energy K K pairs are, in general, larger.

  11. γ-Ray polarimetry with conversions to e+e- pairs: Polarization asymmetry and the way to measure it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, P.; Bernard, D.

    2017-02-01

    We revisit the measurement of the polarization fraction, P, and of the polarization angle of partially linearly-polarized gamma rays using their conversion to e+e- pairs in the field of a nucleus. We show that an inappropriate definition of the azimuthal angle, φ, used to reference the orientation of the final state degrades the precision of the measurement of P, by comparison to the optimal case where the bisector angle of the electron and of the positron momenta is used. We then focus on the lowest part of the energy spectrum, below ≈ 10 MeV, where a large part of the statistics lie for a cosmic source. We obtain the value of the polarization asymmetry, A, of pair conversion at threshold and we show that in the case where the correct expression is used for φ, the measured value of A tends to the limit.

  12. Lepton Universality Test in the Photoproduction of e-e+ Versus μ-μ+ Pairs on a Proton Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, Vladyslav; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2015-11-01

    In view of the significantly different proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements as compared to electronic hydrogen spectroscopy or electron-scattering experiments, we study in this Letter the photoproduction of a lepton pair on a proton target in the limit of very small momentum transfer as a way to provide a test of the lepton universality when extracting the proton charge form factor. By detecting the recoiling proton in the γ p →l-l+p reaction, we show that a measurement of a ratio of e-e++μ-μ+ over e-e+ cross sections with an absolute precision of 7 ×1 0-4 would allow for a test to distinguish, at the 3 σ level, between the two different proton charge radii currently extracted from muonic and electronic observables.

  13. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  14. Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference

    SciTech Connect

    Geiling, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  15. Potential roles for autophosphorylation, kinase activity, and abundance of a CDK-activating kinase (Ee;CDKF;1) during growth in leafy spurge.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wun S; Serpe, Marcelo D; Jia, Ying; Shelver, Weilin L; Anderson, James V; Umeda, Masaaki

    2007-02-01

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is a deep-rooted perennial weed that propagates both by seeds and underground adventitious buds located on the crown and roots. To enhance our understanding of growth and development during seed germination and vegetative propagation, a leafy spurge gene (Accession No. AF230740) encoding a CDK-activating kinase (Ee;CDKF;1) involved in cell-cycle progression was identified, and its function was confirmed based on its ability to rescue a yeast temperature-sensitive CAK mutant (GF2351) and through in vitro kinase assays. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ee;CDKF;1 indicated that two threonine residues (Thr291 and Thr296) were mutually responsible for intra-molecular autophosphorylation and for phosphorylating its substrate protein, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). Polyclonal antibodies generated against the Ee;CDKF;1 protein or against a phosphorylated Ee;CDKF;1 peptide [NERYGSL(pT)SC] were used to examine abundance and phosphorylation of CDKF;1 during seed germination and bud growth. The levels of CDKF;1 were lower in dry or imbibed seeds than in germinating seeds or seedlings. Differences in CDKF;1 were also observed during adventitious bud development; small buds appeared to have greater levels of CDKF;1 than large buds. Similar patterns of CDKF;1 expression were detected with either the polyclonal antibody developed using the CDKF;1 protein or the phosphorylated peptide. These results indicated that Thr291 is constitutively phosphorylated in vivo and associated with Ee;CDKF;1 activity. Our results further suggest that a certain level of CDKF;1 activity is maintained in most tissues and may be an important phenomenon for enzymes that regulate early steps in cell-cycle signaling pathways.

  16. Construction and immunogenicity of the recombinant Lactobacillus acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuelan; Jiang, Lufeng; Liu, Teng; Wang, Min; Cao, Wenbo; Bao, Yongzhan; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD) is an infectious disease of cattle with a worldwide distribution, creating a substantial economic impact. It is caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). This research was conducted to construct the recombinant Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) pMG36e-E0-LA-5 of BVDV E0 gene and to test its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against BVDV infection in the mice model. The BVDV E0 gene was sub-cloned into the expression vector and then transformed into the L. acidophilus LA-5 strain by electroporation. The recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 was confirmed by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. The mice were immunized orally with the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5. The serum IgG antibody and fecal sIgA antibody responses, expression levels of interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were detected respectively. On the 7th day after the last-immunization, the mice were inoculated with BVDV to evaluate the protective efficiency of the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5. The results showed that the expressed products protein E0 in the L. acidophilus LA-5 resulted in single band of 27kDa by SDS-PAGE and its strong reactivity with BVDV antibody was confirmed by Western blotting. The IgG and sIgA antibodies responses, IL-12 and IFN-γ expression levels in the vaccinated mice with recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 were significantly higher than those in the control mice. The protective rate of the vaccinated mice against BVDV increased significantly, and a 90.00% protection rate in virulent challenge was observed. These results indicated that the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 strain was successfully constructed and it could effectively improve the immune response in mice and might provide protection against BVDV.

  17. UV, VUV and soft X-ray photoabsorption of dimethyl ether by dipole (e,e) spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Renfei; Cooper, Glyn; Brion, C. E.

    2000-10-01

    Absolute UV and VUV photoabsorption oscillator strengths (cross-sections) for the valence shell discrete and continuum regions of dimethyl ether (CH 3OCH 3, DME) have been measured from 5 to 32 eV using high resolution (HR) (˜0.05 eV f.w.h.m.) dipole (e,e) spectroscopy. A wide-range spectrum, spanning the UV, VUV and soft X-ray regions, from 5 to 200 eV has also been obtained at low resolution (LR) (˜1 eV f.w.h.m.), and this has been used to determine the absolute oscillator strength scale by employing valence shell Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (i.e., S(0)) sum-rule normalization. The presently reported HR and LR absolute photoabsorption oscillator strengths are compared with previously published data from direct photoabsorption measurements in those limited energy regions where such data are available. Evaluation of the S(-2) sum using the presently reported absolute differential photoabsorption oscillator strength data gives a static dipole polarizability for dimethyl ether in excellent agreement (within 0.5%) with previously reported polarizability values. Other dipole sums S( u), ( u=-1,-3,-4,-5,-6,-8,-10), and logarithmic dipole sums L( u), ( u=-1 to -6), are also determined from the presently reported absolute differential photoabsorption oscillator strength data using dipole sum rules.

  18. New developments for an electron impact (e,2e)/(e,3e) spectrometer with multiangle collection and multicoincidence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catoire, F.; Staicu-Casagrande, E. M.; Lahmam-Bennani, A.; Duguet, A.; Naja, A.; Ren, X. G.; Lohmann, B.; Avaldi, L.

    2007-01-15

    We describe new developments aimed to extend the capabilities and the sensitivity of the (e,2e)/(e,3e) multicoincidence spectrometer at Orsay University [Duguet et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3524 (1998)]. The spectrometer has been improved by the addition of a third multiangle detection channel for the fast ''scattered'' electron. The present system is unique in that it is the only system which combines three toroidal analyzers all equipped with position sensitive detectors, thus allowing the triple coincidence detection of the three electrons present in the final state of an electron impact double ionization process. The setup allows measurement of the angular and energy distributions of the ejected electrons over almost the totality of the collision plane as well as that of the scattered electron over a large range of scattering angles in the forward direction. The resulting gain in sensitivity ({approx}25) has rendered feasible a whole class of experiments which could not be otherwise envisaged. The setup is described with a special emphasis on the new toroidal analyzer, data acquisition hardware, and data analysis procedures. The performances are illustrated by selected results of (e,2e) and (e,3e) experiments on the rare gases.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: List of Telescope Array events with E > 57EeV (Abbasi+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.!; Sokolsk, Y. P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-03-01

    The TA is the largest cosmic-ray detector in the northern hemisphere. It consists of a scintillator SD array (Abu-Zayyad et al. 2012NIMPA.689...87A) and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations (Tokuno et al. 2012NIMPA.676...54T). The observatory has been in full operation in Millard Country, Utah, USA (39fdg30N, 112fdg91W; about 1400 m above sea level) since 2008. The TA SD array consists of 507 plastic scintillation detectors each 3 m2 in area and located on a 1.2 km square grid. The array has an area of ~700 km2. The TA SD array observes cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers with E > ~1 EeV, regardless of weather conditions with a duty cycle near 100% and a wide field of view (FoV). These capabilities ensure a very stable and large geometrical exposure over the northern sky survey in comparison with FD observations that have a duty cycle of ~10%. In this analysis, we used SD data recorded between 2008 May 11 and 2013 May 4. (1 data file).

  20. Search for high-mass e+e- resonances in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; 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St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, C; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-01-23

    A search for high-mass resonances in the e+e- final state is presented based on 2.5 fb(-1) of sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV pp collision data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The largest excess over the standard model prediction is at an e+e- invariant mass of 240 GeV/c2. The probability of observing such an excess arising from fluctuations in the standard model anywhere in the mass range of 150-1000 GeV/c2 is 0.6% (equivalent to 2.5sigma). We exclude the standard model coupling Z' and the Randall-Sundrum graviton for k/MPl=0.1 with masses below 963 and 848 GeV/c2 at the 95% credibility level, respectively.