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Sample records for endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle

  1. Intrapulmonary schwannoma diagnosed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Shinkai, Masaharu; Shinoda, Masahiro; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for further examination of a lung tumor. CT of the chest revealed a round, well-defined 2.4-cm nodule in S2, adjacent to right superior lobe bronchus. Endobronchial ultrasonography showed a well-defined, hypoechoic tumor with echogenic capsule and posterior acoustic enhancement. Diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed from the specimen obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. She underwent tumorectomy due to the possibility of obstructive pneumonia. Pathology diagnosis from the surgical specimen was also schwannoma. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and findings with endobronchial ultrasonography might be helpful in the diagnosis of intrapulmonary schwannoma. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Shingyoji, Masato; Ikebe, Dai; Itakura, Meiji; Nakajima, Takahiro; Itami, Makiko; Kimura, Hideki; Iizasa, Toshihiko

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare tumor that is often detected at an advanced stage, when disease is so widespread that a radical surgical procedure is no longer indicated. Therefore, less invasive biopsy techniques are required to establish a definitive preoperative diagnosis. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is useful for producing real-time images of both lymph nodes and the interior of pulmonary arteries adjacent to the bronchi. We report a case with masslike lesions in the pulmonary artery that were observed by EBUS and from which tissue was obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) to establish a diagnosis of PAS.

  3. Training and certification in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Konge, Lars; Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) plays a key role in the staging of lung cancer, which is crucial for allocation to surgical treatment. EBUS-TBNA is a complicated procedure and simulation-based training is helpful in the first part of the long learning curve prior to performing the procedure on actual patients. New trainees should follow a structured training programme consisting of training on simulators to proficiency as assessed with a validated test followed by supervised practice on patients. The simulation-based training is superior to the traditional apprenticeship model and is recommended in the newest guidelines. EBUS-TBNA and oesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA or EUS-B-FNA) are complementary to each other and the combined techniques are superior to either technique alone. It is logical to learn and to perform the two techniques in combination, however, for lung cancer staging solely EBUS-TBNA simulators exist, but hopefully in the future simulation-based training in EUS will be possible.

  4. Bronchogenic Cyst Rupture and Pneumonia after Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Goohyeon; Song, Junwhi; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    We report a 54-year-old woman who presented with a well-defined, homogeneous, and non-enhancing mass in the retrobronchial region of the bronchus intermedius. The patient underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for histological confirmation. Serous fluid was aspirated by EBUS-TBNA. Cytological examination identified an acellular smear with negative microbiological cultures. The patient was finally diagnosed with bronchogenic cysts by chest computed tomography (CT) and EBUS-TBNA findings. However, 1 week after EBUS-TBNA, the patient developed bronchogenic cyst rupture and pneumonia. Empirical antibiotics were administered, and pneumonia from the bronchogenic cyst rupture had resolved on follow-up chest CT. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pneumonia from bronchogenic cyst rupture after EBUS-TBNA. PMID:23678359

  5. Pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Chan, Johnny W M; Chu, Stephanie Y Y; Lam, Connie H K; O, W H; Cheung, O Y; Kwan, T L; Leung, Alex K C; Law, W L

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare disease with poor prognosis that has not been reported in Hong Kong. Its clinical and radiological presentation frequently mimics pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis is usually delayed until surgery, which is the treatment option that provides the best survival. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is an effective non-surgical technique for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal lesions via bronchoscopy. Here we discuss a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by this method, the second one in the literature, which serves to illustrate its potential use for early and minimally invasive diagnosis of the condition. Although such aspiration is a safe procedure, tissue sampling of extravascular extensions is advisable wherever possible.

  6. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Caraway, Nancy P.; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T.; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management. PMID:25745502

  7. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management.

  8. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for the Diagnosis of Central Lung Parenchymal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of convex probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for detecting malignancy in parenchymal pulmonary lesions located adjacent to the central airways. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the diagnostic performance of EBUS-TBNA in consecutive patients with high clinical suspicion of a centrally located primary lung cancer who had undergone EBUS-TBNA at the Samsung Medical Center between May 2009 and June 2011. Results Thirty-seven patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for intrapulmonary lesions adjacent to the central airways. Seven lesions were located adjacent to the trachea and 30 lesions were located adjacent to the bronchi. Cytologic and histologic samples obtained via EBUS-TBNA were diagnostic in 32 of 37 (86.4%) of patients. The final diagnosis was lung cancer in 30 patients (7 small cell lung cancer, 23 non-small cell lung cancer), lymphoma in one and malignant fibrous histiocytoma in one patient. The diagnostic sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA in detecting malignancy and detecting both malignancy and benignity was 91.4% and 86.5%, respectively. Two patients experienced minor complications. Conclusion EBUS-TBNA is an effective and safe method for tissue diagnosis of parenchymal lesions that lie centrally close to the airways. EBUS-TBNA should be considered the procedure of choice for patients with centrally located lesions without endobronchial involvement. PMID:23549813

  9. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  10. Diagnostic value of blood clot core during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirate.

    PubMed

    Amin, Emily N; Russell, Christopher D; Shilo, Konstantin; Islam, Shaheen; Wood, Karen L

    2013-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is being increasingly used in the sampling of pulmonary masses and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The blood clot core (BCC) often obtained during EBUS-TBNA may not be a true core and therefore may not be submitted for histological analysis. The frequency in which the blood clot core is positive in patients with negative cytology undergoing EBUS-TBNA is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of the blood clot core obtained during EBUS-TBNA. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective chart review was performed from January through September 2011 for all patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at The Ohio State University. The data collection included cytology and histology results for each procedure. Blood clot cores obtained from the EBUS-TBNA needle were sent in formalin for histological examination. Seventy patients underwent EBUS-TBNA and 51 (72.8 %) patients had procedures that yielded a BCC for histology and aspirate for cytology. Forty-nine percent of patients with a BCC were diagnosed with malignancy. Of those with a BCC obtained, five (9.8 %) patients diagnosed with malignancy were done so based only on the results of blood clot core alone with negative cytology. Blood clot cores obtained at EBUS-TBNA contain diagnostic material and should be subjected histopathological examination. When blood clot cores are sent for analysis, there is the potential to spare up to 10 % of patients more invasive diagnostic biopsy procedures.

  11. Diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortakoylu, Mediha Gonenc; Iliaz, Sinem; Bahadir, Ayse; Aslan, Asuman; Iliaz, Raim; Ozgul, Mehmet Akif; Urer, Halide Nur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a new method for the diagnosis and staging of lung disease, and its use is increasing worldwide. It has been used as a means of diagnosing lung cancer in its initial stages, and there are data supporting its use for the diagnosis of benign lung disease. The aim of this study was to share our experience with EBUS-TBNA and discuss its diagnostic value. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the results related to 159 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at our pulmonary medicine clinic between 2010 and 2013. We recorded the location and size of lymph nodes seen during EBUS. Lymph nodes that appeared to be affected on EBUS were sampled at least twice. We recorded the diagnostic results of EBUS-TBNA and (for cases in which EBUS-TBNA yielded an inconclusive diagnosis) the final diagnoses after further investigation and follow-up. Results: We evaluated 159 patients, of whom 89 (56%) were male and 70 (44%) were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 14.2 years among the male patients and 51.9 ± 11.3 years among the female patients. Of the 159 patients evaluated, 115 (84%) were correctly diagnosed by EBUS. The diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA was 83% for benign granulomatous diseases and 77% for malignant diseases. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA is also high for benign pathologies, such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In patients with mediastinal disorders, the use of EBUS-TBNA should be encouraged, primarily because it markedly reduces the need for mediastinoscopy. PMID:26578131

  12. Greater physician involvement improves coding outcomes in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration procedures.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Anilkumar; Medford, Andrew R L

    2013-01-01

    Correct coding is essential for accurate reimbursement for clinical activity. Published data confirm that significant aberrations in coding occur, leading to considerable financial inaccuracies especially in interventional procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Previous data reported a 15% coding error for EBUS-TBNA in a U.K. service. We hypothesised that greater physician involvement with coders would reduce EBUS-TBNA coding errors and financial disparity. The study was done as a prospective cohort study in the tertiary EBUS-TBNA service in Bristol. 165 consecutive patients between October 2009 and March 2012 underwent EBUS-TBNA for evaluation of unexplained mediastinal adenopathy on computed tomography. The chief coder was prospectively electronically informed of all procedures and cross-checked on a prospective database and by Trust Informatics. Cost and coding analysis was performed using the 2010-2011 tariffs. All 165 procedures (100%) were coded correctly as verified by Trust Informatics. This compares favourably with the 14.4% coding inaccuracy rate for EBUS-TBNA in a previous U.K. prospective cohort study [odds ratio 201.1 (1.1-357.5), p = 0.006]. Projected income loss was GBP 40,000 per year in the previous study, compared to a GBP 492,195 income here with no coding-attributable loss in revenue. Greater physician engagement with coders prevents coding errors and financial losses which can be significant especially in interventional specialties. The intervention can be as cheap, quick and simple as a prospective email to the coding team with cross-checks by Trust Informatics and against a procedural database. We suggest that all specialties should engage more with their coders using such a simple intervention to prevent revenue losses. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Specimen acquisition training with a new biosimulator in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Taiki; Saegusa, Fumie; Inage, Terunaga; Sakairi, Yuichi; Wada, Hironobu; Suzuki, Hidemi; Iwata, Takekazu; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Training for endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has focused on the procedure itself; however, the techniques for obtaining adequate sample are also important for achieving a pathological diagnosis as well as for molecular testing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a biosimulator for training subjects in adequate sample acquisition during EBUS-TBNA. A total of 19 bronchoscopists voluntarily participated in this study. A biosimulator (ArtiCHEST, HARADA Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used for the training. After a 10-minute briefing, the first pass was performed by pairs of trainees. The trainees then received a 30-minute lecture that focused on the acquisition of samples using EBUS-TBNA. The trainees next performed their second pass under the supervision of the trainers. Each participant obtained a cytological smear that was coded and evaluated for quantity as well as quality by an independent cytotechnologist. The trainees had an average of 5.9 years of bronchoscopy experience. With regard to the quantity evaluation, 9 (47.4%) subjects sampled a greater number of lymphocytes on the second pass than on the first, whereas 2 were better on the first pass, and the others sampled roughly the same amount both times. With regard to the quality assessment, 9 (47.4%) subjects obtained better quality samples on the second pass, whereas the quality of the first and second pass was deemed to be roughly the same for the remaining subjects. A biosimulator can be used to train doctors in specimen acquisition and evaluate their skills with sampling using EBUS-TBNA. PMID:28353607

  14. [Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer diagnosis and staging in 179 patients].

    PubMed

    Bugalho, A; Ferreira, D; Barata, R; Rodrigues, C; Dias, S S; Medeiros, F; Carreiro, L

    2013-01-01

    Linear endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an important minimally invasive procedure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) staging. It is also a valid method for diagnosing extraluminal lesions adjacent to the tracheobronchial tree. To evaluate our EBUS-TBNA performance regarding diagnostic yield, safety and learning curve for lung cancer diagnosis and staging. All patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer diagnosis or staging were included. They were divided into three different groups: paratracheal and parabronchial masses sent for diagnosis (Group 1); peripheral lung lesions with abnormal mediastinal lymph nodes sent for diagnosis and staging (Group 2); NSCLC patients sent for mediastinal staging (Group 3). The learning curve was assessed for yield, accuracy, procedure time, size and number of lesions punctured per patient. A total of 179 patients were included and 372 lesions were punctured. The overall yield and accuracy were 88% and 92.7%, respectively. In Group 1, EBUS-TBNA was performed in 48 patients and sensitivity was 86.1% and accuracy was 87.5%. For the 87 patients included in Group 2, yield was 86.7%, accuracy was 93.1% and cancer prevalence was 51.7%. The diagnostic yield and accuracy in Group 3 was 95% and 97.7% respectively. EBUS-TBNA practice led to an increase number of sites punctured per patient in a shorter time, without complications. EBUS-TBNA is an effective method for diagnosing and staging lung cancer patients. The procedure is clearly safe. Handling and performance improves with the number of procedures executed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Oda, Naohiro; Ninomiya, Takashi; Kubo, Toshio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sato, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kaji, Mitsumasa; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is of diagnostic value in hilar/mediastinal (N1/N2) lymph node staging. We assessed the utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in lung cancer patients with N1/N2 lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Methods Fifty lung cancer patients with N1/N2 disease on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for pathological lymph nodes between November 2012 and April 2015. The diagnostic performance of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, lymph node site and size, number of needle passes and complications were evaluated retrospectively from patients' medical records. Malignancy was defined as a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) >2.5. Results The median longest diameter of the 61 lymph nodes (29 subcarinal, 21 right lower paratracheal, 6 left lower paratracheal, 4 right hilar and 1 upper paratracheal) was 23.4 mm (range: 10.4–45.7); the median number of needle passes was 2 (range: 1–5). There were no severe complications. A definitive diagnosis was made by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in 39 patients (31 adenocarcinomas, 3 small-cell carcinomas, 2 squamous-cell carcinomas, 3 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). In the remaining 11 patients, the diagnosis was indefinite: insufficient endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration material was collected in two patients and non-specific lymphadenopathy was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration or thoracotomy in the other nine patients. The mean lymph node SUVmax was 7.09 (range: 2.90–26.9) and was significantly higher in true-positive than in false-positive nodes (P < 0.05, t-test). Non-specific lymphadenopathy was

  16. Meta-analysis of 21- versus 22-G aspiration needle during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Giri, Smith; Pathak, Ranjan; Yarlagadda, Vivek; Karmacharya, Paras; Aryal, Madan R; Martin, Mike G

    2015-04-01

    Two different needle gauges (21 and 22 G) are currently used for endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Few studies have compared the diagnostic utility of EBUS-TB107NA using 21 versus 22 G needles. We aimed to systematically analyze all existing literature comparing the diagnostic benefit of these 2 needles. A systematic search for the identification of all relevant studies comparing 21 and 22 G needles in EBUS-TBNA was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS databases up to September 21, 2014. All the extracted data underwent meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 and Comprehensive Meta-analysis 3.3. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) were calculated and combined using random-effects model. Between study heterogeneity was assessed using the I statistic. A total of 5 studies involving 1720 patients were identified. The sample adequacy rate was 89.1% in the 21 G group and 90.0% in the 22 G group and this difference was not statistically significant [OR, 0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.56-1.59; P=0.82]. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the diagnostic yield (73.7% vs. 58.5%; OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.80-1.35; P=0.80) or the mean number of needle passes (mean difference -0.31; 95% CI, -1.1 to 0.47; P=0.44). There were no major complications reported in any of these studies. There were no differences in the diagnostic yield, sample adequacy, or the mean number of needle passes between the 21 and 22 G groups during EBUS-TBNA. Similarly, the complication rates were low and similar between the 2 groups.

  17. The role of sedation in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aswanetmanee, Pantaree; Limsuwat, Chok; Kabach, Mohamad; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Kheir, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive procedure that has become an important tool in diagnosis and staging of mediastinal lymph node (LN) lesions in lung cancer. Adequate sedation is an important part of the procedure since it provides patient's comfort and potentially increases diagnostic yield. We aimed to compare deep sedation (DS) versus moderate sedation (MS) in patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA procedure. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library were searched for English studies of clinical trials comparing the two different methods of sedations in EBUS-TBNA until December 2015. The overall diagnostic yield, LN size sampling, procedural time, complication, and safety were evaluated. Results: Six studies with 3000 patients which compared two different modalities of sedation in patients performing EBUS-TBNA were included in the study. The overall diagnostic yield of DS method was 52.3%–100% and MS method was 46.1%–85.7%. The overall sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA of DS method was 98.15%–100% as compared with 80%–98.08% in MS method. The overall procedural times were 27.2–50.9 min and 20.6-44.1 min in DS and MS groups, respectively. The numbers of LN sampled were between 1.33–3.20 nodes and 1.36–2.80 nodes in DS and MS groups, respectively. The numbers of passes per LN were 3.21–3.70 passes in DS group as compared to 2.73–3.00 passes in MS group. The mean of LN size was indifferent between two groups. None of the studies included reported serious adverse events. Conclusions: Using MS in EBUS-TBNA has comparable diagnostic yield and safety profile to DS. The decision on the method of sedation for EBUS-TBNA should be individually selected based on operator experience, patient preference, as well as duration of the anticipated procedure. PMID:27803902

  18. Endobronchial ultrasound guided needle aspiration of a paraspinal mass with prior failed multiple diagnostic interventions: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nishant; Padegal, Vivek; Jermely, Deepthi; Satyanarayana, Satish; Santosh, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing frequency of tuberculosis (TB) in both developed and developing countries has continued to make spinal TB an important health problem. The present case report is about a patient who presented to us with progressive back pain and paraspinal mass. We performed endobronchial ultrasound guided needle aspiration from the paraspinal mass. The cytology showed granulomatous inflammation suggestive of TB. PMID:25378853

  19. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is useful as an initial procedure for the diagnosis of lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Korrungruang, Potjanee; Oki, Masahide; Saka, Hideo; Kogure, Yoshihito; Tsuboi, Rie; Oka, Saori; Nakahata, Masashi; Hori, Kazumi; Murakami, Yasushi; Ise, Yuko; Ahmed, Shimaa Nour Moursi; Kitagawa, Chiyoe

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for evaluating hilar, mediastinal and central parenchymal lesions has been well established. However, its utility for diagnosing lymphoma is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of EBUS-TBNA for the definitive diagnosis of de novo lymphoma with subtype classification. Patients with lymphoma who underwent EBUS-TBNA for diagnostic purposes at a single institution between March 2004 and May 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 971 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA during the study period, 19 patients, who did not have a previous history of lymphoma, had a final diagnosis of lymphoma. EBUS-TBNA provided a diagnosis accompanied with subtype classification in 6 patients (32%), a suspicious but not definitive classification in 10 patients (53%), and a negative classification in 3 patients (16%). Immunohistochemical staining for definitive diagnosis was performed in 15 of 16 patients (94%), with suspicious results from routine hematoxylin and eosin staining. No procedure-related complications occurred. EBUS-TBNA is a useful initial diagnostic procedure, aiding decisions for the management of patients with suspected lymphoma, even though the sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosing lymphoma with subtype classification was lower than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Technical Aspects of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report.

    PubMed

    Wahidi, Momen M; Herth, Felix; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Shepherd, Ray Wesley; Yarmus, Lonny; Chawla, Mohit; Lamb, Carla; Casey, Kenneth R; Patel, Sheena; Silvestri, Gerard A; Feller-Kopman, David J

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) was introduced in the last decade, enabling real-time guidance of transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal and hilar structures and parabronchial lung masses. The many publications produced about EBUS-TBNA have led to a better understanding of the performance characteristics of this procedure. The goal of this document was to examine the current literature on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA as they relate to patient, technology, and proceduralist factors to provide evidence-based and expert guidance to clinicians. Rigorous methodology has been applied to provide a trustworthy evidence-based guideline and expert panel report. A group of approved panelists developed key clinical questions by using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format that addressed specific topics on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA. MEDLINE (via PubMed) and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for relevant literature, which was supplemented by manual searches. References were screened for inclusion, and well-recognized document evaluation tools were used to assess the quality of included studies, to extract meaningful data, and to grade the level of evidence to support each recommendation or suggestion. Our systematic review and critical analysis of the literature on 15 PICO questions related to the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA resulted in 12 statements: 7 evidence-based graded recommendations and 5 ungraded consensus-based statements. Three questions did not have sufficient evidence to generate a statement. Evidence on the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA varies in strength but is satisfactory in certain areas to guide clinicians on the best conditions to perform EBUS-guided tissue sampling. Additional research is needed to enhance our knowledge regarding the optimal performance of this effective procedure. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Yield of new versus reused endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration needles: A retrospective analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Gupta, Nalini; Ram, Babu; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) requires a dedicated needle for aspiration of mediastinal lesions. There is no data on reuse of these needles. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with either new or reused EBUS-TBNA needles. The needles were reused after thorough cleaning with filtered water and organic cleaning solution, disinfection with 2.4% glutaraldehyde solution followed by ethylene oxide sterilization. The yield of EBUS-TBNA was compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 500 EBUS-TBNA procedures (351 new, 149 reused needles) were performed. The baseline characteristics were different in the two groups with suspected granulomatous disorders (sarcoidosis or tuberculosis) being significantly more common in the new compared to the reused needle group. Similarly, the median, interquartile range number of lymph node stations sampled, and the total number of passes were significantly higher in the new versus the reused needle group. The diagnostic yield was significantly higher with new needle as compared to reused needle (65.2% vs. 53.7%, P = 0.02). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, clinical suspicion of granulomatous disorders (odds ratio 1.86 [95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.87], P = 0.005) was the only predictor of diagnostic yield, after adjusting for the type of needle (new or reused), total number of passes and the number of lymph node stations sampled. No case of mediastinitis was encountered in either group. Conclusions: The yield of EBUS-TBNA might be similar with single reuse of needles as compared to new needles. However, reuse of needle should be performed only when absolutely necessary. PMID:27578927

  2. Diagnosis of sarcoidosis in the endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration era.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Oliveira, A; Neves, S; Campainha, S; Nogueira, C; Torres, S; Brito, M C; Almeida, J; e Sá, J M

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disorder of unknown etiology. Its diagnosis is based on compatible clinical and radiological features and supported by histological demonstration of epithelioid cell noncaseating granulomas with exclusion of other causes. Endobronchial ultrasound combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has been proposed as a valuable tool in obtaining suitable tissue sample. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of EBUS-TBNA to the diagnosis of stages I and II thoracic sarcoidosis in a community-based hospital. A prospective study was conducted in patients with suspected stages I and II pulmonary sarcoidosis, based on clinical and radiological data, who were being followed in our Interstitial Lung Disorders Outpatient Clinic or sent from other hospitals to our Respiratory Endoscopy Unit for diagnostic procedures. All suitable and fit patients underwent EBUS-TBNA between March 2010 and June 2013. We assessed demographic characteristics, radiological stages, cytological/histological examination and diagnostic techniques performed. In the period considered 39 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for suspected stages I and II thoracic sarcoidosis and adequate samples were obtained in 38 (97.4%). Within this population, 33 (84.6%) patients had a definite diagnosis of sarcoidosis, of which 31 patients (93.9%) were confirmed to have epithelioid noncaseating granulomas by EBUS-TBNA. Four patients were submitted to surgical procedures (three to mediastinoscopy and one to open surgical lung biopsy). Data analysis allowed to calculate a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of 93.9%, 100%, 100%, 75.0% and 94.8%, respectively. No complications were observed. EBUS-TBNA is a valuable tool in the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected stages I and II thoracic sarcoidosis providing a substantial number of pathological confirmations and with few complications. Its high

  3. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration rinse fluid polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of intrathoracic tuberculous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Boonsarngsuk, Viboon; Saengsri, Siriwan; Santanirand, Pitak

    2017-03-01

    Intrathoracic tuberculous (TB) lymphadenitis is a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. Although endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) can obtain a sample from the affected lymph node, the diagnosis of TB lymphadenitis by cytopathology remains inaccurate. To evaluate the efficacy of EBUS-TBNA rinse fluid TB polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the diagnosis of intrathoracic TB lymphadenitis. A retrospective study was conducted on 102 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA for diagnostic evaluation of intrathoracic lymphadenopathy. EBUS-TBNA specimens were evaluated by cytopathological examination. Rinse fluid of the needle was routinely submitted for acid-fast bacillus (AFB) staining, mycobacterial culture, and TB-PCR using the Anyplex(TM) MTB/NTM real-time detection kit. Of 102 patients, 16 were diagnosed with intrathoracic TB lymphadenitis by either microbiology, cytopathology, or on clinical grounds. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of rinse fluid TB PCR assay were 56.2%, 100.0%, 100.0%, and 92.5%, respectively. Using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as a measure of a diagnostic performance, TB-PCR had the highest AUC, compared with mycobacterial culture, AFB smear, and finding of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation (0.78, 0.75, 0.56, and 0.72, respectively). A combination of TB PCR, mycobacterial culture, and finding of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation provided the best diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and AUC of 75.0%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 95.6%, and 0.88, respectively). EBUS-TBNA rinse fluid TB-PCR is useful in the diagnosis of intrathoracic TB lymphadenitis. Combining TB-PCR with mycobacterial culture and cytopathological findings improved the diagnosis performance.

  4. [Diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Huang, J A

    2016-06-14

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ of sarcoidosis. There were 55 patients of sarcoidosis selected from January 2012 to October 2014 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University. The diagnostic positive rate and the positive rate in stage Ⅰ and Ⅱ patients with sarcoidosis through EBUS-TBNA, conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (cTBNA), endobronchial biopsy (EBB) combined with transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) were calculated. The positive rate of single lymph node puncture and the positive rate of different size of lymph node were compared. The difference of the positive rate of lymph nodes in different stations was checked. By calculating the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA in sarcoidosis patients, the practicality and safety of EBUS-TBNA in diagnosing stage Ⅰ or stage Ⅱ sarcoidosis was assessed. Among 55 patients, 46 patients obtained positive results through EBUS-TBNA or cTBNA. There were 18 patients who had only received EBUS-TBNA among a total of 55 patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis, positive results appeared in 17 cases, while cTBNA was 9/15. There were 20 cases diagnosed in which both had EBUS-TBNA and cTBNA. The diagnostic rate of cTBNA combined with EBB and TBLB was 25/26, while combined with EBUS-TBNA was 21/21. Totally 90 lymph nodes were punctured by EBUS-TBNA, in which 65 lymph nodes got the positive results (65/90) while 49 lymph nodes got the positive results by TBNA in 93 punctured lymph nodes (49/93). The diagnostic positive rate in the lymph nodes with a short diameter ≥2 cm was 33/37 by EBUS-TBNA, while it was 12/19 in those whose short diameter 1-<2 cm. By cTBNA, the diagnostic positive rate was 15/26 and 11/28. No serious adverse events occurred. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ by EBUS-TBNA is safe and effective, while choosing the most noticeable swelling lymph node to puncture is

  5. Usefulness of lymphoid granulomatous inflammation culture obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in a fungal endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John; Zamora, Felix; Podgaetz, Eitan; Andrade, Rafael; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the procedure of choice for the evaluation of mediastinal/hilar lymph node enlargements. Granulomatous inflammation of the mediastinal/hilar lymph nodes is often identified on routine histology. In addition, mediastinal lymphadenopathy may be present with undiagnosed infection. We sought to determine the usefulness of routine cultures and histology for infectious etiologies in a fungal endemic area when granulomatous inflammation is identified. Materials and Methods: We identified 56 of 210 patients with granulomatous inflammation on EBUS-TBNA biopsies from October 2012 through October 2014. An onsite cytologist evaluated all biopsies and an additional TBNA pass for microbiologic stains and cultures were obtained in those with granulomatous inflammation. Results: Of the 56 patients with granulomatous inflammation, 20 patients had caseating (necrotizing) granulomas while noncaseating (nonnecrotizing) granulomas were detected in 36 of the remainder patients. In patients with caseating granulomas, fungal elements were identified in 6 of 20 (30%) patients (histoplasma; N = 5, blastomyces; N = 1) on Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stain. Lymph node cultures identified 3 of 20 (20%) patients as being positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (N = 1), Histoplasma capsulatum (N = 1), and Blastomyces dermatitidis (N = 1). Among patients with noncaseating granulomas, only 2 out of 36 (5%) were positive for fungal elements on GMS stain, identified as Histoplasma, although the lymph node cultures remained negative. Conclusion: The incidence of granulomatous inflammation of mediastinal lymph nodes was 26.6% in our series. Of these patients, noncaseating granulomas were more common (64% vs. 36%). Infectious organisms, fungal or acid-fast bacilli (AFB), on either staining or lymph node culture were rarely identified in noncaseating granulomas, 5% and none, respectively

  6. Performance of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for the Diagnosis of Isolated Mediastinal and Hilar Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Tyan, Chung-Chun; Machuca, Tiago; Czarnecka, Kasia; Ko, Hyang Mi; da Cunha Santos, Gilda; Boerner, Scott L; Pierre, Andrew; Cypel, Marcelo; Waddell, Tom; Darling, Gail; de Perrot, Marc; Keshavjee, Shaf; Geddie, William; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have assessed the diagnostic utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in the context of a specific disease, few studies have assessed the overall diagnostic yield, sensitivity, and negative predictive value in patients with isolated mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy (IMHL). We evaluated the performance of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosing IMHL in a population with a high prevalence of concurrent or preexisting non-pulmonary malignancy. A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA from October 2008 to April 2014 was performed to identify patients with IMHL. Patients with known or suspected primary pulmonary malignancy were excluded. When available, EBUS-TBNA results were cross-referenced with further diagnostic investigation or clinical diagnosis based on follow-up. EBUS-TBNA was used to sample 765 lymph nodes from 350 patients. One hundred and fourteen (33.3%) patients had a concurrent or preexisting non-pulmonary malignancy. The overall yield of EBUS-TBNA for specific diagnosis was 300/350 (86%). The diagnostic yield for sarcoidosis, lymphoproliferative disease, metastatic lymphadenopathy from extrathoracic malignancy, and necrotizing granuloma was 123/149 (83%), 27/33 (82%), 20/25 (80%), and 13/19 (68%), respectively. Amongst 50 patients with non-diagnostic EBUS-TBNA, 25 yielded an insufficient sample and another 25 yielded only benign lymphoid material which was not representative of the underlying pathology. Overall, EBUS-TBNA had a sensitivity of 89%, a diagnostic yield of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 79%. For patients with isolated hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy and a high background prevalence of concurrent and preexisting non-pulmonary malignancy, EBUS-TBNA is a reliable first-line diagnostic investigation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Pulmonary mucormycosis diagnosed by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of cavity wall

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vidya; Sharma, Rahul Kumar; Khanna, Arjun; Talwar, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection in immunocompromised individuals. It is difficult to diagnose as it requires tissue biopsy, and generally these patients are unfit to undergo invasive lung biopsies. We describe a novel technique in a case with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with nonresolving pulmonary cavitary disease where convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided aspiration of lung cavity wall showed classical histopathological picture establishing the diagnosis of mucorale infection. EBUS being real-time, minimally invasive technique with minimal risk of complications, led to early diagnosis, and prompt treatment. This appears to be a novel diagnostic modality in pulmonary mucormycosis with minimal complications as compared with other biopsy methods with very high complication risk. PMID:28360470

  8. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration compared with conventional approaches: an open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Navani, Neal; Nankivell, Matthew; Lawrence, David R; Lock, Sara; Makker, Himender; Baldwin, David R; Stephens, Richard J; Parmar, Mahesh K; Spiro, Stephen G; Morris, Stephen; Janes, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnosis and staging of lung cancer is an important process that identifies treatment options and guides disease prognosis. We aimed to assess endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration as an initial investigation technique for patients with suspected lung cancer. Methods In this open-label, multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients who had undergone a CT scan and had suspected stage I to IIIA lung cancer, from six UK centres and randomly assigned them to either endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) or conventional diagnosis and staging (CDS), for further investigation and staging. If a target node could not be accessed by EBUS-TBNA, then endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) was allowed as an alternative procedure. Randomisation was stratified according to the presence of mediastinal lymph nodes measuring 1 cm or more in the short axis and by recruiting centre. We used a telephone randomisation method with permuted blocks of four generated by a computer. Because of the nature of the intervention, masking of participants and consenting investigators was not possible. The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment decision after completion of the diagnostic and staging investigations and analysis was by intention-to-diagnose. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00652769. Findings Between June 10, 2008, and July 4, 2011, we randomly allocated 133 patients to treatment: 66 to EBUS-TBNA and 67 to CDS (one later withdrew consent). Two patients from the EBUS-TBNA group underwent EUS-FNA. The median time to treatment decision was shorter with EBUS-TBNA (14 days; 95% CI 14–15) than with CDS (29 days; 23–35) resulting in a hazard ratio of 1·98, (1·39–2·82, p<0·0001). One patient in each group had a pneumothorax from a CT-guided biopsy sample; the patient from the CDS group needed intercostal drainage

  9. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Increases the Yield of Transbronchial Lung Biopsy for the Evaluation of Peribronchial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Mu, Chuan-Yong; Su, Mei-Qin; Mao, Jing-Yu; Zhu, Ye-Han; Huang, Jian-An

    2017-01-01

    Background: Due to absence of visible endobronchial target, the diagnostic yield of flexible bronchoscopy for peribronchial lesions has been unsatisfactory. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) has allowed for performing real-time transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes and therefore could also be used as a means of diagnosing proximal peribronchial lesions. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the results related to 72 patients who underwent CP-EBUS for peribronchial lesions without endobronchial involvement and adjacent to three-grade bronchi based on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. We recorded the images during EBUS as well as the diagnostic results of TBNA and conventional-transbronchial lung biopsy/brush (C-TBLB/b), and final diagnoses were based on pathologic analysis and follow-up. Results: In all cases, the mass was able to be identified using EBUS in 97.2% patients (70/72) who were performed with EBUS-TBNA + C-TBLB/b. Sixty-six patients had a final diagnosis, 80.0% patients (56/70) had malignancies, and 14.3% patients (10/70) had benign disease. In malignancies, the diagnostic yield of C-TBLB/b was 57.1% (32/56) and in EBUS-TBNA was 85.7% (48/56), whereas pathologic diagnosis reached 94.6% when EBUS-TBNA was combined with C-TBLB/b. C-TBLB/b + EBUS-TBNA also exhibited stronger potency of histolytic diagnosis for malignancies than either EBUS-TBNA or C-TBLB/b alone. Furthermore, there are data supporting the value of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis of benign lung disease. Conclusion: The combined endoscopic approach with EBUS-TBNA and C-TBLB/b is an accurate and effective method for the evaluation of peribronchial lesions, with better results than using each technique alone. PMID:28051017

  10. A foreign body reaction to Surgicel® in a lymph node diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Diana; Pijuan, Lara; Curull, Víctor; Sánchez-Font, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Surgicel® (Ethicon, North Ryde, NSW, Australia) is an absorbable sheet of oxidized cellulose polyanhydroglucuronic acid polymer used as an hemostatic in cardiovascular and thoracic surgery. In some cases, the retained material may cause foreign body granulomatous reactions and simulate tumor recurrence, an abscess, an hematoma, or an infection. We report the case of a 55-year-old patient who was operated of a lung adenocarcinoma. In the thoracic computed tomography scan 1 year after the surgery, a right paratracheal lymph node was detected, so endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was performed suspecting recurrence of the tumor. The cytology results of the lymph node showed a nonnecrotizing granulomatous reaction secondary to Surgicel®, used as an hemostatic during the surgery. The objective of presenting this case is to consider foreign body reaction to Surgicel® in the differential diagnosis of postoperative suspicion of neoplastic recurrence, and on the other hand, to note that EBUS-TBNA enables diagnosis. PMID:28197224

  11. Contribution of cell block obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis of malignant diseases and sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erer, Onur Fevzi; Erol, Serhat; Anar, Ceyda; Aydoğdu, Zekiye; Özkan, Serir Aktoğu

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a safe and minimally invasive procedure that can be performed in outpatient settings. Several studies have demonstrated the usefulness of EBUS-TBNA in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and malignant diseases. This study focused on the role of cell block (CB) analysis in determining the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA in malignant diseases and sarcoidosis. The study was conducted at a training and research hospital. Records of patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA between March 2011 and December 2014 for diagnosed sarcoidosis or malignancy were retrospectively analyzed. Results of all EBUS-TBNA smears and CB were separately evaluated to determine the diagnostic value of each. There were 84 sarcoidosis and 179 malignancy patients. In the malignancy group, CB contributed to cancer diagnosis in 15 (8.3%) patients and subclassification in 19 (10.6%) patients. In the sarcoidosis group, for 45.2% of patients (38/84), smears were not diagnostic but CB showed granulomatous inflammation. CB significantly increases the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for sarcoidosis. In our study, in the malignancy group the diagnostic yield was low but it was helpful for subclassification, especially for adenocarcinoma.

  12. CD4/CD8 Ratio in Mediastinal Lymph Nodes Involved by Sarcoidosis: Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data Obtained by Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sory J; Zhang, Yaxia; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Despite mixed results in the literature, some clinicians continue to consider an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid to be supportive of a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. However, the CD4/CD8 ratio in mediastinal lymph nodes involved by sarcoidosis has not been extensively studied. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the CD4/CD8 ratio in mediastinal lymph node aspirates obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for diagnosing sarcoidosis. Our archives were searched for EBUS-TBNAs in which mediastinal lymph node aspirates had been submitted for flow cytometry (n=160). Clinical and pathologic findings in these cases were reviewed retrospectively. Cases were included in the study if they had (1) a clinical diagnosis of sarcoidosis supported by cytopathologic confirmation of non-necrotizing granulomas in EBUS-TBNA-derived lymph node aspirates (23 cases), or (2) a pathologically confirmed non-neoplastic diagnosis other than sarcoidosis (7 cases). Cases that did not fulfil these criteria were excluded (130 cases). The CD4/CD8 ratios in mediastinal lymph nodes and BAL fluid were compared. The CD4/CD8 ratio was elevated in mediastinal lymph nodes in 12/23 (52%) cases of sarcoidosis and 3/7 (43%) pathologically confirmed nonsarcoid cases. BAL fluid had been concurrently submitted for flow cytometry in 20/23 cases of sarcoidosis and 5/7 nonsarcoid cases. CD4/CD8 was elevated in BAL fluid in 9/20 (45%) cases of sarcoidosis and 2/5 (40%) nonsarcoid cases. As in BAL fluid, the CD4/CD8 ratio in mediastinal lymph nodes involved by sarcoid granulomas is highly variable and does not reliably confirm or exclude sarcoidosis.

  13. Rapid On-Site Evaluation of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspirations for the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer: A Perspective From Members of the Pulmonary Pathology Society.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepali; Allen, Timothy Craig; Aisner, Dara L; Beasley, Mary Beth; Cagle, Philip T; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Hariri, Lida P; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Miller, Ross; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Monaco, Sara E; Moreira, Andre; Raparia, Kirtee; Rekhtman, Natasha; Roden, Anja Christiane; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; da Cunha Santos, Gilda; Thunnissen, Erik; Troncone, Giancarlo; Vivero, Marina

    2017-06-22

    - Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged as a very useful tool in the field of diagnostic respiratory cytology. Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) of EBUS-TBNA not only has the potential to improve diagnostic yield of the procedure but also to triage samples for predictive molecular testing to guide personalized treatments for lung cancer. - To provide an overview of the current status of the literature regarding ROSE of EBUS-TBNA in the diagnosis of lung cancer. - An electronic literature search in PubMed and Google databases was performed using the following key words: cytology, lung cancer, on-site evaluation, rapid on-site evaluation, and ROSE EBUS-TBNA. Only articles published in English were included in this review. - Rapid on-site evaluation can ensure that the targeted lesion is being sampled and can enable appropriate specimen triage. If available, it should be used with EBUS-TBNA in the diagnosis of lung cancer because it can minimize repeat procedures for additional desired testing (ie, molecular studies). Some studies have shown that while ROSE does not adversely affect the number of aspirations, total procedure time of EBUS-TBNA, or the rate of postprocedure complications, it is helpful in providing a preliminary diagnosis that can reduce the number of additional invasive procedures, such as mediastinoscopy. As EBUS technology continues to evolve, our knowledge of the role of ROSE in EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis of lung cancer will also continue to grow and evolve.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  15. Role of radial endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Gupta, Nalini; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary nodules can be made using several methods including computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA), radial endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided sampling techniques (transbronchial lung biopsy [TBLB], transbronchial brush, bronchoalveolar lavage, or transbronchial needle aspiration [TBNA]), or occasionally with convex probe (CP) EBUS-TBNA. While CT-guided FNA is associated with a high (25%) rate of pneumothorax, the CP-EBUS cannot reach lesions beyond the interlobar region. Radial EBUS-guided TBLB and transbronchial brushing are excellent modalities in the evaluation of peripheral pulmonary lesions. However, these techniques cannot access lesions that are located adjacent to the proximal segmental bronchus, due to the presence of a cartilaginous wall. Herein, we describe a 58-year-old man, who presented with a lung nodule in the right middle lobe, wherein radial EBUS-guided TBNA proved to be the most appropriate diagnostic modality. We also discuss the current utility of radial EBUS-guided TBNA in day-to-day practice. PMID:28144062

  16. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  17. A comparison of ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations used for sedation in the endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a prospective, single-blind, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Dal, Tülay; Sazak, Hilal; Şahin, Şaziye; Yılmaz, Aydın

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations for procedural sedation in endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Methods Sixty patients who were undergoing EBUS-TBNA were included in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was given 0.25 mg/kg intravenous (iv) ketamine, 2 min later than 0.05 mg/kg iv midazolam. Group 2 received 0.125 mg/kg ketamine-propofol mixture (ketofol), 2 min subsequent to injection of 0.25 mg/kg each. Sedation was maintained with additional doses of ketamine 0.25 mg/kg, and ketofol 0.125 mg/kg each in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Blood pressure, heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation, respiratory rate (RR), Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS), and severity of cough were recorded prior to and after administration of sedation agent in the beginning of fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) and every 5 min of the procedure. The consumption of the agents, the satisfactions of the bronchoscopist and the patients, and the recovery time were also recorded. Results HR in the 10th min and RSS value in the 35th min of induction in Group 1 were higher than the other group (P<0.05). The recovery time in Group 1 was statistically longer than Group 2 (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between groups with respect to other parameters (P>0.05). Conclusions It was concluded that both ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations for sedation during EBUS-TBNA were similarly effective and safe without remarkable side effects. PMID:24976998

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Needle Technique Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela N.; Peiffer, Jeffery S.; Halmann, Nahi; Delaney, Luke; Owen, Cindy A.; Hersh, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia facilitates an approach to sensitive targets such as nerve clusters without contact or inadvertent puncture. We compared accuracy of needle placement with a novel passive magnetic ultrasound needle guidance technology (NGT) versus conventional ultrasound (CU) with echogenic needles. Methods Sixteen anesthesiologists and 19 residents performed a series of 16 needle insertion tasks each, 8 using NGT (n = 280) and 8 using CU (n = 280), in high-fidelity porcine phantoms. Tasks were stratified based on aiming to contact (target-contact) or place in close proximity with (target-proximity) targets, needle gauge (no. 18/no. 22), and in-plane (IP) or out-of-plane (OOP) approach. Distance to the target, task completion by aim, number of passes, and number of tasks completed on the first pass were reported. Results Needle guidance technology significantly improved distance, task completion, number of passes, and completion on the first pass compared with CU for both IP and OOP approaches (P ≤ 0.001). Average NGT distance to target was lower by 57.1% overall (n = 560, 1.5 ± 2.4 vs 3.5 ± 3.7 mm), 38.5% IP (n = 140, 1.6 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.8 mm), and 68.2% OOP (n = 140, 1.4 ± 2.2 vs 4.4 ± 4.3 mm) (all P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analyses revealed accuracy gains were largest among target-proximity tasks performed by residents and for OOP approaches. Needle guidance technology improved first-pass completion from 214 (76.4%) per 280 to 249 (88.9%) per 280, a significant improvement of 16.4% (P = 0.001). Conclusions Passive magnetic NGT can improve accuracy of needle procedures, particularly among OOP procedures requiring close approach to sensitive targets, such as nerve blocks in anesthesiology practice. PMID:28079754

  19. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Aspiration of an Endotracheal Bronchogenic Cyst: Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Venkata N; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh; Behera, Digambar

    2016-04-01

    The most common location of bronchogenic cysts is the mediastinum, adjacent to the major airways. Endotracheal bronchogenic cysts are rare and most present in infancy with respiratory failure. Although surgical resection has remained the treatment of choice, there is increasing interest in the management of these cysts with therapeutic aspiration alone. In this article, we describe a 68-year-old man with endotracheal bronchogenic cyst who was managed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. We also systematically review the literature for reports of endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The review identified 9 reports (10 patients) with endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The most common age at presentation was infancy (n=8) and surgical resection was the most common treatment modality used (n=7).

  20. Ultrasound-guided needle aspiration of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, A.; Ramani, R.; Kumar, M. S.; Lakhkar, B. N.; Kundaje, G. N.

    1993-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 200 patients with clinically, ultrasonographically and serologically confirmed amoebic liver abscess. The role of ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in addition to medications was evaluated compared to drug treatment alone. Both the groups were monitored clinically and sonographically for up to 6 months after diagnosis. The initial response (after 15 days) was better in the aspirated group (P < 0.05) but resolution of abscess after 6 months were similar. There was a more rapid clinical response in the aspirated group, particularly in those with larger (> 6 cm) abscesses and there were no complications. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided needle aspiration is a safe diagnostic and therapeutic approach which enhances clinical recovery, accelerates resolution, especially in large abscesses, and prevents complications. PMID:8346134

  1. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbae J; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2011-12-01

    Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation+rotation. In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation+rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted.

  2. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  3. An augmented reality simulator for ultrasound guided needle placement training.

    PubMed

    Magee, D; Zhu, Y; Ratnalingam, R; Gardner, P; Kessel, D

    2007-10-01

    Details are presented of a low cost augmented-reality system for the simulation of ultrasound guided needle insertion procedures (tissue biopsy, abscess drainage, nephrostomy etc.) for interventional radiology education and training. The system comprises physical elements; a mannequin, a mock ultrasound probe and a needle, and software elements; generating virtual ultrasound anatomy and allowing data collection. These two elements are linked by a pair of magnetic 3D position sensors. Virtual anatomic images are generated based on anatomic data derived from full body CT scans of live humans. Details of the novel aspects of this system are presented including; image generation, registration and calibration.

  4. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P < 0.001). For ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P < 0.001) in experienced performers and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P < 0.001). Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more in ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration needles: which one and in what situation?

    PubMed

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is increasingly used as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for pancreatic and other gastrointestinal disorders. Several factors affect the outcome of EUS-FNA, one of which is needle size. The decision to use a specific needle depends on factors including location, consistency, and type of the lesion; presence of onsite cytopathologist; and need for additional tissue procurement for histology. This review provides a balanced perspective on the use of different needle sizes available, highlighting the differences among them and potential niche applications of each to maximize diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, K Nithin; McDowall, Adam; Simunovic, Nicole; Bhandari, Mohit; Choudur, Hema N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in treating calcific tendinitis. Two independent assessors searched medical databases and screened studies for eligibility. Eleven articles were included. Heterogeneity among included studies precluded meta-analysis. Results of randomized controlled trials suggested no difference in pain relief between needle lavage and other interventions, but the studies were of low quality. Additional high-quality evidence is required to determine the relative efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in the management of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  7. Dominant hand operating probe vs needle: a comparison study of ultrasound-guided needle placement in phantom models.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D F; Stafford, M

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a replicated crossover design study to assess if using one's dominant hand for operating a probe vs directing a needle would affect the time taken, the number of needle passes and the accuracy of an ultrasound-guided procedure in phantom models. Twenty ultrasound-novice participants completed the task 10 times for each hand arrangement (alternating between attempts). The time taken and number of needle passes required for both dominant hand-probe and hand-needle decreased over time (p = 0.001). Dominant hand-needle had a lower mean time used (p = 0.001) and fewer needle passes (p = 0.02) compared with hand-probe. Sixty-five per cent of participants preferred using their dominant hand to direct the needle. When learning ultrasound-guided needle procedures on phantom models, use of the dominant hand to operate the needle is associated with a shorter procedure time and fewer needle passes.

  8. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... nodule and aspirate samples of tissue. After the sampling, the needle will be removed. New needles will ... for adequate biopsies. Needle biopsy is a reliable method of obtaining tissue samples that can help diagnose ...

  10. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in the diagnosis of neuroblastic tumors in children: a retrospective study on 83 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihui; Mu, Jie; Du, Ping; Wang, Hailing; Mao, Yiran; Xu, Yong; Xin, Xiaojie; Zang, Fenglin

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided biopsy technique with the large-core needle has widely been applied in the diagnosis of adult abdominopelvic cavity, thyroid, and neck tumors. There are few reports on ultrasound-guided biopsy using large-core needle in pediatric abdominopelvic cavity tumors. This study was to evaluate the ultrasound features and the diagnostic value of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for pediatric neuroblastic tumors. The pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumor that underwent ultrasound examination and ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from January 2009 to November 2015 were reviewed. A minimum of two cores in each case was obtained. The biopsy results were confirmed by subsequent surgical histopathology. The ultrasound features and the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy were evaluated. Eighty-three patients were enrolled into the study. Conventional ultrasound examination showed irregular hypoechoic or mixed echo masses and calcification and liquefied necrosis. The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy was 96.4% (80/83). Three cases were misdiagnosed because of inadequate tissue sample. No serious complication, infection, or needle track seeding occurred. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy seems to be an accurate, minimally invasive, and safe diagnostic method of pediatric neuroblastic tumor.

  11. From cytology to histology: diagnosis of a relapsed mediastinal lymphoma by endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial histological needle

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Bango Álvarez, Antonio; Pérez, Liliana; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fuentes, Nelson; Casan, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is highly accurate in diagnosing mediastinal lymphadenopathies of lung cancer and benign disorders, with the advantage that it is a minimally invasive technique, unlike open surgery and mediastinoscopy. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis of lymphoma in patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy is not well defined. The lack of tissue architecture obtained by cytological needles decreases the diagnostic accuracy for diagnosis and subtyping of de novo and relapsed mediastinal lymphomas. We present the first described case in the literature of an anaplastic large cell lymphoma relapsed, diagnosed on tissue fragments obtained by EBUS-TBNA with the particularity of using a histological needle. PMID:26090115

  12. Value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration as a screening test for ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in nonpalpable breast masses.

    PubMed

    Lieu, David

    2009-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of breast masses in the United States has been on the decline for the last decade and has been largely replaced by ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy (UG-CNB). Some studies show core-needle biopsy (CNB) is superior to FNA in terms of absolute sensitivity, specificity, and inadequate rate. However, the importance of a skilled aspirator, experienced cytopathologist, and immediate cytological evaluation (ICE) in FNA is often not considered. CNB is more expensive, invasive, risky, and painful than FNA. This prospective study examines the value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided FNA (UG-FNA) with ICE as a screening test for cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB on nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate solid breast masses visible on ultrasound. One hundred twenty consecutive nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate presumably solid breast masses in 109 female patients from January2, 2008 to June 30, 2008 underwent cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA with ICE. Twenty cases were converted to cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB because ICE was inadequate, hypocellular, atypical, suspicious, or malignant. Patients with clearly benign cytology did not undergo UG-CNB. UG-FNA with ICE reduced the percentage of patients undergoing UG-CNB by 87%. A new role for cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA of nonpalpable breast masses has been identified.

  13. Giardia lamblia infection diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Nelson, John J; Eves, Matthew; Boudreaux, Carole

    2007-06-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease worldwide. We report the case of a 59-yr-old male who presented to his primary care physician with complaints of abdominal pain and weight loss. Imaging studies revealed a liver mass and a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the liver mass proved to be benign, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the head of the pancreas showed no evidence of malignancy; however, numerous pear-shaped, binucleated, flagellated organisms morphologically consistent with trophozoites of Giardia lamblia were identified in the specimen. With the increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for sampling of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic lesions, cytopathologists examining such specimens will need to be familiar with the diagnostic characteristics of this protozoal parasite.

  14. New model for learning ultrasound-guided needle to target localization.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    The acquisition of technical skills for the novice learner presents challenges for students and teachers alike. With the introduction of ultrasound techniques in regional anesthesia, there has been interest from residents, fellows, and staff to acquire the skills necessary to incorporate this technology into their everyday practice. However, as both ultrasound machines and commercial target models are inherently costly, there are often issues of accessibility that may affect the opportunity to learn the desired skills. Readily available extra-firm tofu, wood dowel, and electrical wire are easily composed to create models for learning ultrasound-guided needle manipulation. Wood and wire targets embedded in tofu present hypo- and hyper-echoic targets that allow the learner to appreciate the relationship between the two-dimensional ultrasound screen image and three-dimensional target planes. This report presents an inexpensive, variable complexity model for learning ultrasound-guided needle-to-target localization.

  15. Sudden appearance of free fluid during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Rimbaş, Mihai; Deaconu, Marian; Croitoru, Alexandru; Haidar, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    During endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of a pancreatic malignancy, a small quantity of free fluid, not seen before, suddenly appeared in the view, and time was spent ruling out ongoing hemorrhage. However, during follow-up, the patient gradually developed peritoneal signs and was referred for surgery. The images presented elucidate the diagnosis and raise the question of a theoretical change in diagnostic and therapeutic approach. PMID:26879168

  16. Sudden appearance of free fluid during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Rimbas, Mihai; Deaconu, Marian; Croitoru, Alexandru; Haidar, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    During endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of a pancreatic malignancy, a small quantity of free fluid, not seen before, suddenly appeared in the view, and time was spent ruling out ongoing hemorrhage. However, during follow-up, the patient gradually developed peritoneal signs and was referred for surgery. The images presented elucidate the diagnosis and raise the question of a theoretical change in diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  17. Treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with ultrasound guided dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment of a patient with tendinopathy using sonographically guided dry needling. Tendinopathies are a highly prevalent problem in musculoskeletal medicine, and no one form of treatment has gained universal acceptance as being superior to another. Clinical Features A 30-year-old woman with a 4-month history of anterolateral right shoulder pain was diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy upon physical examination, which was confirmed with diagnostic sonography. Intervention and Outcome Sonography was used to guide an acupuncture needle into the pathologic tissue to induce a humoral healing response. Therapeutic exercise was also prescribed. At 10-day follow-up, increased echogenicity was found in the previously heterogenous hypoechoic areas. The patient also experienced a subjective resolution of her shoulder pain, which did not return with increased physical activity. Conclusions Sonographically guided dry needling was shown to be beneficial for this patient as evident by sonographic changes pre- and postprocedure. PMID:23997721

  18. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  19. Bench-top testing of suction forces generated through endoscopic ultrasound-guided aspiration needles.

    PubMed

    Katanuma, Akio; Itoi, Takao; Baron, Todd H; Yasuda, Ichiro; Kin, Toshifumi; Yane, Kei; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Hajime; Sano, Itsuki; Minami, Ryuki; Manabu, Sen-yo; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Osanai, Manabu; Takahashi, Kuniyuki

    2015-05-01

    Adequate needle size and tissue acquisition techniques for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) need further elucidation. Moreover, the actual negative pressure and suction forces of FNA needles remain unknown. We evaluated the suction forces of 19-gauge, 22-gauge, and 25-gauge conventional FNA needles and side hole aspiration needles using conventional negative pressure and the slow pull technique. Using a manometer, we determined the mean (SD) negative pressure and suction force for needle gauge, aspiration volume, and aspiration technique. We also evaluated the time to reach the maximum negative pressure. Suction force was comparatively higher in the 19-gauge needle when 50 ml of negative pressure was applied. Suction force using the slow pull method was very weak at 5% of pressure found with conventional methods. With the use of a 20-ml syringe, the time to reach the maximum negative pressure was 4 s in the 19-gauge needle, 11 s in the 22-gauge needle, and 80 s in the 25-gauge needle. Bench-top testing showed that suction force increases with a larger gauge needle and larger aspiration volume. The slow pull method produces a very weak suction force. The time to reach the maximum negative pressure was longest in the 25-gauge needle. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of fibroepithelial breast tumors].

    PubMed

    Ricci, Marcos Desidério; Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório do; Aoki, Denis Seiiti; Oliveira Filho, Hélio Rubens de; Pinheiro, Walter da Silva; Filassi, José Roberto; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    to evaluate the concordance rate of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy followed by excisional biopsy in palpable breast lumps, suggestive of fibroepithelial tumors. a retrospective study included 70 biopsies with a histological diagnosis of fibroepithelial tumor in 67 out of 531 patients with breast lesions submitted to ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy with a high frequency (7.5 MHz) linear transducer, using an automatic Bard-Magnum gun and a 14-gauge needle. Cases with a diagnosis of fibroepithelial tumor by core needle biopsy or excisional biopsy and with a diagnosis of fibrosclerosis were included in the study. The agreement between the two biopsy methods was assessed using the Kappa coefficient. excisional biopsy revealed 40 cases of fibroadenoma (57.1%), 19 cases of phyllodes tumor (27.2%), and 11 cases of fibrosclerosis (15.7%). The concordance rate for fibroadenoma was substantial (k = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.45 - 0.91), almost perfect for the phyllodes tumor (k = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.57 - 1.0), and moderate for fibrosclerosis (k = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.36 - 0.90). the core needle biopsy is a minimally invasive method that has "substantial" to "almost perfect" concordance rate with excisional biopsy. Fibrosclerosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fibroepithelial tumors.

  1. A case report of local treatment of inoperable squamous cell lung carcinoma with convex-probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided intratumoral injection of cisplatin in a patient with severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochen; Liu, Xiansheng; Rao, Xiaoling; Zhao, Jianping; Xu, Yongjian; Xie, Min

    2017-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound as a powerful diagnostic technology can also be used to perform intratumoral chemotherapy for extraluminal tumor. A 69-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with worsening dyspnea. A pulmonary function test showed severe airway obstruction and that forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 43% of the predicted value after a bronchodilator. A bronchoscopy and histopathological analyses revealed a squamous cell carcinoma mostly located outside of the lumen with central airway obstruction. Due to the poor pulmonary function, he cannot tolerate conventional active treatments, such as surgery, full dose systemic chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Local treatments including argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and bronchoscopic endobronchial intratumoral chemotherapy with cisplatin were performed to debulk intraluminal component of the tumor and recanalize occlusive airways in the left upper lobe. Convex-probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection (EBUS-TBNI) delivered cisplatin into the extraluminal component of the tumor to relieve the symptom of dyspnea and opened up the opportunity for systemic chemotherapy without severe systemic complications. The patient had a good response to the comprehensive therapy of 4 cycles of low-dose intravenous chemotherapy and bronchoscopic interventions. EBUS-TBNI is proven an effective and safe method to treat inoperable extraluminal central pulmonary carcinoma complicated with severe COPD. In the future, EBUS-TBNI may offer more treatment indications outlined in the existing publications.

  2. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  3. The role of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, M; Pollastri, P; Ferraro, A; Betoni, F; Bacci, G; Galletti, S

    2007-06-01

    Soft-tissue tumors are not very common, but their diagnosis can be very difficult. In the final analysis, their diagnosis requires a biopsy, which must furnish a sufficient amount of material to allow a reliable histological diagnosis. The authors evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the study was to optimize the biopsy procedure, with particular emphasis on the choice of the biopsy needle (large-gauge manual versus semiautomatic) based on the characteristics of the neoplastic mass (consistency, depth, size, location). The results of the study showed that appropriate needle selection significantly reduced the frequency of biopsies that were insufficient for histological diagnosis. The method proved to be highly reliable for diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors but strongly related to the proper selection of the needle to be used.

  4. The role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: SEED-SEPD-AEG Joint Guideline.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; González-Panizo-Tamargo, Fernando; Barturen, Ángel; Calderón, Ángel; Esteban, José Miguel; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Gimeno-García, Antonio; Ginés, Angels; Lariño, José; Pérez-Carreras, Mercedes; Romero, Rafael; Súbtil, José Carlos; Vila, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in our environment, and represents the first cause of cancer related death in western countries. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients may be complicated, with endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), classically performed by gastroenterologists, playing a very important role. As this disease is not closely related to the "digestive tract", gastroenterologists have been forced to update their knowledge on this field o adequately diagnose this significant group of patients. The recent advent of modern and promising techniques like endobronchial ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA) have prompted new approaches for diagnosis and staging of this type of patients. In this clinical guideline, the "Sociedad Española de Endoscopia Digestiva" (SEED), "Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva" (SEPD) and the "AsociaciónEspañola de Gastroenterología", have jointed efforts to update the existing knowledge on the field and provide their members with evidence based recommendations.

  5. Thyroid Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology Results.

    PubMed

    Manning, Amy M; Yang, Huaitao; Falciglia, Mercedes; Mark, Jonathan R; Steward, David L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate changes in distribution of reported thyroid nodule fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytopathology results since implementation of the Bethesda classification and revised 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines for selecting nodules for biopsy. Study Design Retrospective review. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Evaluation of ultrasound (US)-guided thyroid FNA by a single surgeon using 2015 ATA nodule selection criteria and Bethesda reporting on 211 thyroid nodules in a 1-year period (2015). Comparison is made to an earlier sample wherein any nodule >1 cm underwent US FNA with cytology reported prior to Bethesda consensus (2006). Results The current cohort involved mostly women (79%); nodules ranged from 1 to 7 cm (mean ± SEM, 2.4 ± 0.07 cm). Mean ± SEM age was 53.5 ± 1.1 years. Bethesda reporting yielded 6% nondiagnostic, 57% benign, 3% malignant, and 34% indeterminate (27% atypia of undetermined significance [AUS]/follicular lesion of undetermined significance [FLUS], 4% follicular neoplasm [FN]/Hürthle neoplasm [HN], and 2% suspicious for malignancy [SFM]). The malignancy rate in indeterminate nodules was 26% (18% AUS/FLUS, 33% FN/HN, and 80% SFM). Age, sex, or nodule size did not correlate with indeterminate cytology. The comparator sample of 447 nodules had significantly different distribution, with 7% nondiagnostic, 80% benign, 5% malignant, and 8% indeterminate ( P < .00001). Conclusion We observed a significantly increased proportion of indeterminate cytology and corresponding decrease in benign nodules compared with an earlier sample, predominately from an increase in AUS/FLUS. Multiple factors are likely involved, including selection of sonographically suspicious nodules for biopsy based upon 2015 ATA guidelines coupled with cytopathological interpretation by a new generation of cytopathologists trained in the era of Bethesda reporting; further study is required to make a definitive conclusion.

  6. 3-D Ultrasound-Guided Robotic Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Ashley E.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2017-01-01

    Robotic needle steering systems have the potential to greatly improve medical interventions, but they require new methods for medical image guidance. Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is a widely available, low-cost imaging modality that may be used to provide real-time feedback to needle steering robots. Unfortunately, the poor visibility of steerable needles in standard grayscale ultrasound makes automatic segmentation of the needles impractical. A new imaging approach is proposed, in which high-frequency vibration of a steerable needle makes it visible in ultrasound Doppler images. Experiments demonstrate that segmentation from this Doppler data is accurate to within 1–2 mm. An image-guided control algorithm that incorporates the segmentation data as feedback is also described. In experimental tests in ex vivo bovine liver tissue, a robotic needle steering system implementing this control scheme was able to consistently steer a needle tip to a simulated target with an average error of 1.57 mm. Implementation of 3-D ultrasound-guided needle steering in biological tissue represents a significant step toward the clinical application of robotic needle steering. PMID:25014948

  7. Using an abdominal phantom to teach urology residents ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle placement

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, Pauline; Odisho, Anobel; Ramaswamy, Krishna; Usawachintachit, Manint; Hu, Weiguo; Li, Jianxing; Chi, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To assess the effect of a hands-on ultrasound training session to teach urologic trainees ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle placement. Materials and methods: University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) urology residents completed a time trial, placing a needle into a phantom model target under ultrasound guidance. Participants were randomized into three educational exposure groups: Group 1's time trial occurred prior to any teaching intervention, group 2's after experiencing a hands-on training module, and group 3's after exposure to both the training module and one-on-one attending feedback. Needle placement speed and accuracy as well as trainees' perceived confidence in utilizing ultrasound were measured. Results: The study cohort consisted of 15 resident trainees. Seven were randomized to group 1, three to group 2, and five to group 3. All residents reported minimal prior ultrasound experience. Their confidence in using ultrasound improved significantly after completing the training module with the most significant improvement seen among junior residents. Time to needle placement was fastest after receiving attending feedback (46.6sec in group 3 vs. 82.7sec in groups 1 and 2, p<0.01). Accuracy also improved with attending feedback, though the number of repositioning attempts did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions: A hands-on training module and use of an abdominal phantom trainer increased resident confidence and skill in their use of ultrasound to guide percutaneous needle positioning. Attending feedback is critical for improving accuracy in needle guidance toward a target. Ultrasound-guided needle positioning is a teachable skill and can be applicable to multiple urologic procedures. PMID:27564282

  8. The Value of Hormone Receptor Assessment in Ultrasound Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Pal, Andrej; Milevcić, Drazen; Bosilj, Doroteja; Purković, Sandra; Cujzek, Ivana; Kopjar, Andrina; Radiković, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Western countries after skin tumors. Successful treatment depends on many factors, relies on clinical examination, diagnostic procedures, pathologic evaluation, and good therapy decision. The Pathologic diagnosis should be the determining factor in the decision on therapeutic approach. There are several methods of obtaining tissue samples. The percutaneous ultrasound guided breast Core needle biopsy (CNB) is one of them. The Aim of this Study is to evaluate our experience in the accuracy of hormone receptors assessment in ultrasound guided CNB. In our institution, in last 12 month 60 women (with 67 lesions) underwent Breast CNB. The CNB was performed with 16 Gauge semiautomatic biopsy needle with 15 Gauge coordinated introducer needle. 3-6 specimen (mean 4) were taken during the procedure. We analyzed five factors (histological type, histological grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and HER2 from the biopsied sample. All results were presented at the Multidisciplinary Oncology Team. In addition to demographic data and morphological features of the lesion, we analyzed five pathological factors (histological type, histological grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and HER2 from the biopsied sample. All results were presented at the Multidisciplinary Oncology Team. Ultrasound-guided CNB has proven to be a reliable technique for performing a biopsy for breast. It is a good and reliable, complication free method, for preoperative staging, operative planning as well for prognostic value. It is a cost-effective method, can be performed quickly and in outpatient population, does not deform the breast and multiple lesions can be biopsied. This technique shows a high sensitivity value and offers many advantages over other imaging methods to guide a biopsy. All advantages have made this technique the most widespread used technique to perform a biopsy for a suspicious breast lesion.

  9. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors in 4 dogs

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Parent, Joane M.; Dobson, Howard; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Holmberg, David; Duque, M. Carolina; Poma, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was used in establishing the diagnosis in 4 cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Sonographic and cytologic characteristics are discussed. Because of its availability and ease of use, axillary ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration can be an initial diagnostic step for suspected brachial plexus tumors. PMID:18320983

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate.

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  12. Effect of Needle Size in Ultrasound-guided Core Needle Breast Biopsy: Comparison of 14-, 16-, and 18-Gauge Needles.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Michela; Rinaldi, Pierluigi; Rella, Rossella; Fabrizi, Gina; Petta, Federica; Carlino, Giorgio; Di Leone, Alba; Mulè, Antonino; Bufi, Enida; Romani, Maurizio; Belli, Paolo; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2017-03-06

    The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) of breast lesions, comparing smaller needles (16- and 18-gauge) with the 14-gauge needle, and to analyze the lesion characteristics influencing US-CNB diagnostic performance. All the patients provided informed consent before the biopsy procedure. The data from breast lesions that had undergone US-CNB in our institution from January 2011 to January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criterion was the surgical histopathologic examination findings of the entire lesion or radiologic follow-up data for ≥ 24 months. The exclusion criterion was the use of preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. The US-CNB results were compared with the surgical pathologic results or with the follow-up findings in the 3 needle size groups (14-, 16-, and 18-gauge). The needle size- and lesion characteristic-specific diagnostic accuracy parameters were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using a dedicated software program, and P ≤ .01 was considered significant. A total of 1118 US-CNB cases (1042 patients) were included. Of the 1118 cases, 630 (56.3%) were in the 14-gauge group, 136 (12.2%) in the 16-gauge, and 352 (31.5%) in the 18-gauge needle group. Surgery was performed on 800 lesions (71.6%). Of these, 619 were malignant, 77 were high risk, and 104 were benign. The remaining 318 lesions (28.4%) underwent follow-up imaging studies. All the lesions were stable and, therefore, were considered benign. No differences were observed in the diagnostic accuracy parameters among the 3 needle size groups (P > .01). The false-negative rate was greater for lesions < 10 mm (7.2%) (P < .01) but without statistically significant differences among the 3 gauges (P > .01). US-CNB performed with small needles (16 and 18 gauge) had the same diagnostic accuracy as that performed with 14-gauge needles, regardless of the lesion characteristics. Copyright © 2017

  13. Ultrasound-guided catheterisation of the subclavian vein: freehand vs needle-guided technique.

    PubMed

    Maecken, T; Heite, L; Wolf, B; Zahn, P K; Litz, R J

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this prospective, randomised study was to examine the impact of a multi-angle needle guide for ultrasound-guided, in-plane, central venous catheter placement in the subclavian vein. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly allocated to two groups, freehand or needle-guided, and then 159 catheterisations were analysed. Cannulation of the first examined access site was successful in 96.9% of cases with no significant difference between groups. There were three arterial punctures and no other severe injuries. Catheter misplacements did not differ between the groups. Higher success rates within the first and second attempts in the needle-guided group were observed (p = 0.041 and p = 0.019, respectively). Use of the needle guide reduced the access time from a median (IQR [range]) of 30 (18-76 [6-1409]) s to 16 (10-30 [4-295]) s; p = 0.0001, and increased needle visibility from 31.8% (9.7%-52.2% [0-96.67]) to 86.2% (62.5%-100% [0-100]); p < 0.0001. A multi-angle needle guide significantly improved aligning the needle and ultrasound plane compared with the freehand technique when cannulating the subclavian vein. Use of the guide resulted in faster access times and increased success at the first and second attempts.

  14. Diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions with radial probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Boonsarngsuk, Viboon; Kanoksil, Wasana; Laungdamerongchai, Sarangrat

    2014-09-01

    The diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) is a challenging task for pulmonologists. Radial probe endobronchial ultrasound (R-EBUS) has been developed to enhance diagnostic yield. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of R-EBUS in the diagnosis of PPLs. A retrospective study was conducted on 174 patients diagnosed with PPLs who underwent EBUS-guided bronchoscopy. Histological examination of specimens obtained by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) and cytological examinations of brushing smear, brush rinse fluid and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated for the diagnosis. The mean diameter of the PPLs was 25.1 ± 10.7 mm. The final diagnoses included 129 malignancies and 45 benign lesions. The overall diagnostic yield of EBUS-guided bronchoscopy was 79.9%. Neither size nor etiology of the PPLs influenced the diagnostic performance of EBUS-guided bronchoscopy (82.9% vs. 74.6% for PPLs>20mm and PPLs≤20mm; p=0.19, and 82.9% vs. 71.1% for malignancy and benign diseases; p=0.09). TBLB rendered the highest yield among these specimens (69.0%, 50.6%, 42.0%, and 44.3% for TBLB, brushing smear, brush rinse fluid, and BALF, respectively; p<0.001). The combination of TBLB, brush smear, and BALF provided the greatest diagnostic yield, while brush rinse fluid did not add benefits to the outcomes. R-EBUS-guided bronchoscopy is a useful technique in the diagnosis of PPLs. To achieve the highest diagnostic performance, TBLB, brushing smear and bronchoalveolar lavage should be performed together. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical exam in asymptomatic people drivers the detection of thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Maraka, Spyridoula; Espinosa De Ycaza, Ana E; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Castro, M Regina; Morris, John C; Montori, Victor M; Brito, Juan P

    2016-11-01

    Understanding epidemiology and the factors leading to thyroid nodule diagnosis might help alter the course of the thyroid cancer epidemic. Population-based study using the Rochester Epidemiology Project database between 2003 and 2006. Patients with thyroid nodules who underwent ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy were included. We identified 453 patients with 520 thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration. Patients were mostly women (n: 349, 77 %) with a mean age of 52 (standard deviation 17) years. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules between 2003 and 2006 was 89 (95 % confidence interval, 80-97) per 100,000 person-years; the incidence in women was 130 (95 % confidence interval, 117-144), and for men 43 (95 % confidence interval, 35-52) per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules increased by 42 %, from 68 (95 % confidence interval, 54-82) in 2003 to 97 (95 % confidence interval, 80-113) per 100,000 person-years in 2006. The group with the highest incidence was patients between 70 and 79 years of age, 258 per 100,000 person-years. Most ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules were found in asymptomatic patients (n: 371, 82 %) by physical examination (n: 197, 43 %) or on imaging studies performed for non-thyroid issues (n: 108, 24 %). Women were more likely to have nodules detected by palpation (45 %), whereas imaging and physical examination contributed similarly in men (39 and 38 %). There is a large and rapid increase in the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules, particularly among women and elderly patients which mirrors the trends observed in thyroid cancer. Most thyroid nodules were found in asymptomatic patients as a result of routine physical examination or imaging.

  16. Ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Pagani, C; Coscia, D R; Dellabianca, C; Bonardi, M; Alessi, S; Calliada, F

    2011-12-01

    Breast biopsy consists in the collection of cells or tissue fragments from a breast lesion and their analysis by a pathologist. There are several types of breast biopsy defined on the basis of the type of needle used: fine-needle aspiration and biopsy performed with a spring-based needle. This article focuses on fine-needle aspiration performed under sonographic guidance.It is used mainly to assess cysts that appear to contain vegetations or blood or that are associated with symptoms; lesions and solid nodules that are not unequivocally benign; and axillary lymph nodes that appear suspicious on physical examination and/or sonography.In addition to distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions, ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration also plays an important role in tumor grading and in immunocytochemical identifying specific tumor markers. This article describes the technique used and the possible causes of false negative and false positive findings. Despite its limitations, fine-needle aspiration has become a fundamental tool for the identification and preoperative management of malignant breast lesions.

  17. Esophageal seeding after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of a mediastinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kensuke; Ushio, Jun; Numao, Norikatsu; Tamada, Kiichi; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Kawarai Lefor, Alan; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2017-09-01

    Background and study aims  Tumor seeding after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is rare. A 53-year-old man underwent transesophageal EUS-FNA for diagnosis of a 6-cm mass in the mediastinum as seen by computed tomography (CT). Four weeks later, repeat CT scan revealed a mass in the esophageal wall. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy confirmed a lesion in the mid-esophagus, which was biopsied and found to be consistent with needle tract seeding after EUS-FNA. Tumor seeding in the gastrointestinal wall or peritoneum after EUS-FNA is rare, but may adversely affect the prognosis. Indications for EUS-FNA must be carefully considered.

  18. Comparative cost analysis of endobronchial ultrasound-guided and blind TBNA in the evaluation of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Grove, Daniel A; Bechara, Rabih I; Josephs, Josh S; Berkowitz, David M

    2012-07-01

    The superior accuracy of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) averts many diagnostic surgical procedures. This likely leads to significant cost savings despite an increased per procedure cost. We sought to compare the true costs of endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) compared with "blind" fiberoptic bronchoscopy-transbronchial needle aspiration (FB-TBNA) factoring in the impact of diagnostic surgical procedures in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. In this retrospective case study, we selected 294 patients with thoracic lymphadenopathy as diagnosed by computed tomography at a university hospital. Information was extracted from the electronic record. Costs were determined from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services resource-based relative value scale. We defined a positive diagnosis as one where benign or malignant disease was found. A negative biopsy was one where lymph node sampling was confirmed, but no pathology (benign or malignant) was seen. A nondiagnostic biopsy was one where no pathology was seen and lymph node sampling could not be confirmed. The total cost of endoscopic and surgical diagnostic procedures was tallied for each patient to obtain mean costs per patient. Thirty-seven patients underwent FB-TBNA and 257 underwent EBUS-TBNA. A diagnosis was found in 90% of patients in the EBUS group and 62.2% of patients in the FB-TBNA group (P<0.001). More patients in the FB-TBNA group underwent a diagnostic surgical procedure (HR= -0.1573, 95% confidence interval, -0.30 to -0.15; P<0.001). After accounting for all diagnostic procedures, the mean savings with EBUS was $1071.09 (P=0.09) per patient. EBUS-TBNA is less expensive than blind FB-TBNA in the evaluation of thoracic lymphadenopathy when accounting for diagnostic surgical procedures.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Miniscalpel-Needle Release versus Dry Needling for Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongjun; Shi, Dongping; Wu, Xiaotong; Gu, Minghong; Ai, Zisheng; Tang, Kun; Ye, Le; Wang, Xiangrui

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare ultrasound-guided miniscalpel-needle (UG-MSN) release versus ultrasound-guided dry needling (UG-DN) for chronic neck pain. Methods. A total of 169 patients with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive either UG-MSN release or UG-DN. Before treatment and at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, pain was measured using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Neck function was examined using the neck disability index. Health-related quality of life was examined using the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) of the SF-36 health status scale. Results. Patients in the UG-MSN release had greater improvement on the VAS (by 2 points at 3 months and 0.9 points at 6 months) versus in the UG-DN arm; (both P < 0.0001). Patients receiving UG-MSN release also showed significantly lower scores on the adjusted neck disability index, as well as significantly lower PCS. No severe complications were observed. Conclusion. UG-MSN release was superior to UG-DN in reducing pain intensity and neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain and was not associated with severe complications. The procedural aspects in the two arms were identical; however, we did not verify the blinding success. As such, the results need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:25386218

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Jamil, Laith H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy in the adrenal glands. EUS-FNA with biopsy of suspicious masses in either adrenal gland allows for assessment of these lesions while keeping complications relatively rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity, and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of adrenal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to either decrease unnecessary treatment or guide therapy in cancer patients by aiding in either staging of malignancy or treatment of recurrence.v PMID:27366030

  1. Glomus tumor of the stomach: cytologic diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Debol, Steven M; Stanley, Michael W; Mallery, Shawn; Sawinski, Elizabeth; Bardales, Ricardo H

    2003-06-01

    The glomus tumor is usually a benign solitary neoplasm that arises from modified smooth muscle cells of the glomus body, a type of neuromyoarterial receptor that plays a role in the regulation of arterial blood flow. We report a case of gastric glomus tumor diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration. Smears exhibited groups of cohesive, uniform, small, round to polygonal cells with scant cytoplasm, indistinct cell borders, and round, hyperchromatic nuclei with homogeneous chromatin. The cell block contained fragments of cells with similar morphologic features and immunohistochemical staining exhibited positivity for smooth muscle actin and vimentin. The diagnosis was confirmed by the surgically resected specimen. Ultrastructural examination revealed prominent pinocytotic vesicles lining the plasmalemma. In this report, we discuss the differential diagnosis of gastric glomus tumor and compare the cytologic features of this case with two others reported in the literature. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sural nerve conduction studies using ultrasound-guided needle positioning: Influence of age and recording location.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Olivier; Kihm, Christina; Kamm, Christian Philipp; Rösler, Kai Michael

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare results of orthodromic sural nerve conduction studies (NCS) using ultrasound-guided needle positioning (USNP) to those of surface electrode recordings. Fifty-one healthy subjects, aged 24-80 years, divided into 5 age groups, were examined. Electrical stimuli were applied behind the lateral malleolus. Sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) were recorded 8 and 15 cm proximally with surface and needle electrodes. Mean SNAP amplitudes (surface / needle electrodes) averaged 12.7 (SD 7.6) μV / 40.6 (SD 20.8) μV (P < 0.001) for subjects aged 20-29 years, and 5.0 (SD 2.4) μV / 19.8 (SD 9.8) μV (P < 0.01) for subjects >60 years of age. SNAP amplitudes were smaller at the proximal recording location. NCS using USNP yield higher amplitude responses than surface electrodes in all age groups at all recording sites. SNAP amplitudes are smaller at proximal recording locations due to sural nerve branching. Muscle Nerve 54: 879-882, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A serious game for learning ultrasound-guided needle placement skills.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is a key step in a lot of radiological intervention procedures such as biopsy, local anesthesia and fluid drainage. To help training future intervention radiologists, we develop a serious game to teach the skills involved. We introduce novel techniques for realistic simulation and integrate game elements for active and effective learning. This game is designed in the context of needle placement training based on the some essential characteristics of serious games. Training scenarios are interactively generated via a block-based construction scheme. A novel example-based texture synthesis technique is proposed to simulate corresponding ultrasound images. Game levels are defined based on the difficulties of the generated scenarios. Interactive recommendation of desirable insertion paths is provided during the training as an adaptation mechanism. We also develop a fast physics-based approach to reproduce the shadowing effect of needles in ultrasound images. Game elements such as time-attack tasks, hints and performance evaluation tools are also integrated in our system. Extensive experiments are performed to validate its feasibility for training.

  4. The effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Fatih; Özcan, Osman; Selvi, İsmail; Eraslan, Pınar; Köşüş, Aydın; Baş, Okan; Yıkılmaz, Taha Numan; Güven, Oğuz; Başar, Halil

    2015-11-01

    Several studies evaluating the tolerance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsies showed that moderate-to-severe pain was associated with the procedure. Additionally, prebiopsy anxiety or rebiopsy as a result of a prior biopsy procedure is mentioned as factors predisposing to higher pain intensity. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety. Sixty-four patients presenting for TRUS-guided prostate needle biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either 10-min presurgery hypnosis session (n = 32, mean age 63.5 ± 6.1, p = 0.289) or a presurgery control session (n = 32, mean age 61.8 ± 6.8, p = 0.289). The hypnosis session involved suggestions for increased relaxation and decreased anxiety. Presurgery pain and anxiety were measured using visual analog scales (VAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS), respectively. In our statistics, p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Postintervention, and before surgery, patients in the hypnosis group had significantly lower mean values for presurgery VAS [mean 1 (0-8); p = 0.011], BAI (6.0 vs 2.0; p < 0.001), and HAS (11.0 vs 6.0; p < 0.001). The study results indicate that a brief presurgery hypnosis intervention can be an effective means of controlling presurgical anxiety, and therefore pain, in patients awaiting diagnostic prostate cancer surgery.

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Rendezvous Drainage of Biliary Obstruction Using a New Flexible 19-Gauge Fine Needle Aspiration Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhouwen; Igbinomwanhia, Efehi; Elhanafi, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. A successful endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) biliary drainage is dependent on accurate puncture of the bile duct and precise guide wire manipulation across the ampulla of Vater. We aim to study the feasibility of using a flexible 19-gauge fine aspiration needle in the performance of EUS-RV biliary drainage. Method. This is a retrospective case series of EUS-RV biliary drainage procedures at a single center. Patients who failed ERCP during the same session for benign or malignant biliary obstruction underwent EUS-RV using a flexible, nitinol covered, 19-gauge needle for biliary access and guide wire manipulation. Result. 24 patients underwent EUS-RV biliary drainage via extrahepatic access while 1 attempt was via intrahepatic access. The technical success rate was 80%, including 83.3% of cases via extrahepatic access. There was no significant difference in success rate of inpatient and outpatient procedures, benign or malignant indications, or type of guide wire used. Adverse events included mild pancreatitis (3 patients) and cholangitis (1 patient). Conclusion. A flexible 19-gauge needle for biliary access can be safe and effective when used to perform EUS-RV biliary drainage. Direct comparison between the nitinol needle and conventional metal needles in the performance of EUS guided biliary drainage is needed. PMID:27822005

  6. [Diagnostic value of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for soft tissue tumors].

    PubMed

    Na, Jia; Fang, Zhi-wei; Zhao, Ai-lian; Li, Ji-you

    2013-03-01

    To study the diagnostic value and pitfalls of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) of soft tissue tumors. One hundred and six cases of CNB specimens encountered during the period from 2007 to 2012 were enrolled into the study. The pathologic diagnosis using CNB was compared with that using surgical specimens. Diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Chi-square test, with respect to the histologic pattern (such as spindle cell and myxoid), biologic behavior (benign versus malignant) and immunohistochemical results. The 59 cases of sarcoma were subdivided into three grades according to FNCLCC grading system. Histologic diagnosis could be made in 84.0% (89/106) cases. Thirteen cases were non-diagnostic on CNB. There were 4 cases on CNB showing diagnostic discrepancy with surgical specimens. Four cases of "benign lesions" on CNB found to be myxoid liposarcoma and lipoma-like liposarcoma upon resection. In general, myxoid pattern (9/17) seen on CNB showed less diagnostic correlation with surgical specimens, as compared to spindle cell and other histologic patterns (P < 0.01). The rate of diagnostic correlation was 79.7% (49/59) for the 59 cases of sarcoma studied, with grade 2 and grade 3 sarcoma showing better correlation (in contrast to 7/17 for grade 1 sarcoma) (P < 0.01). Comparative analysis showed no significant difference between benign/borderline tumors and sarcomas. The application of immunohistochemical study did not result in significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy on CNB. Ultrasound-guided CNB is a reliable tool in pathologic diagnosis of soft tissue tumors and shows a high accuracy rate especially for high-grade sarcoma. Tumors with myxoid pattern, lipomatous tumors and grade 1 sarcomas are associated with lower diagnostic accuracy on CNB. Correlation with clinicoradiologic findings would also be helpful in diagnostic evaluation and surgical planning.

  7. Ultrasound-guided dry needling with percutaneous paratenon decompression for chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Andrea; Kendall, Namita; Jayaraman, Sunderarajan

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury. There are several modalities of treatment, reflecting difficulties in management. In particular, due to the well-recognised surgical morbidity, treatment has steered towards less invasive routes. Previous studies have targeted pathology either inside or outside the tendon in isolation with varying results. This study aimed to target both pathological sites by combining dry needling with percutaneous hydrostatic decompression as a novel treatment. Twenty-one patients with 26 chronic, non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were prospectively enrolled. Ultrasound-guided dry needling of neovascular areas and small-volume hydrostatic paratenon decompression was performed 6-weekly. Sonographic assessment of tendon thickness and neovascularity was undertaken. Following treatment, a standardised physiotherapy regime was adopted. Visual analogue scores (VAS) were used as the primary outcome measure. Telephonic interviews were carried out 12 and 24 months post-treatment. Twenty-four tendons (in 19 patients) were successfully treated. The mean treatment session was 2. There was no significant change in neovascularity or tendon thickness. Therapeutic intervention led to a significant improvement in VAS at rest (42.4 ± 24.4 vs. 18.4 ± 26.0, p = 0.0005) and during activity (72.8 ± 16.0 vs. 33.7 ± 23.2, p < 0.0001). At 12 and 24 months, >75 % of patients were highly satisfied with their outcome with nearly half reporting complete resolution of their symptoms. >85 % were also able to return to their sporting interests. Combined therapy of dry needling with percutaneous hydrostatic paratenon decompression under ultrasound guidance is a well-tolerated procedure with good short- and long-term pain and functional outcomes. Prospective case series, Level IV.

  8. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous splenic biopsy using an 18-G core biopsy needle: our experience with 52 cases

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, Gemma; Tung, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The spleen is more commonly affected in multiorgan disease, but alternative sites are selected for biopsy owing to perceived haemorrhage risk. If these sites are inaccessible or, less commonly, the spleen is the only disease site, then splenic biopsy is considered, with most studies using a 20- to 22-G needle. The primary aim of biopsy is to exclude underlying malignancy or to obtain histological analysis in known malignancy, usually lymphoma, when reclassification is required for therapy. We present, to our knowledge, the largest series of 18-G ultrasound-guided splenic core needle biopsy assessing diagnostic and complication rates. Methods: All ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy cases from May 1990 to May 2015 were identified on the radiology information system. Histological diagnosis and complications were identified from laboratory reports, case notes and discharge summaries to assess diagnostic positive and complication rates. Haemorrhages requiring transfusion, embolization or splenectomy, pneumothorax, other significant intra-abdominal injury or death are classified as major complications, whilst conservative haemorrhage management is considered a minor complication. Results: A total of 52 splenic biopsies were performed in 47 patients. A positive diagnostic yield for all biopsies was 90.4%. The major and minor complication rates were 0% and 1.9% (1/52), respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided 18-G splenic biopsy is a safe and accurate procedure with no added risk of complications when compared with smaller needles or biopsy of other abdominal organs. Advances in knowledge: This is the largest case series of ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy with an 18-G needle, and our experience confirms a high diagnostic yield and a complication rate which compares favourably with the biopsy of other abdominal organs. PMID:26337505

  9. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration of non‐pancreatic lesions: an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Dipti; Barroeta, Julieta E; Gupta, Prabodh K; Kochman, Michael; Baloch, Zubair W

    2007-01-01

    Background Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS‐FNA) has proven to be an effective diagnostic modality for the detection and staging of pancreatic malignancies. In recent years EUS‐FNA has also been used to diagnose lesions of non‐pancreatic sites such as structures in close proximity to the gut wall within the mediastinum, abdomen, pelvis and retro‐peritoneum. Aims To evaluate experience with EUS‐FNA of non‐pancreatic sites at a large university medical centre. Methods The study cohort included 234 patients who underwent EUS‐FNA of 246 lesions in non‐pancreatic sites (122 peri‐pancreatic and coeliac lymph nodes; 9 peri‐pancreatic masses; other sites: mediastinum 12, gastric 25, liver 27, oesophagus 17, duodenum/colon/rectum 15, retro‐peritoneum 8, lung 7, miscellaneous 4). Results The cytology diagnoses were classified as non‐neoplastic/reactive in 82 (33%), atypical/suspicious for malignancy in 25 (10%), malignant in 86 (35%) and non‐diagnostic in 53 (22%) cases. Surgical pathology follow‐up was available in 75 (31%) cases. Excluding the non‐diagnostic cases there were 7 false negative and 3 false positive cases. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of EUS‐FNA in the diagnosis of lesions of non‐pancreatic sites was 92%, 98% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions EUS‐FNA can be effectively used as a diagnostic modality in the diagnosis of lesions from non‐pancreatic sites. PMID:17220205

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of the Adrenal Glands: Analysis of 21 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Choudhary, Narendra S.; Kotecha, Hardik; Misra, Smruti Ranjan; Bhagat, Suraj; Paliwal, Manish; Madan, Kaushal; Saraf, Neeraj; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Sud, Randhir

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology of adrenal masses helps in etiological diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA of adrenal masses in cases where other imaging methods failed and/or were not feasible. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with adrenal masses, in whom adrenal FNA was performed because conventional imaging modalities failed and/or were not feasible, were prospectively evaluated over a period of 3 years. Results Of the 21 patients (mean age, 56±12.2 years; male:female ratio, 2:1), 12 had pyrexia of unknown origin and the other nine underwent evaluation for metastasis. The median lesion size was 2.4×1.6 cm. Ten patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis (shown by the presence of caseating granulomas [n=10] and acid-fast bacilli [n=4]). Two patients had EUS-FNA results suggestive of histoplasmosis. The other patients had metastatic lung carcinoma (n=6), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), and adrenal lipoma (n=1) and adrenal myelolipoma (n=1). EUS results were not suggestive of any particular etiology. No procedure-related adverse events occurred. Conclusions EUS-FNA is a safe and effective method for evaluating adrenal masses, and it yields diagnosis in cases where tissue diagnosis is impossible or has failed using conventional imaging modalities. PMID:25844346

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration core biopsy: comparison between an automatic biopsy device and two conventional needle systems.

    PubMed

    Ardengh, José Celso; Paulo, Gustavo Andrade de; Nakao, Frank Shigueo; Venco, Filadélfio; Santo, Giulio Cesare; Geocze, Stephan

    2008-06-01

    endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) allows cytologic and/or histologic diagnosis of lesions within or adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract. However, the amount of tissue obtained with a regular 22 gauge needle is not always satisfactory. With the development of a needle XNA-10J-KB (Shot-Gun) that resembles the automatic liver biopsy needle, it is expected that significant samples be obtained more frequently (core biopsy), optimizing histological analysis. to compare samples obtained with EUS-FNA using 3 different needle systems: GIP, NA-10J-1 and Shot-Gun. 19 patients underwent EUS-FNA for diagnosis (5) or tumor staging (14). Mean age was 58.9 years (range 27-82), being 50% men. All patients were submitted to EUS-FNA with the 3 needle models. The Shot-Gun model was "shot" when its tip was near the target inside the lesion, followed by aspiration. Samples were submitted for cytologic and histologic examination. mean lesion size was 3.0 cm (range 0.8-5.5 cm). Final diagnoses were made after surgery or intra-operative biopsy: 13 pancreatic tumors (12 adenocarcinomas and 1 neuroendocrine tumor), 4 chronic pancreatitis, 1 acute pancreatitis, and 1 cholangiocarcinoma. Specimens adequate for cytologic diagnosis were obtained in 13/19 (68. 4%) patients using GIP model, in 14/19 (73.7%) with NA10J-1 model, and in 17/19 (89.5%) with ShotGun, model (p=0.039). Histologic analysis was possible in 10/19 (52.6%) patients using the GIP model, in 14/19 (73.7%) with NA10J-1, and in 17/19 (89.5%) with Shot-Gun, model (p=0.005). Adequate samples for cytologic or histologic assessment in 16/19 (84.2%) patients using the GIP model, in 17/19 (89.5%) with NA10J-1, and in 18/19 (94.7%) with Shot-Gun, model (p=0.223). In two cases biopsies were negative due to very hard tumors. the Shot-Gun needle obtained better samples for histological diagnosis than NA10J-1 needle and GIP.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in solid pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Marc; Caillol, Fabrice; Monges, Geneviève; Poizat, Flora; Lemaistre, Anne-Isabelle; Pujol, Bertrand; Lucidarme, Damien; Palazzo, Laurent; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is currently suboptimal in centers that are not equipped with rapid on-site evaluation. Needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) enables real-time in vivo microscopic imaging during endoscopy. This study aimed to describe nCLE interpretation criteria for the characterization of pancreatic masses, with histopathological correlation, and to perform the first validation of these criteria. A total of 40 patients were evaluated by EUS-FNA combined with nCLE for the diagnosis of pancreatic masses. Final diagnosis was based on EUS-FNA histology and follow-up at 1 year. Five unblinded examiners defined nCLE criteria for adenocarcinoma, chronic pancreatitis, and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) using a set of video sequences from 14 patients with confirmed pathology (Step 1). These criteria were retrospectively validated by four independent, blinded examiners using sequences from 32 patients (Step 2). nCLE criteria were described for adenocarcinoma (dark cell aggregates, irregular vessels with leakages of fluorescein), chronic pancreatitis (residual regular glandular pancreatic structures), and NET (black cell aggregates surrounded by vessels and fibrotic areas). These criteria correlated with the histological features of the corresponding lesions. In the validation review, a conclusive nCLE result was obtained in 75 % of cases (96 % correct). Statistical evaluation provided promising results, with high specificity, and negative and positive predictive values for all types of pancreatic masses. Considering the low negative predictive value of EUS-FNA, nCLE could help to rule out malignancy after a previous inconclusive EUS-FNA. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings and to establish the role of nCLE in the diagnosis of pancreatic masses. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01563133). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Lean Six Sigma Applied to Ultrasound Guided Needle Biopsy in the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Matt, Bruce H; Woodward-Hagg, Heather K; Wade, Christopher L; Butler, Penny D; Kokoska, Mimi S

    2014-07-01

    (1) Confirm the positive value stream of office-based ultrasound using Lean Six Sigma; (2) demonstrate how ultrasound reduces time to diagnosis, costs, patient inconvenience and travel, exposure to ionizing radiation, intravenous contrast, and laboratory tests. Case series with historical controls using chart review. Tertiary Veterans Administration Hospital (university-affiliated). Patients with a consult request or decision for ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) from 2006 to 2012. Process evaluation using Lean Six Sigma methodologies; years study conducted: 2006-2012; outcome measurements: type of diagnostic tests and imaging studies including CT scans with associated radiation exposure, time to preliminary and final cytopathologic diagnosis, episodes of patient travel. Value stream mapping prior to and after implementing office-based ultrasound confirmed the time from consult request or decision for USFNA to completion of the USFNA was reduced from a range of 0 to 286 days requiring a maximum 17 steps to a range of 0 to 48 days, necessitating only a maximum of 9 steps. Office-based USFNA for evaluation of head and neck lesions reduced costs, time to diagnosis, risks and inconvenience to patients, radiation exposure, unnecessary laboratory, and patient complaints while increasing staff satisfaction. In addition, office-based ultrasound also changed the clinical management of specific patients. Lean Six Sigma reduces waste and optimizes quality and accuracy in manufacturing. This is the first known application of Lean Six Sigma to office-based USFNA in the evaluation of head and neck lesions. The literature supports the value of office-based ultrasound to patients and health care systems. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  15. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  16. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of gallbladder lesions: a study of 596 cases.

    PubMed

    Rana, C; Krishnani, N; Kumari, N

    2016-12-01

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is not a commonly performed procedure for gallbladder lesions for fear of causing biliary peritonitis; hence data on gallbladder cytology is scarce. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the diagnostic application of ultrasound-guided (US) FNA cytology in the pre-operative diagnosis of neoplastic as well as non-neoplastic lesions of the gallbladder and to review the cytomorphological spectrum of gallbladder lesions encountered along with various diagnostic difficulties that can arise during reporting. The study was carried out on 596 patients with gallbladder lesions in whom US-guided FNA was performed over a 5-year period. In 130 cases, simultaneous aspirations from other organs were done. The histological correlation was available in 32 cases. No major complications such as haemorrhage, peritonitis, etc. were encountered related to the procedure. The majority were mass lesions whereas in 73 cases (12.2%) only focal or diffuse gallbladder wall thickening was present. Cytological examination of 596 cases revealed malignancy in 462 (77.6%), 26 (4.4%) suspicious of malignancy, 23 (3.8%) inflammatory lesion, 29 negative (4.8%) and 56 cases showed necrosis only or were inadequate for any definite opinion. The lesions diagnosed on FNA cytology included carcinoma (predominantly adenocarcinoma), xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC), acute suppurative inflammation and tuberculosis. Of 26 with adequate cytology, 24 were accurate with respect to malignant (including one suspicious FNA) versus benign: one false positive and one false negative both involved xanthogranulomatous change. The present study is the largest series evaluating the role of US-guided FNA in the diagnosis of gallbladder lesions. It is a safe, rapid, reliable, cost-effective and reasonably accurate method for diagnosing gallbladder lesions. FNA should always be attempted in cases with a mass lesion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery.

  18. A new needle on the block: EchoTip ProCore endobronchial ultrasound needle

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, H Erhan; Andrade, Rafael; Zamora, Felix; Podgaetz, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound has become the first choice standard of care procedure to diagnose benign or malignant lesions involving mediastinum and lung parenchyma adjacent to the airways owing to its characteristics of being real-time and minimally invasive. Although the incidence of lung cancer has been decreasing, it is and will be the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the next few decades. When compared to other cancers, lung cancer kills more females than breast and colon cancers combined and more males than colon and prostate cancers combined. The type of lung cancer has changed in recent decades and adenocarcinoma has become the most frequent cell type. Prognosis of lung cancer depends upon the cell type and the staging at the time of diagnosis. The cell type and molecular characteristics of adenocarcinoma may allow individualized targeted treatment. Other malignant conditions in the mediastinum and lung (eg, metastatic lung cancers and lymphoma) can be biopsied using endobronchial ultrasound needles. Endobronchial ultrasound needle biopsies provides mostly cytology specimens due to its small sizes of needles (22 gauge or larger) which may not give enough tissue to make a definitive diagnosis in malignant (eg, lymphoma) or benign conditions (eg, sarcoidosis). EchoTip ProCore endobronchial needle released in early 2014 provides histologic biopsy material. Larger tissue biopsies may potentially provide a higher diagnostic yield and it eliminates mediastinoscopy or other surgical interventions. Here we aim to review bronchoscopic approach in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions with emphasis of EchoTip ProCore needles. PMID:27099535

  19. Preoperative Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Ovarian Lesions- Is It a Rapid and Effective Diagnostic Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saikat; Chaudhuri, Snehamay; Paul, Prabir Chandra; Khandakar, Binny; Mandal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The deep seated ovarian lesions unapproachable by unguided aspiration cytology were easily done under ultrasound guidance. It gave a before hand cytological diagnosis of the lesion to the surgeon determining the modality of treatment for the patient. Aim To find the diagnostic accuracy of the method of ultrasound guided cytological assessment of ovarian lesion. Materials and Methods The study was conducted as a prospective observational study over a period of one year, in hospital setting, where ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration had been used to aspirate ovarian lesions, giving a rapid cytological diagnosis. In 43 sample cases, aspiration of fluid done from ovarian lesions were followed by cyto-centrifugation and staining by May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG) and Papanicolaou (Pap) stain providing a cytological opinion regarding benign/malignant nature of the lesion and further categorization. Later the cytological diagnosis was compared with final histopathological diagnosis, taking it as a gold standard. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound guided aspiration and cytological analysis were high, 96%, 76.92% and 89.47% respectively as calculated by comparing the cytological diagnosis with histological diagnosis, taking it as gold standard. Conclusion This method has evolved as a highly sensitive, rapid, simple and effective modality for screening and as well as accurate preoperative diagnosis of ovarian lesions. PMID:27134878

  20. Comparison on the use of semi-automated and automated core biopsy needle in ultrasound guided breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, R; Yunos, S M; Aziz, S; Hussain, R I; Alhabshi, S M; Suria Hayati, M P; Saladina, J J; Zulfiqar, M A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the use of semi-automated (Medax Velox 2; Poggio Rusco, Italy) and automated (Bard Magnum Biopsy Instrument; Covington, GA, USA) core biopsy needles, for ultrasound guided breast biopsy. A 14G semi-automatic spring loaded core biopsy needle with a 22-mm-throw (Medax Velox 2; Poggio Rusco, Italy) and 14-gauge automated needle device with a 22-mm-throw biopsy gun (Bard-Magnum Biopsy Instrument, Covington, GA, USA) were used for breast biopsies under ultrasound guidance on alternate months during the study period between July 2009 and May 2011. One hundred and sixty lesions were biopsied and specimens were sent for histological evaluation. The automated needle obtained a higher number of histology reports at 84% (67/80) as compared with the semiautomated needle at 60% (48/80) (Fisher exact test, p value=0.023). Inadequate samples with the automated needle were much less at 9% (7/60) than with the semiautomated needle at 23% (18/60) (Fisher exact test, p value=0.028). The semi-automated needle showed slightly less fragmented samples. However, the number of fragmented samples with definitive diagnosis was slightly higher with the automated compared with the semiautomated needle, at 16% (13/80) and 13% (10/80) respectively. Compared with histology of 29 lesions that were excised, the semi-automated needle had higher sensitivity (100%) but lower specificity (75%) and accuracy (90%) compared with the automated needle (88% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 95% accuracy). Definitive diagnosis from the study samples slightly favours the use of automated core biopsy needle as compared to semi-automated core biopsy needle.

  1. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future. PMID:26087785

  2. Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. PMID:28246516

  3. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an accurate technique for sampling the pancreas and mediastinum; however, limited data are available for other mass lesions. The aim of this study was to explore the value of EUS-FNA in the differential diagnosis of all mass lesions. Data from patients who underwent EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of mass lesions, including pancreatic, mediastinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The accuracy was calculated by comparing the results of FNA with the results of pathological examination or follow-up surveillances in non-operated cases. A total of 150 cases were included. The location of the mass varied from the pancreas (n=62) to the mediastinum (n=29), gastrointestinal tract (n=36), celiac cavity and retroperitoneum (n=23). The sensitivity and Youdens index of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of all lesions were 92.97% and 0.93 respectively. The accuracy of diagnosis of pancreatic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions was 85.48, 89.66, 83.33 and 78.23%, respectively. Masses were categorized into parenchymal organs (n=66), luminal organs (n=36) and enlarged lymph nodes (n=33). Lesions in parenchymal organs were likely to be bigger than those in luminal organs (P=0.03) and enlarged lymph nodes (P=0.01). For solid and cystic masses, which constituted 63.3 and 14.7% of the total masses, no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed (P=0.56); however, lesion sizes were significantly different between these two groups (P=0.04) and the majority of cystic masses were identified in women (P=0.03). Malignant lesions were more common in older (P=0.01) and male (P=0.03) patients. In conclusion, EUS-FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of unexplained mass lesions; it influences the management of patients by enabling the appropriate treatment to be identified. PMID:27446324

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-07-14

    To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly higher in the MRS-3 patient

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. METHODS: A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. RESULTS: A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly

  6. Cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation- and ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ahmet Selçuk

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to perform a cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies (P-FNA) and ultrasound-guided thyroid FNA biopsies (USG-FNA). Methods Each nodule was considered as a case. Diagnostic steps were history and physical examination, TSH measurement, Tc99m thyroid scintigraphy for nodules with a low TSH level, initial P-FNA versus initial USG-FNA, repeat USG-FNA for nodules with initial inadequate P-FNA or USG-FNA, hemithyroidectomy for inadequate repeat USG-FNA. American Thyroid Association thyroid nodule management guidelines were simulated in estimating the cost of P-FNA strategy. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines were simulated for USG-FNA strategy. Total costs were estimated by adding the cost of each diagnostic step to reach a diagnosis for 100 nodules. Strategy cost was found by dividing the total cost to 100. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated by dividing the difference between strategy cost of USG-FNA and P-FNA to the difference between accuracy of USG-FNA and P-FNA. A positive ICER indicates more and a negative ICER indicates less expense to achieve one more additional accurate diagnosis of thyroid cancer for USG-FNA. Results Seventy-eight P-FNAs and 190 USG-FNAs were performed between April 2003 and May 2008. There were no differences in age, gender, thyroid function, frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule location and diameter (median nodule diameter: 18.4 mm in P-FNA and 17.0 mm in USG-FNA) between groups. Cytology results in P-FNA versus USG-FNA groups were as follows: benign 49% versus 62% (p = 0.04), inadequate 42% versus 29% (p = 0.03), malignant 3% (p = 1.00) and indeterminate 6% (p = 0.78) for both. Eleven nodules from P-FNA and 18 from USG-FNA group underwent surgery. The accuracy of P-FNA was 0.64 and USG-FNA 0.72. Unit cost of P-FNA was 148 Euros and USG-FNA 226 Euros. The cost of P-FNA strategy was 534 Euros and USG

  7. Cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation- and ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Can, Ahmet Selçuk

    2009-05-16

    The aim of this study is to perform a cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies (P-FNA) and ultrasound-guided thyroid FNA biopsies (USG-FNA). Each nodule was considered as a case. Diagnostic steps were history and physical examination, TSH measurement, Tc99m thyroid scintigraphy for nodules with a low TSH level, initial P-FNA versus initial USG-FNA, repeat USG-FNA for nodules with initial inadequate P-FNA or USG-FNA, hemithyroidectomy for inadequate repeat USG-FNA. American Thyroid Association thyroid nodule management guidelines were simulated in estimating the cost of P-FNA strategy. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines were simulated for USG-FNA strategy. Total costs were estimated by adding the cost of each diagnostic step to reach a diagnosis for 100 nodules. Strategy cost was found by dividing the total cost to 100. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated by dividing the difference between strategy cost of USG-FNA and P-FNA to the difference between accuracy of USG-FNA and P-FNA. A positive ICER indicates more and a negative ICER indicates less expense to achieve one more additional accurate diagnosis of thyroid cancer for USG-FNA. Seventy-eight P-FNAs and 190 USG-FNAs were performed between April 2003 and May 2008. There were no differences in age, gender, thyroid function, frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule location and diameter (median nodule diameter: 18.4 mm in P-FNA and 17.0 mm in USG-FNA) between groups. Cytology results in P-FNA versus USG-FNA groups were as follows: benign 49% versus 62% (p = 0.04), inadequate 42% versus 29% (p = 0.03), malignant 3% (p = 1.00) and indeterminate 6% (p = 0.78) for both. Eleven nodules from P-FNA and 18 from USG-FNA group underwent surgery. The accuracy of P-FNA was 0.64 and USG-FNA 0.72. Unit cost of P-FNA was 148 Euros and USG-FNA 226 Euros. The cost of P-FNA strategy was 534 Euros and USG-FNA strategy 523 Euros

  8. Endotracheal tuberculous granuloma formation following endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Woo-Jin; Park, Chan-Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Choi, Yoo-Duk

    2013-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a useful and safe diagnostic test. We herein report a case of endotracheal granuloma formation that occurred after EBUS-TBNA in a 73-year-old woman. The patient was admitted due to coughing and dyspnea after 70 days of antituberculous therapy for mediastinal lymphadenitis. Computed tomography revealed decreases in the size of the lymph nodes with a new mass protruding into the tracheal lumen. The mass originated from the right paratracheal area, which was a previous puncture site. This case suggests that clinicians should pay attention to complications because tuberculosis can produce new granulomas via the sinus tract after EBUS-TBNA.

  9. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  10. [Significance of ultrasound and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for the detection of laryngeal occult metastases].

    PubMed

    Cvorović, Ljiljana; Milutinović, Zoran; Strbac, Mile; Pavićević, Ljubomir; Racić, Alek J

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate ultrasound criteria based on a node size, shape, vascularity and cytology findings with respect to their value for the comparative determination of metastatic lymph nodes in laryngeal carcinoma. A prospective study included 30 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma without node enlargement on computerized tomography, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, the University Hospital, Zemun. Thirty-six neck lymph nodes were evaluated sonographically and aspirated with an ultrasound-guided fine-needle. They were examined cytologically and/or histopathologically and compared to the sonographic assessment of their malignancy. Of the 36 neck lymph nodes evaluated cytologically, the 13 were found to be with a metastatic deposit. The assessment of a lymph node malignancy using the parameter of size had the senzitivity of 84%, the specificity of 70%, and the reliability of 75%. Using the criteria of a lymph node shape for the assessment of malignancy, the sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 65%, and the reliability of 64% were achieved. The evaluation of a lymph node vascularity by the use of the effect of Doppler showed the sensitivity of 69%, the specificity of 95%, and the reliability of 86%. Ultrasound and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration citology should be always used for the preoperative staging and for the postoperative follow-up of the status of the neck with cancer of the larynx becouse of their high accuracy, availability and semiinvasivity, and in order to enhance the reliability of the evaluation of the malignant disease progression.

  11. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulakci, Mesut; Ilhan, Mehmet; Bademler, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Erdem; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bayraktar, Adem; Asik, Murat; Guloglu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:27101838

  12. A novel, stepwise approach combining conventional and endobronchial ultrasound needle aspiration for mediastinal lymph node sampling.

    PubMed

    Liran, Levy; Rottem, Kuint; Gregorio, Fridlender Zvi; Avi, Abutbul; Neville, Berkman

    2017-09-07

    Since the introduction of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), most pulmonary centers use this technique exclusively for mediastinal lymph node (LN) sampling. Conventional "blind" TBNA (cTBNA), however, is cheaper, more accessible, provides more tissue, and requires less training. We evaluated whether sampling of mediastinal LN using EBUS-TBNA or cTBNA according to a predefined set of criteria provides acceptable diagnostic yield. Sampling method was determined prospectively according to a predefined set of criteria based on LN station, LN size, and presumed diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive value were evaluated for each modality. One hundred and eighty-six biopsies were carried out over a 3-year period (86 cTBNA, 100 EBUS-TBNA). Seventy-seven percent of LN biopsied by EBUS-TBNA were <20 mm, while 83% of cTBNA biopsies were ≥20 mm. Most common sites of cTBNA sampling were station 7, 4R, and 11R as opposed to 7, 11R, 4R, and 4 L in the case of EBUS-TBNA. Most common EBUS-TBNA diagnosis was malignancy versus sarcoidosis in cTBNA. EBUS-TBNA and cTBNA both had a true positive yield of 65%, but EBUS-TBNA had a higher true negative rate (21% vs. 2% for cTBNA) and a lower false negative rate (7% vs. 28%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for EBUS-TBNA were 90%, 100%, 100%, and 75%, respectively, and for cTBNA were 68%, 100%, 100%, and 7%, respectively. A stepwise approach based on LN size, station, and presumed diagnosis may be a reasonable, cost-effective approach in choosing between cTBNA and EBUS-TBNA.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in the Neck Region Using an Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Naoki; Tsunoda, Mayumi; Mitsuhashi, Masatsugu; Okubo, Keisuke; Takeshima, Taro; Sehara, Yoshihide; Nagai, Mutsumi; Kawai, Kensuke

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of an optical see-through head-mounted display (OST-HMD) to improve ergonomics during ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in the neck region. This randomized controlled study compared an OST-HMD with a normal ultrasound monitor during an ultrasound-guided FNA in the neck region. Patients with a neck tumor were recruited and randomized into one of two groups. Two practitioners performed ultrasound-guided FNA with or without the HMD, as indicated. An independent researcher measured the procedure time, the number and time of head movements, as well as the number of needle redirections. In addition, practitioners completed questionnaires after performing the FNA on each patient. In 93% of the sessions with the OST-HMD, practitioners performed ultrasound-guided FNA without turning the patients' heads. There was no difference in procedural time and number of needle redirections between the two groups. Results from the questionnaire revealed not only good wearability and low fatigue, but also the practitioners' preference for the HMD. The OST-HMD improved the practitioners' ergonomics and can be adopted for performing ultrasound-guided interventional procedures in clinical settings. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. [Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Needle Aspiration of a Lung Cyst and Eosinophilic Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Avsar, K; Behr, J; Lindner, M; Morresi-Hauf, A

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a young male patient with a solitary pulmonary echinococcus cyst. The diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis is based on clinical findings, imaging and serology. In the setting of lung cysts the diagnosis can be difficult, particularly as the sensitivity of the serologic tests is lower compared to liver cysts. Bronchoscopic ultrasound of the cystic lesion and respectively the analysis of the cyst aspirate can lead to the diagnosis. In the present case an eosinophilic pneumonia as the result of the puncture has to be discussed.

  15. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy and Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration for Solid Pancreatic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sur, Young Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Young Bae

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) using a 25-gauge needle and ultrasound (US)-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) using an 18-gauge core needle for diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. This retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Patients who underwent either EUS-guided FNA or US-guided CNB for a solid pancreatic lesion from January 2008 to December 2012 were included and reviewed. Fine-needle aspirations and CNBs were performed by experienced endoscopists and radiologists. The diagnostic yield, accuracy, technical failure rate, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy were calculated and compared. A total of 106 biopsy attempts were undertaken in 89 patients (EUS-guided FNA, n = 70; US-guided CNB, n = 36). Biopsy specimens were successfully obtained in 98 biopsy attempts (EUS-guided FNA, n = 63; US-guided CNB, n = 35). The accuracy, technical failure rate, sensitivity, and specificity of EUS-guided FNA for malignancy (73.02%, 10.00%, 77.78%, and 44.44%, respectively) was not significantly different from those of US-guided CNB (88.57%, 2.78%, 87.10%, and 100%, respectively; P ≥ .089). Diagnostic performance did not differ between the modalities according to the size and the location of the lesion in the pancreas. However, the diagnostic yield of US-guided CNB (86.11%) was higher than that of EUS-guided FNA (65.71%, P = .035). The diagnostic yield of US-guided CNB for solid pancreatic lesions is superior to that of EUS-guided FNA. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Design and Production of an Articulating Needle Guide for Ultrasound-Guided Needle Block Manufactured With a Three-Dimensional Printer: Technical Communication.

    PubMed

    Bigeleisen, Paul E

    2017-05-15

    Needle guides may allow the practitioner to align the needle with the probe when ultrasound-guided nerve block is performed. The author's goal was to design and fabricate an inexpensive ($1.90), disposable, needle guide that could articulate over a range from 85 degrees to 0 degrees with a three-dimension printer. Three-dimensional representations of an L50, L25, and C 60 ultrasound probe (Sono Site, Bothell, WA) were created using a laser scanner. Computer-aided design software (Solid Works, Waltham, MA) was used to design a needle bracket and needle guide to attach to these probes. A three-dimensional printer was used to fabricate the needle bracket and guide with acrylonitrile polybutadiene polystyrene. An echogenic needle was held in plane with the needle guide. The author performed a supraclavicular block in a morbidly obese patient. The needle was easily visualized. Similar guides that are commercially available cost as much as $400. A knowledge of computer-aided design is necessary for this work.

  17. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology.

  18. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K.; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. Methods This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. Results One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). Conclusions As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology. PMID:25232713

  19. Modeling, Production, and Testing of an Echogenic Needle for Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Bigeleisen, Paul E; Hess, Aaron; Zhu, Richard; Krediet, Annelot

    2016-06-01

    We have designed, produced, and tested an echogenic needle based on a sawtooth pattern where the height of the tooth was 1.25 times the wavelength of the ultrasound transducer. A numeric solution to the time-independent wave equation (Helmholtz equation) was used to create a model of backscattering from a needle. A 21-gauge stainless steel prototype was manufactured and tested in a water bath. Backscattering from the needle was compared to theoretical predications from our model. Based on these results, an 18-gauge prototype needle was fabricated from stainless steel and tested in a pig cadaver. This needle was compared to a commercial 18-gauge echogenic needle (Pajunk Medical Systems, Tucker, GA) by measuring the brightness of the needle relative to the background of sonograms of a needle in a pig cadaver. The backscattering from the 21-gauge prototype needle reproduced the qualitative predictions of our model. At 30° and 45° of insonation, our prototype performed equivalently to the Pajunk needle. At 60°, our prototype was significantly brighter than the Pajunk needle (P = .017). In conclusion, we chose a model for the design of an echogenic needle and modeled it on the basis of a solution to the Helmholtz equation. A prototype needle was tested in a water bath and compared to the model prediction. After verification of our model, we designed an 18-gauge needle, which performed better than an existing echogenic needle (Pajunk) at 60° of insonation. Our needle will require further testing in human trials.

  20. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses.

    PubMed

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-10-21

    To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle.

  1. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Padda, Manmeet S; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R

    2010-09-28

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas.

  2. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J.; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas. PMID:21060710

  3. Ultrasound-Guided, Percutaneous Needle Fascial Fenestration for the Treatment of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-03-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) involves a painful increase in compartment pressure caused by exercise and relieved by rest. The most common site for CECS in the lower extremity is the anterior leg compartment. We report a case of a collegiate athlete with bilateral anterior and lateral leg compartment CECS who was successfully treated with an ultrasound-guided, percutaneous needle fascial fenestration of the affected compartments in both legs and was able to return to full, unrestricted activity within 1 week of the procedure. This case highlights the potential application of this procedure for the treatment of anterior and lateral leg CECS. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Slow pull versus suction in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid masses.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Chang, Kenneth J; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Uchino, Rie; Mizuno, Suguru; Miyabayashi, Koji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hirano, Kenji; Tanaka, Mariko; Tada, Minoru; Fukayama, Masashi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses is an established procedure for obtaining a pathological specimen. However, application of suction during EUS-FNA is still controversial and the efficacy of the slow-pull technique was recently reported for new core biopsy needles. The purpose of this study was to compare the suction and slow-pull techniques using regular FNA needles. The diagnostic yield of the suction and slow-pull techniques was retrospectively studied for patients who underwent EUS-FNA for pancreatic solid lesions. A total of 367 passes (181 by suction and 186 by the slow-pull technique) were performed during 97 EUS-FNA procedures for 93 patients with pancreatic solid lesions. The slow-pull technique resulted in lower scores for cellularity (≥2 for 37.5 % vs. 76.7 %) but scores for contamination with blood were lower (≥2 for 25.0 % vs. 66.7 %) and sensitivity of diagnosis of malignancy was higher (90.0 % vs. 67.9 %) when a 25-gauge FNA needle was used. There were no significant differences between the two techniques when a 22-gauge needle was used. In multivariate analysis of 82 cases with malignancy, the slow-pull technique (odds ratio (OR) 1.92, P = 0.028), tumor size ≥25 mm (OR 4.64, P < 0.001), and tumor location in the body or tail (OR 2.82, P < 0.001) were associated with greater sensitivity. The slow-pull technique was associated with less contamination with blood and can potentially increase the diagnostic yield compared with the suction technique in EUS-FNA of pancreatic solid masses, especially with a 25-gauge FNA needle.

  5. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  6. [Pain during transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate: comparison of the use or not of lidocaine gel].

    PubMed

    Díaz Pérez, Gilmer A; Meza Montoya, Luis; Morante Deza, Carlos; Pow-Sang Godoy, Mariela; Destefano Urrutia, Víctor

    2009-02-01

    The prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound is the method of choice for early diagnosis of prostate cancer, is a safe whose main trouble is that it feels discomfort during the procedure. From July 2004 until March 2005 we prospectively studied 114 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate, they were divided in two groups: in one group we used lidocaina gel 2% inside the rectum before the procedure and in the other group we did not use it. We compared the pain that patients felt during the procedure with a pain scale. We did not find differences between both groups, but the patients in whom we used a new needle felt less pain than the patients in whom we used a re-esterilized one. The use of lidocaine gel intrarectal 2% before a prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound did not diminish the sensation of pain from the procedure in our patients, which was increased by the use of sterilized needles.

  7. Biomechanics-Based Curvature Estimation for Ultrasound-guided Flexible Needle Steering in Biological Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-08-01

    Needle-based procedures are commonly performed during minimally invasive surgery for treatment and diagnosis. Accurate needle tip placement is important for the success of the procedures. Misplacement of the needle tip might cause unsuccessful treatment or misdiagnosis. Robot-assisted needle insertion systems have been developed in order to steer flexible bevel-tipped needles. However, current systems depend on the information of maximum needle curvature, which is estimated by performing prior insertions. This work presents a new three-dimensional flexible needle steering system which integrates an optimal steering control, ultrasound-based needle tracking system, needle deflection model, online needle curvature estimation and offline curvature estimation based on biomechanics properties. The online and the offline curvature estimations are used to update the steering control in real time. The system is evaluated by experiments in gelatin phantoms and biological tissues (chicken breast tissues). The average targeting error in gelatin phantoms is 0.42 ± 0.17 mm, and in biological tissues is 1.63 ± 0.29 mm. The system is able to accurately steer a flexible needle in multi-layer phantoms and biological tissues without performing prior insertions to estimate the maximum needle curvature.

  8. COMPARISON OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED VS. STANDARD LANDMARK TECHNIQUES FOR TRAINING NOVICE OPERATORS IN PLACING NEEDLES INTO THE LUMBAR SUBARACHNOID SPACE OF CANINE CADAVERS.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Anne-Laure; Delguste, Catherine; Busoni, Valeria

    2016-07-01

    The standard technique for placing a needle into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space is primarily based on palpation of anatomic landmarks and use of probing movements of the needle, however, this technique can be challenging for novice operators. The aim of the current observational, prospective, ex vivo, feasibility study was to compare ultrasound-guided vs. standard anatomic landmark approaches for novices performing needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space using dog cadavers. Eight experienced operators validated the canine cadaver model as usable for training landmark and ultrasound-guided needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space based on realistic anatomy and tissue consistency. With informed consent, 67 final year veterinary students were prospectively enrolled in the study. Students had no prior experience in needle placement into the lumbar subarachnoid space or use of ultrasound. Each student received a short theoretical training about each technique before the trial and then attempted blind landmark-guided and ultrasound-guided techniques on randomized canine cadavers. After having performed both procedures, the operators completed a self-evaluation questionnaire about their performance and self-confidence. Total success rates for students were 48% and 77% for the landmark- and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. Ultrasound guidance significantly increased total success rate when compared to the landmark-guided technique and significantly reduced the number of attempts. With ultrasound guidance self-confidence was improved, without bringing any significant change in duration of the needle placement procedure. Findings indicated that use of ultrasound guidance and cadavers are feasible methods for training novice operators in needle placement into the canine lumbar subarachnoid space. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Preoperative ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of 63 uterine tumors having high signal intensity upon T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ryo; Kashima, Katsunori; Asatani, Mina; Nishino, Koji; Nishikawa, Nobumichi; Sekine, Masayuki; Serikawa, Takehiro; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The differential diagnosis between uterine sarcoma and benign leiomyoma is difficult when made only by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it usually requires an additional preoperative diagnostic procedure. We report our results using ultrasound-guided needle biopsy for these types of uterine tumors. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy was performed on 63 patients with uterine smooth muscle tumors suspected of malignancy by MRI. We compared the results of presurgical biopsy against the postsurgical pathology of the tumor. Among 63 patients with a high signal intensity of the uterine tumor on T2-weighted MRI (1 case was undetermined), 12 cases (19.3%) were diagnosed by the needle biopsy as malignant, and 51 cases (80.6%) were benign. Among the 12 diagnosed as malignant tumors, 11 had surgery performed, and one was treated with chemotherapy. Among the 51 patients diagnosed with a benign tumor, 27 had surgery performed, and 24 were put on a wait-and-see clinical follow-up schedule. One of the 27 surgical patients with a benign tumor had a postsurgical diagnosis of a low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma. In the 38 cases where surgery was performed, we found the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values of the needle biopsy were 91.7%, 100%, 100%, and 96.2%, respectively. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy may be a reliable preoperative diagnostic procedure for uterine tumors with suspected malignancy.

  10. Training with Perk Tutor improves ultrasound-guided in-plane needle insertion skill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lia, Hillary; Keri, Zsuzsanna; Holden, Matthew S.; Harish, Vinyas; Mitchell, Christopher H.; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: The open-source Perk Tutor training platform has been shown to improve trainee performance in interventions that require ultrasound guidance. Our goal was to determine if needle coordination of medical trainees can be improved by training with Perk Tutor compared to training with ultrasound only. METHODS: Twenty participants with no previous experience were randomized into two groups; the Perk Tutor group and the Control group. The Perk Tutor group had access to the 3D visualization while the Control group used ultrasound only during their training. Performance was analyzed, measured and compared by Perk Tutor with regards to four needle coordination metrics. None of the groups had access to 3D visualization during performance testing. RESULTS: The needle tracking measurements showed, for the Perk Tutor group, lower average distance between the needle tip and ultrasound (1.2 [0.9 - 2.8] mm vs 2.7 [2.3 - 4.0] mm, respectively; P = 0.023) and lower maximum distance between the needle tip and ultrasound (2.2 [1.9 - 3.2] mm vs 4.6 [3.9 - 6.2] mm, respectively; P = 0.013). There was no significant difference in average needle to ultrasound plane angle and maximum needle to ultrasound plane distance. All participants were successful in the procedure. CONCLUSION: The Perk Tutor group had significantly reduced distance from the needle tip to the ultrasound plane. Training with Perk Tutor can improve trainees' needle and ultrasound coordination.

  11. Improving needle tip identification during ultrasound-guided procedures in anaesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Scholten, H J; Pourtaherian, A; Mihajlovic, N; Korsten, H H M; A Bouwman, R

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance is becoming standard practice for needle-based interventions in anaesthetic practice, such as vascular access and peripheral nerve blocks. However, difficulties in aligning the needle and the transducer can lead to incorrect identification of the needle tip, possibly damaging structures not visible on the ultrasound screen. Additional techniques specifically developed to aid alignment of needle and probe or identification of the needle tip are now available. In this scoping review, advantages and limitations of the following categories of those solutions are presented: needle guides; alterations to needle or needle tip; three- and four-dimensional ultrasound; magnetism, electromagnetic or GPS systems; optical tracking; augmented (virtual) reality; robotic assistance; and automated (computerised) needle detection. Most evidence originates from phantom studies, case reports and series, with few randomised clinical trials. Improved first-pass success and reduced performance time are the most frequently cited benefits, whereas the need for additional and often expensive hardware is the greatest limitation to widespread adoption. Novice ultrasound users seem to benefit most and great potential lies in education. Future research should focus on reporting relevant clinical parameters to learn which technique will benefit patients most in terms of success and safety. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Abdominal Viscera: Tips to Ensure Safe and Effective Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications. PMID:28246511

  13. Ultrasound Guided Core Biopsy versus Fine Needle Aspiration for Evaluation of Axillary Lymphadenopathy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganott, Marie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Abrams, Gordon S.; Lu, Amy H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Chivukula, Mamatha; Carter, Gloria; Austin, R. Marshall; Bandos, Andriy I.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives. To compare the sensitivities of ultrasound guided core biopsy and fine needle aspiration (FNA) for detection of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with a current diagnosis of ipsilateral breast cancer. Materials and Methods. From December 2008 to December 2010, 105 patients with breast cancer and abnormal appearing lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axilla consented to undergo FNA of an axillary node immediately followed by core biopsy of the same node, both with ultrasound guidance. Experienced pathologists evaluated the aspirate cytology without knowledge of the core histology. Cytology and core biopsy results were compared to sentinel node excision or axillary dissection pathology. Sensitivities were compared using McNemar's test. Results. Of 70 patients with axillary node metastases, FNA was positive in 55/70 (78.6%) and core was positive in 61/70 (87.1%) (P = 0.18). The FNA and core results were discordant in 14/70 (20%) patients. Ten cases were FNA negative/core positive. Four cases were FNA positive/core negative. Conclusion. Core biopsy detected six (8.6%) more cases of metastatic lymphadenopathy than FNA but the difference in sensitivities was not statistically significant. Core biopsy should be considered if the node is clearly imaged and readily accessible. FNA is a good alternative when a smaller needle is desired due to node location or other patient factors. This trial is registered with NCT01920139. PMID:24649373

  14. Comparison of the Clinical Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection with and without Needle Release of the Transverse Carpal Ligament in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuan-Yan; Xiong, Mao-Xiang; Zhao, Yu; He, Fan-Ding; Cheng, Xue-Qing; Wu, Yan-Yan; Chen, Kai; Lu, Man

    2017-01-01

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection with and without needle release of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Between May 2014 and June 2016, 52 patients (56 wrists) with CTS were included in this study. Among these patients, 28 wrists were treated with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection plus needle release of the TCL (group A) and 28 wrists were treated with a single ultrasound-guided corticosteroids injection (group B). The following parameters were assessed and compared including postoperative results of procedure based on relief of symptoms, electrophysiological parameters (distal motor latency, sensory conduction velocity, and sensory nerve action potential of median nerve), and ultrasound parameters (anteroposterior diameter and cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the levels of pisiform and hamate bone, and the thicknesses of TCL on the cross-section at the level of hamate bone). The overall excellent and good rate regarding the postoperative results of procedure based on the relief of symptoms at 1 month postoperatively was 82.1% in group A and 46.4% in group B (p = 0.004). There was significant difference in the above electrophysiological and ultrasound parameters between the preoperative and postoperative values in both groups (all p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant difference was also observed in the postoperative values of the above-mentioned electrophysiological and ultrasound parameters in the 2 groups (all p < 0.05). Both approaches had treatment benefit in CTS. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection in combination with needle release of the TCL is superior to the single ultrasound-guided corticosteroids injection. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Assessment of Factors Affecting the Usefulness and Diagnostic Yield of Core Biopsy Needles with a Side Hole in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Sano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A barbed puncture needle with a side hole was recently developed to improve sample quality and quantity in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we retrospectively assessed the usefulness of this puncture needle. Methods Factors affecting diagnostic yield, safety, and diagnostic accuracy were investigated in 76 patients who consecutively underwent EUS-FNA for neoplastic lesions at our hospital between January and December 2013. Results The procedure was successful in all cases; the rates of sample collection and determination of the correct diagnosis were 92.1% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean number of needle passes required for diagnosis was 1.1. Complications included mild intraluminal bleeding in two patients (2.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size (≤20 mm) was significantly associated with a decreased chance of determining the correct diagnosis. Conclusions Core biopsy needles with a side hole are safe and provide a satisfactory diagnostic yield. However, the side hole may potentially reduce the rate of making the correct diagnosis in small lesions. PMID:25963081

  16. Assessment of Factors Affecting the Usefulness and Diagnostic Yield of Core Biopsy Needles with a Side Hole in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Sano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A barbed puncture needle with a side hole was recently developed to improve sample quality and quantity in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we retrospectively assessed the usefulness of this puncture needle. Factors affecting diagnostic yield, safety, and diagnostic accuracy were investigated in 76 patients who consecutively underwent EUS-FNA for neoplastic lesions at our hospital between January and December 2013. The procedure was successful in all cases; the rates of sample collection and determination of the correct diagnosis were 92.1% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean number of needle passes required for diagnosis was 1.1. Complications included mild intraluminal bleeding in two patients (2.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size (≤20 mm) was significantly associated with a decreased chance of determining the correct diagnosis. Core biopsy needles with a side hole are safe and provide a satisfactory diagnostic yield. However, the side hole may potentially reduce the rate of making the correct diagnosis in small lesions.

  17. A novel technique of needle setting for curvilinear endobronchial ultrasound: Improved efficiency with no cost

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Nikhil; Innabi, Ayoub; Alzghoul, Bashar; Bartter, Thaddeus

    2016-01-01

    Background: Standard instructions for biopsy using the convex curvilinear endobronchial ultrasound scope include visualization and adjustment of the sheath housing the biopsy needle before every puncture. In our practice, we pre-set this relationship before inserting the endobronchial ultrasound scope and leave it fixed for every puncture. Objective: We postulated that this approach is more efficient than repeated re-adjustment and aimed to show that it would not increase the frequency of endobronchial ultrasound scope damage. Methods: Retrospective review of every biopsy using the endobronchial ultrasound scope over a 6-year period with documentation of damages and costs. Results: There were 15 scope damages out of 1792 procedures (0.8%). Eight damages were determined to be due to needle damage, one due to patient bite, three due to Williams airway abrasions, and three were camera failures. All damages occurred during the first 5 years of the study. Costs totaled US$138,725, for an average of US$23,120 per year. This rate of damages appears to be similar to or lower than that reported when standard instructions are followed. Conclusion: Pre-setting of the biopsy needle when the endobronchial ultrasound scope is used leads to greater efficiency and no increase in scope damages. PMID:27974969

  18. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses

    PubMed Central

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. METHODS Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. RESULTS Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. CONCLUSION Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle. PMID:27818598

  19. Lingual nerve paralysis after endobronchial ultrasound utilizing laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; O'Leary, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman developed loss of sensation and taste in the anterior two thirds of her tongue after undergoing endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). This was believed to be due to bilateral lingual nerve injury, likely caused by stretching of tissue of the upper airway because of repetitive movements of LMA during attempts to obtain a clearer ultrasound image to direct needle insertion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of lingual nerve injury after an endobronchial ultrasound procedure using LMA.

  20. Design of an ultrasound-guided robotic brachytherapy needle-insertion system.

    PubMed

    Hungr, Nikolai; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Zemiti, Nabil; Tripodi, Nathanaël

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new robotic brachytherapy needle-insertion system that is designed to replace the template used in the manual technique. After a brief review of existing robotic systems, we describe the requirements that we based our design upon. A detailed description of the proposed system follows. Our design is capable of positioning and inclining a needle within the same workspace as the manual template. To help improve accuracy, the needle can be rotated about its axis during insertion into the prostate. The system can be mounted on existing steppers and also easily accommodates existing seed dispensers, such as the Mick Applicator.

  1. Experimental evaluation of ultrasound-guided 3D needle steering in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance toward stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. We obtained a mean targeting error of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions ([Formula: see text] 2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Ultrasound-Guided 3D Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J.; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel-tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance towards stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Methods Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. Results We obtained a mean targeting error of 0.32 ± 0.10 mm and 0.38 ± 0.19 mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. Conclusions The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions (ϕ2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:24562744

  3. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. METHODS Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. RESULTS There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:28028373

  4. Basic technique in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: What needle is the best?

    PubMed Central

    Lachter, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Basic technique for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of solid lesions has developed during 30 years of EUS, as endoscopes and accessory equipment, particularly needles, have been developed. Systematic high-quality examinations require understanding and planning. Needles used for EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) have gone through many improvements; some 18 characteristics of any needle are presented and these come under consideration whenever choosing the best needle for each procedure. The bright future of EUS and FNA for solid lesions currently still leaves much room for continued developments. PMID:24949410

  5. Accidental fracture of EBUS-TBNA needle during sampling of an enlarged mediastinal lymph node.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Syed Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Endobronchial ultrasounded-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for sampling enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, and mediastinal tumours is a safe procedure and can be performed under sedation and local anaesthesia. Rare complications of this procedure include haemorrhage, pneumothorax, pneumonia, mediastinitis and pericarditis (Asano F et al., Complications associated with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a nationwide survey by the Japan Society for Respiratory Endoscopy. Respir Res 2013;14:50). I report an unexpected fracture of the tip of the EBUS-TBNA needle as it hit a bronchial cartilage ring during attempted insertion into a subcarinal node.

  6. Three-dimensional ultrasound-guided robotic needle placement: an experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Boctor, Emad M.; Choti, Michael A.; Burdette, Everette C.; Webster III, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical use of image-guided needle placement robots has lagged behind laboratory-demonstrated robotic capability. Bridging this gap requires reliable and easy-to-use robotic systems. Methods Our system for image-guided needle placement requires only simple, low-cost components and minimal, entirely off-line calibration. It rapidly aligns needles to planned entry paths using 3D ultrasound (US) reconstructed from freehand 2D scans. We compare system accuracy against clinical standard manual needle placement. Results The US-guided robotic system is significantly more accurate than single manual insertions. When several manual withdrawals and reinsertions are allowed, accuracy becomes equivalent. In ex vivo experiments, robotic repeatability was 1.56 mm, compared to 3.19 and 4.63 mm for two sets of manual insertions. In an in vivo experiment with heartbeat and respiratory effects, robotic system accuracy was 5.5 mm. Conclusions A 3D US-guided robot can eliminate error bias and reduce invasiveness (the number of insertions required) compared to manual needle insertion. Remaining future challenges include target motion compensation. PMID:18433079

  7. Characterization of tissue-simulating phantom materials for ultrasound-guided needle procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Susan; Moore, John; Lammers, Deanna; Baxter, John; Peters, Terry

    2012-02-01

    Needle biopsies are standard protocols that are commonly performed under ultrasound (US) guidance or computed tomography (CT)1. Vascular access such as central line insertions, and many spinal needle therapies also rely on US guidance. Phantoms for these procedures are crucial as both training tools for clinicians and research tools for developing new guidance systems. Realistic imaging properties and material longevity are critical qualities for needle guidance phantoms. However, current commercially available phantoms for use with US guidance have many limitations, the most detrimental of which include harsh needle tracks obfuscating US images and a membrane comparable to human skin that does not allow seepage of inner media. To overcome these difficulties, we tested a variety of readily available media and membranes to evaluate optimal materials to fit our current needs. It was concluded that liquid hand soap was the best medium, as it instantly left no needle tracks, had an acceptable depth of US penetration and portrayed realistic imaging conditions, while because of its low leakage, low cost, acceptable durability and transparency, the optimal membrane was 10 gauge vinyl.

  8. Successful treatment of de Quervain tenosynovitis with ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Ely, Erin

    2013-05-01

    De Quervain tenosynovitis is a disorder of the tendons of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist that causes pain and functional disability, which may be refractory to conservative treatments. We present a case of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection for the successful treatment of de Quervain tenosynovitis. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle tissue acquisition: Where we stand in 2013?

    PubMed Central

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration and fine needle biopsy have become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of lesions within the gastrointestinal tract and surrounding organs. It has proved to be an effective diagnostic method with high accuracy and low complication rates. Several factors can influence the accuracy and the diagnostic yield of this procedure including experience of the endosonographer, availability of onsite cytopathology services, the method of cytopathology preparation, the location and physical characteristics of the lesion, sampling techniques and the type and size of the needle used. In this review we will outline the recent studies evaluating EUS-guided tissue acquisition and will provide practical recommendations to maximize tissue yield. PMID:24605016

  10. [Evaluation of the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, core-needle aspiration and fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohang; Niu, Lijuan

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, ultrasound-guided core-needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid. A retrospective was performed in 92 patients with suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid. Of them, 52 patients underwent US-CNB and US-FNA and 40 patients underwent US-CNA and US-FNA. The diagnoses for the micro-nodules were identified by histopathlogical examination after surgery. Among 52 cases with both US-CNB and US-FNA, 41 got nondiagnostic US-CNB and 11 cases successfully got the correct diagnoses of US-CNB; 6 cases got the incorrect diagnosis of US-FNA and 46 cases got the correct diagnosis of US-FNA. Of 40 cases with US-CNA and US-FNA, unsatisfactory specimen of US-CNA occurred in 14 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-CNA were got in 26 cases; unsatisfactory specimen of US-FNA occurred in 4 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-FNA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US-FNA in 92 cases for the diagnosis of malignancy were 93.4%, 86.7%, 97.3%, 72.2% and 92.3%, respectively. US-FNA is the most valuable method for the diagnosis of suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid before operation.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: How to obtain a core biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Larghi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration has emerged as the procedure of choice to obtain samples to reach a definitive diagnosis of lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and of adjacent organs. The obtainment of a tissue core biopsy presents several advantages that can substantially contribute to the widespread diffusion of EUS utilization in the community and in countries where cytology expertise may be difficult to be achieved. This article will review the EUS-guided fine needle biopsy techniques developed so far, the clinical results, their limitations as well as their future perspective. PMID:24955336

  12. Multicentric solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Megumi; Fukuda, Toshikatsu; Nakahara, Masahiro; Amano, Mio; Takei, Daisuke; Kawashima, Masumi; Sumi, Yusuke; Amano, Hironobu; Yonehara, Shuji; Hanada, Keiji; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare tumor. This neoplasm usually arises as a single mass; multicentricity is exceptionally rare. We report the preoperative diagnosis of multicentric SPNs by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 32-year-old woman presented to the hospital with a pancreatic tumor that was detected on abdominal echography. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 5-mm low-density mass in the body of the pancreas and a 10-mm mass in the tail of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also revealed two tumors in the body and tail of the pancreas. On endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), two indistinct and heterogeneous echogenic masses were found, and EUS-FNA was performed for each of these tumors. Cytological analysis revealed that the two masses were highly cellular with papillary groups of small, uniform, oval cells surrounding a fibrovascular core. Immunohistochemistry was positive for α-1 antitrypsin, vimentin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), CD10, and progesterone receptor. These features confirmed the preoperative diagnosis of multicentric SPNs. The patient underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was multicentric SPNs. During 2 years of follow-up, she has not developed any recurrence.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jane; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Cai, Guoping; Theoharis, Constantine G A; Ustun, Berrin; Beckman, Danita; Aslanian, Harry R; Harigopal, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with a high propensity for local, regional, and distant spread. Distant metastasis of MCC to the pancreas is uncommonly seen and may impose a diagnostic challenge cytologically. Here we report a case of MCC with pancreatic metastasis, which was diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The aspirates revealed both single and clustered epithelial cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei with stippled chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. Immunocytochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CK20, synaptophysin, CD56, and CD117. The neoplastic cells were also identified by flow cytometry as non-hematopoietic cells which were positive for CD56 and negative for CD45. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA. There have been several reports of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed only at the time of surgical resection. However, a preoperative diagnosis allows for appropriate management while sparing a patient the morbidity of unnecessary procedures.

  14. Diagnosis of pancreatic lesions collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kameta, Eri; Sugimori, Kazuya; Kaneko, Takashi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Miwa, Haruo; Sato, Takeshi; Ishii, Yasuaki; Sue, Soichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Yuki; Shibata, Wataru; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Maeda, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUF-FNA) has improved the diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) facilitates the production of millions of sequences concurrently. Therefore, in the current study, to improve the detectability of oncogenic mutations in pancreatic lesions, an NGS system was used to diagnose EUS-FNA samples. A total of 38 patients with clinically diagnosed EUS-FNA specimens were analyzed; 27 patients had pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 11 had non-PDAC lesions. DNA samples were isolated and sequenced by NGS using an Ion Personal Genome Machine system. The Cancer Hotspot Panel v2, which includes 50 cancer-related genes and 2,790 COSMIC mutations, was used. A >2% mutation frequency was defined as positive. KRAS mutations were detected in 26 of 27 PDAC aspirates (96%) and 0 of 11 non-PDAC lesions (0%). The G12, G13, and Q61 KRAS mutations were found in 25, 0, and 1 of the 27 PDAC samples, respectively. Mutations were confirmed by TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction analysis. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 27 PDAC aspirates (44%). SMAD4 was observed in 3 PDAC lesions and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A in 4 PDAC lesions. Therefore, the current study was successfully able to develop an NGS assay with high clinical sensitivity for EUS-FNA samples. PMID:27895743

  15. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  16. Management of Dupuytren contracture with ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection and needle aponeurotomy coupled with osteopathic manipulative treatment.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Steven; Meng, Michael; Schulte, Adam; Trainor, Drew; Montenegro, Roberto; Aufiero, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    Dupuytren contracture is a debilitating disease that characteristically presents as a firm nodularity on the palmar surface of the hand with coalescing cords of soft tissue on the webs and digits. With few nonsurgical modalities providing clinical benefits, open surgical procedures are the standard of care for patients with this condition. However, recent studies have associated surgical intervention with many complications, necessitating further exploration of nonsurgical treatment options. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with decreased extension of the fourth and fifth digits on the upper extremities bilaterally; previous conservative treatment regimens had been unsuccessful. After a diagnostic ultrasound, the patient was diagnosed as having Dupuytren contracture and underwent 5 treatments consisting of ultrasound-guided dry-needle aponeurotomy, lidocaine injections, and osteopathic manipulative treatment. During the fifth treatment session, the patient experienced dramatic relief of her symptoms after a palpable release during the manual manipulation portion of her therapeutic regimen. At 2-week follow-up, the patient was symptom-free. Based on this desirable outcome, the authors suggest future research be directed at minimally invasive therapeutic options in the management of Dupuytren contracture.

  17. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of solid pancreatic masses: Results in 250 patients.

    PubMed

    Kahriman, Guven; Ozcan, Nevzat; Dogan, Serap; Ozmen, Soner; Deniz, Kemal

    2016-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy and complications of percutaneous sonographic (US)-guided core needle-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Cases of US-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of solid pancreatic masses performed in our department between July 2009 and June 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The demographic data, lesions' size and location, pathology results, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and complications of the biopsies were determined. A total of 250 patients (150 males, 100 females; age range, 16-88 years; mean age, 64.3 ± 12.1 years) were included in the study. The overall diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of all 250 biopsies were 94.8%, 94.3%, 97.2%, 99.5%, and 75%, respectively, and changed to 98.4%, 99%, 94.7%, 99%, and 94.7%, respectively, after the biopsy was repeated in 12 patients. Four (1.6%) major complications, including a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery, and three cases of acute pancreatitis, and one (0.4%) minor complication (a vaso-vagal syncope), were observed. There was no biopsy-related death. US-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy is a safe and highly effective method with acceptable complication rates in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:470-473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The use of a needle guide kit improves the stability of ultrasound-guided techniques.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Hironobu; Kitamura, Akira

    2015-10-01

    A needle guide kit will be able to improve visibility on ultrasonic images. We examined the degree of stability using a SIVA guide. The SIVA guide is a needle guide kit in which the angle is not restricted, allowing the puncture to be made at any angle. We punctured the Blue Phantom™ with a high-frequency linear probe with a SIVA guide and measured the intensities of the needle at depths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 cm on the ultrasound image with Image J software. We set all punctures angles at 45 degrees from the Blue Phantom™. Six anesthesiologists with >7 years experience performed two punctures-one case was punctured with a SIVA guide and the other was punctured without a SIVA guide. Some significant differences were noted in the results between the two punctures at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 cm. We were able to prove that the use of a needle guide kit could improve visibility on ultrasonic images.

  19. Ultrasound-guided three-dimensional needle steering in biological tissue with curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Moreira, Pedro; Shahriari, Navid; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering a bevel-tipped flexible needle under ultrasound guidance toward a physical target while avoiding a physical obstacle embedded in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue with curved surfaces. An ultrasound pre-operative scan is performed for three-dimensional (3D) target localization and shape reconstruction. A controller based on implicit force control is developed to align the transducer with curved surfaces to assure the maximum contact area, and thus obtain an image of sufficient quality. We experimentally investigate the effect of needle insertion system parameters such as insertion speed, needle diameter and bevel angle on target motion to adjust the parameters that minimize the target motion during insertion. A fast sampling-based path planner is used to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We present experimental results for target reconstruction and needle insertion procedures in gelatin-based phantoms and biological tissue. Mean targeting errors of 1.46 ± 0.37 mm, 1.29 ± 0.29 mm and 1.82 ± 0.58 mm are obtained for phantoms with inclined, curved and combined (inclined and curved) surfaces, respectively, for insertion distance of 86–103 mm. The achieved targeting errors suggest that our approach is sufficient for targeting lesions of 3 mm radius that can be detected using clinical ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:25455165

  20. Ultrasound-guided three-dimensional needle steering in biological tissue with curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Abayazid, Momen; Moreira, Pedro; Shahriari, Navid; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering a bevel-tipped flexible needle under ultrasound guidance toward a physical target while avoiding a physical obstacle embedded in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue with curved surfaces. An ultrasound pre-operative scan is performed for three-dimensional (3D) target localization and shape reconstruction. A controller based on implicit force control is developed to align the transducer with curved surfaces to assure the maximum contact area, and thus obtain an image of sufficient quality. We experimentally investigate the effect of needle insertion system parameters such as insertion speed, needle diameter and bevel angle on target motion to adjust the parameters that minimize the target motion during insertion. A fast sampling-based path planner is used to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We present experimental results for target reconstruction and needle insertion procedures in gelatin-based phantoms and biological tissue. Mean targeting errors of 1.46±0.37 mm, 1.29±0.29 mm and 1.82±0.58 mm are obtained for phantoms with inclined, curved and combined (inclined and curved) surfaces, respectively, for insertion distance of 86-103 mm. The achieved targeting errors suggest that our approach is sufficient for targeting lesions of 3mm radius that can be detected using clinical ultrasound imaging systems.

  1. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  2. Core needle versus standard needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy of solid pancreatic masses: a randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Napoléon, Bertrand; Saint Paul, Marie Christine; Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Wangermez, Marc; Bichard, Philippe; Subtil, Clément; Koch, Stéphane; Grandval, Philippe; Gincul, Rodica; Karsenti, David; Heyries, Laurent; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Bourgaux, Jean François; Levy, Michaël; Calament, Gilles; Fumex, Fabien; Pujol, Bertrand; Lefort, Christine; Poincloux, Laurent; Pagenault, Maël; Bonin, Eduardo Aimé; Fabre, Monique; Barthet, Marc

    2014-12-01

    A new core biopsy needle for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling has recently been developed. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to compare this needle with a standard needle in patients with solid pancreatic masses. Consecutive patients with solid pancreatic masses referred to 17 centers for EUS-guided sampling were included. Each patient had two passes with a standard 22G needle and a single pass with a 22G core needle performed in a randomized order. Samples from both needles were separately processed for liquid-based cytology and cell-block preparation and were assessed independently by two blinded expert pathologists. The primary endpoint was the accuracy of the detection of malignancy. The reference standard was based on further cytohistological analysis obtained under ultrasound or computed tomography scanning, endoscopic or surgical guidance, and/or by clinical follow-up with repeated imaging examinations for at least 12 months. The secondary endpoints were the rate of technical failure and the quality of the cytohistological samples obtained. Of the 80 patients included (49 men; mean age 67.1 ± 11.1), 87.5 % had final malignant diagnoses (adenocarcinoma n = 62, 77.5 %). There was no difference between the needles in diagnostic accuracy (standard needle 92.5 % vs. core needle 90 %; P = 0.68) or technical failure. Both pathologists found the overall sample quality significantly better for the standard needle (expert 1, P = 0.009; expert 2, P = 0.002). The diagnostic accuracy of EUS sampling for solid pancreatic masses using standard and core needles seems comparable but with a better overall histological sample quality for the former. ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT01479803. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Clinicopathologic predictors of thyroid bed recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer using ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Laura J; Sciallis, Andrew P; Reynolds, Jordan; Jenkins, Sarah; Smith, Carin; Stan, Marius N; Nassar, Aziza

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring changes in the thyroid bed (TB) is one of the clinical mainstays for surveillance of recurrent thyroid carcinoma. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a diagnostic tool that is commonly used to aid in the identification of residual or recurrent disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided FNA of the TB in detecting recurrent thyroid cancer and to correlate the findings with clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of TB recurrence. We retrieved cases of soft tissue masses within the TB that were evaluated for recurrence between January 1, 2006, and February 1, 2011. All ultrasound-guided FNA biopsies clinically suspected to indicate a lymph node metastasis and specimens with lymphocytes were excluded from the data. Of the 291 patients identified for evaluation of recurrence, 250 had papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 10 had follicular carcinoma, 22 had medullary carcinoma, 7 had Hürthle cell carcinoma, and 2 had a previous thyroidectomy for an unknown type of thyroid carcinoma. For all FNAs that were clinically suspicious or intermediate for recurrence, the rate of positivity was 71.8% (209 patients). All cases diagnosed as "positive for PTC" or "suspicious for PTC" on TB FNA were found to have soft tissue metastasis on follow-up surgical resection. This resulted in a negative predictive value of 88.4% and a positive predictive value of 100%. The average time between thyroidectomy and TB FNA was 73.5 months. Of the patients with a previous diagnosis of PTC, those with suspicious/positive cytology were more likely to be women, to be older at thyroidectomy, to have documented metastasis to other sites as well as extrathyroidal extension and multifocal primary disease as compared with nondiagnostic/negative cytology cases. Patient age ≥45 years, primary tumor size at thyroidectomy, and surgical resection margin status had no statistical significance for predicting risk of TB recurrence. TB recurrence of PTC is

  4. Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in thyroid nodules. A study of 676 consecutive cases with surgical correlation.

    PubMed

    Paja, Miguel; del Cura, Jose L; Zabala, Rosa; Corta, Igone; Lizarraga, Aitzol; Oleaga, Amelia; Expósito, Amaia; Gutiérrez, M Teresa; Ugalde, Aitziber; López, José I

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) of thyroid nodules. Of 3517 CNBs performed using an 18G spring-loaded device in one institution, we retrospectively reviewed 676 nodules in 629 consecutive patients who underwent surgery. CNB and pathological examination were compared. CNB diagnosis was standardized in four categories: insufficient (I), benign (B), follicular lesion (FOL), and malignant (M). Main outcome measures were predictive positive values (PPV), false positives (FP), and false negatives (FN). CNB showed a low rate of insufficient and FOL diagnoses (5.8 % and 4.5 %). On surgery, there were eight FNs in 374 benign CNBs and three FPs in 148 malignant CNBs. The 154 nodules classified as FOL in CNB included, at surgery, 122 neoplasms; 28 of them malignant. PPV for malignancy of a malignant CNB was 98 %, and for a CNB diagnosis of FOL 18.2 %. Sensitivity for malignancy if CNB of FOL and M are considered positive was 95.6. Only one major complication was observed. CNB is reliable, safe, and accurate to evaluate thyroid nodules and can be an alternative technique to FNA. It has low rate of non-diagnostic and undetermined cases, with high sensitivity and PPV. Thyroid core-needle biopsy (CNB) has high sensitivity and PPV. Pitfalls of CNB are rare. Pitfalls are due to cystic cancer, histological heterogeneity, and mistakes in analysis. CNB is a reliable, safe, and accurate method to approach thyroid nodules. CNB can be used primarily or after insufficient or indeterminate FNA.

  5. Comparison of cytological and histological preparations in the diagnosis of pancreatic malignancies using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Kee; Lee, Sang Hyub; Lee, Jun Kyu; Paik, Woo Hyun; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Ban Seok; Son, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2017-08-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a crucial diagnostic technique for pancreatic malignancies. The specimen obtained by EUS-FNA can be prepared for either cytological or histological examinations. This study was to compare diagnostic performance of cytological and histological preparations using EUS-FNA in the same lesions when pancreatic malignancies were suspected. One hundred and eighteen patients who underwent EUS-FNA for suspected pancreatic malignancies were consecutively enrolled. All procedures were conducted by a single echoendoscopist under the same conditions. Four adequate preparations were obtained by 22-gauge needles with 20 to-and-fro movements for each pass. The 4 preparations included 2 cytological and 2 histological specimens. The pathologic reviews of all specimens were conducted independently by a single experienced cytopathologist. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 2 preparations were compared. The enrolled patients consisted of 62 males (52.5%), with the mean age of 64.6±10.5 years. Surgery was performed in 23 (19.5%) patients. One hundred and sixteen (98.3%) lesions were classified as malignant, while 2 (1.7%) were benign. Sensitivity of cytology and histology were 87.9% and 81.9%, respectively, with no significant difference (P=0.190). Accuracy was also not significantly different. Cytological preparation was more sensitive when the size of lesion was <3 cm (86.7% vs 68.9%, P=0.033). Our results suggested that the diagnostic performances of cytological and histological preparations are not significantly different for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignancies. However, cytological preparation might be more sensitive for pancreatic lesions <3 cm. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Needle Biopsy of Neck Lymph Nodes in Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer: Are the Specimens Sufficient for Complete Pathologic Evaluation to Guide Patient Management?

    PubMed

    Duguay, Sean; Wagner, Jason M; Zheng, Wei; Ling, Johnny; Zhao, Lichao C; Allen, Karen S; North, Justin C; Deb, Subrato J

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the ability of ultrasound guided needle biopsy of a neck lymph node to provide adequate tissue for complete pathologic evaluation of suspected metastatic lung cancer, including molecular testing for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations by pyrosequencing and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Institutional review board approval was obtained and the requirement for informed consent was waived. All ultrasound guided neck biopsies performed July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2015, were retrospectively reviewed, and all biopsies performed for suspected lung cancer metastatic to supraclavicular and cervical lymph nodes were included. Forty patients with suspected lung cancer underwent ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of an abnormal appearing neck lymph node identified on preprocedure computed tomography or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Thirty-seven patients were subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer and 3 were diagnosed with lymphoma. A definitive pathologic diagnosis was rendered in 95% of neck node biopsies (38/40; 95% confidence interval, 84%-99%). Of the 36 specimens diagnostic for lung cancer, 16 were considered for further molecular testing and the specimen was adequate for molecular testing in 15 (94%; 73%-100%) cases. Therefore, the neck node biopsy specimens were adequate for complete pathologic workup in 93% (37/40; 81%-98%). No complications related to the biopsies were observed. In patients presenting with suspected lung cancer and suspicious neck lymph nodes, ultrasound-guided needle biopsy frequently provides adequate tissue for complete pathologic evaluation and eliminates the need for more invasive procedures.

  7. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in salivary glands: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Joon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2017-07-12

    Core needle biopsy is an effective diagnostic tool widely used in many oncological diagnostic approaches. It provides an adequate tissue sample for histological evaluation of architecture, which allows tumor grading and classification of malignant and benign tumors. This study aimed to provide an updated meta-analysis and systematic review of core needle biopsy in the salivary glands. A literature search using PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library through December 2016. Data on true positives, true negatives, false positives, and false negatives were extracted from the relevant articles. Methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 tool. We calculated accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random-effects models that considered both within- and between-study variations. Our search included 10 observational studies. For core needle biopsy, the sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of salivary glands were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92-0.96, I(2)  = 18.7%, χ(2) P = .27) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.97-0.99, I(2)  = 79.6%, χ(2) P = .00), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.97-0.99). Seven hematomas, one case of temporary facial paralysis caused by local anesthesia, and no tumor seeding were reported from a total of 1,315 procedures. Ultrasound core needle biopsy of salivary glands is an excellent diagnostic tool in terms of accuracy, technical performance, and safety profile. NA Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. A new sensor technology for 2D ultrasound-guided needle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huanxiang; Li, Junbo; Lu, Qiang; Bharat, Shyam; Erkamp, Ramon; Chen, Bin; Drysdale, Jeremy; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2014-01-01

    2D Ultrasound (US) is becoming the preferred modality for image-guided interventions due to its low cost and portability. However, the main limitation is the limited visibility of surgical tools. We present a new sensor technology that can easily be embedded on needles that are used for US-guided interventions. Two different types of materials are proposed to be used as sensor--co-polymer and PZT. The co-polymer technology is particularly attractive due to its plasticity, allowing very thin depositions (10-20 μm) on a variety of needle shapes. Both sensors receive acoustic energy and convert it to an electrical signal. The precise location of the needle can then be estimated from this signal, to provide real-time feedback to the clinician. We evaluated the feasibility of this new technology using (i) a 4DOF robot in a water tank; (ii) extensive ex vivo experiments; and (iii) in vivo studies. Quantitative robotic studies indicated that the co-polymer is more robust and stable when compared to PZT. In quantitative experiments, the technology achieved a tracking accuracy of 0.14 ± 0.03mm, significantly superior to competing technologies. The technology also proved success in near-real clinical studies on tissue data. This sensor technology is non-disruptive of existing clinical workflows, highly accurate, and is cost-effective. Initial clinician feedback shows great potential for large scale clinical impact.

  9. [Automatic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy of the transplanted kidney. Risks and uses].

    PubMed

    Höppner, W; Zantvoort, F A; Lison, A E; Dreikorn, K

    1994-09-01

    Renal allograft biopsy is very valuable in the assessment of graft dysfunction, but complications are frequent and graft loss has even been described. Between 1991 and 1993, a total of 133 graft biopsies were done. We used an automated biopsy gun with a fine-caliber core needle (diameter 1.2 mm) under ultrasound guidance. Histological diagnosis was possible in 95.5% of the biopsies. On average 5.5 glomerula per specimen were obtained. This method proved to be safe, surgical intervention becoming necessary in 2 cases (1.5%).

  10. Comparison of two different size needles in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for diagnosing solid pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei-Mei; Jia, Hong-Yu; Yan, Li-Li; Li, Shan-Shan; Zheng, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aimed to provide a pooled analysis of prospective controlled trials comparing the diagnostic accuracy of 22-G and 25-G needles on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS-FNA) of the solid pancreatic mass. Methods: We established a rigorous study protocol according to Cochrane Collaboration recommendations. We systematically searched the PubMed and Embase databases to identify articles to include in the meta-analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for 22-G and 25-G needles of individual studies from the contingency tables. Results: Eleven prospective controlled trials included a total of 837 patients (412 with 22-G vs 425 with 25-G). Our outcomes revealed that 25-G needles (92% [95% CI, 89%–95%]) have higher sensitivity than 22-G needles (88% [95% CI, 84%–91%]) on solid pancreatic mass EUS-FNA (P = 0.046). However, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in overall diagnostic specificity (P = 0.842). The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratio of the 22-G needle were 12.61 (95% CI, 5.65–28.14) and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.12–0.21), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio was 12.61 (95% CI, 5.65–28.14), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.16 (95% CI, 0.12–0.21) for the 22-G needle. The pooled positive likelihood ratio was 8.44 (95% CI, 3.87–18.42), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI, 0.09–0.18) for the 25-G needle. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.97 for the 22-G needle and 0.96 for the 25-G needle. Conclusion: Compared to the study of 22-G EUS-FNA needles, our study showed that 25-G needles have superior sensitivity in the evaluation of solid pancreatic lesions by EUS–FNA. PMID:28151856

  11. [Ultrasound-guided biopsies for breast nodules: value of automatic biopsy needle].

    PubMed

    Belin, X; Sauval, P; Tranbaloc, P; Millet, P; Kinkel, K; Touraine, P; Chabriais, J; Moreau, J F

    1996-05-01

    Within 18 month, 83 solid breast nodules were biopsied with a long throw biopsy gun with 18 gauge needle (Monopty, Bard Urological, Covington) and a 13 Mhz real time AU 530 (Easote Biomedica, Italy) for the ultrasound guidance. The biopsy procedure was well tolerated with no serious complications, and with no insufficient material. US guided biopsy detected 9 cancers, 47 specific benign lesions (39 fibroadenomas, 1 lipofibroadenoma, 4 sclerosing adenoses, 1 fibromatosis, 1 cyst, 1 lymphadenopathy) and 27 non specific benign fibrocystic dystrophy. In 14 out of the 15 nodules surgically removed, the histological diagnoses were identical. In the one remaining case a fibroadenomas was assessed. In the 36 other cases no evolution occurred. US guided core biopsy with automatic device is probably a very useful approach of uncertain pathological diagnoses in mastology.

  12. A training phantom for ultrasound-guided needle insertion and suturing.

    PubMed

    Nattagh, Khashayar; Siauw, Timmy; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I-Chow; Cunha, J Adam

    2014-01-01

    During gynecologic brachytherapy (BT), suturing and image-guided needle insertions are highly skill-dependent tasks. Medical residents often have to practice these techniques in the operating room; this is sub-optimal for many reasons. We present a fast and low-cost method of building realistic and disposable gynecologic phantoms, which can be used to train physicians new to gynecologic BT. Phantoms comprised a rectal cavity large enough to accommodate a standard transrectal ultrasound (US) probe, a vaginal cavity, a uterus, a uterine canal, and a cervix, all embedded in a gelatin matrix. The uterus was made of gelatin and coated with rubber to mimic the texture of soft tissue and for computed tomography (CT) and US image contrast. The phantom's durability, longevity, construction times, materials costs, CT, and US image quality were recorded. The speed of sound in the gelatin was measured using pulse echo measurements. Anatomic structures were distinguishable using CT and US. For the first phantom, material costs were under $200, curing time was approximately 48 hours, and active participation time was 3 hours. Reusable parts allowed for reduction in time and cost for subsequent phantoms: under $20, 24 hours curing time, and 1 hour active participation time. The speed of sound in the gelatin ranged from 1495 to 1506 m/s. A method for constructing gelatin gynecologic phantoms was developed. It can be used for training in image-guided BT needle insertion, placing a suture on the vaginal wall, and suturing the cervical lip. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytological Results of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology for Thyroid Nodules: Emphasis on Correlation with Sonographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Jung; Hong, Soon Won; Chung, Woung Youn; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Min Jung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cytological results of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) cytology of thyroid nodules to sonographic findings and determine whether US findings are helpful in the interpretation of cytological results. Materials and Methods Among the thyroid nodules that underwent US-FNA cytology, we included the 819 nodules which had a conclusive diagnosis. Final diagnosis was based on pathology from surgery, repeated FNA cytology or follow-up of more than one year. Cytological results were divided into five groups: benign, indeterminate (follicular or Hurthle cell neoplasm), suspicious for malignancy, malignant, and inadequate. US findings were categorized as benign or suspicious. Cytological results and US categories were analyzed. Results Final diagnosis was concluded upon in 819 nodules based on pathology (n=311), repeated FNA cytology (n=204) and follow-up (n=304), of which 634 were benign and 185 were malignant. There were 560 benign nodules, 141 malignant nodules, 49 nodules with inadequate results, 21 with indeterminate results, and 48 that were suspicious for malignancy. The positive and negative predictive values of the US categories were 59.1% and 97.0%, and those of the cytological results were 93.7% and 98.9%. The US categories were significantly correlated with final diagnosis in the benign (p=0.014) and suspicious for malignancy (p<0.001) cytological result groups, but not in the inadequate and indeterminate cytological results groups. The false positive and negative rates of cytological results were 1.9% and 3.2%. Conclusion Sonographic findings can be useful when used alongside cytological results, especially in nodules with cytological results that are benign or suspicious for malignancy. PMID:21786450

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy for thyroid malignancy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Brito, Juan P; Maraka, Spyridoula; Espinosa de Ycaza, Ana E; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Benkhadra, Khalid; Al Nofal, Alaa; Erwin, Patricia; Morris, John C; Castro, M Regina; Montori, Victor M

    2016-09-01

    To systematically appraise and summarize the available evidence about the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (USFNA) for thyroid malignancy, and to explore the integration of these estimates with the probability of thyroid malignancy before USFNA. A comprehensive search of multiple databases from each database's inception to August 2014 was performed. Eligible studies included those that evaluated patients with thyroid nodules who underwent USFNA and subsequent evaluation by histopathology or long-term follow-up. We identified 32 studies at moderate risk of bias evaluating the USFNA diagnostic characteristics for the diagnosis of thyroid malignancy. Results were imprecise and inconsistent across trials. The pooled likelihood ratio (LR) of thyroid malignancy for a benign USFNA result was 0.09 (95 % CI 0.06, 0.14; I (2) = 33 %), whereas the pooled LR for a malignant result was 197 (95 % CI, 68, 569; I (2) = 77 %). In the case of a suspicious for follicular neoplasm result, the pooled LR for malignancy was 0.6 (95 % CI, 0.4, 1.0; I (2) = 84 %) and 8.3 (95 % CI, 3.6, 19.2; I (2) = 89) for a result of suspicious for malignancy. The available evidence regarding the diagnostic accuracy of USFNA warrants only limited confidence due to risk of bias, imprecision, and inconsistency. However, some USFNA results (benign, malignant) are likely very helpful, by significantly changing the pre-test probability of thyroid cancer.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  16. Incidents and adverse events of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chen; Chai, Ning-Li; Linghu, En-Qiang; Li, Hui-Kai; Sun, Yu-Fa; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Tang, Ping; Yang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the diagnostic value and safety mainly regarding incidents of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). METHODS A total of 150 consecutive patients with suspected PCLs were prospectively enrolled from April 2015 to November 2016. We finally enrolled 140 patients undergoing EUS-FNA. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and pathological diagnosis, which is regarded as the gold standard, for PCLs. Patients undergoing EUS-FNA at least 1 wk preoperatively were monitored for incidents and adverse events to evaluate its safety. RESULTS There were 88 (62.9%) women and 52 (37.1%) men among 140 patients, with a mean age of 50.1 (± 15.4) years. There were 67 cysts located in the head/uncinate of the pancreas and 67 in the body/tail, and 6 patients had at least 1 cyst in the pancreas. There were 75 patients undergoing surgery and 55 undergoing EUS-FNA with interval at least 1 wk before other operations, with 3 patients undergoing the procedure twice. The accuracy of EUS-FNA in differentiating benign and malignant lesions was 97.3% (73/75), while the accuracy of characterizing PCL subtype was 84.0% (63/75). The incident rate was 37.9% (22/58), whereas only 1 AE was observed in 58 cases. CONCLUSION EUS-FNA is effective and safe for diagnosis of PCLs, however procedure-related incidents are common. Caution should be taken in patients undergoing EUS-FNA. PMID:28852320

  17. Efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for schwannoma: six cases of a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Takasumi, Mika; Hikichi, Takuto; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Konno, Naoki; Waragai, Yuichi; Asama, Hiroyuki; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2017-08-09

    Schwannomas are difficult to diagnose using imaging alone. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an effective and safe tissue sampling technique. Nevertheless, few reports have described EUS-FNA for schwannoma. This study evaluates the efficacy of EUS-FNA for diagnosing schwannoma. This retrospective study examined six consecutive schwannoma patients who were diagnosed as having schwannoma either from EUS-FNA results or from surgically resected specimens. The primary endpoint was diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA for schwannoma. The secondary endpoint was EUS-FNA safety. Based on cytomorphologic features and immunocytochemistry results after EUS-FNA, 4 out of 6 patients (66.7%) were diagnosed with schwannoma. The diagnoses before EUS-FNA were the following: 3 cases of gastric subepithelial lesion (SEL, suspicious for gastrointestinal stromal tumor), 1 case of intraperitoneal tumor, 1 case of retroperitoneal tumor, and 1 case of pancreatic tumor, with sizes of 15-44 mm (median 36 mm). No case was diagnosed as schwannoma solely based on image findings. Two cases of gastric SELs could not be diagnosed as schwannoma by EUS-FNA before surgery. Inadequate sampling and a lack of additional material for immunohistochemical studies could have engendered less-definite diagnoses in those cases. No procedural adverse events occurred. The diagnostic accuracy rate of EUS-FNA for schwannoma is somewhat low. However, tissue samples were obtained safely using this method. Moreover, it is an important procedure for diagnosing schwannoma, which cannot be diagnosed solely from image findings.

  18. Risk factors for aggressive nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and the role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ende, Alexander R.; Sedarat, Alireza; Shah, Pari; Jhala, Nirag; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Metz, David C.; Kochman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-pNETs) are increasingly being diagnosed but management, especially of small tumors, remains a clinical dilemma. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is now routinely used for diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) but has not been well studied as a tool for identifying aggressive disease. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of the cytology database identified all patients at our center who underwent EUS-FNA from 1999 through 2011 and were diagnosed with NF-pNET. Results: A total of 50 patients were identified. Though patients with metastatic disease had a mean tumor size of 40 mm compared to 25 mm in patients without metastatic disease (P = 0.04), we also identified several patients with tumors <20 mm who presented with metastatic disease. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant difference in metastatic disease between tumors <20 mm and >20 mm (P = 0.13). Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, we found that using a cutoff point of 20 mm only led to a sensitivity of 85% in screening for metastases, while lowering the cutoff point to 18 mm allowed for a sensitivity of 95%. Conclusion: Currently, guidelines suggest that only patients with tumors greater than 20 mm undergo surgical resection, as tumors less than this size are thought to have low risk of metastases. Our analysis suggests that these recommendations could lead to undertreating patients with small tumors. Tumor size alone may be inadequate as a marker for aggressive NF-pNETs. Given this, other risk factors for aggressive pNETs should be studied to help identify the patients most likely to benefit from surgery. PMID:26879167

  19. Pancreatic involvement by metastasizing neoplasms as determined by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: A clinicopathologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Amin, Khalid; Mettler, Tetyana; Miller, Lizette K; Mallery, Shawn; Stewart, Jimmie

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic tumors often represent primary neoplasms, however organ involvement with metastatic disease can occur. The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to determine the underlying pathology provides guidance of clinical management. 25 cases were identified in a retrospective review of our institution's records from 2006 to 2016. Clinical parameters and prognosis are described. Metastatic lesions to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA accounted for 4.2% of all pancreatic neoplastic diagnoses, each lesion had a median greatest dimension of 1.5 cm, were most often located in the head of the pancreas, and by EUS were typically hypoechoic masses with variably defined borders. Patients were of a median age of 64 years old at diagnosis of the metastatic lesion(s) and the mean interval from primary diagnosis to the diagnosis of metastasis to the pancreas was 58.7 months (95% confidence interval, CI, 35.4 to 82.0 months). The rates of 24-month overall survival after diagnoses of metastatic renal cell carcinoma or all other neoplasms to the pancreas were 90% and 7% respectively. The origin of the neoplasms included the kidney (n = 10), colon (n = 4), ovary (n = 3), lung (n = 2), et al. Smear-based cytomorphology, and a combination of histomorphology and immunohistochemical studies from cell block preparations showed features consistent with the neoplasm of derivation. Metastases to the pancreas can be diagnosed via EUS-FNA, with enough specimen to conduct immunohistochemical studies if necessary to delineate origin. The determination of metastatic disease to the pancreas alters management and prognosis of the patient. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:418-425. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Trends in pancreatic pathology practice before and after implementation of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration: an example of disruptive innovation effect?

    PubMed

    Eltoum, Isam A; Alston, Evans A; Roberson, Janie

    2012-04-01

    Little has been reported on changes in pancreatic pathology practice after implementation of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We assessed the impact of EUS-FNA on cytologic diagnosis replacing histologic diagnosis for pancreatic disease and determined whether it fulfills Christensen criteria of a disruptive innovation effect. Pattern of utilization during 20 years, diagnostic categories, and diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic cytology were compared before and after implementation of EUS-FNA. The disruptive effect of cytology relevant to biopsy was assessed by comparing the utilization trends and the accuracy of diagnosis over time. The mean annual volume (standard deviation) of cytologic specimens increased from 24 (11) to 231 (10) after implementation of EUS-FNA, and that of histologic specimens increased from 97 (42) to 377 (148). The average percentage of annual cases managed by following cytology alone was 19% (10) before versus 51% (8) after implementation. The percentage managed by histology alone was 56% before versus 23% after implementation. Non-endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology decreased from 36% to 1%. Needle biopsies decreased from 7% to 1%, and other biopsy types from 29% to 9%. Unsatisfactory (7% versus 1%), atypical (16% versus 4%), and suspicious (16% versus 3%) diagnoses were significantly reduced. The accuracy of cytologic diagnosis significantly improved: the sensitivity (confidence interval) and specificity (confidence interval) for cancer diagnosis were 55% (38%-70%) and 78% (58%-89%) before versus 88% (84%-91%) and 96% (93%-98%) after implementation, respectively. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration improved the accuracy of cytologic diagnosis, reduced the number of indeterminate diagnoses, and replaced the need for tissue biopsy. Given its cost and simplicity as compared with tissue biopsy, this trend represents a disruptive innovation effect.

  1. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the breast: does frozen section give an accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Mueller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Frede, Thomas; Daniaux, Martin; Ban, Michael; Taucher, Susanne; Schneitter, Alois; Zeimet, Alain G; Marth, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Reducing the period of uncertainty between the discovery of a breast tumor and histological diagnosis alleviates the psychological impact of breast cancer to an important degree. We aimed to verify whether histological results obtained with frozen sections of core needle biopsies (CNBs) offer an accurate and reliable tool for minimising this period. In 2619 cases we compared histological diagnosis on frozen sections with those on paraffin sections of CNB and finally with the results of open biopsies. Of the cases 49% were proved malignant and 51% benign. In 99.3% of the malignant lesions preceding CNB was correctly classified as B5 (n = 1185, 92.9%) or at least B4 (n = 82, 6.4%) in frozen and in paraffin sections. There were seven false-negative cases in frozen (false-negative rate = 0.5%) and five false-negative cases (false-negative rate = 0.4%) in paraffin sections of CNB. On frozen sections complete sensitivity was 99.5% and the positive predictive value of B5 was 99.9%. There was one false-positive case in frozen sections and one in paraffin sections. False-positive rate = 0.08%, negative predictive value for B2 = 99.4% for frozen and 99.6% for paraffin sections; full specificity was 85.9 for frozen and 85.8 for paraffin sections of CNBs. Immediate investigation of CNB in frozen sections is an accurate diagnostic method and an important step in reducing psychological strain on patients with breast tumors and may be offered by specialised Breast Assessment Units.

  2. High risk of acute pancreatitis after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali A.; Shahid, Haroon; Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Huntington, William; Ghumman, Saad S.; Loren, David E.; Kowalski, Thomas E.; Laique, Sobia; Hayat, Umar; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Data on the risk of acute pancreatitis following endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic cystic lesions are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions, and determine whether there was a difference in pancreatitis risk in patients with side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (SB-IPMN). Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions was performed. The primary outcome measure was development of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA. Factors associated with acute pancreatitis were examined by statistical analysis to determine independent predictors of acute pancreatitis. Statistical significance was determined at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: We identified 186 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions and 557 with solid lesions in which EUS-FNA was performed. The median size of the cysts was 19 mm (range: 10-66 mm). There were 37 IPMNs, 33 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 58 serous cysts and 46 pseudocysts and 12 solid-cystic ductal carcinomas. The majority of patients (75%) with solid lesions were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Patients with pancreatic cysts had a statistically greater frequency of developing pancreatitis after EUS-FNA when compared to those with solid lesions (2.6% vs. 0.36% respectively; P = 0.13). In patients with cysts, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (with and without pancreatitis) with regard to a cyst location, size of the cyst, and number of needle passes or trainee involvement. Patients with SB-IPMN had a statistically higher frequency of pancreatitis after EUS-FNA compared to those with other cyst types (8% vs. 1.3% respectively; odds ratio = 6.4, 95% confidence intervals = 1.0-40.3, P = 0.05). Discussion: Patients with SB-IPMN are at a higher risk of developing acute pancreatitis after

  3. The effects of twisting and type of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Katagiri, Seiji; Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    The effects of twisting and type (single- or double-lumen) of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up (US-guided OPU) were investigated in cattle. The first study using slaughterhouse ovaries revealed that twisting of the needle during follicle aspiration improved the oocyte recovery rate without deleterious effects on the attachment of cumulus layers. Vacuum pressure affected the oocyte recovery and cumulus attachment, regardless of the needle type. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment with an optimized vacuum pressure. In the second study, US-guided OPU was performed in live cows using two types of needles with a vacuum pressure of 75 mmHg. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment of the recovered oocytes. The results revealed that twisting of the needle is effective in follicle aspiration, and suggested that a single-lumen needle is as useful as a double-lumen needle for US-guided OPU in cattle.

  4. Sampling of the adrenal glands by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Stelow, Edward B; Debol, Steven M; Stanley, Michael W; Mallery, Shawn; Lai, Rebecca; Bardales, Ricardo H

    2005-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has proven to be a valuable modality for the primary diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal, and perigastrointestinal malignancy. Aside from assessing thoracic and abdominal lymph nodes and the liver for metastases, EUS can assess and sample the adrenal glands, which are frequently involved by metastatic disease, but can also harbor benign primary neoplasms. The cytology files at our institution were reviewed for all cases of EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal glands. Clinical histories, sonographic findings, and cytologic findings of all cases were reviewed. Results were compared with overall EUS-guided FNA performance and the performance of non-EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal. The utility of cell block immunohistochemistry (IHC) in these cases was reviewed. Between 1/1/00 and 5/15/04 there were 24 cases of EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal gland from 22 different patients (13 men; 9 women) at our institution. This represented 1.4% of overall EUS-guided FNA and 77% of adrenal gland FNA. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 86 yr (mean 69 +/- 11 yr). Most patients had other cancers or mass lesions and were being staged at the time of the procedure (19 of 22). Almost all FNAs were of the left adrenal gland (23 of 24). Lesion size ranged from 0.9 to 7.9 cm (mean 2.5 +/- 1.6 cm). Diagnostic material was present in all cases when compared with an overall EUS-guided FNA diagnostic rate of 88%. Material for cell block was present in 21 cases, and IHC was used in 3 cases. Final diagnoses were as follows: cortical tissue consistent with cortical adenoma (19), metastatic adenocarcinoma (3), pheochromocytoma (1), and adrenal cortical carcinoma (1). EUS-guided FNA of the adrenal gland is primarily used in the staging of other malignancies when lesions of the left adrenal are recognized sonographically. Diagnostic tissue is easily obtained, including material for cell block IHC, which allows definitive diagnosis in cases that

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of 22/25-gauge core needle in endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kang, Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Geun Joo; Choi, Jung Sik

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle aspiration with that of standard fine-needle aspiration by systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies using 22/25-gauge core needles, irrespective of comparison with standard fine needles, were comprehensively reviewed. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic curves for the diagnosis of malignancy were used to estimate the overall diagnostic efficiency. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the core needle for the diagnosis of malignancy were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 0.90), 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1), and 167.37 (95% CI, 65.77 to 425.91), respectively. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the standard needle were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.88), 1 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1), and 130.14 (95% CI, 34.00 to 495.35), respectively. The area under the curve of core and standard needle in the diagnosis of malignancy was 0.974 and 0.955, respectively. The core and standard needle were comparable in terms of pancreatic malignancy diagnosis. There was no significant difference in procurement of optimal histologic cores between core and standard needles (risk ratio [RR], 0.545; 95% CI, 0.187 to 1.589). The number of needle passes for diagnosis was significantly lower with the core needle (standardized mean difference, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.02 to -0.41). There were no significant differences in overall complications (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.34 to 4.62) and technical failure (RR, 5.07; 95% CI, 0.68 to 37.64). Core and standard needles were comparable in terms of diagnostic accuracy, technical performance, and safety profile.

  7. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Woo; Chung, Moon Jae; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44-89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14-122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066.

  8. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  9. Comparison of sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the sample adequacy, patient pain ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience. From March 2012 to May 2012, two radiologists performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration to diagnose thyroid nodules in consecutive patients using the same techniques. 157 patients were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of 75 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by an experienced radiologist and group 2 consisted of 82 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by a less experienced radiologist. The sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications related to ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration were compared between the two groups. There was no statistical difference in sex, age, nodule size, or location between the two groups. There was no statistical difference (p = 0.710) in the prevalence of adequate cytology between group 1 (94.7 % [71/75]) and group 2 (96.3 % [79/82]). The mean ± standard deviation of pain-scale ratings was 1.99 ± 1.68 in group 1 and 2.30 ± 1.83 in group 2, but there was no statistical difference (p = 0.326). There were no significant complications related to the procedure and no sonographic changes on follow-up ultrasound for either group. The study results demonstrated good outcomes for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules and no statistically significant differences in sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, or complication rates between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

  10. Application of transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in Chinese population: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Xizhi; Yu, Jiang; Ouyang, Jun; Shen, Weidong; Zhou, Yibin; Hou, Jianquan; Wen, Duangai; Pu, Jinxian; Shan, Yuxi; Xue, Boxin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy (TUGRNB) is widely used for diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, significance of TUGRNB in Chinese population was rarely reported. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the significance of TUGRNB applied in prediction of PCa in Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A total of 960 from January 2009 to December 2012 were included. Repeat needle biopsy rate and PCa positive detection rate were evaluated. Relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and PCa positive rates was analyzed. Results: PCa positive detection rate after initial needle biopsy was 28.4%, which was lower than the rate of repeat needle biopsy (40%). The rate for immediate transurethral resection (TUR), surgery after initial needle biopsy, was 27.1%, however with a low PCa positive detection rate (0.66%). The repeat needle biopsy rate was lower compared with the initial biopsy rate (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, immediate TUR rate was significantly higher than that of the repeat needle biopsy rate (P < 0.05). Among the three groups, the PCa positive detection rate in repeat needle biopsy group was the highest. In subgroups with different PSA levels, the PCa positive rate increased with the elevation of PSA level. In cases with PSA > 20 ng/ml, PCa positive rate was significantly higher than those with PSA < 20 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PCa positive detection rate following repeat needle biopsy in Chinese population was higher, although the repeated needle biopsy rate was still in a low level. TUGRNB should attract more attention in the diagnosis of PCa. PMID:27904624

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules: is it Necessary to Use Local Anesthesia for the Application of One Needle Puncture?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Ki Nam

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the difference in the degree of patient pain for an ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (USFNAB) of a thyroid nodule with one needle puncture with and without local anesthesia. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients participated in the study. We examined prospective patients who would undergo US-FNABs of two thyroid nodules (larger than 10 mm maximum diameter), which were located in separate thyroid lobes. For one of these thyroid nodules, US-FNAB was performed following the administration of local anesthesia; for the other nodule, no anesthesia was administered. The application of anesthesia was alternatively administered between patients (either prior to the first US-FNAB procedure or prior to the second procedure). For all patients, the degree of pain during and after each US-guided FNAB was evaluated according to a 4-category verbal rating scale (VRS), an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The mean maximum diameters of thyroid nodules examined by US-FNAB with the use of local anesthesia and with no local anesthesia were 13.6 mm and 13.0 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference in nodule size (p > 0.05) between two groups. For the VRS, there were 27 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and four patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Nineteen patients had equivalent pain score for both treatments. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the NRS, there were 33 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 10 patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Seven patients had an equivalent pain score for each treatment. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the VAS, there were 35 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 11 patients with a higher pain score

  12. Slow-pull and different conventional suction techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid lesions using 22-gauge needles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ying; Ding, Qing-Yu; Lv, Yang; Guo, Wen; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and compare them with different suction techniques. METHODS From July 2010 to December 2015, 102 patients with pancreatic solid lesions who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with 22-gauge needles were retrospectively evaluated. EUS-FNA diagnosis was based on a cytological examination, and final diagnosis was based on a comprehensive standard of cytological diagnosis, surgical pathology and clinical or imaging follow-up. Cytological specimens were characterized for cellularity and blood contamination. The cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were analyzed. RESULTS Of all of the EUS-FNA procedures, the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were used in 31, 19, 34 and 18 procedures, respectively. There were significant differences between these four suction techniques in terms of cytological diagnostic accuracy (90.3% vs 63.2% vs 58.8% vs 55.6%, P = 0.019), sensitivity (88.2% vs 41.7% vs 40.0% vs 36.4%, P = 0.009) and blood contamination (score ≥ 2 for 29.0% vs 52.6% vs 70.6% vs 72.2%, P = 0.003). The accuracy and sensitivity of the slow-pull technique were significantly higher than those of the suction techniques using 5-mL (P = 0.03, P = 0.014), 10-mL (P = 0.005; P = 0.006) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.01, P = 0.01). Blood contamination was significantly lower in the slow-pull technique than in the suction techniques with 10-mL (P = 0.001) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION The slow-pull technique may increase the cytological diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity with slight blood contamination during EUS-FNA when using 22-gauge needles for solid pancreatic masses. PMID:27818594

  13. Slow-pull and different conventional suction techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid lesions using 22-gauge needles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Ying; Ding, Qing-Yu; Lv, Yang; Guo, Wen; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2016-10-21

    To evaluate the cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and compare them with different suction techniques. From July 2010 to December 2015, 102 patients with pancreatic solid lesions who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with 22-gauge needles were retrospectively evaluated. EUS-FNA diagnosis was based on a cytological examination, and final diagnosis was based on a comprehensive standard of cytological diagnosis, surgical pathology and clinical or imaging follow-up. Cytological specimens were characterized for cellularity and blood contamination. The cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were analyzed. Of all of the EUS-FNA procedures, the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were used in 31, 19, 34 and 18 procedures, respectively. There were significant differences between these four suction techniques in terms of cytological diagnostic accuracy (90.3% vs 63.2% vs 58.8% vs 55.6%, P = 0.019), sensitivity (88.2% vs 41.7% vs 40.0% vs 36.4%, P = 0.009) and blood contamination (score ≥ 2 for 29.0% vs 52.6% vs 70.6% vs 72.2%, P = 0.003). The accuracy and sensitivity of the slow-pull technique were significantly higher than those of the suction techniques using 5-mL (P = 0.03, P = 0.014), 10-mL (P = 0.005; P = 0.006) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.01, P = 0.01). Blood contamination was significantly lower in the slow-pull technique than in the suction techniques with 10-mL (P = 0.001) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.007). The slow-pull technique may increase the cytological diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity with slight blood contamination during EUS-FNA when using 22-gauge needles for solid pancreatic masses.

  14. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: how much practice do novices require before achieving competency in ultrasound needle visualization using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Michael J; Wong, Daniel M; Slater, Ben; Ivanusic, Jason J; Ovens, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound needle visualization is a fundamental skill required for competency in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The primary objective of this study using a cadaver model was to quantify the number of procedures that novices need to perform before competency, using a predefined dynamic scoring system was achieved in ultrasound needle visualization skills. Fifteen trainees, novices to ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, performed 30 simulated sciatic nerve blocks in cadavers. After each procedure, a supervisor provided feedback regarding quality-compromising behaviors. Learning curves were constructed for each individual trainee by calculating cusum statistics. Trainees were categorized into those who were proficient, not proficient, and undetermined. A mathematical model predicted the number of procedures required before an acceptable success rate would be attained. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with success. There was wide variability in individual cusum curves. The mean number of trials required to achieve competency in this cohort was 28. Trainees were categorized as proficient (n = 6), not proficient (n = 5), and undetermined (n = 4). With each subsequent procedure, there was a significant increase in the likelihood of success for trainees categorized as not proficient (P = 0.023) or undetermined (P = 0.024) but not for trainees categorized as proficient (P = 0.076). Participants recruited later in the study had an increased likelihood of success (P < 0.001). Trainees became competent in ultrasound needle visualization at a variable rate. This study estimates that novices would require approximately 28 supervised trials with feedback before competency in ultrasound needle visualization is achieved.

  15. A prospective comparison of liquid-based cytology and traditional smear cytology in pancreatic endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Kyu; Choi, E Ryoung; Jang, Tae Hoon; Chung, Yun Hee; Jang, Kee-Taek; Park, Sang-Mo; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    To compare results of liquid-based cytology (LBC) and the conventional smear method (SMEAR) when performing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for lesions of suspected pancreatic malignancy without an on-site cytopathologist. Fifty-eight patients were prospectively enrolled between July and December 2009. Aspirates obtained from the first needle pass were randomized either to SMEAR or LBC. Another sample from the second needle pass was allocated to the other method. The rest of the aspirates from the third or later needle passes were used for SMEAR. Diagnostic accuracy was compared and related factors were pursued. Although both methods were 100% specific, LBC was inferior to SMEAR in terms of sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy. However, LBC provided correct diagnoses in 2 out of 3 cases of false negatives for malignancy by SMEAR in which blood was highly contaminated. Although no factor was identified for LBC, low blood contamination and more than 3 needle passes were related with accurate diagnosis in SMEAR. LBC was less accurate than SMEAR when performing pancreatic EUS-FNA without an on-site cytopathologist. However, LBC might serve as a good complement to SMEAR if blood contamination is profound. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Respiratory Cytology--Current Trends Including Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy and Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy: Analysis of Data From a 2013 Supplemental Survey of Participants in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology.

    PubMed

    Sturgis, Charles D; Marshall, Carrie B; Barkan, Guliz A; Booth, Christine N; Kurtycz, Daniel F I; Souers, Rhona J; Keylock, Joren B; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Russell, Donna K; Moriarty, Ann T; Doyle, Mary A; Thomas, Nicole; Yildiz-Aktas, Isil Z; Collins, Brian T; Laucirica, Rodolfo; Crothers, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Nongynecologic cytology (NGC) practices are expanding in relationship to historical gynecologic cytology screening programs. Bronchopulmonary cytology is experiencing an evolution regarding new procedural types. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) tracks practice patterns in NGC by developing questionnaires, surveying participants, and analyzing respondent data. To analyze responses to a 2013 CAP supplemental survey from the Interlaboratoy Comparison Program on bronchopulmonary NGC. The "NGC 2013 Supplemental Questionnaire: Demographics in Performance and Reporting of Respiratory Cytology" was mailed to 2074 laboratories. The survey response rate was 42% (880 of 2074) with 90% of respondents (788 of 880) indicating that their laboratories evaluated cytology bronchopulmonary specimens. More than 95% of respondents indicated interpreting bronchial washings (765 of 787) and bronchial brushings (757 of 787). A minority of laboratories (43%, 340 of 787) dealt with endobronchial ultrasound-guided samples, and an even smaller fraction of laboratories (14%, 110 of 787) saw cases from electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy. Intraprocedural adequacy assessments by pathologists (and less often by cytotechnologists or pathologists-in-training) were routinely performed in percutaneous transthoracic aspiration cases (74%, 413 of 560) with less involvement for other case types. Most laboratories reported that newly diagnosed primary pulmonary adenocarcinomas were triaged for molecular testing of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. The parameters examined in this 2013 survey provide a snapshot of current pulmonary cytopathology practice and may be used as benchmarks in the future.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Transcutaneous Needle Biopsy of the Base of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth From a Submental Approach.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jason M; Conrad, Rachel D; Cannon, Trinitia Y; Alleman, Anthony M

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist regarding the feasibility of ultrasound-guided transcutaneous biopsy of the base of the tongue and floor of the mouth. This retrospective study reviewed 8 cases with lesions in the base of the tongue or floor of the mouth that were biopsied by fine-needle aspiration. Core biopsy was also needed in 1 case. All biopsies were technically successful, and all yielded squamous cell carcinoma. One biopsy yielded a false-positive result, as subsequent resection yielded high-grade dysplasia with no invasion. The other biopsy results were considered true-positive based on subsequent pathologic examinations (2 cases) or clinical/imaging follow-up (5 cases). There were no significant complications associated with the biopsies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. In vivo visualization of epidermal growth factor receptor and survivin expression in porcine pancreas using endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle imaging with confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Y; Shinoura, S; Ahluwalia, A; Tarnawski, A S; Chang, K J

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to establish a principle of molecular imaging of the pancreas and determine in vivo expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and survivin using a novel endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle imaging (EUS-FNI) technique, which incorporates needle based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy (nCLE) after intrapancreatic injection of FTIC-labeled antibodies. Studies were performed in anesthetized pigs. FITC-labeled specific antibodies against EGF-R and survivin were injected into the tail and neck of the pancreas using a 19 gauge needle introduced under EUS guidance. Thirty minutes later, nCLE was performed using a prototype needle-based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy probe (Cellvizio AQ-Flex-19, Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris, France) to determine cellular and tissue localization of EGF-R and survivin in the pancreas. Then pigs were euthanized and specimens of pancreas from areas injected with antibodies were obtained for histologic examination under epifluorescence microscope. EUS-guided nCLE enabled visualization of EGF-R and survivin in pancreatic tissue. Expression of EGF-R and survivin in pancreas was confirmed by histology. EGF-R immunoreactivity was localized to majority of duct-lining cells and to the surface and cytoplasm of many acinar cells. Survivin was localized mainly to the acinar cells. This study demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo, real time visualization of EGF-R and survivin in the pancreas by local injection of FITC-labeled antibodies via EUS-guided fine needle injection, followed by EUS-guided needle based confocal laser-induced endomicroscopy.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle.

    PubMed

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 - 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting.

  1. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. Material and Methods The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Results Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). Conclusions The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP

  2. Treatment of isolated mediastinal and hilar recurrence of lung cancer with bronchoscopic endobronchial ultrasound guided intratumoral injection of chemotherapy with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hiren J; Begnaud, Abbie; Penley, Andrea M; Wynne, John; Malhotra, Paras; Fernandez-Bussy, Sebastian; Cope, Jessica M; Shuster, Jonathan J; Jantz, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    A common pattern of recurrence in lung cancer after receiving full dose external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to targeted sites is isolated mediastinal and hilar recurrence (IMHR). Treatment options for these patients are limited to palliative radiation, chemotherapy, and/or best supportive care. We describe our experience with treating IMHR with bronchoscopic endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) guided intratumoral injection of cisplatin (ITC). Patients treated between Jan 2009-September 2014 with ITC for IMHR were included. Patient demographics, tumor histology, size, concurrent therapy, location, number of sites treated, treatment sessions, and encounters were abstracted. Responses were analyzed on follow-up scans 8-12 weeks after the last treatment session using RECIST 1.1 criteria. Locoregional recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were measured. 50 sites were treated in 36 patients (19 males, 17 females) with mean age 61.9±8.5 years. Eight sites treated on subsequent encounters were excluded and one patient had an unevaluable response, leaving 35 patients and 41 sites for final analysis. 24/35 (69%) had complete or partial response (responders), whereas 11/35 (31%) had stable or progressive disease (non-responders). There were no significant differences in response based on histology, size, and concurrent therapy. Median survival for the group was 8 months (95% CI of 6-11 mo). Responders had significantly higher survival and PFS than non-responders. Two patients treated with concurrent EBRT, developed broncho-mediastinal fistula. EBUS guided intratumoral cisplatin for IMHR appears to be safe and effective, and may represent a new treatment paradigm for this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward optical guidance during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations of pancreatic masses using single fiber reflectance spectroscopy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; van Gerven, P.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Sven Mieog, J.; Amelink, Arjen; Veselic, Maud; Morreau, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses suffer from sample errors and low-negative predictive values. Fiber-optic spectroscopy in the visible to near-infrared wavelength spectrum can noninvasively extract physiological parameters from tissue and has the potential to guide the sampling process and reduce sample errors. We assessed the feasibility of single fiber (SF) reflectance spectroscopy measurements during EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses and its ability to distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic tissue. A single optical fiber was placed inside a 19-gauge biopsy needle during EUS-FNA and at least three reflectance measurements were taken prior to FNA. Spectroscopy measurements did not cause any related adverse events and prolonged procedure time with ˜5 min. An accurate correlation between spectroscopy measurements and cytology could be made in nine patients (three benign and six malignant). The oxygen saturation and bilirubin concentration were significantly higher in benign tissue compared with malignant tissue (55% versus 21%, p=0.038; 166 μmol/L versus 17 μmol/L, p=0.039, respectively). To conclude, incorporation of SF spectroscopy during EUS-FNA was feasible, safe, and relatively quick to perform. The optical properties of benign and malignant pancreatic tissue are different, implying that SF spectroscopy can potentially guide the FNA sampling.

  4. Improved laboratory resource utilization and patient care with the use of rapid on-site evaluation for endobronchial ultrasound fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Brian T; Chen, Alexander C; Wang, Jeff F; Bernadt, Cory T; Sanati, Souzan

    2013-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound guided (EBUS) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy has become widely used to evaluate patients with thoracic abnormalities. Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) can provide the bronchoscopist with immediate evaluation findings during the procedure. This study examines EBUS FNA biopsy procedures with and without ROSE, and investigates the impact of ROSE service on the EBUS procedure and laboratory resource utilization. The cytopathology database at Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri, was searched for EBUS FNA biopsy cases before and after introduction of ROSE service, and a matched cohort was collected. Reports were reviewed and pertinent data was collected, such as sites biopsied, ROSE performance, slide smears, cell blocks, and diagnostic categories. Statistical analysis of the results was performed. A matched case-controlled EBUS FNA cohort of 340 patients (680 total) for each category of non-ROSE and ROSE service were identified. There was a 33% reduction in the number of sites biopsied with ROSE. A total of 68% of patients with ROSE had just one biopsy site compared to only 36% of non-ROSE patients. There was a 30% decrease in total slides (mean, 5.27 slides) after the introduction of ROSE. All of these improvements were statistically significant. EBUS FNA biopsy ROSE service benefits patients by contributing to significantly fewer biopsies and improved utilization of health care resources. ROSE service results in substantially fewer total slides, which has a significant impact on the cytopathology laboratory work effort. The use of ROSE for EBUS FNA biopsy provides significant improvements in patient care and laboratory resource utilization. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Fine-needle aspiration of histoplasmosis in the era of endoscopic ultrasound and endobronchial ultrasound: cytomorphologic features and correlation with clinical laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Gailey, Michael P; Klutts, J Stacey; Jensen, Chris S

    2013-09-01

    Histoplasmosis has a textbook cytologic description with numerous intracellular organisms that are readily apparent on routine stains. This is based on series and reports describing histoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients with disseminated disease. With the advent of ultrasound-guided (US) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) techniques, a marked increase in the cytologic diagnosis of histoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients is noted. A search identified all cytology cases diagnosed with Histoplasma within the past 10 years. Cases were reviewed, along with patient demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. A total of 40 FNA cases of histoplasmosis were identified. Patients ranged in age from 15 years to 86 years. There were 23 female patients and 17 male patients; 37 were immunocompetent and 3 were immunosuppressed. Sixteen patients were being staged for primary tumors of other sites; others presented with primary pulmonary symptoms or histoplasmosis was noted incidentally. Specimens were composed of bland acellular necrosis, most commonly with granulomas (77.5%); only rare intracellular organisms were present on routine stains, and variable extracellular organisms were noted on Grocott methenamine silver stain (GMS) stain. GMS stain on direct smears was found to be more sensitive than cell block. Laboratory studies for urine antigen, yeast, and mycelial antibody (by compliment fixation), serum antibody (by immunodiffusion), and culture were positive in 11.8%, 59.1%, 4.5%, 47.6%, and 3.4% of cases, respectively. In an endemic region, histoplasmosis presents more commonly in immunocompetent patients as localized fibrocaseous disease on FNA and is often identified by high-resolution imaging. FNA is increasingly used in the diagnosis because of endoscopic ultrasound and endobronchial ultrasound. GMS stain on direct smears is more sensitive than cell block. In general, laboratory tests have low sensitivity in this patient population. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer

  6. Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris

    1996-09-15

    Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

  7. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Amanda B.; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  8. Non-malignant breast papillary lesions - b3 diagnosed on ultrasound--guided 14-gauge needle core biopsy: analysis of 114 cases from a single institution and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Simonetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Saladino, Valeria; Vezzosi, Vania; Brancato, Beniamino; Nori, Jacopo; Palli, Domenico

    2015-07-01

    One-hundred-fourteen consecutive cases of breast ultrasound-guided 14-gauge needle core biopsy (14G NCB) performed from January 2001 to June 2013 and diagnosed as non-malignant papillary lesion (PL)-B3, were reviewed and compared with definitive histological diagnosis on surgical excision (SE) to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided 14G NCB. PL with epithelial atypia on 14G NCB were associated to malignancy on definitive histological diagnosis on SE in 22 (7 DCIS and 15 invasive carcinomas) of 46 cases with an underestimation rate of 47.8 %, while 9 (4 DCIS and 5 invasive carcinomas) cases out of 68 cases of PL without epithelial atypia were upgraded to carcinoma with an underestimation rate of 13.2 %. In cases of PL with epithelial atypia on ultrasound-guided 14G NCB, SE appears mandatory due to the high risk of associated malignancy. The diagnosis of PL without epithelial atypia on ultrasound-guided 14G NCB does not exclude malignancy at subsequent SE, consequently further assessment (by surgical or vacuum-assisted excision) is recommended to avoid the risk of delaying a diagnosis of malignancy, although this tends to be lower (1 in 8 patients).

  9. Comparative study between ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of axillary lymph nodes and sentinel lymph node histopathology in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Coelho, Lívio Portela; Borges, Rafael Soares; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Cardoso-Campos-Verdes, Larysse Maira; da Silva-Sampaio, João Paulo; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2017-05-01

    The replacement of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) cytology of axillary lymph nodes is controversial, despite the simplicity and reduced cost of the latter. In the present study, US-guided FNA was performed in 27 patients with early-stage breast cancer for comparison with SNB. Data were analyzed by calculation of sample proportions. Tumor subtypes included invasive ductal carcinoma (85%), invasive lobular carcinoma (7%), and tubular and metaplastic carcinoma (4%). FNA had a sensitivity of 45%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 73%. Axillary lymph node cytology obtained by US guided-FNA in patients with breast cancer had a specificity similar to that of sentinel lymph node histopathology in the presence of axillary node metastases. However, when lymph node cytology is negative, it does not exclude the existence of metastatic implants, due to its low sensitivity in comparison to sentinel lymph node histopathology.

  10. Comparative study between ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of axillary lymph nodes and sentinel lymph node histopathology in early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Coelho, Lívio Portela; Borges, Rafael Soares; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Cardoso-Campos-Verdes, Larysse Maira; da Silva-Sampaio, João Paulo; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2017-01-01

    The replacement of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) cytology of axillary lymph nodes is controversial, despite the simplicity and reduced cost of the latter. In the present study, US-guided FNA was performed in 27 patients with early-stage breast cancer for comparison with SNB. Data were analyzed by calculation of sample proportions. Tumor subtypes included invasive ductal carcinoma (85%), invasive lobular carcinoma (7%), and tubular and metaplastic carcinoma (4%). FNA had a sensitivity of 45%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 73%. Axillary lymph node cytology obtained by US guided-FNA in patients with breast cancer had a specificity similar to that of sentinel lymph node histopathology in the presence of axillary node metastases. However, when lymph node cytology is negative, it does not exclude the existence of metastatic implants, due to its low sensitivity in comparison to sentinel lymph node histopathology. PMID:28521436

  11. Real-time ultrasound-guided fine needle cytology of the thyroid gland by capillary action. A modified technique without aspiration.

    PubMed

    Gkeli, M G; Daskalopoulou, D

    2011-01-01

    To present a modified technique of real-time (Rt) ultrasound-guided (Ug) fine-needle (FN) cytology of thyroid nodules without aspiration (RtUg-FNNAC). We retrospectively studied 958 patients with 1202 thyroid nodules referred to our institution between January 2009-January 2010. The efficacy of RtUg-FNNAC was determined by the number of satisfactory specimens that were obtained. Furthermore, we compared the RtUg-FNNAC results with the surgical histological results. All specimens were adequate for diagnosis. Two hundred and twelve (22.1% patients with malignant cytological findings and 20 (2.1%) with indeterminate cytological findings were referred for surgery. All nodules with malignant and indeterminate cytological findings were confirmed histologically. From 20 indeterminate cytological findings 17 (85%) were malignant. From 66 patients with initial benign RtUg-FNNAC who were subjected to surgery the results were true negative in 65 and false negative in 1. Finally, RtUg-FNNAC was true positive in 229 cases and false positive in 3. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of RtUg-FNNAC were 99.6, 95.6, 98.7 and 98.7%, respectively. Accuracy for the detection of malignancy was 98.7%. RtUg-FNNAC is a technique that combines the benefits of real time US-guidance with those of capillary action sampling, maximizing cellular yield and minimizing bloody artefacts in cytologic examination.

  12. Severe Bleeding and Perforation Are Rare Complications of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration for Pancreatic Masses: An Analysis of 3,090 Patients from 212 Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasunaga, Hideo; Nakai, Yousuke; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful for the pathological diagnosis of pancreatic masses, but patients are susceptible to severe bleeding and perforation. Because the incidence and severity of these complications have not been fully evaluated. Methods We aimed to evaluate severe bleeding and perforation after EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses using large-scale data derived from a Japanese nationwide administrative database. Results In total, 3,090 consecutive patients from 212 low- to high-volume hospitals were analyzed. Severe bleeding requiring transfusion or endoscopic treatment occurred in seven patients (0.23%), and no perforation was observed. No patient mortality was recorded within 30 days of EUS-FNA. The rate of severe bleeding in low-volume hospitals was significantly higher than that in medium- and high-volume hospitals (0.48% vs 0.10%, p=0.045). Conclusions Severe bleeding and perforation following EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses are rare, and the procedure is safe. PMID:24672664

  13. Severe bleeding and perforation are rare complications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for pancreatic masses: an analysis of 3,090 patients from 212 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasunaga, Hideo; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful for the pathological diagnosis of pancreatic masses, but patients are susceptible to severe bleeding and perforation. Because the incidence and severity of these complications have not been fully evaluated. We aimed to evaluate severe bleeding and perforation after EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses using large-scale data derived from a Japanese nationwide administrative database. In total, 3,090 consecutive patients from 212 low- to high-volume hospitals were analyzed. Severe bleeding requiring transfusion or endoscopic treatment occurred in seven patients (0.23%), and no perforation was observed. No patient mortality was recorded within 30 days of EUS-FNA. The rate of severe bleeding in low-volume hospitals was significantly higher than that in medium- and high-volume hospitals (0.48% vs 0.10%, p=0.045). Severe bleeding and perforation following EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses are rare, and the procedure is safe.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  15. Opening injection pressure consistently detects needle-nerve contact during ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff C; Choi, Jason J; Lin, Emily; Robinson, Allegra

    2014-05-01

    Needle trauma may cause neuropathy after nerve blockade. Even without injection, nerve injury can result from forceful needle-nerve contact (NNC). High opening injection pressures (OIPs) have been associated with intrafascicular needle tip placement and nerve damage; however, the relationship between OIP and NNC is unclear. The authors conducted a prospective, observational study to define this relationship. Sixteen patients scheduled for shoulder surgery under interscalene block were enrolled if they had clear ultrasound images of the brachial plexus roots. A 22-gauge stimulating needle was inserted within 1 mm of the root, and 1-ml D5W injected at 10 ml/min by using an automated pump. OIP was monitored using an in-line pressure manometer and injections aborted if 15 psi or greater. The needle was advanced to displace the nerve slightly (NNC), and the procedure repeated. Occurrence of evoked motor response and paresthesia were recorded. Fifteen patients had at least one clearly visible root. OIP at 1 mm distance from the nerve was less than 15 psi (mean peak pressure 8.2 ± 2.4 psi) and the 1-ml injection could be completed in all but two cases (3%). In contrast, OIP during NNC was 15 psi or greater (mean peak pressure 20.9 ± 3.7 psi) in 35 of 36 injections. Aborting the injection when OIP reached 15 psi prevented commencement of injection in all cases of NNC except one. High OIP (≥15 psi) consistently detected NNC, suggesting that injection pressure monitoring may be useful in preventing injection against nerve roots during interscalene block.

  16. Performance of the Standard 22G Needle for Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Tissue Core Biopsy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Gheorghiu, Marcel; Zaharia, Teodor; Calinici, Tudor; Samarghitan, Andrada; Marcus, Bogdan; Cainap, Simona; Seicean, Radu

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) are considered good tools for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and for obtaining material for cytology or histology. The accuracy of EUS-FNA can rise to 85-95%, but it is lower in cases with a chronic pancreatitis background or with previous biliary stenting. We aimed to establish the diagnostic yield of the visible length of the core biopsy samples in pancreatic cancer by using one single type of standard 22G needle and to evaluate the factors which can influence the results. EUS-FNA was performed by using a 22G standard needle on patients prospectively recruited with the suspicion of pancreatic masses on transabdominal ultrasound or CT scan over a period of eight months. The number of passes was limited by the length of the core obtained. The final diagnosis was based on EUS-FNA or hepatic biopsy for their metastasis or by follow up every three month by imaging methods. The study included 118 patients. Previous stents were present in 10 patients and chronic pancreatitis features were found in 3 patients. The procedure sensitivity was 89% and the global accuracy was 89%. The presence of biliary stents did not impede the accuracy of results. The number of passes did not influence the results. The diagnostic rate of core biopsy by using 22G needles had a high accuracy and it is safe when the length of core dictates the number of passes. The presence of biliary stents did not influence the results.

  17. Clear cell neuroendocrine tumor of pancreas: Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration diagnosis of an uncommon variant

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Bakshi, Pooja; Singla, Vikas; Verma, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    The cytomorphologic features of clear cell neuroendocrine tumor of pancreas have been rarely reported in cytology literature. The cytomorphology of this rare variant mimics many primary and metastatic clear cell tumors of the pancreas. However, a precise cytological diagnosis can be rendered by awareness of this entity and judicious use of immunohistochemistry. We report one such case in a young woman diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration. The tumor cells showed positive staining with synaptophysin, chromogranin, and also with inhibin. PMID:27081395

  18. Safety and utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of focal splenic lesions: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder S; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Srinivasan, Radhika; Gupta, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of focal splenic lesions (FSL) is usually done under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography guidance. Endoscopic US (EUS), because of its ability to provide high-resolution images, can be used for aspirating FSL. We studied the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided FNA of FSL. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with FSL undergoing EUS-guided FNA over the last six years. EUS-guided FNA was performed in 16 patients (age: 28-43 years; male: 11). A 22-G needle was used in 13 patients, a 25-G needle in 2 patients, and a 19-G needle in 1 patient. All patients had abdominal pain, with 6 patients also having fever. On EUS, 8 patients had focal hypoechoic lesion/lesions, whereas 8 patients had focal cystic lesion/lesions. The size of the focal lesions ranged from 0.8-10 cm. EUS-guided aspiration was performed successfully in all patients. The cytology was adequate in all patients and a diagnosis was established in 13 (81%) patients. The final diagnosis in patients with hypoechoic lesions was tuberculosis in 6 patients and sarcoidosis in 2 patients. The final diagnosis in patients with cystic lesions was pseudocyst in 5 patients and simple cyst in 3 patients. One patient with splenic pseudocyst had a massive hemorrhage from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm 7 days after FNA. No other major complication was encountered. EUS-guided FNA of FSL is safe and provides adequate material for cytological examination, even in the case of small lesions.

  19. Safety and utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of focal splenic lesions: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Srinivasan, Radhika; Gupta, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Background Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of focal splenic lesions (FSL) is usually done under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography guidance. Endoscopic US (EUS), because of its ability to provide high-resolution images, can be used for aspirating FSL. We studied the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided FNA of FSL. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with FSL undergoing EUS-guided FNA over the last six years. Results EUS-guided FNA was performed in 16 patients (age: 28-43 years; male: 11). A 22-G needle was used in 13 patients, a 25-G needle in 2 patients, and a 19-G needle in 1 patient. All patients had abdominal pain, with 6 patients also having fever. On EUS, 8 patients had focal hypoechoic lesion/lesions, whereas 8 patients had focal cystic lesion/lesions. The size of the focal lesions ranged from 0.8-10 cm. EUS-guided aspiration was performed successfully in all patients. The cytology was adequate in all patients and a diagnosis was established in 13 (81%) patients. The final diagnosis in patients with hypoechoic lesions was tuberculosis in 6 patients and sarcoidosis in 2 patients. The final diagnosis in patients with cystic lesions was pseudocyst in 5 patients and simple cyst in 3 patients. One patient with splenic pseudocyst had a massive hemorrhage from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm 7 days after FNA. No other major complication was encountered. Conclusion EUS-guided FNA of FSL is safe and provides adequate material for cytological examination, even in the case of small lesions. PMID:28845112

  20. Learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic lesions in a novel ex-vivo simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Cohen, J.; Gromski, M. A.; Saito, K.; Loundou, A.; Matthes, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is essential in the management of digestive cancers. However, teaching and learning this technique remain challenging due to the lack of cost-effective models. Material and methods: This was a prospective experimental study using a complete porcine upper gastrointestinal ex-vivo organ package, placed in an Erlangen Active Simulator for Interventional Endoscopy (EASIE-R), and prepared with one cyst and two solid masses (2 cm). Five fellows inexperienced in EUS-FNA were enrolled, performing 10 procedures on each lesion, alternatively. The total time, number of attempts for success, of needle view losses, and of scope handling were recorded, associated with an independent skills rating by procedure. We compared the first 15 procedures with the last 15 for each fellow. Results: The fellows successfully performed all procedures in 2 to 40 minutes, requiring 1 to 6 attempts. All (5/5) improved their total time taken (P < 0.001), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (P < 0.05), scope handling (P < 0.005), and skills rating (P < 0.001), whereas 4/5 (80 %) improved their number of attempts. The overall evaluation showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the total time taken (11.2 ± 7.8 vs 4.3 ± 2.2 minutes), number of attempts (2.6 ± 1.2 vs 1.2 ± 0.7), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (2.3 ± 2 vs 0.5 ± 0.7), and need for scope handling (1.1 ± 1.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.2). We also observed an improvement in skills rating (5 ± 1.9 vs. 7.7 ± 1.1). Conclusion: This newly designed ex-vivo model seems to be an effective way to improve the initial learning of EUS-FNA, by performing 30 procedures. PMID:27995190

  1. Autonomic responses to ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis of the patellar tendon in healthy male footballers.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz Torres, Blanca; Albornoz Cabello, Manuel; García Bermejo, Paula; Naranjo Orellana, José

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach, which involves the application of a galvanic current via an acupuncture needle. As in any procedure involving needling, vagal reactions have been reported during PNE. To examine for changes in autonomic activity during the US-guided PNE technique on healthy patellar tendons by measurement and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty-two male footballers were randomly allocated to: a control group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during an exhaustive US examination of the patellar tendon and adjacent structures; and an experimental group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE on the patellar tendon. The following HRV parameters were assessed: mean NN interval, mean heart rate, time domain parameters (SDNN, rMSSD, pNN50), diameters of the Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2), stress score, and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio. There were no differences between groups in any baseline measurements, nor were there any significant differences between control group measurements (baseline vs intervention). The experimental group exhibited statistically significant increases in SDNN/SD1 (p=0.02/p=0.03) and SD2 (p=0.03), indicating increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, respectively. US-guided PNE was associated with an autonomic imbalance characterised by greater parasympathetic activity, which could potentially result in a vasovagal reaction. Care should be taken to monitor for adverse reactions during US-guided PNE and simple HRV indicators may have a role in early detection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules: A Consensus Statement by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, So Lyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Ji-hoon; Shin, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) has played a crucial role in managing patients with thyroid nodules, owing to its safety and accuracy. However, even with US guidance, nondiagnostic sampling and infrequent complications still occur after FNA. Accordingly, the Task Force on US-FNA of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has provided consensus recommendations for the US-FNA technique and related issues to improve diagnostic yield. These detailed procedures are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and from the consensus of experts. PMID:25741201

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Intra-articular Injection of the Radio-ulnar and Radio-humeral Joints and Ultrasound-Guided Dry Needling of the Affected Limb Muscles to Relieve Fixed Pronation Deformity and Myofascial Issues around the Shoulder, in a Case of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1.

    PubMed

    Pai, Renuka S; Vas, Lakshmi

    2017-04-23

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occurs due to different pathophysiological mechanisms. Presently there is no description of definitive treatment that can resolve the especially recalcitrant motor issues of disability in CRPS type 1 (CRPS-1). We have herein described the successful management of motor disability with a multimodal approach in a patient with CRPS-1 that occurred as a result of a fracture sustained in the lower end of the radius. Sensory/sudomotor/vasomotor symptoms were relieved completely by medications and stellate ganglion block in 2 weeks. Ultrasound-guided dry needling secured near-complete improvement of shoulder and hand movements in 45 days. Ultrasound guided intra-articular (radio-ulnar and radio-humeral joint) injections with steroid reduced residual pain and improved forearm movements by 50% initially. The patient continued to receive regular sessions of dry needling, physiotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. By the end of 1 year, the functions of the limb improved remarkably, as did the functional outcome scores. In this patient with CRPS-1, intra-articular injections with steroid reduced nociception in the affected local structures and sensitization in the nervous system; dry needling resolved the myofascial issues; sustained physiotherapy maintained the motor recovery; and behavioral therapy techniques addressed the cognitive and life stress issues. It was concluded that the presenting symptoms in this case were a consequence of interactions between humoral, nervous, and myofascial systems. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Diagnosis of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas using endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Amir; Kahn, Melissa; Jamil, Laith H

    2015-05-16

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the pancreas is a particularly rare entity. Diagnosis of this tumor is tentatively made after ruling out metastatic SCC from another primary site and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) of the pancreas. Here we discuss the case of a 76-year-old woman who was found to have a solitary pancreatic lesion and multiple hepatic lesions. Results of computed tomography-guided biopsy of the liver lesions were consistent with a metastatic carcinoma displaying squamous differentiation; therefore, an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) of the pancreatic mass was performed. Meticulous histopathological examination of the pancreatic specimen at multiple levels revealed moderately well-differentiated SCC with no glandular component. An extensive metastatic work-up did not reveal an extra-pancreatic origin for this SCC; hence, a diagnosis of primary SCC of the pancreas was established. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the diagnosis of a primary SCC of the pancreas using EUS-guided CNB. We believe that CNB has a diagnostic yield equivalent to that of fine-needle aspiration for recognizing pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, when cytological examinations reveal atypical squamous epithelial cells suggestive of malignancy, CNB may provide a better tissue specimen, from which to determine the presence of a glandular component. Such an assessment will differentiate pancreatic SCC from ASC.

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Pancreatic Lesions: A Systematic Review of Technical and Procedural Variables.

    PubMed

    Jani, Bhairvi S; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Lim, Diego; Rastogi, Amit; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition has emerged over the last decade as an invaluable diagnostic tool in approaching the different pancreatic lesions. Given the safety and minimal invasiveness of this approach combined with the high diagnostic yield, it became the standard of care when dealing with different pancreatic pathologies. However, some variables regarding this procedure remain not fully understood. These can influence the diagnostic yield of the procedure and include the presence of the on-site cytopathologist, the type and size of the needle used as well as obtaining aspiration versus core biopsy, the number of passes and the sampling technique, and the role of suction and stylet use among others. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase for studies that assessed these variables. Eligible studies were analyzed using several parameters such as technique and procedure, with the aim of reviewing results from an evidence-based standpoint.

  6. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4-6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients' perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as 'successful' at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a 'successful' outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. Methods A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4–6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients’ perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. Results All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as ‘successful’ at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a ‘successful’ outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Conclusions Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. PMID:25122629

  8. Endobronchial Ultrasound-directed Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Mediastinal Lesions: Initial Egyptian Experience.

    PubMed

    Safwat, Tarek; Khattab, Adel; Haddad, Salwa El; Mostafa, Yasser; Korraa, Emad; Madkour, Ashraf; Fattah, Wael Abd El

    2009-01-01

    Mediastinal lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and often require invasive approaches. We evaluated the role of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound-directed transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in the evaluation of mediastinal lesions. Between March 2005 to February 2006, 30 consecutive patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes from unknown etiologies or suspicious for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma and mediastinal masses underwent EBUS-TBNA and were clinically followed up. EBUS-TBNA was applied under topical anesthesia, midazolam sedation with a mean dose of 4.6+1.7 mg and prolonged the examination by 14.7 minutes on average. EBUS-directed TBNA was performed in 17 lymph nodes and 13 mediastinal masses, achieving specific diagnosis in 82.3% (14/17) and 84.6% (11/13) of examined lesions, respectively, with an overall yield of 83%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in distinguishing benign from malignant mediastinal lesions were 89.4%, 100%, and 93.3%, respectively. EBUS was well tolerated by most of the patients with no TBNA-related complications. In conclusion, EBUS-TBNA of mediastinal lesions is a minimally invasive safe diagnostic technique with high yield, even in the hands of those with initial experience. This initial study is convincing and stimulating for widespread application of EBUS-TBNA in Egyptian bronchoscopy practice.

  9. Comparison between endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial biopsy and CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy for the diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Qing; Miu, Ying-Ying; Liu, Ya-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Zhou, Ze-Jun; Jin, Jia-Jia; Li, Qian; Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Tu, Chih-Yen; Cheng, Wen-Chien; Evison, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background With the release of the National Lung Screening Trial results, the detection of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) is likely to increase. Computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) and radial probe endobronchial ultrasound (r-EBUS)-guided transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) are recommended for tissue diagnosis of PPLs. Methods A systematic review of published literature evaluating the accuracy of r-EBUS-TBLB and CT-PTNB for the diagnosis of PPLs was performed to determine point sensitivity and specificity, and to construct a summary receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results This review included 31 publications dealing with EBUS-TBLB and 14 publications dealing with CT-PTNB for the diagnosis of PPLs. EBUS-TBLB had point sensitivity of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) for the diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer (PLC), which was lower than the sensitivity of CT-PTNB (0.94, 95% CI: 0.94–0.95). However, the complication rates observed with EBUS-TBLB were lower than those reported for CT-PTNB. Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that EBUS-TBLB is a safe and relatively accurate tool in the investigation of PLC. Although the yield remains lower than that of CT-PTNB, the procedural risks are lower. PMID:28331821

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration plus KRAS and GNAS mutation in malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Bournet, Barbara; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Grand, David; Roques, Céline; Breibach, Florence; Cros, Jérome; Muscari, Fabrice; Carrère, Nicolas; Selves, Janick; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background: KRAS and GNAS mutations are common in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia of the pancreas (IPMN). The aims of this study were to assess the role of pre-therapeutic cytopathology combined with KRAS and GNAS mutation assays within cystic fluid sampled by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to predict malignancy of IPMN. Patients and methods: We prospectively included 37 IPMN patients with clinical and/or imaging predictors of malignancy (men: 24; mean age: 69.5 years). Cytopathology (performed on cystic fluid and/or IPMN nodules), KRAS (Exon 2, codon 12) and GNAS (Exon 8, codon 201) mutations assays (using TaqMan® allelic discrimination) were performed on EUS-FNA material. The final diagnosis was obtained from IPMN resections (n = 18); surgical biopsies, EUS-FNA analyses, and follow-up (n = 19): 10 and 27 IPMN were benign and malignant, respectively. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of cytopathology alone to diagnose IPMN malignancy were 55 %, 100 %, 100 %, 45 %, and 66 %, respectively. When KRAS-mutation analysis was combined with cytopathology these values were 92 %, 50 %, 83 %, 71 %, and 81 %, respectively. GNAS assays did not improve the performances of cytopathology alone or those of cytopathology plus a KRAS assay. Conclusions: In patients with a likelihood of malignant IPMN at pre-therapeutic investigation, testing for KRAS mutations in cystic fluid sampling by EUS-FNA improved the results of cytopathology for the diagnosis of malignancy whereas GNAS mutation assay did not. PMID:27995180

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate-derived preclinical pancreatic cancer models reveal panitumumab sensitivity in KRAS wild-type tumors.

    PubMed

    Berry, William; Algar, Elizabeth; Kumar, Beena; Desmond, Christopher; Swan, Michael; Jenkins, Brendan J; Croagh, Daniel

    2017-05-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely refractory to existing therapies used in unselected patient trials, thus emphasizing the pressing need for new approaches for patient selection in personalized medicine. KRAS mutations occur in 90% of PC patients and confer resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (e.g., panitumumab), suggesting that KRAS wild-type PC patients may benefit from targeted panitumumab therapy. Here, we use tumor tissue procured by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) to compare the in vivo sensitivity in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of KRAS wild-type and mutant PC tumors to panitumumab, and to profile the molecular signature of these tumors in patients with metastatic or localized disease. Specifically, RNASeq of EUS-FNA-derived tumor RNA from localized (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 20) PC cases revealed a comparable transcriptome profile. Screening the KRAS mutation status of tumor genomic DNA obtained from EUS-FNAs stratified PC patients into either KRAS wild-type or mutant cohorts, and the engraftment of representative KRAS wild-type and mutant EUS-FNA tumor samples into NOD/SCID mice revealed that the growth of KRAS wild-type, but not mutant, PDXs was selectively suppressed with panitumumab. Furthermore, in silico transcriptome interrogation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived KRAS wild-type (n = 38) and mutant (n = 132) PC tumors revealed 391 differentially expressed genes. Taken together, our study validates EUS-FNA for the application of a novel translational pipeline comprising KRAS mutation screening and PDXs, applicable to all PC patients, to evaluate personalized anti-EGFR therapy in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salla, Charitini; Chatzipantelis, Paschalis; Konstantinou, Panagiotis; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Dappola, Victoria

    2007-10-14

    We describe the clinical, imaging and cytopathological features of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS-guided) fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of an unexplained episodic abdominal pain for 2 mo and a short history of hypertension in the endocrinology clinic. Clinical laboratory examinations revealed polycystic ovary syndrome, splenomegaly and low serum amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a mass of the pancreatic tail with solid and cystic consistency. EUS confirmed the mass, both in body and tail of the pancreas, with distinct borders, which caused dilation of the peripheral part of the pancreatic duct (major diameter 3.7 mm). The patient underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA cytology specimens consisted of single cells and aggregates of uniform malignant cells, forming microadenoid structures, branching, papillary clusters with delicate fibrovascular cores and nuclear overlapping. Naked capillaries were also seen. The nuclei of malignant cells were round or oval, eccentric with fine granular chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves in some of them. The malignant cells were periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-Alcian blue (+) and immunocytochemically they were vimentin (+), CA 19.9 (+), synaptophysin (+), chromogranin (-), neuro-specific enolase (-), a1-antitrypsin and a1-antichymotrypsin focal positive. Cytologic findings were strongly suggestive of SPTP. Biopsy confirmed the above cytologic diagnosis. EUS-guided FNA diagnosis of SPTP is accurate. EUS findings, cytomorphologic features and immunostains of cell block help distinguish SPTP from pancreatic endocrine tumors, acinar cell carcinoma and papillary mucinous carcinoma.

  13. Peri-procedural povidone-iodine rectal preparation reduces microorganism counts and infectious complications following ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Gyorfi, Justin R; Otteni, Christopher; Brown, Kevin; Patel, Amar; Lehman, Kathleen; Phillips, Brett E; Dewan, Kalyan; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Raman, Jay D

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether a peri-procedural povidone-iodine rectal preparation (PIRP) prior to transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy (TRUS PNB) can reduce microorganism colony counts and infectious complications. Our institutional TRUS PNB database was reviewed to identify infectious post-biopsy complications (defined as fever >38.5 °C with positive culture). The last 570 biopsy patients were divided into those administered only preoperative oral and/or parenteral antibiotics (n = 456; chronologically cohorts A-D) versus men receiving peri-procedural PIRP in conjunction with standard preoperative antibiotics (n = 114; cohort E). Rectal cultures were obtained in the PIRP cohort to quantify changes in microorganism colony counts. Mean baseline PSA for patients was 11.6 ng/ml, 63 % were undergoing an initial biopsy, and 17 % had documented use of antibiotic therapy within the previous 6 months. A reduction in infectious complications was observed when comparing the conventional antibiotic (cohorts A-D) versus PIRP (cohort E) group (1.8 vs. 0 %), with the largest magnitude of decline occurring in the concurrent contemporary cohorts (cohort D-5.3 % vs. cohort E-0 %, p = 0.03). Rectal cultures obtained in 92 men before and after PIRP administration noted a 97 % reduction in microorganism colonies (2.1 × 10(5) vs. 6.3 × 10(3) CFU/ml, p < 0.001). No adverse reactions to the PIRP were reported by patients 7 days post-biopsy. Peri-procedural PIRP decreased microorganism colony counts and effectively reduced infectious complications following TRUS PNB. This safe, cheap, and simple strategy may be a reasonable alternative to systemic or targeted antibiotic therapy to reduce post-biopsy infections.

  14. Does Tumor Size Influence the Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology for Thyroid Nodules?

    PubMed

    Koo, Do Hoon; Song, KwangSeop; Kwon, Hyungju; Bae, Dong Sik; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Min, Hye Sook; Lee, Kyu Eun; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is diagnostic standard for thyroid nodules. However, the influence of size on FNAC accuracy remains unclear especially in too small or too large thyroid nodules. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the effect of nodule size on FNAC accuracy. Methods. All consecutive patients who underwent thyroidectomy for nodules in 2010 were enrolled. FNAC results (according to the Bethesda system) were compared to pathological diagnosis. The nodules were categorized into groups A-E on the basis of maximal diameter on ultrasound (≤0.5, >0.5-1, >1-2, >2-4, and >4 cm, resp.). Results. There were 502 cases with 690 nodules. Overall FNAC sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 95.4%, 98.2%, 99.4%, 86.4%, and 96.0%, respectively. False-negative rates (FNRs) of groups A-E were 3.2%, 5.1%, 1.3%, 13.3%, and 50%, respectively. Accuracy rates of groups A-E were 96.8%, 94.8%, 99%, 94.7%, and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Although accuracy rates of FNAC in thyroid nodules smaller than 0.5 cm are comparable to the other group, thyroid nodules larger than 4 cm with benign cytology carry a higher risk of malignancy, which suggest that those should be considered for intensive follow-up or repeated biopsy.

  15. Eosinophilic esophageal myositis diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ryo; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Yamamoto, Shogo; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is diagnosed by microscopic findings of eosinophilic infiltration into the squamous epithelium. In contrast, another disease concept termed "eosinophilic esophageal myositis (EoEM)" has been proposed, whereby there is eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria instead. A 60-year-old man was referred to our hospital for chest pain, dysphagia, and several episodes of esophageal food impaction. Although EoE was suspected based on clinical features, biopsy specimens showed no mucosal eosinophilic infiltration. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed thickening of the muscularis propria layer and subsequent EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) revealed eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria. Although the patient's symptoms gradually improved after steroid administration, complete remission was not achieved after 1 year of treatment. This case may reflect a disorder distinct from typical EoE based on eosinophilic infiltration of the muscularis propria but not the squamous epithelium, and we, therefore, diagnosed it as EoEM using the EUS-FNA findings as reference.

  16. TIPS in patients with cranial porta hepatis: ultrasound-guided transhepatic portohepatic-portocaval puncture in single needle pass.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huei-Lung; Liu, Wan-Chen; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Pan, Huey-Ben; Chen, Clement-Kuen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our technique of transhepatic serial puncture of the portal vein and hepatic vein-inferior vena cava in one needle pass under ultrasound guidance to place a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with a porta hepatis cranial to the usual location. Six patients (five men, one woman) underwent transhepatic TIPS procedures at our institution. The indications for portal decompression were recurrent variceal bleeding in four patients and refractory ascites and hydrothorax in one patient each. In five patients initial attempts at a classic transjugular approach failed because of an unusual angle between the hepatic vein and the portal vein; in the other patient, revision of an occluded shunt had failed. Two patients had main portal vein thrombosis. Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Two patients received a portohepatic venous shunt and four a portocaval shunt (inferior vena cava to right portal vein in three patients and inferior vena cava to left portal vein in one patient).The portosystemic pressure gradient before TIPS was 17-35 mm Hg and after TIPS was 6-10 mm Hg. No procedure-related complications occurred. One patient had severe hepatic encephalopathy. Two patients had shunt occlusion, which was successfully revised 17 and 10 months after the procedure. Our technique is a safe, effective, and universally applicable method for establishment of a TIPS in patients with either normal venous anatomy or severely distorted liver parenchyma.

  17. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  18. Management of Clinically and Mammographically Occult Benign Papillary Lesions Diagnosed at Ultrasound-Guided 14-Gauge Breast Core Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Mo; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Kim, Youdong; Lee, Kyong Sik

    2016-11-01

    To determine how to manage clinically and mammographically occult benign papillary lesions diagnosed at ultrasound (US)-guided 14-gauge breast core needle biopsy (CNB) by evaluating their upgrade rates. From our pathologic database of US-guided 14-gauge breast CNB, 69 benign papillomas and 9 atypical papillomas with available subsequent excisional findings (surgery or vacuum-assisted removal with additional US follow-up for ≥2 years) or US follow-up alone (≥2 years) were included in this study. We analyzed their upgrade rates by using excisional or US follow-up findings, with no change at 2 years as the reference standard. Patient age, lesion size, lesion distance from the nipple, multiplicity, imaging-histologic concordance, and histologic findings were compared between groups with and without upgrades by statistical analysis. Surgical excision was performed in 53 (67.9%) of 78 benign papillary lesions and revealed 5 upgrades (11.4%) to atypical papillomas in 44 benign papillomas and 2 upgrades (22.2%) to ductal carcinomas in situ in 9 atypical papillomas. Among 12 benign papillomas (15.4%) with vacuum-assisted removal and US follow-up (≥2 years), 1 (8.3%) was upgraded to atypical papilloma. The remaining 13 benign papillomas (16.7%) were followed with US and were stable after a 2-year follow-up period. There were no significant differences in the variables between the groups. Uniform surgical excision is not a reasonable management strategy for clinically and mammographically occult benign papillary lesions diagnosed at US-guided 14-gauge breast CNB. Clinically and mammographically occult benign papillary lesions may be subsequently managed by vacuum-assisted removal or imaging follow-up if atypia is not found. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. A Fresh Cadaver Model for the Instruction of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    McCrary, Hilary C; Faucett, Erynne A; Hurbon, Audriana N; Milinic, Tijana; Cervantes, Jose A; Kent, Sean L; Adamas-Rappaport, William J

    2017-07-01

    Objective The aim of our study is to determine if a fresh cadaver model (FCM) for the instruction of ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules is a practical method for instruction. Study Design Pre- and postinstruction assessment of medical students' ability to perform US-guided FNA of artificially created thyroid nodules placed adjacent to the thyroid gland of a fresh cadaver. Setting University-based fresh cadaver laboratory. Subjects and Methods Study participants included a total of 17 first- and second-year medical students with minimal US training. Technical skills were assessed using a 10-item checklist. In addition, a cognitive assessment regarding the indications, contraindications, and complications of the procedure was completed. A postinstruction assessment was provided for participants 5 weeks after their initial assessment. Differences between pre- and postinstruction assessment scores of technical skills were analyzed using McNemar's test. The mean cognitive knowledge gain was analyzed using a paired 2-sample t test. Results Eight of 10 items on the skills checklist were statistically significant between pre- and postinstruction skills assessment ( P < .05). There was a statistically significant change in cognitive knowledge gain regarding the contraindications of the procedure ( P = .001), but not for indications or complications ( P = .104 and P = .111, respectively). Conclusion US-guided FNA continues to be an important diagnostic procedure in the workup of thyroid nodules, making it an essential skill to integrate into surgical skills lab. Our FCM for the instruction of US-guided FNA is the first of its kind, and this pilot study shows this is a viable method for instruction.

  20. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  1. Initially non-diagnostic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of thyroid nodules: value and management.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Eun-kyung; Ryu, Young Hoon; Son, Eun Ju

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is an accurate, reliable, and simple method to identify a thyroid nodule as benign or malignant. However, non-diagnostic cytology results for thyroid nodules are a major limitation of US-guided FNAC. To investigate the incidence of thyroid cancer among cases with non-diagnostic results on FNAC and to provide suggestions for the management of thyroid nodules that are initially non-diagnostic by FNAC according to ultrasonographic findings. From July 2006 to December 2009, 10,317 thyroid nodules in 6684 consecutive patients underwent US-guided FNAC at our institute. Among these, 871 thyroid nodules (8.4%) were diagnosed as non-diagnostic on initial cytologic evaluation and 196 underwent a second or third FNAC. Twenty-seven thyroid nodules (18.9%) underwent surgery, while 116 thyroid nodules were cytologically confirmed as benign with no remarkable change on follow-up US were included. We retrospectively reviewed the US findings for a total of 143 thyroid nodules (123 benign nodules and 20 malignant nodules). The US features that we compared included composition, echogenicity, margin, calcifications, shape, and underlying echogenicity. In total, thyroid cancer was diagnosed in 20 nodules (14.0%). The size of the nodule was significantly associated with malignancy (P < 0.05). Most of the sonographically probable benign nodules were found to be benign (97.6%). Suspicious nodules on US were thyroid cancer in 43.2% of cases. Marked hypoechogenicity, microlobulated or irregular margin, microcalcifications, and taller-than-wide shape were significant US findings that correlated with malignancy (P < 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ultrasound for initially non-diagnostic thyroid nodules was as follows: sensitivity of 90.0%, specificity of 65.0%, positive predictive value of 29.5%, and negative predictive value of 97.6%. In terms of management of thyroid nodules with non-diagnostic FNAC cytology, US evaluation

  2. Interobserver agreement among cytopathologists in the evaluation of pancreatic endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Mounzer, Rawad; Yen, Roy; Marshall, Carrie; Sams, Sharon; Mehrotra, Sanjana; Said, Mohamed Sherif; Obuch, Joshua C; Brauer, Brian; Attwell, Augustin; Fukami, Norio; Shah, Raj; Amateau, Stuart; Hall, Matthew; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert; Rastogi, Amit; Wani, Sachin

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become the standard of care in the evaluation of solid pancreatic lesions. Limited data exist on interobserver agreement (IOA) among cytopathologists in assessing solid pancreatic EUS-FNA specimens. This study aimed to evaluate IOA among cytopathologists in assessing EUS-FNA cytology specimens of solid pancreatic lesions using a novel standardized scoring system and to assess individual clinical and cytologic predictors of IOA. Consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic lesions at a tertiary care referral center were included. EUS-FNA slides were evaluated by four blinded cytopathologists using a standardized scoring system that assessed final cytologic diagnosis and quantitative (number of nucleated/diagnostic cells) and qualitative (bloodiness, inflammation/necrosis, contamination, artifact) cytologic parameters. Final clinical diagnosis was based on final cytology, surgical pathology, or 1-year clinical follow-up. IOA was calculated using multi-rater kappa (κ) statistics. Bivariate analyses were performed comparing cases with and without uniform agreement among the cytopathologists followed by logistic regression with backward elimination to model likelihood of uniform agreement. Ninety-nine patients were included (49 % males, mean age 64 years, mean lesion size 26 mm). IOA for final diagnosis was moderate (κ = 0.45, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.4 - 0.49) with minimal improvement when combining suspicious and malignant diagnoses (κ = 0.54, 95 %CI 0.49 - 0.6). The weighted kappa value for overall diagnosis was 0.65 (95 %CI 0.54 - 0.76). IOA was slight to fair (κ = 0.04 - 0.32) for individual cytologic parameters. A final clinical diagnosis of malignancy was the most significant predictor of agreement [OR 3.99 (CI 1.52 - 10.49)]. Interobserver agreement among cytopathologists for pancreatic EUS-FNA specimens is moderate

  3. Endobronchial Ultrasound–guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Prevents Mediastinoscopies in the Diagnosis of Isolated Mediastinal Lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David R.; Kolvekar, Shyam; Hayward, Martin; McAsey, Dorcas; Kocjan, Gabrijela; Falzon, Mary; Capitanio, Arrigo; Shaw, Penny; Morris, Stephen; Omar, Rumana Z.; Janes, Sam M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy (IML) are a common presentation to physicians, and mediastinoscopy is traditionally considered the “gold standard” investigation when a pathological diagnosis is required. Endobronchial ultrasound–guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is established as an alternative to mediastinoscopy in patients with lung cancer. Objective: To determine the efficacy and health care costs of EBUS-TBNA as an alternative initial investigation to mediastinoscopy in patients with isolated IML. Methods: Prospective multicenter single-arm clinical trial of 77 consecutive patients with IML from 5 centers between April 2009 and March 2011. All patients underwent EBUS-TBNA. If EBUS-TBNA did not provide a diagnosis, then participants underwent mediastinoscopy. Measurements and Main Results: EBUS-TBNA prevented 87% of mediastinoscopies (95% confidence interval [CI], 77–94%; P < 0.001) but failed to provide a diagnosis in 10 patients (13%), all of whom underwent mediastinoscopy. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of EBUS-TBNA in patients with IML were 92% (95% CI, 83–95%) and 40% (95% CI, 12–74%), respectively. One patient developed a lower respiratory tract infection after EBUS-TBNA, requiring inpatient admission. The cost of the EBUS-TBNA procedure per patient was £1,382 ($2,190). The mean cost of the EBUS-TBNA strategy was £1,892 ($2,998) per patient, whereas a strategy of mediastinoscopy alone was significantly more costly at £3,228 ($5,115) per patient (P < 0.001). The EBUS-TBNA strategy is less costly than mediastinoscopy if the cost per EBUS-TBNA procedure is less than £2,718 ($4,307) per patient. Conclusions: EBUS-TBNA is a safe, highly sensitive, and cost-saving initial investigation in patients with IML. Clinical trial registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00932854). PMID:22652031

  4. Incidence of Fever Following Endobronchial Ultrasound–Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yun; Lee, Jin woo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo

    2017-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound–guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic method for mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of fever following EBUS-TBNA. Methods A total of 684 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA from May 2010 to July 2012 at Seoul National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were evaluated for fever by a physician every 6–8 hours during the first 24 hours following EBUS-TBNA. Fever was defined as an increase in axillary body temperature over 37.8℃. Results Fever after EBUS-TBNA developed in 110 of 552 patients (20%). The median onset time and duration of fever was 7 hours (range, 0.5–32 hours) after EBUS-TBNA and 7 hours (range, 1–52 hours), respectively, and the median peak body temperature was 38.3℃ (range, 37.8–39.9℃). In most patients, fever subsided within 24 hours; however, six cases (1.1%) developed fever lasting longer than 24 hours. Infectious complications developed in three cases (0.54%) (pneumonia, 2; mediastinal abscess, 1), and all three patients had diabetes mellitus. The number or location of sampled lymph nodes and necrosis of lymph node were not associated with fever after EBUS-TBNA. Multiple logistic regression analysis did not reveal any risk factors for developing fever after EBUS-TBNA. Conclusion Fever is relatively common after EBUS-TBNA, but is transient in most patients. However, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of infectious complications among patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:28119746

  5. Needle tract implantation of hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma after ultrasound-guided percutaneous puncture: clinical and pathologic characteristics and the treatment of needle tract implantation.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Chihiro; Furuse, Junji; Ishii, Hiroshi; Maru, Yasushi; Yoshino, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Taira; Konishi, Masaru; Nakagohri, Toshio; Inoue, Kazuto; Oda, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Tumor implantation along the needle tract following percutaneous procedures under ultrasonographic guidance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) has been well documented. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the procedure, the pathologic differentiation of the primary tumor, and the treatment after implantation. Between July 1992 and March 2000, HCC patients (n=372) who underwent biopsy, percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) therapy and percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) and PC (n=73) patients who underwent biopsy were retrospectively studied. Needle tract implantation was found in six of the HCC patients (1.6%) and one of the PC patients (1.4%). The interval to diagnosis ranged from 5 to 25 months (mean +/- SD 11.2 +/- 7.6 months) in the HCC patients. The needle tract implantation was evident for all procedure types in these patients (two after PEI alone, two after both biopsy and PEI, and one after PMCT) and for each degree of pathologic differentiation of the primary tumors (well differentiated in one, moderately differentiated in two, and poorly differentiated in one). Each implanted tumor was surgically resected, with no recurrence at the focal lesion. These results suggest that needle tract implantation develops regardless of the procedure or the pathologic differentiation of the primary tumor, and that surgical resection might be effective for controlling these implanted lesions.

  6. Ultrasound-guided thyroid nodule fine-needle biopsies--comparison of sample adequacy with different sampling techniques, different needle sizes, and with/without onsite cytological analysis.

    PubMed

    Cerit, Mahinur; Yücel, Cem; Göçün, Pınar Uyar; Poyraz, Aylar; Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Taneri, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic adequacy of thyroid samples obtained by aspiration or capillary biopsy techniques, with 22 or 27 gauge needles, and with or without on-site cytological analysis (OCA). Four hundred patients with thyroid nodules underwent ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle biopsies. Patients were divided into eight groups according to needle size (22 vs. 27 gauge), biopsy technique (aspiration vs. capillary), and whether or not OCA was performed. Sample adequacy rates were calculated for each group and subgroups and compared using chi-square tests. When all nodes were evaluated (n = 400), the adequacy rate was significantly greater with the capillary than with the aspiration technique (97% vs. 91.5%, p = 0.032) and when OCA was than was not performed (97% vs. 91.5%, p = 0.032). When only solid nodules were evaluated (n = 205) the adequacy rate was also significantly greater with the capillary than with the aspiration technique (98.9% vs. 89.7%, p = 0.008) and when OCA was than was not performed (97.9% vs. 89.6%, p = 0.014). In contrast, the adequacy rate was similar for 22 and 27 gauge needles (94.2% vs. 93.1%, p = 0.733). Optimal results were obtained with the capillary technique and OCA. The capillary technique and OCA should be the preferred approach in thyroid nodule biopsy, optimising adequacy rates and patient comfort.

  7. Feasibility of telecytopathology for rapid preliminary diagnosis of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of axillary lymph nodes in a remote breast care center

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Kamal K.; Kovalovsky, Andra; Masrani, Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the recent years, the advances in digital methods in pathology have resulted in the use of telecytology in the immediate assessment of fine needle aspiration (FNA) specimens. However, there is a need for organ-based and body site-specific studies on the use of telecytology for the immediate assessment of FNA to evaluate its pitfalls and limitations. We present our experience with the use of telecytology for on-site evaluation of ultrasound-guided FNA (USG-FNA) of axillary lymph nodes in a remote breast care center. Materials and Methods: Real-time images of Diff-Quik-stained cytology smears were obtained with an Olympus digital camera attached to an Olympus CX41 microscope and transmitted via ethernet by a cytotechnologist to a pathologist who rendered preliminary diagnosis while communicating with the on-site cytotechnologist over the Vocera system. The accuracy of the preliminary diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis, retrospectively. Results: A total of 39 female patients (mean age: 50.5 years) seen at the breast care center underwent USG-FNA of 44 axillary nodes. Preliminary diagnoses of benign, suspicious/malignant, and unsatisfactory were 41, 52, and 7%, respectively. Only one of the 23 cases that were initially interpreted as benign was reclassified as suspicious on final cytologic diagnosis. Seventeen of 18 suspicious/malignant cases on initial cytology corresponded with a malignant diagnosis on final cytology. One suspicious case was reclassified as benign on final cytologic diagnosis. All unsatisfactory cases remained inadequate for final cytologic interpretation. The presence of additional material in the cell block and interpretative error were the main reasons for discrepancy, accounting for the two discrepant cases. Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrates that the on-site telecytology evaluation of USG-FNA of axillary lymph nodes in patients at a remote breast care center was highly accurate compared with the final

  8. Feasibility of telecytopathology for rapid preliminary diagnosis of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of axillary lymph nodes in a remote breast care center.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Kamal K; Kovalovsky, Andra; Masrani, Deepa

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, the advances in digital methods in pathology have resulted in the use of telecytology in the immediate assessment of fine needle aspiration (FNA) specimens. However, there is a need for organ-based and body site-specific studies on the use of telecytology for the immediate assessment of FNA to evaluate its pitfalls and limitations. We present our experience with the use of telecytology for on-site evaluation of ultrasound-guided FNA (USG-FNA) of axillary lymph nodes in a remote breast care center. Real-time images of Diff-Quik-stained cytology smears were obtained with an Olympus digital camera attached to an Olympus CX41 microscope and transmitted via ethernet by a cytotechnologist to a pathologist who rendered preliminary diagnosis while communicating with the on-site cytotechnologist over the Vocera system. The accuracy of the preliminary diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis, retrospectively. A total of 39 female patients (mean age: 50.5 years) seen at the breast care center underwent USG-FNA of 44 axillary nodes. Preliminary diagnoses of benign, suspicious/malignant, and unsatisfactory were 41, 52, and 7%, respectively. Only one of the 23 cases that were initially interpreted as benign was reclassified as suspicious on final cytologic diagnosis. Seventeen of 18 suspicious/malignant cases on initial cytology corresponded with a malignant diagnosis on final cytology. One suspicious case was reclassified as benign on final cytologic diagnosis. All unsatisfactory cases remained inadequate for final cytologic interpretation. The presence of additional material in the cell block and interpretative error were the main reasons for discrepancy, accounting for the two discrepant cases. This retrospective study demonstrates that the on-site telecytology evaluation of USG-FNA of axillary lymph nodes in patients at a remote breast care center was highly accurate compared with the final cytologic evaluation. It allows pathologists to use their

  9. Core biopsy needle versus standard aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic masses: a randomized parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Nah; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Hee Kyung; Choi, Hyun Jong; Choi, Moon Han; Kim, Dong Choon; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum

    2014-12-01

    An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) device using a core biopsy needle was developed to improve diagnostic accuracy by simultaneously obtaining cytological aspirates and histological core samples. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB with standard EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in patients with solid pancreatic masses. Between January 2012 and May 2013, consecutive patients with solid pancreatic masses were prospectively enrolled and randomized to undergo EUS-FNB using a core biopsy needle or EUS-FNA using a standard aspiration needle at a single tertiary center. The specimen was analyzed by onsite cytology, Papanicolaou-stain cytology, and histology. The main outcome measure was diagnostic accuracy for malignancy. The secondary outcome measures were: the median number of passes required to establish a diagnosis, the proportion of patients in whom the diagnosis was established with each pass, and complication rates. The overall accuracy of combining onsite cytology with Papanicolaou-stain cytology and histology was not significantly different for the FNB (n = 58) and FNA (n = 58) groups (98.3 % [95 %CI 94.9 % - 100 %] vs. 94.8 % [95 %CI 91.9 % - 100 %]; P = 0.671). Compared with FNA, FNB required a significantly lower median number of needle passes to establish a diagnosis (1.0 vs. 2.0; P < 0.001). On subgroup analysis of 111 patients with malignant lesions, the proportion of patients in whom malignancy was diagnosed on the first pass was significantly greater in the FNB group (72.7 % vs. 37.5 %; P < 0.001). The overall accuracy of FNB and FNA in patients with solid pancreatic masses was comparable; however, fewer passes were required to establish the diagnosis of malignancy using FNB.This study was registered on the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000014057). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2017-04-19

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  11. Ultrasound-guided vacuum assisted breast biopsy in the assessment of C3 breast lesions by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology: results and costs in comparison with surgery.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Francesca; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Latronico, Antuono; Trentin, Chiara; Penco, Silvia; Menna, Simona; Viale, Giuseppe; Cassano, Enrico; Bellomi, Massimo

    2009-04-01

    Breast lesions defined C3 at ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) are probably benign, but exhibit atypias. We evaluate the results of US-guided vacuum assisted breast biopsy (VABB) of these lesions. Patients diagnosed C3 by US-FNAC, submitted to US-VABB and with a minimum follow-up of 36 months or surgery were enrolled. Cost outcome of this diagnostic protocol was evaluated. We evaluated 138 patients with non-palpable C3 lesions. In 2/138 (1.4%) cases VABB results were inadequate. VABB diagnosed: 17/138 (12.3%) malignant and 119/138 (86.2%) benign lesions. In 28/138 cases (20.3%) surgery retrieved 18/28 (64.3%) malignant lesions. One false negative result of VABB was observed. Sensitivity and specificity of VABB resulted 94.4% and 100%. Our diagnostic algorithm estimated a 45% mean decrease of costs using VABB when compared with surgical biopsy of all C3 lesions.

  12. Endobronchial ultrasonography-guided transbronchial needle aspiration biopsy for preoperative nodal staging of lung cancer in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Lorraine D; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Lan, Charlie K W; Omer, Shuab; Preventza, Ourania; Pickrell, Brent; Nguyen, Alex; Casal, Roberto F

    2013-11-01

    Recently, preoperative lung cancer staging has evolved to include endobronchial ultrasonography-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsies of the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, but the feasibility and usefulness of the procedure have not been well studied in the veteran population. To determine the safety and effectiveness of EBUS-TBNA as a key component of a preoperative staging algorithm for lung cancer in veterans. Review of a prospectively maintained thoracic surgery database that includes patients who underwent lung resection for lung cancer between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2012, at a single Veterans Affairs medical center among a consecutive cohort of 166 patients with clinically early-stage (I or II) lung cancer who underwent lobectomy with nodal dissection. Endobronchial ultrasonography-guided transbronchial needle aspiration mediastinal staging (EBUS group) in 62 patients (37.3%) was compared with noninvasive nodal staging plus integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography only (PET/CT-only group) in 104 patients (62.7%). The accuracy of nodal staging was assessed by comparison with the final pathological staging after complete nodal dissection (the gold standard). Primary outcomes were feasibility, safety, accuracy, and negative predictive value of EBUS-TBNA for preoperative nodal staging. A secondary outcome was the rate of nontherapeutic lung resection for occult N2 disease, with comparison between the EBUS group and the PET/CT-only group. No significant complications were attributable to the EBUS-TBNA procedure. In the EBUS group, 258 lymph node stations were sampled. N1 hilar metastases were diagnosed in 8 patients (12.9%) before surgery, and the remainder were staged N0. Accuracy and negative predictive value of EBUS-TBNA were 93.5% (58 of 62) and 92.6% (50 of 54), respectively. The overall rate of nontherapeutic lung resection performed in patients with occult N2 disease was 10.8% (18 of 166) (8.1% in the

  13. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Russo, Giuseppe; Boccalini, Sara; Michaud, Johan; Klauser, Andrea; Serafini, Giovanni; Martinoli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this review is to illustrate the spectrum of ultrasound-guided procedures around the shoulder. The shoulder is affected by a wide range of both, traumatic and degenerative diseases. Ultrasound guidance is a low-cost and safe tool to perform minimally invasive interventional procedures around the shoulder. The clinical outcome is shown by the use of clinical scores: visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant's score and Shoulder Pain Disability Index (SPADI). Rotator cuff calcification is a common painful condition that occurs in up to 7.5 % of otherwise healthy adults. Ultrasound-guided procedures include single-needle and double-needle approach with different needles. These techniques are described and the results are critically compared. Ultrasound-guided viscosupplementation is a new therapeutic approach for treatment of several shoulder pain disorders: osteoarthritis, rotator cuff tear and tendinosis. In adhesive capsulitis, different therapeutic ultrasound-guided techniques such as corticosteroid injection, capsular distension (sodium chlorate solution; sodium chlorate and corticosteroids; air) and viscosupplementation are evaluated. Acromion-clavear injection of steroid and lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance is easy to perform and is indicated in conservative treatment of painful osteoarthrosis. The treatment of rotator cuff tendinosis and partial tears with ultrasound-guided injection of concentrated autologous platelets is also described.

  14. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  15. The complimentary role of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy and endobronchial ultrasound fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Aragaki-Nakahodo, Alejandro Adolfo; Baughman, Robert P; Shipley, Ralph T; Benzaquen, Sadia

    2017-10-01

    Transbronchial lung cryobiopsy (TBLC) is a novel technique that has proved to be useful in diagnosing various interstitial lung diseases (ILD). The use of TBLC to diagnose sarcoidosis in an unselected patient population is unknown, and could be complimentary to endobronchial ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA). A retrospective analysis of 36 patients in a single, tertiary-care, academic medical center was conducted to describe the yield of both EBUS-FNA and TBLC in the diagnosis of suspected sarcoidosis over a three year period. A grading system to evaluate the presence and extent of specific radiographic features on computed tomography chest imaging studies was compared to the results of EBUS-FNA and TBLC. Complications associated with the procedures were also noted. The overall diagnostic yield in our cohort (all pathologic diagnosis considered) was 80.6% (29 out of 36 patients had a definite pathologic diagnosis). Eighteen patients referred for possible sarcoidosis had a positive bronchoscopic specimen confirming the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. For those patients with a pathologic diagnosis of sarcoidosis, the diagnostic yield for EBUS-FNA and TBLC was 66.7% each (12 out of 18 patients), while the combined diagnostic yield for EBUS-FNA and TBLC increased to 100%. For all cases, the pneumothorax rate was 11.1%. TBLC appears to be a safe and complimentary technique to diagnose sarcoidosis and could be considered part of the diagnostic armamentarium in bronchoscopic centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. KALK study: ultrasound guided needling and lavage (barbotage) with steroid injection versus sham barbotage with and without steroid injection - protocol for a randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Moosmayer, Stefan; Ekeberg, Ole Marius; Hallgren, Hanna Bjørnsson; Heier, Ingar; Kvalheim, Synnøve; Blomquist, Jesper; Pripp, Are Hugo; Juel, Nils Gunnar; Kjellevold, Stein Harald; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2017-04-04

    For the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder a variety of treatment regimes exist. Commonly used treatment measures include medication with oral analgesics, corticosteroid injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, ultrasound guided needling and lavage, and surgical treatment. Earlier cohort studies suggest that patients may benefit from these treatments, but there are few randomized studies and conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of the various treatments. In the present study we aim to compare the effectiveness of ultrasound guided needling and lavage (barbotage) together with a steroid injection to sham barbotage with and without an additional steroid injection. The study will be performed in six secondary-care institutions in Norway and Sweden. It is designed as a pragmatic, randomized, three-arm, parallel group, double-blinded, sham-controlled clinical trial with a 2-year follow-up. It will be performed on 210 patients, aged 30 years or older, presenting with painful arc, positive impingement sign and a calcium deposit > 5 mm. Randomization to one of the three treatment options will be performed by using an online central randomization system. The three treatment groups are barbotage together with a subacromial steroid injection (the barbotage group), sham barbotage together with a subacromial steroid injection (the steroid group) or sham barbotage without a subacromial steroid injection (the placebo group). In the placebo group the steroid injection will be replaced by a short-acting local anaesthetic. Standardized home-based post-treatment physiotherapy will be performed by all patients for 8 weeks. Follow-ups are at 2 and 6 weeks, 4, 8, 12 and 24 months after treatment was given and will be performed with the patients and the outcome assessors blinded for group assignment. Primary outcome will be the Oxford shoulder score at 4 month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures are the QuickDASH upper extremity score, the EQ-5D-5L

  17. Stylet Use Does Not Improve Diagnostic Outcomes in Endobronchial Ultrasonographic Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Eric L; Semaan, Roy; Illei, Peter; Mallow, Christopher; Arias, Sixto; Feller-Kopman, David; Oakjones-Burgess, Karen; Frimpong, Bernice; Ortiz, Ricardo; Lee, Hans; Yarmus, Lonny

    2017-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonographically guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) of thoracic structures is a commonly performed tissue sampling technique. The use of an inner-stylet in the EBUS needle has never been rigorously evaluated and may be unnecessary. In a prospective randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial, patients with a clinical indication for EBUS-TBNA underwent lymph node sampling using both with-stylet and without-stylet techniques. Sample adequacy, diagnostic yield, and various cytologic quality measures were compared. One hundred twenty-one patients were enrolled, with 194 lymph nodes sampled, each using both with-stylet and without-stylet techniques. There was no significant difference in sample adequacy or diagnostic yield between techniques. The without-stylet technique resulted in adequate samples in 87% of the 194 study lymph nodes, which was no different from the with-stylet adequacy rate (82%; P = .371). The with-stylet technique resulted in a diagnosis in 50 of 194 samples (25.7%), which was similar to the without-stylet group (49 of 194 [25.2%]; P = .740). There was a high degree of concordance in the determination of adequacy (84.0%; 95% CI, 78.1-88.9) and diagnostic sample generation (95.4%; 95% CI, 91.2-97.9) between the two techniques. A similar qualitative number of lymphocytes, malignant cells, and bronchial respiratory epithelia were recovered using each technique. Omitting stylet use during EBUS-TBNA does not affect diagnostic outcomes and reduces procedural complexity. ClinicalTrials.Gov: No. NCT 02201654; URL:www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with signet-ring cells of the pancreas: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Komura, Takuya; Marukawa, Yohei; Ohta, Hajime; Kasashima, Satomi; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Yano, Masaaki; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    A man in his 60s visited our hospital because of a pancreatic head tumor. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed that the tumor consisted of a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and adenocarcinoma, including signet-ring cell carcinoma, and that the ratio of these components was approximately 50:50. Therefore, he was diagnosed with mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Because of liver and lymph node metastases, systemic chemotherapy was initiated using a regimen for the NEC component based on an increase in neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Although the patient achieved stable disease after two chemotherapy cycles, the tumor increased in size after three cycles, which was associated with a gradual increase in carcinoembryonic antigen and a decrease in NSE level. An EUS-FNA reexamination revealed that the adenocarcinoma component accounted for 90 % of the tumor. Thus, an adenocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen was started, and a slight reduction in tumor size was observed. Here, we report an extremely rare and remarkable case of MANEC of the pancreas that demonstrates the effectiveness of EUS-FNA for helping to decide the chemotherapy regimen.

  19. Which method is more effective in treatment of calcific tendinitis in the shoulder? Prospective randomized comparison between ultrasound-guided needling and extracorporeal shock wave therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Yoon-vin; Kong, Chae-Gwan

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided needling with subacromial corticosteroid injection is more effective than extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for function restoration and pain relief in patients with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Fifty-four patients diagnosed with unilateral painful calcific tendinitis were randomly allocated to a US needling or ESWT group. The US needling group underwent US-guided needling and received a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The ESWT group received ESWT 3 times a week. All patients were prospectively evaluated; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Simple Shoulder Test, and visual analog scale for pain scores were recorded before the procedure and at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, and the last follow-up. The size and morphology of the deposits were evaluated by radiography. The average follow-up period was 23.0 months. At last follow-up, the mean size of the deposits was significantly different between the 2 groups (P = .001); it decreased to 0.5 mm from 14.8 mm in the US needling group and to 5.6 mm from 11.0 mm in the ESWT group. There were also significant improvements in clinical outcomes in both groups after treatment (P < .05). At 1-year follow-up, the US needling group had significantly better scores than the ESWT group with regard to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons assessment (90.3 and 74.6, respectively; P = .001), Simple Shoulder Test (83.3 and 70.8, respectively; P = .015), and visual analog scale for pain (1.4 and 3.3, respectively; P = .003).The initial calcium deposit sizes and clinical outcomes were weakly correlated in both groups (P > .05). Both treatment modalities for calcific tendinitis improved clinical outcomes and eliminated calcium deposits. US-guided needling treatment, however, was more effective in function restoration and pain relief in the short term. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Usefulness of endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling using core biopsy needle as a percutaneous biopsy rescue for diagnosis of solid liver mass: Combined histological-cytological analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Nah; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Hee Kyung; Choi, Hyun Jong; Choi, Moon Han; Kim, Dong Choon; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo; Kim, Sang Gyune; Kim, Young Seok

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is one of the alternative methods for tissue sampling of liver solid mass. However, the diagnostic efficacy using cytology alone was limited. In this study, we evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) as a percutaneous biopsy rescue for liver solid mass. The EUS-FNB using core biopsy needle for liver solid mass was performed prospectively for patients who were failure to acquire a tissue or achieve a diagnosis using percutaneous liver biopsy. The primary outcome was the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for malignancy and specific tumor type. The secondary outcomes were the median numbers of passes required to establish a diagnosis, the proportions of patients in whom immunohistochemical (IHC) stain was possible and obtained adequate specimen, and safety of EUS-FNB. Twenty-one patients (12 women; mean age, 63 years [range, 37-81]) underwent EUS-FNB for solid liver masses. The median number of needle passes was 2.0 (range, 1-5). On-site cytology and cytology with Papanicolaou stain showed malignancy in 16 patients (76.2%) and 17 patients (81.0%), respectively. In histology with HE stain, 19 patients (90.5%) were diagnosed malignancy and optimal to IHC stain. The overall diagnostic accuracy for malignancy and specific tumor type were 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. No complications were seen. EUS-FNB with core biopsy needle for solid liver mass may be helpful in the management of patients who are unable to diagnose using percutaneous liver biopsy. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Biliary plastic stent does not influence the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of pancreatic head masses performed with core biopsy needles.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Giorgini, Sara; Fabbri, Carlo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Scarpelli, Marina; Macarri, Giampiero

    2017-08-01

    While the presence of biliary stent significantly decreases the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for pancreatic head cancer staging, its impact on the EUS-guided sampling accuracy is still debated. Furthermore, data on EUS-fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) using core biopsy needles in patients with pancreatic mass and biliary stent are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of biliary stent on the adequacy and accuracy of EUS-FNB in patients with pancreatic head mass. All patients who underwent EUS-guided sampling with core needles of solid pancreatic head masses causing obstructive jaundice were retrospectively identified in a single tertiary referral center. Adequacy, defined as the rate of cases in which a tissue specimen for proper examination was achieved, with and without biliary stent, was the primary outcome measure. The diagnostic accuracy and complication rate were the secondary outcome measures. A total of 130 patients with pancreatic head mass causing biliary obstruction were included in the study: 74 cases of them were sampled without stent and 56 cases with plastic stent in situ. The adequacy was 96.4% in the stent group and 90.5% in the group without stent (p=0.190). No significant differences were observed for sensitivity (88.9% vs. 85.9%), specificity (100% for both groups), and accuracy (89.3% vs. 86.5%) between those with and without stent, respectively. The accuracy was not influenced by the timing of stenting (<48h or ≥48h before EUS). No EUS-FNB related complications were recorded. The presence of biliary stent does not influence the tissue sampling adequacy, the diagnostic accuracy and the complication rate of EUS-FNB of pancreatic head masses performed with core biopsy needles. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The negative predictive value of ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses: a validation study of 339 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Charlie; Lewis, Darrell R; Nasute, Paola; Hayes, Malcolm; Warren, Linda J; Gordon, Paula B

    2012-10-31

    To determine the negative predictive value of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses, with detailed analysis of any false-negative cases. We reviewed 669 cases of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies that had benign pathologic findings. Given a benign pathology on core biopsy, true-negatives had either benign pathology on surgical excision or at least 2 years of stable imaging and/or clinical follow-up; false-negatives had malignant histology on surgical excision. Follow-up was available for 339 breast lesions; 117 were confirmed to be benign via surgical excision, and 220 were stable after 2 years or more of imaging or clinical follow-up (mean follow-up time 33.1 months, range 24-64 months). The negative predictive value was determined to be 99.4%. There were 2 false-negative cases, giving a false-negative rate of 0.1%. There was no delay in diagnosis in either case because the radiologist noted discordance between imaging and core biopsy pathology, and recommended surgical excision despite the benign core biopsy pathology. Sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy provides a high negative predictive value in assessing breast lesions. Radiologic/pathologic correlation should be performed to avoid delay in the diagnosis of carcinoma.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to help locate a lump or abnormality ... exam. The transducer sends out inaudible, high—frequency sound waves into the body and then listens for ...

  4. [Gelatine phantom for training of ultrasound guided vascular access].

    PubMed

    Clemmesen, Louise; Bendtsen, Thomas F; Sloth, Erik; Oveland, Nils Petter; Knudsen, Lars

    2013-02-25

    This article describes the production of a low-cost training phantom for ultrasound guided invasive procedures of peripheral and central veins and presents a video of the process. The phantom can be adapted for use with other ultrasound techniques. It is a universal useful skill training tool for ultrasound guided invasive procedures. The phantom is easily made of concentrated gelatine. It is cheap and recyclable. The shelf life is prolonged by cold storage in a freezer. The gelatine phantom is a useful tool for practice of probe handling techniques and needle dexterity when placing peripheral and central venous catheters.

  5. Establishing an accurate diagnosis of a parotid lump: evaluation of the current biopsy methods - fine needle aspiration cytology, ultrasound-guided core biopsy, and intraoperative frozen section.

    PubMed

    Howlett, D C; Skelton, E; Moody, A B

    2015-09-01

    The optimum technique for histological confirmation of the nature of a parotid mass remains controversial. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), which has traditionally been used, is associated with high non-diagnostic and false negative rates, and ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy and frozen section have been explored as alternatives. US-guided core biopsy is more invasive than FNAC, but is safe, well-tolerated, and associated with improved diagnostic performance. Although frozen section offers better specificity than FNAC, it has a number of important drawbacks and cannot be considered as a primary diagnostic tool. US-guided core biopsy should be considered as the initial diagnostic technique of choice, and in units where the accuracy of FNAC is good it can be used when FNAC is equivocal or non-diagnostic. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The integration of single fiber reflectance (SFR) spectroscopy during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) in pancreatic masses: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Amelink, Arjen; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2016-03-01

    EUS-FNA can be used for pathological confirmation of a suspicious pancreatic mass. However, performance depends on an on-site cytologist and time between punction and final pathology results can be long. SFR spectroscopy is capable of extracting biologically relevant parameters (e.g. oxygenation and blood volume) in real-time from a very small tissue volume at difficult locations. In this study we determined feasibility of the integration of SFR spectroscopy during EUSFNA procedures in pancreatic masses. Patients with benign and malignant pancreatic masses who were scheduled for an EUS-FNA were included. The working guide wire inside the 19 gauge endoscopic biopsy needle was removed and the sterile single fiber (300 μm core and 700 μm outer diameter, wide-angle beam, NA 0.22) inserted through the needle. Spectroscopy measurements in the visiblenear infrared wavelength region (400-900 nm) and autofluorescence measurements (excitation at 405 nm) were taken three times, and subsequently cytology was obtained. Wavelength dependent optical properties were compared to cytology results. We took measurements in 13 patients with corresponding cytology results (including mucinous tumor, ductal adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, and pancreatitis). In this paper we show the first analyzed results comparing normal pancreatic tissue with cancerous tissue in the same patient. We found a large difference in blood volume fraction, and blood oxygenation was higher in normal tissue. Integration of SFR spectroscopy is feasible in EUS-FNA procedures, the workflow hardly requires changes and it takes little time. The first results differentiating normal from tumor tissue are promising.

  7. Contribution of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cell blocks of metastatic supraclavicular lymph nodes to the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Ying; Xu, Dong; Liu, Jun-Ping; Mao, Wei-Min; Chen, Li-Yu; Yang, Chen; Wang, Li-Ping; Shi, Kai-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Routine smears of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens of supraclavicular lymph nodes with ultrasound (US) real-time guidance have proven useful in lung cancer staging, but the clinical value of additional information from cell-block of FNA samples has been little researched. This study mainly focused on the contribution of cell block analysis to the diagnosis and staging in lung cancer. Clinical data about 211 lung cancer patients with supraclavicular lymph node enlargement admitted to ultrasonography in the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital and recommended a needle biopsy under US-guided, the adequacy of the specimens for preparing cell blocks was acquireded, and the additional immunohistochemistry or genetic information provided from cell block analysis was examined. In 211 lung cancer patients referred for US-guided FNA (median age 61.8 ± 10.0 years, range 30-88) 279 aspirations were performed. Conventional smears could be obtained from 185 aspirates (66.3%) and contained 176 (95.1%) diagnostic smears. Cell blocks could be obtained from 94 aspirates (33.7%) and contained diagnostic material in 88 (93.6%) aspirates. Above all, cell blocks also made epithelial growth factor receptor gene mutation analysis in 17 patients with FNA samples, and the positive rate was 70.6%. Overall, cell blocks provided clinically significant information for 51 of the 211 patients participating in the study (24.2%). Cell-block samples from US-guided FNA is a promising, relatively noninvasive technique to provide additional information in lung cancer diagnosis. Analysis of cell blocks allows for genetic analysis of the patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes metastasis.

  8. Collision tumor of primary merkel cell carcinoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, diagnosed on ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a unique case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghua; Yang, Jing-Jing; Wu, Maoxin

    2015-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of skin collision tumor between primary Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) first diagnosed on ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA). A 95-year-old female with a history of CLL presented with a slow growing left malar mass was referred to our clinic for US-FNA. US scan showed a well-defined subcutaneous mass (2.78 cm) with complex echogenicity. On-site assessment showed a cellular aspiration which was interpreted as small blue round cell tumor. On further examination, smears and cell block showed dimorphic populations of relatively larger cells with neuroendocrine features and smaller lymphoid cells. Immunocytochemical studies of cell block sections revealed that the larger cells were positive for CD56, Chromogranin, Synaptophysin, CK8/18, CK20 (dot-like pattern); and the smaller cells were positive for CD45. Flow cytometric analysis showed a majority of CD16/CD56 positive cells, 17% of monoclonal B-cells, and 14% of reactive T cells. The immunophenotype of the monoclonal B cells were of CLL/SLL. The diagnosis of a collision tumor composed of primary MCC and CLL/SLL was confirmed. Surgical resection of the mass one month later concurred with the FNA cytological diagnosis. The fact that surgical specimen displayed a solid tumor with both CLL/SLL and MCC components ruled out the possibility that the FNA merely had MCC with peripheral leukemic blood contaminant. No additional MCC lesion was found in the patient, which ruled out the possibility of metastatic MCC to a lymphomatous lymph node. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Outcome of patients with early stage oral cancer managed by an observation strategy towards the N0 neck using ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology: No survival difference as compared to elective neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Flach, Géke B; Tenhagen, Mark; de Bree, Remco; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; van der Waal, Isaac; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Kuik, Dirk J; Castelijns, Jonas A; Leemans, C René

    2013-02-01

    Management of the clinically N0 neck in oral cancer patients remains controversial. We describe the outcome of patients with T1-T2 oral cancer and N0 neck based on ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology (USgFNAC) who were treated by transoral excision and followed by a 'wait and scan' policy (W&S). This retrospective analysis included 285 consecutive patients of whom 234 were followed by W&S and 51 underwent elective neck dissection (END). Survival rates were compared between groups and correction for confounding factors was performed. Of W&S patients, the 5-year disease-specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were 94.2% and 81.6% respectively. During follow-up 72.2% remained free of lymph node metastases and 27.8% developed delayed metastases. W&S patients with delayed metastases had a 5-year DSS and OS of 80.0% and 62.8%, respectively. In patients with positive END these rates were 81.3% and 64.2%, respectively. Between the groups, survival rates were not significantly different. Of the W&S patients with delayed metastases, 90.6% needed adjuvant radiotherapy versus 55.0% of patients with positive END. With regard to survival, in patients with early stage oral cancer and cN0 neck a 'wait and scan' policy using strict USgFNAC surveillance is justified as survival is not negatively influenced. Using a 'wait and scan' follow-up strategy instead of elective neck treatment, unnecessary neck dissection and its accompanying morbidity can be avoided in 72.2% of patients. However, for the small proportion of patients with delayed metastases, more extensive treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy is needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy with an automatic full-incision system: the initial experiences and comparison with a conventional biopsy gun].

    PubMed

    Pokieser, P; Kain, R; Helbich, T; Gebauer, A; Neuhold, N; Walter, R; Tscholakoff, D; Mostbeck, G H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new automatic biopsy device (Autovac, Angiomed, Karlsruhe, Germany) in ultrasound (US) guided biopsies of focal abdominal lesions. 50 consecutive patients with focal abdominal lesions underwent US guided biopsies. In the first 24 patients, needle passes were performed with the Autovac system (outer diameter 0.95 mm) as well as with the Biopty gun (outer diameter 0.9 mm) (Bard Covington, USA). The size and the quality of the histologic and the cytologic material obtained by both systems were evaluated by histopathologists blinded to the system used. Autovac yielded significantly more material (defined as the area of the obtained tissue cores) and a significantly higher quality score than did the Biopty system. 96% of the histologic specimen and 100% of the cytologic smears obtained with Autovac were diagnostic, compared to 70 and 81% with Biopty, respectively. With the exception of a short-time elevation of the blood pressure in one patient, no complications occurred. The results indicate an advantage of the automatic full-cut type system Autovac over the tru-cut type Biopty gun in US-guided biopsies of focal abdominal lesions.

  11. Reliable EGFR mutation testing in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular lymph node fine-needle aspirates: a cohort study with diagnostic performance analysis.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Amir; Tiwari, Sandeep; Sovani, Vishakha; Baldwin, David R; Kumaran, Maruti

    2015-01-01

    15-30% of patients with lung cancer will have supraclavicular and cervical lymphadenopathy (SCLN). Ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is regarded as an effective diagnostic tool in small size lymph nodes (LNs) and impalpable positron emission tomography detected nodes. We evaluated our diagnostic service performance in relation to the adequacy of samples for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. Retrospective data analysis from electronic records, searching for all suspected lung cancer referrals that underwent US of the neck±FNA, over a continuous period of 4 years. Of 306 cases with suspected lung cancer referred to our department for US FNA of SCLN, 228 patients underwent the procedure. Of the remaining 78 patients, LNs were not detected in 52 cases and appeared benign in 26. Cytological diagnosis was established in 171 patients (75%) for treatment decisions without further investigations. The remaining 57 patients had further investigations; 45 reconfirmed the US-guided FNA diagnosis. The average LN size was 12.9 mm, and positive cytology was obtained in LNs ranging from 3 to 45 mm. Of 57 adenocarcinoma cases, 34 were tested for EGFR confirming 4 positive, 25 negative and 5 insufficient samples. No complications were recorded. US-guided FNA of SCLN remains an important diagnostic tool in lung cancer. Adequate tissue can be obtained for reliable diagnosis from LNs and for EGFR mutational analysis, without the need for more invasive and expensive investigations in more than 80% of cases.

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy with a "cooled-tip needle" for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma adjacent to the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Zheng, Rong-Qin; Nan, Lin; Fang, He-Ping; Liu, Bo; Tang, Zhao-Feng; Deng, Mei-Hai; Xu, Rui-Yun

    2010-09-01

    Curative percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy is difficult or contraindicated in patients with tumors adjacent to the gallbladder because of the associated risk of injury. To date, no clinical data have been published regarding the effects and safety of percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy on tumors that are adjacent to the gallbladder. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a combined treatment involving laparoscopic cholecystectomy and subsequent percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma adjacent to the gallbladder. Twenty-three patients with hepatocellular carcinoma nodules (of less than 5 cm diameter) and adjacent to the gallbladder were treated by percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy with a "cooled-tip needle" after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with enhanced helical computed tomography and sonography, and the rates of complete necrosis as well as postoperative complications were also analyzed. All of the patients exhibited complete necrosis of their tumor lesions after treatment with percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy. During the follow-up period (which lasted more than 21 months), 22 of 23 patients were alive. Recurrent nodules appeared in other subsegments, but not at the original site treated with percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy. Of note, no fatal complications were observed in any of the patients treated with percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy. Our results suggest that combined treatment comprising both laparoscopic cholecystectomy and subsequent percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy is an effective and safe approach for patients with small (<5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas that are adjacent to the gallbladder.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  14. Reliable EGFR mutation testing in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular lymph node fine-needle aspirates: a cohort study with diagnostic performance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Amir; Tiwari, Sandeep; Sovani, Vishakha; Baldwin, David R; Kumaran, Maruti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 15–30% of patients with lung cancer will have supraclavicular and cervical lymphadenopathy (SCLN). Ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is regarded as an effective diagnostic tool in small size lymph nodes (LNs) and impalpable positron emission tomography detected nodes. We evaluated our diagnostic service performance in relation to the adequacy of samples for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. Methods Retrospective data analysis from electronic records, searching for all suspected lung cancer referrals that underwent US of the neck±FNA, over a continuous period of 4 years. Results Of 306 cases with suspected lung cancer referred to our department for US FNA of SCLN, 228 patients underwent the procedure. Of the remaining 78 patients, LNs were not detected in 52 cases and appeared benign in 26. Cytological diagnosis was established in 171 patients (75%) for treatment decisions without further investigations. The remaining 57 patients had further investigations; 45 reconfirmed the US-guided FNA diagnosis. The average LN size was 12.9 mm, and positive cytology was obtained in LNs ranging from 3 to 45 mm. Of 57 adenocarcinoma cases, 34 were tested for EGFR confirming 4 positive, 25 negative and 5 insufficient samples. No complications were recorded. Conclusions US-guided FNA of SCLN remains an important diagnostic tool in lung cancer. Adequate tissue can be obtained for reliable diagnosis from LNs and for EGFR mutational analysis, without the need for more invasive and expensive investigations in more than 80% of cases. PMID:26175906

  15. Prospective validation of microRNA signatures for detecting pancreatic malignant transformation in endoscopic-ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Adam E.; Krell, Jonathan; Prado, Mireia Mato; Gall, Tamara M.H.; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Funel, Niccola; Giovannetti, Elisa; Castellano, Leandro; Basyouny, Mohamed; Habib, Nagy A.; Kaltsidis, Harry; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Stebbing, Justin; Jiao, Long R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease. Novel biomarkers are required to aid treatment decisions and improve patient outcomes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially ideal diagnostic biomarkers, as they are stable molecules, and tumour and tissue specific. Results Logistic regression analysis revealed an endoscopic-ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) 2-miRNA classifier (miR-21 + miR-155) capable of distinguishing benign from malignant pancreatic lesions with a sensitivity of 81.5% and a specificity of 85.7% (AUC 0.930). Validation FNA cohorts confirmed both miRNAs were overexpressed in malignant disease, while circulating miRNAs performed poorly. Methods Fifty-five patients with a suspicious pancreatic lesion on cross-sectional imaging were evaluated by EUS-FNA. At echo-endoscopy, the first part of the FNA was sent for cytological assessment and the second part was used for total RNA extraction. Candidate miRNAs were selected after careful review of the literature and expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Validation was performed on an independent cohort of EUS-FNAs, as well as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and plasma samples. Conclusions We provide further evidence for using miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers for pancreatic malignancy. We demonstrate the feasibility of using fresh EUS-FNAs to establish miRNA-based signatures unique to pancreatic malignant transformation and the potential to enhance risk stratification and selection for surgery. PMID:27086919

  16. The clinical impact of immediate on-site cytopathology evaluation during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of pancreatic masses: a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wani, Sachin; Mullady, Daniel; Early, Dayna S; Rastogi, Amit; Collins, Brian; Wang, Jeff F; Marshall, Carrie; Sams, Sharon B; Yen, Roy; Rizeq, Mona; Romanas, Maria; Ulusarac, Ozlem; Brauer, Brian; Attwell, Augustin; Gaddam, Srinivas; Hollander, Thomas G; Hosford, Lindsay; Johnson, Sydney; Kushnir, Vladimir; Amateau, Stuart K; Kohlmeier, Cara; Azar, Riad R; Vargo, John; Fukami, Norio; Shah, Raj J; Das, Ananya; Edmundowicz, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Observational data on the impact of on-site cytopathology evaluation (OCE) during endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses have reported conflicting results. We aimed to compare the diagnostic yield of malignancy and proportion of inadequate specimens between patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses with and without OCE. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, consecutive patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent randomization for EUS-FNA with or without OCE. The number of FNA passes in the OCE+ arm was dictated by the on-site cytopathologist, whereas seven passes were performed in OCE- arm. EUS-FNA protocol was standardized, and slides were reviewed by cytopathologists using standardized criteria for cytologic characteristics and diagnosis. A total of 241 patients (121 OCE+, 120 OCE-) were included. There was no difference between the two groups in diagnostic yield of malignancy (OCE+ 75.2% vs. OCE- 71.6%, P=0.45) and proportion of inadequate specimens (9.8 vs. 13.3%, P=0.31). Procedures in OCE+ group required fewer EUS-FNA passes (median, OCE+ 4 vs. OCE- 7, P<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to overall procedure time, adverse events, number of repeat procedures, costs (based on baseline cost-minimization analysis), and accuracy (using predefined criteria for final diagnosis of malignancy). There was no difference between the two groups with respect to cytologic characteristics of cellularity, bloodiness, number of cells/slide, and contamination. Results of this study demonstrated no significant difference in the diagnostic yield of malignancy, proportion of inadequate specimens, and accuracy in patients with pancreatic mass undergoing EUS-FNA with or without OCE.

  17. Diagnostic accuracies of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with distinct negative pressure suction techniques in solid lesions: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ronghua; Wang, Jinlin; Li, Yawen; Duan, Yaqi; Wu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is highly accurate in obtaining specific diagnoses for various diseases. The present study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic yields, accuracies and sampling adequacies, of slow-pull, 5 ml suction and 10 ml suction techniques in EUS-FNA of solid lesions. The present study was a retrospective comparative study, which was performed in tertiary academic centers, recognized for their expertise in EUS and EUS-guided FNA. The present study involved 149 patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid masses. A total of 34 (22.8%), 37 (24.8%) and 78 (52.4%) patients underwent EUS-FNA with slow-pull, 5 ml suction and 10 ml suction techniques, respectively. The EUS-FNA cytology and histology results were compared with those from the gold standard of surgical histopathology [hematoxylin-eosin staining; immunohistochemical test of cluster of differentiation (CD) 79a, CD20 and flow cytometry test] or long-term clinical follow-up. The present retrospective comparative study demonstrated that the diagnostic yields and accuracies of EUS-FNA with slow-pull (86.1%) were significantly superior to those achieved with 5 ml suction (83.3%) or 10 ml suction (69.9%; P<0.0001; χ2 test). Consistently, 86.5% (32/37) of the samples obtained from the 5 ml suction group were adequate for histological diagnosis. By contrast, 70.6 (24/34) and 85.9% (67/78) of samples from the slow-pull and 10 ml suction groups were adequate for histological diagnosis, respectively. The samples obtained using 10 ml suction contained more blood compared with those obtained via slow-pull and 5 ml suction (P=0.0056; χ2 test). No complications were noted in any of the three groups. The samples that were obtained for histopathological diagnosis using 5 ml suction were superior to those obtained using slow-pull or 10 ml suction. Additional multi-central prospective studies in which EUS-FNA is performed with variable negative pressures are required to improve

  18. Impact and safety of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration on patients with cirrhosis and pyrexia of unknown origin in India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Narendra; Bansal, Rinkesh Kumar; Puri, Rajesh; Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Nasa, Mukesh; Shah, Vinit; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Sud, Randhir; Soin, Arvinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Etiologic diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin is important in patients with cirrhosis for optimal management and to prevent flare up of infectious disease after liver transplantation. However, there is very limited literature available on this subject. The present study aimed to examine the safety and impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with cirrhosis. Methods: The study was conducted between January 2014 and January 2016 at a tertiary care center. A total of 50 (47 lymph nodes, 3 adrenal) EUS guided FNAs were performed in 46 patients. Data are presented as median (25 – 75 IQR). Results: The study included 46 patients (40 males) whose mean age was 47.9 ± 11.1 (SD) years; mean Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score and mean MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) score were 10 (8 – 11) and 18 (12 – 20), respectively. The Child Pugh class was A in 4, B in 14, and C in 28 (including three patients with adrenal FNAs). Indications for FNA were pyrexia of unknown origin and lymphadenopathy on CT imaging. The cytopathological diagnoses were metastatic disease in 1 (adrenal), granulomatous change in 10 (6 positive with acid fast bacilli stain), histoplasmosis in three (two adrenals, one lymph node), 32 lymph nodes were reactive and four lymph node FNAs showed inadequate cellularity. The pathologic nodes had significantly lower long-to-short axis ratio [1.25 (1.09 – 1.28) versus 1.46 (1.22 – 1.87), P = 0.020]; a higher proportion of hypoechoic echotexture (5 versus 3, P = 0.017), and sharply defined borders (4 versus 2, P = 0.029). Complications included mild hepatic encephalopathy related to sedation in two patients with Child’s C status. Conclusion: EUS guided FNA is safe in patients with cirrhosis and modified the management in 14/46 (30.4 %) patients. PMID:27652300

  19. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  20. Ultrasound-guided drainage of a seroma following tumescent liposuction.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, William G; Hanke, C William; Petersen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Of the complications that can occur following tumescent liposuction, seroma formation is unusual. It is a common practice for seromas to be aspirated blindly with a needle and syringe. We present a case of seroma formation following liposuction, with a subsequent step-by-step technical description of ultrasound-guided drainage of the seroma. Utilization of ultrasound provides a safe, effective method for aspirating seromas, allowing for accurate visualization and delineation of the seroma margins, proper needle placement, and monitoring of progress. It is a simple and useful tool in postprocedural management of patients undergoing liposuction. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Ultrasound-guided biopsy of the testis: indications and results].

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Capasso, Raffaella; Izzo, Andrea; Cesarano, Elviro; La Porta, Michele; Amato, Mario; D'Andrea, Alfredo; Coppolino, Francesco; Fonio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the testis is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of intratesticular focal lesions. In spite of its high sensibility, eco-Doppler-elastography is lacking of specificity in discrimination between benign and malign lesions, not always allowing us to make a definitive diagnosis of malignancy. When a diagnostic doubt persists, for such lesions that are indeterminate at clinical and radiological evaluation, it is possible to recur to ultrasound-guided testicular needle biopsy. This paper describes the main application scenarios of testicular fine-needle aspiration under ultrasound guidance and the experience in our institute.

  2. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  3. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Oncologic Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the early 1990s, its application has been extended to various diseases. For pancreatic cancer, EUS-FNA can obtain specimens from the tumor itself with fewer complications than other methods. Interventional EUS enables various therapeutic options: local ablation, brachytherapy, placement of fiducial markers for radiotherapy, and direct injection of antitumor agents into cancer. This paper will focus on EUS-guided oncologic therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23533319

  5. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  7. Ultrasound-guided chest biopsies.

    PubMed

    Middleton, William D; Teefey, Sharlene A; Dahiya, Nirvikar

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary nodules that are surrounded by aerated lung cannot be visualized with sonography. Therefore, percutaneous biopsy must be guided with computed tomography or fluoroscopy. Although this restriction only applies to central lung nodules, it has permeated referral patterns for other thoracic lesions and has retarded the growth of ultrasound-guided interventions. Nevertheless, sonography is an extremely flexible modality that can expeditiously guide many biopsy procedures in the thorax. Peripheral pulmonary nodules can be successfully biopsied with success rates exceeding 90% and complications rates of less than 5%. Orienting the probe parallel to the intercostal space facilitates biopsies of peripheral pulmonary nodules. Anterior mediastinal masses that extend to the parasternal region are often easily approachable provided the internal mammary vessels, costal cartilage, and deep great vessels are identified and avoided. Superior mediastinal masses can be sampled from a suprasternal or supraclavicular approach. Phased array probes or tightly curved arrays may provide improved access for biopsies in this location. Posterior mediastinal masses are more difficult to biopsy with ultrasound guidance because of the overlying paraspinal muscles. However, when posterior mediastinal masses extend into the posterior medial pleural region, they can be biopsied with ultrasound guidance. Because many lung cancers metastasize to the supraclavicular nodes, it is important to evaluate the supraclavicular region when determining the best approach to obtain a tissue diagnosis. When abnormal supraclavicular nodes are present, they often are the easiest and safest lesions to biopsy.

  8. Impact of Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) Training on the Diagnostic Yield of Conventional Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for Lymph Node Stations 4R and 7

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Gupta, Nalini; Bal, Amanjit; Ram, Babu; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Background There is sparse literature on whether training in endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improves the diagnostic yield of conventional TBNA (cTBNA). Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of cTBNA before and after the introduction of EBUS. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent cTBNA at our center. The study was divided into two periods, before and after the introduction of EBUS at our facility. The diagnostic yield of cTBNA was compared between the study periods. Rapid on-site cytological examination was not available. Results A total of 1,050 patients (61.6% men; mean age 45.6 years) underwent cTBNA during the study period (849 before EBUS; 201 after EBUS). Sarcoidosis (n = 527) followed by bronchogenic carcinoma (n = 222) formed the most common indications for performing cTBNA. There was a significant increase in both the success of obtaining a representative sample (from 71% to 85%), and the diagnostic yield (from 33% to 49.5%) of cTBNA, after the introduction of EBUS. The increase in the diagnostic yield of cTBNA after introduction of EBUS remained significant even after adjusting for years of performing cTBNA and the type of anesthesia (topical vs. sedation and topical) on a multivariate analysis. Conclusion The diagnostic yield of cTBNA at our facility increased after the introduction of EBUS-TBNA. However, given the retrospective nature of the study, prospective studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:27083009

  9. New economic training model for installing ultrasound-guided drainages.

    PubMed

    Mohr, A; Jung, E M; Stroszczynski, C; Schacherer, D; Klebl, F

    2014-11-01

    Abscesses and circumscribed collections of fluid are frequently found as complications of infectious diseases or surgery. Drainage is often indicated. We have established a new, economic, easy-to-make model to learn and improve competence in installing ultrasound-guided drainage. Up to fifteen water balloons (size 30 - 50 mm) were placed in a plastic box which then was filled with instant custard powder mixed with water. Spiral computed tomography (CT) of this box was performed. Experienced (n = 8) and inexperienced examiners (n = 8) drained the balloons via a direct puncture technique using either ultrasound-guidance alone or volume navigation with image fusion (ultrasound and CT) with needle tracking. Trainees filled out a questionnaire (before and after training) asking for information on their experience in ultrasound, in installing drainages and evaluating the new model. The time needed for installing the drainage was measured. None of the participants had ever attended a course on drainage installation. Only a few of the experienced examiners (n = 3) would autonomously install a drainage into a fluid collection with a size exceeding 4 cm before training. After training all participants felt more confident in ultrasound and in installing drainages into abscesses or other fluid collections. Most of the participants rated additional volume navigation with image fusion as a helpful tool. Ultrasound-guided drainage of abscesses can be trained easily with this new and economic model. Students and physicians can improve their skills and gain confidence in performing ultrasound-guided interventions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Role of the Endobronchial Landmarks Guiding TBNA and EBUS-TBNA in Lung Cancer Staging

    PubMed Central

    Arias, S.; Liu, Q. H.; Frimpong, B.; Lee, H.; Feller-Kopman, D.; Yarmus, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lung cancer is the leading cause of malignancy related mortality in the United States. Accurate staging of NSCLC influences therapeutic decisions. Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA) has been accepted as a procedure for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and adequacy of TBNA and EBUS-TBNA for sampling of mediastinal adenopathy using the Wang's eleven lymph node map stations. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 99 consecutive cases diagnosed with malignancy by EBUS-TBNA and a series 74 patients evaluated for mediastinal adenopathy or a pulmonary lesion using conventional transbronchial needle aspiration. The IASLC lymph node map was correlated with Wang's map. Results. A total of 182 lymph node stations were sampled using EBUS-TBNA. 96 were positive for nodal metastasis. A total of four cases of samples taken from station 2R showed malignant cells. From the 74 cases series using cTBNA 167 nodes were sampled in 222 passes. Lymphoid or malignant tissue was obtained in 67 (91.8%) cases; 55.1% of the nodes were 1 cm or less. Conclusions. The use of the eleven stations described in Wang's map to guide TBNA of the mediastinal nodes allows sampling of radiologically considered nonpathological nodes. These data suggest that Wang's map covers the most frequent IASLC nodal stations compromised with metastasis. PMID:28058035

  11. Endobronchial ultrasonography with guide sheath versus computed tomography guided transthoracic needle biopsy for peripheral pulmonary lesions: a propensity score matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Zuli; Zhao, Hui; Li, Zhixin; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography guided transthoracic needle aspiration (CT-TTNA) and endobronchial ultrasonography with guide sheath (EBUS-GS) transbronchial lung biopsy are important methods for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs). Without enough evidence, it is controversial which is a better choice for diagnosing PPLs. In this study, we hypothesized that the complication rate of EBUS-GS would be lower than CT-TTNA and the diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-GS were not inferior to CT-TTNA. Methods This study was a retrospective analysis of a prospective registry with propensity matching. Patients with PPLs were divided into EBUS-GS group and CT-TTNA group according to patients’ intent to treatment. Pathological results and procedure related complications of EBUS-GS and CT-TTNA were recorded. Propensity score matching(PSM) was used to eliminate the intergroup bias. Diagnostic yields and complications of two groups were compared. Subgroup analysis was performed to conclude the indications of different procedures. Results A total of 187 patients (CT-TTNA: 130; EBUS-GS: 57) were enrolled. After propensity score matching, 54 paired patients were included. Diagnostic yield was 81% (44/54) for EBUS-GS and 87% (47/54) for CT-TTNA (P=0.43), respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity in malignancy was 93% (42/45) for CT-TTNA and 79% (37/47) for EUBS-GS (P=0.04). Subgroup analysis revealed that the sensitivity of CT-TTNA was significantly higher in diagnosing of lesions close to the chest wall (100% vs. 80%, P=0.04), and bronchus sign on CT was a predictive factor for accurate diagnosis by EBUS-GS. The overall complication rate was 13% (7/54) for CT-TTNA group, which was not significantly higher than that of EBUS-GS group (2%, P=0.06). Subgroup analysis showed that patients combined with pulmonary comorbidities and lesions apart from chest wall were risk factors for complications of CT-TTNA. Conclusions Both of the two procedures are effective for the diagnosis of PPLs

  12. Can botulinum toxin type A injection technique influence the clinical outcome of patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity? A randomized controlled trial comparing manual needle placement and ultrasound-guided injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Baricich, Alessio; Cisari, Carlo; Pilotto, Alberto; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2014-12-15

    Botulinum toxin type A is a first-line treatment for post-stroke focal spasticity, and the accuracy in delivering the toxin to the target muscles may influence the treatment outcome. Our aim was to compare the reduction of spasticity and the related finger position at rest improvement in post-stroke patients treated with botulinum toxin type A in upper limb muscles using ultrasound guidance and manual needle placement. In a randomized clinical trial, two groups of 15 stroke patients were treated with botulinum toxin type A injections in the wrist and finger flexor muscles of the affected upper limb using ultrasound guidance or manual needle placement. The Modified Ashworth Scale and the finger position at rest were measured at baseline and one month after toxin injections. After one month of follow-up from toxin injections, the Modified Ashworth Scale and finger position at rest significantly improved in both treatment groups, although these clinical outcomes were significantly better in patients treated under ultrasound guidance than in patients injected using manual needle placement. Ultrasound guidance for botulinum toxin type A injections could improve clinical outcome measures better than manual needle placement in post-stroke patients with spasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block: safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer

    2014-06-01

    Cervical sympathetic and stellate ganglion blocks (SGB) provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic benefit to sympathetically maintained pain syndromes in the head, neck, and upper extremity. With the ongoing efforts to improve the safety of the procedure, the techniques for SGB have evolved over time, from the use of the standard blind technique, to fluoroscopy, and recently to the ultrasound (US)-guided approach. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the ultrasound-guided technique and the many advantages that it might offer. Fluoroscopy is a reliable method for identifying bony surfaces, which facilitates identifying the C6 and C7 transverse processes. However, this is only a surrogate marker for the cervical sympathetic trunk. The ideal placement of the needle tip should be anterolateral to the longus colli muscle, deep to the prevertebral fascia (to avoid spread along the carotid sheath) but superficial to the fascia investing the longus colli muscle (to avoid injecting into the muscle substance). Identifying the correct fascial plane can be achieved with ultrasound guidance, thus facilitating the caudal spread of the injectate to reach the stellate ganglion at C7-T1 level, even if the needle is placed at C6 level. This allows for a more effective and precise sympathetic block with the use of a small injectate volume. Ultrasound-guided SGB may also improve the safety of the procedure by direct visualization of vascular structures (inferior thyroidal, cervical, vertebral, and carotid arteries) and soft tissue structures (thyroid, esophagus, and nerve roots). Accordingly, the risk of vascular and soft tissue injury may be minimized.

  14. An ultrasound-guided, tendon-sparing, lateral approach to injection of the navicular bursa.

    PubMed

    Nottrott, K; De Guio, C; Khairoun, A; Schramme, M

    2017-09-01

    Navicular disease in the horse often requires injection of the navicular bursa. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, lateral needle approach to navicular bursocentesis, which avoids penetration of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and the need for radiographic control. To describe and evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an ultrasound-guided, lateral bursocentesis technique. Cadaveric and in vivo experiments. The navicular bursa in 62 cadaveric forelimbs of 31 horses and in both forelimbs of 26 live horses, positioned with the foot flexed in a navicular block, were submitted to lateral, ultrasound-guided injection of 1.5 ml radiocontrast agent. Lateromedial radiographs were taken to locate the contrast. A second injection of 0.5 ml methylene blue was administered during needle withdrawal in cadaveric limbs to investigate the needle pathway during dissection. Contrast agent was successfully deposited in the navicular bursa in 104 of 114 (91%) limbs and in the navicular bursa alone in 89 of 114 (78%) limbs. Dissection showed no evidence of penetration of the DDFT in cadaver limbs. Failure to inject the navicular bursa was significantly associated with poor quality of the ultrasound image (P = 0.04) and resulted in aberrant injection of the distal interphalangeal joint in five of 114 (4%) limbs, the peribursal soft tissues in four of 114 (4%) limbs and the digital flexor tendon sheath in one of 114 (0.9%) limbs. Synovial fluid was observed at the needle hub in 58% of live horses. It is unknown whether injection results obtained in the limbs of horses without disease can be extrapolated to horses with clinical disease of the podotrochlear apparatus. The localisation of contrast medium on radiographs may not accurately reflect the behaviour of local anaesthetic solution or therapeutic medications injected in the navicular bursa. This lateral, ultrasound-guided technique for injecting the navicular bursa is effective, does not penetrate the DDFT and avoids

  15. Three-dimensional ultrasound-guided breast biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wendy L.; Surry, Kathleen J. M.; Campbell, Laura; Mills, Greg; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2001-05-01

    We introduce a mechanically constrained, 3D ultrasound- guided core-needle breast biopsy device. With modest breast compression, 3D ultrasound scans localize suspicious masses. A biopsy needle is mechanically guided into position for firing into the sampling region. Th needle is parallel to the transducer, allowing real-time guidance during needle insertion. Lesion sampling is verified by another ultrasound image after firing. Two procedures quantified targeting accuracy of this apparatus. First, we biopsied eleven breast phantoms containing 123 embedded, cylindrical lesions constructed from PVA-C (poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel) with diameters ranging from 1.6 to 15.9mm. Identification of the colored lesion in the biopsy sample and analysis of the post-biopsy US images provided a model for the success rates. Using this, we predict that our apparatus will require six passes to biopsy a 3.0 mm lesion with 99% confidence. For the second experiment, agar phantoms were embedded with four rows of 0.8mm stainless steel beads. A 14-gauge needle was inserted to each bead position seen in a 3D ultrasound scan and the tip position was compared to the pre-insertion bead position. The inter-observer standard errors of measurement were less than 0.15 and 0.28mm for the bead and needle tip positions, respectively. The off-axis 3D 95% confidence intervals were determined to have widths between 0.43 and 1.71mm, depending on direction and bead position.

  16. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of iliopsoas spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, L.M.; Perrone, N.; Lacelli, F.; Lentino, C.; Serafini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a common treatment for iliopsoas muscle spasticity, but it is not easy to position the needle in this muscle without guidance. In this paper we describe an ultrasound-guided technique for the intramuscular injection of BTX-A to treat spasticity of the iliopsoas muscle. Its effectiveness was assessed in 10 patients. Method and materials The ultrasound-guided technique for BTX-A injection was used on 10 patients. The needle was inserted into the muscle belly at an angle of 45° along the longitudinal axis of the muscle when allowed by patient's condition. Results In all cases, the iliopsoas muscle was easily identified and both the iliac and psoas components were assessed. Introduction of the needle and drug injection were entirely carried out under ultrasonographic guidance. The procedure was successful in all patients, even in those with a high-grade spasticity, and general anesthesia was not required. Conclusions This ultrasound-guided technique allows accurate guidance for the injection of BTX-A, and it can be considered as an alternate supportive therapy in patients with spasticity and dystonia. PMID:23396653

  17. Spinal Cord Injury During Ultrasound-Guided C7 Cervical Medial Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghwi; Seong, Min Yong; Kim, Ha Yong; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch block (CMBB) is commonly performed to diagnose and treat head, neck, and shoulder pain. However, its use at the C7 level has been shown to be less accurate than at other levels, which may increase the chance of injury owing to the imprecision of needle site provided by the ultrasound guide. We report the first case of iatrogenic spinal cord injury from an ultrasound-guided C7 CMBB. The patient, upon receiving this procedure, had fainted shortly after experiencing an electrical sensation that ran from the neck to the toe. The patient complained of weakness and tingling sensation in the left upper extremity. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hematoma in the cervical spinal cord, and an electrophysiological study, which was performed at 3 weeks after the incident, revealed an injury at the left C3-T2 anterior horn. After 2 months of rehabilitation, the patient showed moderate improvement in the strength of the left proximal upper extremity; however, there was no improvement in the strength of the left distal upper extremity. Therefore, we recommend caution when performing ultrasound-guided CMBB at the C7 level, as the guide particularly at this level is relatively inaccurate, posing a risk of spinal cord injury.

  18. ABSTRACTS SELECTED FOR AEC 2017: LUMINAL PLENARY: OR-LUM-01: Comparison of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration by capillary action, suction, and no suction methods: A randomized blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Rinkesh; Puri, Rajesh; Choudhary, Narendra S.; Sud, Randhir; Patle, Saurabh; Guleria, Mridula; Sarin, Haimanti; Kaur, Gagandeep; Prabha, Chandra; Bhatia, Sumit

    2017-01-01

    Background: Different types of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) techniques are used in clinical practice; the best method in terms of outcome is not standardized. Objectives: To compare diagnostic adequacy of aspirated material, cytopathologic and EUS morphological features among capillary action, suction, and no suction FNA methods. Methods: A prospective, single-blinded, randomized study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital. A total of 37 patients were excluded, and a total of 300 (100 in each arm) patients were included. Patients were randomized into the three groups, i.e., capillary action (Group 1), suction (Group 2), and no suction (Group 3). Results: A total of 300 patients (195 males) underwent EUS-guided FNA of 235 lymph nodes and 65 pancreatic masses (distribution not statistically different among groups); mean age was 52 ± 14 years. A 22-gauze needle (93%) was used in majority. There was no statistically difference among all the groups regarding lymph node size at large axis and ratio, type of needle, echo-features, echogenicity, calcification, necrosis, shape, borders (lymph nodes), number of passes, and cellularity. Diagnostic adequacy of the specimen was 91%, 91%, and 94% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P = 0.665). The suction group had significantly more number of slides and more hemorrhagic slides in comparison to other groups. Conclusion: EUS-guided FNA by capillary action, suction, and no suction methods has similar diagnostic adequacy of specimen; suction method has disadvantage of more number of slides and more hemorrhagic slides.

  19. The Effectiveness of High-Energy Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy Versus Ultrasound-Guided Needling Versus Arthroscopic Surgery in the Management of Chronic Calcific Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Louwerens, Jan K G; Veltman, Ewout S; van Noort, Arthur; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this comprehensive quantitative review of the treatment of calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff were to investigate if there is a sustainable positive effect on outcomes after treatment with high-energy extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) or ultrasound (US)-guided needling and to compare these results with those of treatment with arthroscopic surgery. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed to conduct this review. A systematic literature search was conducted in December 2014 to identify relevant clinical articles in peer-reviewed journals with at least 6 months' follow-up. Each article was scored using the Coleman Methodology Score. The primary endpoints were functional outcome and radiologic change in the size of the calcific deposit. Twenty-two studies were included (1,258 shoulders). The mean Coleman Methodology Score for the included studies was 77.1 ± 9.1. Overall, good to excellent clinical outcomes were achieved after treatment with either high-energy ESWT, US-guided needling, or arthroscopic surgery, with an improvement in the Constant-Murley score ranging between 26.3 and 41.5 points after 1 year. No severe side effects or long-term complications were encountered. Patients can achieve good to excellent clinical outcomes after high-energy ESWT, US-guided needling, and arthroscopy for calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder. Side effects and post-treatment complications should be taken into account when a decision is being made for each individual patient. Physicians should consider high-energy ESWT and US-guided needling as minimally invasive treatment options when primary conservative treatment fails. Arthroscopy can safely be used as a very effective but more invasive secondary option, although the extent of deposit removal and the additional benefit of subacromial decompression remain unclear. Level IV, systematic review of Level I, II, and IV studies. Copyright

  20. Objective assessment of operator performance during ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Tabriz, David M; Street, Mandie; Pilgram, Thomas K; Duncan, James R

    2011-09-01

    ultrasound-guided needle placement. The performance indices were closely related to operator experience.

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy for the treatment of iliopsoas impingement: a description of technique and case study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew J; Rezaian, Nimah; Hopkins, James M K

    2015-04-01

    Iliopsoas impingement is a commonly recognised source of groin pain following total hip replacement. When conservative measures fail, open or arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release can reliably alleviate pain and improve function. This article describes an alternative ultrasound-guided percutaneous technique, achieving iliopsoas tenotomy utilising a modified 18G coaxial needle and thus minimising the morbidity and cost associated with an open or arthroscopic procedure. This method proved successful with resultant complete resolution of patient symptoms. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first case of ultrasound-guided percutaneous iliopsoas tenotomy for iliopsoas impingement post total hip replacement. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Access Simulator for Medical Training: Proposal of a Simple, Economic and Effective Model.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Rafael Vilhena de Carvalho; Polimanti, Afonso César; Galego, Sidnei José; Bicudo, Maria Claudia; Montagna, Erik; Corrêa, João Antônio

    2017-03-01

    To present a simple and affordable model able to properly simulate an ultrasound-guided venous access. The simulation was made using a latex balloon tube filled with water and dye solution implanted in a thawed chicken breast with bones. The presented model allows the simulation of all implant stages of a central catheter. The obtained echogenicity is similar to that observed in human tissue, and the ultrasound identification of the tissues, balloon, needle, wire guide and catheter is feasible and reproducible. The proposed model is simple, economical, easy to manufacture and capable of realistically and effectively simulating an ultrasound-guided venous access.

  3. Visuospatial Ability as a Predictor of Novice Performance in Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Atif; Ferguson, Eamonn; Thanawala, Vishal; Bedforth, Nigel M; Hardman, Jonathan G; McCahon, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Visuospatial ability correlates positively with novice performance of simple laparoscopic tasks. The aims of this study were to identify whether visuospatial ability could predict technical performance of an ultrasound-guided needle task by novice operators and to describe how emotional state, intelligence, and fear of failure impact on this. Sixty medical student volunteers enrolled in this observational study. The authors used an instructional video to standardize training for ultrasound-guided needle advancement in a turkey breast model and assessed volunteers' performance independently by two assessors using composite error score (CES) and global rating scale (GRS). The authors assessed their "visuospatial ability" with mental rotation test (MRT), group embedded figures test, and Alice Heim group ability test. Emotional state was judged with UWIST Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL), and fear of failure and general cognitive ability were judged with numerical reasoning test. High CES scores (high error rate) were associated with low MRT scores (ρ = -0.54; P < 0.001). Better GRS scores were associated with better MRT scores (ρ = 0.47; P < 0.001). Regarding emotions, GRS scores were low when anxiety levels were high (ρ = -0.35; P = 0.005) and CES scores (errors) were low when individuals reported feeling vigorous and active (ρ = -0.30; P = 0.01). An MRT predicts novice performance of an ultrasound-guided needling task on a turkey model and as a trait measure could be used as a tool to focus training resources on less-able individuals. Anxiety adversely affects performance. Therefore, both may prove useful in directing targeted training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

  4. Ten Years of Linear Endobronchial Ultrasound: Evidence of Efficacy, Safety and Cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Mouronte-Roibás, Cecilia; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Ruano-Raviña, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is one of the major landmarks in the history of bronchoscopy. In the 10 years since it was introduced, a vast body of literature on the procedure and its results support the use of this technique in the study of various mediastinal and pulmonary lesions. This article is a comprehensive, systematic review of all the available scientific evidence on the more general indications for this technique. Results of specific studies on efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness available to date are examined. The analysis shows that EBUS-TBNA is a safe, cost-effective technique with a high grade of evidence that is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and mediastinal staging of patients with suspected or confirmed lung cancer. However, more studies are needed to guide decision-making in the case of a negative result. Evidence on the role of EBUS-TBNA in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and extrathoracic malignancies is also high, but much lower when used in the study of tuberculosis, lymphoma and for the re-staging of lung cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, due to its good safety record and lack of invasiveness compared to surgical techniques, the grade of evidence for recommending EBUS-TBNA as the initial diagnostic test in patients with these diseases is very high in most cases. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. The frequency and cancer risk associated with the atypical cytologic diagnostic category in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration specimens of solid pancreatic lesions: a meta-analysis and argument for a Bethesda System for Reporting Cytopathology of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawwad, Mohammad S; Alston, Evan; Eltoum, Isam A

    2013-11-01

    The atypical cytologic diagnostic category is ambiguous and presents a management problem for pathologists and clinicians. This meta-analysis reviewed the frequency and cancer risk associated with atypical diagnoses in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) specimens of solid pancreatic lesions. PubMed and Scopus were searched using the keywords "EUS-FNA" and "pancreas." Articles were screened focusing on studies of solid lesions. Studies with information regarding the frequency and outcomes of atypical diagnoses were included; the "suspicious" category was excluded from the analysis. The frequency of atypical diagnoses and the associated risk were calculated using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. The authors assessed whether the following factors explained the heterogeneity of the studies: rapid on-site interpretation; type of reference standard; the study type, size, and site; and the frequency of inadequate, atypical, and positive categories. A total of 23 studies with complete data regarding atypical diagnoses were identified, 12 of which had complete data available regarding outcomes. The frequency of the atypical category ranged from 1% to 14% (mean, 5.3%; 95% confidence interval, 4.1%-6.9%). The risk of malignancy associated with an atypical diagnosis ranged from 25% to 100% (mean, 58%; 95% confidence interval, 47%-69%). There was significant heterogeneity noted among the studies (I-squared, 62%; P = .0004). The frequency of the atypical category and its associated risk were found to be correlated only with the frequency of the specimens being positive for malignancy. The rate of atypical diagnoses of the pancreas is similar to that of the thyroid but the risk of malignancy is higher. Significant heterogeneity exists among the studies reporting atypical diagnoses. There is a need for standardization of the reporting and management of atypical diagnoses in EUS-FNA specimens from the pancreas. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  6. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder.

  7. Ultrasound-guided serial transabdominal cardiac biopsies in cats.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Vivian J; Uilenreef, Joost J; Szatmári, Viktor; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; Kuiper, Raoul V; Rothuizen, Jan; de Bruin, Alain

    2012-03-01

    A percutaneous/transdiaphragmatic core needle biopsy technique was developed in cats to obtain serial biopsies from different locations of the left ventricle, through which morphological and molecular changes within the same individual can be studied to unravel the mechanisms of feline cardiomyopathies. Transmural left ventricular myocardial samples were obtained from 29 anesthetized, healthy, adult cats with ultrasound guidance. An 18G automatic biopsy needle was inserted between the last left rib and the sternum through the diaphragm into the thorax. Biopsies were obtained from the left ventricular wall. In five cats, three single biopsies were taken with 4-week intervals. Autopsy was performed on six cats, of which three cats had serial biopsies. In total, 87 biopsies were obtained without long-term effects on cardiac function or structure. The biopsies caused transient single ventricular premature complexes and mild pericardial effusion without tamponade. Necropsy revealed a minimal amount of fibrous connective tissue in the diaphragm and the heart without any significant microscopic lesions in the adjacent muscle tissue. The high quality biopsy material was suitable for morphological and molecular studies. This minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided cardiac biopsy technique thus allows for the safe collection of serial biopsies to study feline cardiomyopathies in an experimental setting.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Non-palpable and Suspicious Axillary Lymph Nodes with Subsequent Removal after Tattooing: False-Negative Results and Concordance with Sentinel Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Kim, Hye Jung; Jung, Jin Hyang; Park, Ho Yong; Lee, Jeeyeon; Kim, Wan Wook; Park, Ji Young; Cheon, Hyejin; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Seung Hyun; Shin, Kyung Min; Kim, Gab Chul

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) for axillary lymph nodes (ALNs) is currently used with various techniques for the initial staging of breast cancer and tagging of ALNs. With the implementation of the tattooing of biopsied ALNs, the rate of false-negative results of US-guided FNA for non-palpable and suspicious ALNs and concordance with sentinel lymph nodes were determined by node-to node analyses. A total of 61 patients with breast cancer had negative results for metastasis on US-guided FNA of their non-palpable and suspicious ALNs. The biopsied ALNs were tattooed with an injection of 1-3 mL Charcotrace (Phebra, Lane Cove West, Australia) ink and removed during sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary dissection. We determined the rate of false-negative results and concordance with the sentinel lymph nodes by a retrospective review of surgical and pathologic findings. The association of false-negative results with clinical and imaging factors was evaluated using logistic regression. Of the 61 ALNs with negative results for US-guided FNA, 13 (21%) had metastases on final pathology. In 56 of 61 ALNs (92%), tattooed ALNs corresponded to the sentinel lymph nodes. Among the 5 patients (8%) without correspondence, 1 patient (2%) had 2 metastatic ALNs of 1 tattooed node and 1 sentinel lymph node. In multivariate analysis, atypical cells on FNA results (odds ratio = 20.7, p = 0.040) was independently associated with false-negative FNA results. False-negative ALNs after US-guided FNA occur at a rate of 21% and most of the tattooed ALNs showed concordance with sentinel lymph nodes. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue to identify nerve pathology and guide surgery.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joseph A; Breshears, Jonathan D; Arnaout, Omar; Simon, Neil G; Hastings-Robinson, Ashley M; Aleshi, Pedram; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology. METHODS The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration. RESULTS A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

  10. Ultrasound guided electrochemotherapy for the treatment of a clear cell thymoma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Menicagli, Francesco; Pettorali, Michela; Baldi, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    A twelve-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented for rapidly progressing respiratory distress. The cat was depressed, tachypneic and moderately responsive. Ultrasonography showed a mediastinal mass associated with a significant pleural effusion that needed tapping every five to seven days. Ultrasound guided biopsy yielded a diagnosis of clear cell thymoma upon histopathology. After complete staging procedures, the owner elected to treat the cat with electrochemotherapy (ECT) using systemic bleomycin. Two sessions of ultrasound guided ECT were performed at two week intervals with trains of biphasic electric pulses applied using needle electrodes until complete coverage of the area was achieved. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in partial remission (PR). Additional sessions were performed on a monthly basis. The cat is still in PR after fourteen months. ECT resulted in improved local control and should be considered among the available adjuvant treatments in pets carrying visceral tumors. PMID:28331834

  11. Ultrasound guided robotic biopsy using augmented reality and human-robot cooperative control.

    PubMed

    Freschi, C; Troia, E; Ferrari, V; Megali, G; Pietrabissa, A; Mosca, F

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided biopsy is a proficient mininvasive approach for tumors staging but requires very long training and particular manual and 3D space perception abilities of the physician, for the planning of the needle trajectory and the execution of the procedure. In order to simplify this difficult task, we have developed an integrated system that provides the clinician two types of assistance: an augmented reality visualization allows accurate and easy planning of needle trajectory and target reaching verification; a robot arm with a six-degree-of-freedom force sensor allows the precise positioning of the needle holder and allows the clinician to adjust the planned trajectory (cooperative control) to overcome needle deflection and target motion. Preliminary tests have been executed on an ultrasound phantom showing high precision of the system in static conditions and the utility and usability of the cooperative control in simulated no-rigid conditions.

  12. Ultrasound-guided trigger point injections in the cervicothoracic musculature: a new and unreported technique.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Kenneth P; Sharma, Kavita; Saliba, Romeo; Patel, Bharat C

    2008-01-01

    Myofascial pain is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The myofascial pain syndrome is one of the largest groups of under diagnosed and under treated medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Trigger points are commonly seen in patients with myofascial pain which is responsible for localized pain in the affected muscles as well as referred pain patterns. Correct needle placement in a myofascial trigger point is vital to prevent complications and improve efficacy of the trigger point injection to help reduce or relieve myofascial pain. In obese patients, these injections may not reach the target tissue. In the cervicothoracic spine, a misguided or misplaced injection can result in a pneumothorax. Here, we describe an ultrasound-guided trigger point injection technique to avoid this potential pitfall. Office based ultrasound-guided injection techniques for musculoskeletal disorders have been described in the literature with regard to tendon, bursa, cystic, and joint pathologies. For the interventionalist, utilizing ultrasound yields multiple advantages technically and practically, including observation of needle placement in real-time, ability to perform dynamic studies, the possibility of diagnosing musculoskeletal pathologies, avoidance of radiation exposure, reduced overall cost, and portability of equipment within the office setting. To our knowledge, the use of ultrasound guidance in performing trigger point injection in the cervicothoracic area, particularly in obese patients, has not been previously reported. A palpable trigger point in the cervicothoracic musculature was localized and marked by indenting the skin with the tip of a plastic needle cover. The skin was then sterile prepped. Then, using an ultrasound machine with sterile coupling gel and a sterile latex free transducer cover

  13. Ultrasound-guided retrobulbar nerve block in horses: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Morath, Ute; Luyet, Cédric; Spadavecchia, Claudia; Stoffel, Michael H; Hatch, Garry M

    2013-03-01

    To develop an ultrasound-guided technique for retrobulbar nerve block in horses, and to compare the distribution of three different volumes of injected contrast medium (CM) (4, 8 and 12 mL), with the hypothesis that successful placement of the needle within the retractor bulbi muscle cone would lead to the most effective dispersal of CM towards the nerves leaving the orbital fissure. Prospective experimental cadaver study. Twenty equine cadavers. Ultrasound-guided retrobulbar injections were performed in 40 cadaver orbits. Ultrasound visualization of needle placement within the retractor bulbi muscle cone and spread of injected CM towards the orbital fissure were scored. Needle position and destination of CM were then assessed using computerized tomography (CT), and comparisons performed between ultrasonographic visualization of orbital structures and success rate of injections (intraconal needle placement, CM reaching the orbital fissure). Higher scores for ultrasound visualization resulted in a higher success rate for intraconal CM injection, as documented on the CT images. Successful intraconal placement of the needle (22/34 orbits) resulted in CM always reaching the orbital fissure. CM also reached the orbital fissure in six orbits where needle placement was extraconal. With 4, 8 and 12 mL CM, the orbital fissure was reached in 16/34, 23/34 and 28/34 injections, respectively. The present study demonstrates the use of ultrasound for visualization of anatomical structures and needle placement during retrobulbar injections in equine orbits. However, this approach needs to be repeated in controlled clinical trials to assess practicability and effectiveness in clinical practice. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  14. Local periprostatic anesthesia between option and necessity in transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Novac, B; Costache, C; Costachescu, Oana; Nechifor, V; Miron, Adelina; Ciută, C; Novac, C

    2013-01-01

    According to the European Association of Urology guidelines, local periprostatic anesthesia during ultrasound guided biopsy is "state of the art" without specifying the exact benefits and character of choice vs. necessity of this maneuver. To determine the benefits of using periprostatic anesthesia as standard method of analgesia in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. We conducted a prospective randomized study involving 100 biopsy patients. The patients were randomized in two groups, 50 patients benefiting from local periprostatic anesthesia with 10 ml of lidocaine and the remaining 50 without local anesthesia. In our clinic we use the 12-core prostate biopsy procedure using 18G/20 cm caliber needles. To assess perceived pain intensity during the procedure, immediately after biopsy we applied to patients a VAS questionnaire (Visual Analogue Scale) as a simple method of quantitative evaluation of a symptom the perception of which varies greatly between individuals. A reduction in perceived pain by 45.06% (30.47 vs. 16.74) was recorded in the group receiving local periprostatic anesthesia. It is also worth mentioning that the patients receiving anesthesia said that anesthesia punctures were the most painful (the remaining punctures being much less painful), while patients without anesthesia reported pain intensity levels more or less equal in all 12 performed punctures. Local anesthesia is a necessity in ultrasound guided prostate biopsies as it significantly reduces pain intensity in patients undergoing this diagnostic procedure.

  15. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant osteolyses.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Gatti, Carlo; Melazzini, Mario; Bernardo, Giovanni; Strada, Mariarosa; Teragni, Cristina; Delmonte, Angelo; Tagliaferri, Carlo; Bonezzi, Cesare; Barbieri, Massimo; Bernardo, Antonio; Fratino, Pietro

    2003-01-01

    Metastases are the most common neoplastic pathology involving the skeletal system. The hallmark of skeletal metastases is pain that often compromises the patient's quality of life. Radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy are the cornerstones of the treatment, but these techniques are not completely effective. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) may offer an alternative to conventional therapies for pain control. At present, the main field of application of RFA is the treatment of primary or secondary tumors of the liver but, recently, the technique has been effectively used to treat various other tumors in organs such as the prostate, kidney, lung, brain, pancreas and breast and to control pain caused by osteoid osteomas. Five patients with six painful bone metastases underwent RFA. The patients were three women and two men, aged 40-77 years (mean: 63.4). The radiofrequency system consists of an insulated 18-gauge needle electrode attached to a 500-kHz RF generator (Radionics, Burlington, Mass, USA). Four of our five patients rapidly obtained pain relief. One patient was completely pain free within 48 hours of the procedure and the control of pain persisted for 88 weeks. Another three patients obtained at least fifty percent pain reduction that lasted, on average, 12 weeks. Our preliminary results confirm that ultrasound-guided RFA is a simple and safe technique for treating painful superficial bone metastases.

  16. Ultrasound-guided therapeutic procedures in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    del Cura, Jose Luis

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound allows the exploration of most of the musculoskeletal system, including lytic bone lesions. Its flexibility, availability, and low cost make it the best tool to guide interventional therapeutic procedures in any musculoskeletal system lesion visible on ultrasound. These techniques include drainages of abscesses, bursitis, hematomas or muscular strains, treatment of cystic lesions (ganglions, Baker's cysts), arthrocentesis, injection of substances in joints and soft tissues, and aspiration of calcific tendinitis. Although the puncture of joints for arthrocentesis and injection of substances are performed by clinicians using palpation, the use of ultrasound guidance improves the effectiveness of the technique especially for small or poorly accessible lesions and joints and for obese patients. Drainage can be performed using catheters or needles and can avoid a more aggressive approach most of the time. Intracavitary urokinase helps when the aim is to drain clotted hematomas or fibrinous collections. Injection of corticoids is useful in the treatment of ganglia, Baker's cysts, tendinitis, and noninfected arthritis. Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder can be effectively treated using percutaneous "lavage" with lidocaine. Calcifications usually disappear and symptoms improve in nearly 90% of the cases within a year. Most of these techniques are low cost and require only a moderate skill. Ultrasound-guided procedures are useful tools to effectively treat some diseases of the musculoskeletal system and should be routine in any imaging department.

  17. A technical report on ultrasound-guided scapulocostal syndrome injection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C; Harmon, D

    2016-08-01

    We describe a case report and technique for using an ultrasound scanner and a linear transducer to guide serratus posterior superior (SPS) muscle injection. A 43-year-old female presented with chronic pain centered under the right upper portion of her scapula impacting her activities of daily living. For the ultrasound-guided SPS muscle injection, the patient was placed in the prone position. The transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the C6-T1 vertebrae. Here the SPS muscle attaches to the lower portion of the ligament nuchae and the intervening interspinous ligaments. The muscle fibers run inferiorly and laterally to attach to the 2nd-5th ribs which were identified along with the lateral portion of the serratus posterior superior muscle which is covered by the scapula. Real-time imaging was used to direct a spinal needle into the trigger points of the SPS muscle, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient's pain symptoms improved significantly. Serratus posterior superior injection can confirm a diagnosis of scapulocostal syndrome and be therapeutically beneficial.

  18. Factors Contributing to the Success of Ultrasound-Guided Native Renal Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kriegshauser, J Scott; Patel, Maitray D; Young, Scott W; Chen, Frederick; Eversman, William G; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Smith, Maxwell

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors contributing to the success of ultrasound-guided native renal biopsy. We retrospectively identified patients who had ultrasound-guided native renal biopsy at our institution over a 10-year period. We reviewed the imaging and electronic medical records to collect demographic information and clinical data, including pathologic results. Biopsy samples were categorized and compared on the basis of the number of glomeruli (optimal [≥20] versus suboptimal [<20]) and the pathologist's reported diagnostic confidence (high confidence versus limited confidence). Procedure details, including the operator and the use of the cortical tangential approach, were also obtained. For 282 patients with biopsies using 18-gauge needles, the number of passes made was significantly higher for optimal (P < .001) and high-confidence (P < .001) specimens than for suboptimal and limited-confidence specimens. The cortical tangential approach was used more frequently for optimal (P< .001) and high-confidence (P = .01) specimens than for suboptimal and limited-confidence specimens. Radiologists routinely doing ultrasound-guided procedures of all types had significantly more optimal (P= .01) and high-confidence (P= .001) specimens than radiologists with limited ultrasound experience. The distance to the kidney, cortical thickness, glomerular filtration rate, and body mass index were not significant factors. The ultrasound-guided procedural experience of the operator, taking more than 1 specimen, and the use of the cortical tangential approach significantly improved the pathologic material obtained during native renal biopsies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Scraping for Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mederic M; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-06-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is a common complaint among athletes who repetitively stress the extensor mechanism of the knee. Multiple treatment options have been described, but evidence is lacking, specifically when eccentric loading has failed. Debate continues regarding the patho-etiology of chronic patellar tendon pain. There has been recent interest regarding the neurogenic influences involved in chronic tendinopathy, and interventions targeting neovessels and accompanying neonerves have shown promise. This is the first description of an ultrasound-guided technique in which the neovessels and accompanying neonerves in patellar tendinopathy were targeted using a needle scraping technique of the posterior surface of the patellar tendon.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Mahoney, Mary C

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tissue sampling of the breast has positively altered the management of breast lesions, both benign and malignant, since its inception in the 1980s and subsequent widespread acceptance in the 1990s. Its safety, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness have been validated in several studies. However, percutaneous biopsy serves a patient best when performed by an operator with full awareness of patient׳s salient imaging findings; a knowledge of the benefits, limitations, and technical requirements of breast ultrasound; and a thorough understanding of what constitutes an adequate and concordant pathologic specimen. This article outlines a general approach to ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous breast biopsy and discusses indications, potential complications, and technical aspects of the procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion–clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  2. Randomized controlled trial of ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement versus traditional techniques in difficult-access pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Doniger, Stephanie J; Ishimine, Paul; Fox, John Christian; Kanegaye, John T

    2009-03-01

    We hypothesized that the use of ultrasound guidance would improve the success rate of peripheral intravenous catheter placement in pediatric patients with difficult access in a pediatric emergency department (ED). Our secondary hypotheses were that ultrasound guidance would reduce the number of attempts, the number of needle redirections, and the overall time to catheter placement. This was a prospective randomized study of pediatric ED patients younger than 10 years old requiring intravenous access, presenting between August 2006 and May 2007. Inclusion criteria were 2 unsuccessful traditional attempts at peripheral intravenous access or history of difficult access. Exclusion was critical illness or instability. Patients were randomized to undergo peripheral intravenous catheter placement using continued traditional approaches or real-time, dual-operator ultrasound-guided technique. Measured outcomes were success of cannulation, number of attempts, number of needle redirections, and overall time to catheter placement. Fifty patients were enrolled, with 25 patients randomized to each group. The overall success rates for the ultrasound-guided group were 80% and for the traditional-attempts group, 64%, with a difference in proportions of 16% (95% confidence interval, -9% to 38%, P = 0.208). The ultrasound-guided group required less overall time (6.3 vs 14.4 minutes, difference of -8.1 minutes [95% confidence interval, -12.5 to -3.6], P = 0.001), fewer attempts (median, 1 vs 3; P = 0.004), and fewer needle redirections (median, 2 vs 10; P G 0.0001) than traditional approaches. In a sample of pediatric ED patients with difficult access, ultrasound-guided intravenous cannulation required less overall time, fewer attempts, and fewer needle redirections than traditional approaches.

  3. A lateral paracarotid approach for ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block with a linear probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuckgoo; Song, Sun Ok; Jung, Gul

    2017-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (SGB) is safer and more accurate than classic SGB by the using the surface anatomical landmark. However, previous reports concern the classic paratracheal approach using a small specialized curved probe, which may not be appropriate in some patients. The authors have attempted several approaches, including paratracheal, trans-thyroidal, lateral paracarotid, and lateral approaches, to find a safe and suitable method for real-time ultrasound-guided SGB using a standard high-frequency linear probe. A total of 27 injections were performed on 27 patients with sensorineural hearing loss. The lateral paracarotid out-of-plane and lateral in-plane approaches were identified as the easiest and safest methods among the four tested. In this report, we describe a new lateral paracarotid approach for ultrasound-guided SGB. An ipsilateral paratracheal short-axis transverse scan was acquired at the C6 level with a linear probe (6-13 MHz). The probe was moved laterally, scanning the thyroid, carotid artery, internal jugular vein, longus colli muscle, and the transverse process of the C6, placing the carotid artery in the middle of the view. Light pressure was applied to the probe postero-medially to displace the carotid artery medially and completely compress the internal jugular vein. The needle was inserted out-of-plane between the lateral margin of the carotid artery and Chassaignac's tubercle, traversing the collapsed internal jugular vein, and targeted between the longus colli muscle and the prevertebral fascia. A total of 4 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected for each procedure after a negative aspiration test. Successful blockade was confirmed with the onset of Horner's sign. All 27 injections resulted in successful blockade with Horner's sign presenting within 5 min after injection. Side effects were minor and caused minimal discomfort; they included hoarseness and a foreign body sensation. No hematomas

  4. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  5. Effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Ali

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts. METHODS From January 2002 to January 2014, 35 simple breast cysts (mean volume, 8.2 mL; range, 4–33 mL) in 28 females (mean age, 39 years) were evaluated. In a single session, all cysts were aspirated using 20G needles, refilled with 99% ethanol (90% of the volume of the aspirated fluid), and reaspirated completely after 10 minutes of exposure under ultrasound guidance. Follow-up ultrasonography examinations were performed at one week, one month, three months, and six months for all patients and 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months for available patients. Follow-up duration varied between 6 and 24 months (mean, 15 months). RESULTS The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy was 97%. The needle tip was dislocated and ethanol was given into the breast parenchyma in one patient (3%). One cyst (3%) was reaspirated at the first week follow-up due to intracystic hemorrhage. Of the 34 cysts treated, 25 (74%) completely responded to therapy and were no longer detectable on follow-up examinations. Eight cysts (24%) significantly decreased in size and then completely disappeared at six months. At the end of the follow-up period, the clinical success rate reached 100%, and none of the cysts were visible. Except mild to moderate sensation of burning or pain which disappeared or subsided significantly in a couple of minutes, no other complications were observed in patients. CONCLUSION Ultrasound-guided ethanol sclerotherapy is a fast, safe, and highly effective method in the treatment of simple breast cysts. PMID:27087190

  6. Ultrasound-guided micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy in pediatric patients with kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Bodakçi, Mehmet Nuri; Penbegul, Necmettin; Dağgülli, Mansur; Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mehmet Mazhar; Hatipoglu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali

    2015-08-01

    To present the outcomes of ultrasound-guided micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy for the treatment of renal stones in pediatric patients. Ultrasound-guided micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy was carried out on 25 pediatric patients from June 2012 to October 2014. Micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy surgery was completed without the use of fluoroscopy in 19 patients. Medical records were retrieved from our institutional database and retrospectively reviewed. Percutaneous puncture was carried out by an "all-seeing needle" in seven patients and by a 14-G intravenous cannula in 18 patients. After entering to the collecting system through an "all-seeing needle" or by Microsheath, the calculus was fragmented using a 273-micron holmium yttrium aluminium garnet laser. After the stone was fragmented to the smallest pieces possible, the operation was terminated. Single access was obtained in all patients using ultrasound guidance. The average age of the patients was 4.12 ± 5.33 years. The mean stone size was 13.45 ± 3.11 mm. The mean operative time was 51.45 ± 30.69 min. The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.18 ± 1.77 days. Treatment success was 92%. Two patients had residual fragments after the procedure; these patients were followed conservatively. A total of three minor complications were observed and all of them were managed conservatively. To our knowledge, this is the first study of ultrasound-guided micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy in the pediatric population. Our findings suggest that micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy can be safely carried out with ultrasound guidance in children by experienced hands, allowing to minimize risks associated with radiation exposure in this patient population. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Design and application of model for training ultrasound-guided vascular cannulation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Quevedo, O; López-Álvarez, J M; Limiñana-Cañal, J M; Loro-Ferrer, J F

    2016-01-01

    Central vascular cannulation is not a risk-free procedure, especially in pediatric patients. Newborn and infants are small and low-weighted, their vascular structures have high mobility because of tissue laxity and their vessels are superficial and with small diameter. These characteristics, together with the natural anatomical variability and poor collaboration of small children, make this technique more difficult to apply. Therefore, ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used to locate vessels and guide vascular access in this population. (a) To present a model that simulates the vascular system for training ultrasound-guided vascular access in pediatrics patients; (b) to ultrasound-guided vascular cannulation in the model. The model consisted of two components: (a) muscular component: avian muscle, (b) vascular component: elastic tube-like structure filled with fluid. 864 ecoguided punctures was realized in the model at different vessel depth and gauge measures were simulated, for two medical operators with different degree of experience. The average depth and diameter of vessel cannulated were 1.16 (0.42)cm and 0.43 (0.1)cm, respectively. The average number of attempts was of 1.22 (0.62). The percentage of visualization of the needle was 74%. The most frequent maneuver used for the correct location, was the modification of the angle of the needle and the relocation of the guidewire in 24% of the cases. The average time for the correct cannulations was 41 (35.8)s. The more frequent complications were the vascular perforation (11.9%) and the correct vascular puncture without possibility of introducing the guidewire (1.2%). The rate of success was 96%. The model simulates the anatomy (vascular and muscular structures) of a pediatric patient. It is cheap models, easily reproducible and a useful tool for training in ultrasound-guided puncture and cannulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous release of the annular pulley in trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, Gajan; Lee, Justin C; Eckersley, Rupert; Katsarma, Effie; Healy, Jeremiah C

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a new technique for ultrasound-guided percutaneous release of the annular pulley in trigger digit using a modified hypodermic needle. A total of 35 ultrasound-guided percutaneous releases were performed on 25 patients diagnosed and referred by hand surgeons in our institution over 16 months from October 2006. Inclusion criteria were as follows: adulthood, triggering present for at least 4 months, failure to respond to conservative management or steroid injections, no previous history of pulley release in the affected digit. Under ultrasound guidance, the affected pulley was released using a standard 19-gauge hypodermic needle bent at two points as the cutting device. Follow-up took place at 12 weeks and 6 months with improvement in triggering and clinically graded pain. At follow-up, no complications had occurred and all patients demonstrated improvement in their triggering, with complete resolution in 32 digits (91%), good improvement in 2 digits (6%) and some improvement in 1 digit (3%). This new technique uses a widely available and safe cutting device and is safe and can be used to provide definitive management for trigger finger, allowing the procedure to be performed in a variety of clinical settings.

  9. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  10. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Fauza, Dario O; Barnewolt, Carol; Brown, Stephen D; Jennings, Russell W

    2002-03-01

    This study was aimed at examining the feasibility of fetal tracheal occlusion guided exclusively by ultrasonography and at establishing the technical principles of this procedure based on current instrumentation and ultrasound technology. Time-dated pregnant ewes underwent a small laparotomy and partial uterine exposure. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, a steerable guide wire was fed into the fetal tracheal lumen. An 8F catheter then was fed around the guide wire into the trachea. This was followed by intratracheal placement of a 2F coaxial angiographic catheter, connected to a detachable silicone balloon at its extremity, which then was inflated with saline and delivered locally. Euthanasia was performed at term. Complete tracheal occlusion was achieved in all fetuses (n = 7) intraoperatively. Operating time needed for tracheal occlusion, once access to the amniotic cavity was established, varied widely, but could be as short 1 minute. Tracheal lumen dimensions outgrew balloon diameter in 57.1% of fetuses (4 of 7), resulting in balloon dislodgment in those animals. No balloon rupture was observed. (1) Accurate access to the fetal trachea and local delivery of an occlusive detachable silicone balloon are consistently feasible exclusively under real-time ultrasound guidance with commercially available instrumentation. (2) Balloon dimensions are determining factors of displacement risk and must be selected carefully before tracheal delivery. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion may be a preferable alternative to surgical intervention for treatment of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  11. Ethnicity influences pain after ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Mahfudz, Anis S; Vijayananthan, Anushya

    2015-12-01

    The influence of ethnicity on pain complicating ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy (US-guided PLB) and its clinical impact has not been reported to date. Consecutive adults from a multiethnic background, undergoing an US-guided PLB, were independently assessed for pain up to 6 h after the procedure. Clinical and demographic parameters were analysed to determine independent predictors of significant pain after PLB. Willingness to undergo a repeat procedure was assessed 1 week after PLB. Data from 203 patients (median age 50 years; 43.9% female; ethnicity: Malay 41.5%, Chinese 40%, Indian 18%; median BMI 27.7 kg/m; median waist circumference 92.0 cm) were analysed. Pain after US-guided PLB was experienced in 133 (61.1%) patients, with severity grades as follows: none, n=81 (39.9%); mild, n=56 (27.6%); moderate, n=51 (25.1%); and severe, n=15 (7.4%). Analgesia requirements correlated well with severity of pain. Independent predictors of significant pain after PLB (moderate and severe categories) in patients included age less than 50 years [odds ratio (OR) 3.0], female sex (OR 3.7), Indian ethnicity (OR 2.9) and Malay ethnicity (OR 2.7), but not number of needle passes, BMI and educational levels. Patients who experienced moderate/severe pain were less willing to undergo a repeat PLB compared with those who experienced mild/no pain (60.9 vs. 82.8%, P=0.001). Ethnicity has an important role in the development of pain after US-guided PLB. This has a significant impact on willingness to repeat the procedure.

  12. Pathological fracture of the patella due to an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst: verification by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes; Henninger, Benjamin; Gruber, Leonhard; Kosiol, Juana; Loizides, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on a rare case of an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the patella presenting with pathological fracture after trauma. Using all available diagnostic modalities and by means of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy an unclear and suspected pathological fractured cystic bone lesion in the patella of a young man could be further clarified. The acquired images suggested the diagnosis of a pathological fractured aneurysmal bone cyst after mild trauma. However, due to the extraordinary location and clinical presentation the diagnosis was secured by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy through a small cortical gap. As shown in this rare case of an atypical aneurysmal bone cyst of the patella, the quite seldom but sometimes possible ultrasound-guided biopsy of intraosseous lesions can help to achieve the diagnostic clarification and should also be taken into account as a non-standard procedure.

  13. Spectrum Analysis of Endobronchial Ultrasound Radiofrequency of Lymph Nodes in Patients With Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Shingyoji, Masato; Anayama, Takashi; Kimura, Hideki; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the spectral features of the radiofrequency of lymph nodes during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and to determine its diagnostic value for detecting metastatic nodes in patients with lung cancer. Ultrasound spectrums of lymph nodes during EBUS-TBNA were retrospectively analyzed. A linear regression of frequency spectrum and the ultrasonic spectral parameters midband-fit, slope, and intercept were calculated. Mean values for these parameters within lymph nodes were computed. The cutoff values for each parameter for distinguishing metastatic vs benign lymph nodes were first determined within the training set; these cutoff values were then applied to the testing set for validation. Overall, 362 lymph nodes (112 metastatic, 250 benign) were analyzed as the training set, and 284 lymph nodes (74 metastatic, 210 benign) were evaluated as the testing set. In the training set, all of the parameters showed a significant difference between metastatic and benign lymph nodes (P < .001). The metastatic nodes tended to show low midband-fit, high slope, and low intercept. When midband-fit and intercept were combined, the diagnostic accuracy was maximized in the training set. In the testing set, the combination of intercept and slope produced the highest diagnostic accuracy, with the following outcomes: sensitivity, 79.7%; specificity, 84.3%; diagnostic accuracy, 83.1%; positive predictive value, 64.1%; and negative predictive value, 92.2%. Metastatic lymph nodes possess unique ultrasonic spectrum features, and spectrum analysis can be used as a novel diagnostic tool for differentiating between benign and malignant nodes in patients with lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Conduction Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bum Jun; Joeng, Eui Soo; Choi, Jun Kyu; Kang, Seok; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the utility of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) ultrasound-guided conduction technique compared to that of the conventional nerve conduction technique. Methods Fifty-eight legs of 29 healthy participants (18 males and 11 females; mean age, 42.7±14.9 years) were recruited. The conventional technique was performed bilaterally. The LFCN was localized by ultrasound. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LFCN and the distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the LFCN was measured. The nerve conduction study was repeated with the corrected cathode location. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the LFCN were recorded and compared between the ultrasound-guided and conventional techniques. Results Mean body mass index of the participants was 23.7±3.5 kg/m2, CSA was 4.2±1.9 mm2, and the distance between the ASIS and LFCN was 5.6±1.7 mm. The mean amplitude values were 6.07±0.52 µV and 6.66±0.54 µV using the conventional and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. The SNAP amplitude of the LFCN using the ultrasound-guided technique was significantly larger than that recorded using the conventional technique. Conclusion Correcting the stimulation position using the ultrasound-guided technique helped obtain increased SNAP amplitude. PMID:25750871

  16. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in children with umbilical hernia: Case series.

    PubMed

    Alsaeed, Abdul Hamid; Thallaj, Ahmed; Khalil, Nancy; Almutaq, Nada; Aljazaeri, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Umbilical hernia repair, a common day-case surgery procedure in children, is associated with a significant postoperative pain. The most popular peripheral nerve blocks used in umbilical hernia repair are rectus sheath infiltration and caudal block. The rectus sheath block may offer improved pain relief following umbilical hernia repair with no undesired effects such as lower limb motor weakness or urinary retention seen with caudal block which might delay discharge from the hospital. Ultrasound guidance of peripheral nerve blocks has reduced the number of complications and improved the quality of blocks. The aim of this case series is to assess the post rectus sheath block pain relief in pediatric patients coming for umbilical surgery. Twenty two (22) children (age range: 1.5-8 years) scheduled for umbilical hernia repair were included in the study. Following the induction of general anesthesia, the ultrasonographic anatomy of the umbilical region was studied with a 5-16 MHz 50 mm linear probe. An ultrasound-guided posterior rectus sheath block of both rectus abdominis muscles (RMs) was performed (total of 44 punctures). An in-plain technique using Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm. Surgical conditions, intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, and postoperative analgesia by means of the modified CHEOPS scale were evaluated. ultrasonograghic visualization of the posterior sheath was possible in all patients. The ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade provided sufficient analgesia in all children with no need for additional analgesia except for one patient who postoperatively required morphine 0.1 mg/kg intravenously. There were no complications. Ultrasound guidance enables performances of an effective rectus sheath block for umbilical hernia. Use of the Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm provides easy, less traumatic skin and rectus muscle penetration and satisfactory needle visualiza.

  17. Feasibility of eye-tracking technology to quantify expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kou, Alex; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R; Howard, Steven K

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) requires an advanced procedural skill set that incorporates both sonographic knowledge of relevant anatomy as well as technical proficiency in needle manipulation in order to achieve a successful outcome. Understanding how to differentiate a novice from an expert in UGRA using a quantifiable tool may be useful for comparing educational interventions that could improve the rate at which one develops expertise. Exploring the gaze pattern of individuals performing a task has been used to evaluate expertise in many different disciplines, including medicine. However, the use of eye-tracking technology has not been previously applied to UGRA. The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish the feasibility of applying such technology as a measurement tool for comparing procedural expertise in UGRA. eye-tracking data were collected from one expert and one novice utilizing Tobii Glasses 2 while performing a simulated ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in a gel phantom model. Area of interest fixations were recorded and heat maps of gaze fixations were created. Results suggest a potential application of eye-tracking technology in the assessment of UGRA learning and performance.

  18. An affordable and easily constructed model for training in ultrasound-guided vascular access.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Blanco, Pablo; Carr, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and inexpensive method to make high-fidelity simulators for use in ultrasound-guided vascular access teaching. The phantoms can be created to reflect the ultrasound appearance and feel of central or peripheral arteries and veins. Different clinical states such as hypovolaemia may be readily displayed using the phantoms. The article and associated videos describe the production, appearance and use of phantoms for central vascular access, for peripheral venous access and for peripheral arterial access. Key ingredients are readily accessible and include chicken breasts, modelling balloons and thin walled latex or silicone tubing. The phantoms are easily and rapidly constructed and may be used repeatedly in a training session. As the needle passes through the phantom and vessel wall, the ultrasound appearance and tactile sensation is very similar to that of human tissue and vessels. Using this method, simple and inexpensive phantoms can be created. These are ideal for use in training for ultrasound-guided vascular access. Links to videos describing the phantom construction process, their appearance and the teaching techniques utilised by the authors are found in the text.

  19. Longstanding Endobronchial Foreign Body

    PubMed Central

    Trisolini, R.; Dore, R.; Bertolini, R.; Pasturenzi, L.; Catania, A. Fede; Gualtieri, G.; Torre, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are many circumstances in which the diagnosis of endobronchial inhalation of a foreign body (FB) can be missed. Generally, in such cases, within weeks or at most months from the event, clinical bronchopulmonary symptoms develop which allow a correct diagnosis to be made and significant complications to be avoided. We report the case of a patient in whom an endobronchial FB remained undiagnosed, because of lack of symptoms, for almost three years, and then caused signifiicant complications before being identified and removed. Problems related to diagnosis and therapy are discussed. PMID:18493510

  20. Treatment efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-long; Lu, Feng; Yue, Wen-wen; Sun, Li-ping; Bo, Xiao-wan; Guo, Le-hang; Xu, Jun-mei; Liu, Bo-ji; Li, Dan-dan; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) of benign thyroid nodules by comparison with a matched untreated control group. Methods: The therapeutic efficacy and safety in 35 patients who were subjected to a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA (Group A) for benign thyroid nodules were compared with those in 35 untreated patients (Group B) with benign nodules. The benign nature of all the nodules was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), and all the patients had normal thyroid functions. BRFA was performed with a bipolar electrode (CelonProSurge 150–T20) with an output power of 20 W. Nodule volume, thyroid function and clinical symptoms of all the patients were compared before treatment and during follow-up. Results: In Group A, the BRFA procedures were completed with a mean time of 10.02 ± 3.30 min (range, 5.47–16.03 min) and with a mean total energy deposition of 10.747 ± 3704 J (range, 5510–17.770 J). The procedures were tolerated well in all the patients without causing any major complications. At the 6-month follow-up, all of the nodule volume decreased significantly (from 8.81 ± 8.66 to 1.59 ± 1.55 ml, p < 0.001) in Group A, whereas the nodule volume increased from 6.90 ± 3.77 to 7.87 ± 3.95 ml in Group B (p < 0.001). All (100%) the 35 nodules in Group A had volume reduction ratios (VRRs) of >50%, among which 3 (8.57%) had VRRs >90%. In Group A, the clinical symptoms of the patients who had symptoms before BRFA disappeared, whereas in Group B, the patients had no resolution of clinical symptoms at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA seems to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It may gain a wide use in clinical practice. Advances in knowledge: Based on the comparable efficacy and clinical

  1. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    PubMed

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. PMID:27818584

  3. Ultrasound-guided procedures to treat sport-related muscle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Arcidiacono, Alice; Messina, Carmelo; Serafini, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is well known as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to guide percutaneous procedures. The lower limb muscles represent a good target to perform such procedures under ultrasound guidance, thus allowing for clear and precise visualization of the needle during the whole procedure. The knowledge of guidelines and technical aspects is mandatory to act in the most safe and accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. This review will focus above the local treatments of traumatic lower limb muscle injuries described in literature, focusing on new and promising approaches, such as platelet-rich plasma treatment of muscle tears in athletes. For each procedure, a brief how-to-do practical guide will be provided, emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the lower limb muscles. PMID:26562097

  4. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  5. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca; Facciorusso, Domenico; Decembrino, Francesco; Attino, Vito; Bisceglia, Michele

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yielded no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Proximal Suprascapular Nerve Block With Radiofrequency Lesioning for Patients With Malignancy-Associated Recalcitrant Shoulder Pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Yang, Rong-Sen; Sun, Wei-Zen; Lin, Chih-Peng

    2015-11-01

    The classic suprascapular nerve block has limitations, such as postural requirements and lack of direct nerve visualization. This series investigated the analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular suprascapular nerve blocks in patients with malignancy-associated shoulder pain. Ablative radiofrequency lesioning of the suprascapular nerve in 6 patients provided substantial pain relief. The mean distance from the suprascapular nerve to the brachial plexus was 8.05 mm, and the mean angle of needle entry was 20.6°. This approach appears to be effective in relieving malignancy-associated shoulder pain and is tolerated by patients unable to sit or lie prone.

  7. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  8. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Walter J; Nye, Jonathan A; Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj A; Votaw, John R; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-14

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  9. Conventional Landmark-Guided Midline Versus Preprocedure Ultrasound-Guided Paramedian Techniques in Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kallidaikurichi Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Iohom, Gabriella; Loughnane, Frank; Lee, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Multiple passes and attempts while administering spinal anesthesia are associated with a greater incidence of postdural puncture headache, paraesthesia, and spinal hematoma. We hypothesized that the routine use of a preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique for spinal anesthesia would reduce the number of passes required to achieve entry into the subarachnoid space when compared with the conventional landmark-guided midline approach. One hundred consenting patients scheduled for elective total joint replacements (hip and knee) were randomized into group C (conventional) and group P (preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique) with 50 in each group. The patients were blinded to the study group. All spinal anesthetics were administered by a consultant anesthesiologist. In group C, spinal anesthetic was done via the midline approach using clinically palpated landmarks. In group P, a preprocedural ultrasound scan was used to mark the paramedian insertion site, and spinal anesthetic was performed via the paramedian approach. The average number of passes (defined as the number of forward advancements of the spinal needle in a given interspinous space, i.e., withdrawal and redirection of spinal needle without exiting the skin) in group P was approximately 0.34 times that in group C, a difference that was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Similarly, the average number of attempts (defined as the number of times the spinal needle was withdrawn from the skin and reinserted) in group P was approximately 0.25 times that of group C (P = 0.0021). In group P, on an average, it took 81.5 (99% confidence interval, 68.4-97 seconds) seconds longer to identify the landmarks than in group C (P = 0.0002). All other parameters, including grading of palpated landmarks, time taken for spinal anesthetic injection, periprocedural pain scores, periprocedural patient discomfort visual analog scale score, conversion to general anesthetic, paresthesia, and radicular pain

  10. An optical tracker based robot registration and servoing method for ultrasound guided percutaneous renal access

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-assisted needle steering facilitates the percutaneous renal access (PRA) for their accuracy and consistency over manual operation. However, inaccurate image-robot correspondence and uncertainties in robot parameters make the needle track deviate from the intrarenal target. This paper aims to simplify the image-tracker-robot registration procedure and improves the accuracy of needle alignment for robot assisted ultrasound-guided PRA. Methods First, a semi-automatic rigid registration is used for the alignment of the preoperative MR volume and the intraoperative orthogonal US slices. Passive markers are mounted both on US probe and robot end-effector, the planned puncture path is transferred from the MR volume frame into optical tracker frame. Tracker-robot correspondence and robot calibration are performed iteratively using a simplified scheme, both position and orientation information are incorporated to estimate the transformation matrix, only several key structural robot parameters and joint zero-positions are calibrated for simplicity in solving the inverse kinematic. Furthermore, an optical tracker feedback control is designed for compensating inaccuracies in robot parameters and tracker-robot correspondence, and improving the accuracy of needle alignment. The intervention procedure was implemented by a telemanipulated 5R1P robot, two experiments were conducted to validate the efficiency of robot-tracker registration method and the optical tracker feedback control, robot assisted needle insertion experiment was conducted on kidney phantom to evaluate the system performance. Results The relative positioning accuracy of needle alignment is 0.24 ± 0.08 mm, the directional accuracy is 6.78 ± 1.65 × 10-4rad; the needle-target distance of needle insertion is 2.15 ± 0. 17 mm. The optical tracker feedback control method performs stable against wide range of angular disturbance over (0 ~ 0.4) radians, and the length disturbance

  11. [Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation: procedure description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Carmona Monge, F J; Martínez Lareo, M; Núñez Reiz, A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial catheterization is the second most common invasive procedure performed in critical care units. These devices are essential in certain types of patients (the hemodinamically unstable or those who require regular evaluation of the gasometric values). Complications related to arterial cannulation are relatively scarce. However, there are no reliable indicators to predict the occurrence of radial artery occlusions or ischemic lesions in the hand after a radial cannulation procedure has been performed. Ultrasound-guided catheter insertion has been used for years to guide central venous cannulation in critical care, but its use has been more limited for arterial catheterization. This paper aims to describe the technique of ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization and reviews the most important research papers that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the adult population.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Therapy for Knee and Foot Ganglion Cysts.

    PubMed

    Ju, Brian L; Weber, Kristy L; Khoury, Viviane

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided aspiration/injection of ganglion cysts in the lower extremities (knee and foot) that required referral to the radiology department for precise localization. The present study is the first series to describe such results. The study population consisted of 15 patients who had undergone treatment from April 2012 to January 2015. Follow-up was by telephone survey, which was performed at a mean of 15 ± 6 months after treatment. Almost 90% of patients experienced immediate improvement in symptoms (mostly pain), and 77% of these patients had not experienced a recurrence of symptoms at a mean follow-up time of 14 ± 6 months. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided therapy is a safe and potentially effective treatment for most cases of symptomatic lower extremity ganglion cysts.

  13. A novel technique for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization under short-axis out-of-plane approach: "stepwise flashing with triangulation".

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Toshinori; Okuda, Chie; Kurita, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Ayako; Kitagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Masafumi; Sha, Keiichi; Nagahata, Toshihiro

    2017-06-20

    In ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization, there is no standard technique either for the needle tip visualization or for the adequate needle angle and entry to the skin with short-axis view under out-of-plane technique. In the present study, we propose a novel technique named "stepwise flashing with triangulation", and the efficacy of this technique is assessed. Before and after a didactic session in which the technique was explained, 12 novice residents were asked to position the needle tip on or into the imitation vessels and to avoid deeper penetration by using an agar tissue phantom with ultrasound guidance. "Stepwise flashing" technique was for stepwise visualization of the needle tip, and "triangulation" technique was for adequate needle angle and entry to the skin. After the session, the success rate was increased and a deeper penetration rate was decreased. This technique will help us to facilitate vascular access and to avoid complications in clinical settings.

  14. Automatic Segmentation and Probe Guidance for Real-Time Assistance of Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Leidig, Linda; Lervik Bakeng, Janne Beate; Johansen, Kaj Fredrik; Lindseth, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can be challenging, especially for inexperienced physicians. The goal of the proposed methods is to create a system that can assist a user in performing ultrasound-guided femoral nerve blocks. The system indicates in which direction the user should move the ultrasound probe to investigate the region of interest and to reach the target site for needle insertion. Additionally, the system provides automatic real-time segmentation of the femoral artery, the femoral nerve and the two layers fascia lata and fascia iliaca. This aids in interpretation of the 2-D ultrasound images and the surrounding anatomy in 3-D. The system was evaluated on 24 ultrasound acquisitions of both legs from six subjects. The estimated target site for needle insertion and the segmentations were compared with those of an expert anesthesiologist. Average target distance was 8.5 mm with a standard deviation of 2.5 mm. The mean absolute differences of the femoral nerve and the fascia segmentations were about 1-3 mm.

  15. Diagnostic value of core biopsy histology and cytology sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes using 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Saha, Avinandan; Kate, Arvind H; Pandey, Kamlesh; Chavhan, Vinod B; Leuppi, Joerg D; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the initial modality of choice in sampling mediastinal lymphadenopathy. It is possible to obtain both cytological and histological samples using both 21-gauge and 22-gauge EBUS-TBNA needles. The current study was undertaken to compare the diagnostic yield of cytology and histology samples obtained by the same EBUS-TBNA 21-gauge needle. One hundred sixty-six consecutive patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with a 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle over a period of 3 years were included in this retrospective analysis. The diagnostic yields of EBUS-TBNA histology (EBUS-TBNA-H) and EBUS-TBNA cytology (EBUS-TBNA-C) specimens were compared using the McNemar test. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA were 89% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA were 100% and 53%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-H were 85% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-H were 100% and 43%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-C were 65% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-C were 100% and 14%, respectively. The diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA-H over EBUS-TBNA-C was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). EBUS-TBNA-H with 21-gauge needle significantly improves the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA-H improves the NPV of EBUS-TBNA. The combination of EBUS-TBNA-H and EBUS-TBNA-C improves the overall diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA.

  16. Dynamic multiplanar real time ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Hamill, Mark; Collier, Bryan; Bradburn, Eric; Ferrara, John

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound guided vascular access has been well-characterized as a safe and effective technique for internal jugular and femoral vein catheterization. However, there is limited experience with the use of ultrasound to access the infraclavicular subclavian vein. Multiple ultrasound techniques do exist to identify the subclavian vein, but real time access is limited by vessel identification in a single planar view. To overcome this limitation, a novel technique of ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization using a real time multiplanar approach has been developed. The initial experience with this approach is described. A single surgeon used combined oblique, transverse, and longitudinal views along with Doppler color flow images to both define the infraclavicular anatomy and to obtain subclavian vein access in 42 adult patients (20 M/22 F and 22 L/20 R) with a mean body mass index of 29.2 (range = 18.9-55.4). Chest x-ray was obtained to confirm position and to rule out pneumothorax. Subclavian vein cannulation was achieved in 100 per cent of patients; subsequent catheterization was successful in 92.9 per cent. The number of attempts required for cannulation averaged 1.3 (range = 1-5), and decreased after a five patient learning curve. No patient developed a pneumothorax, hematoma, or cannula malposition. Ultrasound guided multiplanar infraclavicular subclavian vein access appears to be a safe and effective adjunct for central line placement.

  17. Analgesic Efficacy of Ultrasound Guided FICB in Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Sarla; Kiran, Shashi; Devi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are often encountered in the elderly and present special problems to the anaesthesiologist. Fascia iliaca compartment block is another technique with the intent to block all the three nerves like 3-in-1 nerve block. Aim To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca compartment block to facilitate positioning of patients with hip fracture for spinal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in 50 patients aged between 40-80 years, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-III undergoing surgery for hip fracture. All 50 patients received an ultrasound guided Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block (FICB) in the premedication room with 30 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine by 23G spinal needle. Sensory blockade was evaluated 5, 10 and 20 minutes after ropivacaine administration using loss of perception to cold in the lateral, anterior and medial part of the thigh. Visual analogue scale scores were noted before the block, 20 minutes after block and during positioning for spinal anaesthesia. Patient’s acceptance for FICB was evaluated 24 hour after arriving back to the orthopaedics ward using a two-point score. Any episode of hypotension or bradycardia was noted and managed accordingly. Results In lateral part of thigh, at 5 minutes sensory blockade was present in 33 patients (66%) and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 45 cases (90%). In anterior part of thigh, sensory blockade was present in 34 cases (68%) at 5 minutes time interval and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 48 cases (96%). In medial part of thigh, 28 cases (56%) had sensory blockade at 5 minutes and at 10 minutes in 43 cases (86%). Sensory blockage was same at 20 minutes as on 10 minutes interval in all thigh parts. Before FIC block average VAS was 7.5 which was decreased to average of 2.94 at 20 minutes after block which was statistically significant (p<0.01). During positioning for

  18. Medial approach of ultrasound-guided costoclavicular plexus block and its effects on regional perfussion.

    PubMed

    Nieuwveld, D; Mojica, V; Herrera, A E; Pomés, J; Prats, A; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block in the costoclavicular space located between the clavicle and the first rib, reaches the secondary trunks when they are clustered together and lateral to the axillary artery. This block is most often performed through a lateral approach, the difficulty being finding the coracoid process an obstacle and guiding the needle towards the vessels and pleura. A medial approach, meaning from inside to outside, will avoid these structures. Traditionally the assessment of a successful block is through motor or sensitive responses but a sympathetic fibre block can also be evaluated measuring the changes in humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and/or perfusion index. To describe the medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block evaluating its development by motor and sensitive response and measurement of sympathetic changes. Description of the technique and administration of 20ml of contrast in a fresh cadaver model, evaluating the distribution with CT-scan and sagittal sections of the anatomic piece. Subsequently in a clinical phase, including 11 patients, we evaluated the establishment of motor, sensitive and sympathetic blocks. We evaluated the sympathetic changes reflected by humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and distal perfusion index. In the anatomical model the block was conducted without difficulties, showing an adequate periclavicular distribution of the contrast in the CT-scan and in sagittal sections, reaching the interscalenic space as far as the secondary trunks. Successful blocks were observed in 91% of patients after 25minutes. All the parameters reflecting sympathetic block increased significantly. The humeral artery blood flow showed an increase from 108 ± 86 to 188±141ml/min (P=.05), skin temperature from 32.1±2 to 32.8±9°C (P=.03) and perfusion index from 4±3 to 9±5 (P=.003). The medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block is anatomically feasible, with high

  19. Endobronchial ultrasound convex probe for lymphoma, sarcoidosis, lung cancer and other thoracic entities. A case series.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Huang, Haidong; Bai, Chong; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Trakada, Georgia; Veletza, Lemonia; Tsiouda, Theodora; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Athanasiou, Evangelia; Hatzibougias, Dimitris; Kallianos, Anastasios; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Papaemmanouil, Liana; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound endoscopy is a state of the art diagnostic endoscopic procedure for the thorax. Firstly it was designed mainly for the staging of lung cancer and of course for the diagnosis of suspicious findings in large central airways. The main limitation of the equipment is the diameter of the instrument and therefore it can only be guided through large airways. However; the diameter of the working channel also provides a large tissue sample nowadays with the 19G biopsy needle. We will provide our experience with the 22G needle of the endobronchial convex-probe in several medical situations of the thorax.

  20. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P < .05). At all measurement intervals beyond 10 minutes, however, neither group showed a statistically significant difference in complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P < .05). Except for faster onset, this prospective randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  1. Ultrasound-guided facet block to low back pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ana Ellen Q; Leal, Plinio C; Bezerra, Elmiro Helio M; Giraldes, Ana Laura A; Ferraro, Leonardo C; Rezende, Andre H; Sakata, Rioko Kimiko

    2014-01-01

    osteoarthrosis is a common cause of low back pain. The diagnosis is clinical and can be confirmed by imaging studies. Pain treatment and confirmation of diagnosis are made by intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and by local anesthetic use, due to clinical improvement. A direct monitoring of the procedure can be done under fluoroscopy, a classic technique, or else by an ultrasound-guided procedure. female patient, 88 years old, 1.68 m and 72 kg, with facet osteoarthrosis at L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 for two years. On physical examination, she exhibited pain on lateralization and spinal extension. We opted in favor of an ultrasound-guided facet joint block. A midline spinal longitudinal scan was obtained, with identification of the desired joint space at L3-L4. A 25G needle was inserted into the skin by the echographic off-plane ultrasound technique. 1 mL of contrast was administered, with confirmation by fluoroscopy. After aspiration of the contrast, 1 mL of solution containing 0.25% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10mg of methylprednisolone acetate was injected. Injections into L3-L4, L2-L3 and L1-L2 to the right were applied. the visualization of the facet joint by ultrasound involves minimal risk, besides reduction of radiation. This option is suitable for a large part of the population. However, fluoroscopy and computed tomography remain as monitoring techniques indicated for patients with specific characteristics, such as obesity, severe degenerative diseases and anatomical malformations, in which the ultrasound technique is still in need of further study. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. [Ultrasound-guided facet block to low back pain: a case report].

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ana Ellen Q; Leal, Plinio C; Bezerra, Elmiro Helio M; Giraldes, Ana Laura A; Ferraro, Leonardo C; Rezende, Andre H; Sakata, Rioko Kimiko

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a common cause of low back pain. The diagnosis is clinical and can be confirmed by imaging studies. Pain treatment and confirmation of diagnosis are made by intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and by local anesthetic use, due to clinical improvement. A direct monitoring of the procedure can be done under fluoroscopy, a classic technique, or else by an ultrasound-guided procedure. Female patient, 88 years old, 1.68m and 72kg, with facet osteoarthrosis at L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 for two years. On physical examination, she exhibited pain on lateralization and spinal extension. We opted in favor of an ultrasound-guided facet joint block. A midline spinal longitudinal scan was obtained, with identification of the desired joint space at L3-L4. A 25 G needle was inserted into the skin by the echographic off-plane ultrasound technique. 1 mL of contrast was administered, with confirmation by fluoroscopy. After aspiration of the contrast, 1 mL of solution containing 0.25% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 mg of methylprednisolone acetate was injected. Injections into L3-L4, L2-L3 and L1-L2 to the right were applied. The visualization of the facet joint by ultrasound involves minimal risk, besides reduction of radiation. This option is suitable for a large part of the population. However, fluoroscopy and computed tomography remain as monitoring techniques indicated for patients with specific characteristics, such as obesity, severe degenerative diseases and anatomical malformations, in which the ultrasound technique is still in need of further study. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Consistent evaluation of an ultrasound-guided surgical navigation system by utilizing an active validation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Kim, Sungmin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasound image-guided needle tracking systems have been widely used due to their cost-effectiveness and nonionizing radiation properties. Various surgical navigation systems have been developed by utilizing state-of-the-art sensor technologies. However, ultrasound transmission beam thickness causes unfair initial evaluation conditions due to inconsistent placement of the target with respect to the ultrasound probe. This inconsistency also brings high uncertainty and results in large standard deviations for each measurement when we compare accuracy with and without the guidance. To resolve this problem, we designed a complete evaluation platform by utilizing our mid-plane detection and time of flight measurement systems. The evaluating system uses a PZT element target and an ultrasound transmitting needle. In this paper, we evaluated an optical tracker-based surgical ultrasound-guided navigation system whereby the optical tracker tracks marker frames attached on the ultrasound probe and the needle. We performed ten needle trials of guidance experiment with a mid-plane adjustment algorithm and with a B-mode segmentation method. With the midplane adjustment, the result showed a mean error of 1.62+/-0.72mm. The mean error increased to 3.58+/-2.07mm without the mid-plane adjustment. Our evaluation system can reduce the effect of the beam-thickness problem, and measure ultrasound image-guided technologies consistently with a minimal standard deviation. Using our novel evaluation system, ultrasound image-guided technologies can be compared under equal initial conditions. Therefore, the error can be evaluated more accurately, and the system provides better analysis on the error sources such as ultrasound beam thickness.

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Electrodes for Conduction Studies of the Saphenous Nerve.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Maria E; Humpert, Sebastian; Rösler, Kai M

    2017-05-01

    Saphenous nerve conduction studies are difficult, because the nerve is hard to localize and evoked responses are small. Ultrasound imaging may assist in the accurate localization and optimal positioning of surface (SE) and needle electrodes (NE). The study population included 39 subjects and was divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 20 healthy subjects, whereas group B of 19 patients with polyneuropathies. Orthodromic conduction was measured by distal supramaximal nerve stimulation. Surface electrode and NE recordings were compared. In the control group, SEs recorded responses in 17 of 20 healthy subjects, whereas NEs in 19. In the patients' group, SEs recorded responses in 7 of 19 patients, whereas NEs in 16. In all healthy subjects and patients, sensory nerve action potentials recorded by NEs were significantly larger than those obtained by SEs (healthy subjects: 5.85 ± 3.01 μV vs. 1.98 ± 1.37 μV, P < 0.0001; patients 3.05 ± 2.35 μV vs. 0.71 ± 1.14 μV, t-test P < 0.0001). Ultrasound guidance allows precise electrode positioning for saphenous nerve electrophysiological testing. Amplitudes of the recorded sensory nerve action potentials are clearly higher with ultrasound-guided needle than with surface recordings.

  5. Endobronchial pleomorphic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Rizwan; Arrossi, Andrea Valeria; Mehta, Atul C.; Frye, Laura; Mazzone, Peter; Almeida, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenomas are the most common tumors of the salivary glands. Rarely, they occur as benign lesions in the lungs in both the central airways and the lung parenchyma. Herein, we present a case of a 60-year-old smoker who was incidentally found to have an endobronchial mass while undergoing evaluation for a lung nodule. During bronchoscopy, a smooth globular nodule was identified at the main carina and removed using electrocautery snare. Histopathology examination revealed this to be a pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:28031854

  6. Endobronchial solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcelo Padovani Toledo; Colby, Thomas; Oliveira, Gilmar Felisberto; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria; De Faveri, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm that appears primarily in the pleura and rarely in intrapulmonary or endobronchial topography. The authors report the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented obstructive respiratory symptoms for 4 years. The chest computed tomography and bronchoscopy showed an obstructive polypoid lesion located between the trachea and the left main bronchus associated with distal atelectasis of the left lung. A resection of the lesion was performed and, macroscopically, the mass was oval, encapsulated, and firm, measuring 2.3 × 1.7 × 1.5 cm. Histology revealed low-grade mesenchymal spindle cell neoplasm, with alternating cellularity, myxoid areas, and mature adipose tissue outbreaks, as well as blood vessels with irregular walls. The immunohistochemical study was positive for CD34, CD99, and BCL2. The diagnosis was SFT in an unusual topography. The patient’s symptoms remitted after tumor excision, and no systemic problems were evident. SFTs primarily affect adults and often follow a benign course; however, their behavior is unpredictable. The presence of necrosis and mitotic activity may portend a poor prognosis. Endobronchial SFTs are rare but should be evaluated and monitored similar to SFTs at other sites, with a long-term follow-up. PMID:28210572

  7. Technical communication: new teaching model for practicing ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques: no perishable food products!

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Glass, Nancy L; Power, Robert W

    2010-04-01

    There is a pronounced learning curve for the technique of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Practicing with a simulator model has been shown to speed the acquisition of these skills for various ultrasound-guided procedures. However, commercial models for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia may be too costly or not readily available. Models using turkey breasts or tofu blocks have the disadvantage of containing perishable food products that can be a source for infection. We describe an alternative inexpensive model that is made from nonperishable components readily available in the operating room. The materials required include 1 clean used 500-mL bag of IV fluids, a bottle of Premisorb (TYCO Healthcare Group, Mansfield, MA), and a piece of foam material approximately 0.3 cm in diameter and 5 cm in length trimmed from operating room foam pads. After filling the IV bag with tap water and inserting the foam into the IV bag from the outlet port of the IV bag, one-third of a bottle of Premisorb (approximately 15 g) is poured into the IV bag. The outlet port of the bag is then sealed by taping the rubber stopper that originally came with the bag. Premisorb, a solidifying agent frequently used to absorb irrigating fluids or blood in operating room suction canisters, produces a gel-like material in the IV bag. The foam inserted into the bag creates a relatively hyperechoic target. This gel-like substance in the bag will seal the holes created after multiple practice needle insertions, resulting in minimal leakage. The semitransparent nature of the gel allows the trainee to visualize the target directly and on the ultrasound screen. The model we describe is inexpensive and easy to make from materials readily available in the operating room with the advantages of being nonperishable, easy to carry, and reusable.

  8. Ultrasound-guided cable-free 13-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy of non-mass breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwoon; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Bohyoung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of ultrasound-guided core biopsy for non-mass breast lesions by the novel 13-gauge cable-free vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) and by the conventional 14-gauge semi-automated core needle biopsy (CCNB). Materials and methods Our institutional review board approved this prospective study, and all patients provided written informed consent. Among 1840 ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies performed from August 2013 to December 2014, 145 non-mass breast lesions with suspicious microcalcifications on mammography or corresponding magnetic resonance imaging finding were subjected to 13-gauge VAB or 14-gauge CCNB. We evaluated the technical success rates, average specimen numbers, and tissue sampling time. We also compared the results of percutaneous biopsy and final surgical pathologic diagnosis to analyze the rates of diagnostic upgrade or downgrade. Results Ultrasound-guided VAB successfully targeted and sampled all lesions, whereas CCNB failed to demonstrate calcification in four (10.3%) breast lesions with microcalcification on specimen mammography. The mean sampling time were 238.6 and 170.6 seconds for VAB and CCNB, respectively. No major complications were observed with either method. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) lesions were more frequently upgraded after CCNB (8/23 and 3/5, respectively) than after VAB (2/26 and 0/4, respectively P = 0.028). Conclusion Non-mass breast lesions were successfully and accurately biopsied using cable-free VAB. The underestimation rate of ultrasound-detected non-mass lesion was significantly lower with VAB than with CCNB. Trial registration CRiS KCT0002267. PMID:28628656

  9. Use of platelet-rich plasma in the care of sports injuries: our experience with ultrasound-guided injection

    PubMed Central

    Bernuzzi, Gino; Petraglia, Federica; Pedrini, Martina Francesca; De Filippo, Massimo; Pogliacomi, Francesco; Verdano, Michele Arcangelo; Costantino, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma is being used more frequently to promote healing of muscle injuries. The growth factors contained in platelet-rich plasma accelerate physiological healing processes and the use of these factors is simple and minimally invasive. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided injection of platelet-rich plasma in muscle strains and the absence of side effects. Materials and methods Fifty-three recreational athletes were enrolled in the study. The patients were recruited from the Emergency Room in the University Hospital at Parma according to a pre-defined protocol. Every patient was assessed by ultrasound imaging to evaluate the extent and degree of muscle injuries. Only grade II lesions were treated with three ultrasound-guided injections of autologous platelet-rich plasma every 7 days. Platelet concentrate was produced according to standard methods, with a 10% variability in platelet count. The platelet gel for clinical use was obtained by adding thrombin to the concentrates under standardised conditions. Outcomes assessed were: pain reduction, muscle function recovery and return to sports activity, ultrasound-imaging tissue healing, relapses, local infections, and any side effect during the treatment. Results In all cases muscle lesions healed fully on ultrasound-imaging, the pain disappeared, and muscle function recovery was documented with a return to sports activity. A single patient had a relapse 1 year after treatment. Discussion Platelet-rich plasma injected into the injury site is one of the most important factors rendering the treatment effective. To maximise its efficacy the preliminary ultrasound must be done accurately to localise the lesion and guide the needle into the corresponding lesion. According to the current results, which document full muscle recovery and no relapse except for one case, platelet-rich plasma ultrasound-guided injection represents a valid mini-invasive treatment for

  10. Ultrasound-guided proximal paravertebral anaesthesia in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Anne H; Doherr, Marcus G; Stoffel, Michael H; Steiner, Adrian; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    To develop and evaluate a method for ultrasound-guidance in performing the proximal paravertebral block for flank anaesthesia in cattle through a cadaveric study, followed by clinical application. prospective experimental cadaveric study and clinical series. Previously frozen lumbar sections of cows without known spinal abnormalities were used. The clinical case group comprised of ten animals for which a right flank laparotomy was indicated. Twenty cow cadavers were used to perform ultrasound-guided bilateral injections of 1.0 mL dye (1.0 mL 1% Toluidine Blue in 1% Borax) at the intervertebral foramen at the level of T13, L1 and L2 spinal nerves. Distance and depth of injection, staining of the dorsal and ventral nerve branches, and deviation from the target were evaluated. The investigator's confidence as to visualisation and expected success at staining the nerve was assessed. Ten clinical cases received the ultrasound-guided proximal paravertebral anaesthesia. Analgesic success was evaluated using a 4-grade scoring system at 10 minutes after the injection and during surgery, respectively. Categorical variables were described using frequencies and proportions. Both dorsal and ventral branches of the spinal nerves T13, L1 or L2 were at least partially stained in 41% of injections, while in 77% of injections one of the branches was stained. Five out of ten clinical cases had a satisfactory anaesthesia. There was no significant association between confidence at injection and either staining or analgesic success. Results from the cadaveric and clinical study suggest no significant improvement using ultrasound guidance to perform proximal paravertebral block in cows compared to our previous clinical experience and to references in the literature using the blind method. Further research should be conducted to improve the ultrasound-guided technique described in this study. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary

  11. [Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) for the internist].

    PubMed

    Stern, J-B; Wyplosz, B; Girard, P; Validire, P; Escaut, L; Caliandro, R

    2016-11-01

    Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) is a recent mini-invasive technique allowing transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal lymph nodes as well as peribronchial lesions. EBUS was initially developed for lung cancer mediastinal staging. Over the years, indications for EBUS have been progressively extended to the scope of inflammatory disorders, mediastinal lymphomas, and infectious diseases. Particularly in immunosuppressed patients, including HIV-infected patients, EBUS allows the diagnosis of several diseases that involve the mediastinum, avoiding invasive surgical explorations such as mediastinoscopy or thoracoscopy. This review aims at discussing the technical aspects, and specifies indications, results, and limits of EBUS for the internist. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a simplified augmented reality device for ultrasound-guided vascular access in a vascular phantom.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yunseok; Choi, Seungpyo; Kim, Heechan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether a novel ultrasound device may be used with a simplified augmented reality technique, and to compare this device with conventional techniques during vascular access using a vascular phantom. Prospective, randomized study. Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine departments of a university-affiliated hospital. 20 physicians with no experience with ultrasound-guided techniques. All participants performed the vascular access technique on the vascular phantom model using both a conventional device and the new ultrasound device. Time and the number of redirections of the needle until aspiration of dye into a vessel of the vascular phantom were measured. The median/interquartile range of time was 39.5/41.7 seconds versus 18.6/10.0 seconds (P < 0.001) and number of redirections was 3/3.5 versus 1/0 (P < 0.001) for the conventional and novel ultrasound devices, respectively. During vascular access in a vascular phantom model, the novel device decreased the time and the number of redirections significantly. The device successfully improved the efficiency of the ultrasound-guided vascular access technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ex Vivo Assessment of an Ultrasound-Guided Injection Technique of the Navicular Bursa in the Horse.

    PubMed

    Perrin, R; Diguet, A C; Cantet, P; Bailly, C; Brogniez, L; Dugdale, A; Nisolle, J F; Vandeweerd, J M

    2016-12-01

    Synovitis of the navicular bursa is common in performance horses. The objective of this study was to describe an ultrasound-guided technique to inject a distended navicular bursa and to evaluate its feasibility for use by a clinician not trained in the technique. Twenty distal limbs of horses of various breeds and sizes were used. To produce synovial distension, the navicular bursa of each limb was injected with contrast medium using a lateral approach and radiography was performed to confirm that the contrast medium was distending the bursa. The digit was positioned with the distal interphalangeal joint in hyperextension. A microconvex ultrasound probe was placed in the hollow of the pastern, palmar to the middle phalanx and the region was assessed in a transverse plane slightly oblique to the horizontal plane. The ultrasound probe was rotated to visualize both the lateral and medial recesses and to select which side was more distended to inject. A 21G 0.8 × 50 mm needle was inserted abaxially to the probe in the plane of the ultrasound beam into the proximal recess of this navicular bursa and a methylene blue solution was injected. Following injection, dissection was performed to assess whether the navicular bursa had been successfully injected. This ultrasound-guided technique was reliably performed with a success rate of 68%. The success of injection is influenced by hyperextension of the foot, quality of ultrasound images and degree of distension of the bursa. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Development of an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jackie

    Use of the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) has gained popularity over the past 30 years in the USA and over the past 15 years in the UK. The PICC was initially used for specific purposes, such as the delivery of parenteral nutrition and chemotherapy, but its use has expanded both within the acute hospital and community settings. This article describes an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service that has been set up in a district general hospital to expand the service within the oncology department and to begin a service for non-oncology patients. As expected, patients who have benefited from the development of this service include those requiring parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy and intravenous therapy in the community. However, retrospective audit has shown that the largest group of patients to benefit from the ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service was those with difficult venous access for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are discussed, along with an overview of the benefits the service has provided to other groups of patients, and associated benefits to the hospital trust.

  15. Preoperative ultrasound-guided mapping of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Gofeld, Michael; Bristow, Sandee J; Chiu, Sheila; Kliot, Michel

    2013-09-01

    Surgical exposure of a peripheral nerve can be technically challenging, making the operation more extensive and time consuming, particularly in the treatment of small nerves with an anatomically variable position. This study describes the application of ultrasound to facilitate surgical access and localization of targeted peripheral nerves. A preclinical feasibility study was performed at the University of Washington's Willed Body Program laboratory. Unembalmed cadavers were placed on the dissection table in positions mimicking those typically required for surgical access to specific nerves that can be challenging to localize. A high-frequency portable ultrasound system was used to identify the nerves. An extraneural injection of methylene blue immediately adjacent to the target nerve was performed under ultrasound guidance as the experimental nerve mapping procedure. Surgical dissections through a small skin incision parallel to skin tension lines were guided by the transducer position and angle. Success was determined by the accuracy and rapidity of surgical identification and exposure of the nerve. Using ultrasound-guided mapping, all anticipated peripheral nerves were correctly identified via a direct approach from the skin incision. This was confirmed by performing an anatomical dissection to expose and identify the intended nerve and its relation to the injected methylene blue dye. In no case was intraneural injection of the dye observed. Preoperative ultrasound-guided nerve mapping may be useful in facilitating surgical access to a targeted nerve and thereby minimizing tissue dissection and operating time.

  16. Clinical experience with ultrasound guided angioplasty for vascular access

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of ultrasound guided percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (UG-PTA), which use ultrasound as an imaging modality, is an evolving strategy. But, in Korea, this method is rarely used. We report our experiences with UG-PTA with respect to technical success rates and complication rates compared to conventional PTA (C-PTA), performed between 2010 and 2015 at Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea. Methods In our series, 53 cases of UG-PTA and 90 cases of C-PTA were reviewed, respectively. Cases of central vein stenosis, cephalic arch stenosis, arterial stenosis and thrombosis were excluded. However, cases of juxta-anastomotic stenosis and outflow vein stenosis were included. Results Technical success was achieved in 96.2% (51 of 53) of cases in the UG-PTA group and in 93.3% (84 of 90) of cases in the C-PTA group, respectively (P = 0.710). Technical failure was experienced in a total 8 cases (UG-PTA group: 2/53, 3.8%; C-PTA group: 6/90, 6.7%). No differences were observed in complications. Conclusion Duplex ultrasound-guided angioplasty for dialysis access in the outpatient setting is feasible, safe, and effective for peripheral venous stenotic lesions. It offers many advantages over conventional angiographic procedures, and, in the future, it has great potential to play a significant role in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:28393000

  17. The challenge of pulmonary endobronchial chondromatous hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Georgios; Challoumas, Dimitrios; Rama Rao Podila, Sita; Mainwaring, Anne-Marie; Kolettis, Theophilos; Kornazewska, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary chondromatous (or chondroid) hamartomas are common benign tumours of the lung and may be either parenchymal or endobronchial. The latter are only rarely encountered and have a variation in their clinical presentation related to the endobronchial obstructive lesion, including atelectasis, pneumonia, hemoptysis. If not diagnosed early and treated properly, endobronchial hamartomas can cause irreversible lung damage. We present a review of the recent English literature over the diagnostic approach and management of pulmonary endobronchial chondromatous hamartomas.

  18. Ultrasound guided percutaneous EVAR success is predicted by vessel diameter

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Huang, Zhen; Pomposelli, Frank; Hamdan, Allen; Wyers, Mark; Chaikof, Elliot; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound guided access allows for direct visualization of the access artery during percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. We hypothesize that the use of ultrasound guidance allowed us to safely increase the utilization of percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair to almost all patients and decrease access complications. Methods A retrospective chart review of all elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs, both abdominal and descending thoracic, from 2005-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using ICD9 codes and stratified based on access type: percutaneous vs. cutdown. We examined the success rate of percutaneous access and the cause of failure. Sheath size was large (18-24 Fr) or small (12-16 Fr). Minimum access vessel diameter was also measured. Outcomes were wound complications (infections or clinically significant hematomas that delayed discharge or required transfusion), operative and incision time, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Predictors of percutaneous failure were identified. Results 168 patients (296 arteries) had percutaneous access (P-EVAR) while 131 patients (226 arteries) had femoral cutdown access (C-EVAR). Ultrasound guided access was introduced in 2007. P-EVAR increased from zero cases in 2005 to 92.3% of all elective cases in 2010. The success rate with percutaneous access was 96%. Failures requiring open surgical repair of the artery included 7 for hemorrhage and 6 for flow limiting stenosis or occlusion of the femoral artery. P-EVAR had fewer wound complications (0.7% vs. 7.4%, P = .001) shorter operative time (153.3 vs. 201.5 minutes, P < .001) and larger minimal access vessel diameter (6.7 mm vs. 6.1 mm, P < .01). Patients with failed percutaneous access had smaller minimal access vessel diameters when compared to successful P-EVAR (4.9 mm vs. 6.8 mm, P < .001). More failures occurred in small sheaths than large ones (7.4% vs. 1.9%, P = .02). Access vessel diameter < 5 mm is predictive

  19. Endobronchial valves for advanced emphysema: an endobronchial follow-up.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Pablo S; Seijo, Luis M; Zulueta, Javier J

    2014-01-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery is a therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced emphysema. However, it is an invasive procedure benefitting only a selected group of patients with heterogeneous upper lobe predominant disease and limited exercise capacity. The most widely studied alternatives are endobronchial valves. Hundreds of patients worldwide have undergone endobronchial valve placement. Although short-term outcomes have been described, little is known about the long-term side effects following this treatment, and endoscopic follow-up is virtually nonexistent. The images, biopsies, and microbiologic evidence accrued from this patient are witnesses to the natural evolution of endobronchial valves in the airways and should offer a word of caution with regard to valve placement in patients with life expectancies exceeding those typical of severe chronic obstructive lung disease.

  20. Long-axis view for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement via the internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, Angel F.; McEvoy, Matthew D.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Background In modern practice, real-time ultrasound guidance is commonly employed for the placement of internal jugular vein catheters. With a new tool, such as ultrasound, comes the opportunity to refine and further optimize the ultrasound view during jugular vein catheterization. We describe jugular vein access techniques and use the long-axis view as an alternative to the commonly employed short-axis cross-section view for internal jugular vein access and cannulation. Conclusion The long-axis ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein approach for internal jugular vein cannulation is a useful alternative technique that can provide better needle tip and guidewire visualization than the more traditional short-axis ultrasound view. PMID:28913474

  1. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach.

  2. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  3. Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Thrombin Injection for Endoleaks: An Alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthuri, Ram. S.; Stivaros, Stavros M.; Gavan, Duncan

    2005-01-15

    Endoleaks are now well-recognized complications of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and an incidence of up to 46% has been reported in the literature. These endoleaks can result in rupture of the aneurysmal sac with potentially serious consequences. A type 2 endoleak is the most common type with a feeding vessel reperfusing the aneurysm sac. Radiological treatment of such an endoleak usually involves coil or particle angioembolisation, but sometimes this can be difficult, especially if endovascular access to the feeding vessel is not straightforward. We describe and illustrate percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection in the treatment of a type 2 endoleak. In appropriate patients, this technique is simple to perform, and has low associated morbidity.

  4. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position.

    PubMed

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique.

  5. Ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection. A new approach.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua Alén, E; Diz Villar, A; Curt Nuño, F; Illodo Miramontes, G; Refojos Arencibia, F J; López González, J M

    2016-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon cause of buttock and leg pain. Some treatment options include the injection of piriformis muscle with local anesthetic and steroids. Various techniques for piriformis muscle injection have been described. Ultrasound allows direct visualization and real time injection of the piriformis muscle. We describe 5 consecutive patients, diagnosed of piriformis syndrome with no improvement after pharmacological treatment. Piriformis muscle injection with local anesthetics and steroids was performed using an ultrasound technique based on a standard technique. All 5 patients have improved their pain measured by numeric verbal scale. One patient had a sciatic after injection that improved in 10 days spontaneously. We describe an ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection that has the advantages of being effective, simple, and safe. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  7. Ultrasound-guided paravertebral block using an intercostal approach.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Alon; Moreno, Milena; Chelly, Jacques E; Bigeleisen, Paul E

    2009-11-01

    We describe an ultrasound-guided technique of continuous bilateral paravertebral block using an intercostal approach in 12 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Postoperatively, each of the patient's paravertebral catheters was bolused with 10 mL lidocaine (15 mg/mL), and each of the patient's catheters was infused with 0.2% ropivacaine at 10 mL/h. Using a pinprick test, the median number of dermatomes blocked after the initial bolus was 5 (interquartile range, 4-6), and 23 of 24 catheters produced a local anesthetic block. The median verbal pain score on postoperative day 1 was 5.5 (interquartile range, 3.5-6), and median dose of IV hydromorphone consumed during the first 24 h after surgery was 1.9 mg (interquartile range, 0.7-5.05). All catheters were removed within 72 h after surgery.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Management of Splenic Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Python, Johanne L; Wakefield, Brian W; Kondo, Kimi L; Bang, Tami J; Stamm, Elizabeth R; Hurt, K Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Splenic ectopic pregnancies are a rare cause of abdominal pain in reproductive-age women. A 21-year-old woman with worsening abdominal pain and a positive pregnancy test presented with hemoperitoneum and no intrauterine pregnancy on transvaginal ultrasound. After 2 nondiagnostic laparoscopies, a splenic pregnancy was diagnosed by computed tomography scan and abdominal ultrasound. Currently, diagnosis and treatment of splenic pregnancies involve exploratory surgery and splenectomy. We report the successful treatment of this splenic ectopic pregnancy with combined intramuscular plus ultrasound-guided percutaneous methotrexate injection, with preservation of the patient's spleen. Abdominal implantation must be considered in patients with pregnancy of unknown location, and in carefully selected patients splenic ectopic pregnancy can be successfully managed by minimally invasive methods. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser prostatectomy: initial Luebeck experince

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephen; Spitzenpfeil, Elisabeth; Knipper, Ansgar; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Transurethral ultrasound guided laser prostatectomy is one of the most promising alternative invasive treatment modalities for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The principle feature is an on- line 3-D controlling of Nd:YAG laser denaturation of the periurethral tissue. Necrotic tissue is not removed, but sloughs away with the urinary stream within weeks. The bleeding hazard during and after the operation is minimal. By leaving the bladder neck untouched, sexual function is not endangered. Thirty-one patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with the TULIP system and followed up for at least 12 weeks. Suprapubic bladder drainage had to be maintained for a mean time of 37 days. Conventional TURP was performed in four patients due to chronic infection, recurrent bleeding, and poor results. Our initial experience with the TULIP system shows it to be very efficient and safe. A longer follow up of a larger patient population is necessary to compare the therapeutic efficiency to conventional transurethral resection.

  10. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  11. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  12. Optimal biliary access point and learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy with transmural stenting

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongwook; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) with transmural stenting has increased for biliary decompression in patients with an inaccessible papilla, the optimal biliary access point and the learning curve of EUS-HGS have not been studied. We evaluated the optimal biliary access point and learning curve for technically successful EUS-HGS. Methods: 129 consecutive patients (male n = 81, 62.3%; malignant n = 113, 87.6%) who underwent EUS-HGS due to an inaccessible papilla were enrolled. EUS finding and procedure times according to each needle puncture attempt in EUS-HGS were prospectively measured. Learning curves of EUS-HGS were calculated for two main outcome measurements (procedure time and adverse events) by using the moving average method and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis, respectively. Results: A total of 174 EUS-HGS attempts were performed in 129 patients. The mean number of needle punctures was 1.35 ± 0.57. Using the logistic regression model, bile duct diameter of the puncture site ⩽ 5 mm [odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71–8.1, p < 0.01] and hepatic portion length [linear distance from the mural wall to the punctured bile duct wall on EUS; mean hepatic portion length was 27 mm (range 10–47 mm)] > 3 cm (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.7–12, p < 0.01) were associated with low technical success. Procedure time and adverse events were shorter after 24 cases, and stabilized at 33 cases of EUS-HGS, respectively. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a bile duct diameter > 5 mm and hepatic portion length 1 cm to ⩽ 3 cm on EUS may be suitable for successful EUS-HGS. In our learning curve analysis, over 33 cases might be required to achieve the plateau phase for successful EUS-HGS. PMID:28286558

  13. Geometric Evaluation of Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misop; Chang, Doyoung; Kim, Chunwoo; Lee, Brian J.; Zuo, Yihe; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Partin, Alan W.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carter, H. Ballentine; Allaf, Mohamad; Kim, Jongwon; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy results rely on physician ability to target the gland according to the biopsy schema. However, to our knowledge it is unknown how accurately the freehand, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy cores are placed in the prostate and how the geometric distribution of biopsy cores may affect the prostate cancer detection rate. Materials and Methods To determine the geometric distribution of cores, we developed a biopsy simulation system with pelvic mock-ups and an optical tracking system. Mock-ups were biopsied in a freehand manner by 5 urologists and by our transrectal ultrasound robot, which can support and move the transrectal ultrasound probe. We compared 1) targeting errors, 2) the accuracy and precision of repeat biopsies, and 3) the estimated significant prostate cancer (0.5 cm3 or greater) detection rate using a probability based model. Results Urologists biopsied cores in clustered patterns and under sampled a significant portion of the prostate. The robot closely followed the predefined biopsy schema. The mean targeting error of the urologists and the robot was 9.0 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Robotic assistance significantly decreased repeat biopsy errors with improved accuracy and precision. The mean significant prostate cancer detection rate of the urologists and the robot was 36% and 43%, respectively (p <0.0001). Conclusions Systematic biopsy with freehand transrectal ultrasound guidance does not closely follow the sextant schema and may result in suboptimal sampling and cancer detection. Repeat freehand biopsy of the same target is challenging. Robotic assistance with optimized biopsy schemas can potentially improve targeting, precision and accuracy. A clinical trial is needed to confirm the additional benefits of robotic assistance. PMID:23088974

  14. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Tarantino, Ilaria; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-16

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) develop secondary to either fluid leakage or liquefaction of pancreatic necrosis following acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, surgery or abdominal trauma. Pancreatic fluid collections include acute fluid collections, acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and pancreatic necrosis. Before the introduction of linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s and the subsequent development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage (EUS-GD) procedures, the available options for drainage in symptomatic PFCs included surgical drainage, percutaneous drainage using radiological guidance and conventional endoscopic transmural drainage. In recent years, it has gradually been recognized that, due to its lower morbidity rate compared to the surgical and percutaneous approaches, endoscopic treatment may be the preferred first-line approach for managing symptomatic PFCs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage has the following advantages, when compared to other alternatives such as surgical, percutaneous and non-EUS-guided endoscopic drainage. EUS-GD is less invasive than surgery and therefore does not require general anesthesia. The morbidity rate is lower, recovery is faster and the costs are lower. EUS-GD can avoid local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the fluid collection, it can have direct access to the fluid cavity, unlike percutaneous drainage which traverses the abdominal wall. Complications such as bleeding, inadvertent puncture of adjacent viscera, secondary infection and prolonged periods of drainage with resultant pancreatico-cutaneous fistulae may be avoided. The only difference between EUS and non-EUS drainage is the initial step, namely, gaining access to the pancreatic fluid collection. All the subsequent steps are similar, i.e., insertion of guide-wires with fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilatation of the cystogastrostomy and insertion of

  16. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (P<0.05), while the rate of complication was lower, in the ultrasound-guided thoracentesis cases compared to standard care treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive procedure to alleviate pleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  17. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions in American football: 18 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Dave, Radhika B; Stevens, Kathryn J; Shivaram, Giri M; McAdams, Timothy R; Dillingham, Michael F; Beaulieu, Christopher F

    2014-12-01

    Myotendinous strains, contusions, and hematomas are common injuries in American football. Along with ligament sprains and inflammatory disorders, musculoskeletal injuries often result in lost participation time. This article summarizes 18 years of experience with 128 ultrasound-guided drainages and injections in 69 football players with 88 injuries. When performed by an operator with sufficient expertise in diagnostic and procedural skills, ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions are minimally invasive, are safe, and can play an integral role in injury management.

  19. Ultrasound-guided spinal anaesthesia in obstetrics: is there an advantage over the landmark technique in patients with easily palpable spines?

    PubMed

    Ansari, T; Yousef, A; El Gamassy, A; Fayez, M

    2014-08-01

    Data are scarce on the advantage of ultrasound-guided spinal anaesthesia in patients with easily identifiable bony landmarks. In this study, we compared the use of ultrasound to the landmark method in patients with no anticipated technical difficulty, presenting for caesarean delivery under spinal anaesthesia. A total of 150 pregnant women were recruited in this randomized, controlled study. Ultrasound examination and spinal anaesthesia were performed by three anaesthetists with experience in ultrasound-guided neuraxial block. Patients were randomized to either the Ultrasound Group (n=75) or the Landmark Group (n=75). In both groups the level of L3-4 or L4-5 was identified by ultrasound (transverse and longitudinal approach) or palpation. The primary outcome was the procedure time, measured from the time of skin puncture by the introducer to the time of viewing cerebrospinal fluid at the hub of the spinal needle. Secondary outcomes were the number of skin punctures, number of passes, and incidence of successful spinal blockade. The average procedure time, number of skin punctures and needle passes, were similar in both groups. The number of patients with successful spinal anaesthesia after one puncture was not statistically different between the groups. The present results indicate that when performed by anaesthetists experienced in both ultrasound and landmark techniques, the use of ultrasound does not appear to increase the success rate of spinal anaesthesia, or reduce the procedure time or number of attempts in obstetric patients with easily palpable spines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery puncture techniques.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Michael M; Goh, Gerard S; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F; McGrath, Frank P; Lee, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    To prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques. Hundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients' age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests. Sixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm(2). Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group. Ultrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  1. Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block, a comparison with the conventional technique: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Sunita Milind; Bhalerao, Pradnya Milind; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional technique of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block may be associated with drug toxicity, block failure and needs large drug volume. The ultrasound-guided (USG) nerve block enables accurate needle positioning that may reduce the chances of drug toxicity, drug dose and block failure. Aim: In this study, we compared the onset and duration of the motor and sensory nerve block, the drug volume required and time to rescue analgesic between USG and conventional technique. Settings and Design: Sixty male patients aged between 18 and 60 years, belonging to American society of Anesthesiology I-II, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective study and were randomly allocated into two groups of thirty each by computerized method. Materials and Methods: Group A patients received hernia block by conventional method using 0.75% ropivacaine 15 ml, and Group B patients were given the block guided by ultrasound using 0.75% ropivacaine, till the nerves were surrounded on all sides by the drug. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using two independent sample t-tests for demographic and hemodynamic parameters. Nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) was used to find the significance between visual analog scale. Results: There was significantly early onset of sensory block in Group B 14.03 ± 2.82 min as compared to Group A 15.57 ± 1.52 min (P = 0.047). The onset of motor block was also earlier in Group B 19.40 ± 2.85 min as compared to Group A 20.67 ± 1.90 min. The time to rescue analgesia was more in Group B 7.22 ± 0.97 h as compared to Group A 6.80 ± 0.70 h (P = 0.062). The volume of drug required was less with ultrasound guided block. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided hernia block thus has the advantage of early onset, less dose requirement and increase in time to rescue analgesia. PMID:26240549

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  4. Ultrasound-guided Transthoracic Intramyocardial Injection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prendiville, Terence W.; Ma, Qing; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Pingzhu; He, Aibin; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Murine models of cardiovascular disease are important for investigating pathophysiological mechanisms and exploring potential regenerative therapies. Experiments involving myocardial injection are currently performed by direct surgical access through a thoracotomy. While convenient when performed at the time of another experimental manipulation such as coronary artery ligation, the need for an invasive procedure for intramyocardial delivery limits potential experimental designs. With ever improving ultrasound resolution and advanced noninvasive imaging modalities, it is now feasible to routinely perform ultrasound-guided, percutaneous intramyocardial injection. This modality efficiently and reliably delivers agents to a targeted region of myocardium. Advantages of this technique include the avoidance of surgical morbidity, the facility to target regions of myocardium selectively under ultrasound guidance, and the opportunity to deliver injectate to the myocardium at multiple, predetermined time intervals. With practiced technique, complications from intramyocardial injection are rare, and mice quickly return to normal activity on recovery from anesthetic. Following the steps outlined in this protocol, the operator with basic echocardiography experience can quickly become competent in this versatile, minimally invasive technique. PMID:25146757

  5. Ultrasound-guided transthoracic intramyocardial injection in mice.

    PubMed

    Prendiville, Terence W; Ma, Qing; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Pingzhu; He, Aibin; Pu, William T

    2014-08-05

    Murine models of cardiovascular disease are important for investigating pathophysiological mechanisms and exploring potential regenerative therapies. Experiments involving myocardial injection are currently performed by direct surgical access through a thoracotomy. While convenient when performed at the time of another experimental manipulation such as coronary artery ligation, the need for an invasive procedure for intramyocardial delivery limits potential experimental designs. With ever improving ultrasound resolution and advanced noninvasive imaging modalities, it is now feasible to routinely perform ultrasound-guided, percutaneous intramyocardial injection. This modality efficiently and reliably delivers agents to a targeted region of myocardium. Advantages of this technique include the avoidance of surgical morbidity, the facility to target regions of myocardium selectively under ultrasound guidance, and the opportunity to deliver injectate to the myocardium at multiple, predetermined time intervals. With practiced technique, complications from intramyocardial injection are rare, and mice quickly return to normal activity on recovery from anesthetic. Following the steps outlined in this protocol, the operator with basic echocardiography experience can quickly become competent in this versatile, minimally invasive technique.

  6. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portocentesis in 21 cows.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Koller-Wild, K; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R

    2000-11-25

    An ultrasound-guided portocentesis was performed in 21 clinically healthy cows, and blood was collected for haematological, biochemical and blood-gas analyses. At the same time blood samples were collected from the left jugular vein of each cow for the same analyses. Immediately after the centesis, portal blood pressure was measured. The cows were examined daily thereafter for eight days and then slaughtered for postmortem examination of the internal organs. The mean (sd) portal blood pressure was 37.1 (5.47) mmHg, and ranged from 24 to 49 mmHg. There were small but significant differences between many of the haematological and biochemical parameters in jugular and portal blood, and the concentration of bile acids was on average 2.7 times higher, and the concentration of ammonia was 19.3 times higher in portal blood. The demeanour and behaviour of the cows, and their appetite and rectal temperature remained normal during the eight-day observation period. The haematocrit, total and differential leucocyte counts, and the concentrations of total solids and fibrinogen were not affected by portocentesis. On postmortem examination, no lesions were apparent in the peritoneum, liver and portal vein.

  7. A randomised controlled trial comparing meat-based with human cadaveric models for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Lim, Y C; Aneja, H; Duce, N A; Appleyard, R; Forrest, K; Royse, C F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study was to compare novices' acquisition of the technical skills of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia using either a meat phantom model or fresh-frozen human cadavers. The primary outcome was the time taken to successfully perform an ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block on a cadaver; secondary outcomes were the cumulative score of errors, and best image quality of the sciatic nerve achieved. After training, the median (IQR [range]) time taken to perform the block was 311(164-390 [68-600]) s in the meat model trained group and 210 (174-354 [85-600]) s in the fresh-frozen cadaver trained group (p = 0.24). Participants made a median (IQR [range]) of 18 (14-33 [8-55]) and 15 (12-22 [8-44]) errors in the two groups respectively (p = 0.39). The image quality score was also not different, with a median (IQR [range]) of 62.5 (59.4-65.6 [25.0-100.0])% vs 62.5 (62.5-75.0 [25.0-87.5])% respectively (p = 0.58). The training and deliberate feedback improved all participants' block performance, the median (IQR [range]) times being 310 (206-532 [110-600]) s before and 240 (174-354 [85-600]) s after training (p = 0.02). We conclude that novices taught ultrasound scanning and needle guidance skills using an inexpensive and easily constructed meat model perform similarly to those trained on a cadaveric model. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Volume Navigation Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Breast Lesions Detected Only at MRI.

    PubMed

    Aribal, Erkin; Tureli, Derya; Kucukkaya, Fikret; Kaya, Handan

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of a volume navigation technique (VNT) for ultrasound-guided biopsy of MRI-detected, but sonographically ambiguous or occult, breast lesions. Within a recruitment period of 13 months (January 1, 2014, through February 1, 2015), 22 patients with 26 BI-RADS category 4 or 5 lesions that were detected at MRI but missed at second-look ultrasound were reimaged using a rapid sequence and a flexible body coil in a 3-T MRI scanner. Patients were supine, with three skin markers placed on the breasts. MRI volume data were coregistered to real-time ultrasound in a dedicated platform, and MRI-detected lesions (six masses, 11 nonmass enhancements, eight foci, and one architectural distortion) were sought using VNT-guided ultrasound. Five needle biopsy specimens were obtained either from each sonographically detected lesion (n = 11) or from VNT-guided sonographically localized breast volume corresponding to the MRI-detected, but still ultrasound-occult, lesions (n = 15). Histopathologic analysis revealed 18 benign and six malignant lesions. The remaining two lesions, both of which appeared as masses at MRI, were high risk and were upgraded to carcinoma after excisional biopsy. All malignant lesions underwent curative surgery; the final histopathologic diagnoses remained unchanged. Of the six malignant lesions, one was a mass, three were nonmass enhancements, and two were enhancing foci at MRI. Three malignant lesions were occult at ultrasound, and three were discerned as subtle hypoechoic changes. No benign lesion was sonographically visualized as a mass, and none progressed, with 56% disappearing at MRI performed during the follow-up period (mean, 14 months). Coregistration of MRI and real-time ultrasound enables sonographic localization of breast lesions detected at MRI only. VNT is a feasible alternative to MRI-guided biopsy of ultrasound-occult breast lesions.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies for mediastinal lesions and lymph node diagnosis and staging

    PubMed Central

    Ardengh, José Celso; Bammann, Ricardo H.; de Giovani, Matheus; Venco, Filadelfio; Parada, Artur A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To disseminate transesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) as an alternative to investigate mediastinal tumoral lesions because it is an underused modality that has been available in Brazil for more than 15 years. METHODS: Descriptive analysis of a single endoscopy service's experience since 1997 in the accomplishment of EUS-FNA for mediastinal staging of previously known malignancies (Group 1) or diagnostic definition of suspect lymph nodes and masses (Group 2). RESULTS: EUS-FNA was performed in 51 patients between 26 and 87 years of age. The diameter of the lesions ranged between 1.1 and 9.8 cm (mean 3.9 cm). Their location corresponded to the following stations: higher paratracheal (4 cases), lower paratracheal (7), aortic window (12), para-aortic (6), subcarinal (9), paraesophageal (8), and hilar (5). In Group 1, 17 patients had previously diagnosed primary lung (9), breast (4), kidney (2), colon (1), and bladder (1) cancer. Fifteen of these punctures were positive for malignity. Two others were later submitted to mediastinoscopy, which identified metastases not detected by EUS-FNA. Group 2 comprised 34 patients. Among these patients, EUS-FNA diagnosed 22 neoplasms, five cases of tuberculosis and two duplication cysts. Cytology was inconclusive or without a specific diagnosis in five other cases. Mediastinoscopy identified two undiagnosed cases of oat-cell carcinoma, one lymphoma and one cryptococcosis, and confirmed one reactive lymphadenitis. There were no complications related to the method. CONCLUSIONS: EUS-FNA obviated the need for surgical procedures in 86.3% of cases. Therefore, oncologists, pulmonologists, and thoracic surgeons should always remember the technique's potential and availability. PMID:22179163

  10. [Clinical evaluation of in-plane ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach].

    PubMed

    Xu, T; Li, M; Tian, Y; Song, J T; Ni, C; Guo, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To evaluate the feasibility and success rate of in-plane ultrasound-guided paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach. In the study, 27 patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were selected to do paravertebral block preoperatively. The fifth intercostal space was scanned by ultrasound probe which was placed along the long axis of the rib and 8 cm lateral to the midline of the spine. The needle was advanced in increments aiming at the space between the internal and innermost intercostal muscles. Once the space between the muscles was achieved, 20 mL of 0.5% (mass fraction) ropivacaine was injected and a catheter was inserted. Whether the tip of catheter was in right place was evaluated by ultrasound image. The block dermatomes of cold sensation were recorded 10, 20 and 30 min after the bolus drug was given. Then 0.2% ropivacaine was infused with 6 mL/h via the catheter by an analgesia pump postoperatively. The block dermatomes of cold sensation and pain score were recorded 1, 6, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. The first attempt success rate of catheteration was 81.48% (22/27); the tips of catheter were proved in right places after the second or third attempt in 5 patients. The median numbers of the block dermatomes 10, 20 and 30 min after the bolus drug was given were 2, 3, 4; the median numbers of block dermatomes were 5, 5, 5, 4, and of pain score were 1, 1, 2, 2 at 1, 6, 24, 48 h postoperatively; no case of bilateral block, pneumothorax or vessel puncture occurred. Thoracic paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach is feasible, which has high success rate of block and low rate of complications.

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound: morphological predictors of benign disease.

    PubMed

    Gogia, Pratibha; Insaf, Tabassum Z; McNulty, William; Boutou, Afroditi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Zoumot, Zaid; Shah, Pallav L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) morphology of lymph nodes in predicting benign cytology of transbronchial needle aspirates in a prospective observational study. Five ultrasonic morphological characteristics of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes were recorded: size, shape, margins, echogenic appearance and the presence of a central blood vessel. These characteristics were correlated with the final diagnosis. A total of 402 consecutive patients (237 males and 165 females) undergoing EBUS were studied. The final diagnosis was malignant disease in 244 (60.6%) and benign disease in 153 (38.05%) subjects. Out of 740 sampled nodes, in 463 (62.6%) malignant cells were identified, whereas in 270 (36.5%) nodes, no malignant cells were identified. On univariate analysis small size, triangular shape and the presence of a central vessel were predictive of a benign aetiology. In the final multivariate model, a predictive probability of 0.811 (95% CI 0.72-0.91) for benign disease was found if lymph node size was <10 mm and a central vessel was present. Sonographic appearances of lymph nodes improve the predictive probability of EBUS for benign aetiologies, and may reduce the number of nodes requiring sampling and the need for further invasive investigations.

  12. Endobronchial tuberculosis—a review

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Talha

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is a tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbial and histopathological evidence. Patients may present with symptoms secondary to disease itself or from the complication of disease like endobronchial obstruction. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Computed tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy along with microbiological investigations are the most useful diagnostic tools for the confirmation as well as for the evaluation of the tracheobronchial stenosis. The goals of treatment are eradication of tubercle bacilli with anti-tubercular medications and the prevention of airway stenosis. Interventional Bronchoscopic techniques and surgery is required for those patients who develop severe tracheobronchial stenosis that causing significant symptoms including dyspnea, repeated post obstructive pneumonia or bronchiectasis. PMID:28149579

  13. Pathology Reporting of Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy: A Proposal of the Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chan Kwon; Min, Hye Sook; Park, Hyo Jin; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Jang Hee; Park, So Yeon; Yoo, Hyunju; Shin, Mi Kyung

    2015-07-01

    In recent years throughout Korea, the use of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) has become common for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB. The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants. This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB.

  14. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  16. Ultrasound-guided peripheral and truncal blocks in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Delvi, Mohamed Bilal

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound has added a feather in the cap of the anesthesiologists as real-time nerve localization and drug deposition around the nerve structure under real-time guidance is now a reality, as the saying "seeing is believing" has been proven true with the advent of ultrasound in anesthesia. Pediatric patients are a unique group regarding their anatomical and physiological features in comparison with adults; regional blocks in adults with the anatomical landmark and surface marking are almost uniform across the adult population. The landmark technique in pediatric patients is not reliable in all patients due to the variability in the age and size; the advent of ultrasound in assisting nerve localization has changed the way regional blocks are achieved in children and the range of blocks performed on adults can now be performed on pediatric patients; with advances in the technology and dexterity of ultrasound equipment, the chances of success of blocks has increased with a smaller dose of the local anesthetic in comparison to the traditional methods. Anesthesiologists are now able to perform blocks with more accuracy and avoid complications like intravascular injection and injury to the pleura and peritoneum during routine practice with the assistance of high-frequency transducers and top of the range portable ultrasound machines; catheters can be inserted to provide a continuous analgesia in the postoperative period. This review article describes the common peripheral blocks in pediatric patients; the readers are encouraged to gain experience by attending workshops, hands-on practice under supervision, and conduct random controlled trials pertaining to ultrasound-guided blocks in the pediatric age group. The recent literature is encouraging and further research is promising; a wide range of blocks being described in detail by many prominent experts from all over the world.

  17. Ultrasound-guided tru-cut biopsy of abdominal and pelvic tumors in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Zikan, M; Fischerova, D; Pinkavova, I; Dundr, P; Cibula, D

    2010-12-01

    To analyze the safety, adequacy and accuracy of tru-cut biopsy and to evaluate factors potentially affecting adequacy. We analyzed retrospectively a group of patients who had undergone tru-cut biopsy for either primary suboptimally operable tumors, recurrence or suspected non-genital or secondary tumor. Tru-cut biopsy was performed either transvaginally or transabdominally, using an automatic biopsy gun with disposable needle and needle guide attached to the probe. The adequacy, i.e. obtaining a sample sufficient for identification of the origin of the tumor and performance of immunohistochemistry; accuracy, i.e. agreement between biopsy and final postoperative histology; and safety, as determined by complication rate, were assessed. Variables potentially influencing adequacy were analyzed using the orthogonal projections to latent structure method. A total of 195 biopsies were performed on 190 patients. An adequate sample was obtained in 178 (91.3%) biopsies. The final histology was not in agreement with the result from tru-cut biopsy in two out of 118 patients who underwent subsequent surgery (accuracy 98.3%). There were complications in two cases out of the 195 biopsies performed (1.0%). Ascites, elevated CA 125, primary suboptimal operable tumor, serous epithelial ovarian cancer histology, carcinomatosis and vaginal approach were significant positive predictors for the achievement of an adequate sample, while recurrence as an indication, non-serous and non-ovarian histotypes and transabdominal approach were negative predictors. Ultrasound-guided tru-cut biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate and safe diagnostic method in the management of advanced, recurrent or atypical abdominal and pelvic tumors of probable non-genital origin, where unnecessary laparotomy or laparoscopy can be avoided. The adequacy of tru-cut biopsy is mainly influenced by indication group, histology, site of biopsy and approach. Our analysis can help in counseling the patient

  18. Method for endobronchial video parsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Patrick D.; Higgins, William E.

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic examination of the lungs during bronchoscopy produces a considerable amount of endobronchial video. A physician uses the video stream as a guide to navigate the airway tree for various purposes such as general airway examinations, collecting tissue samples, or administering disease treatment. Aside from its intraoperative utility, the recorded video provides high-resolution detail of the airway mucosal surfaces and a record of the endoscopic procedure. Unfortunately, due to a lack of robust automatic video-analysis methods to summarize this immense data source, it is essentially discarded after the procedure. To address this problem, we present a fully-automatic method for parsing endobronchial video for the purpose of summarization. Endoscopic- shot segmentation is first performed to parse the video sequence into structurally similar groups according to a geometric model. Bronchoscope-motion analysis then identifies motion sequences performed during bronchoscopy and extracts relevant information. Finally, representative key frames are selected based on the derived motion information to present a drastically reduced summary of the processed video. The potential of our method is demonstrated on four endobronchial video sequences from both phantom and human data. Preliminary tests show that, on average, our method reduces the number of frames required to represent an input video sequence by approximately 96% and consistently selects salient key frames appropriately distributed throughout the video sequence, enabling quick and accurate post-operative review of the endoscopic examination.

  19. Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Biopty gun superior to aspiration.

    PubMed

    Ragde, H; Aldape, H C; Bagley, C M

    1988-12-01

    We used a 7 MHz transrectal ultrasound scanner to perform guided core biopsy and aspiration cytologies on 292 patients with findings suspicious for prostate cancer. One hundred two cancers were identified, 35 of which were not palpable and were detected only by ultrasound. Aspiration needles were guided by ultrasound through the center of the suspicious lesion. Core biopsies were performed using an 18-gauge Tru-Cut type of needle with an automatic, spring-powered needle biopsy device (Biopty). All patients received only local anesthetic and biopsies were done as an outpatient office procedure. The core biopsies gave excellent specimens which detected 89 percent of the cancers, whereas the aspiration method detected 51 percent (P less than 0.001). Aspiration cytology was significantly less sensitive among well-differentiated compared with moderately differentiated cancers. High-resolution transrectal ultrasound and the Biopty device are detecting and documenting prostate cancer with much greater sensitivity than preceding techniques have achieved.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided central venous access in patients with uncorrected coagulopathy].

    PubMed

    Reusz, Géza; Langer, Csilla; Hevessy, Tibor; Csomós, Ákos

    2015-07-05

    Correction of coagulopathy prior to central venous catheterization is a standard practice. Before ultrasound-guided procedures, routine correction of coagulopathy is controversial as mechanical complications are rare. To evaluate the safety of ultrasound-guided central venous access in critically ill patients with coagulopathy. In this retrospective study the authors included all ultrasound-guided central venous catheterizations performed in their Intensive Care Unit between February 2011 and January 2013. They defined coagulopathy as INR or APTT ratio above 1.5, platelet count below 100 G/l, and anticoagulation or clopidogrel therapy. Data obtained from ultrasound register and patient records were used. 310 ultrasound-guided central venous catheterizations were performed. Coagulopathy was observed in 134 cases (43.2%) and corrected in 10 cases prior to catheterization. There were no bleeding complications (complication rate in uncorrected coagulopathy: 0%, 95% confidence interval: 0-3.0%). Coagulopathy is common in critically ill patients, but its routine correction prior to ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization seems unnecessary.

  1. Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: An Ultrasound-Guided Technique Versus a Landmark-Guided Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turker, Gurkan; Kaya, Fatma Nur; Gurbet, Alp; Aksu, Hale; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Atlas, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01). Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05). The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications. PMID:19841706

  2. Robotic Assistance for Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fichtinger, Gabor; Fiene, Jonathan P.; Kennedy, Christopher W.; Kronreif, Gernot; Iordachita, Iulian; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present a robotically assisted prostate brachytherapy system and test results in training phantoms and Phase-I clinical trials. The system consists of a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and a spatially co-registered robot, fully integrated with an FDA-approved commercial treatment planning system. The salient feature of the system is a small parallel robot affixed to the mounting posts of the template. The robot replaces the template interchangeably, using the same coordinate system. Established clinical hardware, workflow and calibration remain intact. In all phantom experiments, we recorded the first insertion attempt without adjustment. All clinically relevant locations in the prostate were reached. Non-parallel needle trajectories were achieved. The pre-insertion transverse and rotational errors (measured with a Polaris optical tracker relative to the template’s coordinate frame) were 0.25mm (STD=0.17mm) and 0.75° (STD=0.37°). In phantoms, needle tip placement errors measured in TRUS were 1.04mm (STD=0.50mm). A Phase-I clinical feasibility and safety trial has been successfully completed with the system. We encountered needle tip positioning errors of a magnitude greater than 4mm in only 2 out of 179 robotically guided needles, in contrast to manual template guidance where errors of this magnitude are much more common. Further clinical trials are necessary to determine whether the apparent benefits of the robotic assistant will lead to improvements in clinical efficacy and outcomes. PMID:18650122

  3. Needle tip visibility in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Muhammad; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2017-03-01

    Needle visibility is of crucial importance for ultrasound guided interventional procedures. However, several factors, such as shadowing by bone or gas and tissue echogenic properties similar to needles, may compromise needle visibility. Additionally, small angle between the ultrasound beam and the needle, as well as small gauged needles may reduce visibility. Variety in needle tips design may also affect needle visibility. Whereas several studies have investigated needle visibility in 2D ultrasound imaging, no data is available for 3D ultrasound imaging, a modality that has great potential for image guidance interventions1. In this study, we evaluated needle visibility using a 3D ultrasound transducer. We examined different needles in a tissue mimicking liver phantom at three angles (200, 550 and 900) and quantify their visibility. The liver phantom was made by 5% polyvinyl alcohol solution containing 1% Silica gel particles to act as ultrasound scattering particles. We used four needles; two biopsy needles (Quick core 14G and 18G), one Ablation needle (Radiofrequency Ablation 17G), and Initial puncture needle (IP needle 17G). The needle visibility was quantified by calculating contrast to noise ratio. The results showed that the visibility for all needles were almost similar at large angles. However the difference in visibility at lower angles is more prominent. Furthermore, the visibility increases with the increase in angle of ultrasound beam with needles.

  4. Ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the cervical spine and brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Recent applications in ultrasound imaging include ultrasound assessment and ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the spine and brachial plexus. Discussion: Ultrasound is an ideal modality for these regions as it allows accurate safe and quick injection of single or multiple sites. It has the added advantages of lack of ionising radiation, and can be done without requiring large expensive radiology equipment. Conclusion: Brachial plexus pathology may be present in patients presenting for shoulder symptoms where very little is found at imaging the shoulder. It is important to understand the anatomy and normal variants that may exist to be able to recognise when pathology is present. When pathology is demonstrated it is easy to do a trial of therapy with ultrasound guided injection of steroid around the nerve lesion. This review will outline the normal anatomy and variants and common pathology, which can be amenable to ultrasound guided injection of steroid. PMID:28191203

  5. Effective low dosage of mepivacaine in ultrasound-guided axillary nerve block: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial of efficacy in patients undergoing distal upper extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Perov, Samuel; Patel, Pranav; Kumar, Sanjeev; McKelvey, George M; Chidiac, Elie; Motlani, Faisal

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate two low-dose volumes (20 mL or 30 mL) of 1.5% mepivacaine solution used for ultrasound-guided axillary blockade for outpatients undergoing distal upper limb surgery. Prospective, double-blinded randomized study. Outpatient surgical setting of a university-affiliated hospital. 64 adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, aged 28-46 years, scheduled for upper limb surgery. Patients were randomized to two groups to receive either 20 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine solution (n=31) or 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine solution (n=33) for ultrasound-guided axillary plexus blockade. Block duration, proportion of surgical and functional successful blocks, onset of sensory and motor blockade measured from 0 to 30 minutes following final needle extraction, total amount of preoperative sedative (midazolam), and intraoperative propofol administered were recorded. Following axillary plexus blockade, neither patient group showed any statistically significant difference in the percentage of functionally successful blockade (30 mL, 100%: 20 mL, 97%; P = 0.48), surgically successful blockade (30 mL, 100%; 20 mL, 94%; P = 0.23), cumulative sensory or motor blockade surgical time, block performance time, preoperative midazolam use, or intraoperative propofol use. Low volumes (30 mL or 20 mL) of 1.5% mepivacaine provides satisfactory anesthesia for ambulatory distal upper limb surgery with no significant difference in clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Successful Treatment with Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration of Intractable Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Brain Abscess in an Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-kyung; Kim, Young-soo; Lee, Young-soo; Oh, Sung-hee; Lee, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses are an uncommon and devastating complication of bacteremia in extremely low birth weight infants (<1 kg). We report a 25-week preterm neonate who developed a brain abscess 4 weeks following methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) sepsis. A huge brain abscess was seen with routine brain sonography on day 19 of life. Despite intravenous vancomycin treatment, the brain abscess increased in size and was associated with increased intracranial pressure on day 49 of life. The brain abscess was accompanied by mild meningeal inflammation with negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Diagnosis of abscess was confirmed by bedside ultrasound-guided aspiration, and MRSA was isolated from the pus culture. The MRSA brain abscess refractory to vancomycin was successfully treated by surgical ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle aspiration of brain abscess and prolonged courses of antibiotic administration. At the time of this report, the infant was 9 months old (corrected age was 6 months) and had normal neurodevelopment for her corrected age on the Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  8. Development and Implementation of an Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Program for Emergency Nurses.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Courtney; Jones, Jodi

    2017-08-09

    Emergency medical care often necessitates placement of peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters. When traditional methods for obtaining PIV access are not successful, ultrasound guidance is a rescue technique for peripheral vascular placement that improves the quality of patient care. The aim of this training program was to develop a process where emergency nurses would be competent to perform ultrasound guided PIV to improve the quality of patient care delivered while reducing throughput time. Administrative program development required creating a nursing practice statement, procedure guideline, operational plan, and competency validation. A training program comprising both didactic and hands-on training was developed and provided by emergency medicine physicians with formal ultrasound fellowship training. In determining whether the training program was adequate in preparing the student to place an ultrasound-guided PIV, 92.9% of students "agreed" or "strongly agreed." In having confidence in their ability to obtain an ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 35.7% of respondents "agreed" and 64.3% "strongly agreed." In finding it difficult to be successful in achieving ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 71.4% of students "strongly disagreed" and 14.3% "disagreed." All students (100%) felt it was a feasible task to train nurses to successfully place ultrasound-guided PIV catheters and 71.4% of students strongly support continuing to provide this training program and competency validation. Establishment of an effective didactic and hands-on training program resulted in emergency department nurses becoming competent in placement of ultrasound guided PIV catheters to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Field Operable Ultrasound Needle Guidance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-21

    Field Operable Ultrasound Needle Guida rtIl~tMil\\L HAS BEEN CLEARED fOR-PUBLIC RELEASE BY 66 ABtJ/PA Laura J. Brattain·, Caspar Floryan·, Oliver P. m...ultrasound guided procedures from central line placements to peripheral nerve blocks. Furthermore, with the receDt development of blghly portable...feed of the ultrasound image with a prediction of the needle’s trajectory, seen in Fig. 4. The practitioner sees a red line superimposed over the

  10. Compound imaging technology and echogenic needle design: effects on needle visibility and tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Thomas; Bornträger, Andreas; Zoremba, Martin; Neff, Martin; Wulf, Hinnerk; Steinfeldt, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Needle visualization in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can be improved by using needles of echogenic design with higher rate of reflection of ultrasound waves. Imaging solutions such as compound imaging might further improve imaging of both needle and tissue; these effects have not yet been studied. We hypothesized that compound imaging would significantly improve needle visibility, regardless of the insertion angle or needle type used. The effects of compound imaging on needle artifacts and tissue imaging were also investigated. A total of 200 video clips of in-plane needle insertions were obtained in embalmed cadavers with a conventional needle and an echogenic needle at 5 different insertion angles, with both conventional B-mode ultrasound imaging and compound imaging technology. Visibility of the needle shaft and needle tip as well as the needle artifact rate were assessed by a blinded investigator on a 4-point ordinal scale. The effects on tissue image quality and speckle artifacts were also assessed. Stepwise linear regression was performed to differentiate effects on needle visibility scores. Imaging of the needle shaft and tip was significantly enhanced when compound imaging technology was used (P < 0.0001). Use of echogenically designed needles or shallow needle insertion angles improved visibility of both shaft and tip (both P < 0.0001). With compound imaging, there are fewer needle artifacts, and tissue imaging quality and speckle artifact rate are significantly improved. Compound imaging technology enhances needle imaging with both echogenic and conventional needles. Tissue imaging and speckle artifacts are also optimized. Echogenic needle design results in better needle visibility scores in both B-mode and compound imaging.

  11. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ultrasound guided foreign body removal P4 #5861 Female Right leg 68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 5 Yes 23 23 0 N/A...68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 5 Yes 26 26 0 N/A Radiological Procedure Removal Technique - Percutaneous - interventional...radiological ultrasound guided foreign body removal P6 #5861 Female Right leg 68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 9 Yes 17 17 0 N/A

  13. [Endobronchial hamartoma revealed by hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Smati, Belhassen; Boudaya, Mohamed Sadok; Mestiri, Taher; Djilani, Habiba; Mezni, Faouzi; Kilani, Tarek

    2005-05-01

    Hamartoma is the most frequent benign tumor of the lung. Its endo bronchial location is rare. We report two cases of endo bronchial hamartoma occurring in 2 men aged 68 and 60 years respectively. The two cases were revealed by hemoptysis. Bronchial fibroscopy showed a bud respectively in the left stump and in the lower left bronchus. Treatment consisted in a pneumonectomy and a lower lobectomy. A histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of endo bronchial hamartoma. Diagnosis of endobronchial hamartoma before surgery is difficult. Pulmonary resections are often necessary because of parenchyma lelions caused bronchial obstruction.

  14. Novel use of ultrasound in the ED: ultrasound-guided hematoma block of a proximal humeral fracture.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, Emily; Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are a common injury after falls, particularly in the elderly population. An ultrasound-guided hematoma block is a novel technique for analgesia in cases when standard intravenous analgesia is not efficacious. We present a case in which ultrasound-guided hematoma block was the ideal method for adjunctive pain control in a patient with a comminuted humeral head fracture.

  15. Cost minimization analysis for combinations of sampling techniques in bronchoscopy of endobronchial lesions.

    PubMed

    Roth, Kjetil; Hardie, Jon Andrew; Andreassen, Alf Henrik; Leh, Friedemann; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind

    2009-06-01

    The choice of sampling techniques in bronchoscopy with sampling from a visible lesion will depend on the expected diagnostic yields and the costs of the sampling techniques. The aim of this study was to determine the most economical combination of sampling techniques when approaching endobronchial visible lesions. A cost minimization analysis was performed. All bronchoscopies from 2003 and 2004 at Haukeland university hospital, Bergen, Norway, were reviewed retrospectively for diagnostic yields. 162 patients with endobronchial disease were included. Potential sampling techniques used were biopsy, brushing, endobronchial needle aspiration (EBNA) and washings. Costs were estimated based on registration of equipment costs and personnel costs. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine threshold values. The combination of biopsy, brushing and EBNA was the most economical strategy with an average cost of Euro 893 (95% CI: 657, 1336). The cost of brushing had to be below Euro 83 and it had to increase the diagnostic yield more than 2.2%, for biopsy and brushing to be more economical than biopsy alone. The combination of biopsy, brushing and EBNA was more economical than biopsy and brushing when the cost of EBNA was below Euro 205 and the increase in diagnostic yield was above 5.2%. In the current study setting, biopsy, brushing and EBNA was the most economical combination of sampling techniques for endobronchial visible lesions.

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound—guidance for interstitial photodynamic therapy of locally advanced lung cancer—a new interventional concept

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Emily; Bellnier, David; Shafirstein, Gal

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in interventional pulmonology led to a significant expansion of the diagnostic and therapeutic role of endobronchial ultrasound. In this paper, we describe a new concept for using endobronchial ultrasound to guide interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). For this purpose, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments using a phantom and animal models, respectively. A new 0.5 mm optical fiber, with cylindrical diffuser end, was used to deliver the therapeutic light through the 21-gauge endobronchial ultrasound needle. The animal experiments were performed under real-time ultrasonography guidance in mice and rabbits’ tumor models. Safe and effective fiber placements and tumor illumination was accomplished. In addition, computer simulation of light propagation suggests that locally advanced lung cancer tumor can be illuminated. This study demonstrates the potential feasibility of this new therapeutic modality approach, justifying further investigation in the treatment of locally advanced lung cancers. PMID:28932569

  17. Recurrent endobronchial actinomycosis following an interventional procedure

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Actinomycosis is an indolent, slowly progressive infection caused by anaerobic or microaerophilic bacteria, primarily from the genus Actinomyces. Thoracic involvement is observed in approximately 15% of cases of infection with actinomycosis. Here, we present a case of a 61-year-old male who presented with recurrent endobronchial actinomycosis. The case is being presented because of its rarity on three counts – endobronchial involvement, which is uncommon, recurrence in different sites in the bronchial tree, which is even rarer and development of the disease following an endobronchial procedure. PMID:28360473

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  19. How to achieve ultrasound-guided femoral venous access: the new standard of care in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Benedict M; Child, Nicholas; Roberts, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Bedside vascular ultrasound machines are increasingly available. They are used to facilitate safer vascular access across a number of different specialties. In the electrophysiology laboratory however, where patients are frequently anticoagulated and require the insertion of multiple venous sheaths, anatomical landmark techniques predominate. Despite the high number of vascular complications associated with electrophysiological procedures and the increasing evidence to support its use in electrophysiology, ultrasound remains underutilised. A new standard of care is required. A comprehensive technical report, providing a detailed explanation of this important technique, will provide other electrophysiology centres with the knowledge and justification for adopting ultrasound guidance as their standard practice. We review the increasing body of evidence which demonstrates that routine ultrasound usage can substantially improve the safety of femoral venous access in the electrophysiology laboratory. We offer a comprehensive technical report to guide operators through the process of ultrasound-guided venous access, with a specific focus on the electrophysiology laboratory. Additionally, we detail a novel technique which utilises real-time colour Doppler ultrasound to accurately identify needle tip location during venous puncture. The use of vascular ultrasound to guide femoral venous cannulation is rapid, inexpensive and easily learnt. Ultrasound is readily available and offers the potential to significantly reduce vascular complications in the unique setting of the electrophysiology laboratory. Ultrasound guidance to achieve femoral venous access should be the new standard of care in electrophysiology.

  20. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application.

    PubMed

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE.

  1. Rating scale for the assessment of competence in ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access - a Delphi Consensus Study.

    PubMed

    Primdahl, Stine C; Todsen, Tobias; Clemmesen, Louise; Knudsen, Lars; Weile, Jesper

    2016-09-21

    Peripheral vascular access is vital for treatment and diagnostics of hospitalized patients. Ultrasound-guided vascular access (UGVA) is superior to the landmark technique. To ensure competence-based education, an assessment tool of UGVA competence is needed. We aimed to develop a global rating scale (RS) for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions on the content from ultrasound experts in a modified Delphi consensus study. We included experts from anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology across university hospitals in Denmark. Nine elements were drafted based on existing literature and recommendations from international societies. In a multi-round survey, the experts rated the elements on a five-point Likert scale according to importance, and suggested missing elements. The final Delphi round occurred when >80% of the experts rated all elements ≥4 on the Likert scale. Sixteen experts consented to participate in the study, one withdrew consent prior to the first Delphi round, and 14 completed all three Delphi rounds. In the first Delphi round the experts excluded one element from the scale and changed the content of two elements. In the second Delphi round, the experts excluded one element from the scale. In the third Delphi round, consensus was obtained on the eight elements: preparation of utensils, ergonomics, preparation of the ultrasound device, identification of blood vessels, anatomy, hygiene, coordination of the needle, and completion of the procedure. We developed an RS for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions of ultrasound experts through a modified Delphi consensus study.

  2. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  3. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Weyker, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lifestyle modification, pharmacologic management, and injections are the mainstay of therapy. Previously, pain management interventions were limited to intra-articular joint injections and viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid. Fluoroscopic-guided techniques for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the genicular nerves have been previously described and a recent cadaveric study suggests that ultrasound-guided genicular nerve blocks can be performed accurately. We performed an ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves in 88-year-old woman who had deferred surgical management given her age. Following successful ultrasound guided diagnostic genicular nerve blocks, she proceeded to RFA using the same ultrasound guided technique. The procedure resulted in significant pain relief and improvement in overall function for greater than 6 months. The use of ultrasound provides a relatively rapid and noninvasive method to directly visualize genicular nerves and surrounding vasculature. Our case suggests that, for genicular nerve blockade and RFA, ultrasound may be a useful alternative to fluoroscopy. Not only did the procedure result in significant pain relief that has persisted for greater than 6 months but also more importantly her function status and quality of life were improved. PMID:27822391

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joshua; Bremer, Nicholas; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lifestyle modification, pharmac