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Sample records for endocochlear potential depends

  1. Changes in the endocochlear potential and cochlear blood flow induced by ATP infusion and arterial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Jiang, S; Gu, R

    1995-06-01

    To assess the relationship between cochlear blood flow (CBF) and auditory function, a procedure of intravital microscopy for observations of the lateral wall vessels of the cochlea coupled with the simultaneous measurement of the endocochlear potential (EP) was established in guinea pigs with gradual ischemia of the cochlea. It was found that occlusions of both common carotid arteries and one of the vertebral arteries produced a minor reduction in CBF with no significant alteration in the EP. When intravenous infusion of ATP induced sharp and severe decreases in CBF, the EP varied only slightly from the baseline in some animals while there were no alteration in others. Furthermore, ATP infusions combined with arterial occlusions caused even more severe declines in CBF and a moderate decrease in the EP. The results indicate that not only does the CBF satisfy the basic needs of the processes of cochlear function, but also has a regulatory mechanism to ensure the normal function of the cochlea in the ischemia condition. It was also found that the changes in the stria vascularis vessels induced by decreases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rates were more severe than those of the spiral ligament vessels. This phenomenon indicated that the stria vascularis vessels were more sensitive to decreases of BP and heart rates. PMID:7555252

  2. S1PR2 variants associated with auditory function in humans and endocochlear potential decline in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Neil J.; Carlisle, Francesca; Pearson, Selina; Lewis, Morag A.; Buniello, Annalisa; Chen, Jing; Isaacson, Rivka L.; Pass, Johanna; White, Jacqueline K.; Dawson, Sally J.; Steel, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive hearing loss is very common in the population but we still know little about the underlying pathology. A new spontaneous mouse mutation (stonedeaf, stdf ) leading to recessive, early-onset progressive hearing loss was detected and exome sequencing revealed a Thr289Arg substitution in Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 (S1pr2). Mutants aged 2 weeks had normal hearing sensitivity, but at 4 weeks most showed variable degrees of hearing impairment, which became severe or profound in all mutants by 14 weeks. Endocochlear potential (EP) was normal at 2 weeks old but was reduced by 4 and 8 weeks old in mutants, and the stria vascularis, which generates the EP, showed degenerative changes. Three independent mouse knockout alleles of S1pr2 have been described previously, but this is the first time that a reduced EP has been reported. Genomic markers close to the human S1PR2 gene were significantly associated with auditory thresholds in the 1958 British Birth Cohort (n = 6099), suggesting involvement of S1P signalling in human hearing loss. The finding of early onset loss of EP gives new mechanistic insight into the disease process and suggests that therapies for humans with hearing loss due to S1P signalling defects need to target strial function. PMID:27383011

  3. Effects of carbogen on decreases in endocochlear potential and cochlear microcirculation induced by ischemia of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Hua, H B; Chang, J S; Rui, G

    1993-11-01

    Preventive effects of carbogen on decreases in endocochlear potential (EP) and cochlear microcirculation induced by ischemia of the cochlea were examined in guinea pigs with intravital microscopy. The experimental model giving a severe decline in cochlear blood flow (CBF) was established by occlusion of both common carotid arteries and one of the vertebral arteries and i.v. infusion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The results showed no significant difference in the magnitude and pattern of the decrease in the cochlear microcirculation induced by ATP infusion and arterial occlusion before and after carbogen inhalation. However, even with a dramatic decrease in CBF, carbogen could reduce the decline in EP. The results clearly indicate that although carbogen fails to ameliorate cochlear ischemia in the face of a large impairment of the blood supply caused by a drop of blood pressure and cardiac output, it does in fact enhance the oxygen delivery to the cochlea and thus provide a therapeutic means of treating certain inner ear diseases caused by insufficient blood supply to the cochlea. PMID:8291429

  4. Deafness induced by Connexin 26 (GJB2) deficiency is not determined by endocochlear potential (EP) reduction but is associated with cochlear developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2014-05-23

    Connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are the major cause of hereditary deafness and are responsible for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mouse models show that Cx26 deficiency can cause congenital deafness with cochlear developmental disorders, hair cell degeneration, and the reduction of endocochlear potential (EP) and active cochlear amplification. However, the underlying deafness mechanism still remains undetermined. Our previous studies revealed that hair cell degeneration is not a primary cause of hearing loss. In this study we investigated the role of EP reduction in Cx26 deficiency-induced deafness. We found that the EP reduction is not associated with congenital deafness in Cx26 knockout (KO) mice. The threshold of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in Cx26 KO mice was even greater than 110 dB SPL, demonstrating complete hearing loss. However, the EP in Cx26 KO mice varied and not completely abolished. In some cases, the EP could still remain at higher levels (>70 mV). We further found that the deafness in Cx26 KO mice is associated with cochlear developmental disorders. Deletion of Cx26 in the cochlea before postnatal day 5 (P5) could cause congenital deafness. The cochlea had developmental disorders and the cochlear tunnel was not open. However, no congenital deafness was found when Cx26 was deleted after P5. The cochlea also displayed normal development and the cochlear tunnel was open normally. These data suggest that congenital deafness induced by Cx26 deficiency is not determined by EP reduction and may result from cochlear developmental disorders.

  5. Activity-dependent regulation of prestin expression in mouse outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yohan; Xia, Anping; Lee, Hee Yoon; Wang, Rosalie; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein necessary for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and normal hearing. Its regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Several mouse models of hearing loss demonstrate increased prestin, inspiring us to investigate how hearing loss might feedback onto OHCs. To test whether centrally mediated feedback regulates prestin, we developed a novel model of inner hair cell loss. Injection of diphtheria toxin (DT) into adult CBA mice produced significant loss of inner hair cells without affecting OHCs. Thus, DT-injected mice were deaf because they had no afferent auditory input despite OHCs continuing to receive normal auditory mechanical stimulation and having normal function. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated no change in OHC prestin, indicating that loss of information transfer centrally did not alter prestin expression. To test whether local mechanical feedback regulates prestin, we used TectaC1509G mice, where the tectorial membrane is malformed and only some OHCs are stimulated. OHCs connected to the tectorial membrane had normal prestin levels, whereas OHCs not connected to the tectorial membrane had elevated prestin levels, supporting an activity-dependent model. To test whether the endocochlear potential was necessary for prestin regulation, we studied TectaC1509G mice at different developmental ages. OHCs not connected to the tectorial membrane had lower than normal prestin levels before the onset of the endocochlear potential and higher than normal prestin levels after the onset of the endocochlear potential. Taken together, these data indicate that OHC prestin levels are regulated through local feedback that requires mechanoelectrical transduction currents. This adaptation may serve to compensate for variations in the local mechanical environment. PMID:25810486

  6. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  7. Bohr Hamiltonian with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, L.; Hassanabadi, H.; Sobhani, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, Bohr Hamiltonian has been studied with the time-dependent potential. Using the Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method appropriate dynamical invariant for this Hamiltonian has been constructed and the exact time-dependent wave functions of such a system have been derived due to this dynamical invariant.

  8. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Dentin Biomodification Potential Depends on Polyphenol Source

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, T.R.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Phansalkar, R.S.; Todorova, I.; Napolitano, J.G.; McAlpine, J.B.; Chen, S.N.; Pauli, G.F.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the extracts was determined (as gallic acid equivalents) using Folin-Ciocalteau assays. Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity, mass change, and resistance to enzymatic biodegradation. Extracts with a high polyphenol and PAC content from Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao, Camellia sinensis, and Pinus massoniana induced a significant increase in modulus of elasticity and mass. The UHPLC analysis showed the presence of multiple types of polyphenols, ranging from simple phenolic acids to oligomeric PACs and highly condensed tannins. Protective effect against enzymatic degradation was observed for all experimental groups; however, statistically significant differences were observed between plant extracts. The findings provide clear evidence that the dentin bioactivities of PACs are source dependent, resulting from a combination of concentration and specific chemical constitution of the complex PAC mixtures. PMID:24574140

  10. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Peng, Qing; Carter, Emily A

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na4 cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na4 cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  11. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na{sub 4} cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na{sub 4} cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  12. Separable representation of energy-dependent optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.

  13. Dependence Potential of Tramadol: Behavioral Pharmacology in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hye Jin; Song, Min Ji; Lee, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yunje; Seong, Won-Keun; Hong, Sa-Ik; Jang, Choon-Gon; Yoo, Han Sang; Jeong, Ho-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Tramadol is an opioid analgesic agent that has been the subject of a series of case reports suggesting potential for misuse or abuse. However, it is not a controlled substance and is not generally considered addictive in Korea. In this study, we examined the dependence potential and abuse liability of tramadol as well as its effect on the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in rodents. In animal behavioral tests, tramadol did not show any positive effects on the experimental animals in climbing, jumping, and head twitch tests. However, in the conditioned place preference and self-administration tests, the experimental animals showed significant positive responses. Taken together, tramadol affected the neurological systems related to abuse liability and has the potential to lead psychological dependence. PMID:25489425

  14. Evaluation of gravity-dependent membrane potential shift in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Baba, S A; Mogami, Y; Otsu, T

    1999-01-01

    It is still debated whether or not gravity can stimulate unicellular organisms. This question may be settled by revealing changes in the membrane potential in a manner depending on the gravitational forces imposed on the cell. We estimated the gravity-dependent membrane potential shift to be about 1 mV G-1 for Paramecium showing gravikinesis at 1-5 G, on the basis of measurements of gravity-induced changes in active propulsion and those of propulsive velocity in solutions, in which the membrane potential has been measured electrophysiologically. The shift in membrane potential to this extent may occur from mechanoreceptive changes in K+ or Ca2+ conductance by about 1% and might be at the limit of electrophysiological measurement using membrane potential-sensitive dyes. Our measurements of propulsive velocity vs membrane potential also suggested that the reported propulsive force of Paramecium measured in a solution of graded densities with the aid of a video centrifuge microscope at 350 G was 11 times as large as that for -29 mV, i.e., the resting membrane potential at [K+]o = 1 mM and [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, and, by extrapolation, that Paramecium was hyperpolarized to -60 mV by gravity stimulation of 100-G equivalent, the value corrected by considering the reduction of density difference between the interior and exterior of the cell in the graded density solution. The estimated shift of the membrane potential from -29 mV to -60 mV by 100-G equivalent stimulation, i.e., 0.3 mV G -1, could reach the magnitude entirely feasible to be measured more directly.

  15. Saturation dependence of the streaming potential during drainage and imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, J.; Leinov, E.; Jackson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rock pore space in many subsurface settings is saturated with water and one or more immiscible fluid phases; examples include NAPLs in contaminated aquifers, supercritical CO2 during sequestration in deep saline aquifers, the vadose zone, and hydrocarbon reservoirs. To interpret spontaneous potential measurements for groundwater flow and hydraulic properties in these settings requires an understanding of the saturation dependence of the streaming potential. Vinogradov and Jackson [2011] recently reported measurements of the streaming potential during drainage and, for the first time, imbibition in sandstone plugs saturated with water and either undecane or nitrogen. However, they reported effective values of the streaming potential coupling coefficient (C) at partial saturation (Sw), because Sw in the plugs was not uniform during drainage or imbibition. The aim of this study is to determine the true value of C as a function of Sw. We use a three-step approach in which hydraulic and electrical parameters are determined using numerical simulation and either Nelder-Mead simplex unconstrained optimisation or Active-set constrained optimisation algorithm. In the first step, we determine the saturation dependence of the relative permeability and capillary pressure, assuming these are simple exponential functions of Sw (Corey-type) and using an objective function which is a weighted average of the measured (i) pressure drop across the plug, (ii) liquid rate flowing out of the plug, and (iii) fraction of water flowing out of the plug. In the second, we determine the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity, using the measured conductivity of the plug as the objective function. In the final step, we determine the saturation dependence of the streaming potential, using the measured streaming potential across the plug as the objective function. We obtain a good match between simulated and measured values of C, and find that it (i) exhibits hysteresis, (ii) can

  16. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-07-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov loop potential (μ PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the μ -dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of u , d quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyze the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and properties of the mixed phase would bring relevant information on the expected chemical potential dependence of the Polyakov loop contribution.

  17. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  18. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  19. Rapidity-dependent chemical potentials in a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Biedroń, Bartłomiej

    2008-04-01

    We present a single-freeze-out model with thermal and geometric parameters dependent on the position within the fireball and use it to describe the rapidity distribution and transverse-momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons measured at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_NN}=200\\,\\, GeV by BRAHMS. THERMINATOR is used to perform the necessary simulation, which includes all resonance decays. The result of the fit to the data is the expected growth of the baryon and strange chemical potentials with the spatial rapidity αpar. The value of the baryon chemical potential at αpar ~ 3 is about 200 MeV, i.e. it lies in the range of the highest SPS energies. The chosen geometry of the fireball has a decreasing transverse size as the magnitude of αpar is increased, which also corresponds to decreasing transverse flow. The strange chemical potential obtained from the fit to the K+/K- ratio is such that the local strangeness density in the fireball is compatible with zero. The resulting rapidity distribution of net protons are described qualitatively within the statistical approach. As a result of our study, the knowledge of the 'topography' of the fireball is acquired, allowing for other analyses and predictions. Research supported by the Polish Ministry of Education and Science, grants N202 034 32/0918 and 2 P03B 02828.

  20. Mapping potential groundwater-dependent ecosystems for sustainable management.

    PubMed

    Gou, Si; Gonzales, Susana; Miller, Gretchen R

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems which rely on either the surface expression or subsurface presence of groundwater are known as groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs). A comprehensive inventory of GDE locations at an appropriate management scale is a necessary first-step for sustainable management of supporting aquifers; however, this information is unavailable for most areas of concern. To address this gap, this study created a two-step algorithm which analyzed existing geospatial and remote sensing data to identify potential GDEs at both state/province and aquifer/basin scales. At the state/province scale, a geospatial information system (GIS) database was constructed for Texas, including climate, topography, hydrology, and ecology data. From these data, a GDE index was calculated, which combined vegetative and hydrological indicators. The results indicated that central Texas, particularly the Edwards Aquifer region, had highest potential to host GDEs. Next, an aquifer/basin scale remote sensing-based algorithm was created to provide more detailed maps of GDEs in the Edwards Aquifer region. This algorithm used Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images to track the changes of NDVI for each vegetation pixel. The NDVI dynamics were used to identify the vegetation with high potential to use groundwater--such plants remain high NDVI during extended dry periods and also exhibit low seasonal and inter-annual NDVI changes between dry and wet seasons/years. The results indicated that 8% of natural vegetation was very likely using groundwater. Of the potential GDEs identified, 75% were located on shallow soil averaging 45 cm in depth. The dominant GDE species were live oak, ashe juniper, and mesquite. PMID:24571583

  1. Mapping potential groundwater-dependent ecosystems for sustainable management.

    PubMed

    Gou, Si; Gonzales, Susana; Miller, Gretchen R

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems which rely on either the surface expression or subsurface presence of groundwater are known as groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs). A comprehensive inventory of GDE locations at an appropriate management scale is a necessary first-step for sustainable management of supporting aquifers; however, this information is unavailable for most areas of concern. To address this gap, this study created a two-step algorithm which analyzed existing geospatial and remote sensing data to identify potential GDEs at both state/province and aquifer/basin scales. At the state/province scale, a geospatial information system (GIS) database was constructed for Texas, including climate, topography, hydrology, and ecology data. From these data, a GDE index was calculated, which combined vegetative and hydrological indicators. The results indicated that central Texas, particularly the Edwards Aquifer region, had highest potential to host GDEs. Next, an aquifer/basin scale remote sensing-based algorithm was created to provide more detailed maps of GDEs in the Edwards Aquifer region. This algorithm used Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images to track the changes of NDVI for each vegetation pixel. The NDVI dynamics were used to identify the vegetation with high potential to use groundwater--such plants remain high NDVI during extended dry periods and also exhibit low seasonal and inter-annual NDVI changes between dry and wet seasons/years. The results indicated that 8% of natural vegetation was very likely using groundwater. Of the potential GDEs identified, 75% were located on shallow soil averaging 45 cm in depth. The dominant GDE species were live oak, ashe juniper, and mesquite.

  2. Estimation of time-dependent input from neuronal membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Shinomoto, Shigeru; Lansky, Petr

    2011-12-01

    The set of firing rates of the presynaptic excitatory and inhibitory neurons constitutes the input signal to the postsynaptic neuron. Estimation of the time-varying input rates from intracellularly recorded membrane potential is investigated here. For that purpose, the membrane potential dynamics must be specified. We consider the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process, one of the most common single-neuron models, with time-dependent mean and variance. Assuming the slow variation of these two moments, it is possible to formulate the estimation problem by using a state-space model. We develop an algorithm that estimates the paths of the mean and variance of the input current by using the empirical Bayes approach. Then the input firing rates are directly available from the moments. The proposed method is applied to three simulated data examples: constant signal, sinusoidally modulated signal, and constant signal with a jump. For the constant signal, the estimation performance of the method is comparable to that of the traditionally applied maximum likelihood method. Further, the proposed method accurately estimates both continuous and discontinuous time-variable signals. In the case of the signal with a jump, which does not satisfy the assumption of slow variability, the robustness of the method is verified. It can be concluded that the method provides reliable estimates of the total input firing rates, which are not experimentally measurable. PMID:21919789

  3. Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Prokin, Ilya; Xu, Hao; Delord, Bruno; Genet, Stephane; Venance, Laurent; Berry, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a cardinal cellular mechanism for learning and memory. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as a pivotal pathway for synaptic plasticity because of its widely characterized ability to depress synaptic transmission on short- and long-term scales. Recent reports indicate that eCBs also mediate potentiation of the synapse. However, it is not known how eCB signaling may support bidirectionality. Here, we combined electrophysiology experiments with mathematical modeling to question the mechanisms of eCB bidirectionality in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses. We demonstrate that STDP outcome is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Moreover, we show that eCB-tLTD requires active calcineurin whereas eCB-tLTP necessitates the activity of presynaptic PKA. Therefore, just like glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system to encode learning and memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13185.001 PMID:26920222

  4. Impact parameter dependent potentials and transverse single spin asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalholy, Tareq

    Using the Eikonal approximation, we study single spin azimuthal asymmetry in elastic and in-elastic lepton-nucleon scattering for the case of transversely polarized nucleons with unpolarized lepton beam. We follow two different approaches to evaluate the asymmetry. In the first approach we utilize the convolution theory of Fourier transforms to express the nucleon potential that appears in the Coulomb phase formula in terms of the nucleon's Dirac and Pauli form factors in the nucleon current density for transversely polarized nucleons. In the second approach, we explicitly evaluate the potential due to transversely polarized nucleons in impact parameter space. The result shows that this potential is asymmetric about an axis normal to the transverse plane; a result that is consistent with the fact that the nucleon charge density (or the unpolarized impact parameter dependent parton distribution function) is transversely distorted for transverse nucleon polarization, which is not the case for longitudinal polarization of the nucleon. To further confirm this fact, we calculate the average transverse momentum experienced by the scattered electron. This quantity is zero considering scattering from a classical dipole moment while our results show a non-zero average transverse momentum even for scattering from a neutron; there we get a negative value for the average momentum, and a positive one (and larger in magnitude) for the case of a proton. The sign of the average transverse momentum is directly related to the sign of the single spin asymmetry, where it is negative in the case of a neutron target and positive for a proton. The expansion of the Eikonal amplitude reveals that the asymmetry is due to the interference of the one and two photon exchange Eikonal amplitudes. In both of the above mentioned approaches, we evaluate the one and two photon exchange amplitudes, from which the asymmetry is found for different parametrizations of the form factors.

  5. Temperature dependence in interatomic potentials and an improved potential for Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of deriving an interatomic potentials represents an attempt to integrate out the electronic degrees of freedom from the full quantum description of a condensed matter system. In practice it is the derivatives of the interatomic potentials which are used in molecular dynamics, as a model for the forces on a system. These forces should be the derivative of the free energy of the electronic system, which includes contributions from the entropy of the electronic states. This free energy is weakly temperature dependent, and although this can be safely neglected in many cases there are some systems where the electronic entropy plays a significant role. Here a method is proposed to incorporate electronic entropy in the Sommerfeld approximation into empirical potentials. The method is applied as a correction to an existing potential for titanium. Thermal properties of the new model are calculated, and a simple method for fixing the melting point and solid-solid phase transition temperature for existing models fitted to zero temperature data is presented.

  6. Visualizing the orientational dependence of an intermolecular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Adam; Rashid, Mohammad A.; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Dunn, Janette L.; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy can now be used to map the properties of single molecules with intramolecular precision by functionalization of the apex of the scanning probe tip with a single atom or molecule. Here we report on the mapping of the three-dimensional potential between fullerene (C60) molecules in different relative orientations, with sub-Angstrom resolution, using dynamic force microscopy (DFM). We introduce a visualization method which is capable of directly imaging the variation in equilibrium binding energy of different molecular orientations. We model the interaction using both a simple approach based around analytical Lennard-Jones potentials, and with dispersion-force-corrected density functional theory (DFT), and show that the positional variation in the binding energy between the molecules is dominated by the onset of repulsive interactions. Our modelling suggests that variations in the dispersion interaction are masked by repulsive interactions even at displacements significantly larger than the equilibrium intermolecular separation.

  7. Visualizing the orientational dependence of an intermolecular potential

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Adam; Rashid, Mohammad A.; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Dunn, Janette L.; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy can now be used to map the properties of single molecules with intramolecular precision by functionalization of the apex of the scanning probe tip with a single atom or molecule. Here we report on the mapping of the three-dimensional potential between fullerene (C60) molecules in different relative orientations, with sub-Angstrom resolution, using dynamic force microscopy (DFM). We introduce a visualization method which is capable of directly imaging the variation in equilibrium binding energy of different molecular orientations. We model the interaction using both a simple approach based around analytical Lennard–Jones potentials, and with dispersion-force-corrected density functional theory (DFT), and show that the positional variation in the binding energy between the molecules is dominated by the onset of repulsive interactions. Our modelling suggests that variations in the dispersion interaction are masked by repulsive interactions even at displacements significantly larger than the equilibrium intermolecular separation. PMID:26879386

  8. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  9. Layer-dependent surface potential of phosphorene and anisotropic/layer-dependent charge transfer in phosphorene-gold hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhu, Yi; Yan, Han; Pei, Jiajie; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Shuang; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-01

    The surface potential and the efficiency of interfacial charge transfer are extremely important for designing future semiconductor devices based on the emerging two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene. Here, we directly measured the strong layer-dependent surface potential of mono- and few-layered phosphorene on gold, which is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction. At the same time, we used an optical way photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to probe charge transfer in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system. We firstly observed highly anisotropic and layer-dependent PL quenching in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system, which is attributed to the highly anisotropic/layer-dependent interfacial charge transfer.

  10. Dependence of the N2 vibrational potential on density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Ray

    1988-02-01

    Recently, part of the vibrational spectrum of the ground electronic (X 1∑+g) state of condensed phase N2, shocked to high density, has been measured by Schmidt, Moore, and Shaw. Densities (ρ) of nearly three times the ambient liquid value were obtained in the shock wave experiments. Due to the high temperatures achieved behind the shock waves, up to six vibrational levels of N2 were observed. These vibrational spectra show clear frequency shifts from their ambient condition values. Here, these experimental spectra are used to infer changes in the vibrational potential of N2 due to the high density environment. The vibrational portion of the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) method is used to do this. We find that, in the range of densities studied, the energies [E(n;ρ)] of the first five vibrational transitions of N2 can be accurately represented by E(n;ρ)=ωe(ρ)(n+ 1/2 )-ωexe(n+ 1/2 )2, where ωe(ρ)=ω0e+A[1-(ρ0/ρ)1/3] and ωexe is a constant which is independent of the thermodynamic state of the environment; here, ω0e and A are fitting constants and ρ0 and ρ are the ambient (liquid) and shocked densities of N2. Given E(n;ρ), one can obtain the classical turning point difference, r12, of the N2 potential as a function of n and ρ by using the RKR procedure. It is found that at the highest shock density observed (2.13 g/cm3), the relative change in r12 from the ambient condition values is about -1% for the first six vibrational levels.

  11. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λD. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ωpi ≪ ω ≪ ωpe, where ωpi is the ion plasma frequency and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from Γ. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φp [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φp. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  12. Androgen dependence in hamsters: overdose, tolerance, and potential opioidergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peters, K D; Wood, R I

    2005-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are drugs of abuse. However, the potential for steroid reward and addiction remains largely unexplored. This study used i.c.v. testosterone self-administration and controlled infusions of testosterone or vehicle in hamsters to explore central mechanisms of androgen overdose. Forty-two hamsters used nose-pokes to self-administer 1 microg/microl testosterone i.c.v. 4 h/day in an operant chamber. During 1-56 days of androgen self-administration, 10 (24%) hamsters died. Deaths correlated with peak daily intake of testosterone. Of the hamsters that self-administered a peak intake of <20 microg/day, there was 100% survival (10/10). Survival decreased to 86% (19/22) when daily testosterone intake peaked at 20-60 microg/day. Only 30% (three of 10) survived when daily testosterone intake exceeded 60 microg/day. Deaths are not due to volume or vehicle because i.c.v. infusions of 80 mul vehicle had no effect. Testosterone overdose resembles opiate intoxication. When male hamsters received infusions of 40 microg testosterone, locomotion (25.1+/-18.8 grid-crossings/10 min), respiration (72.7+/-5.4 breaths/min) and body temperature (33.5+/-0.4 degrees C) were significantly reduced, compared with males receiving vehicle infusions (186.1+/-8.1 crossings/10 min, 117.6+/-1.0 breaths/min, 35.9+/-0.1 degrees C, P<0.05). However, males developed tolerance to continued daily testosterone infusion. After 15 days, locomotion (170.2+/-6.3 crossings), respiration (118.4+/-1.3 breaths/min), and body temperature (35.3+/-0.3 degrees C) in testosterone-infused males were equivalent to that in vehicle controls (P>0.05). The depressive effects of testosterone infusion are blocked by the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. With naltrexone pre-treatment (10 mg/kg s.c.), locomotion (183.7+/-1.8 crossings/10 min), respiration (116.9+/-0.3 breaths/min), and body temperature (36.1+/-0.4 degrees C) during testosterone infusion were equivalent to vehicle controls. Likewise, naltrexone

  13. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  14. Using Tensor Momentum Dependent Deuteron Potential to Extract the Asymptotic D/S Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Emad El-Deen, A. Sultan; Mustafa, Mustafa M.; Zahran, Elbadry S.

    2010-09-30

    A new value for the deuteron asymptotic D/S ratio {eta} = 0.02640{+-}0.00024 is extracted from an empirical linear {eta}-Q relation found for a class of deuteron momentum dependent potentials with tensor momentum dependent part. These potentials fit a recently published phase shift analysis and the binding energy of the deuteron.

  15. Density-potential mapping in time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, N. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Woodward, C.; Burke, K.

    2010-04-15

    The key questions of uniqueness and existence in time-dependent density-functional theory are usually formulated only for potentials and densities that are analytic in time. Simple examples, standard in quantum mechanics, lead, however, to nonanalyticities. We reformulate these questions in terms of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a potential that depends nonlocally on the wave function.

  16. Spinless relativistic particle in energy-dependent potential and normalization of the wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchikha, Amar; Chetouani, Lyazid

    2014-06-01

    The problem of normalization related to a Klein-Gordon particle subjected to vector plus scalar energy-dependent potentials is clarified in the context of the path integral approach. In addition the correction relating to the normalizing constant of wave functions is exactly determined. As examples, the energy dependent linear and Coulomb potentials are considered. The wave functions obtained via spectral decomposition, were found exactly normalized.

  17. Velocity-dependent optical potential for neutron elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabar, I. N.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The conventional optical model is quite successful in describing the nucleon elastic scattering data from medium and heavy nuclei. However, its success in describing the light 1 p -shell nuclei is somewhat limited. The velocity-dependent optical potential resulted in a significant improvement in describing the elastic angular distributions for light nuclei in the low energy region. Purpose: To extend the formalism of the velocity-dependent potential to higher energies, and to assess its importance in describing neutron elastic scattering data from light 1 p -shell nuclei at high energies. Method: We fit the angular distribution data for neutron elastic scattering from 12C and 16O using (i) the velocity-dependent optical potential and (ii) the conventional optical potential. The results of the two models are then compared. At low energies, we compare our angular distribution fits with the fits of other works that exist in the literature. Furthermore, the total integrated cross sections in addition to the analyzing power are calculated using the velocity-dependent optical potential and compared to the experimental data. Results: The velocity-dependent potential resulted in significant improvements in describing the angular distributions particularly in the large-angle scattering region and for certain energy ranges. This model is important where the experimental data show structural effects from nuclear surface deformations, which are important in light nuclei. Furthermore, the calculated total elastic cross sections and analyzing power are in good agreement with the experimental data. Conclusions: The velocity-dependent potential gives rise to surface-peaked real terms in the optical model. Such terms account, at least partly, for the structural effects seen in the angular distribution data. The energy range over which the surface terms are needed is found to depend on the target nucleus. Other works that have introduced real surface terms in the optical

  18. Solutions of Morse potential with position-dependent mass by Laplace transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraboutalebi, S.

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the position-dependent mass quantum mechanics, the three dimensional Schrödinger equation is studied by applying the Laplace transforms combining with the point canonical transforms. For the potential analogues to Morse potential and via the Pekeris approximation, we introduce the general solutions appropriate for any kind of position dependent mass profile which obeys a key condition. For a specific position-dependent mass profile, the bound state solutions are obtained through an analytical form. The constant mass solutions are also relived.

  19. Davydov-Chaban Hamiltonian in presence of time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we have investigated collective effects of atomic nuclei in presence of a time-dependent potential in Davydov-Chaban Hamiltonian. Since such potential has an explicit time-dependency, in order to obtain the wave function of considered system, we should face with time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Obtaining the wave function could be possible using Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method. Appropriate dynamical invariant has been constructed after determining the wave functions and values, the wave function will obtain.

  20. Isospectral Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potentials with Position Dependent Mass Generated by Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Cruz, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work a position dependent mass Hamiltonian with the same spectrum of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller one was constructed by means of the underlying potential algebra. The corresponding wave functions are determined by using the factorization method. A new family of isospectral potentials are constructed by applying a Darboux transformation. An example is presented in order to illustrate the formalism.

  1. Dynamic potential-dependent electron transport pathway shifts in anode biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Yoho, Rachel A; Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I

    2014-12-01

    Biofilms of the anode-respiring bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (G. sulfurreducens) demonstrate dynamic potential-dependent changes between two electron transport pathways that are used selectively depending on the anode potential. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggest that these pathways (both n=1), with midpoint potentials of -0.155 (± 0.005) and -0.095 (± 0.003) V versus standard hydrogen electrode, are not additive within the biofilm, but are preferentially used depending on the anode potential. Potential step voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry (CV) confirmed rapid changes between the two pathways in minutes when the anode potential is changed. We confirm that the electrochemical response observed in a slow-scan-rate CV (∼1 mV s(-1) ) is often composed of at least the two pathways characterized. Thus, beyond understanding the electron transport pathways in G. sulfurreducens, this study also has implications on the interpretation of previously collected and future potential-dependent datasets.

  2. Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term for the Davidson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Georgoudis, P. E.; Lenis, D.; Minkov, N.; Quesne, C.

    2011-04-15

    Analytical expressions for spectra and wave functions are derived for a Bohr Hamiltonian, describing the collective motion of deformed nuclei, in which the mass is allowed to depend on the nuclear deformation. Solutions are obtained for separable potentials consisting of a Davidson potential in the {beta} variable, in the cases of {gamma}-unstable nuclei, axially symmetric prolate deformed nuclei, and triaxial nuclei, implementing the usual approximations in each case. The solution, called the deformation-dependent mass (DDM) Davidson model, is achieved by using techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), involving a deformed shape invariance condition. Spectra and B(E2) transition rates are compared to experimental data. The dependence of the mass on the deformation, dictated by SUSYQM for the potential used, reduces the rate of increase of the moment of inertia with deformation, removing a main drawback of the model.

  3. Angular-dependent embedded atom method potential for atomistic simulations of metal-covalent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongare, Avinash M.; Neurock, Matthew; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2009-11-01

    A computationally efficient interatomic potential is developed for the description of interatomic interactions in multicomponent systems composed of metals, Si and Ge. The potential is based on reformulation of the embedded atom method (EAM) potential for metals and Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential commonly used for Si and Ge in a compatible functional form. The potential incorporates a description of the angular dependence of interatomic interactions into the framework of the EAM potential and, therefore, is dubbed angular-dependent EAM (A-EAM) potential. The A-EAM potential retains the properties of the pure components predicted by the original EAM and SW potentials, thus limiting the scope of potential parameterization to only the cross interactions among the components. The ability of the potential to provide an adequate description of binary systems with mixed type of bonding is illustrated for Au-Si/Ge system, with the parameters for Au-Si and Au-Ge interactions determined based on the results of density-functional theory calculations performed for several representative bulk structures and small clusters. To test the performance of the A-EAM potential at finite temperatures, the values of the enthalpy of mixing of liquid Au-Si and Au-Ge alloys, as well as the equilibrium lines on the Au-Si phase diagram are evaluated and compared with experimental data. The calculation of the phase diagram is based on the values of the excess chemical potential difference between Au and Si, evaluated in a series of semi-grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations performed for different temperatures and alloy compositions. The potential is shown to provide an adequate semiquantitative description of the thermodynamic properties of the alloy at different temperatures and in the whole range of compositions, thus showing a considerable promise for large-scale atomistic simulations of metal-Si/Ge systems.

  4. Toward a comparative overview of dependence potential and acute toxicity of psychoactive substances used nonmedically.

    PubMed

    Gable, R S

    1993-01-01

    A procedure is outlined for comparing dependence potential and acute toxicity across a broad range of abused psychoactive substances. Tentative results, based on an extensive literature review of 20 substances, suggested that the margin of safety ("therapeutic index") varied dramatically between substances. Intravenous heroin appeared to have the greatest risk of dependence and acute lethality; oral psilocybin appeared to have the least. Hazards due to behavioral deficits, perceptual distortion, or chronic illness were not factored into the assessments.

  5. Some Exact Results for the Schroedinger Wave Equation with a Time Dependent Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation with a time dependent delta function potential is solved exactly for many special cases. In all other cases the problem can be reduced to an integral equation of the Volterra type. It is shown that by knowing the wave function at the origin, one may derive the wave function everywhere. Thus, the problem is reduced from a PDE in two variables to an integral equation in one. These results are used to compare adiabatic versus sudden changes in the potential. It is shown that adiabatic changes in the p otential lead to conservation of the normalization of the probability density.

  6. Energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus potential close to the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Washiyama, Kouhei; Lacroix, Denis

    2008-08-15

    The nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials in heavy-ion fusion reactions are extracted from the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for the mass symmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca and the mass asymmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 40,} {sup 48}Ca, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca, {sup 16}O + {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 40}Ca + {sup 90}Zr. When the c.m. energy is much higher than the Coulomb barrier energy, potentials deduced with the microscopic theory identify with the frozen density approximation. As the c.m. energy decreases and approaches the Coulomb barrier, potentials become energy dependent. This dependence indicates dynamical reorganization of internal degrees of freedom and leads to a reduction of the 'apparent' barrier felt by the two nuclei during fusion of the order of 2-3% compared to the frozen density case. Several examples illustrate that the potential landscape changes rapidly when the c.m. energy is in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier energy. The energy dependence is expected to have a significant role on fusion around the Coulomb barrier.

  7. On the Chaplygin system on the sphere with velocity dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiganov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss how to get variables of separation, separated relations and the Lax matrix for the Chaplygin system on the sphere with velocity dependent potential starting with the Lax matrix for other integrable system separable in elliptic coordinates on the sphere.

  8. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finster, Felix; Murro, Simone; Röken, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  9. Numerical density-to-potential inversions in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Daniel S; Wasserman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    We treat the density-to-potential inverse problem of time-dependent density functional theory as an optimization problem with a partial differential equation constraint. The unknown potential is recovered from a target density by applying a multilevel optimization method controlled by error estimates. We employ a classical optimization routine using gradients efficiently computed by the discrete adjoint method. The inverted potential has both a real and imaginary part to reduce reflections at the boundaries and other numerical artifacts. We demonstrate this method on model one-dimensional systems. The method can be straightforwardly extended to a variety of numerical solvers of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations and to systems in higher dimensions.

  10. Kinetic and interaction components of the exact time-dependent correlation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kai; Fuks, Johanna I.; Sandoval, Ernesto D.; Maitra, Neepa T.; Elliott, Peter

    2014-05-14

    The exact exchange-correlation (xc) potential of time-dependent density functional theory has been shown to have striking features. For example, step and peak features are generically found when the system is far from its ground-state, and these depend nonlocally on the density in space and time. We analyze the xc potential by decomposing it into kinetic and interaction components and comparing each with their exact-adiabatic counterparts, for a range of dynamical situations in model one-dimensional two-electron systems. We find that often, but not always, the kinetic contribution is largely responsible for these features that are missed by the adiabatic approximation. The adiabatic approximation often makes a smaller error for the interaction component, which we write in two parts, one being the Coulomb potential due to the time-dependent xc hole. Non-adiabatic features of the kinetic component were also larger than those of the interaction component in cases that we studied when there is negligible step structure. In ground-state situations, step and peak structures arise in cases of static correlation, when more than one determinant is essential to describe the interacting state. We investigate the time-dependent natural orbital occupation numbers and find the corresponding relation between these and the dynamical step is more complex than for the ground-state case.

  11. The general operator form for the total-momentum-dependent nucleon-nucleon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolnicki, Kacper; Golak, Jacek; Skibiński, Roman; Witała, Henryk

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe a procedure to obtain the general operator form of two-nucleon (2N) potentials and apply it to the case of the 2N potential that has an additional dependence on the total momentum of the system. This violates Galilean invariance but terms including the total momentum appear in some relativistic approaches. In operator form, the potential is expressed as a linear combination of a fixed number of known spin-momentum operators and scalar functions of momenta. Since the scalar functions effectively define the potentials, using the operator form significantly reduces the number of parameters that are needed in numerical implementations. The proposed operator form explicitly obeys the usual symmetries of rotational invariance, particle exchange, time reflection and parity.

  12. Interplay of infrared divergences and gauge dependence of the effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, J. R.; Garny, M.; Konstandin, T.

    2016-09-01

    The perturbative effective potential suffers infrared (IR) divergences in gauges with massless Goldstones in their minima (like the Landau or Fermi gauges), but the problem can be fixed by a suitable resummation of the Goldstone propagators. When the potential minimum is generated radiatively, gauge independence of the potential at the minimum also requires resummation, and we demonstrate that the resummation that solves the IR problem also cures the gauge-dependence issue, showing this explicitly in the Abelian Higgs model in the Fermi gauge. In the process, we find an IR divergence (in the first derivative of the potential) specific to the Fermi gauge and not appreciated in the recent literature. We show that physical observables can still be computed in this gauge, and we further show how to get rid of this divergence by a field redefinition. All these results generalize to the Standard Model case.

  13. Alpha-drenergic inhibition of calcium-dependent potentials in rat sympathetic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J P; McAfee, D A

    1980-01-01

    1. Post-ganglionic neurones of the rat superior cervical ganglion were studied in vitro (21-26 degrees C) using single intracellular micro-electrode methods. 2. Three Ca2+-dependent potentials were studied: the shoulder on the normal action potential, the hyperpolarizing afterpotential (h.a.p.), and th Ca2+ spike. 3. Bath-applied noradrenaline reversibly inhibited these Ca2+-dependent potentials. The EC50 for inhibition of peak h.a.p. amplitude was about 1 microM. The order of catetholamine potency was: L-adrenaline > L-noradrenaline > D-noradrenaline congruent to dopamine > DL-isoprenaline. Phentolamine (10 microM), an alpha-blocker, but not MJ-1999 (10 microM), a beta-blocker, antagonized the action of noradrenaline. 4. Noradrenaline (10 microM) hyperpolarized most neurones (1-6 mV) studied, with no detectable change in resting membrane conductance. 5. Superfusion with low external Ca2+ and high Mg2+ mimicked the effect of noradrenaline. Either procedure alone antagonized the h.a.p. conductance increase but did not alter the h.a.p. reversal potential. However, in the presence of low Ca2+, high Mg2+, the remaining action potential and h.a.p. were not further reduced by noradrenaline. 6. The Ca2+-dependent shoulder of the action potential did not appear dependent upon GK. Noradrenaline and low Ca2+ antagonized the shoulder when enhanced by TEA+ or Ba2+. 7. Both the rate of rise and amplitude of the Ca2+ spike were antagonized by noradrenaline. 8. We propose that activation of an alpha-adrenoceptor inhibits a voltage-sensitive Ca2+ conductance (GCa(V)), thereby reducing the inward Ca2+ current which may generate the noraml action potential shoulder and the rising phase of the Ca2+ spike. Reduction of Ca2+ current would also reduce the Ca2+-dependent portion of outward K+ current underlying the h.a.p. PMID:6251200

  14. Numerical time-dependent solutions of the Schrödinger equation with piecewise continuous potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Wytse

    2016-06-01

    We consider accurate numerical solutions of the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation when the potential is piecewise continuous. Spatial step sizes are defined for each of the regions between the discontinuities and a matching condition at the boundaries of the regions is employed. The Numerov method for spatial integration is particularly appropriate to this approach. By employing Padé approximants for the time-evolution operator, we obtain solutions with significantly improved precision without increased CPU time. This approach is also appropriate for adaptive changes in spatial step size even when there is no discontinuity of the potential.

  15. Experimentally induced postinhibitory rebound in rat nucleus ambiguus is dependent on hyperpolarization parameters and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Dean, J B; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Millhorn, D E

    1989-06-01

    Postinhibitory rebound (PIR), a transient depolarization subsequent to release from experimental hyperpolarization, was identified and characterized in 81% of the cells studied in the nucleus ambiguus in slices from medulla of rat. Hyperpolarizing current pulses were administered via the recording microelectrode in the bridge-balanced mode to test for PIR. The voltage trajectory was characterized by a depolarizing sag during the pulse, rebound depolarization (PIR) after the pulse and increased input resistance during rebound. The amplitude and time course of PIR were dependent on prepulse membrane potential, pulse amplitude and pulse duration. These results suggest a potential role of PIR in respiratory rhythmogenesis. PMID:2771207

  16. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in time-dependent external potentials and the Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in external potentials, we introduce a method to compute the time-dependence of the expectation value of the current density for time-dependent homogeneous external electric fields. We apply it to the so-called Sauter pulse. For late times, our results agree with the asymptotic value due to electron-positron pair production. We correct a general expression derived by Serber for the expectation value of the current, linearized in the external field, and compare with our results for the Sauter pulse. Based on the properties of the current density, we argue that the appearance of enhanced quasi-particle densities at intermediate times in slowly varying sub-critical potentials is generic. Also an alternative approach, which circumvents these difficulties, is sketched.

  17. Attention-dependent reductions in burstiness and action potential height in macaque area V4

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emily B.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Attention improves the encoding of visual stimuli. One mechanism that is implicated in facilitating sensory encoding is the firing of action potentials in bursts. We tested the hypothesis that when spatial attention is directed to a stimulus, this causes an increase in burst firing to the attended stimulus. To the contrary, we found an attention-dependent reduction in burstiness among putative pyramidal neurons in macaque area V4. We accounted for this using a conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley style model in which attentional modulation stems from scaling excitation and inhibition. The model exhibited attention-dependent increases in firing rate and made the surprising and correct prediction that when attention is directed into a neuron’s receptive field, this reduces action potential height. The model thus provided a unified explanation for three distinct forms of attentional modulation, two of them novel, and implicates scaling of the responses of excitatory and inhibitory input populations in mediating attention. PMID:23852114

  18. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrate, I.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user’s mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials.Approach. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance.Results and significance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  19. Wigner function of a relativistic particle in a time-dependent linear potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagiyev, Sh. M.

    2016-07-01

    We construct phase-space representations for a relativistic particle in both a constant and a time-dependent linear potential. We obtain explicit expressions for the Wigner distribution functions for these systems and find the correct nonrelativistic limit and free-particle limit for these functions. We derive the relativistic dynamical equation governing the time development of the Wigner distribution function and relativistic equation for the Wigner distribution function of stationary states and also calculate the amplitudes of transitions between energy states.

  20. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns. PMID:26900845

  1. Quantum diffusion of a relativistic particle in a time-dependent random potential.

    PubMed

    Sepehrinia, Reza

    2015-04-01

    We present a rigorous study of quantum diffusion of a relativistic particle subjected to a time-dependent random potential with δ correlation in time. We find that in the asymptotic time limit the particle wave packet spreads ballistically in contrast with the nonrelativistic case, which in the same situation exhibits superballistic diffusion. The relativistic suppression of wave packet diffusion is discussed in connection with statistical conservation laws that follow from relativistic dynamics. PMID:25974441

  2. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps.

  3. Cell-type-dependent action potentials and voltage-gated currents in mouse fungiform taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Tateno, Katsumi; Takeuchi, Keita; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptor cells fire action potentials in response to taste substances to trigger non-exocytotic neurotransmitter release in type II cells and exocytotic release in type III cells. We investigated possible differences between these action potentials fired by mouse taste receptor cells using in situ whole-cell recordings, and subsequently we identified their cell types immunologically with cell-type markers, an IP3 receptor (IP3 R3) for type II cells and a SNARE protein (SNAP-25) for type III cells. Cells not immunoreactive to these antibodies were examined as non-IRCs. Here, we show that type II cells and type III cells fire action potentials using different ionic mechanisms, and that non-IRCs also fire action potentials with either of the ionic mechanisms. The width of action potentials was significantly narrower and their afterhyperpolarization was deeper in type III cells than in type II cells. Na(+) current density was similar in type II cells and type III cells, but it was significantly smaller in non-IRCs than in the others. Although outwardly rectifying current density was similar between type II cells and type III cells, tetraethylammonium (TEA) preferentially suppressed the density in type III cells and the majority of non-IRCs. Our mathematical model revealed that the shape of action potentials depended on the ratio of TEA-sensitive current density and TEA-insensitive current one. The action potentials of type II cells and type III cells under physiological conditions are discussed.

  4. Sildenafil Potentiates a cGMP-Dependent Pathway to Promote Melanoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Dhayade, Sandeep; Kaesler, Susanne; Sinnberg, Tobias; Dobrowinski, Hyazinth; Peters, Stefanie; Naumann, Ulrike; Liu, He; Hunger, Robert E; Thunemann, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo; Schittek, Birgit; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert

    2016-03-22

    Sildenafil, an inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 5 that is used to treat erectile dysfunction, has been linked to an increased risk of melanoma. Here, we have examined the potential connection between cGMP-dependent signaling cascades and melanoma growth. Using a combination of biochemical assays and real-time monitoring of melanoma cells, we report a cGMP-dependent growth-promoting pathway in murine and human melanoma cells. We document that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a ligand of the membrane-bound guanylate cyclase B, enhances the activity of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI) in melanoma cells by increasing the intracellular levels of cGMP. Activation of this cGMP pathway promotes melanoma cell growth and migration in a p44/42 MAPK-dependent manner. Sildenafil treatment further increases intracellular cGMP concentrations, potentiating activation of this pathway. Collectively, our data identify this cGMP-cGKI pathway as the link between sildenafil usage and increased melanoma risk. PMID:26971999

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals as potential risk factor for estrogen-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Z; Szybiak, Aleksandra; Serkies, Krystyna; Rachoń, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Civilization, industrialization, and urbanization create an environment where humans are continuously exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Some of breast cancers and endometrial cancer, which are the most common female malignant neoplasms, are estrogen-dependent tumors. Prolonged exposure to estrogens or substances with estrogenic properties may be a risk factor for their development. This paper aimed to discuss the potential adverse effect of EDCs on human health, including the role of EDCs in hormone-dependent carcinogenesis. A review of literature regarding the sources of environmental exposure to EDCs and molecular mechanisms of their action was performed. We analyzed the possible mechanisms of how these substances alter the function of the endocrine system, resulting in adverse health effects. Hundreds of substances with endocrine disrupting potential have been identified in our environment. There is accumulating evidence linking exposure to EDCs with the development of mammary and endometrial cancer. By interacting with steroid receptors, EDCs can impact the cellular processes potentially leading to carcinogenesis. There are also data showing the effect of EDCs on immune dysfunction. During lifespan, people are usually exposed to a mixture of various EDCs, which complicates the assessment of individual substances or compounds implicated in cancer development. As the prevalence of hormone-dependent tumors among women continues to increase, their successful prevention is of human benefit. Institutions representing medicine, science, industry, and governments should develop joint strategies to decrease exposure to EDC, and thus to reduce the risk of hormonedependent tumors in women. PMID:27509913

  6. Strain Loading Mode Dependent Bandgap Deformation Potential in ZnO Micro/Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xuewen; Liao, Zhi-Min; Liu, Ren; Lin, Fang; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Rui; Zhong, Wei; Liu, Yingkai; Guo, Wanlin; Yu, Dapeng

    2015-12-22

    The electronic-mechanical coupling in semiconductor nanostructures under different strain loading modes can modulate their photoelectric properties in different manners. Here, we report the systematic investigation on the strain mode dependent bandgap deformation potential of ZnO micro/nanowires under both uniaxial tensile and bending strains at room temperature. Uniaxial stretching-photoluminescence results show that the deformation potential of the smaller ZnO nanowire (with diameter d = 260 nm) is -30.6 meV/%, and is close to the bulk value, whereas it deviates the bulk value and becomes to be -10.6 meV/% when the wire diameter is increased to d = 2 μm. This unconventional size dependence stems from surface effect induced inhomogeneous strain in the surface layer and the core of the ZnO micro/nanowires under uniaxial tension. For bending load mode, the in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscope analysis reveals that the local strain distributes linearly in the bending cross section. Further cathodoluminescence measurements on a bending ZnO microwire (d = 1.8 μm) demonstrate that the deformation potential is -27 meV/%, whose absolute value is much larger than that of the ZnO microwire under uniaxial tension. Further analysis reveals that the distinct deformation potentials originate from the different deforming modes in ZnO micro/nanowires under bending or uniaxial tensile strains. Our results should facilitate the design of flexible optoelectronic nanodevices. PMID:26517647

  7. The dependence of membrane potential on extracellular chloride concentration in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, A F

    1978-01-01

    1. The steady-state intracellular membrane potential of fibres in thin bundles dissected from mouse extensor digitorum longus or soleus muscles or rat sternomastoid muscles was measured with 3 M-KCl glass micro-electrodes. The steady-state membrane potential was found to depend on the extracellular concentrations of Na, K and Cl ions. 2. The resting membrane potential (3.5 mM-[K]o, 160 mM-[Cl]o) was -74 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.) and a reduction in [Cl]o to 3.5 mM caused a reversible steady-state hyperpolarization to -94 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.). 3. The steady-state membrane potentials recorded in fibres exposed to different [K]o and zero [Cl]o were consistent with potentials predicted by the Goldman, Hodgkin & Katz (GHK) equation for Na and K. The results of similar experiments done with Cl as the major external anion could not be fitted by the same equation. 4. The GHK equation for Na, K and Cl did fit data obtained from fibres in solutions containing different [K]o with Cl as the major external anion if the intracellular Cl concentration was allowed to be out of equilibrium with the steady-state membrane potential. 5. It is suggested that an active influx of Cl ions controls the intracellular Cl concentrations in these fibres and hence maintains the Cl equilibrium potential at a depolarized value with respect to the resting membrane potential. 6. The steady-state membrane potential of rat diaphragm fibres was independent of [Cl]o and it seems likely that the intracellular Cl concentration of these fibres is not controlled by active Cl transport. PMID:650497

  8. Kink ratchet induced by a time-dependent symmetric field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Quintero, Niurka R.

    2016-07-01

    The ratchet effect of a sine-Gordon kink is investigated in the absence of any external force while the symmetry of the field potential at every time instant is maintained. The directed motion appears by a time shift of the sine-Gordon potential through a time-dependent additional phase. A symmetry analysis provides the necessary conditions for the existence of net motion. It is also shown analytically, by using a collective coordinate theory, that the novel physical mechanism responsible for the appearance of the ratchet effect is the coupled dynamics of the kink width with the background field. Biharmonic and dichotomic periodic variations of the additional phase of the sine-Gordon potential are considered. The predictions established by the symmetry analysis and the collective coordinate theory are verified by means of numerical simulations. Inversion and maximization of the resulting current as a function of the system parameters are investigated.

  9. Kink ratchet induced by a time-dependent symmetric field potential.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Quintero, Niurka R

    2016-07-01

    The ratchet effect of a sine-Gordon kink is investigated in the absence of any external force while the symmetry of the field potential at every time instant is maintained. The directed motion appears by a time shift of the sine-Gordon potential through a time-dependent additional phase. A symmetry analysis provides the necessary conditions for the existence of net motion. It is also shown analytically, by using a collective coordinate theory, that the novel physical mechanism responsible for the appearance of the ratchet effect is the coupled dynamics of the kink width with the background field. Biharmonic and dichotomic periodic variations of the additional phase of the sine-Gordon potential are considered. The predictions established by the symmetry analysis and the collective coordinate theory are verified by means of numerical simulations. Inversion and maximization of the resulting current as a function of the system parameters are investigated. PMID:27575137

  10. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will

  11. Effect of potential-dependent potassium uptake on calcium accumulation in rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Akopova, O V; Kolchinskaya, L I; Nosar, V I; Bouryi, V A; Mankovskaya, I N; Sagach, V F

    2013-01-01

    The effect of potential-dependent potassium uptake at 0-120 mM K+ on matrix Ca2+ accumulation in rat brain mitochondria was studied. An increase in oxygen consumption and proton extrusion rates as well as increase in matrix pH with increase in K+ content in the medium was observed due to K+ uptake into the mitochondria. The accumulation of Ca2+ was shown to depend on K+ concentration in the medium. At K+ concentration ≤30 mM, Ca2+ uptake is decreased due to K+-induced membrane depolarization, whereas at higher K+ concentrations, up to 120 mM K+, Ca2+ uptake is increased in spite of membrane depolarization caused by matrix alkalization due to K+ uptake. Mitochondrial K+(ATP)-channel blockers (glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid) diminish K+ uptake as well as K+-induced depolarization and matrix alkalization, which results in attenuation of the potassium-induced effects on matrix Ca2+ uptake, i.e. increase in Ca2+ uptake at low K+ content in the medium due to the smaller membrane depolarization and decrease in Ca2+ uptake at high potassium concentrations because of restricted rise in matrix pH. The results show the importance of potential-dependent potassium uptake, and especially the K+(ATP) channel, in the regulation of calcium accumulation in rat brain mitochondria.

  12. Conceptual design of an apparatus for measuring frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, Eric; Walker, Emilie; Glover, Paul; Ruel, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Electro-kinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the theory of the electro-seismic method. However, surprisingly little experimental determination, numerical modeling and theoretical development have taken place, and what exists is for steady state flow. There have been only a few attempts at making experimental determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coupling coefficient because of their difficulty, and only one rare measurement made on rocks. Here we have considered six different approaches to making laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coupling coefficient. In each case, we have quantified the practical difficulties involved in each method. We conclude that the electro-magnetic drive and the piezo-electric are the only approaches that are practicable with current technology. We have also constructed a simplified trial apparatus using the electro-magnetic drive to test the conceptual design with samples in the form of sands and beads. Tests with this apparatus on Ottawa sandstone and glass bead packs have shown that high quality measurements of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coupling coefficient can be made, and we are currently extending its frequency range. Tests have indicated that it is important to ascertain whether the measured frequency-dependent streaming potential coupling coefficient is independent of the volume of fluid passing through the sample per cycle. We have used our experience with the trial apparatus to design a new apparatus for a 1 cm diameter sample, and with the help of an engineering approach we have determined the range of possible sample permeabilities for samples between 0.5 and 2 cm in length. The new cell will have a maximum confining pressure of compressed nitrogen

  13. Potential-step coulometry of D-glucose using a novel FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Seiya; Kojima, Shinki; Ikeda, Tokuji; Kano, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the construction and characterization of a batch-type coulometric system for the detection of D-glucose using a novel FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase. In order to overcome the problem of interferents, such as ascorbate and urate, a potential-step method was proposed to separate the electrolysis reactions of interferents and D-glucose by selecting a mediator possessing an appropriate formal potential. The rapid oxidative consumption of the interferents proceeded in the first step, whereas the mediator and glucose remained reduced. In the second step, the mediator was immediately oxidized, and subsequent bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of D-glucose occurred with the aid of aldose 1-epimerase. In this study, potassium octacyanomolybdate (IV) with a formal potential of 0.6 V vs. Ag|AgCl was chosen as a mediator, and the first and second electrolysis potentials were set at 0.4 V and 0.8 V, respectively, by considering the heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics and the potential window. The background-corrected response in charge corresponded to 99+/-2 % efficiency in terms of the amount of D-glucose.

  14. Khat (Catha edulis Forsk.) Dependence Potential and Pattern of Use in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Alsanosy, Rashad Mohammed; Rahim, Bahaa-eldin E. A.; Mohan, Syam; Taha, Sara; Mohamed Elhassan, Manal; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Background. Catha edulis Forsk. (Khat) is used for its psychoactive effects among people in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, although its utilization is illegal in some countries such as Saudi Arabia. This study examined the pattern of Khat use and assessed the applicability of the Drug Abuse Screening Test-10 (DAST-10) to measure Khat dependence. Methods. A pretested questionnaire was used to gather data from 603 respondents. Variables included demographic characteristics, pattern of use, reasons for Khat chewing, and DAST-10. Stepwise-logistic regression was used to explore predictors of Khat dependence. Results. The majority of the respondents were married, had a secondary school level of education, were employed, were younger than 35 years old, and were living in rural areas. Many chewers gave more than one reason for using Khat. It was mainly used to increase mental capacity, physical strength, and social entertainment, as well as enhance cheerfulness and orgasms. Statistical modeling of Khat dependence suggested that the most significant predictors were residence (OR = 1.67, P < 0.02), frequency of Khat chewing (OR = 4.8, P < 0.01), age of starting Khat chewing (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01), and time of Khat effect (OR = 1.15, P < 0.04). Conclusion. Our study provides important information on the pattern of Khat use and its potential to cause dependence. PMID:26380288

  15. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions.

  16. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:24626853

  17. Potential-dependent variations of the intracellular pressure in the intracellularly perfused squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, S

    1985-01-01

    Intracellular pressure responses were recorded from squid giant axons after the axoplasm was removed by the intracellular perfusion technique. A glass tube was inserted into the axon and the movement of the air-water interface formed on the end of the tube was observed with a Y-shaped fibrescope. The intracellular pressure increased and decreased rapidly when an action potential was induced by electrical stimulation. The amplitude of the response was about 10 mPa (or 1 X 10(-3) mmH2O), which was very large in comparison with that observed in unperfused axons. It was sensitive to extracellular Ca2+. The pressure response appeared in an all-or-none manner and could be suppressed by tetrodotoxin. This excluded physicochemical processes on the stimulating electrode or current-supplying electrode as sources of the response. Various other sources of artifacts were also excluded. An extensive removal of the axoplasm by intracellular perfusion with a protease-containing solution and a KCl solution did not eliminate the pressure response. The intracellular pressure was membrane potential dependent, increasing upon depolarization and decreasing upon hyperpolarization of the membrane. Under voltage clamp, the relationship between the membrane potential and the pressure response was parabolic with a maximum at +109 mV (in reference to the resting level). The response did not depend on the membrane current. A much slower response due to electro-osmotic water flow was also detected. The pressure response induced by hyperpolarization of the membrane was suppressed by extracellular application of a lidocaine-containing solution, but not by a tetrodotoxin-containing solution. These results suggest that the pressure responses arise either from a change in electrostriction across the axolemma or from a change in charge-dependent tension along the axolemma. PMID:4093881

  18. Adsorption of acridine on silver electrode: SERS spectra potential dependence as a probe of adsorbate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Elena V.; Myund, Liubov A.; Dem'yanchuk, Evgeniya M.; Makarov, Artiom A.; Denisova, Anna S.

    2013-02-01

    This work investigates acridine adsorption on the silver electrode surface. The dependence of the acridine SERS spectra on the electrode potential proved to be quite different for azaheterocycle molecules, while the pH effect as expected. The changes in the acridine SERS spectrum caused by the double electric layer (DEL) rearrangement can be explained by sorption/desorption rather than the adsorbate molecule reorientation. The presence of chloride anions close to the silver surface is important not only for the SERS-active properties but for the formation of the stabilised surface complexes of the protonated acridine as well.

  19. PLP-dependent enzymes as potential drug targets for protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Barbara; Tews, Ivo; Binter, Alexandra; Macheroux, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The chemical properties of the B(6) vitamers are uniquely suited for wide use as cofactors in essential reactions, such as decarboxylations and transaminations. This review addresses current efforts to explore vitamin B(6) dependent enzymatic reactions as drug targets. Several current targets are described that are found amongst these enzymes. The focus is set on diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Comparison across a range of these organisms allows insight into the distribution of potential targets, many of which may be of interest in the development of broad range anti-protozoan drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  20. Temperature dependent effective potential method for accurate free energy calculations of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Steneteg, Peter; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a thorough and accurate method of determining anharmonic free energies, the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP). It is based on ab initio molecular dynamics followed by a mapping onto a model Hamiltonian that describes the lattice dynamics. The formalism and the numerical aspects of the technique are described in detail. A number of practical examples are given, and results are presented, which confirm the usefulness of TDEP within ab initio and classical molecular dynamics frameworks. In particular, we examine from first principles the behavior of force constants upon the dynamical stabilization of the body centered phase of Zr, and show that they become more localized. We also calculate the phase diagram for 4He modeled with the Aziz potential and obtain results which are in favorable agreement both with respect to experiment and established techniques.

  1. Photosynthetic Potential and Light-Dependent Oxygen Consumption in a Benthic Cyanobacterial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Cohen, Yehuda; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    1988-01-01

    The potential to carry out oxygenic photosynthesis after prolonged burial below the photic zone was studied at 0.1-mm depth intervals in the thick, laminated Microcoleus chthonoplastes mats growing in Solar Lake, Sinai. The buried mat community lost about 20% of its photosynthetic potential with depth per annual layer down to 8- to 10-year-old layers at a 14-mm depth. In some of the older layers, below a 30-mm depth, light-dependent oxygen consumption which increased with increasing light intensity was observed. Possible mechanisms for this phenomenon are (i) pseudocyclic electron transport (Mehler reaction), (ii) interactions between respiratory electron transport and photosynthetic electron transport, (iii) photorespiration, and (iv) photooxidation. PMID:16347523

  2. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  3. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  4. Pressure Dependence of Anharmonic Effective Pair Potentials in Rock Salt Type AgI

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiasa, Akira; Sugahara, Masahiko; Fukui, Hiroshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Ohtaka, Osamu; Okube, Maki; Katayama, Yoshinori; Murai, Kei-ichiro

    2007-02-02

    Pressure dependence of anharmonic effective pair potentials V(u)=au2/2+bu3/3{exclamation_point} for the I-Ag bond in rock salt type AgI has been investigated by EXAFS Debye-Waller factors. EXAFS measurements near the I K-edge were performed under pressure up to 6.0 GPa using a multi-anvil high-pressure device and synchrotron radiation from SPring-8, Hyogo. The potential parameter a for rock-salt type is 1.66(5) eV/A2 at 1.0 GPa and increases to 1.88(6) eV/A2 at 6.0 GPa. The phonon energies in rock salt type AgI under pressure have been estimated using the potential parameter a by calculating the dynamical matrix. The anharmonic effective pair potential for each phase is influenced by pressure and becomes steeper with increasing pressure while the extent of anharmonicity decreases with pressure.

  5. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures. PMID:27677356

  6. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures.

  7. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  8. Effect of coupled channels on the energy dependence of phenomenological optical potential parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rayashi, W. S.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    The phenomenological optical potential parameters are known to vary with incident energy due to sources of nonlocalities in the nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering process. Here we investigate the effect of one source, which is coupling the ground-state elastic channel to collective inelastic excitations on the energy dependence of the optical potential parameters. For incident energies in the range 10-70 MeV, we considered elastic and inelastic nucleon scattering from light, medium, and heavy nuclei ranging from 6Li to 208Pb. The potential parameters were first determined by fitting the elastic angular distributions only. Then we included coupling to collective excitation channels and determined the potential parameters that reproduced the elastic and inelastic angular distribution data simultaneously. Our results show that coupling to inelastic excitations reduces the energy variations of the potential parameters compared to that of the elastic scattering case. In particular, the our best fit values for the real part of the spin-orbit term are highly stable as a function of energy. The values of the surface imaginary term are not only more stable but are also reduced compared to the elastic case. The reduction is a direct consequence of the channel coupling accounting explicitly for part of the flux removed from the elastic channel. In the fitting process we also searched for the best fit values of the deformation parameters. Our values compare well with the corresponding ones obtained in previous works. Finally, we used our best fit values for the potential and deformation parameters to theoretically predict the total elastic, total cross section, and polarization data. The predicted values are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Inverse problems for the Schroedinger equations with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Eskin, G.

    2008-02-15

    We consider the inverse boundary value problem for the Schroedinger operator with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials in domains with obstacles. We extend the resuls of the author's works [Inverse Probl. 19, 49 (2003); 19, 985 (2003); 20, 1497 (2004)] to the case of time-dependent potentials. We relate our results to the Aharonov-Bohm effect caused by magnetic and electric fluxes.

  10. Temperature- and potential-dependent structure of the mercury-electrolyte interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Benjamin; Festersen, Sven; Koops, Christian T.; Elsen, Annika; Deutsch, Moshe; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Seeck, Oliver H.; Murphy, Bridget M.; Magnussen, Olaf M.

    2016-04-01

    The atomic-scale structure of the mercury-electrolyte (0.01 M NaF) interface was studied as a function of temperature and potential by x-ray reflectivity and x-ray diffuse scattering measurements. The capillary wave contribution is determined and removed from the data, giving access to the intrinsic surface-normal electron density profile at the interface, especially to the surface layering in the Hg phase. A temperature dependent roughness anomaly known from the Hg-air interface is found to persist also at the Hg-electrolyte interface. Additionally, a temperature dependence of the layering period was discovered. The increase in the layer spacing with increasing temperature is approximately four times lager than the increase expected from thermal expansion. Finally, the interface is found to broaden towards the electrolyte side as the potential becomes more negative, in agreement with the Schmickler-Henderson theory. Our results favor a model for the interface structure, which is different to the model formerly used in comparable studies.

  11. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  12. The flavonoid baicalein promotes NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation and enhances memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Long, Li-Hong; Fu, Hui; Xie, Na; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE There is growing interest in the physiological functions of flavonoids, especially in their effects on cognitive function and on neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the role of the flavonoid baicalein in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region and cognitive behavioural performance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of baicalein on LTP in rat hippocampal slices were investigated by electrophysiological methods. Phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser473), the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (at Ser133) were analysed by Western blot. Fear conditioning was used to determine whether baicalein could improve learning and memory in rats. KEY RESULTS Baicalein enhanced the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor-dependent LTP in a bell-shaped concentration-dependent manner. Addition of the lipoxygenase metabolites 12(S)-HETE and 12(S)-HPETE did not reverse these effects of baicalein. Baicalein treatment enhanced phosphorylation of Akt during induction of LTP with the same bell-shaped dose–response curve. LTP potentiation induced by baicalein was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. CREB phosphorylation was also increased in the CA1 region of baicalein-treated slices. Baicalein-treated rats performed significantly better than controls in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning task. Furthermore, baicalein treatment selectively increased the phosphorylation of Akt and CREB in the CA1 region of hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex, after fear conditioning training. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrate that the flavonoid baicalein can facilitate memory, and therefore it might be useful in the treatment of patients with memory disorders. PMID:21133890

  13. Effects of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation in morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Miladi-Gorji, H; Rashidy-Pour, A; Fathollahi, Y; Semnanian, S; Jadidi, M

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were randomly distributed into the saline-sedentary (Sal/Sed), the dependent-sedentary, the saline-exercise (Sal/Exc), and the dependent-exercise (D/Exc) groups. The Sal/Exc and the D/Exc groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 10 days. The Sal/Sed and the morphine-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same extent of time. Morphine (10 mg/kg) was injected bi-daily (12 h interval) during 10 days of voluntary exercise. On day 11, 2h after the morphine injection, the in vivo LTP in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was examined. The theta frequency primed bursts were delivered to the perforant path for induction of LTP. Population spike (PS) amplitude and the field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) slope were measured as indices of increase in synaptic efficacy. Chronic morphine increased the mean basal EPSP, and augmented PS-LTP. Exercise significantly increased the mean baseline EPSP and PS responses, and augmented PS-LTP in both saline and morphine-treated groups. Moreover, the increase of PS-LTP in the morphine-exercise group was greater (22.5%), but not statistically significant, than that of the Sal/Exc group. These results may imply an additive effect between exercise and morphine on mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Such an interaction between exercise and chronic morphine may influence cognitive functions in opiate addicts.

  14. Osmotic Dependence of the Transmembrane Potential Difference of Broadbean Mesocarp Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ze-Sheng; Delrot, Serge

    1987-01-01

    Pod walls of broadbean (Vicia faba L. cv Aguadulce) were harvested at the import (S1), at the transition (S2) or at the export (S3) phase for assimilate transport. Measurements of the transmembrane potential difference (PD) of mesocarp cells were made under various osmotic conditions. Internal osmotic potentials and cell turgor were calculated from osmolality measurements of cell saps recovered by freeze-thawing, after correction for the contribution of the free-space solution. Changes in the mannitol concentration of the medium altered the PD within a few minutes, and new stable values of PD were reached within 20 minutes after the osmotic change. With mannitol as the osmoticum, the most negative PD was measured at an external osmotic potential of -0.70 megapascals (MPa) for S1 and S2, while the most negative was at -0.40 MPa for S3. Ethylene glycol, a permeant osmoticum, had little effect on PD, showing that the PD was sensitive to turgor, not to solute potential per se. For S1 and S2, the PD was less negative for turgor potentials lower than 0.1 MPa or greater than 0.3 MPa. S3 samples exhibited a different turgor dependence, with a sharp optimum of the negativity of the PD at 0.3 MPa. The data are consistent with the proposal that the proton pump acts as a transducer of the osmotic conditions. They show that the osmotic sensitivity of the PD of mesocarp cells of broadbean changes with the stage of development of the pod. PMID:16665540

  15. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potentialmore » for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.« less

  16. Size-dependent knockdown potential of siRNA-loaded cationic nanohydrogel particles.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Lutz; Tomcin, Stephanie; Miyata, Kanjiro; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Kataoka, Kazunori; Zentel, Rudolf

    2014-11-10

    To overcome the poor pharmacokinetic conditions of short double-stranded RNA molecules in RNA interference therapies, cationic nanohydrogel particles can be considered as alternative safe and stable carriers for oligonucleotide delivery. For understanding key parameters during this process, two different types of well-defined cationic nanohydrogel particles were synthesized, which provided nearly identical physicochemical properties with regards to their material composition and resulting siRNA loading characteristics. Yet, according to the manufacturing process using amphiphilic reactive ester block copolymers of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFPMA) and tri(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate (MEO3MA) with similar compositions but different molecular weights, the resulting nanohydrogel particles differed in size after cross-linking with spermine (average diameter 40 vs 100 nm). This affected their knockdown potential significantly. Only the 40 nm sized cationic nanogel particles were able to generate moderate gene knockdown levels, which lasted, however, up to 3 days. Interestingly, primary cell uptake and colocalization studies with lysosomal compartments revealed that only these small sized nanogels were able to avoid acidic compartments of endolysosomal uptake pathways, which may contribute to their knockdown ability exclusively. To that respect, this size-dependent intracellular distribution behavior may be considered as an essential key parameter for tuning the knockdown potential of siRNA nanohydrogel particles, which may further contribute to the development of advanced siRNA carrier systems with improved knockdown potential.

  17. The dependence of water potential in shoots of Picea abies on air and soil water status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellin, A.

    1998-04-01

    Where there is sufficient water storage in the soil the water potential (x) in shoots of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] is strongly governed by the vapour pressure deficit of the atmosphere, while the mean minimum values of x usually do not drop below -1.5 MPa under meteorological conditions in Estonia. If the base water potential (b) is above -0.62 MPa, the principal factor causing water deficiency in shoots of P. abies may be either limited soil water reserves or atmospheric evaporative demand depending on the current level of the vapour pressure deficit. As the soil dries the stomatal control becomes more efficient in preventing water losses from the foliage, and the leaf water status, in turn, less sensitive to atmospheric demand. Under drought conditions, if b falls below -0.62 MPa, the trees' water stress is mainly caused by low soil water availability. Further declines in the shoot water potential (below -1.5 MPa) can be attributed primarily to further decreases in the soil water, i.e. to the static water stress.

  18. Forecasting Corrosion of Steel in Concrete Introducing Chloride Threshold Dependence on Steel Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Andrea Nathalie

    Corrosion initiates in reinforced concrete structures exposed to marine environments when the chloride ion concentration at the surface of an embedded steel reinforcing bar exceeds the chloride corrosion threshold (CT) value. The value of CT is generally assumed to have a conservative fixed value ranging from 0.2% to - 0.5 % of chloride ions by weight of cement. However, extensive experimental investigations confirmed that C T is not a fixed value and that the value of CT depends on many variables. Among those, the potential of passive steel embedded in concrete is a key influential factor on the value of CT and has received little attention in the literature. The phenomenon of a potential-dependent threshold (PDT) permits accounting for corrosion macrocell coupling between active and passive steel assembly components in corrosion forecast models, avoiding overly conservative long-term damage projections and leading to more efficient design. The objectives of this investigation was to 1) expand by a systematic experimental assessment the knowledge and data base on how dependent the chloride threshold is on the potential of the steel embedded in concrete and 2) introduce the chloride threshold dependence on steel potential as an integral part of corrosion-related service life prediction of reinforced concrete structures. Experimental assessments on PDT were found in the literature but for a limited set of conditions. Therefore, experiments were conducted with mortar and concrete specimens and exposed to conditions more representative of the field than those previously available. The experimental results confirmed the presence of the PDT effect and provided supporting information to use a value of -550 mV per decade of Cl- for the cathodic prevention slope betaCT, a critical quantitative input for implementation in a practical model. A refinement of a previous corrosion initiation-propagation model that incorporated PDT in a partially submerged reinforced concrete

  19. Condition dependence, quantitative genetics, and the potential signal content of iridescent ultraviolet butterfly coloration.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Darrell J; Rutowski, Ronald L

    2007-01-01

    Structural colors result from an interaction between light and the fine-scale physical structure of a surface, and are often extremely bright, chromatic, and iridescent. Given that these visual features depend upon the aggregate abundance and architectural precision of photonic structures, structurally colored sexual ornaments seem well placed to indicate a range of mate quality characteristics. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the signaling potential of structural coloration in the sexually dimorphic butterfly Colias eurytheme. Males of this species display iridescent ultraviolet (UV) markings (arising from multilayer thin films) that overlay a broad area of yellowish-orange pigmentation on their dorsal wing surface. Only the structural UV has demonstrated function as a sexual signal; hence we predicted that it should contain more reliable phenotypic and/or genetic quality information, which would be indicated by phenotypic and/or genetically mediated condition dependence. In two split-family breeding experiments we manipulated condition by exposing full siblings to different stressors at two different juvenile life-history stages: (1) reduced larval host-plant quality and (2) transient heat/cold shocks during metamorphosis. Both stressors had profound effects on key developmental and life-history traits. Each stressor also significantly affected male dorsal coloration; thus, the expression of both structural and pigmentary coloration is phenotypically condition dependent. As predicted, the strongest condition dependence was evident in the brightness and angular visibility (i.e., iridescence) of the UV. Characteristics of both the iridescent UV and pigmentary orange also exhibited moderate-high and significant heritability (H(2) approximately h(2) approximately 0.4-0.9). However, genetic and residual variances did not increase under stress; thus, the observed condition dependence was not genetically mediated as predicted if wing color trait signals "good

  20. Optimized Effective Potential for Quantum Electrodynamical Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Flick, Johannes; Tokatly, Ilya V; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-08-28

    We propose an orbital exchange-correlation functional for applying time-dependent density functional theory to many-electron systems coupled to cavity photons. The time nonlocal equation for the electron-photon optimized effective potential (OEP) is derived. In the static limit our OEP energy functional reduces to the Lamb shift of the ground state energy. We test the new approximation in the Rabi model. It is shown that the OEP (i) reproduces quantitatively the exact ground-state energy from the weak to the deep strong coupling regime and (ii) accurately captures the dynamics entering the ultrastrong coupling regime. The present formalism opens the path to a first-principles description of correlated electron-photon systems, bridging the gap between electronic structure methods and quantum optics for real material applications. PMID:26371646

  1. Strain-dependent arthritogenic potential of the zoonotic pathogen Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Dias, A A S O; Silva, F C; Santos, L S; Ribeiro-Carvalho, M M; Sabbadini, P S; Santos, C S; Filardy, A A; Myioshi, A; Azevedo, V A; Hirata, R; Villas-Bôas, M H S; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L

    2011-12-15

    During the last decade the majority of diphtheria cases in Europe had Corynebacterium ulcerans as the etiologic agent with dogs and cats as the reservoir hosts. However, little has been documented about the virulence factors of this zoonotic pathogen. To set up an in vivo experimental C. ulcerans infection model, conventional Swiss Webster mice were intravenously infected with different doses (from 1 × 10(7) to 5 × 10(9) bacteria per mouse) of C. ulcerans strains, namely 809 (from human lower respiratory tract), BR-AD22 (from asymptomatic dog nares) and CDC-KC279. Mortality rates were demonstrated by LD(50) values ranging from 1.9 × 10(8) to 1.3 × 10(9). Viable bacteria were recovered from blood, kidneys, liver, spleen and joints. For CDC-KC279 and 809 strains (2 × 10(8)mL(-1)) approximately 85% and 72% of animals with articular lesions were observed, respectively; BR-AD22-infected mice showed no signs of arthritis. CDC-KC279 and 809 strains exhibited higher arthritogenic potential when compared to the homologous toxigenic (ATCC27012) and non-toxigenic (ATCC27010) strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. A high number of affected joints and arthritis index in addition to the histopathological features, including subcutaneous edema, inflammatory infiltrate, damage to bone tissue and synoviocyte hypertrophy, indicated a strain-dependent ability of C. ulcerans strains to cause severe polyarthritis. A correlation between the arthritis index and systemic levels of IL-6 and TNF-α was observed for C. ulcerans strains, with the exception of the non-arthritogenic BR-AD22 strain. In conclusion, C. ulcerans revealed a strain-dependent arthritogenic potential independent of DNAse, PLD and diphtheria toxin production.

  2. Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent p53-negative tumor cell death during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Clausse, V; Goloudina, A R; Uyanik, B; Kochetkova, E Y; Richaud, S; Fedorova, O A; Hammann, A; Bardou, M; Barlev, N A; Garrido, C; Demidov, O N

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 found in more than half of human cancers is often associated with increased tumor resistance to anti-cancer therapy. We have previously shown that overexpression of the phosphatase Wip1 in p53-negative tumors sensitizes them to chemotherapeutic agents, while protecting normal tissues from the side effects of anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we decided to search for kinases that prevent Wip1-mediated sensitization of cancer cells, thereby interfering with efficacy of genotoxic anti-cancer drugs. To this end, we performed a flow cytometry-based screening in order to identify kinases that regulated the levels of γH2AX, which were used as readout. Another criterion of the screen was increased sensitivity of p53-negative tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) in a Wip1-dependent manner. We have found that a treatment with a low dose (75 nM) of MK-1775, a recently described specific chemical inhibitor of Wee1, decreases CDDP-induced H2AX phosphorylation in p53-negative cells and enhances the Wip1-sensitization of p53-negative tumors. We were able to reduce CDDP effective concentration by 40% with a combination of Wip1 overexpression and Wee1 kinase inhibition. We have observed that Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent tumor sensitization effect by reducing levels of Hipk2 kinase, a negative regulator of Wip1 pathway. In addition, during CDDP treatment, the combination of Wee1 inhibition and Wip1 overexpression has a mild but significant protective effect in normal cells and tissues. Our results indicate that inhibition of the negative regulators of Wip1 pathway, Wee1 and Hipk2, in p53-negative tumors could potentiate efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents without concomitant increase of cytotoxicity in normal tissues. The development and clinical use of Wee1 and Hipk1 kinase chemical inhibitors might be a promising strategy to improve anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27077811

  3. Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent p53-negative tumor cell death during chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausse, V; Goloudina, A R; Uyanik, B; Kochetkova, E Y; Richaud, S; Fedorova, O A; Hammann, A; Bardou, M; Barlev, N A; Garrido, C; Demidov, O N

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 found in more than half of human cancers is often associated with increased tumor resistance to anti-cancer therapy. We have previously shown that overexpression of the phosphatase Wip1 in p53-negative tumors sensitizes them to chemotherapeutic agents, while protecting normal tissues from the side effects of anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we decided to search for kinases that prevent Wip1-mediated sensitization of cancer cells, thereby interfering with efficacy of genotoxic anti-cancer drugs. To this end, we performed a flow cytometry-based screening in order to identify kinases that regulated the levels of γH2AX, which were used as readout. Another criterion of the screen was increased sensitivity of p53-negative tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) in a Wip1-dependent manner. We have found that a treatment with a low dose (75 nM) of MK-1775, a recently described specific chemical inhibitor of Wee1, decreases CDDP-induced H2AX phosphorylation in p53-negative cells and enhances the Wip1-sensitization of p53-negative tumors. We were able to reduce CDDP effective concentration by 40% with a combination of Wip1 overexpression and Wee1 kinase inhibition. We have observed that Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent tumor sensitization effect by reducing levels of Hipk2 kinase, a negative regulator of Wip1 pathway. In addition, during CDDP treatment, the combination of Wee1 inhibition and Wip1 overexpression has a mild but significant protective effect in normal cells and tissues. Our results indicate that inhibition of the negative regulators of Wip1 pathway, Wee1 and Hipk2, in p53-negative tumors could potentiate efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents without concomitant increase of cytotoxicity in normal tissues. The development and clinical use of Wee1 and Hipk1 kinase chemical inhibitors might be a promising strategy to improve anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27077811

  4. Stability Curve Prediction of Homologous Proteins Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature () and the change in heat capacity () of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies () at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted 's, 's and folding free energies at room temperature () are equal to 13 , 1.3 ) and 4.1 , respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed. PMID:25032839

  5. Size dependent transitions induced by an electron collecting electrode near the plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnat, Edward; Laity, George; Hopkins, Matt; Baalrud, Scott

    2014-10-01

    As the size of a positively biased electrode increases, the nature of the interface formed between the electrode and the host plasma undergoes a transition from an electron-rich structure (electron sheath) to an intermediate structure containing both ion and electron rich regions (double layer) and ultimately forms an electron-depleted structure (ion sheath). In this study, measurements are performed to further test how the key scaling relationship relating the area of the electrode to that of the area of the vessel containing the plasma discharge impacts this transition. This was accomplished using a segmented disk electrode in which individual segments were individually biased to change the effective surface area of the anode. Measurements on bulk plasma parameters such as the collected current density, plasma potential, electron density, electron temperature and optical emission are made as both the size and the bias placed on the electrode are varied. Size dependent transitions in the voltage dependence of the plasma parameters are identified in both argon and helium discharges and are compared to the interface transitions predicted by global current balance. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000.

  6. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  7. A Single Brief Burst Induces GluR1-Dependent Associative Short-Term Potentiation: A Potential Mechanism for Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martha A.; Maramara, Lauren A.; Lisman, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent work showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon…

  8. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  9. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: DEPENDENCE OF THE SURFACE POTENTIAL ON THE GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Z.; Pavlu, J.; Safrankova, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Vaverka, J.; Mann, I.

    2011-09-01

    The secondary electron emission is believed to play an important role for the dust charging at and close to the lunar surface. However, our knowledge of emission properties of the dust results from model calculations and rather rare laboratory investigations. The present paper reports laboratory measurements of the surface potential on Lunar Highlands Type regolith simulants with sizes between 0.3 and 3 {mu}m in an electron beam with energy below 700 eV. This investigation is focused on a low-energy part, i.e., {<=}100 eV. We found that the equilibrium surface potential of this simulant does not depend on the grain size in our ranges of grain dimensions and the beam energies, however, it is a function of the primary electron beam energy. The measurements are confirmed by the results of the simulation model of the secondary emission from the spherical samples. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained in laboratory experiments as well as those inferred from in situ observations.

  10. Spatial dependency of cholera prevalence on potential cholera reservoirs in an urban area, Kumasi, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, Frank B.; Duker, Alfred A.; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Stein, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    Cholera has been a public health burden in Ghana since the early 1970s. Between 1999 and 2005, a total of 25,636 cases and 620 deaths were officially reported to the WHO. In one of the worst affected urban cities, fecal contamination of surface water is extremely high, and the disease is reported to be prevalent among inhabitants living in close proximity to surface water bodies. Surface runoff from dump sites is a major source of fecal and bacterial contamination of rivers and streams in the study area. This study aims to determine (a) the impacts of surface water contamination on cholera infection and (b) detect and map arbitrary shaped clusters of cholera. A Geographic Information System (GIS) based spatial analysis is used to delineate potential reservoirs of the cholera vibrios; possibly contaminated by surface runoff from open space refuse dumps. Statistical modeling using OLS model reveals a significant negative association between (a) cholera prevalence and proximity to all the potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.18, p < 0.001) and (b) cholera prevalence and proximity to upstream potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.25, p < 0.001). The inclusion of spatial autoregressive coefficients in the OLS model reveals the dependency of the spatial distribution of cholera prevalence on the spatial neighbors of the communities. A flexible scan statistic identifies a most likely cluster with a higher relative risk (RR = 2.04, p < 0.01) compared with the cluster detected by circular scan statistic (RR = 1.60, p < 0.01). We conclude that surface water pollution through runoff from waste dump sites play a significant role in cholera infection.

  11. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-07-15

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ{sub o}r{sup 2}. Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed.

  12. Quasiequilibrium directed hopping in a time-dependent two-well periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Shapochkina, I. V.

    2011-11-01

    We consider the directed motion of a Brownian particle in a two-well periodic potential with time-varying barriers and wells described by arbitrary periodic functions of time, v(t) and u(t), alternating with the period τ. In the framework of the low-temperature kinetic approach, we obtain explicit formulas for the probabilities of finding the particle in potential wells, average velocity of directed motion, input energy Pin and useful work Pout against additionally introduced stationary load force f. These formulas are considerably simplified by the assumption of the quasiequilibrium regime of motion corresponding to small values of u(t) and f. It is shown that depending on the same or opposite parity of the functions v(t) and u(t) with respect to time reversal, the motion direction of a Brownian particle is retained or reversed under the reversal of the direction of movement along the (v-u) loop in the phase space of the functions v(t) and u(t), and the nondiagonal kinetic coefficients are mutually symmetric or antisymmetric. In the adiabatic limit τ→∞, the average velocity is proportional to τ-1 in two cases: (i) the above loop has a nonzero area, (ii) the functions v(t) and u(t) are proportional to each other (zero loop area) and include intervals of fast changes with small durations τ0 on the period τ of their variations. In both of these cases, the efficiency of energy conversion, η=Pout/Pin, tends to unity at large variations of the barriers v(t). In the second case, the deviation of η from unity can be split into two contributions: The former decreases exponentially with increasing amplitude v0 of v(t), while the latter is a small nonadiabatic correction proportional to v0-3/2. It is the nonadiabatic correction that limits high efficiencies at large variations of barriers.

  13. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation.

    PubMed

    Moya, Esteban A; Arias, Paulina; Varela, Carlos; Oyarce, María P; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of carotid body (CB) chemosensory potentiation and systemic hypertension induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea. We tested whether peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a highly reactive nitrogen species, is involved in the enhanced CB oxygen chemosensitivity and the hypertension during CIH. Accordingly, we studied effects of Ebselen, an ONOO(-) scavenger, on 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (3-NT-ir) in the CB, the CB chemosensory discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) in rats exposed to CIH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH (5% O2, 12 times/h, 8 h/day) for 7 days. Ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administrated using osmotic minipumps and BP measured with radiotelemetry. Compared to the sham animals, CIH-treated rats showed increased 3-NT-ir within the CB, enhanced CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia, increased BP response to acute hypoxia, and hypertension. Rats treated with Ebselen and exposed to CIH displayed a significant reduction in 3-NT-ir levels (60.8 ± 14.9 versus 22.9 ± 4.2 a.u.), reduced CB chemosensory response to 5% O2 (266.5 ± 13.4 versus 168.6 ± 16.8 Hz), and decreased mean BP (116.9 ± 13.2 versus 82.1 ± 5.1 mmHg). Our results suggest that CIH-induced CB chemosensory potentiation and hypertension are critically dependent on ONOO(-) formation.

  14. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Esteban A.; Arias, Paulina; Varela, Carlos; Oyarce, María P.; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of carotid body (CB) chemosensory potentiation and systemic hypertension induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea. We tested whether peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a highly reactive nitrogen species, is involved in the enhanced CB oxygen chemosensitivity and the hypertension during CIH. Accordingly, we studied effects of Ebselen, an ONOO− scavenger, on 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (3-NT-ir) in the CB, the CB chemosensory discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) in rats exposed to CIH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH (5% O2, 12 times/h, 8 h/day) for 7 days. Ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administrated using osmotic minipumps and BP measured with radiotelemetry. Compared to the sham animals, CIH-treated rats showed increased 3-NT-ir within the CB, enhanced CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia, increased BP response to acute hypoxia, and hypertension. Rats treated with Ebselen and exposed to CIH displayed a significant reduction in 3-NT-ir levels (60.8 ± 14.9 versus 22.9 ± 4.2 a.u.), reduced CB chemosensory response to 5% O2 (266.5 ± 13.4 versus 168.6 ± 16.8 Hz), and decreased mean BP (116.9 ± 13.2 versus 82.1 ± 5.1 mmHg). Our results suggest that CIH-induced CB chemosensory potentiation and hypertension are critically dependent on ONOO− formation. PMID:26798430

  15. Evaluating the Age-Dependent Potential for Protein Deposition in Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Daulat R.; Wecke, Christian; Sharifi, Ahmad R.; Liebert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Growth rates of fast-growing chickens are reduced by a higher ambient temperature (AT) because of difficulties in dissipating heat through the feather coverage. Naked neck meat type genotypes could be helpful in increasing the tolerance for high AT. However, basic model parameters of this genotype necessary to further assess amino acid requirements are as yet unavailable. The experiments were conducted to estimate both the daily nitrogen maintenance requirement (NMR) and the potential for daily nitrogen retention NRmaxT). These observed model parameters provide the basic information to characterize the growth potential of the genotype for further application in modeling of individual amino acid requirements of naked neck meat type chicken. Abstract The introduction of the naked neck gene (Na) into modern meat type chicken is known to be helpful in increasing the tolerance for a high ambient temperature (AT) by reducing the feather coverage which allows for a higher level of heat dissipation compared to normally feathered (na/na) birds. In addition, reduced feather coverage could affect requirements for sulfur containing amino acids. As a prerequisite for further modeling of individual amino acid requirements, the daily N maintenance requirement (NMR) and the threshold value of daily N retention (NRmaxT) were determined. This was carried out using graded dietary protein supply and exponential modeling between N intake (NI) and N excretion (NEX) or N deposition (ND), respectively. Studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% of each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments during both the starter (days 10–20) and the grower period (days 25–35). Birds were randomly allotted to five diets with graded dietary protein supply but constant protein quality. The observed estimates depending on genotype, sex and age varied for NMR and NRmaxT from 224 to 395 and 2881

  16. Thermodynamic behavior of a model covalent material described by the environment-dependent interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keblinski, P.; Bazant, M. Z.; Dash, R. K.; Treacy, M. M.

    2002-08-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulations we study the thermodynamic behavior of a single-component covalent material described by the recently proposed environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). The parametrization of EDIP for silicon exhibits a range of unusual properties typically found in more complex materials, such as the existence of two structurally distinct disordered phases, a density increase upon melting of the low-temperature amorphous phase, and negative thermal-expansion coefficients for both the crystal (at high temperatures) and the amorphous phase (at all temperatures). Structural differences between the two disordered phases also lead to a first-order transition between them, which suggests the existence of a second critical point, as is believed to exist for amorphous forms of frozen water. For EDIP-Si, however, the unusual behavior is associated not only with the open nature of tetrahedral bonding but also with a competition between fourfold (covalent) and fivefold (metallic) coordination. The unusual behavior of the model and its unique ability to simulate the liquid/amorphous transition on molecular-dynamics time scales make it a suitable prototype for fundamental studies of anomalous thermodynamics in disordered systems.

  17. [Bisphenol A and hormone-dependent cancers: potential risk and mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rochefort, Henri

    2013-05-01

    Being concerned by the increasing incidence of breast, prostate and testicular cancers, we overviewed the literature on the potential carcinogenic effect of endocrine disruptors (ED). It is extremely difficult to obtain the epidemiological proof of a carcinogenic effect of one ED in human for multi-factorial diseases and the high number of confusing factors. However, many experimental studies in rodents on bis-phenol A (BPA) and its assay in human blood and urine, strongly suggest that BPA might increase the risk of hormone dependant cancers. Contrary to the mitogenic effect of estradiol, directly mediated in mammary cells by the classical nuclear estrogen receptor α, the mechanisms of the deleterious effect of BPA at low doses and in utero remain unknown since the molecular and cellular target(s) have not been defined. Based on all deleterious effects of BPA, France has banned the use of BPA in all food packaging. This should force the food industry to collaborate with members of public research to rapidly find safer substitutes to BPA. PMID:23732105

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  19. Prevalence of and potential influencing factors for alcohol dependence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Anderson, Peter; Barry, Joe; Dimitrov, Plamen; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Feijão, Fernanda; Frick, Ulrich; Gual, Antoni; Gmel, Gerrit; Kraus, Ludwig; Marmet, Simon; Raninen, Jonas; Rehm, Maximilien X; Scafato, Emanuele; Shield, Kevin D; Trapencieris, Marcis; Gmel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs), and alcohol dependence (AD) in particular, are prevalent and associated with a large burden of disability and mortality. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of AD in the European Union (EU), Iceland, Norway, and Switzerland for the year 2010, and to investigate potential influencing factors. The 1-year prevalence of AD in the EU was estimated at 3.4% among people 18-64 years of age in Europe (women 1.7%, men 5.2%), resulting in close to 11 million affected people. Taking into account all people of all ages, AD, abuse and harmful use resulted in an estimate of 23 million affected people. Prevalence of AD varied widely between European countries, and was significantly impacted by drinking cultures and social norms. Correlations with level of drinking and other drinking variables and with major known outcomes of heavy drinking, such as liver cirrhosis or injury, were moderate. These results suggest a need to rethink the definition of AUDs.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Nakakura, Eric K; Bova, G Steven; Isaacs, John T; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2006-08-01

    We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a known regulator of migration in neuronal development, plays an important role in prostate cancer motility and metastasis. P35, an activator of CDK5 that is indicative of its activity, is expressed in a panel of human and rat prostate cancer cell lines, and is also expressed in 87.5% of the human metastatic prostate cancers we examined. Blocking of CDK5 activity with a dominant-negative CDK5 construct, small interfering RNA, or roscovitine resulted in changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton, loss of cellular polarity, and loss of motility. Expression of a dominant-negative CDK5 in the highly metastatic Dunning AT6.3 prostate cancer cell line also greatly impaired invasive capacity. CDK5 activity was important for spontaneous metastasis in vivo; xenografts of AT6.3 cells expressing dominant-negative CDK5 had less than one-fourth the number of lung metastases exhibited by AT6.3 cells expressing the empty vector. These results show that CDK5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential in prostate cancer.

  1. Brain-state dependent uncoupling of BOLD and local field potentials in laminar olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ling; Li, Bo; Wu, Ruiqi; Li, Anan; Xu, Fuqiang

    2014-09-19

    The neural activities of the olfactory bulb (OB) can be modulated significantly by internal brain states. While blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) has been extensively applied to study OB in small animals, the relationship between BOLD signals and electrophysiological signals remains to be elucidated. Our recent study has revealed a complex relationship between BOLD and local field potentials (LFP) signals in different OB layers during odor stimulation. However, no study has been performed to compare these two types of signals under global brain states. Here, the changes of BOLD and LFP signals in the glomerular, mitral cell, and granular cell layers of the OB under different brain states, which were induced by different concentrations of isoflurane, were sequentially acquired using electrode array and high-resolution MRI. It was found that under deeper anesthesia, the LFP powers in all layers were decreased but the BOLD signals were unexpectedly increased. Furthermore, the decreases of LFP powers were layer-independent, but the increases of BOLD signal were layer-specific, with the order of glomerular>mitral cell>granular cell layer. The results provide new evidence that the direct neural activity levels might not be correlated well with BOLD signals in some cases, and remind us that cautions should be taken to use BOLD signals as the index of neural activities.

  2. Size-dependent effect of zinc oxide on toxicity and inflammatory potential of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Devashri; Kannan, G M; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanomedicines, it is important to understand their potential immunotoxicity. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have several applications in the pharmaceutical and biomedicine industries. This study investigates the effect of particles size (nano and micro) of ZnO on viability, phagocytosis, and cytokine induction in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, a model of the innate immune system. Cells were incubated with nano (approximately 100 nm) and micro (approximately 5 μm) sized ZnO particles in a concentration range of 10-100 μg/ml. The parameters measured included the MTT assay, phagocytosis assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gene expression, and DNA analysis. ZnO particles significantly decreased cell viability in a size- and concentration-dependent manner associated with significant alterations in phagocytic capacity of monocytes. Exposure of THP-1 cells to both sizes of ZnO stimulated and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6, as well as chemokine IL-8, and upregulated the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 genes. However, ZnO particles did not markedly affect monocytes DNA. Collectively, these results suggest higher propensity of nano ZnO particles in inducing cytotoxicity and inflammation in human monocytes regardless of micro size, and caution needs to be taken concerning their biological application. PMID:24555677

  3. Comparison of the potential dependence of the surface-enhanced raman effect at colloid silver particles and bulk silver electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, H.; Gerischer, H.; Pettinger, B.

    1982-01-01

    The potential dependence of surface-enhanccd Raman signals from pyridine adsorbed onto silver sol particles is identical to that from pyridine adsorbed on flat silver electrodes. Variation of the potential at the interface silver sol particle/electrolyte was achieved by adding the redox system europiums 3+/europium 2+ and varying the concentration ratio.

  4. Potential and flux field landscape theory. I. Global stability and dynamics of spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2013-09-28

    We established a potential and flux field landscape theory to quantify the global stability and dynamics of general spatially dependent non-equilibrium deterministic and stochastic systems. We extended our potential and flux landscape theory for spatially independent non-equilibrium stochastic systems described by Fokker-Planck equations to spatially dependent stochastic systems governed by general functional Fokker-Planck equations as well as functional Kramers-Moyal equations derived from master equations. Our general theory is applied to reaction-diffusion systems. For equilibrium spatially dependent systems with detailed balance, the potential field landscape alone, defined in terms of the steady state probability distribution functional, determines the global stability and dynamics of the system. The global stability of the system is closely related to the topography of the potential field landscape in terms of the basins of attraction and barrier heights in the field configuration state space. The effective driving force of the system is generated by the functional gradient of the potential field alone. For non-equilibrium spatially dependent systems, the curl probability flux field is indispensable in breaking detailed balance and creating non-equilibrium condition for the system. A complete characterization of the non-equilibrium dynamics of the spatially dependent system requires both the potential field and the curl probability flux field. While the non-equilibrium potential field landscape attracts the system down along the functional gradient similar to an electron moving in an electric field, the non-equilibrium flux field drives the system in a curly way similar to an electron moving in a magnetic field. In the small fluctuation limit, the intrinsic potential field as the small fluctuation limit of the potential field for spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems, which is closely related to the steady state probability distribution functional, is

  5. Theoretical study of a screened Hartree–Fock exchange potential using position-dependent atomic dielectric constants

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito

    2015-02-21

    Dielectric-dependent screened Hartree–Fock (HF) exchange potential and Slater-formula have been reported, where the ratio of the HF exchange term mixed into potentials is inversely proportional to the dielectric constant of the target semiconductor. This study introduces a position-dependent dielectric constant method in which the dielectric constant is partitioned between the atoms in a semiconductor. These partitioned values differ depending on the electrostatic environment surrounding the atoms and lead to position-dependent atomic dielectric constants. These atomic dielectric constants provide atomic orbital-based matrix elements for the screened exchange potentials. Energy band structures of several semiconductors and insulators are also presented to validate this approach.

  6. Modeling and experiments to explain the potential dependency of an UHSS to hydrogen environment assisted cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehler, Beth A.

    Modern ultra high strength steels have been developed with outstanding combinations of strength and fracture toughness but lack intrinsic corrosion resistance. Such steels are used by the military for aircraft components such as landing gears but require coatings and cathodic protection which can lead to various rates of hydrogen production depending on material, geometry, and electro(chemistry). The susceptibility of such steels to internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) limits their use in marine environments. The objective of this research is to develop the understanding necessary to design coated ultra high strength steels that resist HEE when stressed in marine environments. The cause of HEE is the establishment of high diffusible hydrogen concentrations (CH,diff) at the crack tip. There is a window of applied potentials (Eapplied) where susceptibility to HEE is reduced because CH,diff is reduced. However, Eapplied itself does not yield insight as to the exact conditions at the crack tip. Ohmic potential drop and electrochemical/chemical reactions in the crack can lead to a significantly different environment at the crack tip than on the surface. The issues that hinder understanding of HEE center on the capability to quantify and ultimately predict crack tip hydrogen concentrations (C H,Tip) relative to critical concentrations that trigger fracture as a function of Eapplied. CH,tip was characterized using a multi-pronged approach. Scaling laws were developed to enable measurements of E and pH in a scaled-up crack as a function of the scaling parameter, x2/G and Eapplied . Such measurements were correlated with CH,diff using an experimentally determined hydrogen uptake law based on first order absorption laws and trapping theory. CH,diff values were then used as inputs into existing micromechanical models for KTH and da/dtII to predict cracking susceptibility. The scientific contributions of this work include the

  7. Lipogenic potential of liver from morbidly obese patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, H.A.; McLendon, V.D.; Carpenter, J.W.; Marks, R.H.; Legett, N.; O'Brien, K.; Caro, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Intra-abdominal liver biopsies were obtained during surgery from fasted obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), obese normoglycemic controls, and lean controls. Lipid synthesis was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes and liver homogenates from the three groups of subjects. Incorporation of 3H2O into the lipids of hepatocytes was determined in the absence and presence of insulin (0.1 mumol/L). The activities of five enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, and the incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate into lipids were determined in liver homogenates. Basal lipid synthesis by hepatocytes was not different in the three groups of patients. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis by 8% +/- 30% in the lean controls, 33% +/- 8% in the obese controls and 17% +/- 6% in the NIDDM patients. No significant differences in the activities of the five enzymes that are involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis among the three groups of patients were observed. Similarly, incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate by liver homogenates, in the presence of saturating or submaximal concentrations of fatty acids, did not differ among the three groups. These results show that under the experimental conditions of this study, including the fasted state of the patients, the basal capacity of liver of NIDDM patients to synthesize fatty acids or glycerides is the same as that of liver from obese and lean controls. Thus, it is likely that an increase in fatty acid flux into a liver with normal lipogenic potential may contribute to the increased synthesis of triglycerides by the liver of these patients in vivo.

  8. Time and Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Local Field Potential Synchronization by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Clinton B.; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP) recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective), low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective) and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR), ventroanterior thalamus (VA), primary motor cortex (M1), and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic effects

  9. Event-Related Potential Effects of Object Repetition Depend on Attention and Part-Whole Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, Angela; Thoma, Volker; de Fockert, Jan W.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spatial attention and part-whole configuration on recognition of repeated objects were investigated with behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Short-term repetition effects were measured for probe objects as a function of whether a preceding prime object was shown as an intact image or coarsely scrambled (split into two halves) and whether or not it had been attended during the prime display. In line with previous behavioral experiments, priming effects were observed from both intact and split primes for attended objects, but only from intact (repeated same-view) objects when they were unattended. These behavioral results were reflected in ERP waveforms at occipital–temporal locations as more negative-going deflections for repeated items in the time window between 220 and 300 ms after probe onset (N250r). Attended intact images showed generally more enhanced repetition effects than split ones. Unattended images showed repetition effects only when presented in an intact configuration, and this finding was limited to the right-hemisphere electrodes. Repetition effects in earlier (before 200 ms) time windows were limited to attended conditions at occipito-temporal sites during the N1, a component linked to the encoding of object structure, while repetition effects at central locations during the same time window (P150) were found for attended and unattended probes but only when repeated in the same intact configuration. The data indicate that view-generalization is mediated by a combination of analytic (part-based) representations and automatic view-dependent representations. PMID:27721749

  10. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  11. Efficient methods for linear Schrödinger equation in the semiclassical regime with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Philipp; Iserles, Arieh; Kropielnicka, Karolina; Singh, Pranav

    2016-09-01

    We build efficient and unitary (hence stable) methods for the solution of the linear time-dependent Schrödinger equation with explicitly time-dependent potentials in a semiclassical regime. The Magnus-Zassenhaus schemes presented here are based on a combination of the Zassenhaus decomposition (Bader et al. 2014 Found. Comput. Math. 14, 689-720. (doi:10.1007/s10208-013-9182-8)) with the Magnus expansion of the time-dependent Hamiltonian. We conclude with numerical experiments.

  12. A terrain-dependent reference atmosphere determination method for available potential energy calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    An iterative technique that determines the reference atmosphere which incorporates the effects of uneven surface topography is presented. This method has been successfully applied in several available potential energy studies. An alternative method due to Taylor is also evaluated. While Taylor presented excellent continuous formulations of the available potential energy that include topography, his method for determining the reference atmosphere distributions failed to provide the accuracy needed to produce reliable available potential energy estimates. Since topography has a significant influence on the general circulation, it is important to employ techniques that incorporate its effects in the determination of available potential energy.

  13. Context-dependent symbioses and their potential roles in wildlife diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Alford, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in ecology, evolution and medicine that both the nature (commensal, parasitic and mutualistic) and outcome (symbiont fitness, survival) of symbiotic interactions are often context-dependent. Less is known about the importance of context-dependence in symbioses involved in wildlife disease. We review variable symbioses, and use the amphibian disease chytridiomycosis to demonstrate how understanding context-dependence can improve the understanding and management of wildlife diseases. In chytridiomycosis, the host–pathogen interaction is context-dependent; it is strongly affected by environmental temperature. Skin bacteria can also modify the interaction; some bacteria reduce amphibians' susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. Augmentation of protective microbes is being considered as a possible management tool, but informed application of bioaugmentation requires understanding of how the interactions between host, beneficial bacteria and pathogen depend upon environmental context. The community-level response of the amphibian skin microbiota to environmental conditions may explain the relatively narrow range of environmental conditions in which past declines have occurred. Environmental context affects virulence and the protection provided by mutualists in other host–pathogen systems, including threatened bats and corals. Increased focus on context-dependence in interactions between wildlife and their symbionts is likely to be crucial to the future investigation and management of emerging diseases of wildlife. PMID:22237907

  14. Are distance-dependent statistical potentials considering three interacting bodies superior to two-body statistical potentials for protein structure prediction?

    PubMed

    Ghomi, Hamed Tabatabaei; Thompson, Jared J; Lill, Markus A

    2014-10-01

    Distance-based statistical potentials have long been used to model condensed matter systems, e.g. as scoring functions in differentiating native-like protein structures from decoys. These scoring functions are based on the assumption that the total free energy of the protein can be calculated as the sum of pairwise free energy contributions derived from a statistical analysis of pair-distribution functions. However, this fundamental assumption has been challenged theoretically. In fact the free energy of a system with N particles is only exactly related to the N-body distribution function. Based on this argument coarse-grained multi-body statistical potentials have been developed to capture higher-order interactions. Having a coarse representation of the protein and using geometric contacts instead of pairwise interaction distances renders these models insufficient in modeling details of multi-body effects. In this study, we investigated if extending distance-dependent pairwise atomistic statistical potentials to corresponding interaction functions that are conditional on a third interacting body, defined as quasi-three-body statistical potentials, could model details of three-body interactions. We also tested if this approach could improve the predictive capabilities of statistical scoring functions for protein structure prediction. We analyzed the statistical dependency between two simultaneous pairwise interactions and showed that there is surprisingly little if any dependency of a third interacting site on pairwise atomistic statistical potentials. Also the protein structure prediction performance of these quasi-three-body potentials is comparable with their corresponding two-body counterparts. The scoring functions developed in this study showed better or comparable performances compared to some widely used scoring functions for protein structure prediction. PMID:25212727

  15. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process.

    PubMed

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cárdenas, Ana M; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2-0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies.

  16. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  17. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process.

    PubMed

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cárdenas, Ana M; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2-0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  18. Isolation of Bacteria Whose Growth Is Dependent on High Levels of CO2 and Implications of Their Potential Diversity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kenji; Tagami, Yudai; Kamihara, Yuka; Shiratori, Hatsumi; Takano, Hideaki; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2008-01-01

    Although some bacteria require an atmosphere with high CO2 levels for their growth, CO2 is not generally supplied to conventional screening cultures. Here, we isolated 84 bacterial strains exhibiting high-CO2 dependence. Their phylogenetic affiliations imply that high-CO2 culture has potential as an effective method to isolate unknown microorganisms. PMID:18487395

  19. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  20. The dependence of potential well formation on the magnetic field strength and electron injection current in a polywell device

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, S. Gummersall, D.; Carr, M.; Khachan, J.

    2014-09-15

    A capacitive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential in a polywell device in order to observe the dependence of potential well formation on magnetic field strength, electron injection current, and polywell voltage bias. The effectiveness of the capacitive probe in a high energy electron plasma was determined by measuring the plasma potential of a planar diode with an axial magnetic field. The capacitive probe was translated along the axis of one of the field coils of the polywell, and the spatial profile of the potential well was measured. The confinement time of electrons in the polywell was estimated with a simple analytical model which used the experimentally observed potential well depths, as well as a simulation of the electron trajectories using particle orbit theory.

  1. Theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems: Application to electrode potential dependence of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2014-09-28

    We propose a theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems. The fundamental equation to be solved is based on a time-dependent density functional theory in real-time and real-space in combination with its finite temperature formula treating an electrode potential. Solvation effects are evaluated by a dielectric continuum theory. The approach allows us to treat optical response in electrochemical systems at the atomistic level of theory. We have applied the method to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4-mercaptopyridine on an Ag electrode surface. It is shown that the SERS intensity has a peak as a function of the electrode potential. Furthermore, the real-space computational approach facilitates visualization of variation of the SERS intensity depending on an electrode potential.

  2. Unraveling the potential and pore-size dependent capacitance of slit-shaped graphitic carbon pores in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, R K; Biener, M M; Suss, M E; Merrill, M D; Stadermann, M; Santiago, J G; Baumann, T F; Biener, J; Striolo, A

    2013-02-21

    Understanding and leveraging physicochemical processes at the pore scale are believed to be essential to future performance improvements of supercapacitors and capacitive desalination (CD) cells. Here, we report on a combination of electrochemical experiments and fully atomistic simulations to study the effect of pore size and surface charge density on the capacitance of graphitic nanoporous carbon electrodes. Specifically, we used cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to study the effect of potential and pore size on the capacitance of nanoporous carbon foams. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the pore-size dependent accumulation of aqueous electrolytes in slit-shaped graphitic carbon pores of different widths (0.65 to 1.6 nm). Experimentally, we observe a pronounced increase of the capacitance of sub-nm pores as the applied potential window gets wider, from a few F g(-1) for narrow potential ranges (-0.3 to 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl) to ~40 F g(-1) for wider potential windows (-0.9 V to 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl). By contrast, the capacitance of wider pores does not depend significantly on the applied potential window. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that the penetration of ions into pores becomes more difficult with decreasing pore width and increasing strength of the hydration shell. Consistent with our experimental results, we observe a pore- and ion-size dependent threshold-like charging behavior when the pore width becomes comparable to the size of the hydrated ion (0.65 nm pores for Na(+) and 0.79 nm pores for Cl(-) ions). The observed pore-size and potential dependent accumulation of ions in slit-shaped carbon pores can be explained by the hydration structure of the ions entering the charged pores. The results are discussed in view of their effect on energy-storage and desalination efficiency.

  3. Softness dependence of the anomalies for the continuous shouldered well potential.

    PubMed

    Vilaseca, Pol; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2010-08-28

    By molecular dynamic simulations we study a system of particles interacting through a continuous isotropic pairwise core-softened potential consisting of a repulsive shoulder and an attractive well. The model displays a phase diagram with three fluid phases: a gas-liquid critical point, a liquid-liquid critical point, and anomalies in density, diffusion, and structure. The hierarchy of the anomalies is the same as for water. Here we study in a systematic way the effect on the anomalies of varying the softness of the potential. We find that, making the soft-core steeper and more penetrable, the regions of density and diffusion anomalies contract in the T-rho plane, while the region of structural anomaly is weakly affected. Therefore, a liquid can have anomalous structural behavior without having density or diffusion anomalies. We show that, by considering as effective distances those corresponding to the maxima of the first two peaks of the radial distribution function g(r) in the high-density liquid, we can generalize to continuous two-scale potentials a criterion for the occurrence of the anomalies of density and diffusion, originally proposed for discontinuous potentials. However, we observe that the knowledge of the structural behavior within the first two coordination shells of the liquid is not enough to establish, in general, the occurrence of the anomalies. By introducing the density derivative of the cumulative order integral of the excess entropy, measuring shell by shell the amount of order in the liquid, we show that the anomalous behavior is regulated by the structural order at distances as large as the fourth coordination shell. By comparing the results for different softness of the potential, we conclude that the disappearance of the density and diffusion anomalies for the steeper potentials is due to a more structured short-range order. All these results increase our understanding on how, knowing the interaction potential, we can evaluate the

  4. Activity-dependent potentiation and depression of visual cortical responses to optic nerve stimulation in kittens.

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Tsumoto, T; Hata, Y

    1992-11-01

    1. To see whether long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy are induced in the developing visual cortex (VC), field potentials evoked by test stimulation given alternatively to each of the optic nerves (ONs) were recorded from VC of kittens ranging in age from 4 to 8 wk. In some experiments, field potentials were recorded simultaneously from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in addition to VC. 2. Tetanic stimulation was applied to one of the ONs for 1-60 min at 5 Hz. Homosynaptic potentiation of cortical responses, defined as an increase lasting > 2.5 h in the cortical field potential evoked by test stimulation of the ON that was tetanized, was induced without any changes in LGN responses in 3 of the 12 kittens tested. Heterosynaptic depression, defined as a decrease lasting > 0.5 h in the field potential evoked by stimulation of the ON that was not tetanized, was also induced in two of those three kittens. 3. To elucidate a role of inputs originating from spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells in induction of potentiation and depression in the cortex, tetrodotoxin (TTX) was injected into both eyes of 11 kittens. After we confirmed the suppression of retinal activity by TTX, tetanic stimulation was applied to ON. Homosynaptic potentiation of cortical responses was induced in 6 of the 11 kittens, and the ratio of the mean amplitude of posttetanic responses to that of pretetanic responses for the 11 kittens was on average larger than that for the 12 control kittens. Heterosynaptic depression was not observed in any of the 11 kittens. 4. To see a role of postsynaptic activity in induction of potentiation and depression, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was applied continuously to the VC by an infusion pump in 10 kittens. Tetanic stimulation was given to ON while cortical activities were suppressed by GABA. After recovery of cortical activities, homosynaptic depression was found to be induced in 3 of the 10 kittens, but homosynaptic potentiation was not

  5. Iontophoresis from a micropipet into a porous medium depends on the ζ-potential of the medium.

    PubMed

    Guy, Yifat; Faraji, Amir H; Gavigan, Colleen A; Strein, Timothy G; Weber, Stephen G

    2012-03-01

    Iontophoresis uses electricity to deliver solutes into living tissue. Often, iontophoretic ejections from micropipets into brain tissue are confined to millisecond pulses for highly localized delivery, but longer pulses are common. As hippocampal tissue has a ζ-potential of approximately -22 mV, we hypothesized that, in the presence of the electric field resulting from the iontophoretic current, electroosmotic flow in the tissue would carry solutes considerably farther than diffusion alone. A steady state solution to this mass transport problem predicts a spherically symmetrical solute concentration profile with the characteristic distance of the profile depending on the ζ-potential of the medium, the current density at the tip, the tip size, and the solute electrophoretic mobility and diffusion coefficient. Of course, the ζ-potential of the tissue is defined by immobilized components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell-surface functional groups. As such, it cannot be changed at will. Therefore, the effect of the ζ-potential of the porous medium on ejections is examined using poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels with various magnitudes of ζ-potential, including that similar to hippocampal brain tissue. We demonstrated that nearly neutral fluorescent dextran (3 and 70 kD) solute penetration distance in the hydrogels and OHSCs depends on the magnitude of the applied current, solute properties, and, in the case of the hydrogels, the ζ-potential of the matrix. Steady state solute ejection profiles in gels and cultures of hippocampus can be predicted semiquantitatively.

  6. Pyridoxal-phosphate dependent mycobacterial cysteine synthases: Structure, mechanism and potential as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Robert; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Schneider, Gunter

    2015-09-01

    The alarming increase of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains poses a severe threat to human health. Chemotherapy is particularly challenging because M. tuberculosis can persist in the lungs of infected individuals; estimates of the WHO indicate that about 1/3 of the world population is infected with latent tuberculosis providing a large reservoir for relapse and subsequent spread of the disease. Persistent M. tuberculosis shows considerable tolerance towards conventional antibiotics making treatment particularly difficult. In this phase the bacilli are exposed to oxygen and nitrogen radicals generated as part of the host response and redox-defense mechanisms are thus vital for the survival of the pathogen. Sulfur metabolism and de novo cysteine biosynthesis have been shown to be important for the redox homeostasis in persistent M. tuberculosis and these pathways could provide promising targets for novel antibiotics for the treatment of the latent form of the disease. Recent research has provided evidence for three de novo metabolic routes of cysteine biosynthesis in M. tuberculosis, each with a specific PLP dependent cysteine synthase with distinct substrate specificities. In this review we summarize our present understanding of these pathways, with a focus on the advances on functional and mechanistic characterization of mycobacterial PLP dependent cysteine synthases, their role in the various pathways to cysteine, and first attempts to develop specific inhibitors of mycobacterial cysteine biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  7. Current and potential pharmacological treatment options for maintenance therapy in opioid-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Tetrault, Jeanette M; Fiellin, David A

    2012-01-22

    Opioid dependence, manifesting as addiction to heroin and pharmaceutical opioids is increasing. Internationally, there are an estimated 15.6 million illicit opioid users. The global economic burden of opioid dependence is profound both in terms of HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission, direct healthcare costs, and indirectly through criminal activity, absenteeism and lost productivity. Opioid agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine, that stabilize neuronal systems and provide narcotic blockade are the most effective treatments. Prolonged provision of these medications, defined as maintenance treatment, typically produces improved outcomes when compared with short-duration tapers and withdrawal. The benefits of opioid agonist maintenance include decreased illicit drug use, improved retention in treatment, decreased HIV risk behaviours and decreased criminal behaviour. While regulations vary by country, these medications are becoming increasingly available internationally, especially in regions experiencing rapid transmission of HIV due to injection drug use. In this review, we describe the rationale for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, discuss emerging uses of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone and buprenorphine, and provide a description of the experimental therapies.

  8. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-31

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H{sub 2} molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  9. LIFE-STAGE DEPENDENT DOSIMETRY AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON RISK ASSESSMENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describi...

  10. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  11. Children's Performance on Pseudoword Repetition Depends on Auditory Trace Quality: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceponiene, Rita; Service, Elisabet; Kurjenluoma, Sanna; Cheour, Marie; Naatanen, Risto

    1999-01-01

    Compared the mismatch-negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related brain potentials to explore the relationship between phonological short-term memory and auditory-sensory processing in 7- to 9-year olds scoring the highest and lowest on a pseudoword repetition test. Found that high and low repeaters differed in MMN amplitude to speech…

  12. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement.

  13. Phase separation in optical lattices in a spin-dependent external potential

    SciTech Connect

    A-Hai Chen; Gao Xianlong

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the phase separation in one-dimensional Fermi gases on optical lattices. The density distributions and the magnetization are calculated by means of the density-matrix renormalization method. The phase separation between spin-up and spin-down atoms is induced by the interplay of the spin-dependent harmonic confinement and the strong repulsive interaction between intercomponent fermions. We find the existence of a critical repulsive interaction strength above which the phase separation evolves. By increasing the trap imbalance, the composite phase of the Mott-insulating core is changed into one of the ferromagnetic insulating core, which is incompressible and originates from the Pauli exclusion principle.

  14. Light-dependent cation gradients and electrical potential in Halobacterium halobium cell envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.; Macdonald, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles can be prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes, which contain properly oriented bacteriorhodopsin and which extrude H(+) during illumination. The pH difference that is generated across the membranes is accompanied by an electrical potential of 90 to 100 mV (interior negative) and the movements of other cations. Among these is the efflux of Na(+), which proceeds against its electrochemical potential. The relationship between the size and direction of the light-induced pH gradient and the rate of depletion of Na(+) from the vesicles, as well as other evidence, suggest that the active Na(+) extrusion is facilitated by a membrane component that exchanges H(+) for Na(+) with a stoichiometry greater than 1. The gradients of H(+) and Na(+) are thus coupled to one another. The Na(+) gradient (efflux much larger than influx), which arises during illumination, plays a major role in energizing the active transport of amino acids.

  15. Xenin-25 Potentiates Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Action via a Novel Cholinergic Relay Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wice, Burton M.; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L.; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A.; Althage, Matthew C.; Ford, Eric L.; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A.; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, “GIP/DT” animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the β-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in β-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  16. Xenin-25 potentiates glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide action via a novel cholinergic relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wice, Burton M; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Althage, Matthew C; Ford, Eric L; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J; Ladenson, Jack H; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, "GIP/DT" animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the beta-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in beta-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM. PMID:20421298

  17. Calmodulin has the Potential to Function as a Ca2+-Dependent Adaptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Rainaldi, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a versatile Ca2+-binding protein that regulates the activity of numerous effector proteins in response to Ca2+ signals. Several CaM-dependent regulatory mechanisms have been identified, including autoinhibitory domain displacement, sequestration of a ligand-binding site, active site reorganization, and target protein dimerization. We recently showed that the N- and C-lobes of animal and plant CaM isoforms could independently and sequentially bind to target peptides derived from the CaM-binding domain of Nicotiana tabacum mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (NtMKP1), to form a 2:1 peptide:CaM complex. This suggests that CaM might facilitate the dimerization of NtMKP1, although the dimerization mechanism is distinct from the previously described simultaneous binding of other target peptides to CaM. The independent and sequential binding of the NtMKP1 peptides to CaM also suggests an alternative plausible scenario in which the C-lobe of CaM remains tethered to NtMKP1, and the N-lobe is free to recruit a second target protein to the complex, such as an NtMKP1 target. Thus, we hypothesize that CaM may be capable of functioning as a Ca2+-dependent adaptor or recruiter protein. PMID:19704657

  18. On the Josephson effect in a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a density-dependent gauge potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M. J.; Valiente, M.; Öhberg, P.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the coherent dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a double well, subject to a density-dependent gauge potential. Further, we derive the nonlinear Josephson equations that allow us to understand the many-body system in terms of a classical Hamiltonian that describes the motion of a nonrigid pendulum with an initial angular offset. Finally we analyse the phase-space trajectories of the system, and describe how the self-trapping is affected by the presence of an interacting gauge potential.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Exponential dependence of potential barrier height on biased voltages of inorganic/organic static induction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zhang; Jianhong, Yang; Xueyuan, Cai; Zaixing, Wang

    2010-04-01

    The exponential dependence of the potential barrier height phic on the biased voltages of the inorganic/organic static induction transistor (SIT/OSIT) through a normalized approach in the low-current regime is presented. It shows a more accurate description than the linear expression of the potential barrier height. Through the verification of the numerical calculated and experimental results, the exponential dependence of phic on the applied biases can be used to derive the I-V characteristics. For both SIT and OSIT, the calculated results, using the presented relationship, are agreeable with the experimental results. Compared to the previous linear relationship, the exponential description of phic can contribute effectively to reduce the error between the theoretical and experimental results of the I-V characteristics.

  20. Temperature dependence and independence of effects of pentobarbital on visual evoked potentials of rats.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, B E; Krekow, L K

    1999-01-01

    Visual cortex flash evoked potentials (FEPs), pattern reversal evoked potentials (PREPs), and body temperature were measured in hooded rats following IP injections on separate days of saline, and of 15 and 30 mg pentobarbital/kg body weight. Two experiments were performed, differentiated by standard (23 degrees C) and warm (31 degrees C) room temperatures. The 30 mg/kg dose produced hypothermia of 2.6 degrees C in the standard environment, but not in the warm environment. Early components of FEPs were generally increased in amplitude by the 15 mg/kg dose, and decreased by the 30 mg/kg dose at 23 degrees C. At 31 degrees C, the 30 mg/kg dose did not decrease early component amplitude, suggesting that hypothermia can potentiate some effects of pentobarbital. Amplitudes of late FEP components were depressed at both ambient temperatures. The main PREP components N1P1 and P1N3 were increased in amplitude by the 15 mg/kg dose, but returned to near baseline levels at 30 mg/kg, at both temperatures. PREP component N2P2 was reduced in amplitude by the 30 mg/kg dose only at 23 degrees C. Treatment with 30 mg/kg pentobarbital increased FEP and PREP latencies at both ambient temperatures, but the magnitudes of the increases at 31 degrees C were typically less than half those observed at 23 degrees C. These results indicate that hypothermia contributes to some pentobarbital-induced changes in both FEPs and PREPs, but that pentobarbital also produces effects independent of hypothermia.

  1. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts.

  2. Temperature and pressure dependent Mott potentials and their influence on self-limiting oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Na; Zhou, Guangwen; Müller, Kathrin; Starr, David E.

    2012-10-01

    Classic Cabrera-Mott theory stipulates that the limited oxide-film growth results from electron tunneling from the metal through the oxide film to adsorbed oxygen. This leads to an electric field across the oxide film that assists ion migration for low-temperature oxide-film growth. Here, we show that the field-driven oxide-film growth can be manipulated via the temperature and pressure of oxidation. The magnitude of the self-generated electric field depends on the oxygen surface coverage that exhibits a Langmuir isotherm behavior with changes in temperature and oxygen pressure. These observations demonstrate the ability to tune an interfacial reaction via self-adaptation to its environment.

  3. Nonlinear pressure dependence of the interaction potential of dense protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Martin A; Markgraf, Jonas; Wieland, D C Florian; Sahle, Christoph J; Möller, Johannes; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2011-04-29

    The influence of pressure on the structure and protein-protein interaction potential of dense protein solutions was studied and analyzed using small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with a liquid state theoretical approach. The structural as well as the interaction parameters of dense lysozyme solutions are affected by pressure in a nonlinear way. The structural properties of water lead to a modification of the protein-protein interactions below 4 kbar, which might have significant consequences for the stability of proteins in extreme natural environments.

  4. Nonlinear pressure dependence of the interaction potential of dense protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Martin A; Markgraf, Jonas; Wieland, D C Florian; Sahle, Christoph J; Möller, Johannes; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2011-04-29

    The influence of pressure on the structure and protein-protein interaction potential of dense protein solutions was studied and analyzed using small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with a liquid state theoretical approach. The structural as well as the interaction parameters of dense lysozyme solutions are affected by pressure in a nonlinear way. The structural properties of water lead to a modification of the protein-protein interactions below 4 kbar, which might have significant consequences for the stability of proteins in extreme natural environments. PMID:21635065

  5. Electrochemical loading of TEM grids used for the study of potential dependent morphology of polyaniline nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Bhadu, Gopala Ram; Paul, Anirban; Perween, Mosarrat; Gupta, Rajeev; Chaudhari, Jayesh C; Srivastava, Divesh N

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemical method for loading electroactive materials over the TEM grid is reported. The protocol has been demonstrated using polyaniline as an example. The electroactive polymer was directly deposited over the Au TEM grid, used as working electrode in a 3 electrode electrochemical cell. The undisturbed as-deposited morphologies under the influence of various counter ions and ex situ electrochemical states have been studied and compared. Contrary to behaviour in bulk the individual polyaniline fibre was found thinner at anodic potentials. The movement of counter ions as a function of the electrochemical state of the polymer was studied using STEM-EDX elemental mapping. PMID:26694198

  6. Topological phases of two-component bosons in species-dependent artificial gauge potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Hai; Shi, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We study bosonic atoms with two internal states in artificial gauge potentials whose strengths are different for the two components. A series of topological phases for such systems is proposed using the composite fermion theory and the parton construction. It is found in exact diagonalization that some of the proposed states may be realized for simple contact interaction between bosons. The ground states and low-energy excitations of these states are modeled using trial wave functions. The effective field theories for these states are also constructed and reveal some interesting properties.

  7. Complex absorbing potential based Lorentzian fitting scheme and time dependent quantum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hang Kwok, Yanho; Chen, GuanHua; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Xiao

    2014-10-28

    Based on the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, a Lorentzian expansion scheme is developed to express the self-energy. The CAP-based Lorentzian expansion of self-energy is employed to solve efficiently the Liouville-von Neumann equation of one-electron density matrix. The resulting method is applicable for both tight-binding and first-principles models and is used to simulate the transient currents through graphene nanoribbons and a benzene molecule sandwiched between two carbon-atom chains.

  8. Electrochemical loading of TEM grids used for the study of potential dependent morphology of polyaniline nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Bhadu, Gopala Ram; Paul, Anirban; Perween, Mosarrat; Gupta, Rajeev; Chaudhari, Jayesh C; Srivastava, Divesh N

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemical method for loading electroactive materials over the TEM grid is reported. The protocol has been demonstrated using polyaniline as an example. The electroactive polymer was directly deposited over the Au TEM grid, used as working electrode in a 3 electrode electrochemical cell. The undisturbed as-deposited morphologies under the influence of various counter ions and ex situ electrochemical states have been studied and compared. Contrary to behaviour in bulk the individual polyaniline fibre was found thinner at anodic potentials. The movement of counter ions as a function of the electrochemical state of the polymer was studied using STEM-EDX elemental mapping.

  9. Dynamic dependence of interaction potentials for keV atoms at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, A.; Adamov, G.; Wethekam, S.; Maass, K.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.

    2004-05-01

    He and N atoms are scattered with keV energies under a grazing angle of incidence from clean and flat Ag(111) and Al(111) surfaces. For incidence along low index crystallographic directions in the surface plane, atomic projectiles are steered by rows of atoms (''axial surface channeling'') giving rise to characteristic rainbows in their angular distribution. From the analysis of this effect we derive effective scattering potentials which reveal pronounced dynamical effects. We attribute our observation to the embedding energy for penetration of atoms in the electron gas of a metal.

  10. Context dependence of the event-related brain potential associated with reward and punishment.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Larsen, Jeff T; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2004-03-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is an event-related brain potential elicited by error commission and by presentation of feedback stimuli indicating incorrect performance. In this study, the authors report two experiments in which participants tried to learn to select between response options by trial and error, using feedback stimuli indicating monetary gains and losses. The results demonstrate that the amplitude of the ERN is determined by the value of the eliciting outcome relative to the range of outcomes possible, rather than by the objective value of the outcome. This result is discussed in terms of a recent theory that holds that the ERN reflects a reward prediction error signal associated with a neural system for reinforcement learning.

  11. Persistence of a Brownian particle in a time-dependent potential.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the persistence probability of a Brownian particle in a harmonic potential, which decays to zero at long times, leading to an unbounded motion of the Brownian particle. We consider two functional forms for the decay of the confinement, an exponential decay and an algebraic decay. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that for the case of the exponential relaxation, the dynamics of Brownian particle at short and long times are independent of the parameters of the relaxation. On the contrary, for the algebraic decay of the confinement, the dynamics at long times is determined by the exponent of the decay. Finally, using the two-time correlation function for the position of the Brownian particle, we construct the persistence probability for the Brownian walker in such a scenario.

  12. Adaptively biased molecular dynamics: An umbrella sampling method with a time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Volodymyr; Karpusenka, Vadzim; Moradi, Mahmoud; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    We discuss an adaptively biased molecular dynamics (ABMD) method for the computation of a free energy surface for a set of reaction coordinates. The ABMD method belongs to the general category of umbrella sampling methods with an evolving biasing potential. It is characterized by a small number of control parameters and an O(t) numerical cost with simulation time t. The method naturally allows for extensions based on multiple walkers and replica exchange mechanism. The workings of the method are illustrated with a number of examples, including sugar puckering, and free energy landscapes for polymethionine and polyproline peptides, and for a short β-turn peptide. ABMD has been implemented into the latest version (Case et al., AMBER 10; University of California: San Francisco, 2008) of the AMBER software package and is freely available to the simulation community.

  13. Serum cyclin-dependent kinase 9 is a potential biomarker of atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yeming; Zhao, Shanshan; Gong, Yaoqin; Hou, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Atherosclerosis was considered to be the single most important contributor to CAD. In this study, a distinct serum protein expression pattern in CAD patients was demonstrated by proteomic analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. In particular, CDK9 was found to be highly elevated in serum, monocytes and artery plaque samples of CAD patients. Furthermore, there was high infiltration of CD14+ monocytes/macrophages within artery plaques correlated with the expression of CDK9. Moreover, Flavopiridol (CDK9 inhibitor) could inhibit THP-1 cell (monocytic acute leukemia cell line) proliferation by targeting CDK9. Altogether, These findings indicate that CDK9 represent an important role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It may be a potential biomarker of atherosclerotic inflammation and offer insights into the pathophysiology and targeted therapy for atherosclerotic CAD. PMID:26636538

  14. Dependence of electrostatic potential distribution of Al2O3/Ge structure on Al2O3 thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Xiang, Jinjuan; Wang, Wenwu; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic potential distribution of Al2O3/Ge structure is investigated vs. Al2O3 thickness by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrostatic potential distribution is found to be Al2O3 thickness dependent. This interesting phenomenon is attributed to the appearance of gap states on Al2O3 surface (GSAl2O3) and its higher charge neutrality level (CNL) compared with the CNL of gap states at Al2O3/Ge interface (GSAl2O3/Ge), leading to electron transfer from GSAl2O3 to GSAl2O3/Ge. In the case of thicker Al2O3, fewer electrons transfer from GSAl2O3 to GSAl2O3/Ge, resulting in a larger potential drop across Al2O3 and XPS results.

  15. Cancellation of the N -composite-boson correlation energy under a BCS-like potential: A dimensionality-dependent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-09-01

    We use Richardson-Gaudin exact equations to derive the ground-state energy of N composite bosons (cobosons) interacting via a potential which acts between fermion pairs having zero center-of-mass momentum, that is, a potential similar to the reduced BCS potential used in conventional superconductivity. Through a density expansion, we show that while for two-dimensional (2D) systems, the N -coboson correlation energy undergoes a surprising cancellation which leaves the interaction part with an N (N -1 ) dependence only, such a cancellation does not exist in 1D, 3D, or 4D systems (which correspond to 2D parabolic traps) nor when the cobosons interact via a similar short-range potential but between pairs having an arbitrary center-of-mass momentum. This shows that the previously found cancellation which exists for the Cooper-pair correlation energy results not only from the very peculiar form of the reduced BCS potential, but also from a quite mysterious dimensionality effect, the density of states for Cooper pairs feeling the BCS potential being essentially constant, as for 2D systems.

  16. Dependency of global primary bioenergy crop potentials in 2050 on food systems, yields, biodiversity conservation and political stability.

    PubMed

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Plutzar, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The future bioenergy crop potential depends on (1) changes in the food system (food demand, agricultural technology), (2) political stability and investment security, (3) biodiversity conservation, (4) avoidance of long carbon payback times from deforestation, and (5) energy crop yields. Using a biophysical biomass-balance model, we analyze how these factors affect global primary bioenergy potentials in 2050. The model calculates biomass supply and demand balances for eleven world regions, eleven food categories, seven food crop types and two livestock categories, integrating agricultural forecasts and scenarios with a consistent global land use and NPP database. The TREND scenario results in a global primary bioenergy potential of 77 EJ/yr, alternative assumptions on food-system changes result in a range of 26-141 EJ/yr. Exclusion of areas for biodiversity conservation and inaccessible land in failed states reduces the bioenergy potential by up to 45%. Optimistic assumptions on future energy crop yields increase the potential by up to 48%, while pessimistic assumptions lower the potential by 26%. We conclude that the design of sustainable bioenergy crop production policies needs to resolve difficult trade-offs such as food vs. energy supply, renewable energy vs. biodiversity conservation or yield growth vs. reduction of environmental problems of intensive agriculture.

  17. Dependency of global primary bioenergy crop potentials in 2050 on food systems, yields, biodiversity conservation and political stability

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Plutzar, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The future bioenergy crop potential depends on (1) changes in the food system (food demand, agricultural technology), (2) political stability and investment security, (3) biodiversity conservation, (4) avoidance of long carbon payback times from deforestation, and (5) energy crop yields. Using a biophysical biomass-balance model, we analyze how these factors affect global primary bioenergy potentials in 2050. The model calculates biomass supply and demand balances for eleven world regions, eleven food categories, seven food crop types and two livestock categories, integrating agricultural forecasts and scenarios with a consistent global land use and NPP database. The TREND scenario results in a global primary bioenergy potential of 77 EJ/yr, alternative assumptions on food-system changes result in a range of 26–141 EJ/yr. Exclusion of areas for biodiversity conservation and inaccessible land in failed states reduces the bioenergy potential by up to 45%. Optimistic assumptions on future energy crop yields increase the potential by up to 48%, while pessimistic assumptions lower the potential by 26%. We conclude that the design of sustainable bioenergy crop production policies needs to resolve difficult trade-offs such as food vs. energy supply, renewable energy vs. biodiversity conservation or yield growth vs. reduction of environmental problems of intensive agriculture. PMID:23576836

  18. Dependence Potential of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-073, JWH-081, and JWH-210: In Vivo and In Vitro Approaches.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye Jin; Lee, Kwang-Wook; Song, Min-Ji; Hyeon, Yang-Jin; Hwang, Ji-Young; Jang, Choon-Gon; Ahn, Joon-Ik; Jeon, Seol-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Uk; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kang, Hoil; Yoo, Han Sang; Jeong, Ho-Sang

    2014-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (CBs) such as the JWH series have caused social problems concerning their abuse liability. Because the JWH series produces euphoric and hallucinogenic effects, they have been distributed illegally under street names such as "Spice" and "Smoke". Many countries including Korea have started to schedule some of the JWH series compounds as controlled substances, but there are a number of JWH series chemicals that remain uncontrolled by law. In this study, three synthetic CBs with different binding affinities to the CB1 receptor (JWH-073, 081, and 210) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) were evaluated for their potential for psychological dependence. The conditioned place preference test (unbiased method) and self-administration test (fixed ratio of 1) using rodents were conducted. Ki values of the three synthetic cannabinoids were calculated as supplementary data using a receptor binding assay and overexpressed CB1 protein membranes to compare dependence potential with CB1 receptor binding affinity. All mice administered JWH-073, 081, or 210 showed significantly increased time spent at unpreferred space in a dose-dependence manner in the conditioned place preference test. In contrast, all tested substances except Δ(9)-THC showed aversion phenomenon at high doses in the conditioned place preference test. The order of affinity to the CB1 receptor in the receptor binding assay was JWH-210 > JWH-081 > JWH-073, which was in agreement with the results from the conditioned place preference test. However, no change in self-administration was observed. These findings suggest the possibility to predict dependence potential of synthetic CBs through a receptor binding assay at the screening level. PMID:25143817

  19. Dependence Potential of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-073, JWH-081, and JWH-210: In Vivo and In Vitro Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hye Jin; Lee, Kwang-Wook; Song, Min-Ji; Hyeon, Yang-Jin; Hwang, Ji-Young; Jang, Choon-Gon; Ahn, Joon-Ik; Jeon, Seol-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Uk; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kang, Hoil; Yoo, Han Sang; Jeong, Ho-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (CBs) such as the JWH series have caused social problems concerning their abuse liability. Because the JWH series produces euphoric and hallucinogenic effects, they have been distributed illegally under street names such as “Spice” and “Smoke”. Many countries including Korea have started to schedule some of the JWH series compounds as controlled substances, but there are a number of JWH series chemicals that remain uncontrolled by law. In this study, three synthetic CBs with different binding affinities to the CB1 receptor (JWH-073, 081, and 210) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) were evaluated for their potential for psychological dependence. The conditioned place preference test (unbiased method) and self-administration test (fixed ratio of 1) using rodents were conducted. Ki values of the three synthetic cannabinoids were calculated as supplementary data using a receptor binding assay and overexpressed CB1 protein membranes to compare dependence potential with CB1 receptor binding affinity. All mice administered JWH-073, 081, or 210 showed significantly increased time spent at unpreferred space in a dose-dependence manner in the conditioned place preference test. In contrast, all tested substances except Δ9-THC showed aversion phenomenon at high doses in the conditioned place preference test. The order of affinity to the CB1 receptor in the receptor binding assay was JWH-210 > JWH-081 >> JWH-073, which was in agreement with the results from the conditioned place preference test. However, no change in self-administration was observed. These findings suggest the possibility to predict dependence potential of synthetic CBs through a receptor binding assay at the screening level. PMID:25143817

  20. Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory mediator release by histamine in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Holden, N S; Gong, W; King, E M; Kaur, M; Giembycz, M A; Newton, R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In asthma, histamine contributes to bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation and oedema, and is associated with the late phase response. The current study investigates possible inflammatory effects of histamine acting on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-dependent transcription and cytokine release. Experimental approach: Using BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, NF-κB-dependent transcription and both release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 were examined by reporter assay, ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. Histamine receptors were detected using qualitative RT-PCR and function examined using selective agonists and antagonists. Key results: Addition of histamine to TNFα-stimulated BEAS-2B cells maximally potentiated NF-κB-dependent transcription 1.8 fold, whereas IL-6 and IL-8 protein release were enhanced 7.3- and 2.7-fold respectively. These responses were, in part, NF-κB-dependent and were associated with 2.6- and 1.7-fold enhancements of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression. The H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, caused a rightward shift in the concentration-response curves of TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription (pA2=9.91) and release of IL-6 (pA2=8.78) and IL-8 (pA2=8.99). Antagonists of histamine H2, H3 and H4 receptors were without effect. Similarly, H3 and H4 receptor agonists did not affect TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription, or IL-6 and IL-8 release at concentrations below 10 μM. The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited the histamine enhanced NF-κB-dependent transcription and IL-6 and IL-8 release. Conclusions and implications: Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory cytokine release by histamine predominantly involves receptors of the H1 receptor subtype. These data support an anti-inflammatory role for H1 receptor antagonists by preventing the transcription and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:17891168

  1. Eye color: A potential indicator of alcohol dependence risk in European Americans.

    PubMed

    Sulovari, Arvis; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel; Li, Dawei

    2015-07-01

    In archival samples of European-ancestry subjects, light-eyed individuals have been found to consume more alcohol than dark-eyed individuals. No published population-based studies have directly tested the association between alcohol dependence (AD) and eye color. We hypothesized that light-eyed individuals have a higher prevalence of AD than dark-eyed individuals. A mixture model was used to select a homogeneous sample of 1,263 European-Americans and control for population stratification. After quality control, we conducted an association study using logistic regression, adjusting for confounders (age, sex, and genetic ancestry). We found evidence of association between AD and blue eye color (P = 0.0005 and odds ratio = 1.83 (1.31-2.57)), supporting light eye color as a risk factor relative to brown eye color. Network-based analyses revealed a statistically significant (P = 0.02) number of genetic interactions between eye color genes and AD-associated genes. We found evidence of linkage disequilibrium between an AD-associated GABA receptor gene cluster, GABRB3/GABRG3, and eye color genes, OCA2/HERC2, as well as between AD-associated GRM5 and pigmentation-associated TYR. Our population-phenotype, network, and linkage disequilibrium analyses support association between blue eye color and AD. Although we controlled for stratification we cannot exclude underlying occult stratification as a contributor to this observation. Although replication is needed, our findings suggest that eye pigmentation information may be useful in research on AD. Further characterization of this association may unravel new AD etiological factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cellobiose dehydrogenase and a copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenase potentiate cellulose degradation by Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher M; Beeson, William T; Cate, Jamie H; Marletta, Michael A

    2011-12-16

    The high cost of enzymes for saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is a major barrier to the production of second generation biofuels. Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we report that filamentous fungi use oxidative enzymes to cleave glycosidic bonds in cellulose. Deletion of cdh-1, the gene encoding the major cellobiose dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa, reduced cellulase activity substantially, and addition of purified cellobiose dehydrogenases from M. thermophila to the Δcdh-1 strain resulted in a 1.6- to 2.0-fold stimulation in cellulase activity. Addition of cellobiose dehydrogenase to a mixture of purified cellulases showed no stimulatory effect. We show that cellobiose dehydrogenase enhances cellulose degradation by coupling the oxidation of cellobiose to the reductive activation of copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) that catalyze the insertion of oxygen into C-H bonds adjacent to the glycosidic linkage. Three of these PMOs were characterized and shown to have different regiospecifities resulting in oxidized products modified at either the reducing or nonreducing end of a glucan chain. In contrast to previous models where oxidative enzymes were thought to produce reactive oxygen species that randomly attacked the substrate, the data here support a direct, enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of cellulose. Cellobiose dehydrogenases and proteins related to the polysaccharide monooxygenases described here are found throughout both ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi, suggesting that this model for oxidative cellulose degradation may be widespread throughout the fungal kingdom. When added to mixtures of cellulases, these proteins enhance cellulose saccharification, suggesting that they could be used to reduce the cost of biofuel production.

  3. Time-Dependent Effect of Encapsulating Alginate Hydrogel on Neurogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Due to the restricted potential of neural stem cells for regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) after injury, providing an alternative source for neural stem cells is essential. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells with properties suitable for tissue engineering. In addition, alginate hydrogel is a biocompatible polysaccharide polymer that has been used to encapsulate many types of cells. The aim of this study was to assess the proliferation rate and level of expression of neural markers; NESTIN, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in encapsulated human ADSCs (hADSCs) 10 and14 days after neural induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ADSCs isolated from human were cultured in neural induction media and seeded into alginate hydrogel. The rate of proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated cells were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunocytoflourescent and realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyzes 10 and 14 days after induction. Results The rate of proliferation of encapsulated cells was not significantly changed with time passage. The expression of NESTIN and GFAP significantly decreased on day 14 relative to day 10 (P<0.001) but MAP2 expression was increased. Conclusion Alginate hydrogel can promote the neural differentiation of encapsulated hADSCs with time passage. PMID:26199909

  4. The ozone depletion potentials on halocarbons: Their dependence of calculation assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karol, Igor L.; Kiselev, Andrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) is widely used in the evaluation of numerous halocarbons and of their replacement effects on ozone, but the methods, assumptions and conditions used in ODP calculations have not been analyzed adequately. In this paper a model study of effects on ozone of the instantaneous releases of various amounts of CH3CCl3 and of CHF2Cl (HCFC-22) for several compositions of the background atmosphere are presented, aimed at understanding connections of ODP values with the assumptions used in their calculations. To facilitate the ODP computation in numerous versions for the long time periods after their releases, the above rather short-lived gases and the one-dimensional radiative photochemical model of the global annually averaged atmospheric layer up to 50 km height are used. The variation of released gas global mass from 1 Mt to 1 Gt leads to ODP value increase with its stabilization close to the upper bound of this range in the contemporary atmosphere. The same variations are analyzed for conditions of the CFC-free atmosphere of 1960's and for the anthropogenically loaded atmosphere in the 21st century according to the known IPCC 'business as usual' scenario. Recommendations for proper ways of ODP calculations are proposed for practically important cases.

  5. Event-related potentials in adolescents with different cognitive styles: field dependence and field independence.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghong; Mao, Wei; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Xiating; Han, Chunyu; Lu, Changfeng; Huang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    Field dependence/independence (FD/FI) is an important dimension of personality and cognitive styles. Different ability in mobilizing and/or allocating mental-attentional capacity was considered to be the most possible explanation for the FDI cognitive style. Many studies on characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of attentional control indicated the existence of a dissociable sub-process of conflict-monitoring and "cognitive control" system. However, little was known about it. We might dissociate "cognitive control" system from conflict processing by taking advantage of the variable of the FDI cognitive style. In addition, essentially cognitive styles (FDI) are often widely studied in psychological and educational fields, but hardly in neuroscience. We speculated that ERP components could help to explain the difference between how FD and FI individuals process information. The purpose of the reported study was to explore the possible relation between the "cognitive control" system and the conflict processing system during stimulus-matching task. We first characterized the standard FD/FI of senior-high-school Han students in grade two in Beijing, China, based on 160 students with similar age, education, living and cultural background. Twenty-six adolescents were selected and divided into two groups (extreme FD group and extreme FI group) according to their Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) results (FD: 5-8; FI: 17-19). They were tested on both Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and stimulus-matching task. ERP was measured while the subjects performed the stimulus-matching tasks by categorizing two figures that were presented sequentially either as a match (same shape) or as a conflict (different shape) conditions. The results showed that the mean amplitude of N270 in FI group was higher relative to that in FD group at nearly all centrofrontal areas in the conflict condition. We conclude that the FDI cognitive styles could influence the conflict processing

  6. System-dependent exchange–correlation functional with exact asymptotic potential and ε{sub HOMO} ≈ − I

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, Jonathan D.; Tozer, David J.

    2015-07-14

    Density scaling considerations are used to derive an exchange–correlation explicit density functional that is appropriate for the electron deficient side of the integer and which recovers the exact r → ∞ asymptotic behaviour of the exchange–correlation potential. The functional has an unconventional mathematical form with parameters that are system-dependent; the parameters for an N-electron system are determined in advance from generalised gradient approximation (GGA) calculations on the N- and (N − 1)-electron systems. Compared to GGA results, the functional yields similar exchange–correlation energies, but HOMO energies that are an order of magnitude closer to the negative of the vertical ionisation potential; for anions, the HOMO energies are negative, as required. Rydberg excitation energies are also notably improved and the exchange–correlation potential is visibly lowered towards the near-exact potential. Further development is required to improve valence excitations, static isotropic polarisabilities, and the shape of the potential in non-asymptotic regions. The functional is fundamentally different to conventional approximations.

  7. Generation of matter-wave solitons of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent complicated potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamadou, Alidou; Wamba, Etienne; Kofane, Timoleon C.; Doka, Serge Y.; Ekogo, Thierry B.

    2011-08-15

    We examine the generation of bright matter-wave solitons in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation describing Bose-Einstein condensates with a time-dependent complex potential, which is composed of a repulsive parabolic background potential and a gravitational field. By performing a modified lens-type transformation, an explicit expression for the growth rate of a purely growing modulational instability is presented and analyzed. We point out the effects of the gravitational field, as well as of the parameter related to the feeding or loss of atoms in the condensate, on the instability growth rate. It is evident from numerical simulations that the feeding with atoms and the magnetic trap have opposite effects on the dynamics of the system. It is shown that the feeding or loss parameter can be well used to control the instability domain. Our study shows that the gravitational field changes the condensate trail of the soliton trains during the propagation. We also perform a numerical analysis to solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent complicated potential. The numerical results on the effect of both the gravitational field and the parameter of feeding or loss of atoms in the condensate agree well with predictions of the linear stability analysis. Another result of the present work is the modification of the background wave function in the Thomas-Fermi approximation during the numerical simulations.

  8. A plant alkaloid, veratridine, potentiates cancer chemosensitivity by UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of an oncoprotein, mortalin-2

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Ammara; Sane, Sanam; Branick, Kate A.; Freeling, Jessica L.; Wang, Hongmin; Zhang, Dong; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Veratridine (VTD), an alkaloid derived from the Liliaceae plant shows anti-tumor effects; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Using a high-throughput drug screen, we found that VTD enhances transactivation of UBXN2A, resulting in upregulation of UBXN2A in the cytoplasm, where UBXN2A binds and inhibits the oncoprotein mortalin-2 (mot-2). VTD-treated cancer cells undergo cell death in UBXN2A- and mot-2-dependent manners. The cytotoxic function of VTD is grade-dependent, and the combined treatment with a sub-optimal dose of the standard chemotherapy, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and etoposide, demonstrated a synergistic effect, resulting in higher therapeutic efficacy. VTD influences the CD44+ stem cells, possibly through UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of mot-2. The VTD-dependent expression of UBXN2A is a potential candidate for designing novel strategies for colon cancer treatment because: 1) In 50% of colon cancer patients, UBXN2A protein levels in tumor tissues are significantly lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues. 2) Cytoplasmic expression of the mot-2 protein is very low in non-cancerous cells; thus, VTD can produce tumor-specific toxicity while normal cells remain intact. 3) Finally, VTD or its modified analogs offer a valuable adjuvant chemotherapy strategy to improve the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for colon cancer patients harboring WT-p53. PMID:26188124

  9. A Selective Dopamine Reuptake Inhibitor Improves Prefrontal Cortex-Dependent Cognitive Function: Potential Relevance to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schmeichel, Brooke E.; Zemlan, Frank P.; Berridge, Craig W.

    2012-01-01

    Drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) improve prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent cognitive function. The majority of ADHD-related treatments act either as dual norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) reuptake inhibitors (psychostimulants) or selective NE reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Certain benztropine analogs act as highly selective DA reuptake inhibitors while lacking the reinforcing actions, and thus abuse potential, of psychostimulants. To assess the potential use of these compounds in the treatment of ADHD, we examined the effects of a well-characterized benztropine analog, AHN 2-005, on performance of rats in a PFC-dependent delayed-alternation task of spatial working memory. Similar to that seen with all drugs currently approved for ADHD, AHN 2-005 dose-dependently improved performance in this task. Clinically-relevant doses of psychostimulants and SNRIs elevate NE and DA preferentially in the PFC. Despite the selectivity of this compound for the DA transporter, additional microdialysis studies demonstrated that a cognition-enhancing dose of AHN 2-005 that lacked locomotor activating effects increased extracellular levels of both DA and NE in the PFC. AHN 2-005 produced a larger increase in extracellular DA in the nucleus accumbens, although the magnitude of this was well below that seen with motor activating doses of psychostimulants. Collectively, these observations suggest that benztropine analogs may be efficacious in the treatment of ADHD or other disorders associated with PFC dysfunction. These studies provide a strong rationale for future research focused on the neural mechanisms contributing to the cognition-enhancing actions and the potential clinical utility of AHN 2-005 and related compounds. PMID:22796428

  10. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  11. Development of an electron-temperature-dependent interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulation of tungsten under electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakshouri, S.; Alfè, D.; Duffy, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Irradiation of a metal by lasers or swift heavy ions causes the electrons to become excited. In the vicinity of the excitation, an electronic temperature is established within a thermalization time of 10-100 fs, as a result of electron-electron collisions. For short times, corresponding to less than 1 ps after excitation, the resulting electronic temperature may be orders of magnitude higher than the lattice temperature. During this short time, atoms in the metal experience modified interatomic forces as a result of the excited electrons. These forces can lead to ultrafast nonthermal phenomena such as melting, ablation, laser-induced phase transitions, and modified vibrational properties. We develop an electron-temperature-dependent empirical interatomic potential for tungsten that can be used to model such phenomena using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Finite-temperature density functional theory calculations at high electronic temperatures are used to parametrize the model potential.

  12. The influence of spin orbit coupling and a current dependent potential on the residual resistivity of disordered magnetic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, H.; Vernes, A.; Banhart, J.

    1999-11-01

    It has been shown recently, for a number of various magnetic disordered alloy systems, that the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) may have an important influence on the isotropic residual resistivity and that it is the primary source of the galvano-magnetic properties spontaneous magnetoresistance anisotropy (SMA) and anomalous Hall resistivity (AHR). Here it is demonstrated that—in contrast to many other spin-orbit induced phenomena—all these findings stem from the part of the spin-orbit coupling that gives rise to a mixing of the two spin sub-systems. In line with this result it is shown that inclusion of a current dependent potential within a calculation of the underlying electronic structure hardly affects the transport properties if the corresponding magnetic vector potential does not lead to a mixing of the spin sub-systems.

  13. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration.

  14. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration. PMID:22091984

  15. A New, Self-Contained Asymptotic Correction Scheme To Exchange-Correlation Potentials For Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Apra, Edoardo; Windus, Theresa L.; Dixon, David A.

    2003-11-07

    By combining the asymptotic correction scheme of Casida and Salahub to exchange cor-relation potentials and the phenomenological linear correlation between experimental ionization potentials and highest occupied Kohn–Sham (KS) orbital energies found by Zhan, Nichols, and Dixon, we propose a new, expedient, and self-contained asymptotic correction to exchange-correlation potentials in KS density functional theory (DFT) for use in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that does not require an ionization potential as an external parameter from a separate calculation. The asymptotically-corrected (TD)DFT is implemented in the quan-tum chemistry program suite NWChem for both sequential and massively parallel execution. The method is shown to be well balanced for both valence- and Rydberg-type transitions with average errors in excitation energies of CO, N2, CH2O, and C2H4 being smaller than those of uncorrected BLYP and B3LYP TDDFT by a factor of 4 and 2, respectively. We demonstrate the general ap-plicability and accuracy of the method for the Rydberg excited states of mono- to tetra-fluorinated methanes, the valence and Rydberg excited states of benzene, and the Q, B, N, and L band posi-tions of free-base porphin.

  16. Cathodic Potential Dependence of Electrochemical Reduction of SiO2 Granules in Molten CaCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Yasuda, Kouji; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Rika; Homma, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    As part of an ongoing fundamental study to develop a new process for producing solar-grade silicon, this paper examines the effects of cathodic potential on reduction kinetics, current efficiency, morphology, and purity of Si product during electrolysis of SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 at 1123 K (850 °C). SiO2 granules were electrolyzed potentiostatically at different cathodic potentials (0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 V vs Ca2+/Ca). The reduction kinetics was evaluated based on the growth of the reduced Si layer and the current behavior during electrolysis. The results suggest that a more negative cathodic potential is favorable for faster reduction. Current efficiencies in 60 minutes are greater than 65 pct at all the potentials examined. Si wires with sub-micron diameters are formed, and their morphologies show little dependence on the cathodic potential. The impurities in the Si product can be controlled at low level. The rate-determining step for the electrochemical reduction of SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 changes with time. At the initial stage of electrolysis, the electron transfer is the rate-determining step. At the later stage, the diffusion of O2- ions is the rate-determining step. The major cause of the decrease in reduction rate with increasing electrolysis time is the potential drop from the current collector to the reaction front due to the increased contact resistance among the reduced Si particles.

  17. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental measurement of Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and quartz glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul; Walker, Emilie; Ruel, Jean; Yagout, Fuad

    2013-04-01

    High quality frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and glass bead packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electro-magnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i) based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii) treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii) treat the material as a porous medium. In each case we have considered the real and imaginary parts of the complex streaming potential coefficient as well as its magnitude. It is clear from the results that the complex streaming potential coefficient does not follow a Debye-type behaviour, differing from the Debye-type behaviour most markedly for frequencies above the transition frequency. The best fit to all the data was provided by the Pride (1994) model and its simplification by Walker and Glover (2010), which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Theory predicts that the transition frequency is related to the inverse square of the effective pore radius. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with steady-state streaming potential coefficient data measured using a steady-state streaming potential rig as well as the corpus of steady-state determinations for quartz-based samples existing in the literature.

  18. Fourth order real space solver for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with singular Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorosi, Szilárd; Czirják, Attila

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel numerical method and algorithm for the solution of the 3D axially symmetric time-dependent Schrödinger equation in cylindrical coordinates, involving singular Coulomb potential terms besides a smooth time-dependent potential. We use fourth order finite difference real space discretization, with special formulae for the arising Neumann and Robin boundary conditions along the symmetry axis. Our propagation algorithm is based on merging the method of the split-operator approximation of the exponential operator with the implicit equations of second order cylindrical 2D Crank-Nicolson scheme. We call this method hybrid splitting scheme because it inherits both the speed of the split step finite difference schemes and the robustness of the full Crank-Nicolson scheme. Based on a thorough error analysis, we verified both the fourth order accuracy of the spatial discretization in the optimal spatial step size range, and the fourth order scaling with the time step in the case of proper high order expressions of the split-operator. We demonstrate the performance and high accuracy of our hybrid splitting scheme by simulating optical tunneling from a hydrogen atom due to a few-cycle laser pulse with linear polarization.

  19. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  20. Dependence of SuperDARN-inferred cross polar cap potential upon the solar wind electric field and magnetopause subsolar distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koustov, Alexandre; Khachikjan, Galina; Sofko, George

    Analysis of statistically significant data set on the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) derived from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) measurements for the geoeffective solar wind electric field Ey of up to 12 mV/m is performed. It is shown that if all CPCP data are plotted against Ey, there is a linear increase between 0 and 5 mV/m and saturation at larger values. If the same data are arranged in bins of RMS values, the CPCP depends on Ey linearly in each bin with the slope and intercept of the regression line related to RMS. The inferred linear dependencies CPCP (Ey) for various fixed bins of RMS intersect each other at Ey 2.5-3.0 mV/m, and the character of the CPCP dependence upon the solar wind rum pressure changes at this value. For this reason, the value of 3 mV/m is interpreted as the true threshold of CPCP saturation. This value also corresponds to the condition of the solar wind magnetic field at the subsolar point to be equal to the Earth's dipole field as shown in published MHD simulations. It is argued that the initially inferred saturation threshold of 5 mV/m (for the case of the CPCP data being not sorted according to RMS) is an apparent effect. Presented analysis favors the hypothesis that the CPCP saturates due to shortening of the merging x-line

  1. Alpha5GABAA receptor activity sets the threshold for long-term potentiation and constrains hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Martin, Loren J; Zurek, Agnieszka A; MacDonald, John F; Roder, John C; Jackson, Michael F; Orser, Beverley A

    2010-04-14

    Synaptic plasticity, which is the neuronal substrate for many forms of hippocampus-dependent learning, is attenuated by GABA type A receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition. The prevailing notion is that a synaptic or phasic form of GABAergic inhibition regulates synaptic plasticity; however, little is known about the role of GABA(A)R subtypes that generate a tonic or persistent inhibitory conductance. We studied the regulation of synaptic plasticity by alpha5 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (alpha5GABA(A)Rs), which generate a tonic inhibitory conductance in CA1 pyramidal neurons using electrophysiological recordings of field and whole-cell potentials in hippocampal slices from both wild-type and null mutant mice for the alpha5 subunit of the GABA(A)R (Gabra5(-/-) mice). In addition, the strength of fear-associated memory was studied. The results showed that alpha5GABA(A)R activity raises the threshold for induction of long-term potentiation in a highly specific band of stimulation frequencies (10-20 Hz) through mechanisms that are predominantly independent of inhibitory synaptic transmission. The deletion or pharmacological inhibition of alpha5GABA(A)Rs caused no change in baseline membrane potential or input resistance but increased depolarization during 10 Hz stimulation. The encoding of hippocampus-dependent memory was regulated by alpha5GABA(A)Rs but only under specific conditions that generate moderate but not robust forms of fear-associated learning. Thus, under specific conditions, alpha5GABA(A)R activity predominates over synaptic inhibition in modifying the strength of both synaptic plasticity in vitro and certain forms of memory in vivo. PMID:20392949

  2. Variability in projected elevation dependent warming in boreal midlatitude winter in CMIP5 climate models and its potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Miller, James R.

    2016-04-01

    The future rate of climate change in mountains has many potential human impacts, including those related to water resources, ecosystem services, and recreation. Analysis of the ensemble mean response of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) shows amplified warming in high elevation regions during the cold season in boreal midlatitudes. We examine how the twenty-first century elevation-dependent response in the daily minimum surface air temperature [d(ΔTmin)/dz] varies among 27 different GCMs during winter for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. The focus is on regions within the northern hemisphere mid-latitude band between 27.5°N and 40°N, which includes both the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau/Himalayas. We find significant variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz among the individual models ranging from 0.16 °C/km (10th percentile) to 0.97 °C/km (90th percentile), although nearly all of the GCMs (24 out of 27) show a significant positive value for d(ΔTmin)/dz. To identify some of the important drivers associated with the variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz during winter, we evaluate the co-variance between d(ΔTmin)/dz and the differential response of elevation-based anomalies in different climate variables as well as the GCMs' spatial resolution, their global climate sensitivity, and their elevation-dependent free air temperature response. We find that d(ΔTmin)/dz has the strongest correlation with elevation-dependent increases in surface water vapor, followed by elevation-dependent decreases in surface albedo, and a weak positive correlation with the GCMs' free air temperature response.

  3. Repeated experience with naloxone facilitates acute morphine withdrawal: potential role for conditioning processes in acute opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Schulteis, Gery; Morse, Andrew C; Liu, Jian

    2003-12-01

    Single injections with morphine can induce a state of acute opioid dependence in humans and animals, typically measured as precipitated withdrawal when an antagonist such as naloxone is administered 4-24 h after morphine. Repeated treatment with morphine at 24-h intervals can result in a progressive shift in potency of naloxone to produce such acute withdrawal signs, including suppression of operant responding for food reward. The current study characterized fully both morphine and naloxone dose-effect functions in an effort to establish the relative contributions of repeated morphine vs. repeated naloxone (Nal) experience to these potency shifts. Rats trained on an FR15 schedule for food received four vehicle or morphine injections (0.56-5.6 mg/kg sc), spaced 24 h apart. Four hours after each morphine pretreatment (Repeat Nal), or 4 h after the fourth and final morphine pretreatment only (Single Nal), a cumulative dose-effect function for naloxone-induced suppression of responding was determined. Vehicle-pretreated (Morphine Naive) rats showed little change in the naloxone dose effect function even after four cumulative dose-effect determinations. By contrast, a progressive increase in naloxone potency was observed following successive pretreatments with morphine under Repeat Nal conditions, and the magnitude of naloxone potency shift was morphine dose dependent. At a morphine dose of 5.6 mg/kg, repeated naloxone experience in the presence of morphine was not an absolute requirement to produce an increase in naloxone potency across days, but repeated naloxone could potentiate the magnitude of the observed shift, indicating both experience-independent and experience-dependent processes at work. At lower doses of morphine (1.0 and 3.3 mg/kg) no shift in naloxone potency was observed across days of morphine treatment in the absence of repeated naloxone experience (Single Nal conditions), indicating an increasing contribution of naloxone experience-dependent processes

  4. Phase diagram of the Fermi-Hubbard model with spin-dependent external potentials: A DMRG study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing-Bo; Meng, Ye-Ming; Wu, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Xian-Long

    2015-11-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional two-component system in an optical lattice of attractive interactions under a spin-dependent external potential. Based on the density-matrix renormalization group methods, we obtain its phase diagram as a function of the external potential imbalance and the strength of the attractive interaction through the analysis on the density profiles and the momentum pair correlation functions. We find that there are three different phases in the system, a coexisted fully polarized and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase, a normal polarized phase, and a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) phase. Different from the systems of spin-independent external potential, where the FFLO phase is normally favored by the attractive interactions, in the present situation, the FFLO phases are easily destroyed by the attractive interactions, leading to the normal polarized or the BCS phase. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374266 and 11174253) and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China.

  5. Global analysis of isospin dependent microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potentials in a Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruirui; Ma, Zhongyu; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yuan; van Dalen, E. N. E.; Müther, H.

    2016-09-01

    Background: For the study of exotic nuclei it is important to have an optical model potential that is reliable not only for stable nuclei but can also be extrapolated to nuclear systems with exotic numbers of protons and neutrons. An efficient way to obtain such a potential is to develop a microscopic optical potential (MOP) based on a fundamental theory with a minimal number of free parameters, which are adjusted to describe stable nuclei all over the nuclide chart. Purpose: The choice adopted in the present work is to develop the MOP within a relativistic scheme which provides a natural and consistent relation between the spin-orbit part and the central part of the potential. The Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach provides such a microscopic relativistic scheme, which is based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction and reproduces the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter without any adjustable parameter. Its solution using the projection technique within the subtracted T -matrix representation provides a reliable extension to asymmetric nuclear matter, which is important to describe the features of isospin asymmetric nuclei. The present work performs a global analysis of the isospin dependent nucleon-nucleus MOP based on the DBHF calculation in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. Methods: The DBHF approach is used to evaluate the relativistic structure of the nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter at various densities and asymmetries. The Schrödinger equivalent potentials of finite nuclei are derived from these Dirac components by a local density approximation (LDA). The density distributions of finite nuclei are taken from the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with Gogny D1S force. An improved LDA approach (ILDA) is employed to get a better prediction of the scattering observables. A χ2 assessment system based on the global simulated annealing algorithm is developed to optimize the very few free components in this study. Results

  6. Nitric Oxide Is Required for L-Type Ca2+ Channel-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, Beatrice M.; Garthwaite, John

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has long been implicated in the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) and other types of synaptic plasticity, a role for which the intimate coupling between NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) is likely to be instrumental in many instances. While several types of synaptic plasticity depend on NMDARs, others do not, an example of which is LTP triggered by opening of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs) in postsynaptic neurons. In CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus, NMDAR-dependent LTP (LTPNMDAR) appears to be primarily expressed postsynaptically whereas L-VGCC-dependent LTP (LTPL−VGCC), which often coexists with LTPNMDAR, appears mainly to reflect enhanced presynaptic transmitter release. Since NO is an excellent candidate as a retrograde messenger mediating post-to-presynaptic signaling, we sought to determine if NO functions in LTPL−VGCC in mouse CA3-CA1 synapses. When elicited by a burst type of stimulation with NMDARs and the associated NO release blocked, LTPL−VGCC was curtailed by inhibition of NO synthase or of the NO-receptor guanylyl cyclase to the same extent as occurred with inhibition of L-VGCCs. Unlike LTPNMDAR at these synapses, LTPL−VGCC was unaffected in mice lacking endothelial NO synthase, implying that the major source of the NO is neuronal. Transient delivery of exogenous NO paired with tetanic synaptic stimulation under conditions of NMDAR blockade resulted in a long-lasting potentiation that was sensitive to inhibition of NO-receptor guanylyl cyclase but was unaffected by inhibition of L-VGCCs. The results indicate that NO, acting through its second messenger cGMP, plays an unexpectedly important role in L-VGCC-dependent, NMDAR-independent LTP, possibly as a retrograde messenger generated in response to opening of postsynaptic L-VGCCs and/or as a signal acting postsynaptically, perhaps to facilitate changes in gene expression. PMID:27445786

  7. Recombinant NAD-dependent SIR-2 Protein of Leishmania donovani: Immunobiochemical Characterization as a Potential Vaccine against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Baharia, Rajendra K; Tandon, Rati; Sharma, Tanuj; Suthar, Manish K; Das, Sanchita; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Sunder, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of a vaccine conferring long-lasting immunity remains a challenge against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Immunoproteomic characterization of Leishmania donovani proteins led to the identification of a novel protein NAD+-dependent Silent Information regulatory-2 (SIR2 family or sirtuin) protein (LdSir2RP) as one of the potent immunostimulatory proteins. Proteins of the SIR2 family are characterized by a conserved catalytic domain that exerts unique NAD-dependent deacetylase activity. In the present study, an immunobiochemical characterization of LdSir2RP and further evaluation of its immunogenicity and prophylactic potential was done to assess for its possible involvement as a vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal Findings LdSir2RP was successfully cloned, expressed and purified. The gene was present as a monomeric protein of ~45 kDa and further established by the crosslinking experiment. rLdSir2RP shown cytosolic localization in L. donovani and demonstrating NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity. Bioinformatic analysis also confirmed that LdSir2RP protein has NAD binding domain. The rLdSir2RP was further assessed for its cellular response by lymphoproliferative assay and cytokine ELISA in cured Leishmania patients and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) in comparison to soluble Leishmania antigen and it was observed to stimulate the production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α significantly but not the IL-4 and IL-10. The naïve hamsters when vaccinated with rLdSir2RP alongwith BCG resisted the L. donovani challenge to the tune of ~75% and generated strong IL-12 and IFN-γ mediated Th1 type immune response thereof. The efficacy was further supported by remarkable increase in IgG2 antibody level which is indicative of Th1 type of protective response. Further, with a possible implication in vaccine design against VL, identification of potential T-cell epitopes of rLdSir2RP was done using computational approach. Conclusion

  8. Activity-dependent potentiation of recurrent inhibition: a mechanism for dynamic gain control in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T M; Carew, T J

    1993-03-01

    The siphon withdrawal response (SWR) of Aplysia supports several forms of learning that are under both excitatory and inhibitory control. Here we examine the role of interneuronal processing on the regulation of siphon responses, with an emphasis on the role of inhibition. We focus on the recurrent circuit formed by the excitatory interneuron L29 and the inhibitory interneuron L30, and show that this circuit provides a mechanism for use-dependent regulation of excitatory input onto siphon motor neurons. We utilized a reduced preparation in which input to the SWR circuit was elicited by taps applied to the siphon; tap-evoked EPSPs were measured in LFS siphon motor neurons. We first show that L29 is an important source of excitatory input to LFS motor neurons: voltage-clamp inactivation of a single L29 (out of five) results in a significant reduction of tap-evoked EPSPs. Next, we demonstrate that direct intracellular activation of L29, surprisingly, produces transient inhibition of evoked input to motor neurons that lasts up to 40 sec. We then provide several lines of evidence that the mechanism of L29-induced inhibition is through the recruitment and potentiation of recurrent inhibition from L30: (1) L29 activation results in reduced tap-evoked responses of other (nonactivated) L29s; (2) direct activation of L30 mimics the inhibitory effects produced by L29 activation (LFS neurons receive no direct synaptic input from L30); and (3) the L30 IPSP is significantly potentiated as a result of its own activity, whether produced directly (by L30 activation) or indirectly (through L29 activation). This IPSP potentiation has the same time course as L29-induced inhibition of motor neuron responses. Thus activity-dependent potentiation of L30 transmission can inhibit motor neuron responses, in part through inactivation of the L29 interneuronal pool. Finally, we propose that L29-L30 interactions provide a mechanism for dynamic gain control in the SWR.

  9. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  10. Smooth muscle membrane potential modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat basilar artery via myo-endothelial gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Allen, Tracy; Iftinca, Mircea; Cole, William C; Plane, Frances

    2002-12-15

    The release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, such as nitric oxide (NO), is dependent on an increase in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca(2+)](i)) within endothelial cells. Endothelial cell membrane potential plays a critical role in the regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) in that calcium influx from the extracellular space is dependent on membrane hyperpolarization. In this study, the effect of inhibition of vascular smooth muscle delayed rectifier K(+) (K(DR)) channels by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) on endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat basilar artery to acetylcholine (ACh) was assessed. ACh-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxations were inhibited by N-(Omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), confirming a role for NO and guanylyl cyclase. 4-AP (300 microM) also suppressed ACh-induced relaxation, with the maximal response reduced from approximately 92 to approximately 33 % (n = 11; P < 0.01). However, relaxations in response to exogenous NO, applied in the form of authentic NO, sodium nitroprusside or diethylamineNONOate (DEANONOate), were not affected by 4-AP treatment (n = 3-11). These data are not consistent with the view that 4-AP-sensitive K(DR) channels are mediators of vascular hyperpolarization and relaxation in response to endothelium-derived NO. Inhibition of ACh-evoked relaxation by 4-AP was reversed by pinacidil (0.5-1 microM; n = 5) or 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18betaGA; 5 microM; n = 5), indicating that depolarization and electrical coupling of the smooth muscle to the endothelium were involved. 4-AP caused depolarization of both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of isolated segments of basilar artery (mean change 11 +/- 1 and 9 +/- 2 mV, respectively; n = 15). Significantly, 18betaGA almost completely prevented the depolarization of endothelial cells (n = 6), but not smooth muscle cells (n = 6) by 4-AP. ACh-induced hyperpolarization of endothelium and smooth muscle cells was also reduced by 4-AP

  11. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death.

  12. Kappa-Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striatum as a Potential Modulator of Dopamine Transmission in Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  13. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:23862989

  14. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  15. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death. PMID:27085978

  16. Loss of the Osteogenic Differentiation Potential during Senescence Is Limited to Bone Progenitor Cells and Is Dependent on p53

    PubMed Central

    Despars, Geneviève; Carbonneau, Cynthia L.; Bardeau, Pascal; Coutu, Daniel L.; Beauséjour, Christian M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can lead to the induction of cellular senescence. In particular, we showed that exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) leads to the senescence of bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSC) and osteoblast-like stromal cells (OB–SC), a phenotype associated with bone loss. The mechanism by which IR leads to bone dysfunction is not fully understood. One possibility involves that DNA damage-induced senescence limits the regeneration of bone progenitor cells. Another possibility entails that bone dysfunction arises from the inability of accumulating senescent cells to fulfill their physiological function. Indeed, we show here that exposure to IR prevented the differentiation and mineralization functions of MSC, an effect we found was limited to this population as more differentiated OB–SC could still form mineralize nodules. This is in contrast to adipogenesis, which was inhibited in both IR-induced senescent MSC and 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IR-induced loss of osteogenic potential in MSC was p53-dependent, a phenotype that correlates with the inability to upregulate key osteogenic transcription factors. These results are the first to demonstrate that senescence impacts osteogenesis in a cell type dependent manner and suggest that the accumulation of senescent osteoblasts is unlikely to significantly contribute to bone dysfunction in a cell autonomous manner. PMID:24009740

  17. Stress-induced switch in Numb isoforms enhances Notch-dependent expression of subtype-specific transient receptor potential channel.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, George A; Belal, Cherine; Madan, Meenu; Taylor, David G; Wang, Jang; Wei, Zelan; Pattisapu, Jogi V; Chan, Sic L

    2010-02-26

    The Notch signaling pathway plays an essential role in the regulation of cell specification by controlling differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Numb is an intrinsic regulator of the Notch pathway and exists in four alternative splice variants that differ in the length of their phosphotyrosine-binding domain (PTB) and proline-rich region domains. The physiological relevance of the existence of the Numb splice variants and their exact regulation are still poorly understood. We previously reported that Numb switches from isoforms containing the insertion in PTB to isoforms lacking this insertion in neuronal cells subjected to trophic factor withdrawal (TFW). The functional relevance of the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms is not known. Here we provide evidence that the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms regulates Notch signaling strength and Notch target gene expression. PC12 cells stably overexpressing Numb isoforms lacking the PTB insertion exhibited higher basal Notch activity and Notch-dependent transcription of the transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) when compared with those overexpressing Numb isoforms with the PTB insertion. The differential regulation of TRPC6 expression is correlated with perturbed calcium signaling and increased neuronal vulnerability to TFW-induced death. Pharmacological inhibition of the Notch pathway or knockdown of TRPC6 function ameliorates the adverse effects caused by the TFW-induced switch in Numb isoforms. Taken together, our results indicate that Notch and Numb interaction may influence the sensitivity of neuronal cells to injurious stimuli by modulating calcium-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades.

  18. Clinical symptoms of major depression are associated with the intensity dependence of auditory event-related potential components.

    PubMed

    Linka, Thomas; Sartory, Gudrun; Gastpar, Markus; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller, Bernhard W

    2009-09-30

    The intensity (loudness) dependent amplitude change (IDAP) of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) has been shown to be associated with the outcome of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depression. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate associations between clinical symptoms of major depression and the IDAP as an indirect indicator of cortical serotonergic function. We assessed 40 in-patients suffering from a major depressive episode (DSM-IV) prior to antidepressant treatment. Psychometric characteristics of depression were assessed by means of psychiatric rating scales (CGI, HDRS, HAMA, STAI and BDI) and evaluated for associations with auditory evoked P1, N1, P2 as well as P1/N1 and N1/P2 peak to peak amplitude slopes. Our data revealed a positive correlation of the intensity dependent N1 amplitude slope with the degree of certain somatic symptoms of depression: loss of appetite and weight, insomnia, and sexual dysfunction. The results of our study might contribute to a more specific clinical basis in the differential indication of serotonergic versus noradrenergic antidepressants.

  19. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  20. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  1. Cell-Context Dependent TCF/LEF Expression and Function: Alternative Tales of Repression, De-Repression and Activation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Catherine D; Byers, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling controls cell specification and fate during development and adult tissue homeostasis by converging on a small family of DNA binding factors, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) family. In response to Wnt signals, TCF/LEF members undergo a transcriptional switch from repression to activation mediated in part by nuclear β-catenin binding and recruitment of co-activator complexes. In mammals, the specificity and fine tuning of this transcriptional switch is also achieved by the cell-context-dependent expression of four members (TCF7, TCF7L1, TCF7L2, and LEF1) and numerous variants, which display differential DNA binding affinity and specificity, repression strength, activation potential, and regulators. TCF7/LEF1 variants are generated by alternative promoters, alternative exon cassettes, and alternative donor/acceptor splicing sites, allowing combinatorial insertion/exclusion of modular functional and regulatory domains. In this review we present mounting evidence for the interdependency of TCF7/LEF1 variant expression and functions with cell lineage and cell state. We also illustrate how the p53 and nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, known to control cell fate and to inhibit Wnt signaling, may participate in the fine tuning of TCF7/LEF1 repression/activation potentials. PMID:22111711

  2. Overdamped motion of interacting particles in general confining potentials: time-dependent and stationary-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Nobre, F. D.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2012-12-01

    By comparing numerical and analytical results, it is shown that a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion is very well described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, which can be associated with nonextensive statistical mechanics. The particle-particle interactions considered are repulsive, motivated by three different physical situations: (i) modified Bessel function, commonly used in vortex-vortex interactions, relevant for the flux-front penetration in disordered type-II superconductors; (ii) Yukawa-like forces, useful for charged particles in plasma, or colloidal suspensions; (iii) derived from a Gaussian potential, common in complex fluids, like polymer chains dispersed in a solvent. Moreover, the system is subjected to a general confining potential, φ( x) = ( α| x| z )/ z ( α > 0 , z > 1), so that a stationary state is reached after a sufficiently long time. Recent numerical and analytical investigations, considering interactions of type (i) and a harmonic confining potential ( z = 2), have shown strong evidence that a q-Gaussian distribution, P( x,t), with q = 0, describes appropriately the particle positions during their time evolution, as well as in their stationary state. Herein we reinforce further the connection with nonextensive statistical mechanics, by presenting numerical evidence showing that: (a) in the case z = 2, different particle-particle interactions only modify the diffusion parameter D of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation; (b) for z ≠ 2, all cases investigated fit well the analytical stationary solution P st( x), given in terms of a q-exponential (with the same index q = 0) of the general external potential φ( x). In this later case, we propose an approximate time-dependent P( x,t) (not known analytically for z ≠ 2), which is in very good agreement with the simulations for a large range of times, including the approach to the stationary state. The present work suggests that a wide variety of physical phenomena

  3. Hemolytic potential of miltefosine is dependent on cell concentration: Implications for in vitro cell cytotoxicity assays and pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Lais; Alonso, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Miltefosine possesses antiparasitic, antibacterial, antifungal and antitumor activities; however, its mechanism of action is not well established. In the current work, the miltefosine concentrations required to achieve 50% hemolysis in PBS were shown to vary from 600 μM using 5×10(9) cells/mL to ~2.9 μM for ~5×10(6) cells/mL. This cell concentration-dependent hemolytic potential was described using an equation that included the membrane-water partition coefficient (K) and miltefosine concentrations in the cell membrane (cm) and aqueous medium (cw) as variables. The best-fit values for the 50% hemolysis data were log K=4.68, cm=110.8 mM, and cw=2.3 μM. Hemolysis measurements in whole blood were used to determine the erythrocyte membrane-plasma partition coefficient of miltefosine (Log KM/P=1.77). Additionally, miltefosine concentration in whole blood was found to be ~86% of that in plasma. Previously reported clinical pharmacokinetics data indicate that the plasma concentration of miltefosine peaks at ~90 μg/mL when treating visceral leishmaniasis. Using this concentration, which corresponds to ~77 μg/mL miltefosine in whole blood, we found only 2.8% hemolysis. Significant hemolysis (5.4%) was observed only after doubling the concentration to 180 μg/mL. Recently reported data indicate that miltefosine inhibitory concentrations in Leishmania are also dependent on cell concentration. The biophysical parameters assessed in the current study indicated that this type of response is associated with the accumulation of the drug in the cell membrane, which becomes damaged when critical drug concentrations are reached. PMID:26947181

  4. Epithelial transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-dependent adrenomedullin upregulates blood flow in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Atsushi; Omiya, Yuji; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Ohno, Nagisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The functional roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the gastrointestinal tract have garnered considerable attention in recent years. We previously reported that daikenchuto (TU-100), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) via adrenomedullin (ADM) release from intestinal epithelial (IE) cells (Kono T et al. J Crohns Colitis 4: 161–170, 2010). TU-100 contains multiple TRP activators. In the present study, therefore, we examined the involvement of TRP channels in the ADM-mediated vasodilatatory effect of TU-100. Rats were treated intraduodenally with the TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin (CAP), the TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), or TU-100, and jejunum IBF was evaluated using laser-Doppler blood flowmetry. All three compounds resulted in vasodilatation, and the vasodilatory effect of TU-100 was abolished by a TRPA1 antagonist but not by a TRPV1 antagonist. Vasodilatation induced by AITC and TU-100 was abrogated by anti-ADM antibody treatment. RT-PCR and flow cytometry revealed that an IEC-6 cell line originated from the small intestine and purified IE cells expressed ADM and TRPA1 but not TRPV1. AITC increased ADM release in IEC cells remarkably, while CAP had no effect. TU-100 and its ingredient 6-shogaol (6SG) increased ADM release dose-dependently, and the effects were abrogated by a TRPA1 antagonist. 6SG showed similar TRPA1-dependent vasodilatation in vivo. These results indicate that TRPA1 in IE cells may play an important role in controlling bowel microcirculation via ADM release. Epithelial TRPA1 appears to be a promising target for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23275609

  5. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases. PMID:26343381

  6. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  7. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are heavily dependent on type I hair cell activity of the saccular macula in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Lue, June-Horng; Day, An-Shiou; Cheng, Po-Wen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2009-01-01

    This study applied the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test to guinea pigs coupled with electronic microscopic examination to determine whether VEMPs are dependent on type I or II hair cell activity of the saccular macula. An amount of 0.05 ml of gentamicin (40 mg/ml) was injected directly overlaying, but not through, the round window membrane of the left ear in guinea pigs.One week after surgery, auditory brainstem response test revealed normal responses in 12 animals (80%), and elevated thresholds in 3 animals (20%). The VEMP test using click stimulation showed absent responses in all 15 animals (100%). Another 6 gentamicin-treated animals underwent the VEMP test using galvanic stimulation and all 6 also displayed absent responses. Ultrathin sections of the saccular macula in the gentamicin-treated ears displayed morphologic alterations in type I or II hair cells, including shrinkage and/or vacuolization in the cytoplasm, increased electron density of the cytoplasm and nuclear chromatin, and cellular lucency. However, extrusion degeneration was rare and only present in type II hair cells. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that the histological density of intact type I hair cells was 1.1 +/- 1.2/4000 microm(2) in the gentamicin-treated ears, showing significantly less than that in control ears (4.5 +/- 1.8/4000 microm(2)). However, no significant difference was observed in the densities of intact type II hair cells and supporting cells between treated and control ears. Furthermore, the calyx terminals surrounding the damaged type I hair cells were swollen and disrupted, while the button afferents contacting the damaged type II hair cells were not obviously deformed. Based on the above results, we therefore conclude that VEMPs are heavily dependent on type I hair cell activity of the saccular macula in guinea pigs.

  8. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of polymeric enteric nanoparticles as dermal carriers with pH-dependent targeting potential.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Fitsum Feleke; Balzus, Benjamin; Gerecke, Christian; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2016-09-20

    pH-sensitive nanoparticles which release in a controlled fashion on the skin or dissolve in the hair follicle could significantly improve treatment effectiveness and make transfollicular drug delivery a success. Dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation from an organic drug-polymer solution. Their toxicity potential was assessed using isolated human fibroblasts. pH-dependent swelling and erosion kinetics of the nanoparticles were investigated by dynamic light scattering and viscosity measurements and its effect on drug release was assessed in vitro with Franz diffusion cells. Stable, 100-550nm-sized dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles with drug loading capacity and entrapment efficiency as high as 8.3% and 85%, respectively, were obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizer and ethanol as organic solvent. The nanoparticles showed little or no toxicity on isolated normal human fibroblasts. Dexamethasone existed in the nanoparticles as solid solution or in amorphous form. The nanoparticles underwent extensive swelling and slow drug release in media with a low buffer capacity (as low as 10mM) and a higher pH or at a pH close to the dissolution pH of the polymer (pH6) and a higher buffer capacity. In 40mM buffer and above pH6.8, the nanoparticles eroded fast or dissolved completely and thus released the drug rapidly. pH-sensitive nanoparticles which potentially release in a controlled manner on the stratum corneum but dissolve in the hair follicle could be prepared. PMID:27393341

  9. Density-dependent groundwater flow and dissolution potential along a salt diapir in the Transylvanian Basin, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, Eric; Danchiv, Alex; Dresmann, Horst; Mocuţa, Marius; Huggenberger, Peter; Scheidler, Stefan; Wiesmeier, Stefan; Popa, Iulian; Zlibut, Alexandru; Zamfirescu, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Salt diapirs and the surrounding sediments are often involved in a variety of human activities, such as salt mining, exploration and storage of hydrocarbons, and also storage of radioactive waste material. The presence of highly soluble evaporitic rocks, a complex tectonic setting related to salt diapirsm, and human activities can lead to significant environmental problems, e.g. land subsidence, sinkhole development, salt cavern collapse, and contamination of water resources with brines. In the Transylvanian town of Ocna Mures. rock salt of a near-surface diapir has been explored since the Roman ages in open excavations, and up to the 20th century in galleries and with solution mining. Most recently, in 2010 a sudden collapse in the adjacent Quaternary unconsolidated sediments led to the formation of a 70-90m wide salt lake with a max. depth of 23m. Over the last 3 years a Romanian-Swiss research project has led to the development of 3D geological and hydrogeological information systems in order to improve knowledge on possible hazards related to uncontrolled salt dissolution. One aspect which has been investigated is the possibility of density-driven flow along permeable subvertical zones next to the salt dome, and the potential for subsaturated groundwater to dissolve the upper sides of the diapir. Structural 3D models of the salt diapir, the adjacent basin sediments, and the mining galleries, led to the development of 2D numerical vertical density-dependent models of flow and transport along the diapir. Results show that (1) increased rock permeability due to diapirsm, regional tectonic thrusting and previous dissolution, and (2) more permeable sandstone layers within the adjacent basin sediments may lead to freshwater intrusion towards the top of the diapir, and, therefore, to increased potential for salt dissolution.

  10. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of polymeric enteric nanoparticles as dermal carriers with pH-dependent targeting potential.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Fitsum Feleke; Balzus, Benjamin; Gerecke, Christian; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2016-09-20

    pH-sensitive nanoparticles which release in a controlled fashion on the skin or dissolve in the hair follicle could significantly improve treatment effectiveness and make transfollicular drug delivery a success. Dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation from an organic drug-polymer solution. Their toxicity potential was assessed using isolated human fibroblasts. pH-dependent swelling and erosion kinetics of the nanoparticles were investigated by dynamic light scattering and viscosity measurements and its effect on drug release was assessed in vitro with Franz diffusion cells. Stable, 100-550nm-sized dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles with drug loading capacity and entrapment efficiency as high as 8.3% and 85%, respectively, were obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizer and ethanol as organic solvent. The nanoparticles showed little or no toxicity on isolated normal human fibroblasts. Dexamethasone existed in the nanoparticles as solid solution or in amorphous form. The nanoparticles underwent extensive swelling and slow drug release in media with a low buffer capacity (as low as 10mM) and a higher pH or at a pH close to the dissolution pH of the polymer (pH6) and a higher buffer capacity. In 40mM buffer and above pH6.8, the nanoparticles eroded fast or dissolved completely and thus released the drug rapidly. pH-sensitive nanoparticles which potentially release in a controlled manner on the stratum corneum but dissolve in the hair follicle could be prepared.

  11. Polar polycyclic aromatic compounds from different coal types show varying mutagenic potential, EROD induction and bioavailability depending on coal rank.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wiebke; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Püttmann, Wilhelm; Hollert, Henner; Achten, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of the bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have rarely considered the heterogeneity of coals and the impact of more polar PAC besides polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Earlier, we investigated the toxicity of eight heterogeneous coals and their extracts. In the present study, the hazard potential with respect to mechanism-specific toxicity of polar fractions of dichloromethane extracts from coals was studied. Polar extract fractions of all coal types except for anthracite induced EROD activity (determined in RTL-W1 cells), independent of coal type (Bio-TEQs between 23 ± 16 and 52 ± 22 ng/g). The polar fractions of all bituminous coal extracts revealed mutagenic activity (determined using the Ames Fluctuation test). No significant mutation induction was detected for the polar extract fractions from the lignite, sub-bituminous coal and anthracite samples, which indicates a higher dependency on coal type for polar PAC here. Additionally, information on bioavailability was derived from a bioaccumulation test using the deposit-feeding oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus which was exposed for 28 days to ground coal samples. Despite the high toxic potential of most coal extracts and a reduced biomass of Lumbriculus in bituminous coal samples, bioaccumulation of PAH and mortality after 28 days were found to be low. Limited bioaccumulation of PAH (up to 3.6 ± 3.8 mg/kg EPA-PAH) and polar PAC were observed for all coal samples. A significant reduction of Lumbriculus biomass was observed in the treatments containing bituminous coals (from 0.019 ± 0.004 g to 0.046 ± 0.011 g compared to 0.080 ± 0.025 g per replicate in control treatments). We conclude that bioavailability of native PAC from coals including polar PAC is low for all investigated coal types. In comparison to lignite, sub-bituminous coals and anthracite, the bioavailability of PAC from bituminous coals is slightly increased.

  12. Higher diet-dependent renal acid load associates with higher glucocorticoid secretion and potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Esche, Jonas; Shi, Lijie; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Remer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic acidosis induces elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels. However, the influence of less strong daily acid loads on GCs is largely unexplored. To investigate this, we studied whether higher acid loads in children, fully within the normal range of habitual diets, associate with endogenous GCs. In a specific quasi-experimental design, we examined 200 6- to 10-year-old healthy participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study equally divided to either high or low 24-hour renal net acid excretion. Major urinary GC metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to assess daily adrenal GC secretion and metabolites of tissue cortisol catabolism (6β-hydroxycortisol and 20α-dihydrocortisol). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify urinary free cortisol and cortisone. After confounder adjustment, significant positive associations were unmasked for urinary potential renal acid load and net acid excretion with adrenal GC secretion, free cortisone, free cortisone plus cortisol, 6β-hydroxycortisol, and 20α-dihydrocortisol. An inverse association emerged for an enzymatic marker (5β-reductase) of irreversible GC inactivation. Our data suggest that existing moderate elevations in diet-dependent acid loads suffice to raise GCs and affect cortisol metabolism. Thus, potential detrimental effects of high acid loading appear to be mediated, in part, by increased GC activity via increased GC secretion and/or reduced GC inactivation. Higher cortisone levels, directly available for intracrine activation to cortisol may play a special role. PMID:27165611

  13. Surface-Facet-Dependent Phonon Deformation Potential in Individual Strained Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuan; Zhou, Xu; Jin, Han; Li, Cai-Zhen; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Dressel, Martin; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2015-10-27

    Strain is an important method to tune the properties of topological insulators. For example, compressive strain can induce superconductivity in Bi2Se3 bulk material. Topological insulator nanostructures are the superior candidates to utilize the unique surface states due to the large surface to volume ratio. Therefore, it is highly desirable to monitor the local strain effects in individual topological insulator nanostructures. Here, we report the systematical micro-Raman spectra of single strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons with different thicknesses and different surface facets, where four optical modes are resolved in both Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectral lines. A striking anisotropy of the strain dependence is observed in the phonon frequency of strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons grown along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction. The frequencies of the in-plane Eg(2) and out-of-plane A1g(1) modes exhibit a nearly linear blue-shift against bending strain when the nanoribbon is bent along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction with the curved {0001} surface. In this case, the phonon deformation potential of the Eg(2) phonon for 100 nm-thick Bi2Se3 nanoribbon is up to 0.94 cm(–1)/%, which is twice of that in Bi2Se3 bulk material (0.52 cm(–1)/%). Our results may be valuable for the strain modulation of individual topological insulator nanostructures.

  14. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  15. Analytical solitonlike solutions and the dynamics of ultracold Fermi gases in a time-dependent three-dimensional harmonic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Luo, Guosen; Zhou, Yu; Hang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of solitonlike solutions and their dynamics of ultracold superfluid Fermi gases trapped in a time-dependent three-dimensional (3D) harmonic potential with gain or loss. The 3D analytical solitonlike solutions are obtained without introducing any additional integrability constraints used elsewhere. The propagation of both bright- and dark-soliton-like solutions is investigated. We show that the amplitudes of dark-soliton-like solutions exhibit periodic oscillation, whereas those of the bright-soliton-like ones do not show such behavior. Moreover, we highlight that the oscillation periods of dark-soliton-like solutions predicted by our approach are matched very well with those observed in a recent experiment carried out by Yefsah et al. [T. Yefsah, A. T. Sommer, M. J. H. Ku, L. W. Cheuk, W. Ji, W. S. Bakr, and M. W. Zwierlein, Nature (London) 499, 426 (2013)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature12338] in both Bose-Einstein condensation and unitarity regimes.

  16. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  17. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion. PMID:25243062

  18. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  19. Temperature-dependent evaluation of Nd:LiCAF optical properties as potential vacuum ultraviolet laser material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Yuki; Arita, Ren; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Pham, Minh Hong; Empizo, Melvin John Fernandez; Luong, Mui Viet; Hori, Tatsuhiro; Takabatake, Masahiro; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Mori, Kazuyuki; Yamanoi, Kohei; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature-dependent optical properties of Nd3+-doped LiCaAlF6 (Nd:LiCAF) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region. The 172-nm absorption edge does not seem to experience any significant blue shift as temperature is decreased from room temperature down to 30 K. This is confirmed by excitation spectra for the same temperature range. Several energy levels in the excited state configuration are observed. Based on these energy levels, the dominant emission peak at 177 nm is assigned to the allowed dipole transition from the 4f25d configuration of Nd3+ and the 4I11/2 level of the 4f3 ground state configuration. The position of the dominant 177-nm emission peak appears to be fixed across the temperature range considered. Our results suggest that the spectral overlap between the excitation and emission spectra should not increase as temperature is raised, possibly making Nd:LiCAF a potential VUV laser gain medium operating at room temperature.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Keller, Jason; Kesavapany, Sashi; Agarwal, Nitin; Kuner, Rohini; Pant, Harish C.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated cation channel highly expressed in small-diameter sensory neurons, is activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin. The phosphorylation of TRPV1 provides a versatile regulation of intracellular calcium levels and is critical for TRPV1 function in responding to a pain stimulus. We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity regulates nociceptive signaling. In this article we report that the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 can modulate agonist-induced calcium influx. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons resulted in a significant reduction of TRPV1-mediated calcium influx, and this effect could be reversed by restoring Cdk5 activity. Primary nociceptor-specific Cdk5 conditional-knockout mice showed reduced TRPV1 phosphorylation, resulting in significant hypoalgesia. Thus, the present study indicates that Cdk5-mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation is important in the regulation of pain signaling. PMID:17194758

  1. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, Ireneusz Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam; Fabiano, Eduardo; Teale, Andrew M.; Sala, Fabio Della

    2014-07-14

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of scaling the same- and opposite- spin components is investigated in detail comparing OEP results with Kohn–Sham (KS) quantities determined via an inversion procedure using accurate ab initio electronic densities. Special attention is dedicated in particular to the recently proposed scaled-opposite–spin OEP functional [I. Grabowski, E. Fabiano, and F. Della Sala, Phys. Rev. B 87, 075103 (2013)] which is the most advantageous from a computational point of view. We find that for high accuracy, a careful, system dependent, selection of the scaling coefficient is required. We analyse several size-extensive approaches for this selection. Finally, we find that a composite approach, named OEP2-SOSh, based on a post-SCF rescaling of the correlation energy can yield high accuracy for many properties, being comparable with the most accurate OEP procedures previously reported in the literature but at substantially reduced computational effort.

  2. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Melanie A.; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up. PMID:26109571

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor–dependent enrichment of a megakaryocytic precursor with a high potential to produce proplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Nathalie; Mallo, Lea; Receveur, Nicolas; Mangin, Pierre; Eckly, Anita; Bieche, Ivan; Tarte, Karin; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating megakaryopoiesis and platelet production (thrombopoiesis) are still incompletely understood. Identification of a progenitor with enhanced thrombopoietic capacity would be useful to decipher these mechanisms and to improve our capacity to produce platelets in vitro. Differentiation of peripheral blood CD34+ cells in the presence of bone marrow–human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhanced the production of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelet-like elements. This was accompanied by enrichment in a MK precursor population exhibiting an intermediate level of CD41 positivity while maintaining its expression of CD34. Following sorting and subculture with MSCs, this CD34+CD41low population was able to efficiently generate proplatelet-bearing MKs and platelet-like particles. Similarly, StemRegenin 1 (SR1), an antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor known to maintain CD34 expression of progenitor cells, led to an enriched CD34+CD41low fraction and to an increased capacity to generate proplatelet-producing MKs and platelet-like elements ultrastructurally and functionally similar to circulating platelets. The effect of MSCs, like that of SR1, appeared to be mediated by an AhR-dependent mechanism because both culture conditions resulted in repression of its downstream effector CYP1B1. This newly described isolation of a precursor exhibiting strong MK potential could be exploited to study normal and abnormal thrombopoiesis and for in vitro platelet production. PMID:26966088

  4. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  5. Vanishing rainbows near orbiting and the energy dependence of rainbow scattering - Relation to properties of the potential. [molecular beam scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. F.; Hall, R. B.; Mason, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The energy threshold behavior of elastic rainbow scattering near the transition to orbiting is derived. Analysis of the energy dependence of the rainbow angle shows that the full range from high energies down to orbiting can be fitted with two parameters. Thus, measurements of the rainbow angle can give essentially only two pieces of information about the potential. For potentials of common shapes, such measurements are sensitive to regions of the potential just beyond the minimum and give information about the shape of the potential in this range. However, neither a minimum nor a point of inflection in the potential is necessary for rainbow scattering.

  6. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr).

    PubMed

    Doss, Michael Xavier; Di Diego, José M; Goodrow, Robert J; Wu, Yuesheng; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Urrutia, Janire; Desai, Mayurika; Treat, Jacqueline A; Sachinidis, Agapios; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP) from spontaneously beating clusters (BC) micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C) and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21) or BaCl(2) (n = 22). Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr) and I(K1) from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C). Spontaneous cycle length (CL) and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21) increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (p<0.001) and generated early afterdepolarizations in 8/21 preparations. In 13/21 BC, E-4031 rapidly depolarized the clusters leading to inexcitability. BaCl(2), at concentrations that selectively block I(K1) (50-100 µM), failed to depolarize the majority of clusters (13/22). Patch-clamp experiments revealed very low or negligible I(K1) in 53% (20/38) of the cells studied, but presence of I(Kr) in all (11/11). Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1) in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr.) In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd). The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr) due to the

  7. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches

  8. AMPA receptor potentiation by acetylcholinesterase is age-dependently upregulated at synaptogenesis sites of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Silvia; Henley, Jeremy M.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have used radioligand binding to synaptic membranes from distinct rat brain regions and quantitative autoradiography to investigate the postnatal evolution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-evoked up-regulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in CNS areas undergoing synaptogenesis. Incubation of synaptosomal membranes or brain sections with purified AChE caused a developmentally modulated enhancement in the binding of [3H]-(S)–AMPA and the specific AMPA receptor ligand [3H]-(S)-5–fluorowillardiine, but did not modify binding to kainate neither N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In all postnatal ages investigated (4, 7, 14, 20, 27, 40 days-old and adult rats), AChE effect on binding was concentration-dependent and blocked by propidium, BW 284c51, diisopropylfluorophosphonate and eserine, therefore requiring indemnity of both peripheral and active sites of the enzyme. AChE-mediated enhancement of [3H]-fluorowillardiine binding was measurable in all major CNS areas, but displayed remarkable anatomical selectivity and developmental regulation. Autoradiograph densitometry exhibited distinct temporal profiles and peaks of treated/control binding ratios for different cortices, cortical layers, and nuclei. Within the parietal, occipital and temporal neocortices, hippocampal CA1 field and cerebellum, AChE-potentiated binding ratios peaked in chronological correspondence with synaptogenesis periods of the respective AMPA-receptor containing targets. This modulation of AMPA receptors by AChE is a molecular mechanism able to transduce localized neural activity into durable modifications of synaptic molecular structure and function. It might also contribute to AChE-mediated neurotoxicity, as postulated in Alzheimer’s disease and other CNS disorders. PMID:12565696

  9. From event-related potential to oscillations: genetic diathesis in brain (dys)function and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Porjesz, Bernice

    2008-01-01

    Recording the brain's electrical activity using electrodes placed on the individual's scalp provides noninvasive sensitive measures of brain function in humans. Regardless of whether an individual receives sensory information or performs higher cognitive processes, the brain regions involved exhibit measurable electrical activity, and by recording this activity with numerous electrodes placed on different areas of the scalp, researchers can determine when and where in the brain information processing occurs. Two general approaches can be used to record these neuroelectric phenomena: The continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) records brain activity when the subject is at rest and not involved in a task. It reflects the sum of the random activity of thousands of neurons that have similar spatial orientation in the brain. This activity typically fluctuates in wave-like patterns, and depending on the frequency of these patterns, one distinguishes different brain waves called δ (frequency of 1 to 3 Hz), θ (frequency of 4 to 7 Hz), α (frequency of 8 to 12 Hz), β (frequency of 12 to 28 Hz), and γ (frequency of 28+ Hz) rhythms. Variations in the patterns of these brain waves can indicate the level of consciousness, psychological state, or presence of neurological disorders. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are recorded while the subject is performing a sensory or cognitive task. They reflect the summated activity of network ensembles active during the task and are characterized by a specific pattern called the waveform, which is composed of negative and positive deflections (i.e., waves). For example, a target stimulus detected amidst a series of other nontarget stimuli produces a positive wave around 300 milliseconds after the stimulus. This is known as the P300 or P3 response.

  10. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches

  11. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  12. A Context-Dependent View on the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis: Language Use and SES as Potential Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevoo, Mariëlle J. L.; Malda, Maike; Emmen, Rosanneke A. G.; Yeniad, Nihal; Mesman, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The linguistic interdependence hypothesis states that the development of skills in a second language (L2) partly depends on the skill level in the first language (L1). It has been suggested that the theory lacked attention for differential interdependence. In this study we test what we call the hypothesis of context-dependent linguistic…

  13. Two strictly polyphosphate-dependent gluco(manno)kinases from diazotrophic Cyanobacteria with potential to phosphorylate hexoses from polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2015-05-01

    The single-copy genes encoding putative polyphosphate-glucose phosphotransferases (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) from two nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria, Nostoc sp. PCC7120 and Nostoc punctiforme PCC73102, were cloned and functionally characterized. In contrast to their actinobacterial counterparts, the cyanobacterial PPGKs have shown the ability to phosphorylate glucose using strictly inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) as phosphoryl donors. This has proven to be an economically attractive reagent in contrast to the more costly ATP. Cyanobacterial PPGKs had a higher affinity for medium-long-sized polyP (greater than ten phosphoryl residues). Thus, longer polyP resulted in higher catalytic efficiency. Also in contrast to most their homologs in Actinobacteria, both cyanobacterial PPGKs exhibited a modest but significant polyP-mannokinase activity as well. Specific activities were in the range of 180-230 and 2-3 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with glucose and mannose as substrates, respectively. No polyP-fructokinase activity was detected. Cyanobacterial PPGKs required a divalent metal cofactor and exhibited alkaline pH optima (approx. 9.0) and a remarkable thermostability (optimum temperature, 45 °C). The preference for Mg(2+) was noted with an affinity constant of 1.3 mM. Both recombinant PPGKs are homodimers with a subunit molecular mass of ca. 27 kDa. Based on database searches and experimental data from Southern blots and activity assays, closely related PPGK homologs appear to be widespread among unicellular and filamentous mostly nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. Overall, these findings indicate that polyP may be metabolized in these photosynthetic prokaryotes to yield glucose (or mannose) 6-phosphate. They also provide evidence for a novel group-specific subfamily of strictly polyP-dependent gluco(manno)kinases with ancestral features and high biotechnological potential, capable of efficiently using polyP as an alternative and cheap source of energy-rich phosphate instead of costly ATP

  14. Two strictly polyphosphate-dependent gluco(manno)kinases from diazotrophic Cyanobacteria with potential to phosphorylate hexoses from polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2015-05-01

    The single-copy genes encoding putative polyphosphate-glucose phosphotransferases (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) from two nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria, Nostoc sp. PCC7120 and Nostoc punctiforme PCC73102, were cloned and functionally characterized. In contrast to their actinobacterial counterparts, the cyanobacterial PPGKs have shown the ability to phosphorylate glucose using strictly inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) as phosphoryl donors. This has proven to be an economically attractive reagent in contrast to the more costly ATP. Cyanobacterial PPGKs had a higher affinity for medium-long-sized polyP (greater than ten phosphoryl residues). Thus, longer polyP resulted in higher catalytic efficiency. Also in contrast to most their homologs in Actinobacteria, both cyanobacterial PPGKs exhibited a modest but significant polyP-mannokinase activity as well. Specific activities were in the range of 180-230 and 2-3 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with glucose and mannose as substrates, respectively. No polyP-fructokinase activity was detected. Cyanobacterial PPGKs required a divalent metal cofactor and exhibited alkaline pH optima (approx. 9.0) and a remarkable thermostability (optimum temperature, 45 °C). The preference for Mg(2+) was noted with an affinity constant of 1.3 mM. Both recombinant PPGKs are homodimers with a subunit molecular mass of ca. 27 kDa. Based on database searches and experimental data from Southern blots and activity assays, closely related PPGK homologs appear to be widespread among unicellular and filamentous mostly nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. Overall, these findings indicate that polyP may be metabolized in these photosynthetic prokaryotes to yield glucose (or mannose) 6-phosphate. They also provide evidence for a novel group-specific subfamily of strictly polyP-dependent gluco(manno)kinases with ancestral features and high biotechnological potential, capable of efficiently using polyP as an alternative and cheap source of energy-rich phosphate instead of costly ATP

  15. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  16. INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENTAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    Genetically increasing the function of oncogenes or knocking out the function of a tumor supressor gene has dramatically increased the...

  17. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  18. Monitoring of PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase substrate specificity for its potential use in biocatalysis and bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Streďanský, Miroslav; Monošík, Rastislav; Mastihuba, Vladimír; Sturdík, Ernest

    2013-10-01

    Substrate specificity of 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase was investigated in biosensor arrangement for understanding the suitability and the limitations of its use in bioanalysis and bioproduction of chemicals. The study demonstrated a very broad substrate specificity of biosensor utilising soluble form of PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase. Nineteen saccharides out of 31 were oxidised by the sensor. Investigation confirmed strong importance of hydroxyl configuration in the positions 2 and 5 of oxidised saccharides. The broad specificity suggests that the PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase could be utilised for analysis of other sugars than glucose in food samples for various production processes and for biofuel cells. In addition, the results showed that the substrate specificity of enzymes can be effectively and generally studied by biosensor arrangement for research purposes. This layout utilising immobilised enzyme allowed performing comprehensive study using a small amount of enzymes and thus saving the costs and time.

  19. Dynamic subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40, a potential new mechanism of ABA-dependent transcription factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Geilen, Katja; Böhmer, Maik

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ABA plays a major role during plant development, e.g. seed maturation and seed germination, and during adaptation to abiotic stresses like stomatal aperture regulation. The three closely related WRKY transcription factors WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 function in ABA signal transduction. We recently demonstrated that WRKY18 and WRKY40 but not WRKY60 localize to nuclear bodies in A. thaliana mesophyll protoplasts. WRKY40, a negative regulator of ABA-dependent inhibition of seed germination, relocalizes from PNBs to the nucleoplasm in the presence of ABA in a dynamic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40 might constitute a new regulatory mechanism of ABA-dependent modulation of transcription factor activity. PMID:26479147

  20. In skeletal muscle the relaxation of the resting membrane potential induced by K(+) permeability changes depends on Cl(-) transport.

    PubMed

    Geukes Foppen, R J

    2004-01-01

    In resting skeletal muscle the potassium permeability is determined by the permeability of the inwardly potassium rectifier. Continuous resting membrane potential measurements are done to follow the relaxation of the membrane potential upon changes in potassium permeability. Inhibition of the inwardly potassium rectifier, by extracellular application of 80 microM Ba(2+), causes the cell to depolarize with mean time constants as follows: in control 127+/-7 s ( n=23), in the presence of bumetanide, as an inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter, 182+/-23 s ( n=7), in hypertonic media (340 mosmol/kg) 90.4+/-5 s ( n=7) and in reduced chloride medium 64+/-8 s ( n=5). The depolarizing relaxation of the membrane potential induced by reduction of extracellular potassium produces similar results. These time constants are at least three orders of magnitude slower than the time constants reported in the literature for the inhibition of the inwardly potassium rectifier. Chloride transport affects the relaxation of the membrane potential. A further characterization of chloride transport is done by following the relaxation of the membrane potential upon application of chloride transport modulators. It is argued that the electroneutral cotransporter, for which a flux was preliminarily estimated of 13.4 pmol cm(-2) s(-1), has a considerable role in the processes related to the resting membrane potential.

  1. Host sex-dependent growth of potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells that appear in the thymus of X-irradiated NFS mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, N.; Takamori, Y. )

    1990-01-01

    During the course of studies designed to detect potentially leukemic cells in radiation lymphomagenesis, using an opposite-sex (male----female) transplantation assay method, we previously found that potential Thy-1- lymphoma cells are generated in the bone marrow of NFS mice exposed to a split-dose irradiation (1.7 Gy X 4), while potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells are not detectable. In this report, using a (female----male) intrathymic transplantation assay system we show that potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells were generated in the thymus of female NFS mice exposed to split-dose irradiation, and reconfirm that such cells were not detected in the (male----female) transplantation system. These results demonstrate that the detection of potential Thy-1+ lymphoma cells strictly depends on the transplantation system.

  2. Observation of growth mode dependence on over-potential values: a combination of in-situ optical monitoring and ex-situ atomic force microscopy characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. K.; Gray, J.; Moffat, T.; Orme, C.; Schwarzacher, W.; Zhu, X. D.

    2005-03-01

    We study the over-potential electrodeposition of Pb on Cu(100) using a combination of an in-situ oblique-incidence reflectivity difference technique and ex-situ atomic force microscopy. We identified two distinctly different over-potential growth modes that depend on the values of the overpotential. We have characterized the morphology corresponding to the two growth modes using AFM. At a high over-potential there is even growth of small clusters across the monolayer thick under-potential deposited (UPD) Pb covered Cu(100) surface. At lower over-potentials (a fraction of a volt from the value for UPD), we observed much larger 3-D clusters, more than 400 nm in height and separated by an averaged distance of one micron.

  3. Molecular dissection of lubeluzole use-dependent block of voltage-gated sodium channels discloses new therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Carbonara, Roberta; Costanza, Teresa; Lentini, Giovanni; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; Franchini, Carlo; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2013-02-01

    Lubeluzole, which acts on various targets in vitro, including voltage-gated sodium channels, was initially proposed as a neuroprotectant. The lubeluzole structure contains a benzothiazole moiety [N-methyl-1,3-benzothiazole-2-amine (R-like)] related to riluzole and a phenoxy-propranol-amine moiety [(RS)-1-(3,4-difluorophenoxy)-3-(piperidin-1-yl)propan-2-ol (A-core)] recalling propranolol. Both riluzole and propranolol are efficient sodium channel blockers. We studied in detail the effects of lubeluzole (racemic mixture and single isomers), the aforementioned lubeluzole moieties, and riluzole on sodium channels to increase our knowledge of drug-channel molecular interactions. Compounds were tested on hNav1.4 sodium channels, and on F1586C or Y1593C mutants functionally expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, using the patch-clamp technique. Lubeluzole blocked sodium channels with a remarkable effectiveness. No stereoselectivity was found. Compared with mexiletine, the dissociation constant for inactivated channels was ~600 times lower (~11 nM), conferring to lubeluzole a huge use-dependence of great therapeutic value. The F1586C mutation only partially impaired the use-dependent block, suggesting that additional amino acids are critically involved in high-affinity binding. Lubeluzole moieties were modest sodium channel blockers. Riluzole blocked sodium channels efficiently but lacked use dependence, similar to R-like. F1586C fully abolished A-core use dependence, suggesting that A-core binds to the local anesthetic receptor. Thus, lubeluzole likely binds to the local anesthetic receptor through its phenoxy-propranol-amine moiety, with consequent use-dependent behavior. Nevertheless, compared with other known sodium channel blockers, lubeluzole adds a third pharmacophoric point through its benzothiazole moiety, which greatly enhances high-affinity binding and use-dependent block. If sufficient isoform specificity can be attained, the huge use-dependent block

  4. Validation of differential GDAP1 DNA methylation in alcohol dependence and its potential function as a biomarker for disease severity and therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Brückmann, Christof; Di Santo, Adriana; Karle, Kathrin Nora; Batra, Anil; Nieratschker, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol dependence is a severe disorder contributing substantially to the global burden of disease. Despite the detrimental consequences of chronic alcohol abuse and dependence, effective prevention strategies as well as treatment options are largely missing to date. Accumulating evidence suggests that gene-environment interactions, including epigenetic mechanisms, play a role in the etiology of alcohol dependence. A recent epigenome-wide study reported widespread alterations of DNA methylation patterns in alcohol dependent patients compared to control individuals. In the present study, we validate and replicate one of the top findings from this previous investigation in an independent cohort: the hypomethylation of GDAP1 in patients. To our knowledge, this is the first independent replication of an epigenome-wide finding in alcohol dependence. Furthermore, the AUDIT as well as the GSI score were negatively associated with GDAP1 methylation and we found a trend toward a negative association between GDAP1 methylation and the years of alcohol dependency, pointing toward a potential role of GDAP1 hypomethylation as biomarker for disease severity. In addition, we show that the hypomethylation of GDAP1 in patients reverses during a short-term alcohol treatment program, suggesting that GDAP1 DNA methylation could also serve as a potential biomarker for treatment outcome. Our data add to the growing body of knowledge on epigenetic effects in alcohol dependence and support GDAP1 as a novel candidate gene implicated in this disorder. As the role of GDAP1 in alcohol dependence is unknown, this novel candidate gene should be followed up in future studies.

  5. Kohn–Sham approach to quantum electrodynamical density-functional theory: Exact time-dependent effective potentials in real space

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The density-functional approach to quantum electrodynamics extends traditional density-functional theory and opens the possibility to describe electron–photon interactions in terms of effective Kohn–Sham potentials. In this work, we numerically construct the exact electron–photon Kohn–Sham potentials for a prototype system that consists of a trapped electron coupled to a quantized electromagnetic mode in an optical high-Q cavity. Although the effective current that acts on the photons is known explicitly, the exact effective potential that describes the forces exerted by the photons on the electrons is obtained from a fixed-point inversion scheme. This procedure allows us to uncover important beyond-mean-field features of the effective potential that mark the breakdown of classical light–matter interactions. We observe peak and step structures in the effective potentials, which can be attributed solely to the quantum nature of light; i.e., they are real-space signatures of the photons. Our findings show how the ubiquitous dipole interaction with a classical electromagnetic field has to be modified in real space to take the quantum nature of the electromagnetic field fully into account. PMID:26627715

  6. Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamical density-functional theory: Exact time-dependent effective potentials in real space.

    PubMed

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-12-15

    The density-functional approach to quantum electrodynamics extends traditional density-functional theory and opens the possibility to describe electron-photon interactions in terms of effective Kohn-Sham potentials. In this work, we numerically construct the exact electron-photon Kohn-Sham potentials for a prototype system that consists of a trapped electron coupled to a quantized electromagnetic mode in an optical high-Q cavity. Although the effective current that acts on the photons is known explicitly, the exact effective potential that describes the forces exerted by the photons on the electrons is obtained from a fixed-point inversion scheme. This procedure allows us to uncover important beyond-mean-field features of the effective potential that mark the breakdown of classical light-matter interactions. We observe peak and step structures in the effective potentials, which can be attributed solely to the quantum nature of light; i.e., they are real-space signatures of the photons. Our findings show how the ubiquitous dipole interaction with a classical electromagnetic field has to be modified in real space to take the quantum nature of the electromagnetic field fully into account. PMID:26627715

  7. Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamical density-functional theory: Exact time-dependent effective potentials in real space.

    PubMed

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-12-15

    The density-functional approach to quantum electrodynamics extends traditional density-functional theory and opens the possibility to describe electron-photon interactions in terms of effective Kohn-Sham potentials. In this work, we numerically construct the exact electron-photon Kohn-Sham potentials for a prototype system that consists of a trapped electron coupled to a quantized electromagnetic mode in an optical high-Q cavity. Although the effective current that acts on the photons is known explicitly, the exact effective potential that describes the forces exerted by the photons on the electrons is obtained from a fixed-point inversion scheme. This procedure allows us to uncover important beyond-mean-field features of the effective potential that mark the breakdown of classical light-matter interactions. We observe peak and step structures in the effective potentials, which can be attributed solely to the quantum nature of light; i.e., they are real-space signatures of the photons. Our findings show how the ubiquitous dipole interaction with a classical electromagnetic field has to be modified in real space to take the quantum nature of the electromagnetic field fully into account.

  8. Nitric oxide-dependent long-term depression but not endocannabinoid-mediated long-term potentiation is crucial for visual recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Barker, Gareth; Warburton, E Clea; Burattini, Costanza; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bashir, Zafar I

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in perirhinal cortex is essential for recognition memory. Nitric oxide and endocannabinoids (eCBs), which are produced in the postsynaptic cell and act on the presynaptic terminal, are implicated in mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in other brain regions. In this study, we examine these two retrograde signalling cascades in perirhinal cortex synaptic plasticity and in visual recognition memory in the rat. We show that inhibition of NO-dependent signalling prevented both carbachol- and activity (5 Hz)-dependent LTD but not activity (100 Hz theta burst)-dependent LTP in the rat perirhinal cortex in vitro. In contrast, inhibition of the eCB-dependent signalling prevented LTP but not the two forms of LTD in vitro. Local administration into perirhinal cortex of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NPA (2 μm) disrupted acquisition of long-term visual recognition memory. In contrast, AM251 (10 μm), a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, did not impair visual recognition memory. The results of this study demonstrate dissociation between putative retrograde signalling mechanisms in LTD and LTP in perirhinal cortex. Thus, LTP relies on cannabinoid but not NO signalling, whilst LTD relies on NO- but not eCB-dependent signalling. Critically, these results also establish, for the first time, that NO- but not eCB-dependent signalling is important in perirhinal cortex-dependent visual recognition memory. PMID:23671159

  9. Potential Dependent Adlayer Structures of a Sulfur-Covered Au(111) Electrode in Alkaline Solution: An in Situ STM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaup, C.; Friebel, D.; Broekmann, P.; Wandelt, K.; /Bonn U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-05-11

    A sulfur-covered Au(1 1 1) electrode ({Theta}{sub S} = 0.33 ML) subjected to potential increases in an S-free NaOH solution, i.e., at a fixed S coverage, leads to the reversible formation of a rhombic phase at anodic potentials. The local S coverage increase which is required for the formation of the rhombic phase results from a coverage decrease within the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} regions, where single-S-atom-defects and, in later stages, S vacancy islands are formed. Due to the high potential induced S-Au bond strength, it was possible for the first time to retain islands of this incomplete ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} S layer in the 2D solid state. Furthermore, a Au mass transport was observed during the growth of the rhombic phase. This clearly calls for a reinterpretation of its chemical nature.

  10. Visual evoked potentials in parkinsonism and dopamine blockade reveal a stimulus-dependent dopamine function in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M; Ghilardi, M F; Basciani, M; Gambi, D

    1986-01-01

    VEPs were recorded with three different spatial frequencies of stimulation in patients affected by idiopathic Parkinsonism and by Parkinsonian syndromes. The detection of VEP abnormalities in Parkinson's disease was dependent on the spatial frequency of the visual stimulus (a vertical square wave grating). The VEP latency was normal in Parkinsonian syndrome patients (except in one patient affected by familial Parkinsonism). Dopamine precursor therapy differently reduced the VEP latency, depending on the spatial frequency of the visual stimulus. These findings suggest that the dopaminergic mechanism involved in the generation of VEP delays is sensitive to stimulus spatial frequency. The study of VEPs before and after the administration of haloperidol confirmed this hypothesis. VEP latency did not correlate with the major clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease and could not predict the results of chronic dopaminergic therapy. PMID:3023551

  11. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  12. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  13. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  14. Fasiglifam (TAK-875) has dual potentiating mechanisms via Gαq-GPR40/FFAR1 signaling branches on glucose-dependent insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Kensuke; Yabuki, Chiori; Maruyama, Minoru; Abiru, Akiko; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Negoro, Nobuyuki; Tsujihata, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Koji; Habata, Yugo; Mori, Masaaki

    2016-06-01

    Fasiglifam (TAK-875) is a free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1)/G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) agonist that improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes with minimum risk of hypoglycemia. Fasiglifam potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells glucose dependently, although the precise mechanism underlying the glucose dependency still remains unknown. Here, we investigated key cross-talk between the GSIS pathway and FFAR1 signaling, and Ca(2+) dynamics using mouse insulinoma MIN6 cells. We demonstrated that the glucose-dependent insulinotropic effect of fasiglifam required membrane depolarization and that fasiglifam induced a glucose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and amplification of Ca(2+) oscillations. This differed from the sulfonylurea glimepiride that induced changes in Ca(2+) dynamics glucose independently. Stimulation with cell-permeable analogs of IP3 or diacylglycerol (DAG), downstream second messengers of Gαq-FFAR1, augmented GSIS similar to fasiglifam, indicating their individual roles in the potentiation of GSIS pathway. Intriguingly, the IP3 analog triggered similar Ca(2+) dynamics to fasiglifam, whereas the DAG analog had no effect. Despite the lack of an effect on Ca(2+) dynamics, the DAG analog elicited synergistic effects on insulin secretion with Ca(2+) influx evoked by an L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel opener that mimics glucose-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics. These results indicate that the Gαq signaling activated by fasiglifam enhances GSIS pathway via dual potentiating mechanisms in which IP3 amplifies glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and DAG/protein kinase C (PKC) augments downstream secretory mechanisms independent of Ca(2+) oscillations. PMID:27433346

  15. Characterization of the H2- and CO-dependent chemolithotrophic potentials of the acetogens Clostridium thermoaceticum and Acetogenium kivui.

    PubMed

    Daniel, S L; Hsu, T; Dean, S I; Drake, H L

    1990-08-01

    Strains of Clostridium thermoaceticum were tested for H2- and CO-dependent growth in a defined medium containing metals, minerals, vitamins, cysteine-sulfide, CO2-bicarbonate, and H2 or CO. Ten of the thirteen strains tested grew at the expense of H2 and CO, and C. thermoaceticum ATCC 39073 was chosen for further study. The doubling times for H2- and CO-dependent growth under chemolithotrophic conditions (the defined medium with nicotinic acid as sole essential vitamin and sulfide as sole reducer) were 25 and 10 h, respectively. Product stiochiometries for chemolithotrophic cultures approximated: 4.1H2 + 2.4CO2----CH3COOH + 0.1 cell C + 0.3 unrecovered C and 6.8CO----CH3COOH + 3.5CO2 + 0.4 cell C + 0.9 unrecovered C. H2-dependent growth produced significantly higher acetate concentrations per unit of biomass synthesized than did CO- or glucose-dependent growth. In contrast, the doubling time for H2-dependent growth under chemolithotrophic conditions (the defined medium without vitamins and sulfide as sole reducer) by Acetogenium kivui ATCC 33488 was 2.7 h; as a sole energy source, CO was not growth supportive for A. kivui. The YH2 values for A. kivui and C. thermoaceticum were 0.91 and 0.46 g of cell dry weight per mol of H2 consumed, respectively; the YCO value for C. thermoaceticum was 1.28 g of cell dry weight per mol of CO consumed. The specific activities of hydrogenase and CO dehydrogenase in both acetogens were influenced by the energy source utilized for growth and were significantly lower in C. thermoaceticum than in A. kivui. With extracts of H2-cultivated cells and benzyl viologen as electron acceptor, the Vmax values for hydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum and A. kivui were 155.7 and 1,670 micromoles of H2 oxidized per min mg of protein, respectively; the Vmax values for CO dehydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum and A. kivui were 90.6 and 2,973 micromoles of CO oxidized per min per mg of protein, respectively.

  16. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  17. Corticosterone Time-Dependently Modulates [beta]-Adrenergic Effects on Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Zhenwei; Krugers, Harm J.; Joels, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining whether corticosterone exerts opposite effects on…

  18. Activity-Dependent Calpain Activation Plays a Critical Role in Synaptic Facilitation and Post-Tetanic Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Spira, Micha E.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) are believed to necessitate active regeneration of the release machinery and supply of synaptic vesicles to a ready-releasable site. The prevailing hypothesis assumes that synapsins play pivotal roles in these processes. Using a cholinergic synapse formed between cultured "Aplysia" neurons…

  19. A Protein Synthesis and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Presynaptic Enhancement in Persistent Forms of Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Victoria P. A.; Raymond, Clarke R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important process underlying learning and memory in the brain. At CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus, three discrete forms of LTP (LTP1, 2, and 3) can be differentiated on the basis of maintenance and induction mechanisms. However, the relative roles of pre- and post-synaptic expression mechanisms in LTP1, 2,…

  20. Investigation of Bohr Hamiltonian in the presence of time-dependent Manning-Rosen, harmonic oscillator and double ring shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    This paper contains study of Bohr Hamiltonian considering time-dependent form of two important and famous nuclear potentials and harmonic oscillator. Dependence on time in interactions is considered in general form. In order to investigate this system, a powerful mathematical method has been employed, so-called Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method. Appropriate dynamical invariant for considered system has been constructed. Then its eigen functions and the wave function are derived. At the end, we discussed about physical meaning of the results.

  1. Dependence of the 0.7 anomaly on the curvature of the potential barrier in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Hamilton, A. R.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-06-01

    Ninety-eight one-dimensional channels defined using split gates fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure are measured during one cooldown at 1.4 K. The devices are arranged in an array on a single chip and are individually addressed using a multiplexing technique. The anomalous conductance feature known as the "0.7 structure" is studied using statistical techniques. The ensemble of data shows that the 0.7 anomaly becomes more pronounced and occurs at lower values as the curvature of the potential barrier in the transport direction decreases. This corresponds to an increase in the effective length of the device. The 0.7 anomaly is not strongly influenced by other properties of the conductance related to density. The curvature of the potential barrier appears to be the primary factor governing the shape of the 0.7 structure at a given T and B .

  2. A new ab initio potential energy surface for the NeCO complex with the vibrational coordinate dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongquan; Feng, Eryin; Yu, Haijun; Zhang, Chunzao; Du, Jianming

    2011-01-14

    A new high quality three-dimensional potential energy surface for the Ne-CO van der Waals complex is developed using the CCSD(T) method and avqz∕avqz+33221 basis set. The ab initio calculation is performed in a total of 1365 configurations with supermolecule method. There is a single global minimum located in a nearly T-shaped geometry. The global minimum energy is -49.4090 cm(-1) at R(e)=6.40a(0) and θ(e)=82.5(∘) for V(00). Using the three-dimensional potential energy surface, we have calculated bound rovibrational energy levels up to J = 10 including the Coriolis coupling terms. Compared with the experimental transition frequencies, the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Coupling of nuclear quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom in an angular momentum dependent potential of two deformation variables

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Drenska, S.; Scheid, W.; Bonatsos, Dennis; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.

    2006-04-26

    We propose a collective rotation-vibration Hamiltonian of nuclei in which the axial quadrupole {beta}2 and octupole {beta}3 variables are coupled through the centrifugal interaction. We consider that the system oscillates between positive and negative {beta}3-values by rounding a potential core in the ({beta}2,{beta}3)- space. We examine the effect of the 'rounding' in the structure of the spectrum.

  4. Scalar-Tensor gravity with system-dependent potential and its relation with Renormalization Group extended General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.; Piattella, Oliver F.; Chauvineau, Bertrand E-mail: Bertrand.Chauvineau@oca.eu

    2015-09-01

    We show that Renormalization Group extensions of the Einstein-Hilbert action for large scale physics are not, in general, a particular case of standard Scalar-Tensor (ST) gravity. We present a new class of ST actions, in which the potential is not necessarily fixed at the action level, and show that this extended ST theory formally contains the Renormalization Group case. We also propose here a Renormalization Group scale setting identification that is explicitly covariant and valid for arbitrary relativistic fluids.

  5. Bound and Scattering State of Position Dependent Mass Klein-Gordon Equation with Hulthen Plus Deformed-Type Hyperbolic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikot, A. N.; Obong, H. P.; Abbey, T. M.; Zare, S.; Ghafourian, M.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In this article we use supersymmetry quantum mechanics and factorization methods to study the bound and scattering state of Klein-Gordon equation with deformed Hulthen plus deformed hyperbolical potential for arbitrary state in D-dimensions. The analytic relativistic bound state eigenvalues and the scattering phase factor are found in closed form. We report on the numerical results for the bound state energy in D-dimensions.

  6. Bound and Scattering State of Position Dependent Mass Klein-Gordon Equation with Hulthen Plus Deformed-Type Hyperbolic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikot, A. N.; Obong, H. P.; Abbey, T. M.; Zare, S.; Ghafourian, M.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this article we use supersymmetry quantum mechanics and factorization methods to study the bound and scattering state of Klein-Gordon equation with deformed Hulthen plus deformed hyperbolical potential for arbitrary state in D-dimensions. The analytic relativistic bound state eigenvalues and the scattering phase factor are found in closed form. We report on the numerical results for the bound state energy in D-dimensions.

  7. Malonate induces cell death via mitochondrial potential collapse and delayed swelling through an ROS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Galindo, Maria F; Gómez-Lázaro, Maria; Yuste, Victor J; Comella, Joan X; Aguirre, Norberto; Jordán, Joaquín

    2005-01-01

    Herein we study the effects of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate on its primary target, the mitochondrion. Malonate induces mitochondrial potential collapse, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c (Cyt c) release and depletes glutathione (GSH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme (NAD(P)H) stores in brain-isolated mitochondria. Although, mitochondrial potential collapse was almost immediate after malonate addition, mitochondrial swelling was not evident before 15 min of drug presence. This latter effect was blocked by cyclosporin A (CSA), Ruthenium Red (RR), magnesium, catalase, GSH and vitamin E. Malonate added to SH-SY5Y cell cultures produced a marked loss of cell viability together with the release of Cyt c and depletion of GSH and NAD(P)H concentrations. All these effects were not apparent in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Bcl-xL. When GSH concentrations were lowered with buthionine sulphoximine, cytoprotection afforded by Bcl-xL overexpression was not evident anymore. Taken together, all these data suggest that malonate causes a rapid mitochondrial potential collapse and reactive oxygen species production that overwhelms mitochondrial antioxidant capacity and leads to mitochondrial swelling. Further permeability transition pore opening and the subsequent release of proapoptotic factors such as Cyt c could therefore be, at least in part, responsible for malonate-induced toxicity. PMID:15655518

  8. A Multiple Scattering Theory Approach to Solving the Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation with an Asymmetric Rectangular Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Victor F.; Los, Nicholas V.

    2016-04-01

    The exact expressions for an energy-dependent Green function (resolvent), space-time propagator and time-dependent solution for the wave function Ψ(r, t) of a particle moving in the presence of an asymmetric rectangular well/barrier potential are obtained. It is done by applying to this problem the multiple scattering theory (MST), which is different from previous such approaches by using the localized at the potential jumps effective potentials responsible for transmission through and reflection from the considered rectangular potential. This approach (alternative to the path-integral one) enables considering these processes from a particle (rather than a wave) point of view. The solution for the wave function describes these quantum phenomena as a function of time and is related to the fundamental issues (such as measuring time) of quantum mechanics. It is presented in terms of integrals of elementary functions and is a sum of the forward- and backward-moving components of the wave packet. The relative contribution of these components and their interference as well as of the potential asymmetry to the probability density |Ψ(x, t)|2 and particle dwell time is considered and numerically visualized for narrow and broad energy (momentum) distributions of the initial Gaussian wave packet. It is shown that in the case of a broad initial wave packet, the quantum mechanical counterintuitive effect of the influence of the backward-moving components on the considered quantities becomes significant.

  9. Transcriptional expression of myelin basic protein in oligodendrocytes depends on functional syntaxin 4: a potential correlation with autocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bijlard, Marjolein; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C; Nomden, Anita; Tyagi, Sanjay; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2015-02-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes is essential for saltatory nerve conduction. To form myelin membranes, a coordinated synthesis and subsequent polarized transport of myelin components are necessary. Here, we show that as part of the mechanism to establish membrane polarity, oligodendrocytes exploit a polarized distribution of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) machinery components syntaxins 3 and 4, localizing to the cell body and the myelin membrane, respectively. Our data further reveal that the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a myelin-specific protein that is synthesized "on site" after transport of its mRNA, depends on the correct functioning of the SNARE machinery, which is not required for mRNA granule assembly and transport per se. Thus, downregulation and overexpression of syntaxin 4 but not syntaxin 3 in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells but not immature oligodendrocytes impeded MBP mRNA transcription, thereby preventing MBP protein synthesis. The expression and localization of another myelin-specific protein, proteolipid protein (PLP), was unaltered. Strikingly, conditioned medium obtained from developing oligodendrocytes was able to rescue the block of MBP mRNA transcription in syntaxin 4-downregulated cells. These findings indicate that the initiation of the biosynthesis of MBP mRNA relies on a syntaxin 4-dependent mechanism, which likely involves activation of an autocrine signaling pathway.

  10. On a relativistic particle and a relativistic position-dependent mass particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2016-07-01

    The relativistic quantum dynamics of an electrically charged particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential is investigated. By searching for relativistic bound states, a particular quantum effect can be observed: a dependence of the angular frequency of the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the quantum numbers of the system. The meaning of this behaviour of the angular frequency is that only some specific values of the angular frequency of the Klein-Gordon oscillator are permitted in order to obtain bound state solutions. As an example, we obtain both the angular frequency and the energy level associated with the ground state of the relativistic system. Further, we analyse the behaviour of a relativistic position-dependent mass particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential.

  11. Fixed conditions for achieving the real-valued partition function of one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled with time-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Prayitno, T. B.

    2014-03-24

    We have imposed the conditions in order to preserve the real-valued partition function in the case of onedimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled by time-dependent potential. In this case we have solved the Gross-Pitaevskii equation by means of the time-dependent perturbation theory by extending the previous work of Kivshar et al. [Phys. Lett A 278, 225–230 (2001)]. To use the method, we have treated the equation as the macroscopic quantum oscillator and found that the expression of the partition function explicitly has complex values. In fact, we have to choose not only the appropriate functions but also the suitable several values of the potential to keep the real-valued partition function.

  12. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors Mediate the Induction of the Protein Kinase A-Dependent Component of Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pojeong; Sanderson, Thomas M.; Amici, Mascia; Choi, Sun-Lim; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Two forms of NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses can be distinguished based on their sensitivity to inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). The PKA-dependent form requires multiple episodes of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) or theta burst stimuli (TBS) with a spacing between episodes in the order of minutes. To investigate the mechanism by which spaced episodes induce the PKA-dependent form of LTP, we have compared, in interleaved experiments, spaced (s) and compressed (c) TBS protocols in the rat CA1 synapses. We find that LTP induced by sTBS, but not that induced by cTBS, involves the insertion of calcium-permeable (CP) AMPARs, as assessed using pharmacological and electrophysiological criteria. Furthermore, a single TBS when paired with rolipram [4-(3-(cyclopentyloxy)-4-methoxyphenyl)pyrrolidin-2-one], to activate PKA, generates an LTP that also involves the insertion of CP-AMPARs. These data demonstrate that the involvement of CP-AMPARs in LTP is critically determined by the timing of the induction trigger and is associated specifically with the PKA-dependent form of LTP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Long-term potentiation is a family of synaptic mechanisms that are believed to be important for learning and memory. Two of the most extensively studied forms are triggered by the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and expressed by changes in AMPA receptor function. They can be distinguished on the basis of their requirement for activation of a protein kinase, PKA. We show that the PKA-dependent form also involves the transient insertion of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. These results have implications for relating synaptic plasticity to learning and memory and suggest a specific linkage between PKA activation and the rapid synaptic insertion of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during long-term potentiation. PMID:26758849

  13. Regulatory T cell suppression is potentiated by target T cells in a cell contact, IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Collison, Lauren W; Pillai, Meenu R; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Vignali, Dario A A

    2009-05-15

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are believed to suppress conventional T cell (T(conv)) proliferation in vitro in a contact-dependent, cytokine-independent manner, based in part on experiments in which T(reg) and T(conv) are separated by a permeable membrane. We show that the production of IL-35, a novel inhibitory cytokine expressed by natural T(reg), increases substantially following contact with T(conv). Surprisingly, T(reg) were able to mediate potent suppression of T(conv) across a permeable membrane when placed in direct contact with T(conv) in the upper chamber of a Transwell plate. Suppression was IL-35 and IL-10 dependent, and T(conv) activation was required for maximal potentiation of T(reg) suppression. These data suggest that it is the induction of suppression, rather than the function of T(reg) that is obligatorily contact dependent.

  14. Thin Film Nanocrystalline TiO2 Electrodes: Dependence of Flat Band Potential on pH and Anion Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Minella, M; Maurino, V; Minero, C; Pelizzetti, E

    2015-05-01

    Thin nanocrystalline TiO2 films were produced on ITO conductive glass by dip-coating of a sol-gel TiO2 precursor. The transparent films were characterized from the optical and structural point of view with UV-Vis, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, the roughness of the coating by AFM. The changes in the electrochemical properties features of ITO/TiO2 electrodes were evaluated in the presence of different electrolytes (KCI, Na2SO4 and phosphate buffer) with the aim to clarify the role of the ion adsorption on the structure of the electrical double layer. Electrochemical tests (Cyclic Voltammetry, CV, and Impedance Electrochemical Spectroscopy, EIS) showed a strong influence of the electrolyte properties on the semiconductor band edge position in the electrochemical scale and on band bending. The CV profiles recorded can be explained by considering that the interface capacity is due to the charging of surface states (e.g., Ti(IV) surface sites coordinated by oxygen atoms, ≡Ti-OH or Ti-O-Ti). The surface charge is strongly affected also by the density and nature of adsorbed ions and by dissociation of surficial OH. Of interest the fact that for the produced nanocrystalline electrodes the flat band potential, measured from the Mott-Schottky analysis of the space charge layer capacity obtained with EIS, showed a non Nernstian behavior with the pH probably caused by a change in the surface acidity as a consequence of specific anion adsorption. The modulation of flat band potential with adsorbed ions is of interest for many applications, in particular for photocatalysis (change in the redox potential of photogenerated carriers) and for photovoltaic applications like DSSC (change in the photopotentials).

  15. A numerical study of geometry dependent errors in velocity, temperature, and density measurements from single grid planar retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R. L.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Klenzing, J. H.

    2010-08-15

    Planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) have been utilized numerous times on high profile missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program to measure plasma composition, temperature, density, and the velocity component perpendicular to the plane of the instrument aperture. These instruments use biased grids to approximate ideal biased planes. These grids introduce perturbations in the electric potential distribution inside the instrument and when unaccounted for cause errors in the measured plasma parameters. Traditionally, the grids utilized in RPAs have been made of fine wires woven into a mesh. Previous studies on the errors caused by grids in RPAs have approximated woven grids with a truly flat grid. Using a commercial ion optics software package, errors in inferred parameters caused by both woven and flat grids are examined. A flat grid geometry shows the smallest temperature and density errors, while the double thick flat grid displays minimal errors for velocities over the temperature and velocity range used. Wire thickness along the dominant flow direction is found to be a critical design parameter in regard to errors in all three inferred plasma parameters. The results shown for each case provide valuable design guidelines for future RPA development.

  16. How the mechanisms of long-term synaptic potentiation and depression serve experience-dependent plasticity in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Sam F; Bear, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    Donald Hebb chose visual learning in primary visual cortex (V1) of the rodent to exemplify his theories of how the brain stores information through long-lasting homosynaptic plasticity. Here, we revisit V1 to consider roles for bidirectional 'Hebbian' plasticity in the modification of vision through experience. First, we discuss the consequences of monocular deprivation (MD) in the mouse, which have been studied by many laboratories over many years, and the evidence that synaptic depression of excitatory input from the thalamus is a primary contributor to the loss of visual cortical responsiveness to stimuli viewed through the deprived eye. Second, we describe a less studied, but no less interesting form of plasticity in the visual cortex known as stimulus-selective response potentiation (SRP). SRP results in increases in the response of V1 to a visual stimulus through repeated viewing and bears all the hallmarks of perceptual learning. We describe evidence implicating an important role for potentiation of thalamo-cortical synapses in SRP. In addition, we present new data indicating that there are some features of this form of plasticity that cannot be fully accounted for by such feed-forward Hebbian plasticity, suggesting contributions from intra-cortical circuit components. PMID:24298166

  17. Pigment epithelium-derived factor: clinical significance in estrogen-dependent tissues and its potential in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Chuaire, María Liliana; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra; Chuaire-Noack, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the family of non-inhibitory serpins. The broad spectrum of PEDF biological activity is evident when considering its effects in promoting cell survival and proliferation, as well as its antiangiogenic, antitumor, and anti-metastatic properties. Although the structural domains of the PEDF gene that mediate such diverse effects and their mechanisms of action have not been completely elucidated, there is a large body of evidence describing their diverse range of activities; this evidence combined with the regulation of PEDF expression by sex steroids and their receptors have led to the idea that PEDF is not only a diagnostic and prognostic marker for certain diseases such as cancer, but is also a potential therapeutic target. In this manner, this paper aims to generally review the regulation of PEDF expression and PEDF interactions, as well as the findings that relate PEDF to the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors. In addition, this manuscript will review major advances toward potential therapeutic applications of PEDF. PMID:26523216

  18. [ATl- and calcium-dependent mechanisms of salicy- lates influence on electric potentials of neurons in mollusk Helix albescens].

    PubMed

    Cheretaev, I V; Koreniuk, I; Khusainov, D R; Gamma, T V; Kolotilova, O I; Nozdrachev, A D

    2015-03-01

    The article is devoted to investigation of mechanisms of salicylates influence on electric potentials in neurons of mollusk Helix albescens Rossm. It is shown that adenosinetriphosphate (5 x 10(-4) M) at the combined bath application with salicylates substantially modifies their neurotropic effects. It removes nonselective inhibition of impulse activity of neurons by acetylsalicylic acid and strengthens activating effects of cobalt and zinc acetylsalicylates. It is shown that at the blockade of Ca2+ entry by CdCl2 or BaCl2 (5 x 10(-5) and 5 x 10(-4) M) in a neuron from extracellular space or from intracellular depot do not change significantly neuronal responses to salicylates, what suggests that calcium mechanisms did not participate in these responses.

  19. Does silent reading speed in normal adult readers depend on early visual processes? evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical Decision Task (LDT) and a Face Decision Task (FDT). Amplitudes of the N170 component in the LDT but, interestingly, also in the FDT correlated with behavioral tests measuring silent reading speed. We suggest that reading speed performance can be at least partially accounted for by the extraction of essential structural information from visual stimuli, consisting of a domain-general and a domain-specific expertise-based portion.

  20. Length and sequence dependent accumulation of simple sequence repeats in vertebrates: potential role in genome organization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Garapati, Hita Sony; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are tandemly repeated short DNA sequence motifs found to be abundant in higher eukaryotes. Enrichment of SSRs with increasing genome complexity points to a positive selection and their functional relevance. We analyzed genomes of 24 organisms to find features that may help understand the functional relevance of SSRs. Of the 501 possible SSRs, only 73 show length specific enrichment. We also noticed that ~45 bp is the optimum length for a majority of them particularly in the human genome. Finally, we observed non-random distribution of ACG and CCG, enriched around transcriptional start sites (TSSs) in several species. Taken together, these results suggest that SSRs are functionally relevant with potential regulatory role. We propose that such repeats are evolving under positive selection pressure like any other functional element in the genome.

  1. Effects of rotation on the sleep state-dependent midlatency auditory evoked P50 potential in the human

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dornhoffer, John L.; Mamiya, N.; Bray, P.; Skinner, Robert D.; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Sopite syndrome, characterized by loss of initiative, sensitivity to normally innocuous sensory stimuli, and impaired concentration amounting to a sensory gating deficit, is commonly associated with Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The amplitude of the P50 potential is a measure of level of arousal, and a paired-stimulus paradigm can be used to measure sensory gating. We used the rotary chair to elicit the sensory mismatch that occurs with SMS by overstimulating the vestibular apparatus. The effects of rotation on the manifestation of the P50 midlatency auditory evoked response were then assessed as a measure of arousal and distractibility. Results showed that rotation-induced motion sickness produced no change in the level of arousal but did produce a significant deficit in sensory gating, indicating that some of the attentional and cognitive deficits observed with SMS may be due to distractibility induced by decreased habituation to repetitive stimuli.

  2. Biomimetic study of the Ca(2+)-Mg2+ and K(+)-Li+ antagonism on biologically active sites: new methodology to study potential dependent ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Paczosa-Bator, Beata; Stepien, Milena; Maj-Zurawska, Magdalena; Lewenstam, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    Competitive divalent (magnesium and calcium) or monovalent (potassium, lithium and sodium) ion exchange and its influence on a membrane potential formation was studied at biological ligands (BL) such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln) sites. The sites are dispersed electrochemically in membranes made of the conducting polymers (CPs)--poly(N-methylpyrrole) (PMPy) and poly(pyrrole) (PPy). The membranes are made sensitive to calcium and magnesium or to potassium, sodium and lithium by optimized electrodeposition and soaking procedures supported by the study of membrane topography and morphology. Distinctively different electrochemical responses, i.e. electrical potential transients or currents, are observed in the case of "antagonistic" calcium and magnesium or potassium and sodium/lithium ion pairs. Dissimilarity in the responses is ascribed to a difference between on site vs. bulk concentrations of ions, and is dictated by different transport properties of the ions, as shown by using the Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) model and the diffusion-layer model (DLM). The method described allows inspecting potential-dependent competitive ion-exchange processes at the biologically active sites. It is suggested that this approach could be used as an auxiliary tool in study of potential dependent block in realistic membrane channels, such as Mg block in the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor channel (NMDA).

  3. Dependence of trends in and sensitivity of drought over China (1961-2013) on potential evaporation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sun, Fubao; Xu, Jijun; Chen, Yaning; Sang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Changming

    2016-01-01

    The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) can lead to controversial results in assessing droughts responding to global warming. Here we assess recent changes in the droughts over China (1961-2013) using the PDSI with two different estimates, i.e., the Thornthwaite (PDSI_th) and Penman-Monteith (PDSI_pm) approaches. We found that droughts have become more severe in the PDSI_th but slightly lessened in the PDSI_pm estimate. To quantify and interpret the different responses in the PDSI_th and PDSI_pm, we designed numerical experiments and found that drying trend of the PDSI_th responding to the warming alone is 3.4 times higher than that of the PDSI_pm, and the latter was further compensated by decreases in wind speed and solar radiation causing the slightly wetting in the PDSI_pm. Interestingly, we found that interbasin difference in the PDSI_th and PDSI_pm responses to the warming alone tends to be larger in warmer basins, exponentially depending on mean temperature.

  4. Peroxidase-dependent metabolism of benzene's phenolic metabolites and its potential role in benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M T; Yager, J W; Steinmetz, K L; Eastmond, D A

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of two of benzene's phenolic metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, by peroxidase enzymes has been studied in detail. Studies employing horseradish peroxidase and human myeloperoxidase have shown that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide phenol is converted to 4,4'-diphenoquinone and other covalent binding metabolites, whereas hydroquinone is converted solely to 1,4-benzoquinone. Surprisingly, phenol stimulates the latter conversion rather than inhibiting it, an effect that may play a role in the in vivo myelotoxicity of benzene. Indeed, repeated coadministration of phenol and hydroquinone to B6C3F1 mice results in a dramatic and significant decrease in bone marrow cellularity similar to that observed following benzene exposure. A mechanism of benzene-induced myelotoxicity is therefore proposed in which the accumulation and interaction of phenol and hydroquinone in the bone marrow and the peroxidase-dependent formation of 1,4-benzoquinone are important components. This mechanism may also be responsible, at least in part, for benzene's genotoxic effects, as 1,4-benzoquinone has been shown to damage DNA and is shown here to induce multiple micronuclei in human lymphocytes. Secondary activation of benzene's phenol metabolites in the bone marrow may therefore play an important role in benzene's myelotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:2551665

  5. Structure guided design of potential inhibitors of human calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV containing pyrimidine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Hoda, Nasimul; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Khan, Parvez; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-02-01

    Calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family and considered as an encouraging target for the development of novel anticancer agents. The interaction and binding behavior of three designed inhibitors of human CAMKIV, containing pyrimidine scaffold, was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. In silico docking studies were performed to screen several compounds containing pyrimidine scaffold against CAMKIV. Molecular docking calculation predicted the binding of these ligands in active-site cavity of the CAMKIV structure correlating such interactions with a probable inhibition mechanism. Finally, three active pyrimidine substituted compounds (molecules 1-3) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Molecule 3 is showing very high binding-affinity for the CAMKIV, with a binding constant of 2.2×10(8), M(-1) (±0.20). All three compounds are nontoxic to HEK293 cells up to 50 μM. The cell proliferation inhibition study showed that the molecule 3 has lowest IC50 value (46±1.08 μM). The theoretical and experimental observations are significantly correlated. This study reveals some important observations to generate an improved pyrimidine based compound that holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26783179

  6. Synthesis, pH-Dependent, and Plasma Stability of Meropenem Prodrugs for Potential Use Against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M.; Meissner, Anja; Harding, Ryan A.; Wong, Christopher A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Remmel, Rory P.

    2013-01-01

    Meropenem, a broad-spectrum parenteral β-lactam antibiotic, in combination with clavulanate has recently shown efficacy in patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. As a result of meropenem’s short half-life and lack of oral bioavailability, the development of an oral therapy is warranted for TB treatment in underserved countries where chronic parenteral therapy is impractical. To improve the oral absorption of meropenem, several alkyloxycarbonyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs with increased lipophilicity were synthesized and their stability in physiological aqueous solutions and guinea pig as well as human plasma was evaluated. The stability of prodrugs in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4 was significantly dependent on the ester promoiety with the major degradation product identified as the parent compound meropenem. However, in simulated gastrointestinal fluid (pH 1.2) the major degradation product identified was ring-opened meropenem with the promoiety still intact, suggesting the gastrointestinal environment may reduce the absorption of meropenem prodrugs in vivo unless administered as an enteric-coated formulation. Additionally, the stability of the most aqueous stable prodrugs in guinea pig or human plasma was short, implying a rapid release of parent meropenem. PMID:23845282

  7. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine potentiates synergistically anti-cancer property of artemisinin by promoting ROS dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Arnab; Choudhury, Diptiman; Datta, Satabdi; Bhattacharya, Surela; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) is a well-known anti-malarial drug, and recently it is shown prospective to selectively kill cancer cells. But low potency makes it inappropriate for use as an anticancer drug. In this study, we modulated the ART-induced autophagy to increase Potency of ART as an anticancer agent. ART reduced the cell viability and colony forming ability of non-small lung carcinoma (A549) cells and it was non-toxic against normal lung (WI38) cells. ART induced autophagy at the early stage of treatment. Pre-treatment with chloroquine (CQ) and followed by ART treatment had synergistic combination index (CI) for cell death. Inhibition of autophagy by CQ pre-treatment led to accumulation of acidic vacuoles (AVOs) which acquainted with unprocessed damage mitochondria that subsequently promoted ROS generation, and resulted releases of Cyt C in cytosol that caused caspase-3 dependent apoptosis cell death in ART-treated A549 cells. Scavenging of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) inhibited caspase-3 activity and rescued the cells from apoptosis. Similar effects were observed in other cancer cells SCC25 and MDA-MB-231. The appropriate manipulation of autophagy by using CQ provides a powerful strategy to increase the Potency of selective anticancer property of ART. PMID:25308836

  8. Spin filtering and scaling of spin-dependent potentials in quasi-one-dimensional electron liquids with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, N.-Y.; Wu, G. Y.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate theoretically the spin-filtering effect in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) electron liquid with spin-orbit interaction. The Q1D system considered is formed from a two-dimensional electron-gas (2DEG) subject to both a lateral confining potential and an interface potential perpendicular to the 2DEG. Spin and charge degrees of freedom in the system are mixed by the interface potential through the Rashba mechanism of spin-orbit interaction [A. V. Moroz and C. H. W. Barnes, Phys. Rev. B 60, 14272 (1999)] and we show that when a spin-dependent δ potential is further introduced into the system, for example, via implantation of magnetic/ferromagnetic impurities, the mixing leads to the spin-filtering effect which favors electrons with a certain spin orientation to transport through the δ potential. In particular, we calculate the scaling dimension of electron scattering both by spin-flip and by spin-independent δ potentials when the temperature is varied and show that, in the spin-flip case, the scaling of electron scattering with temperature varies with spin orientation. Conductance is calculated for both spin and charge transport, and the spin-filtering effect is discussed quantitatively in terms of the conductance.

  9. Hypoglycemic Effect of Aquatic Extract of Stevia in Pancreas of Diabetic Rats: PPARγ-dependent Regulation or Antioxidant Potential

    PubMed Central

    Assaei, Raheleh; Mokarram, Pooneh; Dastghaib, Sanaz; Darbandi, Sara; Darbandi, Mahsa; Zal, Fatemeh; Akmali, Masoumeh; Ranjbar Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional medicines with anti-diabetic effects are considered suitable supplements to treat diabetes. Among medicinal herbs, Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni is famous for its sweet taste and beneficial effect in regulation of glucose. However, little is known about the exact mechanism of stevia in pancreatic tissue. Therefore, this study investigated the possible effects of stevia on pancreas in managing hyperglycemia seen in streptozotocin-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups including normoglycemic, diabetic and two more diabetic groups in which, one was treated with aquatic extract of stevia (400 mg/kg) and the other with pioglitazone (10 mg/kg) for the period of 28 days. After completion of the experimental duration, rats were dissected; blood samples and pancreas were further used for detecting biochemical and histopathological changes. FBS, TG, cholestrol, HDL, LDL, ALT and AST levels were measured in sera. Moreover, MDA (malondialdehyde) level, catalase activity, levels of insulin and PPARγ mRNA expression were also measured in pancreatic tissue. Results: Aquatic extract of stevia significantly reduced the FBS, triglycerides, MDA, ALT, AST levels and normalized catalase activity in treated rats compared with diabetic rats (p<0.05). In addition to this, stevia surprisingly, increased PPARγ and insulin mRNA levels in treated rats (p<0.05). Furthermore, stevia compensated for the histopathological damage in diabetic rats. Conclusion: It is concluded that stevia acts on pancreatic tissue to elevate the insulin level and exerts beneficial anti-hyperglycemic effects through the PPARγ-dependent mechanism and stevia’s antioxidant properties. PMID:27141265

  10. Novel analogues of chlormethiazole are neuroprotective in four cellular models of neurodegeneration by a mechanism with variable dependence on GABAA receptor potentiation

    PubMed Central

    VandeVrede, Lawren; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Luo, Jia; Qin, Zhihui; Yue, Lan; Pepperberg, David R; Thatcher, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Chlormethiazole (CMZ), a clinical sedative/anxiolytic agent, did not reach clinical efficacy in stroke trials despite neuroprotection demonstrated in numerous animal models. Using CMZ as a lead compound, neuroprotective methiazole (MZ) analogues were developed, and neuroprotection and GABAA receptor dependence were studied. Experimental Approach: Eight MZs were selected from a novel library, of which two were studied in detail. Neuroprotection, glutamate release, intracellular calcium and response to GABA blockade by picrotoxin were measured in rat primary cortical cultures using four cellular models of neurodegeneration. GABA potentiation was assayed in oocytes expressing the α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor. Key Results: Neuroprotection against a range of insults was retained even with substantial chemical modification. Dependence on GABAA receptor activity was variable: at the extremes, neuroprotection by GN-28 was universally sensitive to picrotoxin, while GN-38 was largely insensitive. In parallel, effects on extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium were associated with GABAA dependence. Consistent with these findings, GN-28 potentiated α1β2γ2 GABAA function, whereas GN-38 had a weak inhibitory effect. Neuroprotection against moderate dose oligomeric Aβ1–42 was also tolerant to structural changes. Conclusions and Implications: The results support the concept that CMZ does not contain a single pharmacophore, rather that broad-spectrum neuroprotection results from a GABAA-dependent mechanism represented by GN-28, combined with a mechanism represented in GN-38 that shows the least dependence on GABAA receptors. These findings allow further refinement of the neuroprotective pharmacophore and investigation into secondary mechanisms that will assist in identifying MZ-based compounds of use in treating neurodegeneration. PMID:24116891

  11. Charged black holes in string-inspired gravity II. Mass inflation and dependence on parameters and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jakob; Yeom, Dong-han

    2015-09-07

    We investigate the relation between the existence of mass inflation and model parameters of string-inspired gravity models. In order to cover various models, we investigate a Brans-Dicke theory that is coupled to a U(1) gauge field. By tuning a model parameter that decides the coupling between the Brans-Dicke field and the electromagnetic field, we can make both of models such that the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward strong or weak coupling directions after gravitational collapses. We observe that as long as the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward any (strong or weak) directions, there is no Cauchy horizon and no mass inflation. Therefore, we conclude that to induce a Cauchy horizon and mass inflation inside a charged black hole, either there is no bias of the Brans-Dicke field as well as no Brans-Dicke hair outside the horizon or such a biased Brans-Dicke field should be well trapped and controlled by a potential.

  12. Charged black holes in string-inspired gravity II. Mass inflation and dependence on parameters and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jakob; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the relation between the existence of mass inflation and model parameters of string-inspired gravity models. In order to cover various models, we investigate a Brans-Dicke theory that is coupled to a U(1) gauge field. By tuning a model parameter that decides the coupling between the Brans-Dicke field and the electromagnetic field, we can make both of models such that the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward strong or weak coupling directions after gravitational collapses. We observe that as long as the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward any (strong or weak) directions, there is no Cauchy horizon and no mass inflation. Therefore, we conclude that to induce a Cauchy horizon and mass inflation inside a charged black hole, either there is no bias of the Brans-Dicke field as well as no Brans-Dicke hair outside the horizon or such a biased Brans-Dicke field should be well trapped and controlled by a potential.

  13. Dependence of carrier doping on the impurity potential in transition-metal-substituted FeAs-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ideta, S; Yoshida, T; Nishi, I; Fujimori, A; Kotani, Y; Ono, K; Nakashima, Y; Yamaichi, S; Sasagawa, T; Nakajima, M; Kihou, K; Tomioka, Y; Lee, C H; Iyo, A; Eisaki, H; Ito, T; Uchida, S; Arita, R

    2013-03-01

    In order to examine to what extent the rigid-band-like electron doping scenario is applicable to the transition metal-substituted Fe-based superconductors, we have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of Ba(Fe(1-x)Ni(x))(2)As(2) (Ni-122) and Ba(Fe(1-x)Cu(x))(2)As(2) (Cu-122), and compared the results with Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))(2)As(2) (Co-122). We find that Ni 3d-derived features are formed below the Fe 3d band and that Cu 3d-derived ones further below it. The electron and hole Fermi surface (FS) volumes are found to increase and decrease with substitution, respectively, qualitatively consistent with the rigid-band model. However, the total extra electron number estimated from the FS volumes (the total electron FS volume minus the total hole FS volume) is found to decrease in going from Co-, Ni-, to Cu-122 for a fixed nominal extra electron number, that is, the number of electrons that participate in the formation of FS decreases with increasing impurity potential. We find that the Néel temperature T(N) and the critical temperature T(c) maximum are determined by the FS volumes rather than the nominal extra electron concentration or the substituted atom concentration.

  14. Calcium-dependent expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Hovsepian, Anahit; Tepel, Martin; Thilo, Florian

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether extracellular calcium may regulate the expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels in patients with chronic kidney disease. Using quantitative in-cell Western assay we compared the expression of TRPC3 channel protein in monocytes from 20 patients with chronic kidney disease and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. TRPC3 channels were identified by immunoblotting using specific antibodies and TRPC3 protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. We observed a significant increase of TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy control subjects (normalized expression, 0.42±0.06 vs. 0.19±0.03; p<0.01). Expression of TRPC3 was significantly inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rates (Spearman r=-0.41) or serum calcium concentration (Spearman r=-0.34). During a hemodialysis session serum calcium concentrations significantly increased, whereas the expression of TRPC3 channels and calcium influx significantly decreased. In vitro studies confirmed that higher calcium concentrations but not magnesium, barium nor sodium concentrations significantly decreased TRPC3 expression in human monocytes. This study indicates that reduced extracellular calcium concentrations up-regulate TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Opposing effects of PSD-93 and PSD-95 on long-term potentiation and spike timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Holly J; Fink, Ann E; Grant, Seth G N; O'Dell, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) PSD-95, PSD-93 and SAP102 are thought to have crucial roles in both AMPA receptor trafficking and formation of NMDA receptor-associated signalling complexes involved in synaptic plasticity. While PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP102 appear to have similar roles in AMPA receptor trafficking, it is not known whether these MAGUKs also have functionally similar roles in synaptic plasticity. To explore this issue we examined several properties of basal synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region of PSD-93 and PSD-95 mutant mice and compared the ability of a number of different synaptic stimulation protocols to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in these mutants. We find that while both AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission are normal in PSD-93 mutants, PSD-95 mutant mice exhibit clear deficits in AMPA receptor-mediated transmission. Moreover, in contrast to the facilitation of LTP induction and disruption of LTD observed in PSD-95 mutant mice, PSD-93 mutant mice exhibit deficits in LTP and normal LTD. Our results suggest that PSD-95 has a unique role in AMPA receptor trafficking at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus of adult mice and indicate that PSD-93 and PSD-95 have essentially opposite roles in LTP, perhaps because these MAGUKs form distinct NMDA receptor signalling complexes that differentially regulate the induction of LTP by different patterns of synaptic activity. PMID:18936077

  16. Retinoids induce cellular senescence in breast cancer cells by RAR-β dependent and independent pathways: Potential clinical implications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SHILKAITIS, ANNE; GREEN, ALBERT; CHRISTOV, KONSTANTIN

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on cellular senescence (CS) have been performed in vitro by employing cytotoxic agents, irradiation, chromatin and telomerase modulators or by activating certain oncogenes. All these approaches usually lead to DNA damage, gene instability and/or chromatin alterations that primarily affect p53-p21 signaling. Little is known on whether retinoids and rexinoids, which are cell differentiation agents, can also induce CS in vitro and in vivo, and which molecular mechanisms are involved in promoting the senescent phenotype. We reviewed the recent publications on CS induced by retinoids and rexinoids in ER+ and ER− breast cancer cell lines and in corresponding animal models of mammary carcinogenesis which simulate those of human breast cancer. The role of retinoic acid receptors β2 and 5 (RARβ2 and RARβ5) and of receptor independent genes involved in mediating the senescence program of retinoids and rexinoids in ER+ and ER− breast cancer cells is discussed. Potential strategists for clinical implication of CS as biomarker of prognosis and of response to treatment with retinoids, rexinoids and with other cell differentiation and antitumor agents are outlined. PMID:25997921

  17. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  18. pH-dependent leaching of constituents of potential concern from concrete materials containing coal combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kosson, David S; Garrabrants, Andrew C; DeLapp, Rossane; van der Sloot, Hans A

    2014-05-01

    Current concerns about the environmental safety of coal combustion fly ash have motivated this evaluation of the impact of fly ash use as a cement replacement in concrete materials on the leaching of constituents of potential concern. The chemical effects of fly ash on leaching were determined through characterization of liquid-solid partitioning using EPA Method 1313 for four fly ash materials as well as concrete and microconcrete materials containing 0% (control materials), 25% and 45% replacement of portland cement with the fly ash source. All source materials, concrete formulations and replacement levels are representative of US concrete industry practices. Eluate concentrations as a function of pH were compared to a broader range of available testing results for international concretes and mortars for which the leaching characteristics of the component fly ashes were unknown. The chemistry of the hydrated cement fraction was found to dominate the liquid-solid partitioning resulting in reduced leaching concentrations of most trace metals compared to concentrations from fly ash materials alone. Compared to controls, eluate concentrations of Sb, As, B, Cr, Mo, Se, Tl and V from concrete products containing fly ash were essentially the same as the eluate concentrations from control materials produced without fly ash replacement indicating little to no significant impact on aqueous partitioning.

  19. Sodium-dependent action potentials induced by brevetoxin-3 trigger both IP3 increase and intracellular Ca2+ release in rat skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Liberona, José Luis; Cárdenas, J César; Reyes, Roberto; Hidalgo, Jorge; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2008-09-01

    Brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3), described to increase the open probability of voltage-dependent sodium channels, caused trains of action potentials and fast oscillatory changes in fluorescence intensity of fluo-3-loaded rat skeletal muscle cells in primary culture, indicating that the toxin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. PbTx-3 did not elicit calcium transients in dysgenic myotubes (GLT cell line), lacking the alpha1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), but after transfection of the alpha1DHPR cDNA to GLT cells, PbTx-3 induced slow calcium transients that were similar to those of normal cells. Ca2+ signals evoked by PbTx-3 were inhibited by blocking either IP3 receptors, with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, or phospholipase C with U73122. PbTx-3 caused a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase in intracellular IP3 mass levels, dependent on extra-cellular Na+. A similar increase in IP3 mass was induced by high K+ depolarization but no action potential trains (nor calcium signals) were elicited by prolonged depolarization under current clamp conditions. The increase in IP3 mass induced by either PbTx-3 or K+ was also detected in Ca2+-free medium. These results establish that the effect of the toxin on both intracellular Ca2+ and IP3 levels occurs via a membrane potential sensor instead of directly by Na+ flux and supports the notion of a train of action potentials being more efficient as a stimulus than sustained depolarization, suggesting that tetanus is the physiological stimulus for the IP3-dependent calcium signal involved in regulation of gene expression. PMID:18276006

  20. Topographic Roughness of Hawaiian Volcanic Terrains: A Scale-Dependent Analysis of a Potential Mars Landing Site Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Anderson, F.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Haldemann, A.

    2006-12-01

    The roughness of a natural surface is often defined by the topography of the surface at scales of a few tens of meters or less and can be quantitatively described by self-affine, or fractal, statistics. To ensure the safety of rovers and scientific instruments on Mars, these scales are of critical importance during landing site selection and rover traverse operations. Published work on terrestrial and Martian topography datasets has demonstrated that statistical values such as the Hurst exponent can be used in conjunction with other statistical measures such as RMS slope to understand the relationship between scale-dependent roughness characteristics and the morphology of a surface. We seek to understand the effects of dataset resolution on the interpretation of various volcanic surfaces on Kilauea volcano, with applications to rover traverse navigation on remote, planetary surfaces. Extensive Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) coverage of the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, (30 cm posting, 1 m DEM, 2 cm vertical resolution) provides an opportunity for simulating higher resolution Martian topography data such as will be obtained from photoclinometry and stereo imaging using the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using the method of calculating fractal statistics described in detail by previous authors, we develop two-dimensional maps of the Hurst exponent of Martian analog flows in Hawaii to understand the effects of limited resolution topographic and imaging data on the interpretation of volcanic features on the surface of Mars. In addition to the LiDAR data, we use high resolution topographic data generated from controlled stereo imaging of volcanic surfaces within Kilauea caldera to provide a detailed view of sub-meter surface roughness of the young volcanic terrains covered by the LiDAR data. To obtain the stereo data, we moved a 12.8 mega- pixel digital camera, pointed perpendicular to the

  1. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  2. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30–35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  3. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control. PMID:26648089

  4. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles : How does one determine their potential for reducing U.S. oil dependence?

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Duoba, M.; Alexander, M.; Energy Systems; EPRI

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of the potential of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV's) ability to reduce U.S. gasoline use is difficult and complex. Although techniques have been proposed to estimate the vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) that can be electrified, these methods may be inadequate and/or inappropriate for early market introduction circumstances. Factors that must be considered with respect to the PHEV itself include (1) kWh battery storage capability; (2) kWh/km depletion rate of the vehicle (3) liters/km use of gasoline (4) average daily kilometers driven (5) annual share of trips exceeding the battery depletion distance (6) driving cycle(s) (7) charger location [i.e. on-board or off-board] (8) charging rate. Each of these factors is actually a variable, and many interact. Off the vehicle, considerations include (a) primary overnight charging spot [garage, carport, parking garage or lot, on street], (b) availability of primary and secondary charging locations [i.e. dwellings, workplaces, stores, etc] (c) time of day electric rates (d) seasonal electric rates (e) types of streets and highways typically traversed during most probable trips depleting battery charge [i.e. city, suburban, rural and high vs. low density]; (f) cumulative trips per day from charger origin (g) top speeds and peak acceleration rates required to make usual trips. Taking into account PHEV design trade-off possibilities (kW vs. kWh of battery, in particular), this paper attempts to extract useful information relating to these topics from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), and the 2005 American Housing Survey (AHS). Costs per kWh of PHEVs capable of charge depleting (CD) all-electric range (CDE, or AER) vs. those CD in 'blended' mode (CDB) are examined. Lifetime fuel savings of alternative PHEV operating/utilization strategies are compared to battery cost estimates.

  5. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances.

  6. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect

    PubMed Central

    Celotto, A.C.; Ferreira, L.G.; Capellini, V.K.; Albuquerque, A.A.S.; Rodrigues, A.J.; Evora, P.R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control. PMID:26648089

  7. Interleukin-6 is a potential therapeutic target in interleukin-6 dependent, estrogen receptor-α-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casneuf, Tineke; Axel, Amy E; King, Peter; Alvarez, John D; Werbeck, Jillian L; Verhulst, Tinne; Verstraeten, Karin; Hall, Brett M; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-01-01

    engraftment with siltuximab, fulvestrant, or combination therapy. Siltuximab alone was able to blunt MCF-7 engraftment. Similarly, siltuximab alone induced regressions in 90% (9/10) of tumors, which were established in the presence which were established in the presence of hMSC expressing human IL-6 and estrogen. Conclusion Given the established role for IL-6 in ERα-positive breast cancer, these data demonstrate the potential for anti-IL-6 therapeutics in breast cancer. PMID:26893580

  8. Potential-dependent structures investigated at the perchloric acid solution/iodine modified Au(111) interface by electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Toru; Tatsumi, Shoko; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-21

    Electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM) was adopted to analyze the electrified interface between an iodine modified Au(111) and a perchloric acid solution. Atomic resolution imaging of the electrode was strongly dependent on the electrode potential within the electrochemical window: each iodine atom was imaged in the cathodic range of the electrode potential, but not in the more anodic range where the tip is retracted by approximately 0.1 nm compared to the cathodic case for the same imaging parameters. The frequency shift versus tip-to-sample distance curves obtained in the electric double layer region on the iodine adlayer indicated that the water structuring became weaker at the anodic potential, where the atomic resolution images could not be obtained, and immediately recovered at the original cathodic potential. The reversible hydration structures were consistent with the reversible topographic images and the cyclic voltammetry results. These results indicate that perchlorate anions concentrated at the anodic potential affect the interface hydration without any irreversible changes to the interface under these conditions.

  9. Calculation of the pair potential interaction in electric double-layered magnetic fluids: a quantitative analysis of the pH-dependent phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; da Silva, G. J.; Depeyrot, J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, the phase behavior of an acidic EDL-MF sample based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is studied in absence of external magnetic field and constant temperature. An experimental pH-dependent phase diagram of the ferrofluid sample is established and the result shows three phases in different pH ranges: a sol phase in low pH conditions, a gel phase when 3.8 dependence of the nanoparticle surface charge density is taken into account in the framework of the extended DLVO pair potential theory allowing a quantitative analysis of the observed phase diagram.

  10. NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation comprises a family of temporally overlapping forms of synaptic plasticity that are induced by different patterns of stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pojeong; Volianskis, Arturas; Sanderson, Thomas M.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Jane, David E.; Zhuo, Min; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Collingridge, Graham L.

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) is extensively studied since it is believed to use the same molecular mechanisms that are required for many forms of learning and memory. Unfortunately, many controversies exist, not least the seemingly simple issue concerning the locus of expression of LTP. Here, we review our recent work and some of the extensive literature on this topic and present new data that collectively suggest that LTP can be explained, during its first few hours, by the coexistence of at least three mechanistically distinct processes that are all triggered by the synaptic activation of NMDARs. PMID:24298134

  11. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  12. Computational Improvements to Quantum Wave Packet ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Using a Potential-Adapted, Time-Dependent Deterministic Sampling Technique.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2006-09-01

    In a recent publication, we introduced a computational approach to treat the simultaneous dynamics of electrons and nuclei. The method is based on a synergy between quantum wave packet dynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Atom-centered density-matrix propagation or Born-Oppenheimer dynamics can be used to perform ab initio dynamics. In this paper, wave packet dynamics is conducted using a three-dimensional direct product implementation of the distributed approximating functional free-propagator. A fundamental computational difficulty in this approach is that the interaction potential between the two components of the methodology needs to be calculated frequently. Here, we overcome this problem through the use of a time-dependent deterministic sampling measure that predicts, at every step of the dynamics, regions of the potential which are important. The algorithm, when combined with an on-the-fly interpolation scheme, allows us to determine the quantum dynamical interaction potential and gradients at every dynamics step in an extremely efficient manner. Numerical demonstrations of our sampling algorithm are provided through several examples arranged in a cascading level of complexity. Starting from a simple one-dimensional quantum dynamical treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) and [CH3-H-Cl](-) along with simultaneous dynamical treatment of the electrons and classical nuclei, through a complete three-dimensional treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) as well as treatment of a hydrogen atom undergoing donor-acceptor transitions in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1), we benchmark the algorithm thoroughly. Apart from computing various error estimates, we also compare vibrational density of states, inclusive of full quantum effects from the shared proton, using a novel unified velocity-velocity, flux-flux autocorrelation function. In all cases, the potential-adapted, time-dependent sampling procedure is seen to improve the

  13. Direct observation of bias-dependence potential distribution in metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under device operation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Chikyo, T.

    2014-01-28

    Although gate stack structures with high-k materials have been extensively investigated, there are some issues to be solved for the formation of high quality gate stack structures. In the present study, we employed hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in operating devices. This method allows us to investigate bias dependent electronic states, while keeping device structures intact. Using this method, we have investigated electronic states and potential distribution in gate metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures under device operation. Analysis of the core levels shifts as a function of the bias voltage indicated that a potential drop occurred at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Pt/HfO{sub 2} gate structure, while a potential gradient was not observed at the Ru/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Ru/HfO{sub 2} gate structure. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a thicker SiO{sub 2} layer was formed at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface, indicating that the origin of potential drop at Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface is formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the interface. The formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the metal/high-k interface might concern the Fermi level pinning, which is observed in metal/high-k gate stack structures.

  14. Long-distance abscisic acid signalling under different vertical soil moisture gradients depends on bulk root water potential and average soil water content in the root zone.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Alcobendas, Rosalía; Alarcón, Juan J; Dodd, Ian C

    2013-08-01

    To determine how root-to-shoot abscisic acid (ABA) signalling is regulated by vertical soil moisture gradients, root ABA concentration ([ABA](root)), the fraction of root water uptake from, and root water potential of different parts of the root zone, along with bulk root water potential, were measured to test various predictive models of root xylem ABA concentration [RX-ABA](sap). Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Nassau) were grown in soil columns and received different irrigation treatments (top and basal watering, and withholding water for varying lengths of time) to induce different vertical soil moisture gradients. Root water uptake was measured at four positions within the column by continuously recording volumetric soil water content (θv). Average θv was inversely related to bulk root water potential (Ψ(root)). In turn, Ψ(root) was correlated with both average [ABA](root) and [RX-ABA](sap). Despite large gradients in θv, [ABA](root) and root water potential was homogenous within the root zone. Consequently, unlike some split-root studies, root water uptake fraction from layers with different soil moisture did not influence xylem sap (ABA). This suggests two different patterns of ABA signalling, depending on how soil moisture heterogeneity is distributed within the root zone, which might have implications for implementing water-saving irrigation techniques.

  15. Voltage- and time-dependent depression of maximum rate of depolarization of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by two steroidal antiarrhythmic drugs, CCI 22277 and ORG 6001.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J

    1982-11-01

    1 The voltage- and time-dependence of the depression of the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax) by two steroidal anti-arrhythmic drugs, CCI22277 and Org 6001 were studied in guinea-pig ventricle. 2 At normal resting potentials CCI22277 (2 microM and 4 microM) produced very little depression of Vmax at very low driving rates (resting block) but trains of stimuli at interstimulus intervals (ISI) of less than 10,000 ms led to an exponential decline in Vmax to a new plateau over 100-200 beats. 3 This 'rate-dependent block' (RDB) increased with rate over the range ISI=4800 to ISI=200 ms. 4 Org 6001 30 microM and 60 microM produced a similar degree of RDB over the same range of frequencies but the new plateau level of Vmax was reached much more rapidly (20-30 beats) and there was a moderate degree of depression of Vmax in the resting tissue. 5 Recovery from RDB in the presence of both drugs was an exponential process with time constants (tau re) of 80.4 +/- 7.4 s for CCI22277 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 s for Org 6001. 6 Both drugs shifted the steady-state inactivation curve, relating Vmax to resting membrane potential, in the hyperpolarizing direction, implying selective depression of depolarized cells.

  16. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  17. Temperature-dependent development, cold tolerance, and potential distribution of Cricotopus lebetis (Diptera: Chironomidae), a tip miner of Hydrilla verticillata (Hydrocharitaceae).

    PubMed

    Stratman, Karen N; Overholt, William A; Cuda, James P; Mukherjee, A; Diaz, R; Netherland, Michael D; Wilson, Patrick C

    2014-01-01

    A chironomid midge, Cricotopus lebetis (Sublette) (Diptera: Chironomidae), was discovered attacking the apical meristems of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f. Royle) in Crystal River, Citrus Co., Florida in 1992. The larvae mine the stems of H. verticillata and cause basal branching and stunting of the plant. Temperature-dependent development, cold tolerance, and the potential distribution of the midge were investigated. The results of the temperature-dependent development study showed that optimal temperatures for larval development were between 20 and 30°C, and these data were used to construct a map of the potential number of generations per year of C. lebetis in Florida. Data from the cold tolerance study, in conjunction with historical weather data, were used to generate a predicted distribution of C. lebetis in the United States. A distribution was also predicted using an ecological niche modeling approach by characterizing the climate at locations where C. lebetis is known to occur and then finding other locations with similar climate. The distributions predicted using the two modeling approaches were not significantly different and suggested that much of the southeastern United States was climatically suitable for C. lebetis. PMID:25347841

  18. UV Light Potentiates STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes)-dependent Innate Immune Signaling through Deregulation of ULK1 (Unc51-like Kinase 1).

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths of sunlight trigger or exacerbate the symptoms of the autoimmune disorder lupus erythematosus is not known but may involve a role for the innate immune system. Here we show that UV radiation potentiates STING (stimulator of interferon genes)-dependent activation of the immune signaling transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to cytosolic DNA and cyclic dinucleotides in keratinocytes and other human cells. Furthermore, we find that modulation of this innate immune response also occurs with UV-mimetic chemical carcinogens and in a manner that is independent of DNA repair and several DNA damage and cell stress response signaling pathways. Rather, we find that the stimulation of STING-dependent IRF3 activation by UV is due to apoptotic signaling-dependent disruption of ULK1 (Unc51-like kinase 1), a pro-autophagic protein that negatively regulates STING. Thus, deregulation of ULK1 signaling by UV-induced DNA damage may contribute to the negative effects of sunlight UV exposure in patients with autoimmune disorders.

  19. Action Potentials are required for nitric oxide dependent LTP in CA1 neurons of adult GluR1 knockout and Wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Keith G.; Hardingham, Neil R.; Fox, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Neocortical LTP consists of both pre- and postsynaptic components that rely on nitric oxide (NO) and GluR1 respectively. In this study, we found that hippocampal LTP, induced by theta-burst stimulation in mature (> 8 week old) GluR1 knockout mice was almost entirely NO-dependent and involved both the α splice variant of NO synthase-1 (αNOS-1) and the NO synthase-3 (NOS-3) isoforms of NO synthase. Theta-burst induced LTP was also partly NO-dependent in wild-type mice, and made up approximately 50% of the potentiation 2 hours post-tetanus. Theta-burst stimulation reliably produced postsynaptic spikes including a high probability of complex spikes. Inhibition of postsynaptic somatic spikes with intracellular QX314 or local TTX application prevented LTP in the GluR1 knockout mice and also blocked the NO-component of LTP in wild-types. We conclude that theta-burst stimulation is particularly well suited to producing the somatic postsynaptic spikes required for NO-dependent LTP. PMID:19109486

  20. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Oostindie, Simone C.; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J. R.; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell–expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  1. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Rob N; Beurskens, Frank J; Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J; Oostindie, Simone C; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J R; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell-expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  2. UV Light Potentiates STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes)-dependent Innate Immune Signaling through Deregulation of ULK1 (Unc51-like Kinase 1)*

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Michael G.; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A.; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths of sunlight trigger or exacerbate the symptoms of the autoimmune disorder lupus erythematosus is not known but may involve a role for the innate immune system. Here we show that UV radiation potentiates STING (stimulator of interferon genes)-dependent activation of the immune signaling transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to cytosolic DNA and cyclic dinucleotides in keratinocytes and other human cells. Furthermore, we find that modulation of this innate immune response also occurs with UV-mimetic chemical carcinogens and in a manner that is independent of DNA repair and several DNA damage and cell stress response signaling pathways. Rather, we find that the stimulation of STING-dependent IRF3 activation by UV is due to apoptotic signaling-dependent disruption of ULK1 (Unc51-like kinase 1), a pro-autophagic protein that negatively regulates STING. Thus, deregulation of ULK1 signaling by UV-induced DNA damage may contribute to the negative effects of sunlight UV exposure in patients with autoimmune disorders. PMID:25792739

  3. UV Light Potentiates STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes)-dependent Innate Immune Signaling through Deregulation of ULK1 (Unc51-like Kinase 1).

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths of sunlight trigger or exacerbate the symptoms of the autoimmune disorder lupus erythematosus is not known but may involve a role for the innate immune system. Here we show that UV radiation potentiates STING (stimulator of interferon genes)-dependent activation of the immune signaling transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to cytosolic DNA and cyclic dinucleotides in keratinocytes and other human cells. Furthermore, we find that modulation of this innate immune response also occurs with UV-mimetic chemical carcinogens and in a manner that is independent of DNA repair and several DNA damage and cell stress response signaling pathways. Rather, we find that the stimulation of STING-dependent IRF3 activation by UV is due to apoptotic signaling-dependent disruption of ULK1 (Unc51-like kinase 1), a pro-autophagic protein that negatively regulates STING. Thus, deregulation of ULK1 signaling by UV-induced DNA damage may contribute to the negative effects of sunlight UV exposure in patients with autoimmune disorders. PMID:25792739

  4. Mutation of light-dependent phosphorylation sites of the Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TRPL) ion channel affects its subcellular localization and stability.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Alexander C; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-05-31

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation.

  5. [Dose-dependent tazepam modulation of amplitude-temporal characteristics of thalamocortical responses and the constant potential of the sensorimotor cortex in rabbits at eye opening].

    PubMed

    Shimko, I A; Fokin, V F

    2000-01-01

    The pronounced benzodiazepine (antiphobic) modulation of the amplitude-temporal parameters of different components of the thalamocortical responses (TCR) of the sensorimotor cortex is observed in rabbits in their early postnatal ontogeny. This modulation is of a dose-dependent character and is registered not after the injection of tazepam in a concentration of the "therapeutic tranquilizing window" but also in the psychotoxic plasma range. A gradual increase in blood tazepam concentration in a young rabbit pup is accompanied by the wave-like and differential decrease in the amplitude of the second and third positive (P2 and P3) and third negative (N3) TCR components, while the second negative (N2) and fourth positive (P4) components tend to a wave-like increase. The dose-dependent dynamics of tazepam modulation of the P2, P3, and N3 latencies is characterized by a wave-like and differential increase. The latency of P4 decreases slightly and that of the N2 increases with a low degree of significance. The selective dynamics of benzodiazepine modulation appears to be related with peculiarities of the electrogenesis of each of the components. The dose-dependent modulation of the level of cortical DC potential is of the same character as the respective amplitude changes in P2, P3, and N3, but its fluctiatuons are more pronounced.

  6. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e., the electron density, its gradient, and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for the exchange of any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredient in exchange-correlation functional development, opening the way to an additional rung in the Jacob's ladder classification of non-empirical density functionals.

  7. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-08-28

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e., the electron density, its gradient, and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for the exchange of any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredient in exchange-correlation functional development, opening the way to an additional rung in the Jacob's ladder classification of non-empirical density functionals. PMID:27586907

  8. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  9. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  10. Incorporating cold-air pooling into downscaled climate models increases potential refugia for snow-dependent species within the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion, CA.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jennifer A; Flint, Lorraine E; Flint, Alan L; Lundquist, Jessica D; Hudgens, Brian; Boydston, Erin E; Young, Julie K

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique water-balance approach for modeling snowpack under historic, current and future climates throughout the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion. Our methodology uses a finer scale (270 m) than previous regional studies and incorporates cold-air pooling, an atmospheric process that sustains cooler temperatures in topographic depressions thereby mitigating snowmelt. Our results are intended to support management and conservation of snow-dependent species, which requires characterization of suitable habitat under current and future climates. We use the wolverine (Gulo gulo) as an example species and investigate potential habitat based on the depth and extent of spring snowpack within four National Park units with proposed wolverine reintroduction programs. Our estimates of change in spring snowpack conditions under current and future climates are consistent with recent studies that generally predict declining snowpack. However, model development at a finer scale and incorporation of cold-air pooling increased the persistence of April 1st snowpack. More specifically, incorporation of cold-air pooling into future climate projections increased April 1st snowpack by 6.5% when spatially averaged over the study region and the trajectory of declining April 1st snowpack reverses at mid-elevations where snow pack losses are mitigated by topographic shading and cold-air pooling. Under future climates with sustained or increased precipitation, our results indicate a high likelihood for the persistence of late spring snowpack at elevations above approximately 2,800 m and identify potential climate refugia sites for snow-dependent species at mid-elevations, where significant topographic shading and cold-air pooling potential exist. PMID:25188379

  11. Incorporating Cold-Air Pooling into Downscaled Climate Models Increases Potential Refugia for Snow-Dependent Species within the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion, CA

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jennifer A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Hudgens, Brian; Boydston, Erin E.; Young, Julie K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique water-balance approach for modeling snowpack under historic, current and future climates throughout the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion. Our methodology uses a finer scale (270 m) than previous regional studies and incorporates cold-air pooling, an atmospheric process that sustains cooler temperatures in topographic depressions thereby mitigating snowmelt. Our results are intended to support management and conservation of snow-dependent species, which requires characterization of suitable habitat under current and future climates. We use the wolverine (Gulo gulo) as an example species and investigate potential habitat based on the depth and extent of spring snowpack within four National Park units with proposed wolverine reintroduction programs. Our estimates of change in spring snowpack conditions under current and future climates are consistent with recent studies that generally predict declining snowpack. However, model development at a finer scale and incorporation of cold-air pooling increased the persistence of April 1st snowpack. More specifically, incorporation of cold-air pooling into future climate projections increased April 1st snowpack by 6.5% when spatially averaged over the study region and the trajectory of declining April 1st snowpack reverses at mid-elevations where snow pack losses are mitigated by topographic shading and cold-air pooling. Under future climates with sustained or increased precipitation, our results indicate a high likelihood for the persistence of late spring snowpack at elevations above approximately 2,800 m and identify potential climate refugia sites for snow-dependent species at mid-elevations, where significant topographic shading and cold-air pooling potential exist. PMID:25188379

  12. Incorporating cold-air pooling into downscaled climate models increases potential refugia for snow-dependent species within the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Hudgens, Brian; Boydston, Erin E.; Young, Julie K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique water-balance approach for modeling snowpack under historic, current and future climates throughout the Sierra Nevada Ecoregion. Our methodology uses a finer scale (270 m) than previous regional studies and incorporates cold-air pooling, an atmospheric process that sustains cooler temperatures in topographic depressions thereby mitigating snowmelt. Our results are intended to support management and conservation of snow-dependent species, which requires characterization of suitable habitat under current and future climates. We use the wolverine (Gulo gulo) as an example species and investigate potential habitat based on the depth and extent of spring snowpack within four National Park units with proposed wolverine reintroduction programs. Our estimates of change in spring snowpack conditions under current and future climates are consistent with recent studies that generally predict declining snowpack. However, model development at a finer scale and incorporation of cold-air pooling increased the persistence of April 1st snowpack. More specifically, incorporation of cold-air pooling into future climate projections increased April 1st snowpack by 6.5% when spatially averaged over the study region and the trajectory of declining April 1st snowpack reverses at mid-elevations where snow pack losses are mitigated by topographic shading and cold-air pooling. Under future climates with sustained or increased precipitation, our results indicate a high likelihood for the persistence of late spring snowpack at elevations above approximately 2,800 m and identify potential climate refugia sites for snow-dependent species at mid-elevations, where significant topographic shading and cold-air pooling potential exist.

  13. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments.

  14. Priming of long-term potentiation in mouse hippocampus by corticotropin-releasing factor and acute stress: implications for hippocampus-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas; Nijholt, Ingrid; Eckart, Klaus; Spiess, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    In the present experiments, we characterized the action of human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) and acute stress (1 hr of immobilization) on hippocampus-dependent learning and on synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus. We first showed that h/rCRF application and acute stress facilitated (primed) long-term potentiation of population spikes (PS-LTP) in the mouse hippocampus and enhanced context-dependent fear conditioning. Both the priming of PS-LTP and the improvement of context-dependent fear conditioning were prevented by the CRF receptor antagonist [Glu(11,16)]astressin. PS-LTP priming and improved learning were also reduced by the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I. Acute stress induced the activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) 2 hr after the end of the stress session. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-62 antagonized the stress-mediated learning enhancement, however, with no effect on PS-LTP persistence. Thus, long-lasting increased neuronal excitability as reflected in PS-LTP priming appeared to be essential for the enhancement of learning in view of the observation that inhibition of PS-LTP priming was associated with impaired learning. Conversely, it was demonstrated that inhibition of CaMKII activity reduced contextual fear conditioning without affecting PS-LTP priming. This observation suggests that priming of PS-LTP and activation of CaMKII represent two essential mechanisms that may contribute independently to long-term memory.

  15. Receptor for catecholamines responding to catechol which potentiates voltage-dependent calcium current in single cells from guinea-pig taenia caeci.

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, K.; Bolton, T. B.; Imaizumi, Y.; Watanabe, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. Single isolated cells were obtained from the taenia of the guinea-pig's caecum by enzymic digestion and held under voltage clamp. The effects of various catecholamines, sympathomimetics and related compounds were tested for their ability to potentiate the voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) evoked in these cells by a depolarizing step. 2. ICa was potentiated by up to 60% by isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline which were equipotent. The EC50 for isoprenaline was about 40 nM. 3. The racemic mixtures of the optical isomers of isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline, and (+)-isoprenaline, were equipotent with the (-)-isomers of these drugs. Dopamine, L-dopa, and catechol were equipotent with these catecholamines. 4. Removal or substitution of one or more of the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety, as in phenylephrine, salbutamol, procaterol, methoxamine, terbutaline, BRL 37344, ICI 215001 or tyramine substantially reduced efficacy and/or potency. 5. The adrenoceptor blockers propranolol, phentolamine, dihydroergotamine, atenolol, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551, or the dopamine receptor blockers, haloperidol or flupenthixol, did not block the potentiating action of catechol or the catecholamines. 6. The receptor activated by catecholamines to increase ICa we suggest should be called a C-receptor in view of its sensitivity to catechol. It may arise by enzymic modification of a conventional adrenoceptor but its transduction also involves a novel mechanism which might indicate that it is present in the muscle cells before enzyme treatment. PMID:8032602

  16. Net electron-phonon scattering rates in InN/GaN multiple quantum wells: The effects of an energy dependent acoustic deformation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, H. Patterson, R.; Feng, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2014-08-11

    The rates of charge carrier relaxation by phonon emission are of substantial importance in the field of hot carrier solar cell, primarily in investigation of mechanisms to slow down hot carrier cooling. In this work, energy and momentum resolved deformation potentials relevant to electron-phonon scattering are computed for wurtzite InN and GaN as well as an InN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) superlattice using ab-initio methods. These deformation potentials reveal important features such as discontinuities across the electronic bandgap of the materials and variations over tens of eV. The energy dependence of the deformation potential is found to be very similar for wurtzite nitrides despite differences between the In and Ga pseudopotentials and their corresponding electronic band structures. Charge carrier relaxation by this mechanism is expected to be minimal for electrons within a few eV of the conduction band edge. However, hole scattering at energies more accessible to excitation by solar radiation is possible between heavy and light hole states. Moderate reductions in overall scattering rates are observed in MQW relative to the bulk nitride materials.

  17. Pathways to decoding the clinical potential of stress response FOXO-interaction networks for Huntington's disease: of gene prioritization and context dependence

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, Frédéric; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Neri, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The FOXO family of transcription factors is central to the regulation of organismal longevity and cellular survival. Several studies have indicated that FOXO factors lie at the center of a complex network of upstream pathways, cofactors and downstream targets (FOXO-interaction networks), which may have developmental and post-developmental roles in the regulation of chronic-stress response in normal and diseased cells. Noticeably, FOXO factors are important for the regulation of proteotoxicity and neuron survival in several models of neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that FOXO-interaction networks may have therapeutic potential. However, the status of FOXO-interaction networks in neurodegenerative disease remains largely unknown. Systems modeling is anticipated to provide a comprehensive assessment of this question. In particular, interrogating the context-dependent variability of FOXO-interaction networks could predict the clinical potential of cellular-stress response genes and aging regulators for tackling brain and peripheral pathology in neurodegenerative disease. Using published transcriptomic data obtained from murine models of Huntington's disease (HD) and post-mortem brains, blood samples and induced-pluripotent-stem cells from HD carriers as a case example, this review briefly highlights how the biological status and clinical potential of FOXO-interaction networks for HD may be decoded by developing network and entropy based feature selection across heterogeneous datasets. PMID:23781200

  18. [Can age-dependent cognitive functions be measured? P300 potentials--concept of brain aging--early diagnosis of dementia processes].

    PubMed

    Kügler, C

    1996-10-10

    Event related P300 potentials as the electrophysiological substrate of cognitive functions, such as the stimulus processing time (P300 latencies) and visual attention capacity (P300 amplitudes) are suitable for the analysis of age-related changes in cognitive human brain functions. P300 investigations carried out in a total of 330 test subjects aged between 18 and 98 years, showed an overall slight prolongation of the P300 latencies by 10 ms for each decade, as well as a discrete reduction in the P300 amplitudes of 1 microV. To describe the relationship between the P300 parameters and chronological age, polynomial regression models are more suitable than linear functions. This means that in middle-age, P300 potentials change only slightly while, from about the age of 60 upwards, a noticeable acceleration in the P300 changes takes place. An interesting observation was the fact that the acceleration in the P300 latency increase occurred some 10 years earlier in women than in men, beginning in the early postmenopausal period. The polynomial course of the regression function for the age-dependence of P300 potentials might reflect the positive influence of socio-cultural factors on the aging of cognitive functions. The true extent of the age-related changes in cognitive functions, however, can be determined only with the aid of intra-individual longitudinal studies. This is of considerable importance for the early diagnosis of both metabolic and primarily degenerative encephalopathies.

  19. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of potentially functional biphenyl-degrading bacterial community in response to extracellular organic matter from Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yin-Dong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Ding, Lin-Xian; Shen, Chao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Biphenyl (BP)-degrading bacteria were identified to degrade various polychlorinated BP (PCB) congers in long-term PCB-contaminated sites. Exploring BP-degrading capability of potentially useful bacteria was performed for enhancing PCB bioremediation. In the present study, the bacterial composition of the PCB-contaminated sediment sample was first investigated. Then extracellular organic matter (EOM) from Micrococcus luteus was used to enhance BP biodegradation. The effect of the EOM on the composition of bacterial community was investigated by combining with culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The obtained results indicate that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were predominant community in the PCB-contaminated sediment. EOM from M. luteus could stimulate the activity of some potentially difficult-to-culture BP degraders, which contribute to significant enhancement of BP biodegradation. The potentially difficult-to-culture bacteria in response to EOM addition were mainly Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas belonging to Gammaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria respectively. This study provides new insights into exploration of functional difficult-to-culture bacteria with EOM addition and points out broader BP/PCB degrading, which could be employed for enhancing PCB-bioremediation processes. PMID:25675850

  20. Mechanisms of Nrf2/Keap1-Dependent Phase II Cytoprotective and Detoxifying Gene Expression and Potential Cellular Targets of Chemopreventive Isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Das, Biswa Nath; Kim, Young-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are abundantly found in cruciferous vegetables. Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic consumption of cruciferous vegetables can lower the overall risk of cancer. Natural ITCs are key chemopreventive ingredients of cruciferous vegetables, and one of the prime chemopreventive mechanisms of natural isothiocyanates is the induction of Nrf2/ARE-dependent gene expression that plays a critical role in cellular defense against electrophiles and reactive oxygen species. In the present review, we first discuss the underlying mechanisms how natural ITCs affect the intracellular signaling kinase cascades to regulate the Keap1/Nrf2 activities, thereby inducing phase II cytoprotective and detoxifying enzymes. We also discuss the potential cellular protein targets to which natural ITCs are directly conjugated and how these events aid in the chemopreventive effects of natural ITCs. Finally, we discuss the posttranslational modifications of Keap1 and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of Nrf2 in response to electrophiles and oxidants. PMID:23781297

  1. Biophysical Insights into How Spike Threshold Depends on the Rate of Membrane Potential Depolarization in Type I and Type II Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic spike threshold plays a critical role in neuronal input-output relations. In many neurons, the threshold potential depends on the rate of membrane potential depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. There are two basic classes of neural excitability, i.e., Type I and Type II, according to input-output properties. Although the dynamical and biophysical basis of their spike initiation has been established, the spike threshold dynamic for each cell type has not been well described. Here, we use a biophysical model to investigate how spike threshold depends on dV/dt in two types of neuron. It is observed that Type II spike threshold is more depolarized and more sensitive to dV/dt than Type I. With phase plane analysis, we show that each threshold dynamic arises from the different separatrix and K+ current kinetics. By analyzing subthreshold properties of membrane currents, we find the activation of hyperpolarizing current prior to spike initiation is a major factor that regulates the threshold dynamics. The outward K+ current in Type I neuron does not activate at the perithresholds, which makes its spike threshold insensitive to dV/dt. The Type II K+ current activates prior to spike initiation and there is a large net hyperpolarizing current at the perithresholds, which results in a depolarized threshold as well as a pronounced threshold dynamic. These predictions are further attested in several other functionally equivalent cases of neural excitability. Our study provides a fundamental description about how intrinsic biophysical properties contribute to the threshold dynamics in Type I and Type II neurons, which could decipher their significant functions in neural coding. PMID:26083350

  2. The Contribution of Ionic Currents to Rate-Dependent Action Potential Duration and Pattern of Reentry in a Mathematical Model of Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Song, Jun-Seop; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Sobie, Eric A.; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF) in humans is characterized by shortening of action potential duration (APD) and attenuation of APD rate-adaptation. However, the quantitative influences of particular ionic current alterations on rate-dependent APD changes, and effects on patterns of reentry in atrial tissue, have not been systematically investigated. Using mathematical models of human atrial cells and tissue and performing parameter sensitivity analysis, we evaluated the quantitative contributions to action potential (AP) shortening and APD rate-adaptation of ionic current remodeling seen with PeAF. Ionic remodeling in PeAF was simulated by reducing L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICaL), increasing inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) and modulating five other ionic currents. Parameter sensitivity analysis, which quantified how each ionic current influenced APD in control and PeAF conditions, identified interesting results, including a negative effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange on APD only in the PeAF condition. At high pacing rate (2 Hz), electrical remodeling in IK1 alone accounts for the APD reduction of PeAF, but at slow pacing rate (0.5 Hz) both electrical remodeling in ICaL alone (-70%) and IK1 alone (+100%) contribute equally to the APD reduction. Furthermore, AP rate-adaptation was affected by IKur in control and by INaCa in the PeAF condition. In a 2D tissue model, a large reduction (-70%) of ICaL becomes a dominant factor leading to a stable spiral wave in PeAF. Our study provides a quantitative and unifying understanding of the roles of ionic current remodeling in determining rate-dependent APD changes at the cellular level and spatial reentry patterns in tissue. PMID:26964092

  3. Differences in central serotoninergic transmission among patients with recent onset, sub-chronic, and chronic schizophrenia as assessed by the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Jung, Eunjoo; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hahn, Sang Woo; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Previous research has shown that abnormalities in serotonin systems are associated with schizophrenia. The loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) has been used as a metric of central serotonin activity. The present study aimed to evaluate LDAEP in patients with schizophrenia of differing chronicity. Sixty-four patients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. LDAEP and psychometric ratings, such as the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), were measured. The cohort was stratified into three subgroups according to the duration of illness: recent onset (<2years, n=21), sub-chronic (2-9years, n=28), and chronic (≥10years, n=15) groups. The LDAEP differed significantly among the three groups. A post-hoc analysis (Bonferroni) demonstrated that the LDAEP differed significantly between the recent onset and chronic groups (p=0.029), and between the healthy control and chronic groups (p=0.008). Age, sex, dosage of antipsychotics, and smoking did not significantly affect the group differences. In the correlation analysis, there was a significant correlation of LDAEP values with illness duration (r=-0.259, p=0.045). The present study verifies that the LDAEP is related to the duration of illness in patients with schizophrenia. This suggests that central serotonin neurotransmission is changeable, and it may depend on the chronicity of schizophrenia pathology.

  4. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  5. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24518820

  6. Potential effects of climate change on inland glacial lakes and implications for lake-dependent biota in Wisconsin: final report April 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Michael W.; Walker, John F.; Kenow, Kevin P.; Rasmussen, Paul W.; Garrison, Paul J.; Hanson, Paul C.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    F statewide, and an increase in precipitation of 1”–2”. However, summer precipitation in the northern part of the state is expected to be less and winter precipitation will be greater. By the end of the 21st century, the magnitude of changes in temperature and precipitation are expected to intensify. Such climatic changes have altered, and would further alter hydrological, chemical, and physical properties of inland lakes. Lake-dependent wildlife sensitive to changes in water quality, are particularly susceptible to lake quality-associated habitat changes and are likely to suffer restrictions to current breeding distributions under some climate change scenarios. We have selected the common loon (Gavia immer) to serve as a sentinel lake-dependent piscivorous species to be used in the development of a template for linking primary lake-dependent biota endpoints (e.g., decline in productivity and/or breeding range contraction) to important lake quality indicators. In the current project, we evaluate how changes in freshwater habitat quality (specifically lake clarity) may impact common loon lake occupancy in Wisconsin under detailed climate-change scenarios. In addition, we employ simple land-use/land cover and habitat scenarios to illustrate the potential interaction of climate and land-use/land cover effects. The methods employed here provide a template for studies where integration of physical and biotic models is used to project future conditions under various climate and land use change scenarios. Findings presented here project the future conditions of lakes and loons within an important watershed in northern Wisconsin – of importance to water resource managers and state citizens alike.

  7. A novel inward-rectifying K+ current with a cell-cycle dependence governs the resting potential of mammalian neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, A; Bianchi, L; Becchetti, A; Faravelli, L; Coronnello, M; Mini, E; Olivotto, M; Wanke, E

    1995-01-01

    1. Human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines were used to investigate, by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, the properties of a novel inward-rectifying K+ current (IIR) in the adjustment of cell resting potential (Vrest), which was in the range -40 to -20 mV. 2. When elicited from a holding potential of 0 mV, IIR was completely inactivated with time constants ranging from 13 ms at -140 mV to 4.5 s at -50 mV. The steady-state inactivation curve (h(V)) was found to be independent of [Na+]o and [K+]o (2-80 mM) and could be fitted to a Boltzmann curve with a steep slope factor of 5-6, and a V1/2 around Vrest. Divalent ion-free extracellular solutions shifted h(V) to the left by about 28 mV. 3. Peak chord conductance, whose maximal value was approximately proportional to the square root of [K+]o, could be fitted to a Boltzmann curve independently of [K+]o, with a V1/2 value around -48 mV and a slope factor of 18. Extracellular Cs+ and Ba2+ blocked the IIR in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, but Ba2+ was less effective than it is on classical inward-rectifier channels. 4. Under control culture conditions the values of Vrest and V1/2 of h(V) varied widely among cells. The knowledge of V1/2 proved crucial or the theoretical prediction of Vrest. After cell synchronization in the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle, or at the G1-S boundaries, the cells reduced their variability of h(V). The same occurred after cell synchronization in G1 by treatment with retinoic acid. 5. The experimental data could be fitted to a classical model of an inward rectifier, after removing the dependence of conductance activation on (V-EK), and incorporating an inactivation with an intrinsic voltage dependence. Moreover, the model predicts, for this novel inward rectifier and in contrast with the classical inward rectifier, the incapacity of maintaining, in physiological media, a Vrest more negative than -35 to -40 mV, which is an important feature of cancer cells. PMID:8847640

  8. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  9. Contribution of potential EF hand motifs to the calcium-dependent gating of a mouse brain large conductance, calcium-sensitive K(+) channel.

    PubMed

    Braun, A P; Sy, L

    2001-06-15

    1. The large conductance, calcium-sensitive K(+) channel (BK(Ca) channel) is a unique member of the K(+)-selective ion channel family in that activation is dependent upon both direct calcium binding and membrane depolarization. Calcium binding acts to dynamically shift voltage-dependent gating in a negative or left-ward direction, thereby adjusting channel opening to changes in cellular membrane potential. 2. We hypothesized that the intrinsic calcium-binding site within the BK(Ca) channel alpha subunit may contain an EF hand motif, the most common, naturally occurring calcium binding structure. Following identification of six potential sites, we introduced a single amino acid substitution (D/E to N/Q or A) at the equivalent of the -z position of a bona fide EF hand that would be predicted to lower calcium binding affinity at each of the six sites. 3. Using macroscopic current recordings of wild-type and mutant BK(Ca) channels in excised inside-out membrane patches from HEK 293 cells, we observed that a single point mutation in the C-terminus (Site 6, FLD(923)QD to N), adjacent to the 'calcium bowl' described by Salkoff and colleagues, shifted calcium-sensitive gating right-ward by 50--65 mV over the range of 2--12 microM free calcium, but had little effect on voltage-dependent gating in the absence of calcium. Combining this mutation at Site 6 with a similar mutation at Site 1 (PVD(81)EK to N) in the N-terminus produced a greater shift (70--90 mV) in calcium-sensitive gating over the same range of calcium. We calculated that these combined mutations decreased the apparent calcium binding affinity approximately 11-fold (129.5 microM vs. 11.3 microm) compared to the wild-type channel. 4. We further observed that a bacterially expressed protein encompassing Site 6 of the BK(Ca) channel C-terminus and bovine brain calmodulin were both able to directly bind (45)Ca(2+) following denaturation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (e.g. SDS-PAGE). 5. Our results suggest

  10. Antihepatocellular Carcinoma Potential of Tetramethylpyrazine Induces Cell Cycle Modulation and Mitochondrial-Dependent Apoptosis: Regulation of p53 Signaling Pathway in HepG2 Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Chen, Weiping; Gao, Jing; Qian, Lei; Qiu, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) was originally isolated from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Ligusticum chuanxiong In the present study, TMP exhibits potent antitumor activities in vitro. However, the molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. Hence, this study aims to investigate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of TMP on HepG2 and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Analyses using Cell Counting Kit-8 and real-time cell analyzer indicated that TMP significantly inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation. We also observed that TMP induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint and apoptosis, using flow cytometry and high-content screening. Furthermore, our results predicted that TMP could directly decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), increase the release of cytochrome c, and increase caspase activation, indicating that mitochondrial pathway apoptosis could be the mechanism for TMP within HepG2 cells. Moreover, TMP altered expression of p53 and the Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, which revealed that TMP induced cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis in HepG2 cells in vitro. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the antitumor properties of TMP, which may be explored as a potential option for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27179035

  11. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as a function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.

  12. Regulation of the temperature-dependent activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by phospholipids in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-02-20

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) proteins are heat-activated nonselective cation channels. TRPV1 channels are polymodal in their function and exhibit multifaceted regulation with various molecular compounds. In this regard, phosphoinositides, particularly phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, are important channel regulators. However, their effects on TRPV1 channel activity have not been conclusively determined. To characterize temperature-induced activation of TRPV1 in the presence of different phospholipids, we purified the TRPV1 protein from HEK-293 cells and incorporated it into planar lipid bilayers. In the presence of 2.5 μm phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, TRPV1 channels demonstrated rapid activation at 33-39 °C and achieved full channel opening at 42 °C. At this temperature range, TRPV1 heat activation exhibited steep temperature dependence (temperature coefficient (Q10) of 18), and the channel openings were accompanied by large changes in entropy and enthalpy, suggesting a substantial conformation change. At a similar temperature range, another phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, also potentiated heat activation of TRPV1, but with much lower efficiency. Negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol could also induce heat activation of TRPV1 channels, although with a small-conductance state. Our data demonstrate that phospholipids, specifically phosphoinositides, are important regulators of TRPV1 and are required for heat-induced channel activity.

  13. An Eight-Degree-of-Freedom, Time-Dependent Quantum Dynamics Study for the H₂+C₂H Reaction on a New Modified potential Energy Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dunyou; Huo, Winifred M.

    2007-10-21

    An eight dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics wavepacket approach is performed for the study of the H₂+C₂H ! H + C₂H₂ reaction system on a new modified potential energy surface (PES) [Chem. Phys. Lett. 409, 249 (2005)]. This new potential energy surface is obtained by modifying Wang and Bowman's old PES [ J. Chem. Phys. 101, 8646 (1994)] based on the new ab initio calculation. This new modified PES has a much lower transition state barrier height at 2.29 kcal/mol than Wang and Bowman's old PES at 4.3 kcal/mol. This study shows the reactivity for this diatom-triatom reaction system is enchanced by vibrational excitations of H₂; whereas, the vibrational excitations of C₂H only have a small effect on the reactivity. Furthermore, the bending excitations of C₂H, comparing to the ground state reaction probability, hinder the reactivity. The comparison of the rate constant between this calculation and experimental results agree with each other very well. This comparison indicates that the new modified PES corrects the large barrier height problem in Wang and Bowman's old PES.

  14. A Primary Cortical Input to Hippocampus Expresses a Pathway-Specific and Endocannabinoid-Dependent Form of Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weisheng; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T.; Karsten, Carley A.; Merrill, Collin B.; Gall, Christine M.; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), a key modulator of synaptic transmission in mammalian brain, is produced in dendritic spines and then crosses the synaptic junction to depress neurotransmitter release. Here we report that 2-AG-dependent retrograde signaling also mediates an enduring enhancement of glutamate release, as assessed with independent tests, in the lateral perforant path (LPP), one of two cortical inputs to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Induction of this form of long-term potentiation (LTP) involved two types of glutamate receptors, changes in postsynaptic calcium, and the postsynaptic enzyme that synthesizes 2-AG. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy confirmed that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are localized presynaptically to LPP terminals, while the inhibition or knockout of the receptors eliminated LPP-LTP. Suppressing the enzyme that degrades 2-AG dramatically enhanced LPP potentiation, while overexpressing it produced the opposite effect. Priming with a CB1 agonist markedly reduced the threshold for LTP. Latrunculin A, which prevents actin polymerization, blocked LPP-LTP when applied extracellularly but had no effect when infused postsynaptically into granule cells, indicating that critical actin remodeling resides in the presynaptic compartment. Importantly, there was no evidence for the LPP form of potentiation in the Schaffer-commissural innervation of field CA1 or in the medial perforant path. Peripheral injections of compounds that block or enhance LPP-LTP had corresponding effects on the formation of long-term memory for cues conveyed to the dentate gyrus by the LPP. Together, these results indicate that the encoding of information carried by a principal hippocampal afferent involves an unusual, regionally differentiated form of plasticity. PMID:27517090

  15. Age-Dependent Switch of the Role of Serotonergic 5-HT1A Receptors in Gating Long-Term Potentiation in Rat Visual Cortex In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gagolewicz, Peter J.; Dringenberg, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    The rodent primary visual cortex (V1) is densely innervated by serotonergic axons and previous in vitro work has shown that serotonin (5-HT) can modulate plasticity (e.g., long-term potentiation (LTP)) at V1 synapses. However, little work has examined the effects of 5-HT on LTP under in vivo conditions. We examined the role of 5-HT on LTP in V1 elicited by theta burst stimulation (TBS) of the lateral geniculate nucleus in urethane-anesthetized (adult and juvenile) rats. Thalamic TBS consistently induced potentiation of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) recorded in V1. While 5-HT application (0.1–10 mM) itself did not alter LTP levels, the broad-acting 5-HT receptor antagonists methiothepin (1 mM) resulted in a clear facilitation of LTP in adult animals, an effect that was mimicked by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (1 mM). Interestingly, in juvenile rats, WAY 100635 application inhibited LTP, indicative of an age-dependent switch in the role of 5-HT1A receptors in gating V1 plasticity. Analyses of spontaneous electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity in V1 indicated that the antagonist-induced LTP enhancement was not related to systematic changes in oscillatory activity in V1. Together, these data suggest a facilitating role of 5-HT1A receptor activation on LTP in the juvenile V1, which switches to a tonic, inhibitory influence in adulthood. PMID:27247804

  16. α1-Adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus involved in learning-dependent long-term potentiation during active-avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Zhan, Su-Yang; Li, Guang-Xie; Wang, Dan; Li, Ying-Shun; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The hippocampus is the key structure for learning and memory in mammals and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. The influences of norepinephrine (NE) on the modulation of learning and memory, as well as LTP, through β-adrenoceptors are well documented, whereas the role of α1-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP is not yet clear. In the present study, we measured extracellular concentrations of NE in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region using an in-vivo brain microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely moving conscious rats. Next, the effects of prazosin (an antagonist of α1-adrenoceptor) and phenylephrine (an agonist of the α1-adrenoceptor) on amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during the active-avoidance behavior. Our results showed that the extracellular concentration of NE in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to the baseline level following extinction training. A local microinjection of prazosin into the DG significantly accelerated the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior, whereas a local microinjection of phenylephrine retarded the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude were accompanied by corresponding changes in active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NE activation of α1-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG inhibits active-avoidance learning by modulation of synaptic efficiency in rats.

  17. A Primary Cortical Input to Hippocampus Expresses a Pathway-Specific and Endocannabinoid-Dependent Form of Long-Term Potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian H; Palmer, Linda C; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Karsten, Carley A; Merrill, Collin B; Mackie, Ken; Gall, Christine M; Piomelli, Daniele; Lynch, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), a key modulator of synaptic transmission in mammalian brain, is produced in dendritic spines and then crosses the synaptic junction to depress neurotransmitter release. Here we report that 2-AG-dependent retrograde signaling also mediates an enduring enhancement of glutamate release, as assessed with independent tests, in the lateral perforant path (LPP), one of two cortical inputs to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Induction of this form of long-term potentiation (LTP) involved two types of glutamate receptors, changes in postsynaptic calcium, and the postsynaptic enzyme that synthesizes 2-AG. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy confirmed that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are localized presynaptically to LPP terminals, while the inhibition or knockout of the receptors eliminated LPP-LTP. Suppressing the enzyme that degrades 2-AG dramatically enhanced LPP potentiation, while overexpressing it produced the opposite effect. Priming with a CB1 agonist markedly reduced the threshold for LTP. Latrunculin A, which prevents actin polymerization, blocked LPP-LTP when applied extracellularly but had no effect when infused postsynaptically into granule cells, indicating that critical actin remodeling resides in the presynaptic compartment. Importantly, there was no evidence for the LPP form of potentiation in the Schaffer-commissural innervation of field CA1 or in the medial perforant path. Peripheral injections of compounds that block or enhance LPP-LTP had corresponding effects on the formation of long-term memory for cues conveyed to the dentate gyrus by the LPP. Together, these results indicate that the encoding of information carried by a principal hippocampal afferent involves an unusual, regionally differentiated form of plasticity. PMID:27517090

  18. α1-Adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus involved in learning-dependent long-term potentiation during active-avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Zhan, Su-Yang; Li, Guang-Xie; Wang, Dan; Li, Ying-Shun; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The hippocampus is the key structure for learning and memory in mammals and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. The influences of norepinephrine (NE) on the modulation of learning and memory, as well as LTP, through β-adrenoceptors are well documented, whereas the role of α1-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP is not yet clear. In the present study, we measured extracellular concentrations of NE in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region using an in-vivo brain microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely moving conscious rats. Next, the effects of prazosin (an antagonist of α1-adrenoceptor) and phenylephrine (an agonist of the α1-adrenoceptor) on amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during the active-avoidance behavior. Our results showed that the extracellular concentration of NE in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to the baseline level following extinction training. A local microinjection of prazosin into the DG significantly accelerated the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior, whereas a local microinjection of phenylephrine retarded the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude were accompanied by corresponding changes in active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NE activation of α1-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG inhibits active-avoidance learning by modulation of synaptic efficiency in rats. PMID:27603730

  19. Genetic knockout of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene alters hippocampal long-term potentiation in a background strain-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Freund, Ronald K; Graw, Sharon; Choo, Kevin S; Stevens, Karen E; Leonard, Sherry; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Reduced α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function is linked to impaired hippocampal-dependent sensory processing and learning and memory in schizophrenia. While knockout of the Chrna7 gene encoding the α7nAChR on a C57/Bl6 background results in changes in cognitive measures, prior studies found little impact on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in these mice. However, schizophrenia is a multi-genic disorder where complex interactions between specific genetic mutations and overall genetic background may play a prominent role in determining phenotypic penetrance. Thus, we compared the consequences of knocking out the α7nAChR on synaptic plasticity in C57/Bl6 and C3H mice, which differ in their basal α7nAChR expression levels. Homozygous α7 deletion in C3H mice, which normally express higher α7nAChR levels, resulted in impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses, while C3H α7 heterozygous mice maintained robust LTP. In contrast, homozygous α7 deletion in C57 mice, which normally express lower α7nAChR levels, did not alter LTP, as had been previously reported for this strain. Thus, the threshold of Chrna7 expression required for LTP may be different in the two strains. Measurements of auditory gating, a hippocampal-dependent behavioral paradigm used to identify schizophrenia-associated sensory processing deficits, was abnormal in C3H α7 knockout mice confirming that auditory gating also requires α7nAChR expression. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic background on the regulation of synaptic plasticity and could be relevant for understanding genetic and cognitive heterogeneity in human studies of α7nAChR dysfunction in mental disorders.

  20. Homology Modeling of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Brugia malayi and Its Drug Target Potential Using Dispiro-Cycloalkanones

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra K.; Pandey, Jyoti; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Shah, Priyanka; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial nematodes maintain a mutualistic relationship with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Depletion of Wolbachia produces profound defects in nematode development, fertility, and viability and thus has great promise as a novel approach for treating filarial diseases. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is an essential enzyme of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Therefore, in the present study, the antifilarial drug target potential of the NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of the Wolbachia symbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-LigA) was investigated using dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds. Dispiro-cycloalkanone specifically inhibited the nick-closing and cohesive-end ligation activities of the enzyme without inhibiting human or T4 DNA ligase. The mode of inhibition was competitive with the NAD+ cofactor. Docking studies also revealed the interaction of these compounds with the active site of the target enzyme. The adverse effects of these inhibitors were observed on adult and microfilarial stages of B. malayi in vitro, and the most active compounds were further monitored in vivo in jirds and mastomys rodent models. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 had severe adverse effects in vitro on the motility of both adult worms and microfilariae at low concentrations. Compound 2 was the best inhibitor, with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (1.02 μM), followed by compound 5 (IC50, 2.3 μM) and compound 1 (IC50, 2.9 μM). These compounds also exhibited the same adverse effect on adult worms and microfilariae in vivo (P < 0.05). These compounds also tremendously reduced the wolbachial load, as evident by quantitative real-time PCR (P < 0.05). wBm-LigA thus shows great promise as an antifilarial drug target, and dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds show great promise as antifilarial lead candidates. PMID:25845868

  1. First-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary unidimensional potential with a superimposed exponential time-dependent drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    In one-dimensional systems, the dynamics of a Brownian particle are governed by the force derived from a potential as well as by diffusion properties. In this work, we obtain the first-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary potential with an exponential temporally decaying superimposed field up to a prescribed threshold. The general system analyzed here describes the sub-threshold signal integration of integrate-and-fire neuron models, of any kind, supplemented by an adaptation-like current, whereas the first-passage-time corresponds to the declaration of a spike. Following our previous studies, we base our analysis on the backward Fokker-Planck equation and study the survival probability and the first-passage-time density function in the space of the initial condition. By proposing a series solution we obtain a system of recurrence equations, which given the specific structure of the exponential time-dependent drift, easily admit a simpler Laplace representation. Naturally, the present general derivation agrees with the explicit solution we found previously for the Wiener process in (2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 185001). However, to demonstrate the generality of the approach, we further explicitly evaluate the first-passage-time statistics of the underlying Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. To test the validity of the series solution, we extensively compare theoretical expressions with the data obtained from numerical simulations in different regimes. As shown, agreement is precise whenever the series is truncated at an appropriate order. Beyond the fact that both the Wiener and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes have a direct interpretation in the context of neuronal models, given their ubiquity in different fields, our present results will be of interest in other settings where an additive state-independent temporal relaxation process is being developed as the particle diffuses.

  2. Event-related potentials reveal task-dependence and inter-individual differences in negation processing during silent listening and explicit truth-value evaluation.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C; Kissler, J

    2014-09-26

    In sentences such as dogs cannot fly/bark, evaluation of the truth-value of the sentence is assumed to appear after the negation has been integrated into the sentence structure. Moreover negation processing and truth-value processing are considered effortful processes, whereas processing of the semantic relatedness of the words within sentences is thought to occur automatically. In the present study, modulation of event-related brain potentials (N400 and late positive potential, LPP) was investigated during an implicit task (silent listening) and active truth-value evaluation to test these theoretical assumptions and determine if truth-value evaluation will be modulated by the way participants processed the negated information implicitly prior to truth-value verification. Participants first listened to negated sentences and then evaluated these sentences for their truth-value in an active evaluation task. During passive listening, the LPP was generally more pronounced for targets in false negative (FN) than true negative (TN) sentences, indicating enhanced attention allocation to semantically-related but false targets. N400 modulation by truth-value (FN>TN) was observed in 11 out of 24 participants. However, during active evaluation, processing of semantically-unrelated but true targets (TN) elicited larger N400 and LPP amplitudes as well as a pronounced frontal negativity. This pattern was particularly prominent in those 11 individuals, whose N400 modulation during silent listening indicated that they were more sensitive to violations of the truth-value than to semantic priming effects. The results provide evidence for implicit truth-value processing during silent listening of negated sentences and for task dependence related to inter-individual differences in implicit negation processing.

  3. Baseline-dependent modulating effects of nicotine on voluntary and involuntary attention measured with brain event-related P3 potentials.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Choueiry, Joelle; Dort, Heather; Smith, Dylan; Impey, Danielle; de la Salle, Sara; Philippe, Tristan

    2014-07-01

    Cholinergic stimulation produces cognitive effects that vary across individuals, and stimulus/task conditions. As of yet, the role of individual differences in moderating the effects of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist nicotine on specific attentional functions and their neural and behavioral correlates is not fully understood. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 64 healthy non-smokers, we address the contribution of baseline-dependence to inter-individual variability in response to nicotine gum (6 mg) assessed with event-related brain potential (ERP) indices of involuntary (the anteriorly distributed P3a) and voluntary (the posteriorly distributed P3b) attention derived from an active 3-stimulus auditory oddball paradigm involving listening to standard and novel stimuli and detection and response to target stimuli. Nicotine enhanced the amplitude of P3a elicited during the processing of novel stimuli but only in individuals with relatively low baseline P3a amplitudes. Exhibiting an inverted-U nicotine response profile, target P3b and standard N1 amplitudes were increased and decreased in participants with low and high baseline amplitudes, respectively. In all, the findings corroborate the involvement of nicotinic mechanisms in attention, generally acting to increase attentional capacity in relatively low attentional functioning (reduced baseline ERPs) individuals, while having negative or detrimental effects in those with medium/high attentional levels (increased baseline ERPs), and in a manner that is differentially expressed during bottom-up (involuntary) attentional capture and top-down (voluntary) attentional allocation.

  4. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance.

  5. Warfarin, a potential pollutant in aquatic environment acting through Pxr signaling pathway and γ-glutamyl carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Santos, Adriana; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent; Gavaia, Paulo J

    2014-11-01

    Warfarin-induced vitamin K (VK) recycling impairment is used worldwide as a rodenticide and human thromboembolic prophylactic. Since VK metabolism/signaling pathways have been conserved throughout vertebrate evolution, its release to the environment might impact on aquatic organisms. Present study assessed the toxic effect of warfarin (0, 5, 25 and 125 mg L(-1)) on zebrafish development and characterized underlying mechanisms of action through qPCR analysis of VK-related genes. Expression of pregnane X receptor (pxr), the nuclear receptor binding vitamin K, was ubiquitous in zebrafish and suggests that warfarin exposure may interfere with several biological processes. Indeed, warfarin exposure of zebrafish larvae caused hemorrhages in brain, skeletal deformities and triggered ectopic calcifications, which may be the consequence of an altered γ-carboxylation of VK-dependent proteins and/or pxr signaling. This study provides new insights into warfarin effects as a bone homeostasis disruptor and soft tissue calcification inductor, and its potential risk for aquatic environments.

  6. Measuring the magnetic-field-dependent chemical potential of a low-density three-dimensional electron gas in n -GaAs and extracting its magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N.; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic-field-dependent shift of the electron chemical potential in bulk, n -type GaAs at room temperature. A transient voltage of ˜100 μ V was measured across a Au-Al2O3 -GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor in a pulsed magnetic field of ˜6 T . Several spurious voltages larger than the signal that had plagued earlier researchers performing similar experiments were carefully eliminated. The itinerant magnetic susceptibility of GaAs is extracted from the experimentally measured data for four different doping densities, including one as low as 5 ×1015cm-3 . Though the susceptibility in GaAs is dominated by Landau-Peierls diamagnetism, the experimental technique demonstrated can be a powerful tool for extracting the total free carrier magnetization of any electron system. The method is also virtually independent of the carrier concentration and is expected to work better in the nondegenerate limit. Such experiments had been successfully performed in two-dimensional electron gases at cryogenic temperatures. However, an unambiguous report on having observed this effect in any three-dimensional electron gas has been lacking. We highlight the 50 year old literature of various trials and discuss the key details of our experiment that were essential for its success. The technique can be used to unambiguously yield only the itinerant part of the magnetic susceptibility of complex materials such as magnetic semiconductors and hexaborides, and thus shed light on the origin of ferromagnetism in such systems.

  7. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance. PMID:25774424

  8. A dynamic transmission model with age-dependent infectiousness and reactivation for cytomegalovirus in the United States: Potential impact of vaccination strategies on congenital infection.

    PubMed

    Hogea, Cosmina; Dieussaert, Ilse; Van Effelterre, Thierry; Guignard, Adrienne; Mols, Johann

    2015-01-01

    We present an age-structured dynamic transmission model for cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the United States, based on natural history and available data, primarily aiming to combine the available qualitative and quantitative knowledge toward more complex modeling frameworks to better reflect the underlying biology and epidemiology of the CMV infection. The model structure explicitly accounts for primary infections, reactivations and re-infections. Duration of infectiousness and likelihood of reactivation were both assumed to be age-dependent, and natural reduction in the re-infection risk following primary infection was included. We used an empirical social contact matrix (POLYMOD-based) as support for CMV transmission between different age groups. The baseline model reproduced well the age-stratified seroprevalence data (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III) used for calibration. The model was further used to explore the potential impact of hypothetical vaccination on reducing congenital CMV infection under various vaccine profiles and vaccination scenarios. Our preliminary model-based simulations suggested that while infant vaccination may represent an attractive way to reduce congenital CMV infection over time, adolescent female vaccination with an adequate routine booster platform may, under certain conditions, provide an alternative. However, for such tools to be considered toward actual decision-making, enhanced validations based on additional studies and data would be further necessary. The modeling framework presented in this paper was designed to be sufficiently general and flexible, such that it can allow for further adaptations to reflect new knowledge or data that may become available in the future.

  9. Analysis of stress-induced mobility enhancement on (100)-oriented single- and double-gate n-MOSFETs using silicon-thickness-dependent deformation potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sujin; Sun, Wookyung; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2015-04-01

    The stress effect in uniaxially strained single- and double-gate silicon-on-insulator n-type metal oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with a (100) wafer orientation is analyzed. A model of silicon-thickness-dependent deformation potential ({{D}ac\\_{{TSi}}}) is introduced to accurately calculate the mobility using a Schrödinger-Poisson solver. Simulation results using the {{D}ac\\_{{TSi}}} model exhibit excellent agreement with the measured mobility for both the unstrained and strained conditions. Electron mobility enhancements with longitudinal and transverse tensile stress conditions are simulated as a function of silicon thickness. The mobility enhancement in the single-gate case has one peak point, whereas it produces two peak points in the double-gate case. An in-depth analysis reveals that this phenomenon results from the hump in the energy difference between the Δ2 and Δ4 valleys, which in turn results from the volume inversion in the double gate.

  10. Analysis of Stress Effect on (110)-Oriented Single-Gate SOI nMOSFETs Using a Silicon-Thickness-Dependent Deformation Potential.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Sun, W; Lee, I; Shin, H

    2016-05-01

    The stress effect in uniaxially strained (100)- and (110)-oriented single-gate (SG) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) was analyzed. A model of a silicon-thickness-dependent deformation potential (D(as_T(si))) was used for accurate calculation of mobility using a Schrödinger-Poisson solver. The simulation results obtained using the D(ac_T(si)) model exhibited excellent agreement with the measured mobility for both strained and unstrained conditions. The enhancements in electron mobility under conditions of longitudinal tensile strain were analyzed as a function of the silicon thickness and strain. As the silicon thickness decreased, the mobility enhancement in (100) SG MOSFETs reached a peak, whereas it diminished in (110) SG MOSFETs. As the strain increased, mobility enhancement increased in the (110) case, whereas it saturated in the (100) case. Therefore, larger mobility enhancement in the (110) orientation is expected. These differences in enhancement between the (100) and (110) cases resulted from differences in the quantization mass, which affect the energy difference between the 1st subbands of two-fold and four-fold degenerate valleys, as well as occupancy change. PMID:27483890

  11. Calcium input potentiates the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent signaling to promote the export of inorganic pyrophosphate by articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Reboul, Pascal; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Bianchi, Arnaud

    2011-06-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates extracellular PP(i) (ePP(i)) generation and promotes chondrocalcinosis, which also occurs secondary to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemia. We previously demonstrated that ANK was up-regulated by TGF-β1 activation of ERK1/2 and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKCα). Thus, we investigated mechanisms by which calcium could affect ePP(i) metabolism, especially its main regulating proteins ANK and PC-1 (plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1). We stimulated articular chondrocytes with TGF-β1 under extracellular (eCa(2+)) or cytosolic Ca(2+) (cCa(2+)) modulations. We studied ANK, PC-1 expression (quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting), ePP(i) levels (radiometric assay), and cCa(2+) input (fluorescent probe). Voltage-operated Ca(2+)-channels (VOC) and signaling pathways involved were investigated with selective inhibitors. Finally, Ank promoter activity was evaluated (gene reporter). TGF-β1 elevated cCa(2+) and ePP(i) levels (by up-regulating Ank and PC-1 mRNA/proteins) in an eCa(2+) dose-dependent manner. TGF-β1 effects were suppressed by cCa(2+) chelation or L- and T-VOC blockade while being mostly reproduced by ionomycin. In the same experimental conditions, the activation of Ras, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKCα, and the stimulation of Ank promoter activity were affected similarly. Activation of SP1 (specific protein 1) and ELK-1 (Ets-like protein-1) transcription factors supported the regulatory role of Ca(2+). SP1 or ELK-1 overexpression or blockade experiments demonstrated a major contribution of ELK-1, which acted synergistically with SP1 to activate Ank promoter in response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 promotes input of eCa(2+) through opening of L- and T-VOCs, to potentiate ERK1/2 and PKCα signaling cascades, resulting in an enhanced activation of Ank promoter and ePP(i) production in chondrocyte.

  12. The membrane-tubulating potential of amphiphysin 2/BIN1 is dependent on the microtubule-binding cytoplasmic linker protein 170 (CLIP-170).

    PubMed

    Meunier, Brigitte; Quaranta, Muriel; Daviet, Laurent; Hatzoglou, Anastassia; Leprince, Corinne

    2009-02-01

    Amphiphysins are BIN-amphiphysin-RVS (BAR) domain-containing proteins that influence membrane curvature in sites such as T-tubules in muscular cells, endocytic pits in neuronal as well as non-neuronal cells, and possibly cytoplasmic endosomes. This effect on lipid membranes is fulfilled by diverse amphiphysin 2/BIN1 isoforms, generated by alternative splicing and showing distinct structural and functional properties. In this study, our goal was to characterize the functional role of a ubiquitously expressed amphiphysin 2/BIN1 by the characterization of new molecular partners. We performed a two-hybrid screen with an isoform of amphiphysin 2/BIN1 expressed in HeLa cells. We identified CLIP-170 as an amphiphysin 2/BIN1-interacting molecule. CLIP-170 is a plus-end tracking protein involved in microtubule (MT) stability and recruitment of dynactin. The binding between amphiphysin 2/BIN1 and CLIP-170 is dependent on the N-terminal part of amphiphysin 2 (mostly the BAR domain) and an internal coiled-coil region of CLIP-170. This partnership was confirmed by GST pull-down assay and by co-immunoprecipitation in HeLa cells that express endogenous amphiphysin 2 (mostly isoforms 6, 9 and 10). When overexpressed in HeLa cells, amphiphysin 2/BIN1 leads to the formation of intracellular tubules which can closely align with MTs. After MT depolymerization by nocodazole, amphiphysin 2-stained tubules disappear, and reappear after nocodazole washout. Furthermore, depletion of CLIP-170 by RNAi induced a decrease in the proportion of cells with amphiphysin 2-stained tubules and an increase in the proportion of cells with no tubules. This result suggests the existence of a mechanistic link between the two types of tubules, which is likely to involve the +TIP protein, CLIP-170. Amphiphysin 2/BIN1 may be an anchoring point on membranes for CLIP-170, and consequently for MT. Then, the pushing force of polymerizing MT could help amphiphysin 2/BIN1 in its tubulation potential. We propose

  13. Alpha synuclein oligomers oppose long-term potentiation and impair memory through a calcineurin-dependent mechanism: relevance to human synucleopathic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Zane S.; Neugebauer, Volker; Dineley, Kelly T.; Kayed, Rakez; Zhang, Wenru; Reese, Lindsay C.; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular deposition of fibrillar aggregates of alpha synuclein (αSyn) characterizes neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). However, recent evidence indicates that small αSyn oligomeric aggregates that precede fibril formation may be the most neurotoxic species and can be found extracellularly. This new evidence has changed the view of pathological αSyn aggregation from a self-contained cellular phenomenon to an extracellular event and prompted investigation of the putative effects of extracellular αSyn oligomers. Here, we report that extracellular application of αSyn oligomers detrimentally impacts neuronal welfare and memory function. We found that oligomeric αSyn increased intracellular Ca2+ levels, induced calcineurin (CaN) activity, decreased cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcriptional activity and resulted in calcineurin-dependent death of human neuroblastoma cells. Similarily, CaN induction and CREB inhibition were observed when αSyn oligomers were applied to organotypic brain slices, which opposed hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Furthermore, αSyn oligomers induced CaN, inhibited CREB and evoked memory impairments in mice that received acute intracerebroventricular injections. Notably, all these events were reversed by pharmacological inhibition of CaN. Moreover, we found decreased active calcineurin (CaN) and reduced levels of phosphorylated CREB in autopsy brain tissue from patients affected by DLB, which is characterized by deposition of αSyn aggregates and progressive cognitive decline. These results indicate that exogenously-applied αSyn oligomers impact neuronal function and produce memory deficits through mechanisms that involve CaN activation. PMID:22060133

  14. Phase dependency of long-term potentiation induction during the intermittent bursts of carbachol-induced β oscillation in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Motoshi; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Natsume, Kiyohisa

    2012-01-01

    The rodent hippocampus possesses theta (θ) and beta (β) rhythms, which occur intermittently as bursts. Both rhythms are related to spatial memory processing in a novel environment. θ rhythm is related to spatial memory encoding process. β rhythm is related to the match/mismatch process. In the match/mismatch process, rodent hippocampus detects a representation matching sensory inputs of the current place among the retrieved internal representations of places. Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is induced in both processes. The cholinergic agent carbachol induces intermittent θ and β oscillations in in vitro slices similar to in vivo bursts. LTP is facilitated during the generation of θ oscillation, suggesting that the facilitation of LTP is dependent upon the phases of intermittent burst (burst phases) of the oscillation. However, whether this is the case for β oscillation has not yet been studied. In the present study, LTP-inducing θ-burst stimulation was administered at the different burst phases of carbachol-induced β oscillations (CIBO), and the synaptic changes were measured at CA3-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses (CA3 synapse) and at CA3-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses (CA1 synapse). At the CA3 synapse, the largest magnitude of LTP was induced at the late burst phases of CIBO. At the CA1 synapse, LTP was induced only at the late burst phases. Modulation of LTP was suppressed when CIBO was blocked by the application of atropine at both synapses. The results suggest that the bursts of hippocampal β rhythm can determine the optimal temporal period for completing with the match/mismatch process.

  15. Role of Sialidase in Long-Term Potentiation at Mossy Fiber-CA3 Synapses and Hippocampus-Dependent Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Akira; Saito, Masakazu; Mamada, Shou; Ieno, Daisuke; Hikita, Tomoya; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid bound to glycans in glycolipids and glycoproteins is essential for synaptic plasticity and memory. Sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18), which has 4 isozymes including Neu1, Neu2, Neu3 and Neu4, regulates the sialylation level of glycans by removing sialic acid from sialylglycoconjugate. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of sialidase activity in rat hippocampus and the role of sialidase in hippocampal memory processing. We previously developed a highly sensitive histochemical imaging probe for sialidase activity, BTP3-Neu5Ac. BTP3-Neu5Ac was cleaved efficiently by rat Neu2 and Neu4 at pH 7.3 and by Neu1 and Neu3 at pH 4.6. When a rat hippocampal acute slice was stained with BTP3-Neu5Ac at pH 7.3, mossy fiber terminal fields showed relatively intense sialidase activity. Thus, the role of sialidase in the synaptic plasticity was investigated at mossy fiber terminal fields. The long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses was impaired by 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA), a sialidase inhibitor. DANA also failed to decrease paired-pulse facilitation after LTP induction. We also investigated the role of sialidase in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory by using the Morris water maze. The escape latency time to reach the platform was prolonged by DANA injection into the hippocampal CA3 region or by knockdown of Neu4 without affecting motility. The results show that the regulation of sialyl signaling by Neu4 is involved in hippocampal memory processing. PMID:27783694

  16. Chronic aspirin via dose-dependent and selective inhibition of cardiac proteasome possibly contributed a potential risk to the ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chunjiang; Chen, Wenlie; Wu, Yanbin; Lin, Jiumao; Lin, Ruhui; Tan, Xuerui; Chen, Songming

    2013-08-01

    Impaired cardiac proteasome has been reported in ischemic heart and heart failure. Recent data highlighted aspirin as an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, however, it's unclear whether it affects cardiac proteasome functions. Myocardial infarction (MI), sham or normal male SD rats were injected intraperitoneally with high (300 mg/kg), low (5 mg/kg) aspirin or saline (control) once a day for seven weeks. Parallel experiments were performed in the hypoxia/reoxygenated human ventricular myocytes. Dose-related increases in heart and ventricular weight, and impaired cardiac functions, were found more exacerbated in the aspirin-treated MI rat hearts than the saline-treated MI counterparts. The activity of 26S, 20S and 19S declined by about 30%, or the 20S proteasome subunits β5, β2 and β1 decreased by 40%, 20% and 30%, respectively, in the MI rats compared with the non-MI rats (P<0.05). Compared with the saline-treated MI rats, 26S and 20S in high or low dose aspirin-treated MI rats further decreased by 30% and 20%, β5 by 30% and 12%, and β1 by 40% and 30%, respectively, and the lost activity was correlated with the compromised cardiac functions or the decreased cell viability. The dose-related and selective inhibition of 26S and 20S proteasome, or the 20S proteasome subunits β5 and β1 by aspirin was comparable to their protein expressions in the MI rats and in the cultured cells. The impaired cardiac proteasome, enhanced by chronic aspirin treatment, attenuated the removal of oxidative and ubiquitinated proteins, and chronic aspirin treatment via selective and dose-dependent inhibition of cardiac proteasome possibly constituted a potential risk to ischemic heart.

  17. Modulatory action of acetylcholine on the Na+-dependent action potentials in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    PubMed

    Terazima, E; Yoshino, M

    2010-12-01

    Kenyon cells, intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom body, have been assumed to be a site of conditioning stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) association in olfactory learning and memory. Acetylcholine (ACh) has been implicated to be a neurotransmitter mediating CS reception in Kenyon cells, causing rapid membrane depolarization via nicotinic ACh receptors. However, the long-term effects of ACh on the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effects of ACh on Na(+) dependent action potentials (Na(+) spikes) elicited by depolarizing current injection and on net membrane currents under the voltage clamp condition in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Current-clamp studies using amphotericin B perforated-patch recordings showed that freshly dispersed cricket Kenyon cells could produce repetitive Na(+) spikes in response to prolonged depolarizing current injection. Bath application of ACh increased both the instantaneous frequency and the amplitudes of Na(+) spikes. This excitatory action of ACh on Kenyon cells is attenuated by the pre-treatment of the cells with the muscarinic receptor antagonists, atropine and scopolamine, but not by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Voltage-clamp studies further showed that bath application of ACh caused an increase in net inward currents that are sensitive to TTX, whereas outward currents were decreased by this treatment. These results indicate that in order to mediate CS, ACh may modulate the firing properties of Na(+) spikes of Kenyon cells through muscarinic receptor activation, thus increasing Na conductance and decreasing K conductance.

  18. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  19. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets (“HuR mRNA regulons”) encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  1. The platelet-derived growth factor signaling system in snapping turtle embryos, Chelydra serpentina: potential role in temperature-dependent sex determination and testis development.

    PubMed

    Rhen, Turk; Jangula, Adam; Schroeder, Anthony; Woodward-Bosh, Rikki

    2009-05-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (Pdgf) signaling system is known to play a significant role during embryonic and postnatal development of testes in mammals and birds. In contrast, genes that comprise the Pdgf system in reptiles have never been cloned or studied in any tissue, let alone developing gonads. To explore the potential role of PDGF ligands and their receptors during embryogenesis, we cloned cDNA fragments of Pdgf-A, Pdgf-B, and receptors PdgfR-alpha and PdgfR-beta in the snapping turtle, a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). We then compared gene expression profiles in gonads from embryos incubated at a male-producing temperature to those from embryos at a female-producing temperature, as well as between hatchling testes and ovaries. Expression of Pdgf-B mRNA in embryonic gonads was significantly higher at a male temperature than at a female temperature, but there was no difference between hatchling testes and ovaries. This developmental pattern was reversed for Pdgf-A and PdgfR-alpha mRNA: expression of these genes did not differ in embryos, but diverged in hatchling testes and ovaries. Levels of PdgfR-beta mRNA in embryonic gonads were not affected by temperature and did not differ between testes and ovaries. However, expression of both receptors increased at least an order of magnitude from the embryonic to the post-hatching period. Finally, we characterized expression of these genes in several other embryonic tissues. The brain, heart, and liver displayed unique expression patterns that distinguished these tissues from each other and from intestine, lung, and muscle. Incubation temperature had a significant effect on expression of PdgfR-alpha and PdgfR-beta in the heart but not other tissues. Together, these findings demonstrate that temperature has tissue specific effects on the Pdgf system and suggest that Pdgf signaling is involved in sex determination and the ensuing differentiation of testes in the snapping turtle. PMID

  2. Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega-5 gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The omega-5 gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which omega-5 gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interfe...

  3. Dopamine D1/D5 receptor modulates state-dependent switching of soma-dendritic Ca2+ potentials via differential protein kinase A and C activation in rat prefrontal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Young, Clint E; Yang, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    To determine the nature of dopamine modulation of dendritic Ca2+ signaling in layers V-VI prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons, whole-cell Ca2+ potentials were evoked after blockade of Na+ and K+ channels. Soma-dendritic Ca2+ spikes evoked by suprathreshold depolarizing pulses, which could be terminated by superimposed brief intrasomatic hyperpolarizing pulses, are blocked by the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nimodipine (1 microM). The D1/D5 receptor agonist dihydrexidine (DHX) (0.01-10 microM; 5 min) or R-(+)SKF81291 (10 microM) induced a prolonged (>30 min) dose-dependent peak suppression of these Ca2+ spikes. This effect was dependent on [Ca2+]i- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms because [Ca2+]i chelation by BAPTA or inhibition of PKC by bisindolymaleimide (BiM1), but not inhibition of [Ca2+]i release with heparin or Xestospongin C, prevented the D1-mediated suppression of Ca2+ spikes. Depolarizing pulses subthreshold to activating a Ca2+ spike evoked a nimodipine-sensitive Ca2+ "hump" potential. D1/D5 stimulation induced an N-[2-((o-bromocinamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89)- or internal PKA inhibitory peptide[5-24]-sensitive (PKA-dependent) transient (approximately 7 min) potentiation of the hump potential to full Ca2+ spike firing. Furthermore, application of DHX in the presence of the PKC inhibitor BiM1 or internal PKC inhibitory peptide[19-36] resulted in persistent firing of full Ca2+ spike bursts, suggesting that a D1/D5-PKA mechanism switches subthreshold Ca2+ hump potential to fire full Ca2+ spikes, which are eventually turned off by a D1/D5-Ca2+-dependent PKC mechanism. This depolarizing state-dependent, D1/D5-activated, bi-directional switching of soma-dendritic L-type Ca2+ channels via PKA-dependent potentiation and PKC-dependent suppression may provide spatiotemporal regulation of synaptic integration and plasticity in PFC. PMID:14715933

  4. Action potential in a plant cell lowers the light requirement for non-photochemical energy-dependent quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Krupenina, Natalia A; Bulychev, Alexander A

    2007-06-01

    This study deals with effects of membrane excitation on photosynthesis and cell protection against excessive light, manifested in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In Chara corallina cells, NPQ and pericellular pH displayed coordinated spatial patterns along the length of the cell. The NPQ values were lower in H(+)-extruding cell regions (external pH approximately 6.5) than in high pH regions (pH approximately 9.5). Generation of an action potential by applying a pulse of electric current caused NPQ to increase within 30-60 s. This effect, manifested as a long-lived drop of maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (F(m)'), occurred at lower photosynthetic flux densities (PFD) in the alkaline as compared to acidic cell regions. The light response curve of NPQ shifted, after generation of an action potential, towards lower PFD. The release of NPQ by nigericin and the rapid reversal of action potential-triggered NPQ in darkness indicate its relation to thylakoid DeltapH. Generation of an action potential shortly after darkening converted the chloroplasts into a latent state with the F(m) identical to that of unexcited cells. This state transformed to the quenched state after turning on weak light that was insufficient for NPQ prior to membrane excitation of the cells. The ionophore, A23187, shifted NPQ plots similarly to the action potential effect, consistent with a likely role of a rise in the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in the action potential-induced quenching. The results suggest that a rapid electric signal, across the plasma membrane, might exert long-lived effects on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence through ion flux-mediated pathways.

  5. Dependence of the Hall Coefficient on a length of rectangular quantum wires with infinitely high potential under the influence of a Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Huong, Nguyen; Quang Bau, Nguyen; Hung, Le Thai; Hung, Dao Manh

    2016-06-01

    The Hall coefficient (HC) of a strong electromagnetic wave (EMW) caused by confined electrons in a rectangular quantum wire (RQW) is theoretically studied by using the quantum kinetic equation for electrons. The problem is considered in the case of electrons - acoustic phonons scattering. Wave function and energy spectrum in a RQW are different from those in a cylindrical quantum wire (CQW) or two dimensional systems (2D). Therefore analytical expressions for the HC in a RQW is obtained, different from CQW or 2D. Numerical calculations are carried out with a specific GaAs/GaAsAl RQW to show clearly the dependence of HC on a length Lx (Ly) RQW with different low temperature values. We can see that the length Lx (Ly) increases in value within the domain that HC increases. The HC reaches a peak before slightly decreases when the length Lx (Ly) continues going up. However, the HC depends on the radius and the length of CQW and wire size of RQW Lx and Ly at different values of temperatures; this is the fundamental difference between CQW and RQW. If the length Lx (Ly) continues to increase, the HC remains constant. It means that HC is no longer dependent on the length of quantum wires (This behavior is similar to the case of the independence of the HC on the length in bulk semiconductor).

  6. Sensitive dependence of the coefficient of variation of interspike intervals on the lower boundary of membrane potential for the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron model.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Junko; Doi, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    After the report of Softky and Koch [Softky, W.R., Koch, C., 1993. The highly irregular firing of cortical cells is inconsistent with temporal integration of random EPSPs. J. Neurosci. 13, 334-350], leaky integrate-and-fire models have been investigated to explain high coefficient of variation (CV) of interspike intervals (ISIs) at high firing rates observed in the cortex. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of the position of a lower boundary of membrane potential on the possible value of CV of ISIs based on the diffusional leaky integrate-and-fire models with and without reversal potentials. Our result shows that the irregularity of ISIs for the diffusional leaky integrate-and-fire neuron significantly changes by imposing a lower boundary of membrane potential, which suggests the importance of the position of the lower boundary as well as that of the firing threshold when we study the statistical properties of leaky integrate-and-fire neuron models. It is worth pointing out that the mean-CV plot of ISIs for the diffusional leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with reversal potentials shows a close similarity to the experimental result obtained in Softky and Koch [Softky, W.R., Koch, C., 1993. The highly irregular firing of cortical cells is inconsistent with temporal integration of random EPSPs. J. Neurosci. 13, 334-350].

  7. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  8. High-momenta estimates for the Klein-Gordon equation: long-range magnetic potentials and time-dependent inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Weder, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    The study of obstacle scattering for the Klein-Gordon equation in the presence of long-range magnetic potentials is addressed. Previous results of the authors are extended to the long-range case and the results the authors previously proved for high-momenta long-range scattering for the Schrödinger equation are brought to the relativistic scenario. It is shown that there are important differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering concerning the long range. In particular, it is proven that the electric potential can be recovered without assuming the knowledge of the long-range part of the magnetic potential, which has to be supposed in the non-relativistic case. The electric potential and the magnetic field are recovered from the high-momenta limit of the scattering operator, as well as fluxes modulo 2π around the handles of the obstacle. Moreover, it is proven that for every \\hat{{v}}\\in {{{S}}}2, {A}∞ (\\hat{{v}})+{A}∞ (-\\hat{{v}}) can be reconstructed, where {A}∞ is the long-range part of the magnetic potential. A simple formula for the high-momenta limit of the scattering operator is given in terms of magnetic fluxes over handles of the obstacle and long-range magnetic fluxes at infinity, that are introduced in this paper. The appearance of these long-range magnetic fluxes is a new effect in scattering theory. Research partially supported by the project PAPIIT-DGAPA UNAM IN102215.

  9. Investigation of temperature dependence of neutron yield and electron screening potential for the d(d, n){sup 3}He reaction proceeding in deuterides ZrD{sub 2} and TiD{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Bystritskii, Vit. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Filipowicz, M.; Gazi, S.; Huran, J.; Kobzev, A. P.; Mesyats, G. A.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Parzhitskii, S. S.; Pen'kov, F. M.; Philippov, A. V.; Kaminskii, V. L.; Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Wozniak, J.

    2012-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the enhancement factor for the dd reaction proceeding in TiD{sub 2} and ZrD{sub 2} is investigated. The experiments were carried out at the Hall pulsed ion accelerator (INP, Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia) in the deuteron energy interval 7.0-12.0 keV and at temperatures ranging from 20 to 200 Degree-Sign C. The values obtained for the electron screening potentials indicate that the dd reaction enhancement factor does not depend on the target temperature in the range 20-200 Degree-Sign C. This result contradicts the conclusions drawn by the LUNA Collaboration from their work.

  10. Cyclin D1/cyclin dependent kinase 4 interacts with filamin A and affects the migration and invasion potential of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhijiu; Yeow, Wen-Shuz; Zou, Chunhua; Wassell, Richard; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G.; Quong, Judy N.; Quong, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin D1 belongs to the family of proteins that regulates progression through the G1-S phase of the cell cycle through binding to cyclin dependent kinase 4 to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein and release E2F transcription factors for progression through cell cycle. Several cancers, including breast, colon and prostate over-express the cyclin D1 gene. However, the correlation between cyclin D1 over-expression with E2F target gene regulation or cyclin dependent kinase-dependent cyclin D1 activity with tumor development have not been identified. This suggests that the role of cyclin D1 in oncogenesis may be independent of its function as a cell cycle regulator. One such function is the role of cyclin D1 in cell adhesion and motility. Filamin A, a member of the actin-binding filamin protein family, regulates signaling events involved in cell motility and invasion. Filamin A has also been associated with a variety of cancers including lung, prostate, melanoma, human bladder cancer, and neuroblastoma. We hypothesized that elevated cyclin D1 facilitates motility in the invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We show that MDA-MB-231 motility is affected by disturbing cyclin D1 levels or cyclin D1-cdk4/6 kinase activity. Using mass spectrometry, we found that cyclin D1 and Filamin A co-immunoprecipitate and that lower levels of cyclin D1 are associated with decreased phosphorylation of FLNa at serine 2152 and 1459. We also identify many proteins related to cytoskeletal function, biomolecular synthesis, organelle biogenesis, and calcium regulation whose levels of expression change concomitant with decreased cell motility induced by decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin D1-cdk4/6 activity. PMID:20179208

  11. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  12. Functional heart diagnosis by the visualization of time-dependent potential deviation and topologic map-based shape analysis from high-resolution ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Bruenken, Barbara; Pelikan, Erich

    1996-04-01

    Our work focuses on functional heart analysis during acute myocardial infarction based on time-sequence data derived with a high-resolution ECG technique. This data stream can be interpreted as a sequence of potential deviation images. The analysis is performed by both visualizing the potential deviation onto the thorax as well as by shape analysis of the underlying ECG signals using a topologic map. The algorithm deals with the measurement of similarity between different pathological signal types. In contrast to other techniques, the whole ECG signal, coded as a feature vector, is used as input for the self-organizing map. The results show that this approach is suitable for handling unsharp class transitions common to the medical domain.

  13. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates anticancer property of 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 by promoting mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Jianye; Wang, Min; Chen, Qidan; Song, Jia; Yu, Ziqi; Huang, Wei; Fang, Jianpei

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most prevalent childhood malignancy. Although most children with ALL are cured, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails owing to severe toxicities and drug resistance. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2), a major bioactive component isolated from Panax ginseng, has been shown to have a therapeutic effect on some tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell death induced by 20(S)-GRh2 in ALL cells remains unclear. In this study, we showed that 20(S)-GRh2 inhibited the cell growth and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. But it has no cytotoxic effect on human normal blood cells. Furthermore, autophagy plays a protective role in 20(S)-GRh2-induced apoptosis in ALL cell lines and human primary ALL cells. We demonstrated that either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy could be more effective in reducing viability and enhancing 20(S)-GRh2-induced toxicity than 20(S)-GRh2 treatment alone. In addition, inhibition of autophagy could aggravate mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial damage, and then accelerate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of autophagy can sensitize ALL cells towards 20(S)-GRh2. The appropriate inhibition of autophagy could provide a powerful strategy to increase the potency of 20(S)-GRh2 as a novel anticancer agent for ALL therapy. PMID:27027340

  14. Soil type-dependent effects of a potential biocontrol inoculant on indigenous bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce.

    PubMed

    Schreiter, Susanne; Ding, Guo-Chun; Grosch, Rita; Kropf, Siegfried; Antweiler, Kai; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biocontrol strains used as an alternative to chemical fungicides may influence bacterial communities in the rhizosphere and effects might differ depending on the soil type. Here we present baseline data on the effects of Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 on the bacterial community composition in the rhizosphere of lettuce grown in diluvial sand, alluvial loam and loess loam at the same field site. 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. DGGE fingerprints revealed that in three consecutive years (2010-2012) RU47 had a slight but statistically significant effect on the bacterial community composition in one (2010), two (2011) or all the three soils (2012). However, these effects were much less pronounced compared with the influence of soil types. Additional pyrosequence analysis of samples from 2011 showed that significant changes in bacterial community compositions in response to RU47 inoculation occurred only in alluvial loam. Different taxonomic groups responded to the RU47 application depending on the soil type. Most remarkable was the increased relative abundance of OTUs belonging to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus in alluvial loam. Pyrosequencing allowed side-effects of the application of bacterial inoculants into the rhizosphere to be identified. PMID:25244497

  15. Assessing potentially time-dependent treatment effect from clinical trials and observational studies for survival data, with applications to the Women's Health Initiative combined hormone therapy trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Song; Prentice, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    For risk and benefit assessment in clinical trials and observational studies with time-to-event data, the Cox model has usually been the model of choice. When the hazards are possibly non-proportional, a piece-wise Cox model over a partition of the time axis may be considered. Here we propose to analyze clinical trials or observational studies with time-to-event data using a certain semiparametric model. The model allows for a time-dependent treatment effect. It includes the important proportional hazards model as a sub-model, and can accommodate various patterns of time-dependence of the hazard ratio. After estimation of the model parameters using a pseudo-likelihood approach, simultaneous confidence intervals for the hazard ratio function are established using a Monte Carlo method to assess the time-varying pattern of the treatment effect. To assess the overall treatment effect, estimated average hazard ratio and its confidence intervals are also obtained. The proposed methods are applied to data from the Women's Health Initiative. To compare the WHI clinical trial and observational study, we use the propensity score in building the regression model. Compared to the piece-wise Cox model, the proposed model yields a better model fit and does not require partitioning of the time axis. PMID:25689356

  16. Size-dependent characterisation of historical gold mine wastes to examine human pathways of exposure to arsenic and other potentially toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachael; Dowling, Kim; Pearce, Dora C; Florentine, Singarayer; Bennett, John W; Stopic, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Abandoned historical gold mining wastes often exist as geographically extensive, unremediated, and poorly contained deposits that contain elevated levels of As and other potentially toxic elements (PTEs). One of the key variables governing human exposure to PTEs in mine waste is particle size. By applying a size-resolved approach to mine waste characterisation, this study reports on the proportions of mine waste relevant to human exposure and mobility, as well as their corresponding PTE concentrations, in four distinct historical mine wastes from the gold province in Central Victoria, Australia. To the best of our knowledge, such a detailed investigation and comparison of historical mining wastes has not been conducted in this mining-affected region. Mass distribution analysis revealed notable proportions of waste material in the readily ingestible size fraction (≤250 µm; 36.1-75.6 %) and the dust size fraction (≤100 µm; 5.9-45.6 %), suggesting a high potential for human exposure and dust mobilisation. Common to all mine waste types were statistically significant inverse trends between particle size and levels of As and Zn. Enrichment of As in the finest investigated size fraction (≤53 µm) is of particular concern as these particles are highly susceptible to long-distance atmospheric transport. Human populations that reside in the prevailing wind direction from a mine waste deposit may be at risk of As exposure via inhalation and/or ingestion pathways. Enrichment of PTEs in the finer size fractions indicates that human health risk assessments based on bulk contaminant concentrations may underestimate potential exposure intensities.

  17. Dependences of Q-branch integrated intensity of linear-molecule pendular spectra on electric-field strength and rotational temperature and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Min; Wang, Hailing; Wang, Qin; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the pendular-state spectra of cold linear molecules, and investigated the dependences of “Q-branch” integrated intensity of pendular spectra on both electric-field strength and molecular rotation-temperature. A new multi-peak structure in the “Q-branch” spectrum is appearing when the Stark interaction strength ω = μE/B equal to or larger than the critical value. Our study shows that the above results can be used not only to measure the electric-field vector and its spatial distribution in some electrostatic devices, such as the Stark decelerator, Stark velocity filter and electrostatic trap and so on, but also to survey the orientation degree of cold linear molecules in a strong electrostatic field. PMID:27231057

  18. Spatial distribution of infectious stages of the nematode Syngamus trachea within pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) release pens on estates in the South West of England: Potential density dependence?

    PubMed

    Gethings, O J; Sage, R B; Leather, S R

    2015-09-15

    The spatial distribution of the infectious stages of parasites with a direct life cycle is one of the most important factors influencing infectious disease dynamics, and acquisition rates will generally increase as the contact time between parasite and host increases. For animal species that are constrained by feeding opportunities, one might expect disease patterns to be highly skewed within confined systems. The aim of the present study was to identify to what extent, if any, eggs of avian parasites are aggregated within the release pen, and to evaluate what effect, if any, this aggregation had on the distribution of the adult stages within the host species. The abundance of Syngamus trachea eggs were highly aggregated within pens, with high levels of contamination driven by a combination of feeder placement, soil moisture and host-mediated heterogeneities in immuno-competence. The log mean and log variance of egg abundance was highly linear (R(2)=0.97-0.99), with an estimated slope (b) of between 1.79 and 1.97 for individual sites, and 2.11 when sites were combined, which indicated aggregation relative to an estimated Poisson slope of unity. Although the placement of feeders and environmental moisture could be contributing to parasite aggregation, density-dependent processes appear to be ensuring the population does not become too over or under-dispersed, in order to maintain the transmission-virulence equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to explicitly demonstrate the high spatial aggregation of eggs around feeding sites and the first to suggest possible density-dependent regulatory mechanisms stabilising disease dynamics between S. trachea and ring necked Pheasants (Phasianus colchicus).

  19. Two potential Ca(2+)-mobilizing processes depend on the abscisic acid concentration and growth temperature in the Arabidopsis stomatal guard cell.

    PubMed

    Cousson, Alain

    2003-05-01

    The abscisic acid (ABA) stomatal closing signal might be transduced through different pathways, depending on the plant growth temperature (GT) and the applied ABA concentration. This was investigated in epidermal peels of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Columbia. Different Ca2+ buffers and guanosine-triphosphate-binding protein (G protein) modulators were tested on stomatal closing under light in response to 3 mumol/L ABA (ABA3 mu) and 30 mumol/L ABA (ABA30 mu) at the 15-17 degrees C and 23-25 degrees C GT ranges. The Ca2+ buffer, 1,2-bis(0-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, used as free acid (BAPTA) or acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), similarly inhibited (up to approximately 70% inhibition) stomatal closing to ABA3 mu and ABA30 mu, whereas ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid specifically inhibited (up to approximately 70% inhibition) the ABA3 mu response at the 23-25 degrees C GT range. At the same GT range, the ABA3 mu response was specifically affected by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor 1-[6-[[17 beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122). Moreover, the ABA30 mu response was specifically inhibited by the G protein antagonist pGlu-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH2 (GP Ant-2) and by the inactive mastoparan analog, mas 17. The inhibitory effects of GP Ant-2 and mas 17 were additive. None of the tested pharmacological compounds were effective at the 15-17 degrees C GT range. Together, these results confirmed that, depending on GT and the exogenous ABA concentration, stomatal closing to ABA involves either one among two Ca2+ mobilizations or none of them.

  20. Xanthone derivatives could be potential antibiotics: virtual screening for the inhibitors of enzyme I of bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Jien; Lin, Shih-Hung; Lin, Meei-Ru; Ku, Hao; Szkaradek, Natalia; Marona, Henryk; Hsu, Alvin; Shiuan, David

    2013-08-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is ubiquitous in eubacteria and absent from eukaryotes. The system consists of two phosphoryl carriers, enzyme I (EI) and the histidine-containing phosphoryl carrier protein (HPr), and several PTS transporters, catalyzing the concomitant uptake and phosphorylation of several carbohydrates. Since a deficiency of EI in bacterial mutants lead to severe growth defects, EI could be a drug target to develop antimicrobial agents. We used the 3D structure PDB 1ZYM of Escherichia coli EI as the target to virtually screen the potential tight binders from NPPEDIA (Natural Product Encyclopedia), ZINC and Super Natural databases. These databases were screened using the docking tools of Discovery Studio 2.0 and the Integrated Drug Design System IDDS. Among the many interesting hits, xanthone derivatives with reasonably high Dock scores received more attentions. Two of the xanthone derivatives were obtained to examine their capabilities to inhibit cell growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The results indicate that they may exert the inhibition effects by blocking the EI activities. We have demonstrated for the first time that the xanthone derivatives have high potential to be developed as future antibiotics.

  1. Capping Agent-Dependent Toxicity and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles: An In Vitro Study. Concerns about Potential Application in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Niska, Karolina; Knap, Narcyz; Kędzia, Anna; Jaskiewicz, Maciej; Kamysz, Wojciech; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In dentistry, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have drawn particular attention because of their wide antimicrobial activity spectrum. However, controversial information on AgNPs toxicity limited their use in oral infections. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities against a panel of oral pathogenic bacteria and bacterial biofilms together with potential cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblasts of 10 nm AgNPs: non-functionalized - uncapped (AgNPs-UC) as well as surface-functionalized with capping agent: lipoic acid (AgNPs-LA), polyethylene glycol (AgNPs-PEG) or tannic acid (AgNPs-TA) using silver nitrate (AgNO3) as control. Methods: The interaction of AgNPs with human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) was evaluated using the mitochondrial metabolic potential assay (MTT). Antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested against anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with oral cavity and respiratory tract infections, and selected aerobic Staphylococci strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by the agar dilution method for anaerobic bacteria or broth microdilution method for reference Staphylococci strains and Streptococcus mutans. These strains were also used for antibiofilm activity of AgNPs. Results: The highest antimicrobial activities at nontoxic concentrations were observed for the uncapped AgNPs and the AgNPs capped with LA. It was found that AgNPs-LA and AgNPs-PEG demonstrated lower cytotoxicity as compared with the AgNPs-TA or AgNPs-UC in the gingival fibroblast model. All of the tested nanoparticles proved less toxic and demonstrated wider spectrum of antimicrobial activities than AgNO3 solution. Additionally, AgNPs-LA eradicated Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus mutans 1-day biofilm at concentration nontoxic to oral cells. Conclusions: Our results proved that a capping agent had significant influence on the antibacterial

  2. Synthesis and characterizations of novel quinoline derivatives having mixed ligand activities at the kappa and mu receptors: Potential therapeutic efficacy against morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Deb, Ishani; Paira, Priyankar; Hazra, Abhijit; Banerjee, Sukdeb; Dutta, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Nirup Bikash; Das, Sumantra

    2009-08-15

    Based on an established 3D pharmacophore, a series of quinoline derivatives were synthesized. The opioidergic properties of these compounds were determined by a competitive binding assay using (125)I-Dynorphine, (3)H-DAMGO and (125)I-DADLE for kappa, mu, and delta receptors, respectively. Results showed varying degree of activities of the compounds to kappa and mu opioid receptors with negligible interactions at the delta receptor. The compound, S4 was the most successful in inhibiting the two most prominent quantitative features of naloxone precipitated withdrawal symptoms - stereotyped jumping and body weight loss. Determination of IC(50) of S4 revealed a greater affinity towards mu compared to kappa receptor. In conclusion, quinoline derivatives of S4 like structure offer potential tool for treatment of narcotic addictions.

  3. Orientation dependence of growth quality in strained-layer superlattices: A model-potential study of the Si-Ge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. E.; Das Sarma, S.

    1991-04-01

    Growth quality of Si-Ge/Si superlattices in various directions is studied using an empirical-potential-based approach. Kuan and Iyer found, experimentally, that growth morphology is best in the [100] direction while twin formation has substantial effects on growth in other directions. We show that twin formation does not relax misfit strain but instead allows growth to switch over to energetically favorable directions. We discuss the relative stability of strained Si-Ge superlattices for different orientations and the applicability of the results to III-V semiconductor superlattices. We also discuss experimental observations of long-range ordering which occur only in thick relaxed Si-Ge layers grown in the [100] direction and not in thin strained-layer superlattices grown in the same direction.

  4. Apigenin potentiates TRAIL therapy of non-small cell lung cancer via upregulating DR4/DR5 expression in a p53-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Wang, Xueshi; Zha, Daolong; Cai, Fangfang; Zhang, Wenjing; He, Yan; Huang, Qilai; Zhuang, Hongqin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Apigenin (APG) is an edible plant-derived flavonoid that shows modest antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo. APG treatment results in cell growth arrest and apoptosis in various types of tumors by modulating several signaling pathways. In the present study, we evaluated interactions between APG and TRAIL in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We observed a synergistic effect between APG and TRAIL on apoptosis of NSCLC cells. A549 cells and H1299 cells were resistant to TRAIL treatment alone. The presence of APG sensitized NSCLC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulating the levels of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) in a p53-dependent manner. Consistently, the pro-apoptotic proteins Bad and Bax were upregulated, while the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xl and Bcl-2 were downregulated. Meanwhile, APG suppressed NF-κB, AKT and ERK activation. Treatment with specific small-molecule inhibitors of these pathways enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death, mirroring the effect of APG. Furthermore, using a mouse xenograft model, we demonstrated that the combined treatment completely suppressed tumor growth as compared with APG or TRAIL treatment alone. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to enhance TRAIL-induced antitumor activity in NSCLC cells by APG via inhibition of the NF-κB, AKT and ERK prosurvival regulators. PMID:27752089

  5. Musical practice and cognitive aging: two cross-sectional studies point to phonemic fluency as a potential candidate for a use-dependent adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Fauvel, Baptiste; Groussard, Mathilde; Mutlu, Justine; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M.; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Platel, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Because of permanent use-dependent brain plasticity, all lifelong individuals' experiences are believed to influence the cognitive aging quality. In older individuals, both former and current musical practices have been associated with better verbal skills, visual memory, processing speed, and planning function. This work sought for an interaction between musical practice and cognitive aging by comparing musician and non-musician individuals for two lifetime periods (middle and late adulthood). Long-term memory, auditory-verbal short-term memory, processing speed, non-verbal reasoning, and verbal fluencies were assessed. In Study 1, measures of processing speed and auditory-verbal short-term memory were significantly better performed by musicians compared with controls, but both groups displayed the same age-related differences. For verbal fluencies, musicians scored higher than controls and displayed different age effects. In Study 2, we found that lifetime period at training onset (childhood vs. adulthood) was associated with phonemic, but not semantic, fluency performances (musicians who had started to practice in adulthood did not perform better on phonemic fluency than non-musicians). Current frequency of training did not account for musicians' scores on either of these two measures. These patterns of results are discussed by setting the hypothesis of a transformative effect of musical practice against a non-causal explanation. PMID:25346684

  6. Yonkenafil: a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor induces neuronal network potentiation by a cGMP-dependent Nogo-R axis in acute experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Nannan; Liu, Yueyang; Liu, Yinglu; Zhang, Tianyu; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yongfeng; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-11-01

    Yonkenafil is a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor. Here we evaluated the effect of yonkenafil on ischemic injury and its possible mechanism of action. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by intraperitoneal or intravenous treatment with yonkenafil starting 2h later. Behavioral tests were carried out on day 1 or day 7 after reperfusion. Nissl staining, Fluoro-Jade B staining and electron microscopy studies were carried out 24h post-stroke, together with an analysis of infarct volume and severity of edema. Levels of cGMP-dependent Nogo-66 receptor (Nogo-R) pathway components, hsp70, apaf-1, caspase-3, caspase-9, synaptophysin, PSD-95/neuronal nitric oxide synthases (nNOS), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and nerve growth factor (NGF)/tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) were also measured after 24h. Yonkenafil markedly inhibited infarction and edema, even when administration was delayed until 4h after stroke onset. This protection was associated with an improvement in neurological function and was sustained for 7d. Yonkenafil enlarged the range of penumbra, reduced ischemic cell apoptosis and the loss of neurons, and modulated the expression of proteins in the Nogo-R pathway. Moreover, yonkenafil protected the structure of synapses and increased the expression of synaptophysin, BDNF/TrkB and NGF/TrkA. In conclusion, yonkenafil protects neuronal networks from injury after stroke.

  7. Rapid Exercise-Induced Mobilization of Dendritic Cells Is Potentially Mediated by a Flt3L- and MMP-9-Dependent Process in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deckx, Nathalie; Wens, Inez; Nuyts, Amber H.; Lee, Wai-Ping; Hens, Niel; Koppen, Gudrun; Goossens, Herman; Van Damme, Pierre; Berneman, Zwi N.; Eijnde, Bert O.; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, one exercise bout induces a substantial increase in the number of circulating leukocytes, while their function is transiently suppressed. The effect of one exercise bout in multiple sclerosis (MS) is less studied. Since recent evidence suggests a role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of MS, we investigated the effect of one combined endurance/resistance exercise bout on the number and function of DC in MS patients and healthy controls. Our results show a rapid increase in the number of DC in response to physical exercise in both MS patients and controls. Further investigation revealed that in particular DC expressing the migratory molecules CCR5 and CD62L were increased upon acute physical activity. This may be mediated by Flt3L- and MMP-9-dependent mobilization of DC, as demonstrated by increased circulating levels of Flt3L and MMP-9 following one exercise bout. Circulating DC display reduced TLR responsiveness after acute exercise, as evidenced by a less pronounced upregulation of activation markers, HLA-DR and CD86, on plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC, respectively. Our results indicate mobilization of DC, which may be less prone to drive inflammatory processes, following exercise. This may present a negative feedback mechanism for exercise-induced tissue damage and inflammation. PMID:26604429

  8. An updated evolutionary study of Flaviviridae NS3 helicase and NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase reveals novel invariable motifs as potential pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Louis; Loukatou, Styliani; Sofia, Kossida; Maroulis, Dimitrios; Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2016-06-21

    The rate of Flaviviridae family virus infections worldwide has increased dramatically in the last few years. In addition, infections caused by arthropod vector viruses including Hepatitis C, West Nile, Dengue fever, Yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis are emerging throughout the world. Based on a recent taxon update, the Flaviviridae family comprises four main genera; Flavivirus, Hepacivirus, Pestivirus and a recent genus Pegivirus. Although the new scientific classification plays a key role in providing useful information about the relationships between viruses, many new documented viruses remain unclassified. Furthermore, based on the different results of several studies the classification is unclear. In an effort to provide more insights into the classification of viruses, a holistic evolutionary study of the two viral enzymes NS3 helicase and NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) has been conducted in this study. These two viral enzymes are very crucial for the inhibition of viruses due to the fact that they are involved in the survival, proliferation and transmission of viruses. The main goal of this study is the presentation of two novel updated phylogenetic trees of the enzymes NS3 helicase and NS5 RdRp as a reliable phylogeny "map" to correlate the information of the closely related viruses and identify new possible targets for the Flaviviridae family virus inhibition. Despite the earliest trials for drugs against Flaviviridae related viruses, no antiviral drug vaccine has been available to date. Therefore there is an urgent need for research towards the development of efficient antiviral agents.

  9. On the path-dependence of the open-cell voltage of a galvanic cell involving a ternary or multinary compound with multiple mobile ionic species under multiple chemical potential gradients.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Han-Ill; Martin, Manfred

    2010-11-28

    It is well known that the open-cell voltage (U) of a galvanic cell involving a binary compound, or a multinary compound with a single kind of mobile ionic species, is a state property under a gradient of chemical potential of the mobile component. It is not so transparent, however, whether U is still a state property when involving a ternary or multinary compound with two or more kinds of mobile ions under multiple chemical potential gradients of those mobile components. We clarify this issue with a multinary oxide that conducts oxide ions, protons and electron holes and is exposed to the chemical potential gradients of both water and oxygen. We show that U is path- and history-dependent, and manifests itself along the diffusion paths of the two mobile components H and O under given boundary conditions.

  10. Xyn11E from Paenibacillus barcinonensis BP-23: a LppX-chaperone-dependent xylanase with potential for upgrading paper pulps.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Susana V; Diaz, Pilar; Pastor, F I Javier

    2014-07-01

    A new xylanase from Paenibacillus barcinonensis BP-23, Xyn11E, has been identified and characterized. Xyn11E has been cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. It is a single-domain xylanase belonging to the family 11 of glycosyl hydrolases (GH11) with a predicted molecular weight of 20.652 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 8.7. Substrate specificity, kinetic properties, and mode of action of the purified xylanase were characterized. Xyn11E exhibited high activity toward branched xylans, being beechwood xylan the preferred substrate. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified enzyme were 6.5 and 50 °C, respectively. Catalytic constants were determined on beechwood xylan, on which Xyn11E showed a Km of 12.98 mg/ml and a Vmax of 3,023 U/mg. The enzyme hydrolyzed long xylooligosaccharides, while oligomers shorter than xylotetraose were not degraded. Products released from glucuronoxylans were shorter than those liberated from cereal arabinoxylans. The xylanase was dependent on P. barcinonensis BP-23 LppX for its expression in an active form. Coexpression of Xyn11E with E. coli chaperones could not replace the need of LppX, which seems to act as a specific chaperone for Xyn11E correct folding. Activity of the enzyme on bleached pulps was evaluated. Xyn11E liberated reducing sugars from ECF and TCF pulps from eucalyptus, sisal, and flax, which makes it a good candidate for the enzymatic-assisted production of high-cellulose-content pulps from paper-grade pulps. PMID:24549767

  11. Activation of tumour cell ECM degradation by thrombin-activated platelet membranes: potentially a P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Pang, J H; Coupland, L A; Freeman, C; Chong, B H; Parish, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    The promotion of tumour metastasis by platelets may occur through several mechanisms including the induction of a more metastatic phenotype in tumour cells and assisted extravasation of circulating tumour cells. Whilst the mechanisms underlying platelet-assisted extravasation have been extensively studied, much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms underlying platelet promotion of an aggressive phenotype within a tumour cell population. Herein, we demonstrate in vitro that MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells incubated with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes adopt a Matrigel-degrading phenotype in a dose- and contact time-dependent manner. The same phenotypic change was observed with three other human tumour cell lines of diverse anatomical origin. Moreover, tumour cell lines that had been cultured with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes had a greater metastatic capacity when injected into mice. This in vivo effect was reliant upon a co-incubation period of >2 h implying a mechanism involving more than platelet membrane binding that occurred within 5 min. Upon further investigation it was found that simultaneous blocking of the platelet-membrane proteins P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa prevented interactions between platelet membranes and MDA-MB-231 cells but also significantly reduced the ability of tumour cells to degrade Matrigel. These results confirm that platelets induce a more aggressive phenotype in tumour cells but also identify the platelet proteins involved in this effect. P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa also play a role in assisting tumour cell extravasation and, thus, are ideal targets for the therapeutic intervention of both stages of platelet-assisted metastasis.

  12. Voltage-dependent anion channel 2 modulates resting Ca²+ sparks, but not action potential-induced Ca²+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Krishna Prasad; Kim, Joon-Chul; Kang, Moonkyung; Son, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2011-02-01

    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are pore forming proteins predominantly found in the outer mitochondrial membrane and are thought to transport Ca(2+). In this study, we have investigated the possible role of type 2 VDAC (VDAC2) in cardiac Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+) sparks using a lentiviral knock-down (KD) technique and two-dimensional confocal Ca(2+) imaging in immortalized autorhythmic adult atrial cells, HL-1. We confirmed high expression of VDAC2 protein in ventricular, atrial, and HL-1 cells using Western blot analysis. Infection of HL-1 cells with VDAC2-targeting lentivirus reduced the level of VDAC2 protein to ∼10%. Comparisons of autorhythmic Ca(2+) transients between wild-type (WT) and VDAC2 KD cells showed no significant change in the magnitude, decay, and beating rate of the Ca(2+) transients. Caffeine (10mM)-induced Ca(2+) release, which indicates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content, was not altered by VDAC2 KD. Interestingly, however, the intensity, width, and duration of the individual Ca(2+) sparks were significantly increased by VDAC2 KD in resting conditions, with no change in the frequency of sparks. VDAC2 KD significantly delayed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during artificial Ca(2+) pulses in permeabilized HL-1 cells. These results suggest that VDAC2 may facilitate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and restrict Ca(2+) spark expansion without regulating activations of sparks under resting conditions, thereby providing evidence on the functional role of VDAC2 in cardiac local Ca(2+) signaling.

  13. Urinary calcium to creatinine ratio: a potential marker of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Kentaro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Kashimada, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR1A) are usually treated with alfacalcidol, an analog of vitamin D. Around puberty, an increased dose of alfacalcidol is recommended for these patients to avoid hypocalcemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, no indicators of secondary hyperparathyroidism except for PTH are presently known. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether urinary calcium to creatinine ratio (U-Ca/Cr) is useful as a biomarker of secondary hyperparathyroidism in VDDR1A patients in order to determine the proper dose of alfacalcidol. Two brothers with VDDR1A were recruited who had null mutations of CYP27B1 which encodes 1-alpha-hydroxylase of vitamin D. We investigated the relationship between U-Ca/Cr and intact-PTH around puberty when the brothers showed hypocalcemia with secondary hyperparathyroidism. The results were compared to those of five patients with vitamin D deficiency (VDD). As a result, high intact-PTH levels were observed when U-Ca/Cr decreased to less than 0.1 (mg/mg) in both VDDR1A brothers. This relationship was also observed in the VDD patients. However, it is necessary to take into account body calcium status, either in depletion or in excess, to accurately evaluate the relationship between U-Ca/Cr and secondary hyperparathyroidism. First, low U-Ca/Cr was detected in situations with calcium depletion without hyperparathyroidism in the VDDR1A patients. Second, high U-Ca/Cr with hyperparathyroidism could be detected theoretically in a condition of excess calcium supply. In conclusion, a U-Ca/Cr ratio of less than 0.1 (mg/mg) in VDDR1A patients is useful to accurately evaluate calcium depletion and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  14. Wnt Regulates Proliferation and Neurogenic Potential of Müller Glial Cells via a Lin28/let-7 miRNA-Dependent Pathway in Adult Mammalian Retinas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Qiu, Suo; Tian, Lin; Snider, William D; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Chen, Bo

    2016-09-27

    In cold-blooded vertebrates such as zebrafish, Müller glial cells (MGs) readily proliferate to replenish lost retinal neurons. In mammals, however, MGs lack regenerative capability as they do not spontaneously re-enter the cell cycle unless the retina is injured. Here, we show that gene transfer of β-catenin in adult mouse retinas activates Wnt signaling and MG proliferation without retinal injury. Upstream of Wnt, deletion of GSK3β stabilizes β-catenin and activates MG proliferation. Downstream of Wnt, β-catenin binds to the Lin28 promoter and activates transcription. Deletion of Lin28 abolishes β-catenin-mediated effects on MG proliferation, and Lin28 gene transfer stimulates MG proliferation. We further demonstrate that let-7 miRNAs are critically involved in Wnt/Lin28-regulated MG proliferation. Intriguingly, a subset of cell-cycle-reactivated MGs express markers for amacrine cells. Together, these results reveal a key role of Wnt-Lin28-let7 miRNA signaling in regulating proliferation and neurogenic potential of MGs in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:27681429

  15. Diverse Mechanisms of Sp1-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation Potentially Involved in the Adaptive Response of Cancer Cells to Oxygen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    The inside of a tumor often contains a hypoxic area caused by a limited supply of molecular oxygen due to aberrant vasculature. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are major transcription factors that are required for cancer cells to adapt to such stress conditions. HIFs, complexed with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator, bind to and activate target genes as enhancers of transcription. In addition to this common mechanism, the induction of the unfolded protein response and mTOR signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress is also known to be involved in the adaptation to hypoxia conditions. Sp1 is a ubiquitously-expressed transcription factor that plays a vital role in the regulation of numerous genes required for normal cell function. In addition to the well-characterized stress response mechanisms described above, increasing experimental evidence suggests that Sp1 and HIFs collaborate to drive gene expression in cancer cells in response to hypoxia, thereby regulating additional adaptive responses to cellular oxygen deficiency. However, these characteristics of Sp1 and their biological merits have not been summarized. In this review, we will discuss the diverse mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by Sp1 and their potential involvement in the adaptive response of cancer cells to hypoxic tumor microenvironments. PMID:26703734

  16. Vinculin potentiates E-cadherin mechanosensing and is recruited to actin-anchored sites within adherens junctions in a myosin II–dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    le Duc, Quint; Shi, Quanming; Blonk, Iris; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors integrate chemical and mechanical cues to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Integrin complexes are the mechanotransducers between the extracellular matrix and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. By analogy, cadherin complexes may function as mechanosensors at cell–cell junctions, but this capacity of cadherins has not been directly demonstrated. Furthermore, the molecular composition of the link between E-cadherin and actin, which is needed to sustain such a function, is unresolved. In this study, we describe nanomechanical measurements demonstrating that E-cadherin complexes are functional mechanosensors that transmit force between F-actin and E-cadherin. Imaging experiments reveal that intercellular forces coincide with vinculin accumulation at actin-anchored cadherin adhesions, and nanomechanical measurements show that vinculin potentiates the E-cadherin mechanosensory response. These investigations directly demonstrate the mechanosensory capacity of the E-cadherin complex and identify a novel function for vinculin at cell–cell junctions. These findings have implications for barrier function, morphogenesis, cell migration, and invasion and may extend to all soft tissues in which classical cadherins regulate cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20584916

  17. A novel dithiocarbamate analogue with potentially decreased ALDH inhibition has copper-dependent proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhai, Shumei; Liu, Xiaojun; Li, Liwen; Wu, Shirley; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates are a class of sulfur-based metal-chelating compounds with various applications in medicine. We reported previously that certain members of dithiocarbamates, such as diethyldithiocarbamate, disulfiram (DSF) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), were able to bind with tumor cellular copper to inhibit tumor growth through the inhibition of proteasome activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. Since the DSF is an irreversible inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), its ALDH-inhibitory activity might potentially affect its usefulness as an anti-cancer drug. For the purpose of selecting potent anti-cancer compounds that are not ALDH inhibitors and mapping out preliminary structure–activity relationship trends for these novel compounds, we synthesized a series of PDTC analogues and chose three novel compounds to study their ALDH-inhibitory activity, proteasome-inhibitory activity as well as the cancer cell apoptosis-inducing activity. The results showed that compared to DSF, compound 9 has less ALDH inhibition activity, and the in vitro results also proved the positive effects of 9-Cu in proteasome inhibition and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells, suggesting that 9 as a lead compound could be developed into a novel proteasome inhibitor anti-cancer drug. PMID:21035945

  18. Temperature dependence of the electrode potential of a cobalt-based redox couple in ionic liquid electrolytes for thermal energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangjing; Al-Masri, Danah; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Pringle, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Increasing the application of technologies for harvesting waste heat could make a significant contribution to sustainable energy production. Thermoelectrochemical cells are one such emerging technology, where the thermal response of a redox couple in an electrolyte is used to generate a potential difference across a cell when a temperature gradient exists. The unique physical properties of ionic liquids make them ideal for application as electrolytes in these devices. One of the keys to utilizing these media in efficient thermoelectrochemical cells is achieving high Seebeck coefficients, Se: the thermodynamic quantity that determines the magnitude of the voltage achieved per unit temperature difference. Here, we report the Se and cell performance of a cobalt-based redox couple in a range of different ionic liquids, to investigate the influence of the nature of the IL on the thermodynamics and cell performance of the redox system. The results reported include the highest Se to-date for an IL-based electrolyte. The effect of diluting the different ILs with propylene carbonate is also reported, which results in a significant increase in the output powers and current densities of the device. PMID:27200437

  19. The copper-mobilizing-potential of dissolved organic matter in soils varies 10-fold depending on soil incubation and extraction procedures.

    PubMed

    Amery, Fien; Degryse, Fien; Degeling, Wim; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2007-04-01

    Copper is mobilized in soil by dissolved organic matter (DOM) but the role of DOM quality in this process is unclear. A one-step resin-exchange method was developed to measure the Cu-Mobilizing-Potential (CuMP) of DOM at pCu 11.3 and pH 7.0, representing background values. The CuMP of DOM was measured in soil solutions of 13 uncontaminated soils with different DOM extraction methods. The CuMP, expressed per unit dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varied 10-fold and followed the order water extracts > 0.01 M CaCl2 extracts > pore water. Soil solutions, obtained from soils that were stored air-dry for a long time or were subjected to drying-wetting cycles, had elevated DOC concentration, but the DOM had a low CuMP. Prolonged soil incubations decreased the DOC concentration and increased the CuMP, suggesting that most of the initially elevated DOM is less humified and has lower Cu affinity than DOM remaining after incubation. A significant positive correlation between the specific UV-absorption of DOM (indicating aromaticity) and CuMP was found for all DOM samples (R(2) = 0.58). It is concluded that the DOC concentration in soil is an insufficient predictor for the Cu mobilization and that DOM samples isolated from air-dried soils are distinct from those of soils kept moist. PMID:17438775

  20. A rate- and state-dependent friction model to describe the seasonal motion of slow-moving earthflows and quantify their potential for catastrophic failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Rempel, A. W.; Roering, J. J.; Hilley, G. E.; Skarbek, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Slow-moving earthflows regularly exhibit seasonal velocity patterns driven by transient perturbations in effective normal stress that alter the frictional resistance along the sliding surface. These annual velocity patterns are ubiquitous in slow-moving landslides throughout the world, with individual landslides often displaying complex spatial patterns of acceleration that can vary from year to year. Here, we model landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional treatment that incorporates variations in effective normal stress and material properties, including both velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS) patches, along the sliding surface. We calculate changes in effective stress by allowing rainfall-induced changes in pore-water pressure to diffuse vertically from the ground surface to the landslide base. We then solve for changes in frictional strength and velocity along a 1D slip surface that extends the length of the landslide. Model parameters are calibrated using measurements from laboratory tests, field instruments, and satellite InSAR. Our model is able to produce seasonal variations in sliding rate that mimic the patterns commonly displayed by these slope failures. We use our model to identify the conditions under which these slides can transition from non-catastrophic motion to catastrophic failure. We find that non-catastrophic motion occurs if the landslides are comprised of entirely VS material or if their spatial dimensions do not exceed a critical nucleation length, which is determined by the ratio of VW to VS material and the effective stress. Furthermore, this modeling framework suggests that landslides that exhibit spatially varying motion (i.e. consisting of an ensemble of smaller slip patches) may be less likely to fail catastrophically when compared to landslides that exhibit spatially uniform motion if differences in the timing of motion along the landslide reflect the presence of temporary slip barriers (i

  1. A new NAD(H)-dependent meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase from an industrially potential strain Serratia marcescens H30.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Xu, Quanming; Zhan, Senran; Li, Yongyu; Lin, Hui; Sun, Shujing; Sha, Li; Hu, Kaihui; Guan, Xiong; Shen, Yaling

    2014-02-01

    The budC gene coding for a new meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH) from Serratia marcescens H30 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified, and characterized for its properties. The recombinant BDH with a molecular weight of 27.4 kDa exhibited a reversible transformation between acetoin and 2,3-butanediol. In the presence of NADH, BDH could catalyze the reduction of diacetyl and (3R)-acetoin to (3S)-acetoin and meso-2,3-butanediol, respectively, while (3S)-acetoin as a substrate could be further transformed into (2S, 3S)-2,3-butanediol at pH 9.0. For diol oxidation reactions, (3R)-acetoin and (3S)-acetoin were obtained when meso-2,3-butanediol and (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol were used as the substrates with BDH and NAD(+). (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol was not a substrate for the BDH at all. The low K m value (4.1 mM) in meso-2,3-butanediol oxidation reaction and no activity for diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol as the substrates with NADP(+)/NADPH suggested that the budC gene product belongs to a NAD(H)-dependent meso-2,3-BDH. Maximum activities for diacetyl and (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction were observed at pH 8.0 and pH 5.0 while for meso-2,3-butanediol oxidation it was pH 8.0. However, the optimum temperature for oxidation and reduction reactions was about 40 °C. In addition, the BDH activity for meso-2,3-butanediol oxidation was enhanced in the presence of Fe(2+) and for diacetyl and (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), while several metal ions inhibited its activity, particularly Fe(3+) for reduction of diacetyl and acetoin. Sequence analysis showed that the BDH from S. marcescens H30 possessed two conserved sequences including the coenzyme binding motif (GxxxGxG) and the active-site motif (YxxxK), which are present in the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily.

  2. Biophysical mechanism of spike threshold dependence on the rate of rise of the membrane potential by sodium channel inactivation or subthreshold axonal potassium current.

    PubMed

    Wester, Jason C; Contreras, Diego

    2013-08-01

    Spike threshold filters incoming inputs and thus gates activity flow through neuronal networks. Threshold is variable, and in many types of neurons there is a relationship between the threshold voltage and the rate of rise of the membrane potential (dVm/dt) leading to the spike. In primary sensory cortex this relationship enhances the sensitivity of neurons to a particular stimulus feature. While Na⁺ channel inactivation may contribute to this relationship, recent evidence indicates that K⁺ currents located in the spike initiation zone are crucial. Here we used a simple Hodgkin-Huxley biophysical model to systematically investigate the role of K⁺ and Na⁺ current parameters (activation voltages and kinetics) in regulating spike threshold as a function of dVm/dt. Threshold was determined empirically and not estimated from the shape of the Vm prior to a spike. This allowed us to investigate intrinsic currents and values of gating variables at the precise voltage threshold. We found that Na⁺ nactivation is sufficient to produce the relationship provided it occurs at hyperpolarized voltages combined with slow kinetics. Alternatively, hyperpolarization of the K⁺ current activation voltage, even in the absence of Na⁺ inactivation, is also sufficient to produce the relationship. This hyperpolarized shift of K⁺ activation allows an outward current prior to spike initiation to antagonize the Na⁺ inward current such that it becomes self-sustaining at a more depolarized voltage. Our simulations demonstrate parameter constraints on Na⁺ inactivation and the biophysical mechanism by which an outward current regulates spike threshold as a function of dVm/dt.

  3. Potential-Dependent Electrocatalytic Pathways: Controlling Reactivity with pKa for Mechanistic Investigation of a Nickel-Based Hydrogen Evolution Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Eric S; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2015-10-21

    A detailed mechanistic analysis is presented for the hydrogen evolution catalyst [Ni(P2(Ph)N2(Ph))2(CH2CN)][BF4]2 in acetonitrile (P2(Ph)N2(Ph) = 1,3,5,7-tetraphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). This complex has a Ni(II/I) redox couple at −0.83 V and a Ni(I/0) redox couple at −1.03 V versus Fc(+/0). These two closely spaced redox events both promote proton reduction catalysis, each via a distinct mechanism: an electrochemical ECEC pathway and an EECC route. The EECC mechanism, operative at more negative potentials, was isolated through use of a weak acid (anilinium, pKa = 10.6 in CH3CN) to avert protonation of the singly reduced species. Electroanalytical methods and time-resolved spectroscopy were used to analyze the kinetics of the elementary steps of hydrogen evolution catalysis. The rate constant for the formation of a nickel(II)–hydride intermediate was determined via measurements of peak shift (k1 = 1.2 × 106 M(-1) s(-1)) and through foot-of-the-wave analysis (k1 = 6.5 × 106 M(-1) s(-1)). Reactivity of the isolated hydride with acid to release hydrogen and regenerate the nickel(II) complex was monitored by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Kinetics obtained from stopped-flow measurements are corroborated by current plateau analysis of the catalytic cyclic voltammograms. These kinetic data suggest the presence of an off-cycle intermediate in the reaction.

  4. Susceptibility to acidification of groundwater-dependent wetlands affected by water level declines, and potential risk to an early-breeding amphibian species.

    PubMed

    Serrano, L; Díaz-Paniagua, C; Gómez-Rodríguez, C; Florencio, M; Marchand, M-A; Roelofs, J G M; Lucassen, E C H E T

    2016-11-15

    Eggs of the Western spadefoot toad (Pelobates cultripes) reached a 100% mortality in all 29 clutches deposited at a pH below 5.0 in a temporary pond of the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) throughout the wet season of 2006-2007. A similar trend was detected in a neighbouring pond. The proximity of these two ponds to a groundwater pumping area (<1.5km), prompted us to elucidate the possible links between the reduction in pond hydroperiod over past decades (1989-2008) and the decrease of groundwater pH-buffering capacity. The average hydroperiod had decreased by 4months since 1998-99 in the pond where the extensive egg mortality had occurred. The total alkalinity, and the Mg(2+)concentration had also significantly declined in the shallow water-table since 1998-99, from an average of 8.56 to 0.32meql(-1), and of 3.57 to 1.15meql(-1), respectively. This decline of the shallow groundwater buffering capacity could turn this pond more susceptible to the inorganic acidity associated with pyrite oxidation as the sediment S content was often above 0.03%. The initial ratio of S/Ca+Mg in the summer dry sediment was a good predictor of pore-water pH on re-wetting after desiccation (r(2)=0.802, p<0.01). Therefore, this ratio can give some anticipation to mitigate the impact of acidity on toad hatching before these temporary ponds are reflooded on the next wet season. Our results suggest that the long-term damage to pond water levels can trigger a potential risk of soil acidification in the presence of iron-sulphide minerals. PMID:27476729

  5. Impact of potential large-scale and medium-scale irrigation on the West African Monsoon and its dependence on location of irrigated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltahir, E. A. B.; IM, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the impact of potential large-scale (about 400,000 km2) and medium-scale (about 60,000 km2) irrigation on the climate of West Africa using the MIT Regional Climate Model. A new irrigation module is implemented to assess the impact of location and scheduling of irrigation on rainfall distribution over West Africa. A control simulation (without irrigation) and various sensitivity experiments (with irrigation) are performed and compared to discern the effects of irrigation location, size and scheduling. In general, the irrigation-induced surface cooling due to anomalously wet soil tends to suppress moist convection and rainfall, which in turn induces local subsidence and low level anti-cyclonic circulation. These local effects are dominated by a consistent reduction of local rainfall over the irrigated land, irrespective of its location. However, the remote response of rainfall distribution to irrigation exhibits a significant sensitivity to the latitudinal position of irrigation. The low-level northeasterly flow associated with anti-cyclonic circulation centered over the irrigation area can enhance the extent of low level convergence through interaction with the prevailing monsoon flow, leading to significant increase in rainfall. Despite much reduced forcing of irrigation water, the medium-scale irrigation seems to draw the same response as large-scale irrigation, which supports the robustness of the response to irrigation in our modeling system. Both large-scale and medium-scale irrigation experiments show that an optimal irrigation location and scheduling exists that would lead to a more efficient use of irrigation water. The approach of using a regional climate model to investigate the impact of location and size of irrigation schemes may be the first step in incorporating land-atmosphere interactions in the design of location and size of irrigation projects. However, this theoretical approach is still in early stages of development and

  6. GluA2-dependent AMPA receptor endocytosis and the decay of early and late long-term potentiation: possible mechanisms for forgetting of short- and long-term memories.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Oliver; Nader, Karim; Wang, Yu-Tian

    2014-01-01

    The molecular processes involved in establishing long-term potentiation (LTP) have been characterized well, but the decay of early and late LTP (E-LTP and L-LTP) is poorly understood. We review recent advances in describing the mechanisms involved in maintaining LTP and homeostatic plasticity. We discuss how these phenomena could relate to processes that might underpin the loss of synaptic potentiation over time, and how they might contribute to the forgetting of short-term and long-term memories. We propose that homeostatic downscaling mediates the loss of E-LTP, and that metaplastic parameters determine the decay rate of L-LTP, while both processes require the activity-dependent removal of postsynaptic GluA2-containing AMPA receptors. PMID:24298143

  7. A hybrid model for low pressure inductively coupled plasmas combining a fluid model for electrons with a plasma-potential-dependent energy distribution and a fluid-Monte Carlo model for ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchtouris, S.; Kokkoris, G.

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid plasma model is utilized for the simulation of inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). It consists of a plasma fluid model coupling fluid with Maxwell’s equations and a Monte Carlo (MC) particle tracing model utilized for the calculation of the ion mobility in high electrostatic fields (sheaths). The model is applied to low pressure Argon plasma in the gaseous electronics conference (GEC) reference cell. Following measurements of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in low pressure ICPs, a three-temperature EEDF is considered; it is formulated with a generalized equation and depends on the local plasma potential. The use of a predefined formula for the EEDF entails a low computational cost: All parameters affected by the EEDF are calculated as functions of the plasma potential and the mean electron energy once and before the solution of the model. The model results are validated by a comparison with spatially resolved (on axial and radial distance) measurements of electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential. Both the calculation of the ion mobility by the MC model and the consideration of the three-temperature EEDF are critical for the accuracy of the model results. The very good agreement of the model results with the measurements and the low computational cost in combination with the flexibility of the code utilized for the numerical solution manifest the potential of the hybrid plasma model for the simulation of low pressure ICPs.

  8. Loperamide dependence and abuse.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Ryan; Heiner, Jason; Villarreal, Joshua; Strote, Jared

    2015-05-02

    Loperamide is a common over-the-counter antidiarrheal considered safe in a broad range of dosages and thought devoid of abuse potential. We describe the first case of a patient with loperamide dependence due to misuse of its opiate-like effects achieved by chronic massive oral ingestions. A 26-year-old man who was taking 800 mg of loperamide per day presented requesting detoxification referral. Loperamide has potential for euphoric effects and information on how to facilitate such effects is easily available. It is important for physicians to be aware of the potential for misuse of and dependence on loperamide, with symptoms mimicking opiate use.

  9. Testing time-dependent density functional theory with depopulated molecular orbitals for predicting electronic excitation energies of valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer states and potential energies near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2014-09-14

    Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with most exchange-correlation functionals is well known to systematically underestimate the excitation energies of Rydberg and charge-transfer excited states of atomic and molecular systems. To improve the description of Rydberg states within the KS TDDFT framework, Gaiduk et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 253005 (2012)] proposed a scheme that may be called HOMO depopulation. In this study, we tested this scheme on an extensive dataset of valence and Rydberg excitation energies of various atoms, ions, and molecules. It is also tested on a charge-transfer excitation of NH{sub 3}-F{sub 2} and on the potential energy curves of NH{sub 3} near a conical intersection. We found that the method can indeed significantly improve the accuracy of predicted Rydberg excitation energies while preserving reasonable accuracy for valence excitation energies. However, it does not appear to improve the description of charge-transfer excitations that are severely underestimated by standard KS TDDFT with conventional exchange-correlation functionals, nor does it perform appreciably better than standard TDDFT for the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  10. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  11. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  13. [Nicotine dependence].

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Shingo; Shinkai, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Smoking is the most widespread addictive behavior in the world, and it causes physical and psychological dependence on nicotine. As for physical nicotine dependence, nicotine produces rewarding effects by interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurons in the brain's reward system. Psychological dependence on nicotine comes with a complex psychological procedure that is based on distorted cognition which justifies their smoking behavior. Clinicians should support smokers with willingness to quit smoking comprehensively with this knowledge, although the success rate of smoking cessation is no ideal in general. PMID:26394514

  14. Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Transgenic Wheat (Triticum aestivum) with Reduced Levels of ω5-Gliadins, the Major Sensitizing Allergen in Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Susan B; Tanaka, Charlene K; Pineau, Florence; Lupi, Roberta; Drouet, Martine; Beaudouin, Etienne; Morisset, Martine; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-10-28

    The ω5-gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which ω5-gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interference. Sera from 7 of 11 WDEIA patients showed greatly reduced levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to ω5-gliadins in both transgenic lines. However, these sera also showed low levels of reactivity to other gluten proteins. Sera from three patients showed the greatest reactivity to proteins other than ω5-gliadins, either high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), α-gliadins, or non-gluten proteins. The complexity of immunological responses among these patients suggests that flour from the transgenic lines would not be suitable for individuals already diagnosed with WDEIA. However, the introduction of wheat lacking ω5-gliadins could reduce the number of people sensitized to these proteins and thereby decrease the overall incidence of this serious food allergy.

  15. Stimulus-induced dissociation of neuronal firing rates and local field potential gamma power and its relationship to the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in macaque primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, M J; Gieselmann, M A; Vuksanovic, V; Hunter, D; Sun, L; Chen, X; Delicato, L S; Thiele, A

    2011-01-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is regularly used to assign neuronal activity to cognitive function. Recent analyses have shown that the local field potential (LFP) gamma power is a better predictor of the fMRI BOLD signal than spiking activity. However, LFP gamma power and spiking activity are usually correlated, clouding the analysis of the neural basis of the BOLD signal. We show that changes in LFP gamma power and spiking activity in the primary visual cortex (V1) of the awake primate can be dissociated by using grating and plaid pattern stimuli, which differentially engage surround suppression and cross-orientation inhibition/facilitation within and between cortical columns. Grating presentation yielded substantial V1 LFP gamma frequency oscillations and significant multi-unit activity. Plaid pattern presentation significantly reduced the LFP gamma power while increasing population multi-unit activity. The fMRI BOLD activity followed the LFP gamma power changes, not the multi-unit activity. Inference of neuronal activity from the fMRI BOLD signal thus requires detailed a priori knowledge of how different stimuli or tasks activate the cortical network. PMID:22081989

  16. Involvement of the brain histaminergic system in addiction and addiction-related behaviors: a comprehensive review with emphasis on the potential therapeutic use of histaminergic compounds in drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Christian; Alleva, Livia; Quertemont, Etienne; Tirelli, Ezio

    2010-11-01

    Neurons that produce histamine are exclusively located in the tuberomamillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus and send widespread projections to almost all brain areas. Neuronal histamine is involved in many physiological and behavioral functions such as arousal, feeding behavior and learning. Although conflicting data have been published, several studies have also demonstrated a role of histamine in the psychomotor and rewarding effects of addictive drugs. Pharmacological and brain lesion experiments initially led to the proposition that the histaminergic system exerts an inhibitory influence on drug reward processes, opposed to that of the dopaminergic system. The purpose of this review is to summarize the relevant literature on this topic and to discuss whether the inhibitory function of histamine on drug reward is supported by current evidence from published results. Research conducted during the past decade demonstrated that the ability of many antihistaminic drugs to potentiate addiction-related behaviors essentially results from non-specific effects and does not constitute a valid argument in support of an inhibitory function of histamine on reward processes. The reviewed findings also indicate that histamine can either stimulate or inhibit the dopamine mesolimbic system through distinct neuronal mechanisms involving different histamine receptors. Finally, the hypothesis that the histaminergic system plays an inhibitory role on drug reward appears to be essentially supported by place conditioning studies that focused on morphine reward. The present review suggests that the development of drugs capable of activating the histaminergic system may offer promising therapeutic tools for the treatment of opioid dependence.

  17. Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Transgenic Wheat (Triticum aestivum) with Reduced Levels of ω5-Gliadins, the Major Sensitizing Allergen in Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Susan B; Tanaka, Charlene K; Pineau, Florence; Lupi, Roberta; Drouet, Martine; Beaudouin, Etienne; Morisset, Martine; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-10-28

    The ω5-gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which ω5-gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interference. Sera from 7 of 11 WDEIA patients showed greatly reduced levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to ω5-gliadins in both transgenic lines. However, these sera also showed low levels of reactivity to other gluten proteins. Sera from three patients showed the greatest reactivity to proteins other than ω5-gliadins, either high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), α-gliadins, or non-gluten proteins. The complexity of immunological responses among these patients suggests that flour from the transgenic lines would not be suitable for individuals already diagnosed with WDEIA. However, the introduction of wheat lacking ω5-gliadins could reduce the number of people sensitized to these proteins and thereby decrease the overall incidence of this serious food allergy. PMID:26447559

  18. Evaluation of metabolism dependent inhibition of CYP2B6 mediated bupropion hydroxylation in human liver microsomes by monoamine oxidase inhibitors and prediction of potential as perpetrators of drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary; Mohammed, Abdul Rasheed; Manoharan, Arunkumar; Ponnamaneni, Ranjith Kumar; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh

    2015-03-25

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the metabolism dependent inhibition of CYP2B6 catalyzed bupropion hydroxylation in human liver microsomes by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors and to predict the drug-drug interaction potential of monoamine oxidase inhibitors as perpetrators of drug interaction. Human liver microsomal CYP2B6 activities were investigated using bupropion hydroxylation as probe substrate marker. The results from single point time dependent inhibition and shift assays suggest that clorgyline, pargyline, phenelzine, and selegiline were metabolism based inhibitors of CYP2B6. In IC50 shift assays, clorgyline, pargyline, phenelzine and selegiline are metabolism based inhibitors of CYP2B6 with fold shit of 3.0-, 3.7-, 2.9-, and 11.4-fold respectively. The inactivation of clorgyline was characterized by KI value of 2.5 ± 0.3 and k(inact) value of 0.045 ± 0.001 min(-1). Phenelzine inactivated CYP2B6 with KI and k(inact) values of 44.9 ± 6.9 μM and 0.085 ± 0.003 min(-1) respectively. Inactivation of selegiline was characterized with KI and k(inact) values of 22.0 ± 3.3 and 0.074 ± 0.002 min(-1) respectively. The inactivation caused by these inhibitors was not reversed by dialysis indicating irreversible inhibition. Based on the mechanistic static model, selegiline showed an increase in the area under the curve (AUC) of efavirenz and bupropion by 1.01-fold. Phenelzine predicted to cause an increase in the AUC of efavirenz and bupropion by 9.4- and 2.4-fold respectively considering unbound hepatic inlet concentrations of phenelzine. In conclusion, the results from this study demonstrated that MAO inhibitors can inactivate human liver microsomal CYP2B6. The likelihood of drug interaction when selegiline co-administered with CYP2B6 substrates is remote. Caution is required while co-administering phenelzine with substrates that are exclusively metabolized by CYP2B6 enzyme and substrates that have narrow therapeutic index.

  19. Endotoxin-induced vascular endothelial cell migration is dependent on TLR4/NF-κB pathway, NAD(P)H oxidase activation, and transient receptor potential melastatin 7 calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cáceres, Mónica; Echeverría, César; Fernández, Ricardo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Cerda, Oscar; Tapia, Pablo; Simon, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is decisive and leads to the development of several inflammatory diseases. Endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome exhibits a broad inflammation-induced endothelial dysfunction. We reported previously that the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts, showing a myofibroblast-like protein expression profile. Enhanced migration is a hallmark of myofibroblast function. However, the mechanism involved in LPS-induced EC migration is no totally understood. Some studies have shown that the transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) ion channel is involved in fibroblast and tumor cell migration through the regulation of calcium influx. Furthermore, LPS modulates TRPM7 expression. However, whether TRPM7 is involved in LPS-induced EC migration remains unknown. Here, we study the participation of LPS as an inducer of EC migration and study the mechanism underlying evaluating the participation of the TRPM7 ion channel. Our results demonstrate that LPS induced EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this migratory process was mediated by the TLR-4/NF-κB pathway and the generation of ROS through the PKC-activated NAD(P)H oxidase. In addition, LPS increased the intracellular calcium level and the number of focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-positive focal adhesions in EC. Finally, we demonstrate that using TRPM7 blockers or suppressing TRPM7 expression through siRNA successfully inhibits the calcium influx and the LPS-induced EC migration. These results point out TRPM7 as a new target in the drug design for several inflammatory diseases that impair vascular endothelium function.

  20. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction. PMID:27601272

  1. Review of insulin-dependent and insulin-independent agents for treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and potential role for sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), continues to be a global health care problem. Although the beneficial effects of glycemic control are well established, in the United States, > 40% of adults with diabetes fail to achieve target glycated hemoglobin levels. Antidiabetic drug classes vary with respect to their mechanisms of action, glucose-lowering potential, and safety and tolerability profiles. Antidiabetic drug classes include some agents that depend on the presence or action of insulin for their therapeutic effect. As the disease state of T2DM progresses, patient pancreatic β-cell function declines, and therapies that stimulate insulin secretion or improve insulin sensitivity become less effective for this population. Therefore, the development of additional antidiabetic agents with novel mechanisms of action that can be used alone or in combination with currently approved medications may help patients achieve glycemic control. Agents that have comparable glucose-lowering capabilities but different mechanisms of action may fill treatment gaps or meet the needs of patient subpopulations. For example, inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) represent an emerging class of glucose-lowering agents. The SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glucose reabsorption by the kidney, leading to increased urinary glucose excretion and caloric loss. In clinical trials, these agents have been shown to improve glycemic control and to reduce body weight in patients with T2DM. Additionally, SGLT2 inhibitors pose a low risk for hypoglycemia and are generally well tolerated; however, their use has been associated with an increase in the frequency of genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors may provide an alternative or an addition to existing therapies for the treatment of patients with T2DM.

  2. Catehol-O-Methyltransferase gene Val158Met polymorphism as a potential predictor of response to computer-assisted delivery of cognitive-behavioral therapy among cocaine-dependent individuals: Preliminary findings from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Herman, Aryeh; DeVito, Elise E.; Frankforter, Tami L.; Potenza, Marc N; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background Findings from uncontrolled studies suggest that the COMT Val108/158Met polymorphism may affect response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in some populations. Using data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating computerized CBT (CBT4CBT), we evaluated treatment response by COMT genotype, with the a priori hypothesis that Val carriers would have improved response to computerized delivery of CBT. Methods 101 cocaine-dependent individuals, of whom 81 contributed analyzable genetic samples, were randomized to standard methadone maintenance treatment plus CBT4CBT or standard treatment alone in an 8-week trial. Results There was a significant genotype by time effect on frequency of cocaine use from baseline to the end of the 6-month follow-up, suggesting greater reductions over time for Val carriers relative to individuals with the Met/Met genotype. There was a significant treatment condition by genotype interactions for rates of participants attaining 21 or more days of continuous abstinence as well as self-reported percent days of abstinence, suggesting less cocaine use among Val carriers when assigned to CBT compared to standard treatment. Exploration of possible mechanisms using measures of attentional biased also pointed to greater change over time in these measures among the Val carriers assigned to CBT. Conclusion These are the first data from a randomized controlled trial indicating significant interactions of COMT polymorphism and behavioral therapy condition on treatment outcome, where Val carriers appeared to respond particularly well to computerized CBT. These preliminary data point to a potential biomarker of response to CBT linked to its putative mechanism of action, enhanced cognitive control. PMID:25930952

  3. The unique ion permeability profile of cochlear fibrocytes and its contribution to establishing their positive resting membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Murakami, Shingo; Ogata, Genki; Uetsuka, Satoru; Choi, Samuel; Nakagawa, Takashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Komune, Shizuo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Hibino, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells exhibit negative resting membrane potential (RMP) owing to the high K(+) permeability of the plasma membrane and the asymmetric [K(+)] between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. However, cochlear fibrocytes, which comprise the basolateral surface of a multilayer epithelial-like tissue, exhibit a RMP of +5 to +12 mV in vivo. This positive RMP is critical for the formation of an endocochlear potential (EP) of +80 mV in a K(+)-rich extracellular fluid, endolymph. The epithelial-like tissue bathes fibrocytes in a regular extracellular fluid, perilymph, and apically faces the endolymph. The EP, which is essential for hearing, represents the potential difference across the tissue. Using in vivo electrophysiological approaches, we describe a potential mechanism underlying the unusual RMP of guinea pig fibrocytes. The RMP was +9.0 ± 3.7 mV when fibrocytes were exposed to an artificial control perilymph (n = 28 cochleae). Perilymphatic perfusion of a solution containing low [Na(+)] (1 mM) markedly hyperpolarized the RMP to -31.1 ± 11.2 mV (n = 10; p < 0.0001 versus the control, Tukey-Kramer test after one-way ANOVA). Accordingly, the EP decreased. Little change in RMP was observed when the cells were treated with a high [K(+)] of 30 mM (+10.4 ± 2.3 mV; n = 7; p = 0.942 versus the control). During the infusion of a low [Cl(-)] solution (2.4 mM), the RMP moderately hyperpolarized to -0.9 ± 3.4 mV (n = 5; p < 0.01 versus the control), although the membranes, if governed by Cl(-) permeability, should be depolarized. These observations imply that the fibrocyte membranes are more permeable to Na(+) than K(+) and Cl(-), and this unique profile and [Na(+)] gradient across the membranes contribute to the positive RMP.

  4. The unique ion permeability profile of cochlear fibrocytes and its contribution to establishing their positive resting membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Murakami, Shingo; Ogata, Genki; Uetsuka, Satoru; Choi, Samuel; Nakagawa, Takashi; Inohara, Hidenori; Komune, Shizuo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Hibino, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells exhibit negative resting membrane potential (RMP) owing to the high K(+) permeability of the plasma membrane and the asymmetric [K(+)] between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. However, cochlear fibrocytes, which comprise the basolateral surface of a multilayer epithelial-like tissue, exhibit a RMP of +5 to +12 mV in vivo. This positive RMP is critical for the formation of an endocochlear potential (EP) of +80 mV in a K(+)-rich extracellular fluid, endolymph. The epithelial-like tissue bathes fibrocytes in a regular extracellular fluid, perilymph, and apically faces the endolymph. The EP, which is essential for hearing, represents the potential difference across the tissue. Using in vivo electrophysiological approaches, we describe a potential mechanism underlying the unusual RMP of guinea pig fibrocytes. The RMP was +9.0 ± 3.7 mV when fibrocytes were exposed to an artificial control perilymph (n = 28 cochleae). Perilymphatic perfusion of a solution containing low [Na(+)] (1 mM) markedly hyperpolarized the RMP to -31.1 ± 11.2 mV (n = 10; p < 0.0001 versus the control, Tukey-Kramer test after one-way ANOVA). Accordingly, the EP decreased. Little change in RMP was observed when the cells were treated with a high [K(+)] of 30 mM (+10.4 ± 2.3 mV; n = 7; p = 0.942 versus the control). During the infusion of a low [Cl(-)] solution (2.4 mM), the RMP moderately hyperpolarized to -0.9 ± 3.4 mV (n = 5; p < 0.01 versus the control), although the membranes, if governed by Cl(-) permeability, should be depolarized. These observations imply that the fibrocyte membranes are more permeable to Na(+) than K(+) and Cl(-), and this unique profile and [Na(+)] gradient across the membranes contribute to the positive RMP. PMID:27344659

  5. Phenibut dependence

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3–4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut. PMID:23391959

  6. Potential conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzinger, Michael; Popovych, Roman O.

    2008-10-15

    We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman et al. [J. Math. Phys. 47, 113505 (2006)]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings, and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of these results is given. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

  7. Tobacco Dependence Among Intermittent Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Stuart G.; Dunbar, Michael S.; Scholl, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Intermittent smokers (ITS) are an increasingly prevalent segment of smokers, yet it is unknown whether or how dependence severity may vary across ITS. Methods: Participants were 217 ITS (70 never daily ITS [NITS], 138 converted ITS [CITS], and 9 unknown), who smoked 4–27 days per month, and 197 daily smokers (DS), recruited for a study on smoking patterns. Participants completed questionnaires on dependence (time to first cigarette after waking, Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence [FTND], Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale [NDSS], Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives [WISDM], and Hooked on Nicotine Checklist [HONC]) and recorded each cigarette in real time over 3 weeks using Ecological Momentary Assessment. Logistic regression assessed differences in dependence between groups (DS vs. ITS; CITS vs. NITS), and least squares regression examined associations between dependence and smoking behavior (mean, maximum cigarettes per day; proportion of days smoked; longest period of abstinence) within ITS. Results: As expected, DS were significantly more dependent than ITS: FTND, NDSS, and WISDM discriminated between ITS and DS with greater than 90% accuracy. Similarly, among ITS, NITS demonstrated lower dependence than CITS. Within ITS, dependence measures also correlated with observed smoking rate and duration of abstinence. Conclusions: The study confirmed that DS are more dependent than ITS and that CITS are more dependent than NITS. Importantly, ITS exhibit features of dependence, and there is meaningful variation in dependence within ITS, suggesting that some aspects of dependence may appear with very infrequent smoking. Future work should examine implications for ITS’ potential progression to daily smoking and cessation outcome. PMID:22529224

  8. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-06-16

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case-control analysis (N = 908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N = 3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N = 81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N = 22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P = 0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P = 0.033). The 168 Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD.

  9. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case–control analysis (N=908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N=3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N=81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N=22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P=0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P=0.033). The 168Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD. PMID:26080318

  10. Developmental emergence of alcohol use disorder symptoms and their potential as early indicators for progression to alcohol dependence in a high risk sample: a longitudinal study from childhood to early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Buu, Anne; Wang, Wei; Schroder, Stephanie A; Kalaida, Natalia L; Puttler, Leon I; Zucker, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    This study characterized developmental emergence of individual alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms, and evaluated their ability as early indicators of progression into alcohol dependence (AD), conditional upon gender, parental alcohol dependence, early onset of drinking, and level of delinquent behavior at onset. The two parameters of interest were (a) likelihood of specific AUD symptom appearance once drinking has begun, and (b) primacy of symptom appearance as an indicator of likelihood for eventual move into diagnosis. We analyzed prospective data from a community sample of high risk youth from childhood to early adulthood. Symptoms that were at higher probability of being experienced at drinking onset and that could serve as good indicators for the early stage of disease progression were: persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to control alcohol use (AD4), and continued use despite having persistent or recurrent interpersonal problems (AA4). Tolerance (AD1) may serve as an indicator for the intermediate stage of progression. Young people tended to be at an elevated risk for developing AD6 (activities given up), AD7 (physical/psychological problems), and AA3 (legal problems) in later years so these symptoms may be good indicators for later stages of progression. In addition to being male, an early onset drinker, or high in delinquent behavior, drinkers who experienced AA4 or AD1 as first symptoms were at higher risk for progression to AD. We also identified two high risk clusters: late onset drinkers with AA4 as first symptom, and children of alcoholics with AD1 as first symptom. PMID:21842966

  11. Time-dependent quantum wave packet study of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime )

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Mei; Liu Xinguo; Tan Ruishan; Li Hongzheng; Xu Wenwu

    2013-05-07

    A new global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime ) of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction has been constructed by multi-reference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction and a basis set of aug-cc-pVQZ. Using 6080 ab initio single-point energies of all the regions for the dynamics, a many-body expansion function form has been used to fit these points. The quantum reactive scattering dynamics calculations taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC) were carried out on the new potential energy surface over a range of collision energies (0.03-1.0 eV). The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the title reaction were calculated. The significance of including the CC quantum scattering calculation has been revealed by the comparison between the CC and the centrifugal sudden approximation calculation. The calculated cross section is in agreement with the experimental result at collision energy 1.0 eV.

  12. How stem cells manage to escape senescence and ageing - while they can: A recent study reveals that autophagy is responsible for senescence-dependent loss of regenerative potential of muscle stem cells during ageing.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, Miria

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells or satellite cells are responsible for muscle regeneration in the adult. Although satellite cells are highly resistant to stress, and display greater capacity to repair molecular damage than the committed progeny, their regenerative potential declines with age. During ageing, satellite cells switch to a state of permanent cell cycle arrest or senescence which prevents their activation. A recent study reveals that the senescence of satellite cell relies on defective autophagy, the quality control mechanism that degrades damaged proteins and organelles. Molecular damage is generated by oxidative stress that also promotes epigenetic changes that activate the expression of master genes, in a double-hit mechanism that ensures senescence. Importantly, genetic, and pharmacological correction of defective autophagy reverses satellite cell senescence and restores muscle regeneration in geriatric mice, with perspectives of modulating age-related functional decline of muscle. This study provides new clues to understand stem cell and organismal ageing. PMID:27389857

  13. Killing two birds with one stone: the potential role of aripiprazole for patients with comorbid major depressive disorder and nicotine dependence via altering brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Chu, Che-Sheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Chang, Hsin-An; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chen, Tien-Yu

    2014-09-01

    The high comorbidity between major depressive disorder (MDD) and nicotine dependence (ND) is well recognized. Patients with comorbid MDD and ND often have increased suicidal risk and poor outcomes. A dysfunctional dopaminergic brain reward system might be a neurobiological link between MDD and ND. Aripiprazole has been considered as a dopamine stabilizer and was the first atypical antipsychotic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an adjunctive to the treatment of unipolar MDD. Bupropion is well known as a dual norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, and has been shown to be effective in smoking cessation. One reason bupropion is useful in treating ND is that it enhances the level of dopamine in the brain. Aripiprazole might act as a dopamine agonist similar to the way that bupropion does because of its partial dopamine D2 agonist and 30% intrinsic dopaminergic activity. Several recent studies have applied the unique pharmacodynamic characteristics of aripiprazole to treat patients with ND. Based on neuroimaging findings, aripiprazole can reduce substance cravings by altering brain activity, particularly in the brain regions of the anterior cingulate cortex. Therefore, we hypothesize that adjunctive aripiprazole with antidepressant may be an effective treatment for patients with MDD and ND comorbidity. A new drug invention that combines an antidepressant with an adequate dose of aripiprazole thus should be considered. The neurobiological basis for this combination to treat patients with MDD and ND comorbidity deserves further study.

  14. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives as potential dual cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Li, Yanzhong; Gao, Guangwei; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Yun; Zhan, Xiaoping; Liu, Zenglu; Mao, Zhenmin; Chen, Shaoxiong; Wang, Liqun

    2014-10-30

    A series of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives have been synthesized and their anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Some of the target compounds exhibited significant antitumor activity, including compounds 6h and 6k (against K562 cells), 6i (against HeLa cells) and 6j (against A549 cells). N-(p-methoxy-phenyl)-isoindigo (6k) exhibited a high and selective anti-proliferative activity against K562 cells (IC50 7.8 μM) and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 6k arrested the cell cycle at S phase in K562 cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin A and CDK2, which played critical roles in DNA replication and passage through G2 phase. Moreover, compound 6k down-regulated the expression of p-GSK-3β (Ser9), β-catenin and c-myc proteins, up-regulated the expression of GSK-3β, consequently, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. The binding mode of compound 6k with GSK-3β was simulated using molecular docking tools. All of these studies gave a better understanding to the molecular mechanisms of this class of agents and clues to develop dual CDK2/GSK-3β (Ser9) phosphorylation inhibitors applied in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25151579

  15. Potentiation of in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P276-00 in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show that the combination of doxorubicin with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P276-00 was synergistic at suboptimal doses in the non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines and induces extensive apoptosis than either drug alone in H-460 human NSCLC cells. Methods Synergistic effects of P276-00 and doxorubicin on growth inhibition was studied using the Propidium Iodide (PI) assay. The doses showing the best synergistic effect was determined and these doses were used for further mechanistic studies such as western blotting, cell cycle analysis and RT-PCR. The in vivo efficacy of the combination was evaluated using the H-460 xenograft model. Results The combination of 100 nM doxorubicin followed by 1200 nM P276-00 showed synergistic effect in the p53-positive and p53-mutated cell lines H-460 and H23 respectively as compared to the p53-null cell line H1299. Abrogation of doxorubicin-induced G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis was observed in the combination treatment. This was associated with induction of tumor suppressor protein p53 and reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Furthermore, doxorubicin alone greatly induced COX-2, a NF-κB target and Cdk-1, a target of P276-00, which was downregulated by P276-00 in the combination. Doxorubicin when combined with P276-00 in a sequence-specific manner significantly inhibited tumor growth, compared with either doxorubicin or P276-00 alone in H-460 xenograft model. Conclusion These findings suggest that this combination may increase the therapeutic index over doxorubicin alone and reduce systemic toxicity of doxorubicin most likely via an inhibition of doxorubicin-induced chemoresistance involving NF-κB signaling and inhibition of Cdk-1 which is involved in cell cycle progression. PMID:23343191

  16. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zile, Melanie A; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (<110 beats per minute). Since pressure alternans occurs simultaneously with MTWA and has a higher signal to noise ratio, it may be a better predictor of arrhythmia, although the mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between force alternans (FORCE-ALT), the cellular manifestation of pressure alternans, and action potential voltage alternans (APV-ALT), the cellular driver of MTWA. Our goal was to uncover the mechanisms linking APV-ALT and FORCE-ALT in failing human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (<110 bpm), where APV-ALT was smallest. We found that the magnitudes of FORCE-ALT, CA-ALT and APV-ALT were altered by heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart

  17. cPrG-HCl a potential H+/Cl- symporter prevents acidification of storage vacuoles in aleurone cells and inhibits GA-dependent hydrolysis of storage protein and phytate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong-sic; Bethke, Paul C; Gubler, Frank; Jones, Russell L

    2003-07-01

    The putative H+/Cl- symporter cycloprodigiosin-HCl (cPrG-HCl) was used to investigate the role of vacuole acidification in cereal aleurone cell function. The protein storage vacuole (PSV) becomes acidified rapidly when aleurone cells are treated with gibberellic acid (GA) but not abscisic acid (ABA). We show that cPrG prevents PSV acidification in aleurone layers and prevents synthesis of secretory proteins such as alpha-amylase. Our data support the hypothesis that decreased hydrolase synthesis is a consequence of decreased hydrolysis of storage proteins in PSV. Support for this hypothesis comes from experiments showing that breakdown of barley 7S globulins and phytate is inhibited by cPrG in GA-treated aleurone layers. Decreased mobilization of PSV reserves is accompanied by reductions in the free amino acid pool size and in the amount of ions released from the aleurone layer. Vacuolation of the aleurone cell is a diagnostic feature of the response to GA, and vacuolation is also inhibited by cPrG. Evidence that cPrG acts as a potential H+/Cl- symporter in aleurone is presented. We show that cPrG does not inhibit the synthesis and secretion of alpha-amylase when Cl- ions are omitted from the incubation medium. Although cPrG blocks many GA-induced responses of aleurone layers, it does not affect early steps in GA signaling. The SLN1 protein, a negative regu