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Sample records for endocochlear potential depends

  1. The nature of the negative endocochlear potentials produced by anoxia and ethacrynic acid in the rat and guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Bosher, S K

    1979-01-01

    1. The alterations in the Na+ and K+ concentrations of the cochlear endolymph and in the endocochlear potential were followed simultaneously by means of ion-sensitive and conventional micro-electrodes during simple anoxia, during anoxia after i.v. ethacrynic acid and after i.v. ethacrynic acid alone. The endolymphatic pH changes were measured separately and the effect of perilymphatic ethacrynic acid upon the endocochlear potential was investigated. 2. The over-all Na+:K+ permeability ratio for the endolymph system was determined in individual animals for the first time using an indirect method. The normal mean values of 0.27 (rat) and 0.38 (guinea-pig) were increased after ethacrynic acid. Permeability changes occurred during anoxia but were delayed in onset. 3. The negative endocochlear potentials in each situation behaved quantitatively like modified K+ diffusion potentials largely dependent upon the K+ and Na+ gradients between endolymph and perilymph. PMID:41092

  2. Effects of various noise exposures on endocochlear potentials correlated with cochlear gross responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Li, Q; Dong, W; Chen, J

    1992-04-01

    Changes in endocochlear potentials (EP), cochlear microphonics (CM), and compound action potentials (CAP) with noise exposure were investigated in guinea pigs. The animals were anesthetized and immobilized and exposed to white noise at intensities ranging from 105 to 125 dB. The negative EP (N-EP) was induced by anoxia and was investigated during and after noise exposure. It was found that the general EP (G-EP, the sum of both positive EP (P-EP) and N-EP) increased remarkably during exposure to 115 dB noise but decreased during exposure to 125 dB noise. A smaller absolute value of N-EP was encountered only during exposure to 125 dB noise. The results shed light on the relationship between EP and CM, CAP changes, and the potential mechanism of EP change and its significance in noise-induced hearing loss.

  3. Mechanism generating endocochlear potential: role played by intermediate cells in stria vascularis.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, S; Ando, M; Kakigi, A

    2000-01-01

    The endocochlear DC potential (EP) is generated by the stria vascularis, and essential for the normal function of hair cells. Intermediate cells are melanocytes in the stria vascularis. To examine the contribution of the membrane potential of intermediate cells (E(m)) to the EP, a comparison was made between the effects of K(+) channel blockers on the E(m) and those on the EP. The E(m) of dissociated guinea pig intermediate cells was measured in the zero-current clamp mode of the whole-cell patch clamp configuration. The E(m) changed by 55.1 mV per 10-fold changes in extracellular K(+) concentration. Ba(2+), Cs(+), and quinine depressed the E(m) in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tetraethylammonium at 30 mM and 4-aminopyridine at 10 mM had no effect. The reduction of the E(m) by Ba(2+) and Cs(+) was enhanced by lowering the extracellular K(+) concentration from 3.6 mM to 1.2 mM. To examine the effect of the K(+) channel blockers on the EP, the EP of guinea pigs was maintained by vascular perfusion, and K(+) channel blockers were administered to the artificial blood. Ba(2+), Cs(+) and quinine depressed the EP in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tetraethylammonium at 30 mM and 4-aminopyridine at 10 mM did not change the EP. A 10-fold increase in the K(+) concentration in the artificial blood caused a minor decrease in the EP of only 10.6 mV. The changes in the EP were similar to those seen in the E(m) obtained at the lower extracellular K(+) concentration of 1.2 mM. On the basis of these results, we propose that the EP is critically dependent on the voltage jump across the plasma membrane of intermediate cells, and that K(+) concentration in the intercellular space in the stria vascularis may be actively controlled at a concentration lower than the plasma level. PMID:11053131

  4. Strial microvascular pathology and age-associated endocochlear potential decline in NOD congenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Rice, Mary E. Rybak; Gagnon, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    NOD/ShiLtJ (previously NOD/LtJ) inbred mice show polygenic autoimmune disease and are commonly used to model autoimmune-related Type I diabetes, as well as Sjogren’s syndrome. They also show rapidly progressing hearing loss, partly due to the combined effects of Cdh23ahl and Ahl2. Congenic NOD.NON-H2nb1/LtJ mice, which carry corrective alleles within the H2 histocompatibility gene complex, are free from diabetes and other overt signs of autoimmune disease, but still exhibit rapidly progressive hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear pathology in these congenics broadly includes hair cell and neuronal loss, plus endocochlear potential (EP) decline from initially normal values after 2 months of age. The EP reduction follows often dramatic degeneration of capillaries in stria vascularis, with resulting strial degeneration. The cochlear modiolus in the congenic mice also features perivascular inclusions that resemble those in some mouse autoimmune models. We posit that cochlear hair cell/neural and strial pathology in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice arise independently. While sensory cell loss may be closely tied to Cdh23ahl and Ahl2, the strial microvascular pathology and modiolar anomalies we observe may arise from alleles on the NOD background related to immune function. Age-associated EP decline in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice may model forms of strial age-related hearing loss caused principally by microvascular disease. The remarkable strial capillary loss in these mice may also be useful for studying the relation between strial vascular insufficiency and strial function. PMID:18727954

  5. S1PR2 variants associated with auditory function in humans and endocochlear potential decline in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Neil J.; Carlisle, Francesca; Pearson, Selina; Lewis, Morag A.; Buniello, Annalisa; Chen, Jing; Isaacson, Rivka L.; Pass, Johanna; White, Jacqueline K.; Dawson, Sally J.; Steel, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive hearing loss is very common in the population but we still know little about the underlying pathology. A new spontaneous mouse mutation (stonedeaf, stdf ) leading to recessive, early-onset progressive hearing loss was detected and exome sequencing revealed a Thr289Arg substitution in Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 (S1pr2). Mutants aged 2 weeks had normal hearing sensitivity, but at 4 weeks most showed variable degrees of hearing impairment, which became severe or profound in all mutants by 14 weeks. Endocochlear potential (EP) was normal at 2 weeks old but was reduced by 4 and 8 weeks old in mutants, and the stria vascularis, which generates the EP, showed degenerative changes. Three independent mouse knockout alleles of S1pr2 have been described previously, but this is the first time that a reduced EP has been reported. Genomic markers close to the human S1PR2 gene were significantly associated with auditory thresholds in the 1958 British Birth Cohort (n = 6099), suggesting involvement of S1P signalling in human hearing loss. The finding of early onset loss of EP gives new mechanistic insight into the disease process and suggests that therapies for humans with hearing loss due to S1P signalling defects need to target strial function. PMID:27383011

  6. A study of the electrochemistry and osmotic relationships of the cochlear fluids in the neonatal rat at the time of the development of the endocochlear potential

    PubMed Central

    Bosher, S. K.; Warren, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    1. Changes in the endocochlear potential between the 8th and 18th days after birth were investigated in the rat. Initially the potential was low but its magnitude increased rapidly between the 11th and 16th day. During the 13th and 14th days the rate of increase was approximately 1 mV/hr. 2. The rapid potential increase arose virtually simultaneously in all three turns of the cochlea. 3. Histological examination revealed the cochlea, including the hair cells of Corti's organ and the stria vascularis, to be fully mature before the period of rapid change in the endocochlear potential, apart from the cells of Claudius, whose final development coincided with the latter part of this phase. 4. The endolymphatic sodium concentration (average 1·0 m-equiv/l.) had attained the very low adult level in the earliest period studied. The potassium and chloride concentrations were slightly below the normal adult levels, the result of some degree of general hypo-osmolality present at this time. 5. The endolymphatic ionic concentrations remained unchanged during the phase of rapid increase in the endocochlear potential. 6. The findings thus indicate that the distinctive endolymphatic ionic composition and the endocochlear potential arise largely independently and in succession during cochlear maturation. 7. No differences in osmotic pressure were demonstrated between endolymph, perilymph and serum. The problems concerning the homoeostasis of the inner ear fluids do not consequently seem to be complicated by unusual hydrodynamic aspects. 8. Alterations in body fluid osmolality, produced by intraperitoneal injection of water or hypertonic glycerol, were accompanied by simultaneous changes in the osmotic pressures of the inner ear fluids. Some portion of the membranes bounding the endolymphatic space is therefore considered to be freely permeable to water. 9. The investigations provide no further information about the nature of the endocochlear potential, although an increase in the

  7. Endolymphatic perfusion with EGTA-acetoxymethyl ester inhibits asphyxia- and furosemide-induced decrease in endocochlear potential in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Mineharu, Akihito; Mori, Yoshiaki; Nimura, Yoshitsugu; Takamaki, Atsuko; Araki, Michitoshi; Yamaji, Junko; Yoshida, Ryotaro; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Kubota, Takahiro

    2005-02-01

    We examined the effect of the Ca(2+) concentration in the endolymph ([Ca](e)) or in the endolymphatic surface cells ([Ca](i)) on the endocochlear potential (EP) by using an endolymphatic or perilymphatic perfusion technique, respectively. (i) A large increase in [Ca](e) up to approximately 10(-3) M with a fall in the EP was induced by transient asphyxia ( approximately 2 min) or by the intravenous administration of furosemide (60 mg/kg), and a significant correlation was obtained between the EP and p[Ca](e) (= -log [Ca](e), r = 0.998). (ii) Perfusion of the endolymph with 10 mM EGTA for 5 min neither produced any significant change in the EP nor altered the asphyxia-induced change in EP (DeltaEP(asp)), suggesting that neither [Ca](e) nor the Ca(2+) concentration gradient across the stria vascularis contributed directly to the generation of the EP in the condition of low [Ca](e). In contrast, endolymphatic perfusion with high Ca(2+) (more than 10 mM) produced a decrease in EP and a significant correlation was obtained between the EP and the Ca(2+) concentration of perfusion solution (r = 0.982), suggesting that Ca(2+) permeability may exist across the stria vascularis. (iii) The administration of a Ca(2+) chelator, EGTA-acetoxymethyl ester (AM, 0.3 mM), to the endolymph, which produced a gradual increase in EP, suppressed significantly, by 60-80%, DeltaEP(asp) or furosemide-induced changes in EP. In contrast, perilymphatic administration of 0.5 mM EGTA-AM caused no significant suppression of the DeltaEP(asp). These findings suggest that [Ca](i) plays an important role in generating/maintaining a large positive EP.

  8. QTL Mapping of Endocochlear Potential Differences between C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kiener, Anna L; Gagnon, Patricia M

    2016-06-01

    We reported earlier that the endocochlear potential (EP) differs between C57BL/6J (B6) and BALB/cJ (BALB) mice, being lower in BALBs by about 10 mV (Ohlemiller et al. Hear Res 220: 10-26, 2006). This difference corresponds to strain differences with respect to the density of marginal cells in cochlear stria vascularis. After about 1 year of age, BALB mice also tend toward EP reduction that correlates with further marginal cell loss. We therefore suggested that early sub-clinical features of the BALB stria vascularis may predispose these mice to a condition modeling Schuknecht's strial presbycusis. We further reported (Ohlemiller et al. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 12: 45-58, 2011) that the acute effects of a 2-h 110 dB SPL noise exposure differ between B6 and BALB mice, such that the EP remains unchanged in B6 mice, but is reduced by 40-50 mV in BALBs. In about 25 % of BALBs, the EP does not completely recover, so that permanent EP reduction may contribute to noise-induced permanent threshold shifts in BALBs. To identify genes and alleles that may promote natural EP variation as well as noise-related EP reduction in BALB mice, we have mapped related quantitative trait loci (QTLs) using 12 recombinant inbred (RI) strains formed from B6 and BALB (CxB1-CxB12). EP and strial marginal cell density were measured in B6 mice, BALB mice, their F1 hybrids, and RI mice without noise exposure, and 1-3 h after broadband noise (4-45 kHz, 110 dB SPL, 2 h). For unexposed mice, the strain distribution patterns for EP and marginal cell density were used to generate preliminary QTL maps for both EP and marginal cell density. Six QTL regions were at least statistically suggestive, including a significant QTL for marginal cell density on chromosome 12 that overlapped a weak QTL for EP variation. This region, termed Maced (Marginal cell density QTL) supports the notion of marginal cell density as a genetically influenced contributor to natural EP variation. Candidate genes for Maced

  9. Different Cellular and Genetic Basis of Noise-Related Endocochlear Potential Reduction in CBA/J and BALB/cJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Allyson D.; Rellinger, Erin A.; Montgomery, Scott C.; Gagnon, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    The acute and permanent effects of noise exposure on the endocochlear potential (EP) and cochlear lateral wall were evaluated in BALB/cJ (BALB) inbred mice, and compared with CBA/J (CBA) and C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Two-hour exposure to broadband noise (4–45 kHz) at 110 dB SPL leads to a ~50 mV reduction in the EP in BALB and CBA, but not B6. EP reduction in BALB and CBA is reliably associated with characteristic acute cellular pathology in stria vascularis and spiral ligament. By 8 weeks after exposure, the EP in CBA mice has returned to normal. In BALBs, however, the EP remains depressed by an average ~10 mV, so that permanent EP reduction contributes to permanent threshold shifts in these mice. We recently showed that the CBA noise phenotype in part reflects the influence of a large effect quantitative trait locus on Chr. 18, termed Nirep (Ohlemiller et al., Hear Res 260:47–53, 2010b). While CBA “EP susceptibility” alleles are dominant to those in B6, examination of (B6 × BALB) F1 hybrid mice and (F1 × BALB) N2 backcross mice revealed that noise-related EP reduction and associated cell pathology in BALBs are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and are dependent on multiple genes. Moreover, while N2 mice formed from B6 and CBA retain strong correspondence between acute EP reduction, ligament pathology, and strial pathology, N2s formed from B6 and BALB include subsets that dissociate pathology of ligament and stria. We conclude that the genes and cascades that govern the very similar EP susceptibility phenotypes in BALB and CBA mice need not be the same. BALBs appear to carry alleles that promote more pronounced long term effects of noise on the lateral wall. Separate loci in BALBs may preferentially impact stria versus ligament. PMID:20922451

  10. Compromised potassium recycling in the cochlea contributes to conservation of endocochlear potential in a mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Huang, Qiuhong; Pang, Jiaqi; Zheng, Xuqing; Chen, Lian; Yu, Rongjun; Zheng, Yiqing

    2013-10-25

    The C57BL/6 strain is considered an excellent model to study age-related hearing loss (AHL). Aging C57BL/6 mice are characterized by profound hearing loss but conservation of the endocochlear potential (EP). Here we show 12-month-old C57BL/6 mice display a notable hearing loss at 4, 8, 16 and 32kHz while the EP is maintained at normal level. Morphological examination shows significant outer hair cells loss in the cochlear basal turn and atrophy of the stria vascularis (SV). Fluorescence immunohistochemical studies reveal that potassium channel KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 expression dramatically decreased in the SV. Concomitant with this, mRNA levels of KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 are also reduced. In addition, three other potassium transporters, including α1-Na,K-ATPase, α2-Na,K-ATPase and NKCC1, reduce their expression at mRNA levels as well. These observations suggest that conservation of the EP in aging C57BL/6 mice is attributable to the SV generating a new balance for potassium influx and efflux at a relatively lower level.

  11. Deafness induced by Connexin 26 (GJB2) deficiency is not determined by endocochlear potential (EP) reduction but is associated with cochlear developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2014-05-23

    Connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are the major cause of hereditary deafness and are responsible for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mouse models show that Cx26 deficiency can cause congenital deafness with cochlear developmental disorders, hair cell degeneration, and the reduction of endocochlear potential (EP) and active cochlear amplification. However, the underlying deafness mechanism still remains undetermined. Our previous studies revealed that hair cell degeneration is not a primary cause of hearing loss. In this study we investigated the role of EP reduction in Cx26 deficiency-induced deafness. We found that the EP reduction is not associated with congenital deafness in Cx26 knockout (KO) mice. The threshold of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in Cx26 KO mice was even greater than 110 dB SPL, demonstrating complete hearing loss. However, the EP in Cx26 KO mice varied and not completely abolished. In some cases, the EP could still remain at higher levels (>70 mV). We further found that the deafness in Cx26 KO mice is associated with cochlear developmental disorders. Deletion of Cx26 in the cochlea before postnatal day 5 (P5) could cause congenital deafness. The cochlea had developmental disorders and the cochlear tunnel was not open. However, no congenital deafness was found when Cx26 was deleted after P5. The cochlea also displayed normal development and the cochlear tunnel was open normally. These data suggest that congenital deafness induced by Cx26 deficiency is not determined by EP reduction and may result from cochlear developmental disorders.

  12. A deafness mechanism of digenic Cx26 (GJB2) and Cx30 (GJB6) mutations: Reduction of endocochlear potential by impairment of heterogeneous gap junctional function in the cochlear lateral wall.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ling; Chen, Jin; Zong, Liang; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Jones, Raleigh O; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2017-08-17

    Digenic Connexin26 (Cx26, GJB2) and Cx30 (GJB6) heterozygous mutations are the second most frequent cause of recessive deafness in humans. However, the underlying deafness mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we created different double Cx26 and Cx30 heterozygous (Cx26(+/-)/Cx30(+/-)) mouse models to investigate the underlying pathological changes and deafness mechanism. We found that double Cx26(+/-)/Cx30(+/-) heterozygous mice had hearing loss. Endocochlear potential (EP), which is a driving force for hair cells producing auditory receptor current, was reduced. However, unlike Cx26 homozygous knockout (Cx26(-/-)) mice, the cochlea in Cx26(+/-)/Cx30(+/-) mice displayed normal development and had no apparent hair cell degeneration. Gap junctions (GJs) in the cochlea form two independent networks: the epithelial cell GJ network in the organ of Corti and the connective tissue GJ network in the cochlear lateral wall. We further found that double heterozygous deletion of Cx26 and Cx30 in the epithelial cells did not reduce EP and had normal hearing, suggesting that Cx26(+/-)/Cx30(+/-) may mainly impair gap junctional functions in the cochlear lateral wall and lead to EP reduction and hearing loss. Most of Cx26 and Cx30 in the cochlear lateral wall co-expressed in the same gap junctional plaques. Moreover, sole Cx26(+/-) or Cx30(+/-) heterozygous mice had no hearing loss. These data further suggest that digenic Cx26 and Cx30 mutations may impair heterozygous coupling of Cx26 and Cx30 in the cochlear lateral wall to reduce EP, thereby leading to hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  14. Bohr Hamiltonian with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, L.; Hassanabadi, H.; Sobhani, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, Bohr Hamiltonian has been studied with the time-dependent potential. Using the Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method appropriate dynamical invariant for this Hamiltonian has been constructed and the exact time-dependent wave functions of such a system have been derived due to this dynamical invariant.

  15. Action potential properties are gravity dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Klaus; Hanke, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    The functional properties of neuronal tissue critically depend on cellular composition and intercellular comunication. A basic principle of such communication found in various types of neurons is the generation of action potentials (APs). These APs depend on the presence of voltage gated ion channels and propagate along cellular processes (e.g. axons) towards target neurons or other cells. It has already been shown that the properties of ion channels depend on gravity. To discover whether the properties of APs also depend on gravity, we examined the propagation of APs in earthworms (invertebrates) and isolated nerve fibres (i.e. bundles of axons) from earthworms under conditions of micro- and macro-gravity. In a second set of experiments we could verify our results on rat axons (vertebrates). Our experiments carried out during two parabolic flight campaigns revealed that microgravity slows AP propagation velocity and macrogravity accelerates the transmission of action potentials. The relevance for live-science related questions is considerable, taking into account that altered gravity conditions might affect AP velocity in man during space flight missions.

  16. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Zeta potential orientation dependence of sapphire substrates.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Ryan J; Bullard, Joseph W; Cima, Michael J

    2004-05-11

    The zeta potential of planar sapphire substrates for three different crystallographic orientations was measured by a streaming potential technique in the presence of KCl and (CH3)4NCl electrolytes. The streaming potential was measured for large single crystalline C-plane (0001), A-plane (1120), and R-plane (1102) wafers over a full pH range at three or more ionic strengths ranging from 1 to 100 mM. The roughness of the epi-polished wafers was verified using atomic force microscopy to be on the order of atomic scale, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to ensure that the samples were free of silica and other contaminants. The results reveal a shift in the isoelectric point (iep) of the three samples by as much as two pH units, with the R-plane surface exhibiting the most acidic behavior and the C-plane samples having the highest iep. The iep at all ionic strengths was tightly centered around a single pH for each wafer. These values of iep are substantially different from the range of pH 8-10 consistently reported in the literature for alpha-Al2O3 particles. Particle zeta potential measurements were performed on a model powder using phase analysis light scattering, and the iep was confirmed to occur at pH 8. Modified Auger parameters (MAP) were calculated from XPS spectra of a monolayer of iridium metal deposited on the sapphire by electron beam deposition. A shift in MAP consistent with the observed differences in iep of the surfaces confirms the effect of surface structure on the transfer of charge between the Ir and sapphire, hence accounting for the changes in acidity as a function of crystallographic orientation.

  18. Estimated erosive potential depends on exposure time.

    PubMed

    Jager, D H J; Vieira, A M; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2012-12-01

    Evaluate erosive potential of beverages, using exposure times from 3 to 30 min, and to analyse the relationship between erosion and several drink parameters. pH, calcium, phosphate and fluoride concentration, saturation, titratable-acidity to pH 5.5 and the viscosity of sixteen beverages were measured or calculated. Enamel samples (N = 90) were serially exposed to 1 ml of the beverages for 3, 6, 9, 15 and 30 min and erosion was measured as the loss of calcium to the beverage. Rate of erosion per min was calculated by linear curve fitting using all exposure times. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation between erosion and the drink parameters. A limited multivariate analysis was performed for the outcome parameter with the highest univariate correlations (erosion per minute) and 4 drink variables. A negative relationship was observed only for pH for all exposure times. Only for erosion per min a significant relationship with pH and saturation was found. In a model for erosion per min using only saturation, fluoride concentration, titratable acidity and viscosity, both saturation and viscosity were shown to have a significant effect (p = 0.01 and p = 0.05, respectively). Exposure times between 3 and 30 min result in very different estimates of erosive potential. There is no sound theoretical ground for preferring one or other exposure time/outcome as being more clinically relevant. This study shows that effect of the choice of study methodology on the measurement of erosive potential of beverages is large. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dentin Biomodification Potential Depends on Polyphenol Source

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, T.R.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Phansalkar, R.S.; Todorova, I.; Napolitano, J.G.; McAlpine, J.B.; Chen, S.N.; Pauli, G.F.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the extracts was determined (as gallic acid equivalents) using Folin-Ciocalteau assays. Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity, mass change, and resistance to enzymatic biodegradation. Extracts with a high polyphenol and PAC content from Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao, Camellia sinensis, and Pinus massoniana induced a significant increase in modulus of elasticity and mass. The UHPLC analysis showed the presence of multiple types of polyphenols, ranging from simple phenolic acids to oligomeric PACs and highly condensed tannins. Protective effect against enzymatic degradation was observed for all experimental groups; however, statistically significant differences were observed between plant extracts. The findings provide clear evidence that the dentin bioactivities of PACs are source dependent, resulting from a combination of concentration and specific chemical constitution of the complex PAC mixtures. PMID:24574140

  20. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Peng, Qing; Carter, Emily A

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na4 cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na4 cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  1. Separable representation of energy-dependent optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.

  2. Temperature dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.

  3. Dependence of polar cap potential drop on interplanetary parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Spiro, R. W.; Hill, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    The convection potential drop across the polar cap is computed from data obtained on high-inclination low-altitude satellites. Potential measurements are correlated with various combinations of parameters measured simultaneously in the upstream solar wind. Most of the potential drop is successfully predicted by merging theory, although a significant background potential drop of 35 kV does not depend on IMF parameters and is attributed to a process other than merging. Results indicate that small values of the IMF are amplified by a factor of 5-10 at the dayside magnetopause, which, when taken into account, improves correlations between IMF parameters and polar cap potential drop. Potential drop is better correlated with IMF parameters than with geomagnetic indices, due to nonlinear response of the magnetosphere affecting geomagnetic activity indices.

  4. Orientation-dependent potential of mean force for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Bhimalapuram, Prabhakar; Bagchi, Biman

    2005-07-01

    We present a solvent-implicit minimalistic model potential among the amino acid residues of proteins, obtained by using the known native structures [deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB)]. In this model, the amino acid side chains are represented by a single ellipsoidal site, defined by the group of atoms about the center of mass of the side chain. These ellipsoidal sites interact with other sites through an orientation-dependent interaction potential which we construct in the following fashion. First, the site-site potential of mean force (PMF) between heavy atoms is calculated [following F. Melo and E. Feytsman, J. Mol. Biol. 267, 207 (1997)] from statistics of their distance separation obtained from crystal structures. These site-site potentials are then used to calculate the distance and the orientation-dependent potential between side chains of all the amino acid residues (AAR). The distance and orientation dependencies show several interesting results. For example, we find that the PMF between two hydrophobic AARs, such as phenylalanine, is strongly attractive at short distances (after the obvious repulsive region at very short separation) and is characterized by a deep minimum, for specific orientations. For the interaction between two hydrophilic AARs, such a deep minimum is absent and in addition, the potential interestingly reveals the combined effect of polar (charge) and hydrophobic interactions among some of these AARs. The effectiveness of our potential has been tested by calculating the Z-scores for a large set of proteins. The calculated Z-scores show high negative values for most of them, signifying the success of the potential to identify the native structure from among a large number of its decoy states.

  5. Targeting glutamate homeostasis for potential treatment of nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; AlSharari, Shakir D.; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated that impairment in glutamatergic neurotransmission is linked to drug dependence and drug-seeking behavior. Increased extracellular glutamate concentration in mesocorticolimbic regions has been observed in animals developing nicotine dependence. Changes in glutamate release might be associated with stimulatory effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) via nicotine exposure. We and others have shown increased extracellular glutamate concentration, which was associated with downregulation of the major glutamate transporter, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), in brain reward regions of animals exposed to drug abuse, including nicotine and ethanol. Importantly, studies from our laboratory and others showed that upregulation of GLT-1 expression in the mesocorticolimbic brain regions may have potential therapeutic effects in drug dependence. In this review article, we discussed the effect of antagonizing presynaptic nAChRs in glutamate release, the upregulatory effect in GLT-1 expression and the role of glutamate receptors antagonists in the treatment of nicotine dependence. PMID:26589642

  6. Saturation dependence of the streaming potential during drainage and imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, J.; Leinov, E.; Jackson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rock pore space in many subsurface settings is saturated with water and one or more immiscible fluid phases; examples include NAPLs in contaminated aquifers, supercritical CO2 during sequestration in deep saline aquifers, the vadose zone, and hydrocarbon reservoirs. To interpret spontaneous potential measurements for groundwater flow and hydraulic properties in these settings requires an understanding of the saturation dependence of the streaming potential. Vinogradov and Jackson [2011] recently reported measurements of the streaming potential during drainage and, for the first time, imbibition in sandstone plugs saturated with water and either undecane or nitrogen. However, they reported effective values of the streaming potential coupling coefficient (C) at partial saturation (Sw), because Sw in the plugs was not uniform during drainage or imbibition. The aim of this study is to determine the true value of C as a function of Sw. We use a three-step approach in which hydraulic and electrical parameters are determined using numerical simulation and either Nelder-Mead simplex unconstrained optimisation or Active-set constrained optimisation algorithm. In the first step, we determine the saturation dependence of the relative permeability and capillary pressure, assuming these are simple exponential functions of Sw (Corey-type) and using an objective function which is a weighted average of the measured (i) pressure drop across the plug, (ii) liquid rate flowing out of the plug, and (iii) fraction of water flowing out of the plug. In the second, we determine the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity, using the measured conductivity of the plug as the objective function. In the final step, we determine the saturation dependence of the streaming potential, using the measured streaming potential across the plug as the objective function. We obtain a good match between simulated and measured values of C, and find that it (i) exhibits hysteresis, (ii) can

  7. Reconstruction of a time-dependent potential from wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, Thies; Lechleiter, Armin

    2017-09-01

    We add a time-dependent potential to the inhomogeneous wave equation and consider the task of reconstructing this potential from measurements of the wave field. This dynamic inverse problem becomes more involved compared to static parameters, as, e.g. the dimensions of the parameter space do considerably increase. We give a specifically tailored existence and uniqueness result for the wave equation and compute the Fréchet derivative of the solution operator, for which also show the tangential cone condition. These results motivate the numerical reconstruction of the potential via successive linearization and regularized Newton-like methods. We present several numerical examples showing feasibility, reconstruction quality, and time efficiency of the resulting algorithm.

  8. Physical dependence potential of daily tramadol dosing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Bigelow, George E.; Strain, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Tramadol is an atypical, mixed-mechanism analgesic involving both opioid and catecholamine processes that appears to have low abuse potential and may be useful as a treatment for opioid dependence. Objectives The current study assessed the level of physical dependence and opioid blockade efficacy produced by daily maintenance on oral tramadol. Methods Nine residential opioid-dependent adults were maintained on two doses of daily oral tramadol (200 and 800 mg) for approximately 4-week intervals in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. The acute effects of intramuscular placebo, naloxone (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg), and hydromorphone (1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 mg) were tested under double-blind, randomized conditions. Outcomes included observer- and subject-rated measures and physiologic indices. Results Challenge doses of naloxone resulted in significantly higher mean peak withdrawal scores compared to placebo. Withdrawal intensity from naloxone was generally greater during 800 versus 200 mg/day tramadol maintenance. Mean peak ratings of agonist effects were elevated at higher hydromorphone challenge doses, but did not differ significantly between tramadol doses. Physiologic measures were generally affected by challenge conditions in a dose-dependent manner, with few differences between tramadol maintenance dose conditions. Conclusions Chronic tramadol administration produces dose-related opioid physical dependence, without producing dose-related attenuation of agonist challenge effects. Tramadol may be a useful treatment for patients with low levels of opioid dependence or as a treatment for withdrawal during opioid detoxification, but does not appear to be effective as a maintenance medication due to a lack of opioid cross-tolerance. PMID:20589494

  9. Temperature dependence of action potential parameters in Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Nam Gyu; Hyun, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Kyungmin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-01-01

    Although the effects of temperature changes on the activity of neurons have been studied in Aplysia, the reproducibility of the temperature dependence of the action potential (AP) parameters has not been verified. To this end, we performed experiments using Aplysia neurons. Fourteen AP parameters were analyzed using the long-term data series recorded during the experiments. Our analysis showed that nine of the AP parameters decreased as the temperature increased: the AP amplitude (A(AP)), membrane potential at the positive peak (V(pp)), interspike interval, first half (Δt(r1)) and last half (Δt(r2)) of the temperature rising phase, first half (Δt(f1)) and last half (Δt(f2)) of the temperature falling phase, AP (Δt(AP, 1/2)), and differentiated signal (Δt(DS, 1/2)) half-width durations. Five of the AP parameters increased with temperature: the differentiated signal amplitude (A(DS)), absolute value of the membrane potential at negative peak (|V(np)|), absolute value of the maximum slope of the AP during the temperature rising (|-MSR|) and falling (|MSF|) phases, and spiking frequency (Frequency). This work could provide the basis for a better understanding of the elementary processes underlying the temperature-dependent neuronal activity in Aplysia.

  10. Spin- and velocity-dependent nonrelativistic potentials in modified electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, G. P.; Malta, P. C.; Ospedal, L. P. R.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interparticle potential between spin-0, spin-1 /2 , and spin-1 sources interacting in modified electrodynamics in the nonrelativistic regime. By keeping terms of O (|p |2/m2) in the amplitudes, we obtain spin- and velocity-dependent interaction energies. We find well-known effects such as spin-orbit couplings, as well as spin-spin (dipole-dipole) interactions. For concreteness, we consider the cases of electrodynamics with higher derivatives (Podolsky-Lee-Wick) and hidden photons.

  11. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  12. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  13. Mapping potential groundwater-dependent ecosystems for sustainable management.

    PubMed

    Gou, Si; Gonzales, Susana; Miller, Gretchen R

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems which rely on either the surface expression or subsurface presence of groundwater are known as groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs). A comprehensive inventory of GDE locations at an appropriate management scale is a necessary first-step for sustainable management of supporting aquifers; however, this information is unavailable for most areas of concern. To address this gap, this study created a two-step algorithm which analyzed existing geospatial and remote sensing data to identify potential GDEs at both state/province and aquifer/basin scales. At the state/province scale, a geospatial information system (GIS) database was constructed for Texas, including climate, topography, hydrology, and ecology data. From these data, a GDE index was calculated, which combined vegetative and hydrological indicators. The results indicated that central Texas, particularly the Edwards Aquifer region, had highest potential to host GDEs. Next, an aquifer/basin scale remote sensing-based algorithm was created to provide more detailed maps of GDEs in the Edwards Aquifer region. This algorithm used Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images to track the changes of NDVI for each vegetation pixel. The NDVI dynamics were used to identify the vegetation with high potential to use groundwater--such plants remain high NDVI during extended dry periods and also exhibit low seasonal and inter-annual NDVI changes between dry and wet seasons/years. The results indicated that 8% of natural vegetation was very likely using groundwater. Of the potential GDEs identified, 75% were located on shallow soil averaging 45 cm in depth. The dominant GDE species were live oak, ashe juniper, and mesquite.

  14. Dynamics of Interacting Fermions in Spin-Dependent Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Andrew P.; Wall, Michael L.; Mundinger, Josh; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments with dilute trapped Fermi gases observed that weak interactions can drastically modify spin transport dynamics and give rise to robust collective effects including global demagnetization, macroscopic spin waves, spin segregation, and spin self-rephasing. In this Letter, we develop a framework for studying the dynamics of weakly interacting fermionic gases following a spin-dependent change of the trapping potential which illuminates the interplay between spin, motion, Fermi statistics, and interactions. The key idea is the projection of the state of the system onto a set of lattice spin models defined on the single-particle mode space. Collective phenomena, including the global spreading of quantum correlations in real space, arise as a consequence of the long-ranged character of the spin model couplings. This approach achieves good agreement with prior measurements and suggests a number of directions for future experiments.

  15. Dynamics of Interacting Fermions in Spin-Dependent Potentials.

    PubMed

    Koller, Andrew P; Wall, Michael L; Mundinger, Josh; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-11-04

    Recent experiments with dilute trapped Fermi gases observed that weak interactions can drastically modify spin transport dynamics and give rise to robust collective effects including global demagnetization, macroscopic spin waves, spin segregation, and spin self-rephasing. In this Letter, we develop a framework for studying the dynamics of weakly interacting fermionic gases following a spin-dependent change of the trapping potential which illuminates the interplay between spin, motion, Fermi statistics, and interactions. The key idea is the projection of the state of the system onto a set of lattice spin models defined on the single-particle mode space. Collective phenomena, including the global spreading of quantum correlations in real space, arise as a consequence of the long-ranged character of the spin model couplings. This approach achieves good agreement with prior measurements and suggests a number of directions for future experiments.

  16. Menthol's potential effects on nicotine dependence: a tobacco industry perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine what the tobacco industry knows about the potential effects menthol may have on nicotine dependence. Methods A snowball strategy was used to systematically search the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library (http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/) between 22 February and 29 April, 2010. Of the approximately 11 million documents available in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library, the iterative searches returned tens of thousands of results. We qualitatively analysed a final collection of 309 documents relevant the effects of menthol on nicotine dependence. Results The tobacco industry knows that menthol overrides the harsh taste of tobacco and alleviates nicotine's irritating effects, synergistically interacts with nicotine, stimulates the trigeminal nerve to elicit a ‘liking’ response for a tobacco product, and makes low tar, low nicotine tobacco products more acceptable to smokers than non-mentholated low delivery products. Conclusion Menthol is not only used in cigarettes as a flavour additive; tobacco companies know that menthol also has sensory effects and interacts with nicotine to produce tobacco products that are easier to smoke, thereby making it easier to expose smokers, especially those who are new and uninitiated, to the addictive power of nicotine. PMID:21504929

  17. Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Prokin, Ilya; Xu, Hao; Delord, Bruno; Genet, Stephane; Venance, Laurent; Berry, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a cardinal cellular mechanism for learning and memory. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as a pivotal pathway for synaptic plasticity because of its widely characterized ability to depress synaptic transmission on short- and long-term scales. Recent reports indicate that eCBs also mediate potentiation of the synapse. However, it is not known how eCB signaling may support bidirectionality. Here, we combined electrophysiology experiments with mathematical modeling to question the mechanisms of eCB bidirectionality in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses. We demonstrate that STDP outcome is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Moreover, we show that eCB-tLTD requires active calcineurin whereas eCB-tLTP necessitates the activity of presynaptic PKA. Therefore, just like glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system to encode learning and memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13185.001 PMID:26920222

  18. Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yihui; Prokin, Ilya; Xu, Hao; Delord, Bruno; Genet, Stephane; Venance, Laurent; Berry, Hugues

    2016-02-27

    Synaptic plasticity is a cardinal cellular mechanism for learning and memory. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as a pivotal pathway for synaptic plasticity because of its widely characterized ability to depress synaptic transmission on short- and long-term scales. Recent reports indicate that eCBs also mediate potentiation of the synapse. However, it is not known how eCB signaling may support bidirectionality. Here, we combined electrophysiology experiments with mathematical modeling to question the mechanisms of eCB bidirectionality in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses. We demonstrate that STDP outcome is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Moreover, we show that eCB-tLTD requires active calcineurin whereas eCB-tLTP necessitates the activity of presynaptic PKA. Therefore, just like glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system to encode learning and memory.

  19. Stimulus dependence of local field potential spectra: experiment versus theory.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Francesca; Mazzoni, Alberto; Logothetis, Nikos K; Panzeri, Stefano; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-10-29

    The local field potential (LFP) captures different neural processes, including integrative synaptic dynamics that cannot be observed by measuring only the spiking activity of small populations. Therefore, investigating how LFP power is modulated by external stimuli can offer important insights into sensory neural representations. However, gaining such insight requires developing data-driven computational models that can identify and disambiguate the neural contributions to the LFP. Here, we investigated how networks of excitatory and inhibitory integrate-and-fire neurons responding to time-dependent inputs can be used to interpret sensory modulations of LFP spectra. We computed analytically from such models the LFP spectra and the information that they convey about input and used these analytical expressions to fit the model to LFPs recorded in V1 of anesthetized macaques (Macaca mulatta) during the presentation of color movies. Our expressions explain 60%-98% of the variance of the LFP spectrum shape and its dependency upon movie scenes and we achieved this with realistic values for the best-fit parameters. In particular, synaptic best-fit parameters were compatible with experimental measurements and the predictions of firing rates, based only on the fit of LFP data, correlated with the multiunit spike rate recorded from the same location. Moreover, the parameters characterizing the input to the network across different movie scenes correlated with cross-scene changes of several image features. Our findings suggest that analytical descriptions of spiking neuron networks may become a crucial tool for the interpretation of field recordings. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414589-17$15.00/0.

  20. Attention-dependent sound offset-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Horváth, János

    2016-05-01

    When performing sensory tasks, knowing the potentially occurring goal-relevant and irrelevant stimulus events allows the establishment of selective attention sets, which result in enhanced sensory processing of goal-relevant events. In the auditory modality, such enhancements are reflected in the increased amplitude of the N1 ERP elicited by the onsets of task-relevant sounds. It has been recently suggested that ERPs to task-relevant sound offsets are similarly enhanced in a tone-focused state in comparison to a distracted one. The goal of the present study was to explore the influence of attention on ERPs elicited by sound offsets. ERPs elicited by tones in a duration-discrimination task were compared to ERPs elicited by the same tones in not-tone-focused attentional setting. Tone offsets elicited a consistent, attention-dependent biphasic (positive-negative--P1-N1) ERP waveform for tone durations ranging from 150 to 450 ms. The evidence, however, did not support the notion that the offset-related ERPs reflected an offset-specific attention set: The offset-related ERPs elicited in a duration-discrimination condition (in which offsets were task relevant) did not significantly differ from those elicited in a pitch-discrimination condition (in which the offsets were task irrelevant). Although an N2 reflecting the processing of offsets in task-related terms contributed to the observed waveform, this contribution was separable from the offset-related P1 and N1. The results demonstrate that when tones are attended, offset-related ERPs may substantially overlap endogenous ERP activity in the postoffset interval irrespective of tone duration, and attention differences may cause ERP differences in such postoffset intervals.

  1. Donnan potentials from striated muscle liquid crystals. Lattice spacing dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Aldoroty, R A; Garty, N B; April, E W

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical potentials were measured as a function of myofilament packing density in crayfish striated muscle. The A-band striations are supramolecular smectic B1 lattice assemblies of myosin filaments and the I-band striations are nematic liquid crystals of actin filaments. Both A- and I-bands generate potentials derived from the fixed charge that is associated with structural proteins. In the reported experiments, filament packing density was varied by osmotically reducing lattice volume. The electrochemical potentials were measured from the A- and I-bands in the relaxed condition over a range of lattice volumes. From the measurements of relative cross-sectional area, unit-cell volume (obtained by low-angle x-ray diffraction) and previously determined effective linear charge densities (Aldoroty, R.A., N.B. Garty, and E.W. April, 1985, Biophys. J., 47:89-96), Donnan potentials can be predicted for any amount of compression. In the relaxed condition, the predicted Donnan potentials correspond to the measured electrochemical potentials. In the rigor condition, however, a net increase in negative charge associated with the myosin filament is observed. The predictability of the data demonstrates the applicability of Donnan equilibrium theory to the measurement of electrochemical potentials from liquid-crystalline systems. Moreover, the relationship between filament spacing and the Donnan potential is consistent with the concept that surface charge provides the necessary electrostatic force to stabilize the myofilament lattice. PMID:3567311

  2. Colour dependence of the early receptor potential and late receptor potential in scallop distal photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1983-07-01

    metarhodopsin to rhodopsin; however, its decay was always complete in 5 min or less.9. The photo-isomerization of metarhodopsin by red light suppressed the p.h.a. and caused an after-depolarizing response that decayed in less than 1 min.10. The spectral sensitivity curve for the induction of the p.h.a. was maximum at 500 nm and corresponded to the spectral sensitivity for the negative e.r.p. and for the l.r.p. studied in the dark-adapted retina, whereas the spectral sensitivity curve for the suppression of the p.h.a. and for the induction of the after-depolarization was maximum at 575 nm and corresponded to the spectral sensitivity for the positive e.r.p.11. In photoreceptors clamped to the resting potential in normal ASW, the photo-isomerization of rhodopsin, in the absence of light absorption by metarhodopsin, activated a persistent outward current that had the same time course of decay as the p.h.a. The photo-isomerization of metarhodopsin suppressed the persistent outward current and activated an inward current whose decay took longer than the decay of the after-depolarizing response.12. In the absence of external Ca(2+) and Na(+) ions, the persistent outward current produced by light absorption by rhodopsin, and the inward current produced by light absorption by metarhodopsin, both reversed at the K(+) equilibrium potential. The results show that the induction of the prolonged hyperpolarizing after-potential and the after-depolarizing response involve only the movement of K(+) ions through the same light-dependent K(+) channels that determine the hyperpolarizing l.r.p. of the distal cells.

  3. HEART ACTION POTENTIAL: DEPENDENCE ON EXTERNAL CALCIUM AND SODIUM IONS.

    PubMed

    ORKAND, R K; NIEDERGERKE, R

    1964-11-27

    The height of the overshoot of the action potential recorded from frog ventricles is markedly less sensitive to lowering the external sodium concentration than predicted by the sodium-hypothesis of excitation, and it is surprisingly sensitive to changes in the external calcium concentration. These observations are explained by a mechanism in which there is competition between sodium and calcium ions, in the excitable membrane, for anionic sites which control the inward current of sodium ions at the crest of the action potential.

  4. Pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Vanmolkot, Floris H; Roodt, Jos Op 't; Hermeling, Evelien; Delhaas, Tammo; Kroon, Abraham A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness measures such as pulse wave velocity (PWV) have a known dependence on actual blood pressure, requiring consideration in cardiovascular risk assessment and management. Given the impact of ageing on arterial wall structure, the pressure-dependence of PWV may vary with age. Using a noninvasive model-based approach, combining carotid artery echo-tracking and tonometry waveforms, we obtained pressure-area curves in 23 hypertensive patients at baseline and after 3 months of antihypertensive treatment. We predicted the follow-up PWV decrease using modelled baseline curves and follow-up pressures. In addition, on the basis of these curves, we estimated PWV values for two age groups (mean ages 41 and 64 years) at predefined hypertensive (160/90 mmHg) and normotensive (120/80 mmHg) pressure ranges. Follow-up measurements showed a near 1 m/s decrease in carotid PWV when compared with baseline, which fully agreed with our model-prediction given the roughly 10 mmHg decrease in diastolic pressure. The stiffness-blood pressure-age pattern was in close agreement with corresponding data from the 'Reference Values for Arterial Stiffness' study, linking the physical and empirical bases of our findings. Our study demonstrates that the innate pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness may have implications for the clinical use of arterial stiffness measurements, both in risk assessment and in treatment monitoring of individual patients. We propose a number of clinically feasible approaches to account for the blood pressure effect on PWV measurements.

  5. Broken scale invariance in time-dependent trapping potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharashi, Seyed Ebrahim; Blume, D.

    2016-12-01

    The response of a cold atom gas with contact interactions to a smoothly varying external harmonic confinement in the nonadiabatic regime is studied. The time variation of the angular frequency is varied such that the system is, for vanishing or infinitely strong contact interactions, scale invariant. The time evolution of the system with broken scale invariance (i.e., the time evolution of the system with finite interaction strength) is contrasted with that for a scale invariant system, which exhibits Efimovian-like expansion dynamics that is characterized by log-periodic oscillations with unique period and amplitude. It is found that the breaking of the scale invariance by the finiteness of the interactions leads to a time dependence of the oscillation period and amplitude. It is argued, based on analytical considerations for atomic gases of arbitrary size and numerical results for two one-dimensional particles, that the oscillation period approaches that of the scale-invariant system at large times. The role of the time-dependent contact in the expansion dynamics is analyzed.

  6. Do Galactic Potential Wells Depend on Their Largescale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, H. J.; Lahav, O.

    1993-04-01

    We study the dependence of the intrinsic velocities of galaxies on their large-scale environment, using a cross-correlation technique that provides an objective way of defining the local overdensity of `trace' galaxies around `target' galaxies. We use galaxies in optical (CfA and SSRS) and IRAS redshift surveys as tracers of the density field, and about 1000 spiral galaxies with measured circular velocities and elliptical galaxies with measured velocity dispersion as `targets'. We find that the correlation function tends to increase with circular velocity, the trend being weak except in the case of cD-like elliptical galaxies with the highest velocity dispersions (σ >~ 300 km s^-1^), where the effect is strong, possibly due to morphological segregations in clusters of galaxies. A fit to the mean overdensity δ(r < r_p_) of the trace galaxies (in spheres of radius r_p_) around target galaxies as a function of the circular velocities V_c_ shows a weak increase of δ with v_c_, with slope {DELTA}δ(r<~3.6 h^-1^ Mpc)/{DELTA}V_c_ <~ 0.02. The observed weak correlation is contrasted with the strong dependence of the correlation functions of dark haloes on their circular velocities predicted in some (e.g. high-biasing cold dark matter) models for galaxy formation. In particular, our results are inconsistent with the prediction of the `natural' (high) biasing model at a high significance level. Comparison of our results with those of a simple biasing model suggests that either the observed circular velocities of galaxies are not simply related to the circular velocities of dark haloes, or most dark haloes were formed at high redshifts, or the galaxy distribution does not trace the matter distribution in a simple way.

  7. Potential-dependent dynamic fracture of nanoporous gold.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaofeng; Chen, Xiying; Badwe, Nilesh; Sieradzki, Karl

    2015-09-01

    When metallic alloys are exposed to a corrosive environment, porous nanoscale morphologies spontaneously form that can adversely affect the mechanical integrity of engineered structures. This form of stress-corrosion cracking is responsible for the well-known 'season cracking' of brass and stainless steel components in nuclear power generating stations. One explanation for this is that a high-speed crack is nucleated within the porous layer, which subsequently injects into non-porous parent-phase material. We study the static and dynamic fracture properties of free-standing monolithic nanoporous gold as a function electrochemical potential using high-speed photography and digital image correlation. The experiments reveal that at electrochemical potentials typical of porosity formation these structures are capable of supporting dislocation-mediated plastic fracture at crack velocities of 200 m s(-1). Our results identify the important role of high-speed fracture in stress-corrosion cracking and are directly applicable to the behaviour of monolithic dealloyed materials at present being considered for a variety of applications.

  8. Potential-dependent dynamic fracture of nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaofeng; Chen, Xiying; Badwe, Nilesh; Sieradzki, Karl

    2015-09-01

    When metallic alloys are exposed to a corrosive environment, porous nanoscale morphologies spontaneously form that can adversely affect the mechanical integrity of engineered structures. This form of stress-corrosion cracking is responsible for the well-known `season cracking’ of brass and stainless steel components in nuclear power generating stations. One explanation for this is that a high-speed crack is nucleated within the porous layer, which subsequently injects into non-porous parent-phase material. We study the static and dynamic fracture properties of free-standing monolithic nanoporous gold as a function electrochemical potential using high-speed photography and digital image correlation. The experiments reveal that at electrochemical potentials typical of porosity formation these structures are capable of supporting dislocation-mediated plastic fracture at crack velocities of 200 m s-1. Our results identify the important role of high-speed fracture in stress-corrosion cracking and are directly applicable to the behaviour of monolithic dealloyed materials at present being considered for a variety of applications.

  9. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  10. Angle-Dependent Ionization of Small Molecules by Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction and an Absorbing Potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-06-04

    The angle-dependence of strong field ionization of O2, N2, CO2, and CH2O has been studied theoretically using a time-dependent configuration interaction approach with a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). Calculation of the ionization yields as a function of the direction of polarization of the laser pulse produces three-dimensional surfaces of the angle-dependent ionization probability. These three-dimensional shapes and their variation with laser intensity can be interpreted in terms of ionization from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lower lying orbitals, and the Dyson orbitals for the ground and excited states of the cations.

  11. Differential effects of K(+) channel blockers on frequency-dependent action potential broadening in supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hlubek, M D; Cobbett, P

    2000-09-15

    Recordings were made from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the supraoptic nucleus of the adult guinea pig to determine the role of voltage gated K(+) channels in controlling the duration of action potentials and in mediating frequency-dependent action potential broadening exhibited by these neurons. The K(+) channel blockers charybdotoxin (ChTx), tetraethylammonium (TEA), and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased the duration of individual action potentials indicating that multiple types of K(+) channel are important in controlling action potential duration. The effect of these K(+) channel blockers was almost completely reversed by simultaneous blockade of voltage gated Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+). Frequency-dependent action potential broadening was exhibited by these neurons during trains of action potentials elicited by membrane depolarizing current pulses presented at 10 Hz but not at 1 Hz. 4-AP but not ChTx or TEA inhibited frequency-dependent action potential broadening indicating that frequency-dependent action potential broadening is dependent on increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels (which are blocked by 4-AP). A model of differential contributions of voltage gated K(+) channels and voltage gated Ca(2+) channels to frequency-dependent action potential broadening, in which an increase of Ca(2+) current during each successive action potential is permitted as a result of the increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels, is presented.

  12. Action potential broadening and frequency-dependent facilitation of calcium signals in pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M B; Konnerth, A; Augustine, G J

    1991-01-15

    Hormone release from nerve terminals in the neurohypophysis is a sensitive function of action potential frequency. We have investigated the cellular mechanisms responsible for this frequency-dependent facilitation by combining patch clamp and fluorimetric Ca2+ measurements in single neurosecretory terminals in thin slices of the rat posterior pituitary. In these terminals both action potential-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and action potential duration were enhanced by high-frequency stimuli, all with a frequency dependence similar to that of hormone release. Furthermore, brief voltage clamp pulses inactivated a K+ current with a very similar frequency dependence. These results support a model for frequency-dependent facilitation in which the inactivation of a K+ current broadens action potentials, leading to an enhancement of [Ca2+]i signals. Further experiments tested for a causal relationship between action potential broadening and facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. First, increasing the duration of depolarization, either by broadening action potentials with the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium or by applying longer depolarizing voltage clamp steps, increased [Ca2+]i changes. Second, eliminating frequency-dependent changes in duration, by voltage clamping the terminal with constant duration pulses, substantially reduced the frequency-dependent enhancement of [Ca2+]i changes. These results indicate that action potential broadening contributes to frequency-dependent facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. However, the small residual frequency dependence of [Ca2+]i changes seen with constant duration stimulation suggests that a second process, distinct from action potential broadening, also contributes to facilitation. These two frequency-dependent mechanisms may also contribute to activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic terminals.

  13. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hallermann, Stefan; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Stuart, Greg J; Kole, Maarten H P

    2012-06-03

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na(+) and K(+) ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na(+)/K(+) charge overlap as a measure of action potential energy efficiency, we found that action potential initiation in the axon initial segment (AIS) and forward propagation into the axon were energetically inefficient, depending on the resting membrane potential. In contrast, action potential backpropagation into dendrites was efficient. Computer simulations predicted that, although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier had the highest metabolic cost per membrane area, action potential backpropagation into the dendrites and forward propagation into axon collaterals dominated energy consumption in cortical pyramidal neurons. Finally, we found that the high metabolic cost of action potential initiation and propagation down the axon is a trade-off between energy minimization and maximization of the conduction reliability of high-frequency action potentials.

  14. Mass dependence of the real optical model potential for light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. K.; Ganguly, N. K.; Basu, D. N.

    1983-06-01

    The observed target mass dependence of the volume integral per interacting nucleon pair of the real optical model potential for deuterons, helium-3 and alpha particles is explained in terms of the density dependence of the effective projectile-nucleon interaction. A mass dependence function for light ions is derived, which for density dependent forces consists of a volume, a surface, a curvature, and a higher order correction term. For non-saturating forces, this has only the volume term and fails to account for the observed mass dependence.

  15. Na+ binding to the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter is potential dependent.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E; Kimmich, G A

    1992-02-01

    Activity of the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells was assayed by measuring sugar-induced currents (IAMG) using whole cell recording techniques. IAMG was compared among cells by standardizing the measured currents to cell size using cell capacitance measurements. IAMG at a given membrane potential was measured as a function of alpha-methylglucoside (AMG) concentration and can be fit to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. IAMG at varying Na+ concentrations can be described by the Hill equation with a Hill coefficient of 1.6 at all tested potentials. At high external Na+ levels (155 mM), Na+ is at least 90% saturating at all tested potentials. Maximal currents at a given membrane potential (Im) are calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation fit to data measuring IAMG vs. AMG concentration at a constant Na+ concentration. Im showed potential dependence under all conditions. Potential-dependent Na+ binding rate(s) cannot alone explain the observed potential dependence of Im under saturating Na+ conditions. Therefore, because Im is potential dependent, at least one step of the transport cycle other than external Na+ binding must be potential dependent. Im was also calculated from data taken at 40 mM external Na+. At all potentials studied, Im at 155 mM Na+ is greater than Im calculated at 40 mM Na+. This implies that the rate of external Na+ binding to the transporter at 40 mM also affects the maximal transport rate. Furthermore, Im at 40 mM external Na+ increases with hyperpolarization faster than Im at 155 mM Na+. Together, these facts indicate that the rate at which Na+ binds to the transporter is also potential dependent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Quantum models with energy-dependent potentials solvable in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel; Roy, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    We construct energy-dependent potentials for which the Schrödinger equations admit solutions in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials. Our method of construction is based on certain point transformations, applied to the equations of exceptional Hermite, Jacobi and Laguerre polynomials. We present several examples of boundary-value problems with energy-dependent potentials that admit a discrete spectrum and the corresponding normalizable solutions in closed form.

  17. Density dependence of microscopic nucleon optical potential in first order Brueckner theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliem, S. M.; Haider, W.

    2002-06-01

    In the present work we apply the lowest order Brueckner theory of infinite nuclear matter to obtain nucleon-nucleus optical potential for p-40Ca elastic scattering at 200 MeV using Urbana V14 soft core internucleon potential. We have investigated the effect of target density on the calculated nucleon-nucleus optical potential. We find that the calculated optical potentials depend quite sensitively on the density distribution of the target nucleus. The important feature is that the real part of calculated central optical potential for all densities shows a wine-bottle-bottom type behaviour at this energy. We also discuss the effect of our new radial dependent effective mass correction. Finally, we compare the prediction of our calculated nucleon optical potential using V14 with the prediction using older hard core Hamada-Johnston internucleon potential for p-40Ca elastic scattering at 200 MeV.

  18. Velocity-dependent optical potential for neutron elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabar, I. N.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The conventional optical model is quite successful in describing the nucleon elastic scattering data from medium and heavy nuclei. However, its success in describing the light 1 p -shell nuclei is somewhat limited. The velocity-dependent optical potential resulted in a significant improvement in describing the elastic angular distributions for light nuclei in the low energy region. Purpose: To extend the formalism of the velocity-dependent potential to higher energies, and to assess its importance in describing neutron elastic scattering data from light 1 p -shell nuclei at high energies. Method: We fit the angular distribution data for neutron elastic scattering from 12C and 16O using (i) the velocity-dependent optical potential and (ii) the conventional optical potential. The results of the two models are then compared. At low energies, we compare our angular distribution fits with the fits of other works that exist in the literature. Furthermore, the total integrated cross sections in addition to the analyzing power are calculated using the velocity-dependent optical potential and compared to the experimental data. Results: The velocity-dependent potential resulted in significant improvements in describing the angular distributions particularly in the large-angle scattering region and for certain energy ranges. This model is important where the experimental data show structural effects from nuclear surface deformations, which are important in light nuclei. Furthermore, the calculated total elastic cross sections and analyzing power are in good agreement with the experimental data. Conclusions: The velocity-dependent potential gives rise to surface-peaked real terms in the optical model. Such terms account, at least partly, for the structural effects seen in the angular distribution data. The energy range over which the surface terms are needed is found to depend on the target nucleus. Other works that have introduced real surface terms in the optical

  19. Forskolin induces NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation at a central synapse in the leech.

    PubMed

    Grey, Kathryn B; Burrell, Brian D

    2008-05-01

    In vertebrate hippocampal neurons, application of forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase activator) and rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) is an effective technique for inducing chemical long-term potentiation (cLTP) that is N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR)-dependent. However, it is not known whether forskolin induces a similar potentiation in invertebrate synapses. Therefore, we examined whether forskolin plus rolipram treatment could induce potentiation at a known glutamatergic synapse in the leech (Hirudo sp.), specifically between the pressure (P) mechanosensory and anterior pagoda (AP) neurons. Perfusion of isolated ganglia with forskolin (50 muM) in conjunction with rolipram (0.1 muM) in Mg(2+)-free saline significantly potentiated the P-to-AP excitatory postsynaptic potential. Application of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, 100 muM), a competitive NMDAR antagonist, blocked the potentiation, indicating P-to-AP potentiation is NMDAR-dependent. Potentiation was blocked by injection of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA, 1 mM) into the postsynaptic cell, but not by BAPTA injection into the presynaptic neuron, indicating a requirement for postsynaptic elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Application of db-cAMP mimicked the potentiating effects of forskolin, and Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, blocked forskolin-induced potentiation. Potentiation was also blocked by autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP), indicating a requirement for activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Finally, potentiation was blocked by botulinum toxin, suggesting that trafficking of glutamate receptors also plays a role in this form of synaptic plasticity. These experiments demonstrate that techniques used to induce cLTP in vertebrate synapses also induce NMDAR-dependent potentiation in the leech CNS and that many of the cellular processes that mediate LTP are conserved between vertebrate and invertebrate phyla.

  20. Isospectral Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potentials with Position Dependent Mass Generated by Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Cruz, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work a position dependent mass Hamiltonian with the same spectrum of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller one was constructed by means of the underlying potential algebra. The corresponding wave functions are determined by using the factorization method. A new family of isospectral potentials are constructed by applying a Darboux transformation. An example is presented in order to illustrate the formalism.

  1. Larger rate dependence of late sodium current in cardiac Purkinje cells: A potential link to arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yu, Ying; Hou, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Yan, Jian-Hua; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2017-03-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) have a steeper rate dependence of repolarization and are more susceptible to arrhythmic activity than do ventricular myocytes (VMs). Late sodium current (INaL) is rate dependent and contributes to rate dependence of repolarization. This study sought to test our hypothesis that PCs have a larger rate dependence of INaL, contributing to their steeper rate dependence of repolarization and higher susceptibility to arrhythmic activity, than do VMs. INaL was recorded in isolated rabbit PCs and VMs with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Action potential was examined using the microelectrode technique. Compared with VMs, PCs exhibited a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL with a larger INaL to basic cycle length (BCL) slope. Moreover, PCs had a larger rate dependence of INaL decay and slower recovery kinetics. Interestingly, the larger rate dependence of INaL matched to a steeper rate dependence of action potential duration (APD) in PCs. The INaL blocker tetrodotoxin significantly blunted, while the INaL enhancer anemone toxin (ATX-II) significantly increased, the rate dependence of INaL and APD in PCs and VMs. In the presence of ATX-II, the rate dependence of INaL in PCs was markedly larger than that in VMs, causing a much steeper rate dependence of APD in PCs. Accordingly, PCs exhibited greater rate-dependent electrical instability and were more prone to ATX-II-induced early afterdepolarizations, which were completely inhibited by the INaL inhibitor ranolazine. PCs have a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL than do VMs because of distinctive INaL decay and recovery kinetics, which contributes to their larger rate adaptation, and simultaneously predisposes them to a higher risk of arrhythmogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical Density-to-Potential Inversions in Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Daniel; Inchaustegui, Jean Pierre; Wasserman, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a formally exact method for solving the quantum many-body problem. In Kohn-Sham TDDFT, a fictitious noninteracting system is defined that exactly reproduces the time-dependent density of the interacting system. The potential that determines this noninteracting system (the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential) has been proven to exist under certain restrictions, but finding the exact Kohn-Sham potential for a given density remains challenging. We show that this ill-posed inverse problem requires some form of regularization to produce realistic Kohn-Sham potentials. We explore various forms of regularization and illustrate how they work on simple one-dimensional model systems. We also show how our method can be applied to problems with both particle-in-a-box and periodic boundary conditions subject to oscillating electric fields.

  3. Dynamic potential-dependent electron transport pathway shifts in anode biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Yoho, Rachel A; Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I

    2014-12-01

    Biofilms of the anode-respiring bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (G. sulfurreducens) demonstrate dynamic potential-dependent changes between two electron transport pathways that are used selectively depending on the anode potential. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggest that these pathways (both n=1), with midpoint potentials of -0.155 (± 0.005) and -0.095 (± 0.003) V versus standard hydrogen electrode, are not additive within the biofilm, but are preferentially used depending on the anode potential. Potential step voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry (CV) confirmed rapid changes between the two pathways in minutes when the anode potential is changed. We confirm that the electrochemical response observed in a slow-scan-rate CV (∼1 mV s(-1) ) is often composed of at least the two pathways characterized. Thus, beyond understanding the electron transport pathways in G. sulfurreducens, this study also has implications on the interpretation of previously collected and future potential-dependent datasets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Isotopic dependence of fusion enhancement of various heavy ion systems using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the fusion of symmetric and asymmetric projectile-target combinations are deeply analyzed within the framework of energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with one dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel code CCFULL. The neutron transfer channels and the inelastic surface excitations of collision partners are dominating mode of couplings and the coupling of relative motion of colliding nuclei to such relevant internal degrees of freedom produces a significant fusion enhancement at sub-barrier energies. It is quite interesting that the effects of dominant intrinsic degrees of freedom such as multi-phonon vibrational states, neutron transfer channels and proton transfer channels can be simulated by introducing the energy dependence in the nucleus-nucleus potential (EDWSP model). In the EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm, which is much larger than a value (a = 0.65 fm) extracted from the elastic scattering data, is needed to reproduce sub-barrier fusion data. However, such diffuseness anomaly, which might be an artifact of some dynamical effects, has been resolved by trajectory fluctuation dissipation (TFD) model wherein the resulting nucleus-nucleus potential possesses normal diffuseness parameter.

  5. Tunnelling in a time dependent quartic potential: Possible implications for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2014-03-01

    The theory of a real scalar field with an arbitrary potential plays an important role in cosmology, particularly in the context of inflationary scenarios. However, in most applications, the potential is treated as independent of time, whereas in an evolving universe, for example, before the onset of inflation, the potential is actually likely to be changing with time. As pointed out by Berry in the context of single-particle quantum mechanics, the existence of multiple time scales can lead to results that are qualitatively different from those obtained with a static potential. The present paper reports on numerical investigations in a scalar field theory with a double-well potential that depends explicitly on time. The transition rate per unit volume for the decay of the false vacuum is found to depend strongly on time. Possible implications for old inflation are discussed.

  6. Molecular determinants of membrane potential dependence in vertebrate gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Revilla, A; Bennett, M V; Barrio, L C

    2000-12-19

    The conductance, g(j), of many gap junctions depends on voltage between the coupled cells (transjunctional voltage, V(j)) with little effect of the absolute membrane potential (V(m)) in the two cells; others show combined V(j) and V(m) dependence. We examined the molecular determinants of V(m) dependence by using rat connexin 43 expressed in paired Xenopus oocytes. These junctions have, in addition to V(j) dependence, V(m) dependence such that equal depolarization of both cells decreases g(j). The dependence of g(j) on V(m) was abolished by truncation of the C-terminal domain (CT) at residue 242 but not at 257. There are two charged residues between 242 and 257. In full-length Cx43, mutations neutralizing either one of these charges, Arg243Gln and Asp245Gln, decreased and increased V(m) dependence, respectively, suggesting that these residues are part of the V(m) sensor. Mutating both residues together abolished V(m) dependence, although there is no net change in charge. The neutralizing mutations, together or separately, had no effect on V(j) dependence. Thus, the voltage sensors must differ. However, V(j) gating was somewhat modulated by V(m), and V(m) gating was reduced when the V(j) gate was closed. These data suggest that the two forms of voltage dependence are mediated by separate but interacting domains.

  7. Angular-dependent interatomic potential for the aluminum-hydrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, F.; Mishin, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the development of an angular-dependent interatomic potential for hydrogen and the aluminum-hydrogen system. The potential reproduces properties of diatomic hydrogen gas, accurate solution energies of hydrogen atoms in crystalline Al, the energetic preference of the tetrahedral interstitial site occupation over octahedral, the hydrogen diffusion barrier in Al, and a number of other properties. Some of the results predicted by the potential have been tested by molecular dynamics simulations. It is suggested that the new potential can be used in atomistic simulations of the effect of dissolved hydrogen on deformation and fracture of Al, a problem which is relevant to hydrogen-induced degradation of Al alloys.

  8. Exact Time-Dependent Exchange-Correlation Potential for a 2-Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Irene; Vignale, Giovanni

    1998-03-01

    We present an exact solution for the Floquet state evolving from the ground state of a 2-electron system confined in a plane by an isotropic parabolic potential whose curvature is periodically modulated in time. >From this solution we extract the exact frequency-dependent exchange correlation potential V_xc which, when used in the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation (in addition to external and Hartree potentials) generates the exact time-dependent density. The exact V_xc is compared with the V_xc's obtained from the adiabatic local density approximation and from the retarded local current-density approximation (G. Vignale and W. Kohn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 2037 (1996); G. Vignale, C. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997)..

  9. Quantum dynamics of H2+ in intense laser fields on time-dependent potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manish; Tiwari, Ashwani K; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-08-30

    We have exploited the fully time-dependent Born-Oppenheimer approximation to develop time-dependent potential energy surfaces for the lowest two states of H(2)(+) in the presence of intense, time-varying, few-cycle laser fields of 2-8 fs duration. Quantum dynamics are explored on these field-dressed, time-dependent potentials. Our results show that the potential well in the lowest-energy state of H(2)(+) (i) collapses as the laser pulse reaches its peak amplitude and (ii) regains its form on the trailing edge of the pulse, and (iii) the trapped nuclear wavepacket has a higher probability of leaking out from the well in the case of longer laser pulses. The carrier envelope phase is found to have negligible effect on the nuclear dynamics.

  10. Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term for the Davidson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Georgoudis, P. E.; Lenis, D.; Minkov, N.; Quesne, C.

    2011-04-15

    Analytical expressions for spectra and wave functions are derived for a Bohr Hamiltonian, describing the collective motion of deformed nuclei, in which the mass is allowed to depend on the nuclear deformation. Solutions are obtained for separable potentials consisting of a Davidson potential in the {beta} variable, in the cases of {gamma}-unstable nuclei, axially symmetric prolate deformed nuclei, and triaxial nuclei, implementing the usual approximations in each case. The solution, called the deformation-dependent mass (DDM) Davidson model, is achieved by using techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), involving a deformed shape invariance condition. Spectra and B(E2) transition rates are compared to experimental data. The dependence of the mass on the deformation, dictated by SUSYQM for the potential used, reduces the rate of increase of the moment of inertia with deformation, removing a main drawback of the model.

  11. Angular Dependence of Ionization by Circularly Polarized Light Calculated with Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction with an Absorbing Potential.

    PubMed

    Hoerner, Paul; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2017-02-16

    The angular dependence of ionization by linear and circularly polarized light has been examined for N2, NH3, H2O, CO2, CH2O, pyrazine, methyloxirane, and vinyloxirane. Time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential was used to simulate ionization by a seven cycle 800 nm cosine squared pulse with intensities ranging from 0.56 × 10(14) to 5.05 × 10(14) W cm(-2). The shapes of the ionization yield for linearly polarized light can be understood primarily in terms of the nodal structure of the highest occupied orbitals. Depending on the orbital energies, ionization from lower-lying orbitals may also make significant contributions to the shapes. The shapes of the ionization yield for circularly polarized light can be readily explained in terms of the shapes for linearly polarized light. Averaging the results for linear polarization over orientations perpendicular to the direction of propagation yields shapes that are in very good agreement with direct calculations of the ionization yield by circularly polarized light.

  12. Some Exact Results for the Schroedinger Wave Equation with a Time Dependent Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation with a time dependent delta function potential is solved exactly for many special cases. In all other cases the problem can be reduced to an integral equation of the Volterra type. It is shown that by knowing the wave function at the origin, one may derive the wave function everywhere. Thus, the problem is reduced from a PDE in two variables to an integral equation in one. These results are used to compare adiabatic versus sudden changes in the potential. It is shown that adiabatic changes in the p otential lead to conservation of the normalization of the probability density.

  13. Fluorescence quenching studies of potential-dependent DNA reorientation dynamics at glassy carbon electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Cui, Chenchen; Higgins, Daniel A; Li, Jun

    2012-09-05

    The potential-dependent reorientation dynamics of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) attached to planar glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surfaces were investigated. The orientation state of surface-bound ds-DNA was followed by monitoring the fluorescence from a 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM6) fluorophore covalently linked to the distal end of the DNA. Positive potentials (i.e., +0.2 V vs open circuit potential, OCP) caused the ds-DNA to align parallel to the electrode surface, resulting in strong dipole-electrode quenching of FAM6 fluorescence. Switching of the GCE potential to negative values (i.e., -0.2 V vs OCP) caused the ds-DNA to reorient perpendicular to the electrode surface, with a concomitant increase in FAM6 fluorescence. In addition to the very fast (submilliseconds) dynamics of the initial reorientation process, slow (0.1-0.9 s) relaxation of FAM6 fluorescence to intermediate levels was also observed after potential switching. These dynamics have not been previously described in the literature. They are too slow to be explained by double layer charging, and chronoamperometry data showed no evidence of such effects. Both the amplitude and rate of the dynamics were found to depend upon buffer concentration, and ds-DNA length, demonstrating a dependence on the double layer field. The dynamics are concluded to arise from previously undetected complexities in the mechanism of potential-dependent ds-DNA reorientation. The possible origins of these dynamics are discussed. A better understanding of these dynamics will lead to improved models for potential-dependent ds-DNA reorientation at electrode surfaces and will facilitate the development of advanced electrochemical devices for detection of target DNAs.

  14. Quantum trajectory dynamics in imaginary time with the momentum-dependent quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garashchuk, Sophya

    2010-01-07

    The quantum trajectory dynamics is extended to the wave function evolution in imaginary time. For a nodeless wave function a simple exponential form leads to the classical-like equations of motion of trajectories, representing the wave function, in the presence of the momentum-dependent quantum potential in addition to the external potential. For a Gaussian wave function this quantum potential is a time-dependent constant, generating zero quantum force yet contributing to the total energy. For anharmonic potentials the momentum-dependent quantum potential is cheaply estimated from the global Least-squares Fit to the trajectory momenta in the Taylor basis. Wave functions with nodes are described in the mixed coordinate space/trajectory representation at little additional computational cost. The nodeless wave function, represented by the trajectory ensemble, decays to the ground state. The mixed representation wave functions, with lower energy contributions projected out at each time step, decay to the excited energy states. The approach, illustrated by computing energy levels for anharmonic oscillators and energy level splitting for the double-well potential, can be used for the Boltzmann operator evolution.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of alkali borate glass using coordination dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.; Cormack, A.N.

    1997-12-31

    The structure of sodium borate glass was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation using coordination dependent potential model. The simulated alkali borate glass consists of basic units, BO{sub 3} triangle, BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and structural groups such as boroxol ring and triborate units. The coordination of boron is converted from 3 to 4 by adding alkali oxide.

  16. Comment on ''Solution of the Schroedinger equation for the time-dependent linear potential''

    SciTech Connect

    Bekkar, H.; Maamache, M.; Benamira, F.

    2003-07-01

    We present the correct way to obtain the general solution of the Schroedinger equation for a particle in a time-dependent linear potential following the approach used in the paper of Guedes [Phys. Rev. A 63, 034102 (2001)]. In addition, we show that, in this case, the solutions (wave packets) are described by the Airy functions.

  17. A Gauss-Bonnet Cosmology with an Effective Time-Dependent Scalar Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    A special class of a Gauss-Bonnet minimal power-law cosmology characterised by an effective time-dependent scalar field potential is explored in this communication. Some new features related to the late-time cosmological dynamics are observed and discussed accordingly.

  18. Airy wave packet for a particle in a time-dependent linear potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrehail, Mounira; Benchiheub, Nadjet

    2017-01-01

    We studied the quantum motion of a particle in the presence of a time-dependent linear potential by using an operator invariant that is quadratic in p and linear in x within the framework of the Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant. The special invariant operator in this work is demonstrated to be Hermitian operator that has an Airy wave packet as its eigenfunctions.

  19. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    SciTech Connect

    Finster, Felix E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de Murro, Simone E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de Röken, Christian E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de

    2016-07-15

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  20. Application of the dielectric-dependent screened exchange potential approach to organic photocell materials.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito

    2016-10-05

    This paper discusses the fundamental features of the dielectric-dependent screened exchange potential approach for organic molecules and photocell materials. The energy difference (gap) between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is a key factor when designing organic photocell materials. The magnitude of this energy gap strongly depends on the ratio of the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange term combined with hybrid density functional theory (DFT) functionals. In ordinary hybrid DFT functionals, the HF exchange term ratio is often determined empirically and a constant value is employed for all materials. Conversely, the dielectric-dependent exchange potential approach employs a system-dependent value for this parameter, which is proportional to the inverse of the dielectric constant. The organic materials examined in this paper take different dielectric constant values according to their material types and unit lengths; therefore, their HF exchange ratios are also different. This paper discusses the relationship between the energy gaps, the dielectric constants, and the HF exchange ratios in the dielectric-dependent screened exchange potential approach. For a series of acene-type compounds, it was found that the HOMO-LUMO gap decreased when their conjugation systems are extended. The dielectric-dependent screened exchange potential approach demonstrated that the values of the dielectric constants of the compounds increased; consequently, the HF exchange ratio decreased. Similar results were obtained for a series of thiophene-based donor molecules. The calculated values were compared with those obtained via experimental measurements. We found that although the theoretical calculations of the HOMO-LUMO gap usually overestimate experimental optical gaps, a better agreement between the experimental and calculated values can be obtained if we correct for the exciton binding energy.

  1. P3a of event-related potential in chronic methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, A; Kuroki, N; Iritani, S; Isono, H; Okajima, Y; Kamijima, K

    1998-12-01

    To investigate the psychophysiological features of methamphetamine (MAP) dependence, we recorded auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in 15 patients with MAP dependence and in 15 age-matched normal controls. ERPs were recorded during a standard oddball task and a read task similar to those employed by Squires et al. (Squires NK, Squires KC, Hillyard SA [1975] Two varieties of long-latency positive waves evoked by unpredictable auditory stimuli in man. Electroenceph Clin Neurophysiol 38:387-401). The patients with MAP dependence showed reduced P3a amplitude and area in the read task and delayed P3b latency with normal P3b amplitude and area in the oddball task. These results suggest that central noradrenergic dysregulation may persist after the remission of acute psychotic symptoms in MAP psychosis and that chronic MAP dependence would produce impairment of the frontal cortex.

  2. Frequency-dependent action potential prolongation in Aplysia pleural sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Edstrom, J P; Lukowiak, K D

    1985-10-01

    The effects of repetitive activity on action-potential shape in Aplysia californica pleural sensory cells are described. Action potentials were evoked by intracellular current injection at frequencies between 7.41 and 0.2 Hz. In contrast to other molluscan neurons having brief action potentials, it was found that at these firing rates the normally brief action potential develops a prominent shoulder or plateau during the repolarization phase. Higher stimulus rates broaden the action potential more rapidly and to a greater extent than lower stimulus rates. Inactivation is slow relative to activation; effects of 3-s 6-Hz trains are detectable after 1 min rest. The amplitude of the plateau voltage reaches a maximum of 50-70 mV at the highest stimulus rates tested. Frequency-dependent increases in action-potential duration measured at half-amplitude normally range between 6 and 15 ms. Cadmium, at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.5 mM, antagonizes frequency-dependent broadening. The increases in duration induced by repetitive activity are more sensitive to cadmium than are the increases in plateau amplitude. Tetraethylammonium, at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 mM, slightly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials. During repetitive activity at high stimulus rates the maximum duration and rate of broadening are both increased but the amplitude of the plateau potential is not affected by these tetraethylammonium concentrations. Above 10 mM, tetraethylammonium greatly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials as well as the rates of action-potential duration and amplitude increase during repetitive activity. These high tetraethylammonium concentrations also cause the normally smoothly increasing duration and amplitude to reach a maximum value early in a train and then decline slowly during the remainder of the train. The consequences of frequency-dependent spike broadening in these neurons have not yet been investigated

  3. Size and shape dependent deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Per, Manolo C.

    2014-11-01

    Many important reactions in biology and medicine involve proton abstraction and transfer, and it is integral to applications such as drug delivery. Unlike electrons, which are quantum mechanically delocalized, protons are instantaneously localized on specific residues in these reactions, which can be a distinct advantage. However, the introduction of nanoparticles, such as non-toxic nanodiamonds, to this field complicates matters, as the number of possible sites increases as the inverse radius of the particle. In this paper we present \\gt {{10}4} simulations that map the size- and shape-dependence of the deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamonds in the range 1.8-2.7 nm in average diameter. We find that while the average deprotonation potential and proton affinities decrease with size, the site-specific values are inhomogeneous over the surface of the particles, exhibiting strong shape-dependence. The proton affinity is strongly facet-dependent, whereas the deprotonation potential is edge/corner-dependent, which creates a type of spatial hysteresis in the transfer of protons to and from the nanodiamond, and provides new opportunities for selective functionalization.

  4. Local chemical potential, local hardness, and dual descriptors in temperature dependent chemical reactivity theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    In this work we establish a new temperature dependent procedure within the grand canonical ensemble, to avoid the Dirac delta function exhibited by some of the second order chemical reactivity descriptors based on density functional theory, at a temperature of 0 K. Through the definition of a local chemical potential designed to integrate to the global temperature dependent electronic chemical potential, the local chemical hardness is expressed in terms of the derivative of this local chemical potential with respect to the average number of electrons. For the three-ground-states ensemble model, this local hardness contains a term that is equal to the one intuitively proposed by Meneses, Tiznado, Contreras and Fuentealba, which integrates to the global hardness given by the difference in the first ionization potential, I, and the electron affinity, A, at any temperature. However, in the present approach one finds an additional temperature-dependent term that introduces changes at the local level and integrates to zero. Additionally, a τ-hard dual descriptor and a τ-soft dual descriptor given in terms of the product of the global hardness and the global softness multiplied by the dual descriptor, respectively, are derived. Since all these reactivity indices are given by expressions composed of terms that correspond to products of the global properties multiplied by the electrophilic or nucleophilic Fukui functions, they may be useful for studying and comparing equivalent sites in different chemical environments.

  5. Dependence of transient and residual calcium dynamics on action-potential patterning during neuropeptide secretion.

    PubMed

    Muschol, M; Salzberg, B M

    2000-09-15

    Secretion of the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) from the neurohypophysis is optimized by short phasic bursts of action potentials with a mean intraburst frequency around 10 Hz. Several hypotheses, most prominently action-potential broadening and buildup of residual calcium, have been proposed to explain this frequency dependence of AVP release. However, how either of these mechanisms would optimize release at any given frequency remains an open question. We have addressed this issue by correlating the frequency-dependence of intraterminal calcium dynamics and AVP release during action-potential stimulation. By monitoring the intraterminal calcium changes with low-affinity indicator dyes and millisecond time resolution, the signal could be dissected into three separate components: rapid Ca(2+) rises (Delta[Ca(2+)](tr)) related to action-potential depolarization, Ca(2+) extrusion and/or uptake, and a gradual increase in residual calcium (Delta[Ca(2+)](res)) throughout the stimulus train. Action-potential stimulation modulated all three components in a manner dependent on both the stimulation frequency and number of stimuli. Overall, the cumulative Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) amplitude initially increased with f(Stim) and then rapidly deteriorated, with a maximum around f(Stim) dependent maxima in Delta[Ca(2+)](tr) and Delta[Ca(2+)](res).

  6. Potential use of Magnolia officinalis bark polyphenols in the treatment of cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Maurizio; Mondola, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, epidemiological data confirm that cannabis-related emergencies, cannabis-use disorders and dependence are significantly increased. Cannabis is generally considered a little dangerous substances of abuse, however, chronic consumption has been associated to the development of mental disorders, cognitive deficits, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, increased risk of myocardial infarction in the hour after use, increased mortality after myocardial infarction, liver inflammation and steatosis in patients affected by hepatitis C. In this article we described the pharmacological characteristics of Magnolia officinalis bark active principles suggesting a potential application in the treatment of both cannabis dependence and cannabis-related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Position-dependent patterning of spontaneous action potentials in immature cochlear inner hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart L.; Eckrich, Tobias; Kuhn, Stephanie; Zampini, Valeria; Franz, Christoph; Ranatunga, Kishani M.; Roberts, Terri P.; Masetto, Sergio; Knipper, Marlies; Kros, Corné J.; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous action potential activity is crucial for mammalian sensory system development. In the auditory system, patterned firing activity has been observed in immature spiral ganglion cells and brain-stem neurons and is likely to depend on cochlear inner hair cell (IHC) action potentials. It remains uncertain whether spiking activity is intrinsic to developing IHCs and whether it shows patterning. We found that action potentials are intrinsically generated by immature IHCs of altricial rodents and that apical IHCs exhibit bursting activity as opposed to more sustained firing in basal cells. We show that the efferent neurotransmitter ACh, by fine-tuning the IHC’s resting membrane potential (Vm), is crucial for the bursting pattern in apical cells. Endogenous extracellular ATP also contributes to the Vm of apical and basal IHCs by activating SK2 channels. We hypothesize that the difference in firing pattern along the cochlea instructs the tonotopic differentiation of IHCs and auditory pathway. PMID:21572434

  8. Bursting Regimes in a Reaction-Diffusion System with Action Potential-Dependent Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Stephen R.; Lancaster, Jarrett L.; Starobin, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium Nernst potential plays a critical role in neural cell dynamics. A common approximation used in studying electrical dynamics of excitable cells is that the ionic concentrations inside and outside the cell membranes act as charge reservoirs and remain effectively constant during excitation events. Research into brain electrical activity suggests that relaxing this assumption may provide a better understanding of normal and pathophysiological functioning of the brain. In this paper we explore time-dependent ionic concentrations by allowing the ion-specific Nernst potentials to vary with developing transmembrane potential. As a specific implementation, we incorporate the potential-dependent Nernst shift into a one-dimensional Morris-Lecar reaction-diffusion model. Our main findings result from a region in parameter space where self-sustaining oscillations occur without external forcing. Studying the system close to the bifurcation boundary, we explore the vulnerability of the system with respect to external stimulations which disrupt these oscillations and send the system to a stable equilibrium. We also present results for an extended, one-dimensional cable of excitable tissue tuned to this parameter regime and stimulated, giving rise to complex spatiotemporal pattern formation. Potential applications to the emergence of neuronal bursting in similar two-variable systems and to pathophysiological seizure-like activity are discussed. PMID:25823018

  9. Numerical time-dependent solutions of the Schrödinger equation with piecewise continuous potentials.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Wytse

    2016-06-01

    We consider accurate numerical solutions of the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation when the potential is piecewise continuous. Spatial step sizes are defined for each of the regions between the discontinuities and a matching condition at the boundaries of the regions is employed. The Numerov method for spatial integration is particularly appropriate to this approach. By employing Padé approximants for the time-evolution operator, we obtain solutions with significantly improved precision without increased CPU time. This approach is also appropriate for adaptive changes in spatial step size even when there is no discontinuity of the potential.

  10. Permeability dependence of streaming potential in rocks for various fluid conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouniaux, Laurence; Pozzi, Jean-Pierre

    1995-02-01

    Streaming potentials have been measured on sandstone and limestone samples in a large range of permeabilities. The electrokinetic coupling coefficient increases with permeability and we explain this effect by the related variation of surface conductivity. A model is proposed to study this effect for various fluid conductivities and it is shown that the dependence of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient on permeability is stronger for high fluid resistivity and is weaker for lower fluid resistivity. When fluid resistivity is below 1 Ohm-meter permeability and streaming potential are no more related.

  11. Solution of the Schro''dinger equation for the time-dependent linear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, I.

    2001-03-01

    In this paper I have drawn out the steps to be followed in order to derive the exact Schro''dinger wave function for a particle in a general one-dimensional time-dependent linear potential. To this end I have used the so-called Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant method, which is based on finding an exact quantum-mechanical invariant in whose eigenstates the exact quantum states are found. In particular, I have obtained the wave functions of a particle in the linear potential well, driven by a monochromatic electric field.

  12. Metformin: Insights into its anticancer potential with special reference to AMPK dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ikhlas, Shoeb; Ahmad, Masood

    2017-09-15

    Metformin has been known for its antidiabetic effects for decades and is used as a first line therapy in type 2 diabetes. But recently its anticancer potential has also been discovered. Metformin targets many pathways that play an important role in cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis, mTORC1 signaling is a crucial pathway among them. Metformin inhibits mTORC1 via AMPK dependent and AMPK independent pathways, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth and development. Encouraged by positive results of numerous preclinical studies on various types of cancer, many clinical trials are underway to study metformin's effect in chemoprevention and treatment of cancers in humans. Nowadays, applications of novel metformin analogues and nanotechnology based targeting have further enhanced the potential of metformin anticancer therapy. Here, we review both AMPK dependent and AMPK independent mechanisms involved in anticancer activity of metformin along with the outcome of preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Attention-dependent reductions in burstiness and action potential height in macaque area V4

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emily B.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Reynolds, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Attention improves the encoding of visual stimuli. One mechanism that is implicated in facilitating sensory encoding is the firing of action potentials in bursts. We tested the hypothesis that when spatial attention is directed to a stimulus, this causes an increase in burst firing to the attended stimulus. To the contrary, we found an attention-dependent reduction in burstiness among putative pyramidal neurons in macaque area V4. We accounted for this using a conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley style model in which attentional modulation stems from scaling excitation and inhibition. The model exhibited attention-dependent increases in firing rate and made the surprising and correct prediction that when attention is directed into a neuron’s receptive field, this reduces action potential height. The model thus provided a unified explanation for three distinct forms of attentional modulation, two of them novel, and implicates scaling of the responses of excitatory and inhibitory input populations in mediating attention. PMID:23852114

  14. Bohr Hamiltonian with an energy-dependent γ-unstable Coulomb-like potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, R.

    2016-10-01

    An exact analytical solution for the Bohr Hamiltonian with an energy-dependent Coulomb-like γ-unstable potential is presented. Due to the linear energy dependence of the potential's coupling constant, the corresponding spectrum in the asymptotic limit of the slope parameter resembles the spectral structure of the spherical vibrator, however with a different state degeneracy. The parameter free energy spectrum as well as the transition rates for this case are given in closed form and duly compared with those of the harmonic U(5) dynamical symmetry. The model wave functions are found to exhibit properties that can be associated to shape coexistence. A possible experimental realization of the model is found in few medium nuclei with a very low second 0+ state known to exhibit competing prolate, oblate and spherical shapes.

  15. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrate, I.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user’s mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials.Approach. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance.Results and significance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  16. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Iturrate, I; Montesano, L; Minguez, J

    2013-04-01

    A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user's mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  17. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns. PMID:26900845

  18. Solution to the Schrödinger Equation for the Time-Dependent Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chao-Yun; Qin, Shui-Jie; Yang, Zhu-Hua; Guo, Guang-Jie

    2009-04-01

    In this work, the Schrödinger equation with the time-dependent potential V(z,hat{p},t)=g1(t)z+g2(t)hat{p}+g3(t) has been solved by the method of time-space transformation in 1+1 dimensions. The corresponding analytical wave function to Schrödinger equation is obtained. In addition, the discussion of solutions to particular cases has been made.

  19. The dependence of all-atom statistical potentials on structural training database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2004-06-01

    An accurate statistical energy function that is suitable for the prediction of protein structures of all classes should be independent of the structural database used for energy extraction. Here, two high-resolution, low-sequence-identity structural databases of 333 alpha-proteins and 271 beta-proteins were built for examining the database dependence of three all-atom statistical energy functions. They are RAPDF (residue-specific all-atom conditional probability discriminatory function), atomic KBP (atomic knowledge-based potential), and DFIRE (statistical potential based on distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state). These energy functions differ in the reference states used for energy derivation. The energy functions extracted from the different structural databases are used to select native structures from multiple decoys of 64 alpha-proteins and 28 beta-proteins. The performance in native structure selections indicates that the DFIRE-based energy function is mostly independent of the structural database whereas RAPDF and KBP have a significant dependence. The construction of two additional structural databases of alpha/beta and alpha + beta-proteins further confirmed the weak dependence of DFIRE on the structural databases of various structural classes. The possible source for the difference between the three all-atom statistical energy functions is that the physical reference state of ideal gas used in the DFIRE-based energy function is least dependent on the structural database.

  20. Tetanic force potentiation of mouse fast muscle is shortening speed dependent.

    PubMed

    Gittings, William; Huang, Jian; Vandenboom, Rene

    2012-10-01

    The activity dependent potentiation of peak isometric force associated with phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is generally restricted to low activation frequencies. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle shortening speed influenced the stimulus frequency domain over which concentric force potentiation was observed. To this end, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (in vitro, 25 °C) were activated at a range of test frequencies (10, 25, 45, 70 or 100 Hz) during shortening ramps at 0.10, 0.30 or 0.50 of the maximal velocity of shortening (V(max)). This procedure was performed before and after a standard conditioning stimulus (CS) that elevated RLC phosphorylation from 0.08 ± 0.01 (rest) to 0.55 ± 0.01 (stimulated) moles phosphate per mol RLC, respectively (n = 9-11) (P < 0.01). When data from all test frequencies were collapsed, the CS potentiated mean concentric force at 0.10, 0.30 and 0.50 V(max) to 1.02 ± 0.03, 1.37 ± 0.03 and 1.59 ± 0.05 of unpotentiated, pre-CS values, respectively (n = 8, P < 0.05). In addition, increasing shortening speed also increased the activation frequency at which concentric force potentiation was maximal, i.e. from 10 Hz at 0.10 V(max) to 10-25 and 25-45 Hz at 0.30 and 0.50 V(max), respectively. These results indicate that both the magnitude of and activation frequency dependence for concentric force potentiation of mouse EDL muscle is shortening speed dependent. Thus, muscle shortening speed may be a critical factor determining the functional utility of the myosin RLC phosphorylation mechanism.

  1. Position-Dependent Mass Schrödinger Equation for the Morse Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovando, G.; Peña, J. J.; Morales, J.; López-Bonilla, J.

    2017-01-01

    The position dependent mass Schrödinger equation (PDMSE) has a wide range of quantum applications such as the study of semiconductors, quantum wells, quantum dots and impurities in crystals, among many others. On the other hand, the Morse potential is one of the most important potential models used to study the electronic properties of diatomic molecules. In this work, the solution of the effective mass one-dimensional Schrödinger equation for the Morse potential is presented. This is done by means of the canonical transformation method in algebraic form. The PDMSE is solved for any model of the proposed kinetic energy operators as for example the BenDaniel-Duke, Gora-Williams, Zhu-Kroemer or Li-Kuhn. Also, in order to solve the PDMSE with Morse potential, we consider a superpotential leading to a special form of the exactly solvable Schrödinger equation of constant mass for a class of multiparameter exponential-type potential along with a proper mass distribution. The proposed approach is general and can be applied in the search of new potentials suitable on science of materials by looking into the viable choices of the mass function.

  2. Voltage-dependent membrane potential oscillations of rat striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bracci, Enrico; Centonze, Diego; Bernardi, Giorgio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    We used whole-cell recordings to investigate subthreshold membrane potential oscillations and their relationship with intermittent firing in striatal fast-spiking interneurons. During current injections (100–500 pA, 1 s), these cells displayed a highly variable pattern of spike bursts (comprising 1–30 action potentials) interspersed with membrane potential oscillations. The oscillation threshold was −42 ± 10 mV, and coincided with that for action potentials. The oscillation frequency was voltage dependent and ranged between 20 and 100 Hz. Oscillations were unaffected by the calcium channel blockers cadmium and nickel and by blockers of ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors. Conversely, the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin fully abolished the oscillations and the spike bursts. The first spike of a burst appeared to be triggered by an oscillation, since the timing and rate of rise of the membrane potential in the subthreshold voltage region was similar for the two events. Conversely, the second spike (and the subsequent ones) displayed much faster depolarisations in the subthreshold voltage range, indicating that they were generated by a different mechanism. Consistent with these notions, a small pulse of intracellular current delivered during the oscillation was effective in triggering a burst of action potentials that largely outlasted the pulse. We conclude that fast-spiking interneuron oscillations are generated by an intrinsic membrane mechanism that does not require fast synaptic transmission, and which depends on sodium conductance but not calcium conductance, and that such oscillations are responsible for triggering the intermittent spike bursts that are typical of these neurons. PMID:12665602

  3. P300 event-related potential in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Haifeng, Jiang; Wenxu, Zhuang; Hong, Cheng; Chuanwei, Li; Jiang, Du; Haiming, Sun; Zhikang, Chen; Din, Xu; Jijun, Wang; Min, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Substance use and abuse are characterized by biases in the attentional processing of substance-related stimuli. There are no event related potential (ERP)-based studies of attentional bias for substance-related cues among methamphetamine (MA) dependent patients. The study aimed to measure changes in P300 event-related potentials elicited by MA-related words in MA-dependent individuals at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of abstinence, examining the relationship of ERP changes to craving. 26 MA-dependent patients (14 male) newly enrolled in two compulsory treatment centers in China and 29 healthy controls (15 male) were included in this study. At baseline (2-3 weeks in treatment) and after 3 and 6 months of abstinence from MA use, we obtained ERP data during a Stroop color-matching task using MA-related and neutral words. Self-reported craving was measured by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Increased P300 amplitudes elicited by MA-related words were observed over left-anterior electrode sites. Abnormal P300 amplitudes declined to the normal levels of healthy controls at the end of 3 months of abstinence, and the decrease was maintained up to the end of 6 months of abstinence. The behavioral data did not show similar changes. The positive relationship between the changes of VAS scores for MA craving and the changes of P300 amplitudes over left anterior electrode sites elicited by MA-related words within the first 3 months was significant. These findings highlight the potential use of ERP as an objective index to track changes in subjective MA craving among abstinent MA-dependent patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Activity dependence of action potential duration in rat supraoptic neurosecretory neurones recorded in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bourque, C W; Renaud, L P

    1985-06-01

    Action potential durations, measured at one-third peak amplitude, were examined during intracellular recordings in 134 supraoptic nucleus neurones maintained in vitro in perfused hypothalamic explants. Spike durations ranged between 1.2 and 3.9 ms and were dependent on firing frequency. Shortest measurements (1.74 +/- 0.03 ms; mean +/- S.E. of mean) were obtained during relative quiescence, i.e. less than or equal to 0.5 Hz. A gradual increase in firing frequency through continuous injection of depolarizing current prolonged spike duration, with maximum levels (2.68 +/- 0.05 ms) achieved at 20 Hz. When interspike interval variability was eliminated and firing was more precisely regulated by brief 15-20 ms intracellular current pulses given at pre-determined frequencies, a proportional relationship between increasing spike duration and firing frequency was retained but the change in spike duration at frequencies between 2 and 10 Hz was less pronounced. Once action potentials had achieved the long duration configuration, their return to the shorter duration took place gradually during any succeeding silent interval with a time constant of 4.9 s. Action potential broadening occurred progressively and was most pronounced at the onset of spontaneous or current-induced bursts. In thirty-six phasically active neurones, spike broadening at the onset of a burst was concurrent with the presence of 5-10 consecutive short (less than or equal to 100 ms) interspike intervals; thereafter, despite a greater than 50% reduction in firing frequency, action potential durations remained prolonged throughout the burst. In all of nineteen cells tested, frequency-dependent changes in spike duration were reversibly decreased or blocked by Cd2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, or when CaCl2 was exchanged for equimolar amounts of EGTA in the perfusion medium. These observations indicate that a Ca2+ conductance contributes to frequency- and firing-pattern-dependent changes in spike duration in rat supraoptic

  5. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will

  6. Frequency-dependent inhibition of antidromic hippocampal compound action potentials by anti-convulsants.

    PubMed

    Teriakidis, Adrianna; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Using rat hippocampal slices, extracellularly recorded antidromic compound action potentials (cAP) were produced in CA1 pyramidal cell populations by electrical stimulation of the alveus at 0.5 Hz. These responses were additionally examined across a range of stimulus frequencies between 0.5 and 100 Hz. Anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use were applied via perfusion of the recording chamber. Three anticonvulsants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cAP evoked at low frequency (0.5 Hz). The following IC(50) values were observed: lamotrigine, 210 microM (interpolated); carbamazepine, 210 microM (interpolated); phenytoin, 400 microM (extrapolated). The extent of inhibition produced was increased when trains of 30 cAPs were evoked at frequencies > or 30 Hz. This frequency dependence was quantified by measuring a response integral for a range of compound concentrations. Three other compounds valproate (5 mM), topiramate (500 microM) and levetiracetam (500 microM) produced no clear effect at any stimulus frequency tested. Using this simple neurophysiological assay it has been possible to compare the use-dependent inhibition of hippocampal action potentials by a range of anticonvulsants, providing a useful adjunct to patch clamp studies of such molecules at Na(+) channels. There is no clear correlation between the activity in this model and the clinical efficacy of these drugs in different forms of epilepsy.

  7. Exponential dependence of the vortex pinning potential on current density in high- Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Abdelhadi, M. M.; Jung, J. A.; Willemsen, B. A.; Kihlstrom, K. E.

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the dependence of the vortex pinning potential on current density Ueff(J) in Tl2Ba2CaCu2Oy , Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3Oy , and YBa2Cu3Oy thin films and single crystals, measured by us and other research groups. In all these cases Ueff(J) was calculated from the magnetic relaxation data using Maley’s procedure [Phys. Rev. B 42, 2639 (1990)]. We explored the exponential dependence of Ueff(J) , first introduced by Thompson [Phys. Rev. B 44, 456 (1991).] to explain long-term nonlogarithmic magnetic relaxations in high-temperature superconductors (HTSC), as an alternative to power-law and logarithmic forms of Ueff(J) . The results revealed that for J larger than approximately 0.4Jc , the energy barrier can be expressed in the following form: Ueff(J)=aIco(1-T/T*)3/2exp(-bJ/Jco) , where the constant b is the same for all samples investigated. This result is independent of the anisotropy (the interplanar coupling). The experimental results were analyzed taking into account the spatial dependence of the pinning potential, proposed by Qin [J. Appl. Phys. 77, 2618 (1995)]. We suggested that the exponential form of Ueff(J) could represent vortex pinning and motion in the a-b planes due to a nanoscopic variation of the order parameter, in agreement with the growing experimental evidence for the presence of nanostructures, stripes (filaments) in HTSC.

  8. Absence of both auditory evoked potentials and auditory percepts dependent on timing cues.

    PubMed

    Starr, A; McPherson, D; Patterson, J; Don, M; Luxford, W; Shannon, R; Sininger, Y; Tonakawa, L; Waring, M

    1991-06-01

    An 11-yr-old girl had an absence of sensory components of auditory evoked potentials (brainstem, middle and long-latency) to click and tone burst stimuli that she could clearly hear. Psychoacoustic tests revealed a marked impairment of those auditory perceptions dependent on temporal cues, that is, lateralization of binaural clicks, change of binaural masked threshold with changes in signal phase, binaural beats, detection of paired monaural clicks, monaural detection of a silent gap in a sound, and monaural threshold elevation for short duration tones. In contrast, auditory functions reflecting intensity or frequency discriminations (difference limens) were only minimally impaired. Pure tone audiometry showed a moderate (50 dB) bilateral hearing loss with a disproportionate severe loss of word intelligibility. Those auditory evoked potentials that were preserved included (1) cochlear microphonics reflecting hair cell activity; (2) cortical sustained potentials reflecting processing of slowly changing signals; and (3) long-latency cognitive components (P300, processing negativity) reflecting endogenous auditory cognitive processes. Both the evoked potential and perceptual deficits are attributed to changes in temporal encoding of acoustic signals perhaps occurring at the synapse between hair cell and eighth nerve dendrites. The results from this patient are discussed in relation to previously published cases with absent auditory evoked potentials and preserved hearing.

  9. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  10. Differential calcium dependence in basal and forskolin-potentiated spontaneous transmitter release in basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuki; Naka, Masamitsu; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2012-10-31

    Action potential-independent transmitter release, or spontaneous release, is postulated to produce multiple postsynaptic effects (e.g., maintenance of dendritic spines and suppression of local dendritic protein synthesis). Potentiation of spontaneous release may contribute to the precise modulation of synaptic function. However, the expression mechanism underlying potentiated spontaneous release remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the involvement of extracellular and intracellular calcium in basal and potentiated spontaneous release. Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) of the basolateral amygdala neurons in acute brain slices were recorded. Forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, increased mEPSC frequency, and the increase lasted at least 25 min after washout. Removal of the extracellular calcium decreased mEPSC frequency in both naïve and forskolin-treated slices. On the other hand, chelation of intracellular calcium by BAPTA-AM decreased mEPSC frequency in naïve, but not in forskolin-treated slices. A blockade of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) resulted in an increase in mEPSC frequency in forskolin-treated, but not in naïve slices. These findings indicate that forskolin-induced potentiation is accompanied by changes in the mechanisms underlying Ca(2+)-dependent spontaneous release.

  11. The origin of the glucose dependent increase in the potential difference across the tortoise small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wright, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to investigate the origin of the glucose dependent increase in the potential difference (p.d.) across the isolated intestinal mucosa of the tortoise. 2. In addition to glucose, galactose, α-methyl glucoside, 3-0-methyl glucopyranose and sucrose also increased the transepithelial potential difference. There was no increase with either fructose or mannose. 3. The use of micro-electrodes demonstrated that the change in the p.d. due to the presence of glucose was wholly accounted for by the increase in the p.d. across the serosal face of the epithelial cells. 4. Diffusion potentials were produced across the isolated mucosa by varying the ionic composition of either the mucosal or serosal fluids. However, there was no reduction of the glucose dependent increase in the p.d. when the ionic concentration gradients across the serosal face of the cell were reversed. 5. These results suggest that the increase in the p.d. associated with the active transfer of sugars across the small intestine was due to the presence of an electrogenic ion pump at the serosal face of the epithelial cell. PMID:16992234

  12. Orbital-dependent functionals in FLAPW: hybrid functionals and optimized effective potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blügel, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Orbital-dependent functionals are a new class of exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for density-functional theory. Hybrid functionals combine a local or semi-local xc functional with a nonlocal orbital-dependent exchange functional and improve the band gaps of semiconductors and insulators as well as the description of localized states. As an alternative to nonlocal hybrid potentials, one can also construct local optimized effective potentials (OEP) from the exact exchange (EXX) functional. So far, most implementations for periodic systems use a pseudopotential plane-wave approach. We present an efficient all-electron, full-potential implementation of the PBE0 and HSE hybrid functionals as well as the OEP-EXX functional within the FLAPW method (Fleur code: www.flapw.de). Results for prototype semiconductors and insulators are in very good agreement with other implementations. We will demonstrate the improvement over conventional local or semilocal functionals for oxide materials and focus in particular on systems where standard functionals yield qualitatively wrong results. In particular, we will discuss the geometric and magnetic structures of EuO and GdN. Additionally, we will address the possibility of using the hybrid-functional ground state as starting point for a GW quasiparticle correction and show results for complex perovskite systems. Financial support from the DFG through the Priority Program 1145 and the Helmholtz association through the Young Investigators Group Program, contract VH-NG-409, is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Epac2 Mediates cAMP-Dependent Potentiation of Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Herman B; Riordan, Sean; Nomura, Toshihiro; Remmers, Christine L; Kraniotis, Stephen; Marshall, John J; Kukreja, Lokesh; Vassar, Robert; Contractor, Anis

    2015-04-22

    Presynaptic terminal cAMP elevation plays a central role in plasticity at the mossy fiber-CA3 synapse of the hippocampus. Prior studies have identified protein kinase A as a downstream effector of cAMP that contributes to mossy fiber LTP (MF-LTP), but the potential contribution of Epac2, another cAMP effector expressed in the MF synapse, has not been considered. We investigated the role of Epac2 in MF-CA3 neurotransmission using Epac2(-/-) mice. The deletion of Epac2 did not cause gross alterations in hippocampal neuroanatomy or basal synaptic transmission. Synaptic facilitation during short trains was not affected by loss of Epac2 activity; however, both long-term plasticity and forskolin-mediated potentiation of MFs were impaired, demonstrating that Epac2 contributes to cAMP-dependent potentiation of transmitter release. Examination of synaptic transmission during long sustained trains of activity suggested that the readily releasable pool of vesicles is reduced in Epac2(-/-) mice. These data suggest that cAMP elevation uses an Epac2-dependent pathway to promote transmitter release, and that Epac2 is required to maintain the readily releasable pool at MF synapses in the hippocampus.

  14. Optical identification of calcium-dependent action potentials transiently expressed in the embryonic rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Momose-Sato, Y; Sato, K; Kamino, K

    1999-01-01

    Using multiple-site optical recording of transmembrane potential changes, we have found a new type of calcium-dependent action potential expressed transiently in the embryonic rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. Slice preparations with vagus nerve fibers attached were dissected from 12- to 16-day-old embryonic (E12-E16) rat brainstems, and they were stained with a voltage-sensitive merocyanine-rhodanine dye (NK2761). Electrical activities in response to vagal stimuli were optically recorded simultaneously from many sites using 1020- or 128-element photodiode array measuring systems. In brainstem preparations, two types of action potential-related optical signals were identified. One was detected from the dorsolateral region, and was related to sensory nerve activity (Type I). The other was detected from the dorsomedial region, and corresponded to the action potential in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (Type II). We found a difference in the ionic basis of the Type I vs Type II signals. The Type I signal was not altered in Ca2+-free bathing solution and was eliminated by tetrodotoxin, suggesting that the sensory nerve activity is mediated by Na+ currents. The Type II signal at early developmental stages (E12-E13, and some preparations in E14) was also independent of Ca2+. However, the Type II signal in later developmental stages (E15-E16, and some preparations in E14) did depend upon Ca2+: it was eliminated in Ca2+-free Ringer's solution, blocked by Cd2+, Ni2+ or Mn2+, and elicited in Sr2+-containing Ringer's solution, where CaCl2 was replaced with SrCl2. These results suggest that the cation which dominates the motoneuron action potential changes from Na+ to Ca2+ during development, and this change occurs around E14. With pharmacological analysis using Ca2+ channel blockers, we show that the Ca2+ channel mediating the motoneuron action potential is distinct from T-, L-, N-, P- or Q-type channels. Because the vagal action potential in adult

  15. Energy-Dependent microscopic optical potential for p+{sup 9}Be elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Maridi, H. M.; Farag, M. Y. H. Esmael, E. H.

    2016-06-10

    The p+{sup 9}Be elastic scattering at an energy range up to 200 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using the single-folding model. The density- and isospin-dependent M3Y-Paris nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is used for the real part and the NN-scattering amplitude of the high-energy approximation for the imaginary one. The analysis reveals that the cross-section data are reproduced well at energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon by use of the partial-wave expansion. For higher energies, the eikonal approximation give results better than the partial-wave expansion calculations. The volume integrals of the optical-potential parts have systematic energy dependencies, and they are parameterized in empirical formulas.

  16. Effective Schrödinger equation with general ordering ambiguity position-dependent mass Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.

    2012-07-01

    We solve the parametric generalized effective Schrödinger equation with a specific choice of position-dependent mass function and Morse oscillator potential by means of the Nikiforov-Uvarov method combined with the Pekeris approximation scheme. All bound-state energies are found explicitly and all corresponding radial wave functions are built analytically. We choose the Weyl or Li and Kuhn ordering for the ambiguity parameters in our numerical work to calculate the energy spectrum for a few (H2, LiH, HCl and CO) diatomic molecules with arbitrary vibration n and rotation l quantum numbers and different position-dependent mass functions. Two special cases including the constant mass and the vibration s-wave (l = 0) are also investigated.

  17. Bepridil blockade of Ca2+-dependent action potentials in vascular smooth muscle of dog coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Harder, D R; Sperelakis, N

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the new vasodilatory and antianginal compound, bepridil (CERM-1978), was examined on the electrical activity of the vascular smooth muscle of isolated dog coronary arteries. Tetraethylammonium (10 mM) was used to induce excitability in the muscle in the form of Ca2+-dependent overshooting action potentials, whose inward current is carried almost exclusively by Ca2+ ion through voltage-dependent slow channels. Bepridil (5 X 10(-7)--1 X 10(--5) M) produced a dose-dependent depression of the rate of rise and amplitude of these Ca2+ spikes. Complete blockade of the action potentials occurred at 1 X 10(-5) M bepridil. These effects of bepridil were antagonized by elevation of external Ca2+ concentration ([CA]o). The effects of bepridil were substantially reversed by washout after about 30 min. Bepridil (10(-5) M) also produced a small but significant (p less than 0.05) increase in resting membrane resistance (input resistance increased from a mean of 10.1 to 12.4 m omega), accompanied by a small but significant (p less than 0.05) depolarization of 6 mV (from a mean of --51 to --45 mV). These latter effects are consistent with a diminution of the resting K+ conductance (gK) by bepridil. It is concluded that the vasodilatory and antianginal properties of bepridil may be explained by the action of this drug in depressing and blocking the Ca2+ influx into the cells, presumably by acting directly on the voltage-dependent slow channels in the cell membrane, and thereby lowering [Ca]i and thus the degree of contraction. Bepridil has Ca2+-antagonistic (or Ca2+ entry blocking or slow channel blocking) properties much like verapamil, but it is somewhat less potent than verapamil in this action (i.e., complete blockade occurred at 10(-5) M bepridil vs. 2 X 10(-6) M verapamil).

  18. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions.

  19. Calcium-dependent but action potential-independent BCM-like metaplasticity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Sarah R; Jones, Owen D; Ireland, David R; Abraham, Wickliffe C

    2012-05-16

    The Bienenstock, Cooper and Munro (BCM) computational model, which incorporates a metaplastic sliding threshold for LTP induction, accounts well for experience-dependent changes in synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex. BCM-like metaplasticity over a shorter timescale has also been observed in the hippocampus, thus providing a tractable experimental preparation for testing specific predictions of the model. Here, using extracellular and intracellular electrophysiological recordings from acute rat hippocampal slices, we tested the critical BCM predictions (1) that high levels of synaptic activation will induce a metaplastic state that spreads across dendritic compartments, and (2) that postsynaptic cell-firing is the critical trigger for inducing that state. In support of the first premise, high-frequency priming stimulation inhibited subsequent long-term potentiation and facilitated subsequent long-term depression at synapses quiescent during priming, including those located in a dendritic compartment different to that of the primed pathway. These effects were not dependent on changes in synaptic inhibition or NMDA/metabotropic glutamate receptor function. However, in contrast to the BCM prediction, somatic action potentials during priming were neither necessary nor sufficient to induce the metaplasticity effect. Instead, in broad agreement with derivatives of the BCM model, calcium as released from intracellular stores and triggered by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation was critical for altering subsequent synaptic plasticity. These results indicate that synaptic plasticity in stratum radiatum of CA1 can be homeostatically regulated by the cell-wide history of synaptic activity through a calcium-dependent but action potential-independent mechanism.

  20. Endocannabinoid-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of Synaptic Transmission at Rat Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Maglio, Laura Eva; Noriega-Prieto, José Antonio; Maraver, Maria Jesús; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in modulating plasticity in sensory cortices. Indeed, a BDNF-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at distal basal excitatory synapses of Layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs) has been demonstrated in disinhibited rat barrel cortex slices. Although it is well established that this LTP requires the pairing of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) with Ca2+ spikes, its induction when synaptic inhibition is working remains unexplored. Here we show that low-frequency stimulation at basal dendrites of L5PNs is able to trigger a PSP followed by an action potential (AP) and a slow depolarization (termed PSP-Ca2+ response) in thalamocortical slices without blocking synaptic inhibition. We demonstrate that AP barrage-mediated release of endocannabinoids (eCBs) from the recorded L5PNs induces PSP-Ca2+ response facilitation and BDNF-dependent LTP. Indeed, this LTP requires the type 1 cannabinoid receptors activation, is prevented by postsynaptic intracellular 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N,N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) or the anandamide membrane transporter inhibitor AM404, and only occurs in L5PNs neurons showing depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition. Additionally, electrical stimulation at the posteromedial thalamic nucleus induced similar response and LTP. These results reveal a novel form of eCB-dependent LTP at L5PNs that could be relevant in the processing of sensory information in the barrel cortex. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Assessment of dependence potential of drugs in humans using multiple indices.

    PubMed

    Johanson, C E; Kilgore, K; Uhlenhuth, E H

    1983-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether behavioral effects of amphetamine, which have been used to predict dependence potential, were stable after multiple exposures to the drug and whether these different indices of dependence potential were correlated. Ten normal human volunteers participated in a series of three identical choice experiments comparing 10 mg d-amphetamine and placebo. Each experiment consisted of nine sessions. During the first four sessions of each experiment, subjects alternately received amphetamine or placebo. During the next five sessions of each experiment, they were given a choice between amphetamine and placebo. Subjective effects were assessed using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) before drug was taken and 1, 3, and 6 h later. Liking scores were obtained after each session, as well as after each experiment. Subjects chose amphetamine an average of 3.9, 3.0, and 3.4 times out of five in the three experiments, in that order. Compared to placebo, amphetamine produced changes in mood as measured by the POMS including increased anxiety, vigor, friendliness, elation, arousal, and positive mood, and decreased fatigue. Liking scores for amphetamine were consistently higher than for placebo. Mood changes and liking scores produced by amphetamine were similar across all three experiments and across subjects. These results indicate that neither tolerance or increased sensitivity develops to the reinforcing properties of 10 mg d-amphetamine. The results are also discussed in terms of methods for predicting the dependence potential of psychotropic drugs and understanding the role of environmental context as a modulator of a drug's reinforcing effects.

  2. Probing the momentum dependence of the symmetry potential by the free n /p ratio of pre-equilibrium emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, He-Lei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Wen, De-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Based on an isospin and momentum-dependent transport model, we studied the effect of the momentum-dependent symmetry potential on the free neutron-to-proton ratio of pre-equilibrium nucleon emission. It is found that, for the 132Sn+124Sn reaction at 400 MeV/nucleon incident beam energy, the free n /p ratio of pre-equilibrium nucleon emission mainly probes the momentum dependence of the symmetry potential at a nucleon momentum around 400-600 MeV/c , whereas for 200 MeV/nucleon incident beam energy this observable mainly probes the momentum dependence of the symmetry potential at a nucleon momentum around 200-400 MeV/c . To probe the symmetry energy/potential using free n /p ratio, not all the details of the momentum dependence of the symmetry potential are important: the values of symmetry potential in only a certain momentum range are crucial for an observable. It is important to input reasonable density and momentum dependence of the symmetry potential according to the magnitude of incident beam energy of heavy-ion collisions. The present experimental data on the symmetry potential are not enough for probing the density-dependent symmetry energy. More experimental data (such as nucleon and nuclei scattering experiments at different nucleonic momenta and densities) on the symmetry potential are therefore needed to pin down the density-dependent symmetry energy.

  3. Adsorption of acridine on silver electrode: SERS spectra potential dependence as a probe of adsorbate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Elena V.; Myund, Liubov A.; Dem'yanchuk, Evgeniya M.; Makarov, Artiom A.; Denisova, Anna S.

    2013-02-01

    This work investigates acridine adsorption on the silver electrode surface. The dependence of the acridine SERS spectra on the electrode potential proved to be quite different for azaheterocycle molecules, while the pH effect as expected. The changes in the acridine SERS spectrum caused by the double electric layer (DEL) rearrangement can be explained by sorption/desorption rather than the adsorbate molecule reorientation. The presence of chloride anions close to the silver surface is important not only for the SERS-active properties but for the formation of the stabilised surface complexes of the protonated acridine as well.

  4. Exact expression for the diffusion propagator in a family of time-dependent anharmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaoli, J. A.; Strier, D. E.; Batista, C.; Drazer, German; Wio, H. S.

    1999-09-01

    We have obtained the exact expression of the diffusion propagator in the time-dependent anharmonic potential V(x,t)=12a(t)x2+b ln x. The underlying Euclidean metric of the problem allows us to obtain analytical solutions for a whole family of the elastic parameter a(t), exploiting the relation between the path integral representation of the short time propagator and the modified Bessel functions. We have also analyzed the conditions for the appearance of a nonzero flow of particles through the infinite barrier located at the origin (b<0).

  5. PLP-dependent enzymes as potential drug targets for protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Barbara; Tews, Ivo; Binter, Alexandra; Macheroux, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The chemical properties of the B(6) vitamers are uniquely suited for wide use as cofactors in essential reactions, such as decarboxylations and transaminations. This review addresses current efforts to explore vitamin B(6) dependent enzymatic reactions as drug targets. Several current targets are described that are found amongst these enzymes. The focus is set on diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Comparison across a range of these organisms allows insight into the distribution of potential targets, many of which may be of interest in the development of broad range anti-protozoan drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  6. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  7. Bohr Hamiltonian with an energy dependent γ-unstable harmonic oscillator potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, Radu

    2017-01-01

    A new exactly solvable collective solution is realized by inducing a linear energy dependence in the γ-unstable harmonic oscillator potential of the Bohr Hamiltonian and taking the asymptotic limit of the slope parameter. The model preserves the degeneracy features of the U(5) dynamical symmetry but with an expanded energy spectrum and with damped B(E2) rates. The phenomenological interpretation of the model is investigated in comparison to the spherical vibrator collective conditions by means of particular features of the corresponding ground state. Three experimental candidates for the new parameter free model are identified and extensively confronted with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Universal time-dependent dispersion properties for diffusion in a one-dimensional critically tilted potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, T.; Dean, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the time-dependent dispersion properties of overdamped tracer particles diffusing in a one-dimensional periodic potential under the influence of an additional constant tilting force F . The system is studied in the region where the force is close to the critical value Fc at which the barriers separating neighboring potential wells disappear. We show that, when F crosses the critical value, the shape of the mean-square displacement (MSD) curves is strongly modified. We identify a diffusive regime at intermediate-time scales with an effective diffusion coefficient which is much larger than the late-time diffusion coefficient for F >Fc , whereas for F

  9. Strongly enhanced temperature dependence of the chemical potential in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, L. C.; Watson, M. D.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Eschrig, M.; Kim, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    Employing a 10-orbital tight-binding model, we present a set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high-temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters, we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. To confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a ˜25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 and 300 K. This strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.

  10. Solutions to position-dependent mass quantum mechanics for a new class of hyperbolic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, H. R.; Cunha, M. S.

    2013-12-15

    We analytically solve the position-dependent mass (PDM) 1D Schrödinger equation for a new class of hyperbolic potentials V{sub q}{sup p}(x)=−V{sub 0}(sinh{sup p}x/cosh{sup q}x), p=−2,0,⋯q [see C. A. Downing, J. Math. Phys. 54, 072101 (2013)] among several hyperbolic single- and double-wells. For a solitonic mass distribution, m(x)=m{sub 0} sech{sup 2}(x), we obtain exact analytic solutions to the resulting differential equations. For several members of the class, the quantum mechanical problems map into confluent Heun differential equations. The PDM Poschl-Teller potential is considered and exactly solved as a particular case.

  11. Surface potential dependence of the distribution of charged dye molecules onto photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Masamoto, K; Matsuura, K; Itoh, S; Nishimura, M

    1981-02-01

    Partition of merocyanine dyes, which have a negative charge, onto photosynthetic membranes of chloroplasts and bacteria was analyzed by measuring the fluorescence intensity change, absorbance change, and amount of dye in the supernatant after centrifugation. The partition depended on the surface potential, which is a function of valence and concentration of ions in the medium. The distribution of dyes between the membrane and aqueous phase was determined after centrifugation. The logarithm of the ratio of distribution was linearly related to the logarithm of salt concentration as predicted from the Gouy-Chapman theory and the Boltzmann distribution. Plots of the logarithm of fluorescence intensity against the logarithm of KCl and MgSO4 concentrations gave two straight lines with a slope ratio of about two. The absorbance change upon salt addition was also explained by the Gouy-Chapman theory. The use of these dyes as probes of the surface potential of membranes is discussed.

  12. Chemical potential dependence of particle ratios within a unified thermal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, I. Nanda, H.; Uddin, S.

    2016-06-15

    A unified statistical thermal freeze-out model (USTFM) is used to study the chemical potential dependence of identified particle ratios at mid-rapidity in heavy-ion collisions. We successfully reproduce the experimental data ranging from SPS energies to LHC energies, suggesting the statistical nature of the particle production in these collisions and hence the validity of our approach. The behavior of the freeze-out temperature is studied with respect to chemical potential. The freeze-out temperature is found to be universal at the RHIC and LHC and is close to the QCD predicted phase transition temperature, suggesting that the chemical freeze-out occurs soon after the hadronization takes place.

  13. Development of a general time-dependent absorbing potential for the constrained adiabatic trajectory method.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Arnaud; Jolicard, Georges; Killingbeck, John P

    2011-05-21

    The constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM) allows us to compute solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the Floquet formalism and Fourier decomposition, using matrix manipulation within a non-orthogonal basis set, provided that suitable constraints can be applied to the initial conditions for the Floquet eigenstate. A general form is derived for the inherent absorbing potential, which can reproduce any dispersed boundary conditions. This new artificial potential acting over an additional time interval transforms any wavefunction into a desired state, with an error involving exponentially decreasing factors. Thus, a CATM propagation can be separated into several steps to limit the size of the required Fourier basis. This approach is illustrated by some calculations for the H(2)(+) molecular ion illuminated by a laser pulse.

  14. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  15. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  16. Optimized distance-dependent atom-pair-based potential DOOP for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Chae, Myong-Ho; Krull, Florian; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-05-01

    The DOcking decoy-based Optimized Potential (DOOP) energy function for protein structure prediction is based on empirical distance-dependent atom-pair interactions. To optimize the atom-pair interactions, native protein structures are decomposed into polypeptide chain segments that correspond to structural motives involving complete secondary structure elements. They constitute near native ligand-receptor systems (or just pairs). Thus, a total of 8609 ligand-receptor systems were prepared from 954 selected proteins. For each of these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems, 1000 evenly sampled docking decoys with 0-10 Å interface root-mean-square-deviation (iRMSD) were generated with a method used before for protein-protein docking. A neural network-based optimization method was applied to derive the optimized energy parameters using these decoys so that the energy function mimics the funnel-like energy landscape for the interaction between these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems. Thus, our method hierarchically models the overall funnel-like energy landscape of native protein structures. The resulting energy function was tested on several commonly used decoy sets for native protein structure recognition and compared with other statistical potentials. In combination with a torsion potential term which describes the local conformational preference, the atom-pair-based potential outperforms other reported statistical energy functions in correct ranking of native protein structures for a variety of decoy sets. This is especially the case for the most challenging ROSETTA decoy set, although it does not take into account side chain orientation-dependence explicitly. The DOOP energy function for protein structure prediction, the underlying database of protein structures with hypothetical ligand-receptor systems and their decoys are freely available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/doop/. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Momentum dependence of the imaginary part of the ω- and η^'-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Nanova, M.; Metag, V.; Afzal, F. N.; Bayadilov, D.; Bantes, B.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Böse, S.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Crede, V.; Drexler, P.; Eberhardt, H.; Elsner, D.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Gottschall, M.; Grüner, M.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, Ch.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Honisch, Ch.; Jude, T.; Kaiser, D.; Kalischewski, F.; Keshelashvili, I.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Makonyi, K.; Messi, F.; Müller, J.; Müllers, J.; Piontek, D.-M.; Rostomyan, T.; Schaab, D.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Schmitz, R.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Sowa, C.; Spieker, K.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Triffterer, T.; Urban, M.; van Pee, H.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Werthmüller, D.; Wiedner, U.; Wilson, A.; Witthauer, L.; Wunderlich, Y.; Zaunick, H.-G.

    2016-09-01

    The photoproduction of ω and η^' mesons off carbon and niobium nuclei has been measured as a function of the meson momentum for incident photon energies of 1.2-2.9GeV at the electron accelerator ELSA. The mesons have been identified via the ω → π0 γ → 3 γ and η^' → π0 π0η → 6 γ decays, respectively, registered with the CBELSA/TAPS detector system. From the measured meson momentum distributions the momentum dependence of the transparency ratio has been determined for both mesons. Within a Glauber analysis the in-medium ω and η^' widths and the corresponding absorption cross sections have been deduced as a function of the meson momentum. The results are compared to recent theoretical predictions for the in-medium ω width and η^'-N absorption cross sections. The energy dependence of the imaginary part of the ω- and η^'-nucleus optical potential has been extracted. The finer binning of the present data compared to the existing data allows a more reliable extrapolation towards the production threshold. The modulus of the imaginary part of the η^'-nucleus potential is found to be about three times smaller than recently determined values of the real part of the η^'-nucleus potential, which makes the η^' meson a suitable candidate for the search for meson-nucleus bound states. For the ω meson, the modulus of the imaginary part near threshold is comparable to the modulus of the real part of the potential. As a consequence, only broad structures can be expected, which makes the observation of ω mesic states very difficult experimentally.

  18. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  19. Frequency and potential dependence of reversible electrocatalytic hydrogen interconversion by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kavita; Islam, Shams T A; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2017-04-11

    The kinetics of hydrogen oxidation and evolution by [FeFe]-hydrogenases have been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy-resolving factors that determine the exceptional activity of these enzymes, and introducing an unusual and powerful way of analyzing their catalytic electron transport properties. Attached to an electrode, hydrogenases display reversible electrocatalytic behavior close to the 2H(+)/H2 potential, making them paradigms for efficiency: the electrocatalytic "exchange" rate (measured around zero driving force) is therefore an unusual parameter with theoretical and practical significance. Experiments were carried out on two [FeFe]-hydrogenases, CrHydA1 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which contains only the active-site "H cluster," and CpI from the fermentative anaerobe Clostridium pasteurianum, which contains four low-potential FeS clusters that serve as an electron relay in addition to the H cluster. Data analysis yields catalytic exchange rates (at the formal 2H(+)/H2 potential, at 0 °C) of 157 electrons (78 molecules H2) per second for CpI and 25 electrons (12 molecules H2) per second for CrHydA1. The experiments show how the potential dependence of catalytic electron flow comprises frequency-dependent and frequency-independent terms that reflect the proficiencies of the catalytic site and the electron transfer pathway in each enzyme. The results highlight the "wire-like" behavior of the Fe-S electron relay in CpI and a low reorganization energy for electron transfer on/off the H cluster.

  20. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures.

  1. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-09-28

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1(st) and 2(nd) primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures.

  2. Zinc-dependent action potentials in giant neurons of the snail, Euhadra quaestia.

    PubMed

    Kawa, K

    1979-09-14

    In giant neurons of subesophageal ganglion of the Japanese land snail, Euhadra quaestia Deshayes, permeation of Zn ions through Ca channels were investigated with a conventional current clamp method. All-or-none action potentials of long duration (90 to 120 sec) were evoked in 24 mM Zn containing salines. The overshoots were about +10 mV and the maximum rate of rises (MRRs) was about 2.9 V/sec. The amplitudes and the MRRs of the action potentials depended on external Zn ion concentrations. The action potentials were suppressed by specific Ca-channel inhibitors such as Co2+, La3+ and Verapamil, but they were resistant to Na-channel inhibitor, tetrodotoxin, even at 30 microM. It is concluded that these action potentials are generated by Zn ions permeating Ca channels in snail neuronal membrane. On the basis of Hagiwara and Takahashi's (S. Hagiwara & K. Takahashi, 1967, J. Gen. Physiol. 50:583) model of Ca channels, it is inferred that Zn ions are 5 to 10 times stronger in affinity to Ca channels than Ca ions, but 10 to 20 times less permeable.

  3. Fibroblast circadian rhythms of PER2 expression depend on membrane potential and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W; Pan, Haiyun; Welsh, David K

    2012-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca(2+). However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. Rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K(+) concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than loss of synchrony among cells. In lower Ca(2+) concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca(2+) by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of inositol triphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca(2+). Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) may mediate the effects of membrane potential observed in this study.

  4. Classical nuclear dynamics on a single time-dependent potential in electronic non-adiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Min, Seung Kyu; Maitra, Neepa T.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-03-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation allows to visualize the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in molecular systems as a set of nuclei moving on a single potential energy surface representing the effect of the electrons in a given eigenstate. Many interesting phenomena, however, such as vision or charge separation in organic photovoltaic materials, take place in conditions beyond its range of validity. Nevertheless, the basic construct of the adiabatic treatment, the BO potential energy surfaces, is employed to describe non-adiabatic processes and the full problem is represented in terms of adiabatic states and transitions among them in regions of strong non-adiabatic coupling. But the concept of single potential energy is lost. The alternative point of view arising in the framework of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function will be presented. A single, time-dependent, potential energy provides the force driving the nuclear motion and is adopted as starting point for the development of quantum-classical approximations to the full quantum mechanical problem.

  5. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  6. Phase-dependent dynamic potential of magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom bistable energy harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pilkee; Nguyen, Minh Sang; Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Young-Jin; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    A system of magnetically coupled oscillators has been recently considered as a promising compact structure to integrate multiple bistable energy harvesters (BEHs), but its design is not straightforward owing to its varying potential energy pattern, which has not been understood completely yet. This study introduces the concept of phase-dependent dynamic potential in a magnetically coupled BEH system with two degrees of freedom (DOFs) to explain the underlying principle of the complicated dynamics of the system. Through theoretical simulations and analyses, two distinct dynamic regimes, called the out-of-phase and in-phase mode regimes in this report, are found to exist in the frequency regions of the 1st and 2nd primary intrawell resonances. For the out-of-phase mode regime, the frequency displacement (and output power) responses of the 2-DOF BEH system exhibit typical double-well dynamics, whereas for the in-phase mode regime, only single-well dynamics is observed though the system is statically bistable. These dynamic regimes are also revealed to be caused by the difference in the dynamic potential energy trajectories propagating on a high-dimensional potential energy surface. The present approach to the dynamics of the 2-DOF BEH system can be extended and applied to higher-DOF systems, which sheds light on compact and efficient designs of magnetically coupled BEH chain structures. PMID:27677356

  7. Effect of coupled channels on the energy dependence of phenomenological optical potential parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rayashi, W. S.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    The phenomenological optical potential parameters are known to vary with incident energy due to sources of nonlocalities in the nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering process. Here we investigate the effect of one source, which is coupling the ground-state elastic channel to collective inelastic excitations on the energy dependence of the optical potential parameters. For incident energies in the range 10-70 MeV, we considered elastic and inelastic nucleon scattering from light, medium, and heavy nuclei ranging from 6Li to 208Pb. The potential parameters were first determined by fitting the elastic angular distributions only. Then we included coupling to collective excitation channels and determined the potential parameters that reproduced the elastic and inelastic angular distribution data simultaneously. Our results show that coupling to inelastic excitations reduces the energy variations of the potential parameters compared to that of the elastic scattering case. In particular, the our best fit values for the real part of the spin-orbit term are highly stable as a function of energy. The values of the surface imaginary term are not only more stable but are also reduced compared to the elastic case. The reduction is a direct consequence of the channel coupling accounting explicitly for part of the flux removed from the elastic channel. In the fitting process we also searched for the best fit values of the deformation parameters. Our values compare well with the corresponding ones obtained in previous works. Finally, we used our best fit values for the potential and deformation parameters to theoretically predict the total elastic, total cross section, and polarization data. The predicted values are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Inverse problems for the Schroedinger equations with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Eskin, G.

    2008-02-15

    We consider the inverse boundary value problem for the Schroedinger operator with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials in domains with obstacles. We extend the resuls of the author's works [Inverse Probl. 19, 49 (2003); 19, 985 (2003); 20, 1497 (2004)] to the case of time-dependent potentials. We relate our results to the Aharonov-Bohm effect caused by magnetic and electric fluxes.

  9. Amphetamine augments action potential-dependent dopaminergic signaling in the striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsson, Eric S; Covey, Daniel P; Daberkow, David P; Litherland, Melissa T; Juliano, Steven A; Garris, Paul A

    2011-06-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is thought to disrupt normal patterns of action potential-dependent dopaminergic signaling by depleting dopamine (DA) vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic DA efflux. Voltammetry in brain slices concurrently demonstrates these key drug effects, along with competitive inhibition of neuronal DA uptake. Here, we perform comparable kinetic and voltammetric analyses in vivo to determine whether AMPH acts qualitatively and quantitatively similar in the intact brain. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry measured extracellular DA in dorsal and ventral striata of urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrically evoked recordings were analyzed to determine K(m) and V(max) for DA uptake and vesicular DA release, while background voltammetric current indexed basal DA concentration. AMPH (0.5, 3, and 10 mg/kg i.p.) robustly increased evoked DA responses in both striatal subregions. The predominant contributor to these elevated levels was competitive uptake inhibition, as exocytotic release was unchanged in the ventral striatum and only modestly decreased in the dorsal striatum. Increases in basal DA levels were not detected. These results are consistent with AMPH augmenting action potential-dependent dopaminergic signaling in vivo across a wide, behaviorally relevant dose range. Future work should be directed at possible causes for the distinct in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of AMPH.

  10. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  11. Fe nanoparticles on ZnSe: Reversible temperature dependence of the surface barrier potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, M.; Bertacco, R.; Brambilla, A.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.; Verdini, A.; Floreano, L.; Morgante, A.; Passoni, M.; Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Fe growth on ZnSe(001) takes place via the initial formation of superparamagnetic nano-islands that subsequently coalesce, giving rise to a continuous film for a nominal thickness of 8 Fe monolayers. For a very low Fe coverage (2 Fe monolayers), we show that the surface barrier potential (i.e. the barrier potential seen by electrons incident on the surface), measured by absorbed current spectroscopy, attains very large values (6.9 eV at room temperature) and dramatically changes as a function of temperature, with an increase of ˜1.5 eV from room temperature down to 130 K, largely exceeding similar changes observed in both thin films and nanoparticles. This phenomenon disappears as the thickness increases and is fully reversible with temperature. Nonequilibrium phenomena due to the experimental conditions are present, but are not able to explain the observed data. Inverse photoemission, core level photoemission, x-ray photoemission diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy are employed in order to find temperature-dependent properties of the Fe islands: while only minor changes as a function of temperature are present in the electronic band structure, the Fe crystal structure, and the morphology of the islands, a noticeable temperature dependence of the Se segregation through the Fe islands is found.

  12. Spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation in ventral tegmental area dopamine cells requires PKC.

    PubMed

    Luu, Percy; Malenka, Robert C

    2008-07-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapses on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) cells is thought to play an important role in mediating some of the behavioral effects of drugs of abuse yet little is known about its underlying mechanisms. We find that spike timing-dependent LTP (STD LTP) in VTA DA cells is absent in slices prepared from mice previously administered cocaine, suggesting that cocaine-induced LTP and STD LTP share underlying mechanisms. This form of STD LTP is dependent on NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation and a rise in postsynaptic calcium but surprisingly was not affected by an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). It was blocked by antagonists of conventional isoforms of PKC, whereas activation of protein kinase C (PKC) using a phorbol ester enhanced synaptic strength. These results suggest that NMDAR-mediated activation of PKC, but not CaMKII, is a critical trigger for LTP in VTA DA cells.

  13. Two distinct membrane potential-dependent steps drive mitochondrial matrix protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Alexander Benjamin; Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Clancy, Anne; Guiard, Bernard; Ieva, Raffaele; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Two driving forces energize precursor translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although the membrane potential (Δψ) is considered to drive translocation of positively charged presequences through the TIM23 complex (presequence translocase), the activity of the Hsp70-powered import motor is crucial for the translocation of the mature protein portion into the matrix. In this study, we show that mitochondrial matrix proteins display surprisingly different dependencies on the Δψ. However, a precursor's hypersensitivity to a reduction of the Δψ is not linked to the respective presequence, but rather to the mature portion of the polypeptide chain. The presequence translocase constituent Pam17 is specifically recruited by the receptor Tim50 to promote the transport of hypersensitive precursors into the matrix. Our analyses show that two distinct Δψ-driven translocation steps energize precursor passage across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Δψ- and Pam17-dependent import step identified in this study is positioned between the two known energy-dependent steps: Δψ-driven presequence translocation and adenosine triphosphate-driven import motor activity.

  14. Effects of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation in morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Miladi-Gorji, H; Rashidy-Pour, A; Fathollahi, Y; Semnanian, S; Jadidi, M

    2014-01-03

    This study was designed to examine the effect of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were randomly distributed into the saline-sedentary (Sal/Sed), the dependent-sedentary, the saline-exercise (Sal/Exc), and the dependent-exercise (D/Exc) groups. The Sal/Exc and the D/Exc groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 10 days. The Sal/Sed and the morphine-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same extent of time. Morphine (10 mg/kg) was injected bi-daily (12 h interval) during 10 days of voluntary exercise. On day 11, 2h after the morphine injection, the in vivo LTP in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was examined. The theta frequency primed bursts were delivered to the perforant path for induction of LTP. Population spike (PS) amplitude and the field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) slope were measured as indices of increase in synaptic efficacy. Chronic morphine increased the mean basal EPSP, and augmented PS-LTP. Exercise significantly increased the mean baseline EPSP and PS responses, and augmented PS-LTP in both saline and morphine-treated groups. Moreover, the increase of PS-LTP in the morphine-exercise group was greater (22.5%), but not statistically significant, than that of the Sal/Exc group. These results may imply an additive effect between exercise and morphine on mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Such an interaction between exercise and chronic morphine may influence cognitive functions in opiate addicts.

  15. Glioblastoma-dependent differentiation and angiogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Tobias; Hildebrandt, Jenna; Nuebling, Georg; Sostak, Petra; Straube, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is of central importance in the malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). As previously shown, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) migrate towards GBM and are incorporated into tumor microvessels. However, phenotype and function of recruited hMSC remain unclear. We evaluated the differentiation and angiogenic potential of hMSC after stimulation with glioblastoma-conditioned medium in vitro. Immunostaining with endothelial, smooth muscle cell and pericyte markers was used to analyze hMSC differentiation in different concentrations of tumor-conditioned medium (CM), and the angiogenic potential was evaluated by matrigel-based tube-formation assay (TFA). Immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumor-conditioned hMSC (CM-hMSC) expressed CD 151, VE-cadherin, desmin, α-smooth muscle actin, nestin, and nerval/glial antigen 2 (NG2) in a CM concentration-dependent manner, whereas no expression of von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and smooth myosin could be detected. These findings are indicative of GBM-dependent differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like cells, rather than endothelial or smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, TFA of hMSC and CM-hMSC revealed CM-dependent formation of capillary-like networks, which differed substantially from those formed by human endothelial cells (HUVEC), also implying pericyte-like tube formation. These results are indicative of GBM-derived differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like mural cells, which might contribute to the neovascularization and stabilization of tumor vessels.

  16. Nonadiabatic, momentum-dependent, and energy-dependent corrections in the effective-potential description for low-energy scattering of spinless systems - Their relations and validity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    In the effective-potential description for low-energy scattering involving a spinless complex (a body with internal structure), the nonadiabatic corrections are sometimes disguised in momentum-dependent terms. These are distinct from energy-dependent corrections. A general procedure is given here by which all the momentum-dependent corrections can be converted into nonadiabatic corrections in truly local form. Circumstances under which an expansion of the effective potential, in terms of the adiabatic term plus nonadiabatic and energy-dependent corrections is allowed and forbidden, are discussed. An example for the latter is in the case of near degeneracy in the spectrum of the complex or in the extrapolation of the effective potential to short-distance behavior. This indicates that certain claims of 'saturation effect' at short distances in low-energy electron-atom scattering are invalid.

  17. Relative permeability and salinity dependence of the streaming potential coupling coefficient in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Aurélien; Cerepi, Adrian; Garcia, Bruno; Deschamps, Hervé; Revil, André

    2017-04-01

    The seismoelectric method is showing promises to characterize both the vadose zone of the Earth and hydrocarbon reservoirs. That said, the dependence of a key parameter, the streaming coupling coefficient with the saturation remains highly debated. We explore here the relationship between the streaming potential coupling coefficient, resistivity, and permeability in saturated and unsaturated carbonate rocks together with the capillary pressure curves. Two rock samples, a limestone from the Paris basin (the Brauvilliers limestone) and a dolostone from the Aquitain basin (Sample labeled LS2), are characterized in terms of their porosity, specific surface area, and intrinsic formation factor. A new core flooding system is used to measure simultaneously and for the first time both the relative permeability, the resistivity, and the streaming potential coupling coefficient in steady-state two phase flow conditions as a function of the saturation. The results are compared with theoretical models predicting the relationship between the streaming potential coupling coefficient, the relative permeability, and the second Archie's exponent. A good agreement is found between the model based on the van Genuchten approach and experimental data but still we could not fit all the curves with the same van Genuchten exponent. Moreover, measurements of the streaming potential coupling coefficient in intact limestones samples saturated with NaCl brines at concentrations up to 100 g/L were realised. As brine salinity increases, the coupling coefficient decreases in magnitude, but is still measureable up to the saturated concentration limit. Our results suggest that streaming potential measurements may be used to monitor flow in saline subsurface environments such as deep saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  18. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    DOE PAGES

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potentialmore » for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.« less

  19. Serotonin receptors as potential targets for modulation of nicotine use and dependence.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul J; Lê, Anh Dzung; Higgins, Guy A

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine use carries considerable health risks and plays a major role in a variety of diseases. Current pharmacological treatments to aid in smoking cessation include nicotine-replacement therapy and non-nicotinic strategies such as bupropion and varenicline. While these treatments benefit some individuals there is still a need for better and more effective treatment strategies. Nicotine is the major psychoactive substance in tobacco. Some behavioural effects of nicotine, including its reinforcing efficacy result in part from activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. Modulation of dopamine function is one potential treatment strategy that could treat nicotine dependence. Serotonergic neurons modulate the functioning of dopamine neurons in a complex fashion. Much of this complexity arises from the fact that serotonin (5-HT) exerts its effects through multiple receptor subtypes, some of which even act in apparent functional opposition to each other. This article reviews evidence, primarily from animal experiments, using behavioural procedures relevant to nicotine use on the potential for 5-HT receptors as targets for treating nicotine dependence. The 5-HT(1A, 2A, 2C, 3, 4, 6) receptor subtypes have received most experimental attention, with the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors being the best studied. Several studies have now shown that 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists alleviate some of the behavioural signs induced by nicotine withdrawal. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies show that stimulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors reduces the function of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists block the stimulatory action of nicotine on midbrain dopamine function. They also reduce several behavioural effects of nicotine including its discriminative stimulus properties and reinforcing effects. Although more work remains to be done, 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists perhaps hold the most promise as potential therapies for smoking cessation.

  20. Modified Fourth-Order Kinetic Energy Gradient Expansion with Hartree Potential-Dependent Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2017-09-12

    Using the semiclassical neutral atom theory, we developed a modified fourth-order kinetic energy (KE) gradient expansion (GE4m) that keeps unchanged all the linear-response terms of the uniform electron gas and gives a significant improvement with respect to the known semilocal functionals for both large atoms and jellium surfaces. On the other hand, GE4m is not accurate for light atoms; thus, we modified the GE4m coefficients making them dependent on a novel ingredient, the reduced Hartree potential, recently introduced in the Journal of Chemical Physics 2016, 145, 084110, in the context of exchange functionals. The resulting KE gradient expansion functional, named uGE4m, belongs to the novel class of u-meta-generalized-gradient-approximations (uMGGA) whose members depend on the conventional ingredients (i.e., the reduced gradient and Laplacian of the density) as well as on the reduced Hartree potential. To test uGE4m, we defined an appropriate benchmark (including total KE and KE differences for atoms, molecules and jellium clusters) for gradient expansion functionals, that is, including only those systems which are mainly described by a slowly varying density regime. While most of the GGA and meta-GGA KE functionals (we tested 18 of them) are accurate for some properties and inaccurate for others, uGE4m shows a consistently good performance for all the properties considered. This represents a qualitative boost in the KE functional development and highlights the importance of the reduced Hartree potential for the construction of next-generation KE functionals.

  1. On Neuron Membrane Potential Distributions for Voltage and Time Dependent Current Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salig, J. B.; Carpio-Bernido, M. V.; Bernido, C. C.; Bornales, J. B.

    Tracking variations of neuronal membrane potential in response to multiple synaptic inputs remains an important open field of investigation since information about neural network behavior and higher brain functions can be inferred from such studies. Much experimental work has been done, with recent advances in multi-electrode recordings and imaging technology giving exciting results. However, experiments have also raised questions of compatibility with available theoretical models. Here we show how methods of modern infinite dimensional analysis allow closed form expressions for important quantities rich in information such as the conditional probability density (cpd). In particular, we use a Feynman integral approach where fluctuations in the dynamical variable are parametrized with Hida white noise variables. The stochastic process described then gives variations in time of the relative membrane potential defined as the difference between the neuron membrane and firing threshold potentials. We obtain the cpd for several forms of current modulation coefficients reflecting the flow of synaptic currents, and which are analogous to drift coefficients in the configuration space Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, we consider cases of voltage and time dependence for current modulation for periodic and non-periodic oscillatory current modulation described by sinusoidal and Bessel functions.

  2. Forecasting Corrosion of Steel in Concrete Introducing Chloride Threshold Dependence on Steel Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Andrea Nathalie

    Corrosion initiates in reinforced concrete structures exposed to marine environments when the chloride ion concentration at the surface of an embedded steel reinforcing bar exceeds the chloride corrosion threshold (CT) value. The value of CT is generally assumed to have a conservative fixed value ranging from 0.2% to - 0.5 % of chloride ions by weight of cement. However, extensive experimental investigations confirmed that C T is not a fixed value and that the value of CT depends on many variables. Among those, the potential of passive steel embedded in concrete is a key influential factor on the value of CT and has received little attention in the literature. The phenomenon of a potential-dependent threshold (PDT) permits accounting for corrosion macrocell coupling between active and passive steel assembly components in corrosion forecast models, avoiding overly conservative long-term damage projections and leading to more efficient design. The objectives of this investigation was to 1) expand by a systematic experimental assessment the knowledge and data base on how dependent the chloride threshold is on the potential of the steel embedded in concrete and 2) introduce the chloride threshold dependence on steel potential as an integral part of corrosion-related service life prediction of reinforced concrete structures. Experimental assessments on PDT were found in the literature but for a limited set of conditions. Therefore, experiments were conducted with mortar and concrete specimens and exposed to conditions more representative of the field than those previously available. The experimental results confirmed the presence of the PDT effect and provided supporting information to use a value of -550 mV per decade of Cl- for the cathodic prevention slope betaCT, a critical quantitative input for implementation in a practical model. A refinement of a previous corrosion initiation-propagation model that incorporated PDT in a partially submerged reinforced concrete

  3. Vestibular-dependent inter-stimulus interval effects on sound evoked potentials of central origin.

    PubMed

    Todd, N P M; Govender, S; Colebatch, J G

    2016-11-01

    Todd et al. (2014ab) have recently demonstrated the presence of vestibular-dependent contributions to auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when passing through the vestibular threshold as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), including a particular deflection labeled as an N42/P52 prior to the long-latency AEPs N1 and P2. In this paper we report the results of an experiment to determine the effect of inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and regularity on potentials recorded above and below VEMP threshold. Five healthy, right-handed subjects were recruited and evoked potentials were recorded to binaurally presented sound stimulation, above and below vestibular threshold, at seven stimulus rates with ISIs of 212, 300, 424, 600, 848, 1200 and 1696 ms. The inner five intervals, i.e. 300, 424, 600, 848, 1200 ms, were presented twice in both regular and irregular conditions. ANOVA on the global field power (GFP) were conducted for each of four waves, N42, P52, N1 and P2 with factors of intensity, ISI and regularity. Both N42 and P52 waves showed significant ANOVA effects of intensity but no other main effects or interactions. In contrast both N1 and P2 showed additional effects of ISI, as well as intensity, and evidence of non-linear interactions between ISI and intensity. A source analysis was carried out consistent with prior work suggesting that when above vestibular threshold, in addition to bilateral superior temporal cortex, ocular, cerebellar and cingulate sources are recruited. Further statistical analysis of the source currents indicated that the origin of the interactions with intensity may be the ISI sensitivity of the vestibular-dependent sources. This in turn may reflect a specific vestibular preference for stimulus rates associated with locomotion, i.e. rates close to 2 Hz, or ISIs close to 500 ms, where saccular afferents show increased gain and the corresponding reflexes are most sensitive.

  4. Experimental study of the water saturation dependence of streaming potential in sandstones during drainage and imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    We report the first measured values of the multiphase streaming potential coupling coefficient in intact sandstone core samples saturated with brine, and either undecane or nitrogen as the second phase, obtained from unsteady-state drainage and imbibition displacement experiments. The displacements are conducted at low rate, with pressure ramping at regular intervals during which the measured pressure and voltage across the sample are used to determine the streaming potential coupling coefficient. The voltage is measured using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes installed on each face of the sample. We find that the behaviour of the coupling coefficient at partial saturation is different depending upon whether oil or nitrogen is the second phase, and whether the brine saturation is decreasing during drainage, or increasing during imbibition. When undecane displaces brine, the coupling coefficient initially drops sharply as undecane enters the inlet face of the sample, and then remains approximately constant until undecane is produced at the outlet face of the sample. There is then a slow decrease in the coupling coefficient as the brine saturation decreases towards the irreducible value, but the coupling coefficient remains significantly greater than zero even after pumping several thousand pore volumes of undecane through the sample, during which the change in brine saturation is less than 1%. This behaviour would not be observed in measurements during capillary desaturation, as the non-wetting phase is prevented from flowing out of the sample. When nitrogen displaces brine, the coupling coefficient falls gradually as the brine saturation decreases, reaching zero (within experimental error) as the brine saturation approaches the irreducible value. During imbibition, the coupling coefficient increases with increasing brine saturation, exceeding the value obtained when the sample is fully saturated with brine as the residual undecane saturation is approached. However

  5. Optimized Effective Potential for Quantum Electrodynamical Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Flick, Johannes; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-08-01

    We propose an orbital exchange-correlation functional for applying time-dependent density functional theory to many-electron systems coupled to cavity photons. The time nonlocal equation for the electron-photon optimized effective potential (OEP) is derived. In the static limit our OEP energy functional reduces to the Lamb shift of the ground state energy. We test the new approximation in the Rabi model. It is shown that the OEP (i) reproduces quantitatively the exact ground-state energy from the weak to the deep strong coupling regime and (ii) accurately captures the dynamics entering the ultrastrong coupling regime. The present formalism opens the path to a first-principles description of correlated electron-photon systems, bridging the gap between electronic structure methods and quantum optics for real material applications.

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors as potential anticancer, antineurodegenerative, antiviral and antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Laurent

    2000-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in the cell division cycle, in neuronal functions, in transcription and in apoptosis. Intensive screening with these kinases as targets has lead to the identification of highly selective and potent small - molecule inhibitors. Co-crystallization with CDK2 shows that these flat heterocyclic hydrophobic compounds bind through two or three hydrogen bonds with the side chains of two amino acids located in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. These inhibitors are anti-proliferative; they arrest cells in G1 and in G2/M phase. Furthermore they facilitate or even trigger apoptosis in proliferating cells while they protect neuronal cells and thymocytes from apoptosis. The potential use of these inhibitors is being extensively evaluated for cancer chemotherapy and also in other therapeutic areas: neurology (Alzheimer's disease), cardiovascular (restenosis, angiogenesis), nephrology (glomerulonephritis), parasitology (Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, etc.) and virology (cytomegalovirus, HIV, herpes virus). Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  7. Histamine potentiates neuronal excitation by blocking a calcium-dependent potassium conductance.

    PubMed

    Haas, H L

    1984-04-01

    Histaminergic neurones send their axons to the whole forebrain. The diffuse projection is consistent with a modulatory role of these pathways. In hippocampal slices from rats a mechanism for this modulation is described, on pyramidal neurones of the CA 1 area: Strong excitations induced by intracellular current injection, ionophoretic administration of glutamate or synaptic stimulation normally restrict themselves by the activation of the calcium-dependent potassium current (gK(Ca) ). This current causes a long lasting afterhyperpolarization and an accommodation of firing. Their block by histamine and impromidine (reversed by metiamide and cimetidine) leads to a profound potentiation of excitatory signals. It is suggested that HA, through H2 receptors, accelerates the removal of intracellular free Ca++ ions.

  8. Stability Curve Prediction of Homologous Proteins Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature () and the change in heat capacity () of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies () at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted 's, 's and folding free energies at room temperature () are equal to 13 , 1.3 ) and 4.1 , respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed. PMID:25032839

  9. Manipulating graphene's lattice to create pseudovector potentials, discover anomalous friction, and measure strain dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitt, Alexander Luke

    Graphene is a single atomic sheet of graphite that exhibits a diverse range of unique properties. The electrons in intrinsic graphene behave like relativistic Dirac fermions; graphene has a record high Young's modulus but extremely low bending rigidity; and suspended graphene exhibits very high thermal conductivity. These properties are made more intriguing because with a thickness of only a single atomic layer, graphene is both especially affected by its environment and readily manipulated. In this dissertation the interaction between graphene and its environment as well as the exciting new physics realized by manipulating graphene's lattice are investigated. Lattice manipulations in the form of strain cause alterations in graphene's electrical dispersion mathematically analogous to the vector potential associated with a magnetic field. We complete the standard description of the strain-induced vector potential by explicitly including the lattice deformations and find new, leading order terms. Additionally, a strain engineered device with large, localized, plasmonically enhanced pseudomagnetic fields is proposed to couple light to pseudomagnetic fields. Accurate strain engineering requires a complete understanding of the interactions between a two dimensional material and its environment, particularly the adhesion and friction between graphene and its supporting substrate. We measure the load dependent sliding friction between mono-, bi-, and trilayer graphene and the commonly used silicon dioxide substrate by analyzing Raman spectra of circular, graphene sealed microchambers under variable external pressure. We find that the sliding friction for trilayer graphene behaves normally, scaling with the applied load, whereas the friction for monolayer and bilayer graphene is anomalous, scaling with the inverse of the strain in the graphene. Both strain and graphene's environment are expected to affect the quadratically dispersed out of plane acoustic phonon. Although

  10. Stability curve prediction of homologous proteins using temperature-dependent statistical potentials.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-07-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature (Tm) and the change in heat capacity (ΔCP) of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies (ΔG) at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted Tm's, ΔCP's and folding free energies at room temperature (ΔG25) are equal to 13° C, 1.3 kcal/(mol° C) and 4.1 kcal/mol, respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed.

  11. Cerebral information processing in personality disorders: I. Intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yehan; Fu, Xianming; Liu, Jianhui; He, Chengsen; Dong, Yi; Livesley, W John; Jang, Kerry L

    2006-02-28

    Patients with personality disorders such as the histrionic type exaggerate their responses when receiving external social or environmental stimuli. We speculated that they might also show an augmenting pattern of the auditory evoked potential N1-P2 component in response to stimuli with increasing levels of intensity, a response pattern that is thought to be inversely correlated with cerebral serotonin (5-HT) activity. To test this hypothesis, we collected auditory evoked potentials in 191 patients with personality disorders (19 patients with the paranoid type, 12 schizoid, 14 schizotypal, 18 antisocial, 15 borderline, 13 histrionic, 17 narcissistic, 25 avoidant, 30 dependent and 28 obsessive-compulsive) and 26 healthy volunteers. Their personality traits were measured using the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ). Compared with healthy subjects and other patient groups, the histrionic group scored higher on the basic traits Affective Instability, Stimulus Seeking, Rejection and Narcissism, and on the higher traits Emotional Dysregulation and Dissocial, than the other groups, and the schizoid group scored lower on most of the DAPP-BQ basic and higher traits. In addition, the histrionic group showed steeper amplitude/stimulus intensity function (ASF) slopes at three midline scalp electrodes than the healthy controls or the other patient groups. The ASF slopes were not correlated with any DAPP-BQ traits in the total sample of 217 subjects. However, the DAPP-BQ basic trait Rejection was positively correlated with the ASF slopes at all three electrode sites in the histrionic group. The increased intensity dependence of the auditory N1-P2 component might indicate that cerebral 5-HT neuronal activity is, on average, weak in the histrionic patients.

  12. Surface-potential dependence of interface-state passivation in metal-tunnel-oxide-silicon diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. O.; Lundgren, A.; Lundgren, P.

    1994-10-01

    Interface-state passivation during dc biased postmetallization annealing at ~350 °C was studied in very thin oxide (~31 Å) metal-tunnel-oxide-silicon structures. The gate metal was aluminum and the substrate was <111> oriented and of p type. Capacitance-voltage and tunnel-current-voltage measurements were used after the anneals to monitor the passivation of interface states. It was found that the passivation process of the initially present interface states is directly dependent on the surface potential but not on the average oxide electric field or the tunnel current. A negative gate voltage increases the passivation rate, whereas a positive gate voltage decreases it as compared to unbiased annealing. The interface states bear significant resemblances to Pb centers, which are dangling bonds on trivalently bonded Si atoms at the interface. The present observations are found to agree well with the theoretical calculations by Edwards [Phys. Rev. B 44, 1832 (1991)] on the surface-potential dependence of the passivation of Pb centers by molecular hydrogen. Furthermore, we report on the impact of biased annealing on the tunnel current and the flatband voltage and also on the behavior of electrically stressed devices during biased annealing. The beneficial effect of a negatively biased annealing makes it possible to find an optimum time and voltage, roughly 1000 s at a gate voltage of -1.2 V in our case, for simultaneously minimizing the dc tunnel current, flatband voltage shifts, and the density of fast interface states in these diodes. None of the passivation events was found to be promoted by annealing in a 10% H2/Ar ambient compared to annealing in an N2 ambient.

  13. A Single Brief Burst Induces GluR1-Dependent Associative Short-Term Potentiation: A Potential Mechanism for Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martha A.; Maramara, Lauren A.; Lisman, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent work showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon…

  14. A Single Brief Burst Induces GluR1-Dependent Associative Short-Term Potentiation: A Potential Mechanism for Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martha A.; Maramara, Lauren A.; Lisman, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent work showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon…

  15. Effective momentum-dependent potentials for atomic bound states and scattering in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, A.; Dharuman, G.; Verboncoeur, J.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling high energy-density experiments requires simulations spanning large length and time scales. These non-equilibrium experiments have time evolving ionization and partial degeneracy, obviating the direct use of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. Therefore, efficient approximate methods are greatly needed. We have examined the accuracy of one such method based on an effective classical-dynamics approach employing effective momentum dependent potentials (MDPs) within a Hamiltonian framework that enables large-scale simulations. We have found that a commonly used formulation, based on Kirschbaum-Wilets MDPs leads to very accurate ground state energies and good first/second-ionization energies. The continuum scattering properties of free electrons were examined by comparing the momentum-transfer cross section (MTCS) predicted by KW MDP to a semi-classical phase-shift calculation. Optimizing the KW MDP parameters for the scattering process yielded poor MTCSs, suggesting a limitation of the use of KW MDP for plasmas. However, our new MDP yields MTCS values in much better agreement than KW MDP.

  16. Microscopic theory of dissipation for slowly time-dependent mean field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, V. P.

    2005-10-01

    We study the dissipation rate Q˙ in systems of nucleons bound by a slowly time-dependent mean-field potential and slightly interacting between themselves. Starting from the many-body linear response formula we evaluate an expression for Q˙ in terms of the pure shell-model quantities and the nucleon-nucleon collision rate Γ. The application of the classical sum rule leads then to an expression for Q˙ in terms of the classical-path integral with the weighting function including Γ. For vanishing Γ this expression reduces to the Koonin-Randrup Knudsen-gas formula. For simplified Skyrme interactions the classical approximation for the Γ itself is obtained. In leptodermous systems the classical-path expression for Q˙ decomposes into the wall formula and the multiple-reflection term owing to incomplete randomization of particle motion between consecutive encounters with the boundary. The mean-free path and temperature dependence of dissipation is analyzed for small-amplitude distortions of spherical cavities.

  17. A TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor of Pseudomonas fluorescens: virulence and vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-hua; Dang, Wei; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium and a common aquaculture pathogen. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor, TdrA, as a secreted protein and examined its function and vaccine potential. TdrA is composed of 746 residues and possesses conserved structural domains of TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tdrA was upregulated under conditions of iron starvation and during infection of host cells. Consistently, iron depletion induced increased production of TdrA protein in the outer membrane. Compared to the wild type, a tdrA-knock out mutant (1) was unable to grow in the absence of iron, (2) exhibited drastically attenuated overall bacterial virulence, and (3) was impaired in the ability to establish lethal infection in host tissues. Purified recombinant TdrA (rTdrA), when used as a subunit vaccine to immunize flounder, was able to induce strong protective immunity, including production of serum-specific antibodies that resulted in effective protection against lethal-dose P. fluorescens challenge. Together, these results indicate that TdrA is an outer membrane receptor and a protective immunogen that is likely to be involved in iron acquisition and, as a result, required for optimal bacterial virulence.

  18. Effect of conditioning contraction intensity on postactivation potentiation is muscle dependent.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Hirata, Kosuke; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to examine whether the influence of conditioning contraction intensity on the extent of postactivation potentiation (PAP) is muscle dependent. Eleven healthy males performed both thumb adduction and plantar flexion as a conditioning contraction. The conditioning contraction intensities were set at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, or 100% of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Before and after the conditioning contraction, twitch torque was measured for the respective joint to calculate the extent of PAP. In plantar flexion, the extent of PAP became significantly larger as the conditioning contraction intensity increased up to 80% MVC (p<0.05). In contrast, the extent of PAP in thumb adduction increased significantly only up to 60% MVC (p<0.05), but not at higher intensities. These results indicate that the influence of the conditioning contraction intensity on the extent of PAP is muscle dependent. Our results suggest that a conditioning contraction with submaximal intensity can sufficiently evoke sizable PAP in the muscle where most of muscle fibers are recruited at submaximal intensities, thereby attenuating muscle fatigue induced by the conditioning contraction.

  19. Cannabidiol potentiates pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol via CB(1) receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Hazekawa, Mai; Sano, Kazunori; Irie, Keiichi; Orito, Kensuke; Egawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Naoki; Nishimura, Ryoji; Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2008-01-10

    Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, has been reported to have interactions with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). However, such interactions have not sufficiently been clear and may have important implications for understanding the pharmacological effects of marijuana. In the present study, we investigated whether cannabidiol modulates the pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-THC on locomotor activity, catalepsy-like immobilisation, rectal temperature and spatial memory in the eight-arm radial maze task in mice. In addition, we measured expression level of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor at striatum, cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Delta(9)-THC (1, 3, 6 and 10 mg/kg) induced hypoactivity, catalepsy-like immobilisation and hypothermia in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Delta(9)-THC (1, 3 and 6 mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired spatial memory in eight-arm radial maze. On the other hand, cannabidiol (1, 3, 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) did not affect locomotor activity, catalepsy-like immobilisation, rectal temperature and spatial memory on its own. However, higher dose of cannabidiol (10 or 50 mg/kg) exacerbated pharmacological effects of lower dose of Delta(9)-THC, such as hypoactivity, hypothermia and impairment of spatial memory. Moreover, cannabidiol (50 mg/kg) with Delta(9)-THC (1 mg/kg) enhanced the expression level of CB(1) receptor expression in hippocampus and hypothalamus. Cannabidiol potentiated pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-THC via CB(1) receptor-dependent mechanism. These findings may contribute in setting the basis for interaction of cannabinoids and to find a cannabinoid mechanism in central nervous system.

  20. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: DEPENDENCE OF THE SURFACE POTENTIAL ON THE GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Z.; Pavlu, J.; Safrankova, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Vaverka, J.; Mann, I.

    2011-09-01

    The secondary electron emission is believed to play an important role for the dust charging at and close to the lunar surface. However, our knowledge of emission properties of the dust results from model calculations and rather rare laboratory investigations. The present paper reports laboratory measurements of the surface potential on Lunar Highlands Type regolith simulants with sizes between 0.3 and 3 {mu}m in an electron beam with energy below 700 eV. This investigation is focused on a low-energy part, i.e., {<=}100 eV. We found that the equilibrium surface potential of this simulant does not depend on the grain size in our ranges of grain dimensions and the beam energies, however, it is a function of the primary electron beam energy. The measurements are confirmed by the results of the simulation model of the secondary emission from the spherical samples. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained in laboratory experiments as well as those inferred from in situ observations.

  1. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental approaches and apparatus design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Ruel, Jean; Tardif, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Electro-kinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Although such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electro-seismic method, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. We have carried out a study that considers six different approaches to making laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient of geomaterials. These are (i) motor and scotch yoke, (ii) motor and cam, (iii) pneumatic drive, (iv) hydraulic drive, (v) electro-magnetic drive, and (vi) piezo-electric drive. In each case, we have analysed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved. We conclude that the electro-magnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezo-electric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  2. Event-related potential map differences depend on the prestimulus microstates.

    PubMed

    Kondákor, I; Pascual-Marqui, R D; Michel, C M; Lehmann, D

    1995-01-01

    The dependency of the landscapes of visually evoked, 47-channel, event-related potential (ERPs) on the functional microstates (momentary map landscape) just before stimulus arrival was investigated, in 12 volunteers. The prestimulus microstates were determined using the map at the last peak of Global Field Power before the stimulus. The landscapes of these maps were described by the electrode locations of the positive and negative extreme potentials, and assigned to basic classes. The two most frequently occurring map-classes were used (left anterior-right posterior, and right anterior-left posterior). ERP map series were averaged for each subject and each prestimulus microstate class. The Randomization-Monte Carlo MANOVA test was used to test the significance of the difference between the ERP map landscapes at each sample point (n = 128, 500 ms) associated with the two prestimulus microstates. At 16 samples the difference was significant at p < 0.05. The longest uninterrupted sequence (n = 9) of significant differences occurred between 164 and 195 ms, i.e. during the conventional component P200. The results demonstrate that the brain electric microstate at stimulus arrival crucially influences the active neuronal populations that contribute to the ERP. This suggests that the processing of information will differ as a function of the momentary brain microstate at information arrival.

  3. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 by lipoxygenase metabolites depends on PKC phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Hazan, Adina; Geron, Matan; Steinberg, Rebbeca; Livni, Lital; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral neuronal activation by inflammatory mediators is a multifaceted physiological response that involves a multitude of regulated cellular functions. One key pathway that has been shown to be involved in inflammatory pain is Gq/GPCR, whose activation by inflammatory mediators is followed by the regulated response of the cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). However, the mechanism that underlies TRPV1 activation downstream of the Gq/GPCR pathway has yet to be fully defined. In this study, we employ pharmacological and molecular biology tools to dissect this activation mechanism via perforated-patch recordings and calcium imaging of both neurons and a heterologous system. We showed that TRPV1 activity downstream of Gq/GPCR activation only produced a subdued current, which was noticeably different from the robust current that is typical of TRPV1 activation by exogenous stimuli. Moreover, we specifically demonstrated that 2 pathways downstream of Gq/GPCR signaling, namely endovanilloid production by lipoxygenases and channel phosphorylation by PKC, converge on TRPV1 to evoke a tightly regulated response. Of importance, we show that only when both pathways are acting on TRPV1 is the inflammatory-mediated response achieved. We propose that the requirement of multiple signaling events allows subdued TRPV1 activation to evoke regulated neuronal response during inflammation.-Kumar R., Hazan, A., Geron, M., Steinberg, R., Livni, L., Matzner, H., Priel, A. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 by lipoxygenase metabolites depends on PKC phosphorylation.

  4. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGES

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; ...

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  5. State-dependent alpha peak frequency shifts: Experimental evidence, potential mechanisms and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Lefebvre, Jérémie

    2017-09-30

    Neural populations produce complex oscillatory patterns thought to implement brain function. The dominant rhythm in the healthy adult human brain is formed by alpha oscillations with a typical power peak most commonly found between 8 and 12Hz. This alpha peak frequency has been repeatedly discussed as a highly heritable and stable neurophysiological "trait" marker reflecting anatomical properties of the brain, and individuals' general cognitive capacity. However, growing evidence suggests that the alpha peak frequency is highly volatile at shorter time scales, dependent on the individuals' "state". Based on the converging experimental and theoretical results from numerous recent studies, here we propose that alpha frequency variability forms the basis of an adaptive mechanism mirroring the activation level of neural populations which has important functional implications. We here integrate experimental and computational perspectives to shed new light on the potential role played by shifts in alpha peak frequency and discuss resulting implications. We further propose a potential mechanism by which alpha oscillations are regulated in a noisy network of spiking neurons in presence of delayed feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic bound state and scattering properties of effective momentum-dependent potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharuman, Gautham; Verboncoeur, John; Christlieb, Andrew; Murillo, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    Effective classical dynamics provide a potentially powerful avenue for modeling large-scale dynamical quantum systems. We have examined the accuracy of a Hamiltonian-based approach that employs effective momentum-dependent potentials (MDPs) within a molecular-dynamics framework through studies of atomic ground states, excited states, ionization energies, and scattering properties of continuum states. Working exclusively with the Kirschbaum-Wilets (KW) formulation with empirical MDPs [C. L. Kirschbaum and L. Wilets, Phys. Rev. A 21, 834 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevA.21.834], optimization leads to very accurate ground-state energies for several elements (e.g., N, F, Ne, Al, S, Ar, and Ca) relative to Hartree-Fock values. The KW MDP parameters obtained are found to be correlated, thereby revealing some degree of transferability in the empirically determined parameters. We have studied excited-state orbits of electron-ion pair to analyze the consequences of the MDP on the classical Coulomb catastrophe. From the optimized ground-state energies, we find that the experimental first- and second-ionization energies are fairly well predicted. Finally, electron-ion scattering was examined by comparing the predicted momentum transfer cross section to a semiclassical phase-shift calculation; optimizing the MDP parameters for the scattering process yielded rather poor results, suggesting a limitation of the use of the KW MDPs for plasmas.

  7. Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-25

    of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence G.M...fiCAtson) Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Irodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by...necessary and identify by block number) An in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum

  8. Protein thermostability prediction within homologous families using temperature-dependent statistical potentials.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Dhanani, Malik; Dehouck, Yves; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The ability to rationally modify targeted physical and biological features of a protein of interest holds promise in numerous academic and industrial applications and paves the way towards de novo protein design. In particular, bioprocesses that utilize the remarkable properties of enzymes would often benefit from mutants that remain active at temperatures that are either higher or lower than the physiological temperature, while maintaining the biological activity. Many in silico methods have been developed in recent years for predicting the thermodynamic stability of mutant proteins, but very few have focused on thermostability. To bridge this gap, we developed an algorithm for predicting the best descriptor of thermostability, namely the melting temperature Tm, from the protein's sequence and structure. Our method is applicable when the Tm of proteins homologous to the target protein are known. It is based on the design of several temperature-dependent statistical potentials, derived from datasets consisting of either mesostable or thermostable proteins. Linear combinations of these potentials have been shown to yield an estimation of the protein folding free energies at low and high temperatures, and the difference of these energies, a prediction of the melting temperature. This particular construction, that distinguishes between the interactions that contribute more than others to the stability at high temperatures and those that are more stabilizing at low T, gives better performances compared to the standard approach based on T-independent potentials which predict the thermal resistance from the thermodynamic stability. Our method has been tested on 45 proteins of known Tm that belong to 11 homologous families. The standard deviation between experimental and predicted Tm's is equal to 13.6°C in cross validation, and decreases to 8.3°C if the 6 worst predicted proteins are excluded. Possible extensions of our approach are discussed.

  9. Protein Thermostability Prediction within Homologous Families Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Dhanani, Malik; Dehouck, Yves; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The ability to rationally modify targeted physical and biological features of a protein of interest holds promise in numerous academic and industrial applications and paves the way towards de novo protein design. In particular, bioprocesses that utilize the remarkable properties of enzymes would often benefit from mutants that remain active at temperatures that are either higher or lower than the physiological temperature, while maintaining the biological activity. Many in silico methods have been developed in recent years for predicting the thermodynamic stability of mutant proteins, but very few have focused on thermostability. To bridge this gap, we developed an algorithm for predicting the best descriptor of thermostability, namely the melting temperature , from the protein's sequence and structure. Our method is applicable when the of proteins homologous to the target protein are known. It is based on the design of several temperature-dependent statistical potentials, derived from datasets consisting of either mesostable or thermostable proteins. Linear combinations of these potentials have been shown to yield an estimation of the protein folding free energies at low and high temperatures, and the difference of these energies, a prediction of the melting temperature. This particular construction, that distinguishes between the interactions that contribute more than others to the stability at high temperatures and those that are more stabilizing at low , gives better performances compared to the standard approach based on -independent potentials which predict the thermal resistance from the thermodynamic stability. Our method has been tested on 45 proteins of known that belong to 11 homologous families. The standard deviation between experimental and predicted 's is equal to 13.6°C in cross validation, and decreases to 8.3°C if the 6 worst predicted proteins are excluded. Possible extensions of our approach are discussed. PMID:24646884

  10. Spatial dependency of cholera prevalence on potential cholera reservoirs in an urban area, Kumasi, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, Frank B.; Duker, Alfred A.; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Stein, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    Cholera has been a public health burden in Ghana since the early 1970s. Between 1999 and 2005, a total of 25,636 cases and 620 deaths were officially reported to the WHO. In one of the worst affected urban cities, fecal contamination of surface water is extremely high, and the disease is reported to be prevalent among inhabitants living in close proximity to surface water bodies. Surface runoff from dump sites is a major source of fecal and bacterial contamination of rivers and streams in the study area. This study aims to determine (a) the impacts of surface water contamination on cholera infection and (b) detect and map arbitrary shaped clusters of cholera. A Geographic Information System (GIS) based spatial analysis is used to delineate potential reservoirs of the cholera vibrios; possibly contaminated by surface runoff from open space refuse dumps. Statistical modeling using OLS model reveals a significant negative association between (a) cholera prevalence and proximity to all the potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.18, p < 0.001) and (b) cholera prevalence and proximity to upstream potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.25, p < 0.001). The inclusion of spatial autoregressive coefficients in the OLS model reveals the dependency of the spatial distribution of cholera prevalence on the spatial neighbors of the communities. A flexible scan statistic identifies a most likely cluster with a higher relative risk (RR = 2.04, p < 0.01) compared with the cluster detected by circular scan statistic (RR = 1.60, p < 0.01). We conclude that surface water pollution through runoff from waste dump sites play a significant role in cholera infection.

  11. Intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials during light interference in migraine.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Anna; Coppola, Gianluca; Gérardy, Pierre-Yves; Pierelli, Francesco; Schoenen, Jean

    2011-04-01

    Migraine patients show interictally a strong intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials (IDAP) and a lack of habituation of evoked potentials. Photic drive on high-frequency flash stimulation is another well-known interictal feature in migraineurs, associated with alpha-rhythm hyper-synchronisation. We compared therefore the influence of light stimulation on IDAP in healthy volunteers (HV) and migraine patients. A continuous flash stimulation was delivered during the recording of auditory evoked potentials at suprathreshold increasing stimulation intensities. IDAP was measured as the amplitude/stimulus intensity function (ASF) slope. In HV, the ASF slope decreased during flash stimulation, whereas, on average, there was no significant change in migraineurs. A closer analysis of migraineurs disclosed two subgroups of patients with no detectable clinical differences: one, the largest, in which the ASF slope was normal at baseline, but increased during light stimulation, the other with an increased ASF slope at rest and a decrease during light interference. Visual sensory overload is able to increase IDAP in the majority of migraineurs, which contrasts with HV. We hypothesise that this could be due to hyper-synchronisation of the alpha rhythm because of photic drive and possibly thalamo-cortical dysfunction. A minority of migraineurs have, like HV, an IDAP reduction during light interference. They are, however, characterised, unlike most HV, by a high IDAP at baseline. Besides underscoring the pathophysiological heterogeneity of migraine, these results suggest that light interference might improve the phenotyping of migraine patients who have a normal IDAP in the resting condition.

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  13. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-07-15

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ{sub o}r{sup 2}. Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed.

  14. Retino-cortical stimulus frequency-dependent gamma coupling: evidence and functional implications of oscillatory potentials.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Mihail I; Kékesi, Katalin A; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Galambos, Robert; Juhász, Gábor; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2016-10-01

    Long-range gamma band EEG oscillations mediate information transmission between distant brain regions. Gamma band-based coupling may not be restricted to cortex-to-cortex communication but may include extracortical parts of the visual system. The retinogram and visual event-related evoked potentials exhibit time-locked, forward propagating oscillations that are candidates of gamma oscillatory coupling between the retina and the visual cortex. In this study, we tested if this gamma coupling is present as indicated by the coherence of gamma-range (70-200 Hz) oscillatory potentials (OPs) recorded simultaneously from the retina and the primary visual cortex in freely moving, adult rats. We found significant retino-cortical OP coherence in a wide range of stimulus duration (0.01-1000 msec), stimulus intensity (800-5000 mcd/mm(2)), interstimulus interval (10-400 msec), and stimulus frequency (0.25-25 Hz). However, at low stimulus frequencies, the OPs were time-locked, flickering light at 25 Hz entrained continuous OP coherence (steady-state response, SSR). Our results suggest that the retina and the visual cortex exhibit oscillatory coupling at high-gamma frequency with precise time locking and synchronization of information transfer from the retina to the visual cortex, similar to cortico-cortical gamma coupling. The temporal fusion of retino-cortical gamma coherence at stimulus rates of theater movies may explain the mechanism of the visual illusion of continuity. How visual perception depends on early transformations of ascending sensory information is incompletely understood. By simultaneous measurement of flash-evoked potentials in the retina and the visual cortex in awake, freely moving rats, we demonstrate for the first time that time-locked gamma oscillatory potentials exhibit stable retino-cortical synchrony across a wide range of stimulus parameters and that the temporal continuity of coherence changes with stimulus frequency according to the expected

  15. Analysis of the potential-dependent changes in optical retardation in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L B; Hille, B; Keynes, R D; Landowne, D; Rojas, E

    1971-10-01

    1. An analysis has been made of the change in optical retradation of the membrane elicited by the application of voltage-clamp pulses in squid giant axons.2. The retardation response consists of three separate voltage-dependent components. For freshly mounted axons, defined as being in state 1, hyperpolarizing pulses give a rapid increase in the light intensity measured with crossed polarizers which has been termed the fast phase. This is followed by a rather slow return towards the base line termed the rebound. On treatment of the axon with certain agents that include tetrodotoxin, high calcium and terbium, the rebound disappears and the fast phase slows down, increases in size, and has a new slow component added to it. This transition from state 1 to a second state, 2, appears to be irreversible.3. In state 1, the time constant of the fast phase is 20-40 musec at 13 degrees C; it has a very large negative temperature coefficient (Q(10) = Ca.(1/8)). The size of the retardation change is independent of temperature and varies as the square of the applied voltage, but the voltage-retardation curve is symmetrical about a point well beyond zero membrane potential, at an internal potential of around + 70 mV. In state 2, the time constant is about five times larger, and varies much less markedly with temperature; the apex of the voltage-retardation curve is shifted to + 200 mV.4. The rebound has a time constant of the order of 20 msec at 13 degrees C. A 10 degrees rise in temperature more than halves the time constant and roughly doubles the amplitude of the rebound. The voltage dependence of the rebound differed from that of the fast phase.5. The slow component of state 2 has a time constant of about 2 msec which does not change noticeably between 10 and 25 degrees C. The size of this component seems to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage, rather than obeying a square law.6. A tenfold increase in external calcium concentration had no discernible effect on the

  16. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of RPF1: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    of the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maria ...this change. Thank you in advance for your help. Sincerely, Maria R. Huacani Principal Investigator DAMD17-98-1-8072 2 Form Approved REPORT...the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator DAMD17-98-1-8072 of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity 6. AUTHOR(S) Maria

  17. Sleep-Dependent Gene Expression in the Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex Following Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo N.; Erraji-Benchekroun, Loubna; Smyrniotopoulos, Peggy; Ogawa, Sonoko; Mello, Claudio V.; Sibille, Etienne; Pavlides, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    The activity-dependent transcription factor zif268 is re-activated in sleep following hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, the activation of secondary genes, possibly involved in modifying local synaptic strengths and ultimately stabilizing memory traces during sleep, has not yet been studied. Here, we investigated changes in hippocampal and cortical gene expression at a time point subsequent to the previously reported initial zif268 re-activation during sleep. Rats underwent unilateral hippocampal LTP and were assigned to SLEEP or AWAKE groups. Eighty minutes after a long rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) episode (or an equivalent amount of time for awake group) animals had their hippocampi dissected and processed for gene microarray hybridization. Prefrontal and parietal cortices were also collected for qRT-PCR analysis. The microarray analysis identified 28 up-regulated genes in the hippocampus: 11 genes were enhanced in the LTPed hemisphere of sleep animals; 13 genes were enhanced after sleep, regardless of hemisphere; and 4 genes were enhanced in LTPed hemisphere, regardless of behavioral state. qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the upregulation of aif-1 and sc-65 during sleep. Moreover, we observed a down-regulation of the purinergic receptor, P2Y4R in the LTP hemisphere of awake animals and a trend for the protein kinase, CaMKI to be up-regulated in the LTP hemisphere of sleep animals. In the prefrontal cortex, we showed a significant LTP-dependent down-regulation of gluR1 and spinophilin specifically during sleep. Zif268 was downregulated in sleep regardless of the hemisphere. No changes in gene expression were observed in the parietal cortex. Our findings indicate that a set of synaptic plasticity-related genes have their expression modulated during sleep following LTP, which can reflect biochemical events associated with reshaping of synaptic connections in sleep following learning. PMID:19389414

  18. Stimulus intensity-dependent modulations of hippocampal long-term potentiation by basolateral amygdala priming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zexuan; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that the relationship between memory and stress/emotionality is complicated, and may include both memory enhancing and memory impairing aspects. It has been suggested that the underlying mechanisms involve amygdala modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP). We recently reported that while in CA1 basolateral amygdala (BLA) priming impaired theta stimulation induced LTP, it enhanced LTP in the dentate gyrus (DG). However, emotional and stressfull experiences were found to activate synaptic plasticity within the BLA, raising the possibility that BLA modulation of other brain regions may be altered as well, as it may depend on the way the BLA is activated or is responding. In previous studies BLA priming stimulation was relatively weak (1 V, 50 μs pulse duration). In the present study we assessed the effects of two stronger levels of BLA priming stimulation (1 V or 2 V, 100 μs pulse duration) on LTP induction in hippocampal DG and CA1, in anesthetized rats. Results show that 1V-BLA priming stimulation enhanced but 2V-BLA priming stimulation impaired DG LTP; however, both levels of BLA priming stimulation impaired CA1 LTP, suggesting that modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by amygdala is dependent on the degree of amygdala activation. These findings suggest that plasticity-induced within the amygdala, by stressful experiences induces a form of metaplasticity that would alter the way the amygdala may modulate memory-related processes in other brain areas, such as the hippocampus. PMID:22586371

  19. Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Doreen; Borbiro, Istvan; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Phosphoinositides are emerging as general regulators of the functionally diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been reported to positively regulate many TRP channels, but in several cases phosphoinositide regulation is controversial. TRP melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a heat-activated ion channel that is also stimulated by chemical agonists, such as pregnenolone sulfate. Here, we used a wide array of approaches to determine the effects of phosphoinositides on TRPM3. We found that channel activity in excised inside-out patches decreased over time (rundown), an attribute of PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels. Channel activity could be restored by application of either synthetic dioctanoyl (diC8) or natural arachidonyl stearyl (AASt) PI(4,5)P2. The PI(4,5)P2 precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) was less effective at restoring channel activity. TRPM3 currents were also restored by MgATP, an effect which was inhibited by two different phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase inhibitors, or by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzyme, indicating that MgATP acted by generating phosphoinositides. In intact cells, reduction of PI(4,5)P2 levels by chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases or a voltage-sensitive 5'-phosphatase inhibited channel activity. Activation of PLC via muscarinic receptors also inhibited TRPM3 channel activity. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel and that decreasing PI(4,5)P2 abundance limits its activity. As all other members of the TRPM family have also been shown to require PI(4,5)P2 for activity, our data establish PI(4,5)P2 as a general positive cofactor of this ion channel subfamily.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Potential Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium, Aquabacterium parvum B6

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Aquabacterium parvum B6 is a potential nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium. The genes related to its denitrifying mechanism and iron metabolisms were unknown. We present the draft genome of Aquabacterium parvum B6, which could provide further insight into the nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing mechanism of strain B6. PMID:26823591

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Potential Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium, Aquabacterium parvum B6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Ma, Fang; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-28

    Aquabacterium parvum B6 is a potential nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium. The genes related to its denitrifying mechanism and iron metabolisms were unknown. We present the draft genome of Aquabacterium parvum B6, which could provide further insight into the nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing mechanism of strain B6. Copyright © 2016 Zhang et al.

  2. Sleep-Dependent Potentiation in the Visual System Is at Odds with the Synaptic Homeostasis Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    Two commentaries recently published in SLEEP came to very different conclusions regarding how data from a mouse model of sleep-dependent neural plasticity (orientation-specific response potentiation; OSRP) fit with the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis (SHY). To assess whether SHY offers an explanatory mechanism for OSRP, we present new data on how cortical neuron firing rates are modulated as a function of novel sensory experience and subsequent sleep in this model system. We carried out longitudinal extracellular recordings of single-neuron activity in the primary visual cortex across a period of novel visual experience and subsequent sleep or sleep deprivation. Spontaneous neuronal firing rates and visual responses were recorded from the same population of visual cortex neurons before control (blank screen) or novel (oriented grating) stimulus presentation, immediately after stimulus presentation, and after a period of subsequent ad lib sleep or sleep deprivation. Firing rate responses to visual stimuli were unchanged across waking experience, regardless of whether a blank screen or an oriented grating stimulus was presented. Firing rate responses to stimuli of the presented stimulus orientation were selectively enhanced across post-stimulus sleep, but these changes were blocked by sleep deprivation. Neuronal firing increased significantly across bouts of post-stimulus rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS), but not across bouts of wake. The current data suggest that following novel visual experience, potentiation of a subset of V1 synapses occurs across periods of sleep. This finding cannot be explained parsimoniously by SHY. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. EET-dependent potentiation of pulmonary arterial pressure: sex-different regulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Froogh, Ghezal; Jiang, Houli; Luo, Meng; Wolin, Michael S.; Huang, An

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that suppression of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) metabolism via genetic knockout of the gene for soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH-KO), or female-specific downregulation of sEH expression, plays a role in the potentiation of pulmonary hypertension. We used male (M) and female (F) wild-type (WT) and sEH-KO mice; the latter have high pulmonary EETs. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in control and in response to in vivo administration of U46619 (thromboxane analog), 14,15-EET, and 14,15-EEZE [14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(z)-enoic acid; antagonist of EETs] were recorded. Basal RVSP was comparable among all groups of mice, whereas MABP was significantly lower in F-WT than M-WT mice and further reduced predominantly in F-KO compared with M-KO mice. U46619 dose dependently increased RVSP and MABP in all groups of mice. The increase in RVSP was significantly greater and coincided with smaller increases in MABP in M-KO and F-WT mice compared with M-WT mice. In F-KO mice, the elevation of RVSP by U46619 was even higher than in M-KO and F-WT mice, associated with the least increase in MABP. 14,15-EEZE prevented the augmentation of U46619-induced elevation of RVSP in sEH-KO mice, whereas 14,15-EET-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction was comparable in all groups of mice. sEH expression in the lungs was reduced, paralleled with higher levels of EETs in F-WT compared with M-WT mice. In summary, EETs initiate pulmonary vasoconstriction but act as vasodilators systemically. High pulmonary EETs, as a function of downregulation or deletion of sEH, potentiate U46619-induced increases in RVSP in a female-susceptible manner. PMID:26498250

  4. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Esteban A.; Arias, Paulina; Varela, Carlos; Oyarce, María P.; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of carotid body (CB) chemosensory potentiation and systemic hypertension induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea. We tested whether peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a highly reactive nitrogen species, is involved in the enhanced CB oxygen chemosensitivity and the hypertension during CIH. Accordingly, we studied effects of Ebselen, an ONOO− scavenger, on 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity (3-NT-ir) in the CB, the CB chemosensory discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) in rats exposed to CIH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH (5% O2, 12 times/h, 8 h/day) for 7 days. Ebselen (10 mg/kg/day) was administrated using osmotic minipumps and BP measured with radiotelemetry. Compared to the sham animals, CIH-treated rats showed increased 3-NT-ir within the CB, enhanced CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia, increased BP response to acute hypoxia, and hypertension. Rats treated with Ebselen and exposed to CIH displayed a significant reduction in 3-NT-ir levels (60.8 ± 14.9 versus 22.9 ± 4.2 a.u.), reduced CB chemosensory response to 5% O2 (266.5 ± 13.4 versus 168.6 ± 16.8 Hz), and decreased mean BP (116.9 ± 13.2 versus 82.1 ± 5.1 mmHg). Our results suggest that CIH-induced CB chemosensory potentiation and hypertension are critically dependent on ONOO− formation. PMID:26798430

  5. Mapping the chemical potential dependence of current-induced spin polarization in a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Hickey, Danielle Reifsnyder; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    We report electrical measurements of the current-induced spin polarization of the surface current in topological insulator devices where contributions from bulk and surface conduction can be disentangled by electrical gating. The devices use a ferromagnetic tunnel junction (permalloy/Al 2O3 ) as a spin detector on a back-gated (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. We observe hysteretic voltage signals as the magnetization of the detector ferromagnet is switched parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the surface current. The amplitude of the detected voltage change is linearly proportional to the applied dc bias current in the (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. As the chemical potential is tuned from the bulk bands into the surface state band, we observe an enhancement of the spin-dependent voltages up to 300% within the range of the electrostatic gating. Using a simple model, we extract the spin polarization near charge neutrality (i.e., the Dirac point).

  6. Design and potential application of PEGylated gold nanoparticles with size-dependent permeation through brain microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Etame, Arnold B; Smith, Christian A; Chan, Warren C W; Rutka, James T

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provides a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood-brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, there are currently no studies that systematically examine brain microvasculature permeation of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized AuNPs. Such studies could pave the way for rationale AuNP design for passive targeting of malignant tumors. In this report we designed and characterized AuNPs with varying core particle sizes (4-24 nm) and PEG chain lengths [molecular weight 1000-10,000]. Using an in-vitro model designed to mimic the transport-permissive brain microvasculature, we demonstrate size-dependent permeation properties with respect to core particle size and PEG chain length. In general short PEG chain length (molecular weight 1000-2000) in combination with smallest core size led to optimum permeation in our model system. In this report the authors designed and characterized PEGylated gold NPs with varying core particle sizes and PEG chain lengths and demonstrate that short PEG chain length in combination with smallest core size led to optimum permeation of a blood-brain barrier model system. These findings may pave the way to optimized therapy of malignant brain tumors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The roles and therapeutic potential of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yunfei; Feng, Yong; Shen, Jacson; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation and cell growth is the hallmark of many different malignant diseases, including sarcomas. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and play crucial roles in tumor cell proliferation and growth by controlling cell cycle, transcription, and RNA splicing. In addition, several CDKs influence multiple targets and phosphorylate transcription factors involved in tumorigenesis. There are many examples linking dysregulated activation and expression of CDKs to tumors, and targeting CDKs in tumor cells has become a promising therapeutic strategy. More recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib for treating metastatic breast cancer. In sarcomas, high levels of CDK mRNA and protein expression have been found in most human sarcoma cells and patient tissues. Many studies have demonstrated consistent results in which inhibition of different CDKs decrease sarcoma cell growth and induce apoptosis. Therefore, CDKs comprise an attractive set of targets for novel anti-sarcoma drug development. In this review, we discuss the roles of different members of CDKs in various sarcomas and provide a pre-clinical overview of promising therapeutic potentials of targeting CDKs with a special emphasis on sarcoma.

  8. Transition state geometry of driven chemical reactions on time-dependent double-well potentials.

    PubMed

    Junginger, Andrej; Craven, Galen T; Bartsch, Thomas; Revuelta, F; Borondo, F; Benito, R M; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-11-09

    Reaction rates across time-dependent barriers are difficult to define and difficult to obtain using standard transition state theory approaches because of the complexity of the geometry of the dividing surface separating reactants and products. Using perturbation theory (PT) or Lagrangian descriptors (LDs), we can obtain the transition state trajectory and the associated recrossing-free dividing surface. With the latter, we are able to determine the exact reactant population decay and the corresponding rates to benchmark the PT and LD approaches. Specifically, accurate rates are obtained from a local description regarding only direct barrier crossings and to those obtained from a stability analysis of the transition state trajectory. We find that these benchmarks agree with the PT and LD approaches for obtaining recrossing-free dividing surfaces. This result holds not only for the local dynamics in the vicinity of the barrier top, but also for the global dynamics of particles that are quenched at the reactant or product wells after their sojourn over the barrier region. The double-well structure of the potential allows for long-time dynamics related to collisions with the outside walls that lead to long-time returns in the low-friction regime. This additional global dynamics introduces slow-decay pathways that do not result from the local transition across the recrossing-free dividing surface associated with the transition state trajectory, but can be addressed if that structure is augmented by the population transfer of the long-time returns.

  9. Visual evoked potentials in migraine patients: alterations depend on pattern spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, R; Grosser, K; Lang, E; Geisslinger, G; Kobal, G; Brune, K; Lötsch, J

    1999-06-01

    Visual information is conducted by two parallel pathways (luminance- and contour-processing pathways) which are thought to be differentially affected in migraine and can be investigated by means of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Components and habituation of VEPs at four spatial frequencies were compared between 26 migraineurs (13 without aura, MO; 13 with aura, MA) and 28 healthy volunteers. Migraineurs were recorded in the headache-free interval (at least 72 h before and after an attack). Five blocks of 50 responses to chequerboards of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 cycles per degree (c.p.d.) were sequentially averaged and analysed for latency and amplitude. Differences in VEPs were dependent on spatial frequency. Only when small checks were presented, i.e. at high spatial frequency (2 and 4 c.p.d.), was the latency of N2 significantly prolonged in MA and did it tend to be delayed in MO subjects. Habituation behaviour was not significantly different between groups under the stimulating conditions employed. Prolonged N2 latency might be explained by the lack or attenuation of a contour-specific component N130 in migraineurs, indicating an imbalance of the two visual pathways with relative predominance of the luminance-processing Y system. These results reflect an interictally persisting dysfunction of precortical visual processing which might be relevant in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  10. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. An interpretation of potential scale dependence of the effectivematrix diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Zhang, Y.Q.; Zhou, Q.; Molz, F.J.

    2005-11-30

    Matrix diffusion is an important process for solutetransport in fractured rock, and the matrix diffusion coefficient is akey parameter for describing this process. Previous studies indicatedthat the effective matrix diffusion coefficient values, obtained from alarge number of field tracer tests, are enhanced in comparison with localvalues and may increase with test scale. In this study, we have performednumerical experiments to investigate potential mechanisms behind possiblescale-dependent behavior. The focus of the experiments is on solutetransport in flow paths having geometries consistent with percolationtheories and characterized by local flow loops formed mainly bysmall-scale fractures. The water velocity distribution through a flowpath was determined using discrete fracture network flow simulations, andsolute transport was calculated using a previously derivedimpulse-response function and a particle-tracking scheme. Values foreffective (or up-scaled) transport parameters were obtained by matchingbreakthrough curves from numerical experiments with an analyticalsolution for solute transport along a single fracture. Results indicatethat a combination of local flow loops and the associated matrixdiffusion process, together with scaling properties in flow pathgeometry, seems to be the dominant mechanism causing the observed scaledependence of theeffective matrix diffusion coefficient (at a range ofscales).

  12. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems.

  13. [Potentiation of nitric oxide-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by levomycetin, tetracycline, and oxolin].

    PubMed

    Shchegolev, A Iu; Sidorova, T A; Severina, I S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of antibiotics laevomycetin and tetracycline and the antivirus agent oxolin on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase, the stimulation of the enzyme by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine nanoate (spermine NONO)) and the combination of spermine NONO and YC-1 was investigated. All preparations used in the concentration range 0,1-10 mM had no effect on the basal activity of guanylate cyclase but potentiated the SNP-induced activation of this enzyme. All preparations used synergistically increased (similar to YC-1) spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. At the same time these compounds did not produce the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve characteristic for YC-1. Moreover, all compounds used did not influence the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve obtained in the presence of YC-1. This demonstrated that there was no competition between YC-1 and the drugs for interaction with the enzyme. The revealed regulatory phenomen of laevomycetin, tetracycline and oxolin to increase synergistically NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase may cause additional pharmacological effects during prolong treatment by these drugs. This fact is necessary taking into account.

  14. Synaptotagmin-7 phosphorylation mediates GLP-1-dependent potentiation of insulin secretion from β-cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bingbing; Wei, Shunhui; Petersen, Natalia; Ali, Yusuf; Wang, Xiaorui; Bacaj, Taulant; Rorsman, Patrik; Hong, Wanjin; Südhof, Thomas C; Han, Weiping

    2015-08-11

    Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from β-cells by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+) then binds to synaptotagmin-7 as a major Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis, triggering secretory granule fusion and insulin secretion. In type-2 diabetes, insulin secretion is impaired; this impairment is ameliorated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which improve glucose homeostasis. However, the mechanism by which GLP-1 receptor agonists boost insulin secretion remains unclear. Here, we report that GLP-1 stimulates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of synaptotagmin-7 at serine-103, which enhances glucose- and Ca(2+)-stimulated insulin secretion and accounts for the improvement of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1. A phospho-mimetic synaptotagmin-7 mutant enhances Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis, whereas a phospho-inactive synaptotagmin-7 mutant disrupts GLP-1 potentiation of insulin secretion. Our findings thus suggest that synaptotagmin-7 is directly activated by GLP-1 signaling and may serve as a drug target for boosting insulin secretion. Moreover, our data reveal, to our knowledge, the first physiological modulation of Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis by direct phosphorylation of a synaptotagmin.

  15. Tacrolimus Triggers Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1-Dependent Relapse of Pancreatitis-Related Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Tsubota, Maho; Sugo, Hiiragi; Wakitani, Kohei; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Wada, Kyoichi; Takada, Mitsutaka; Oita, Akira; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressed in nociceptors is directly phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase C, and involved in the signaling of pancreatic pain. On the other hand, Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels expressed in nociceptors are functionally upregulated by phosphorylation with protein kinase A and also play a role in pancreatitis-related pain. Calcineurin, a phosphatase, negatively regulates various channel functions including TRPV1, and calcineurin inhibitor-induced pain syndrome by tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, used as an immunosuppressant, has been a clinical problem. We thus examined the effect of tacrolimus on pancreatitis-related pain in mice. Repeated treatment with cerulein caused referred hyperalgesia accompanying acute pancreatitis, which was unaffected by tacrolimus. Pancreatitis-related symptoms disappeared in 24 h, whereas the referred hyperalgesia recurred following the administration of tacrolimus, which was abolished by the blockers of TRPV1 but not T-type Ca2+ channels. Thus, tacrolimus appears to cause the TRPV1-dependent relapse of pancreatitis-related pain, suggesting the involvement of calcineurin in the termination of pancreatic pain.

  16. Sodium Dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT): A Potential Target for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge, etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

  17. Potential and flux field landscape theory. I. Global stability and dynamics of spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2013-09-28

    We established a potential and flux field landscape theory to quantify the global stability and dynamics of general spatially dependent non-equilibrium deterministic and stochastic systems. We extended our potential and flux landscape theory for spatially independent non-equilibrium stochastic systems described by Fokker-Planck equations to spatially dependent stochastic systems governed by general functional Fokker-Planck equations as well as functional Kramers-Moyal equations derived from master equations. Our general theory is applied to reaction-diffusion systems. For equilibrium spatially dependent systems with detailed balance, the potential field landscape alone, defined in terms of the steady state probability distribution functional, determines the global stability and dynamics of the system. The global stability of the system is closely related to the topography of the potential field landscape in terms of the basins of attraction and barrier heights in the field configuration state space. The effective driving force of the system is generated by the functional gradient of the potential field alone. For non-equilibrium spatially dependent systems, the curl probability flux field is indispensable in breaking detailed balance and creating non-equilibrium condition for the system. A complete characterization of the non-equilibrium dynamics of the spatially dependent system requires both the potential field and the curl probability flux field. While the non-equilibrium potential field landscape attracts the system down along the functional gradient similar to an electron moving in an electric field, the non-equilibrium flux field drives the system in a curly way similar to an electron moving in a magnetic field. In the small fluctuation limit, the intrinsic potential field as the small fluctuation limit of the potential field for spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems, which is closely related to the steady state probability distribution functional, is

  18. Modeling and experiments to explain the potential dependency of an UHSS to hydrogen environment assisted cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehler, Beth A.

    Modern ultra high strength steels have been developed with outstanding combinations of strength and fracture toughness but lack intrinsic corrosion resistance. Such steels are used by the military for aircraft components such as landing gears but require coatings and cathodic protection which can lead to various rates of hydrogen production depending on material, geometry, and electro(chemistry). The susceptibility of such steels to internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) limits their use in marine environments. The objective of this research is to develop the understanding necessary to design coated ultra high strength steels that resist HEE when stressed in marine environments. The cause of HEE is the establishment of high diffusible hydrogen concentrations (CH,diff) at the crack tip. There is a window of applied potentials (Eapplied) where susceptibility to HEE is reduced because CH,diff is reduced. However, Eapplied itself does not yield insight as to the exact conditions at the crack tip. Ohmic potential drop and electrochemical/chemical reactions in the crack can lead to a significantly different environment at the crack tip than on the surface. The issues that hinder understanding of HEE center on the capability to quantify and ultimately predict crack tip hydrogen concentrations (C H,Tip) relative to critical concentrations that trigger fracture as a function of Eapplied. CH,tip was characterized using a multi-pronged approach. Scaling laws were developed to enable measurements of E and pH in a scaled-up crack as a function of the scaling parameter, x2/G and Eapplied . Such measurements were correlated with CH,diff using an experimentally determined hydrogen uptake law based on first order absorption laws and trapping theory. CH,diff values were then used as inputs into existing micromechanical models for KTH and da/dtII to predict cracking susceptibility. The scientific contributions of this work include the

  19. Lipogenic potential of liver from morbidly obese patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, H.A.; McLendon, V.D.; Carpenter, J.W.; Marks, R.H.; Legett, N.; O'Brien, K.; Caro, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Intra-abdominal liver biopsies were obtained during surgery from fasted obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), obese normoglycemic controls, and lean controls. Lipid synthesis was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes and liver homogenates from the three groups of subjects. Incorporation of 3H2O into the lipids of hepatocytes was determined in the absence and presence of insulin (0.1 mumol/L). The activities of five enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, and the incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate into lipids were determined in liver homogenates. Basal lipid synthesis by hepatocytes was not different in the three groups of patients. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis by 8% +/- 30% in the lean controls, 33% +/- 8% in the obese controls and 17% +/- 6% in the NIDDM patients. No significant differences in the activities of the five enzymes that are involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis among the three groups of patients were observed. Similarly, incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate by liver homogenates, in the presence of saturating or submaximal concentrations of fatty acids, did not differ among the three groups. These results show that under the experimental conditions of this study, including the fasted state of the patients, the basal capacity of liver of NIDDM patients to synthesize fatty acids or glycerides is the same as that of liver from obese and lean controls. Thus, it is likely that an increase in fatty acid flux into a liver with normal lipogenic potential may contribute to the increased synthesis of triglycerides by the liver of these patients in vivo.

  20. Emission location dependent ozone depletion potentials for very short-lived halogenated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Haynes, P. H.; Law, K. S.

    2010-06-01

    We present trajectory-based estimates of Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs) for very short-lived halogenated source gases as a function of surface emission location. The ODPs are determined by the fraction of source gas and its degradation products which reach the stratosphere, depending primarily on tropospheric transport and chemistry, and the effect of the resulting reactive halogen in the stratosphere, which is determined by stratospheric transport and chemistry, in particular by stratospheric residence time. Reflecting the different timescales and physico-chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere, the estimates are based on calculation of separate ensembles of trajectories for the troposphere and stratosphere. A methodology is described by which information from the two ensembles can be combined to give the ODPs. The ODP estimates for a species with a 20 d lifetime, representing a compound like n-propyl bromide, are presented as an example. The estimated ODPs show strong geographical and season variation, particularly within the tropics. The values of the ODPs are sensitive to the inclusion of a convective parametrization in the trajectory calculations, but the relative spatial and seasonal variation is not. The results imply that ODPs are largest for emissions from South and South-East Asia during Northern Hemisphere summer and from the Western Pacific during Northern Hemisphere winter. Large ODPs are also estimated for emissions throughout the tropics with also non-negligible values extending into northern mid-latitudes particularly in the summer. These first estimates, which include some simplifying assumptions, show larger ODP values than previous studies, particularly over Southern Asia, suggesting that emissions of short-lived halogen source gases in certain geographical regions could have a significant impact on stratospheric ozone depletion.

  1. Emission location dependent ozone depletion potentials for very short-lived halogenated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Haynes, P. H.; Law, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    We present trajectory-based estimates of Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs) for very short-lived halogenated source gases as a function of surface emission location. The ODPs are determined by the fraction of source gas and its degradation products which reach the stratosphere, depending primarily on tropospheric transport and chemistry, and the effect of the resulting reactive halogen in the stratosphere, which is determined by stratospheric transport and chemistry, in particular by stratospheric residence time. Reflecting the different timescales and physico-chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere, the estimates are based on calculation of separate ensembles of trajectories for the troposphere and stratosphere. A methodology is described by which information from the two ensembles can be combined to give the ODPs. The ODP estimates for a species with a fixed 20 d lifetime, representing a compound like n-propyl bromide, are presented as an example. The estimated ODPs show strong geographical and seasonal variation, particularly within the tropics. The values of the ODPs are sensitive to the inclusion of a convective parametrization in the trajectory calculations, but the relative spatial and seasonal variation is not. The results imply that ODPs are largest for emissions from south and south-east Asia during Northern Hemisphere summer and from the western Pacific during Northern Hemisphere winter. Large ODPs are also estimated for emissions throughout the tropics with non-negligible values also extending into northern mid-latitudes, particularly in the summer. These first estimates, whilst made under some simplifying assumptions, show larger ODPs for certain emission regions, particularly south Asia in NH summer, than have typically been reported by previous studies which used emissions distributed evenly over land surfaces.

  2. Event-Related Potential Effects of Object Repetition Depend on Attention and Part-Whole Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, Angela; Thoma, Volker; de Fockert, Jan W.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spatial attention and part-whole configuration on recognition of repeated objects were investigated with behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Short-term repetition effects were measured for probe objects as a function of whether a preceding prime object was shown as an intact image or coarsely scrambled (split into two halves) and whether or not it had been attended during the prime display. In line with previous behavioral experiments, priming effects were observed from both intact and split primes for attended objects, but only from intact (repeated same-view) objects when they were unattended. These behavioral results were reflected in ERP waveforms at occipital–temporal locations as more negative-going deflections for repeated items in the time window between 220 and 300 ms after probe onset (N250r). Attended intact images showed generally more enhanced repetition effects than split ones. Unattended images showed repetition effects only when presented in an intact configuration, and this finding was limited to the right-hemisphere electrodes. Repetition effects in earlier (before 200 ms) time windows were limited to attended conditions at occipito-temporal sites during the N1, a component linked to the encoding of object structure, while repetition effects at central locations during the same time window (P150) were found for attended and unattended probes but only when repeated in the same intact configuration. The data indicate that view-generalization is mediated by a combination of analytic (part-based) representations and automatic view-dependent representations. PMID:27721749

  3. Effects of phencyclidine on cardiac action potential: pH dependence and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, G A; Kline, R P; Maayani, S; Weinstein, H; Kupersmith, J

    1983-04-08

    The effects of phencyclidine [1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)-piperidine; PCP] on cardiac action potential duration (APD) were compared to those of some of its derivatives, in strips of isolated frog ventricular muscle perfused with normal Ringer solution. We studied compounds with PCP-like behavioral actions (N-ethyl-1-phenyl-cyclohexylamine: PCE; and m-amino-PCP) as well as behaviorally inactive analogs (m-nitro-PCP; the quaternary derivative PCP-methyl iodide; and various fragments of the PCP molecule). Exposure to PCP, 3 microM to 1 mM, produced reversible, dose- and pH-dependent prolongations, of the APD to over 100% above control. The observed effects of the drugs are compatible with a mechanism of blockade of potassium conductance. An intracellular site for this action is suggested by: (i) the inactivity of the quaternary analog; (ii) the marked increase in the potency of the compounds when the external pH is changed in the region of their respective pKa values to increase the concentration of the unionized species; and (iii) the pronounced acceleration of the termination of the PCP effect by washout with a series of buffer solutions with decreasing pH values. The rank order of potency of the compounds in lengthening APD (PCE greater than m-amino PCP greater than PCP much much greater than m-nitro-PCP) is the same as reported from other pharmacological studies of specific PCP actions, and matches the rank of behavioral activity of the drugs.

  4. Particle in a box with a time-dependent δ -function potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Yi, Su Do; Kim, Minjae

    2016-11-01

    In quantum information processing, one often considers inserting a barrier into a box containing a particle to generate one bit of Shannon entropy. We formulate this problem as a one-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a time-dependent δ -function potential. It is a natural generalization of the particle in a box, a canonical example of quantum mechanics, and we present analytic and numerical investigations on this problem. After deriving an exact Volterra-type integral equation, composed of an infinite sum of modes, we show that approximate formulas with the lowest-frequency modes correctly capture the qualitative behavior of the wave function. If we take into account hundreds of modes, our numerical calculation shows that the quantum adiabatic theorem actually gives a very good approximation even if the barrier height diverges within finite time, as long as it is sufficiently longer than the characteristic time scale of the particle. In particular, if the barrier is slowly inserted at an asymmetric position, the particle is localized by the insertion itself, in accordance with a prediction of the adiabatic theorem. On the other hand, when the barrier is inserted quickly, the wave function becomes rugged after the insertion because of the energy transfer to the particle. Regardless of the position of the barrier, the fast insertion leaves the particle unlocalized so that we can obtain meaningful information by a which-side measurement. Our numerical procedure provides a precise way to calculate the wave function throughout the process, from which one can estimate the amount of this information for an arbitrary insertion protocol.

  5. Mitochondrial GRIM-19 as a potential therapeutic target for STAT3-dependent carcinogenesis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Bao, Liming; Huang, Daochao; Song, Lihua; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant STAT3 activation occurs in most human gastric cancers (GCs) and contributes to the malignant progression of GC, but mechanism(s) underlying aberrant STAT3 remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that the gene associated with retinoid interferon-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19) was severely depressed or lost in GC and chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) tissues and its loss contributed to GC tumorigenesis partly by activating STAT3 signaling. In primary human GC tissues, GRIM-19 was frequently depressed or lost and this loss correlated with advanced clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, H. pylori infection and poor overall survival of GC patients. In CAG tissues, GRIM-19 was progressively decreased along with its malignant transformation. Functionally, we indentified an oncogenic role of GRIM-19 loss in promoting GC tumorigenesis. Ectopic GRIM-19 expression suppressed GC tumor formation in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, we revealed that GRIM-19 inhibited STAT3 transcriptional activation and its downstream targets by reducing STAT3 nuclear distribution. Conversely, knockdown of GRIM-19 induced aberrant STAT3 activation and accelerated GC cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and this could be partly attenuated by the blockage of STAT3 activation. In addition, we observed subcellular redistributions of GRIM-19 characterized by peri-nuclear aggregates, non-mitochondria cytoplasmic distribution and nuclear invasion, which should be responsible for reduced STAT3 nuclear distribution. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial GRIM-19 could not only serve as an valuable prognostic biomarker for GC development, but also as a potential therapeutic target for STAT3-dependent carcinogenesis of GC. PMID:27167343

  6. Dendritic K+ channels contribute to spike-timing dependent long-term potentiation in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeo; Hoffman, Dax A.; Migliore, Michele; Johnston, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the role of A-type K+ channels for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of Schaffer collateral inputs to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. When low-amplitude excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were paired with two postsynaptic action potentials in a theta-burst pattern, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor-dependent LTP was induced. The amplitudes of the back-propagating action potentials were boosted in the dendrites only when they were coincident with the EPSPs. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors PD 098059 or U0126 shifted the activation of dendritic K+ channels to more hyperpolarized potentials, reduced the boosting of dendritic action potentials by EPSPs, and suppressed the induction of LTP. These results support the hypothesis that dendritic K+ channels and the boosting of back-propagating action potentials contribute to the induction of LTP in CA1 neurons. PMID:12048251

  7. Potentially modifiable deployment characteristics and new-onset alcohol abuse or dependence in the US National Guard.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mark G; Prescott, Marta R; Cohen, Gregory H; Calabrese, Joseph R; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Liberzon, Israel; Galea, Sandro

    2014-09-01

    There is a limited amount of data examining the relation between the onset of alcohol abuse/dependence and the experiences of soldiers prior to (pre), during (peri) and after (post) military deployment. Some deployment characteristics, e.g., military unit cohesion, are potentially modifiable in the context of reducing alcohol abuse/dependence peri-/post deployment. We investigated the associations between potentially modifiable deployment characteristics and peri-/post (incident) alcohol abuse/dependence among deployed Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG) soldiers. Using a sample of OHARNG (June, 2008 to February, 2009), eligible participants were ever been deployed and did not report alcohol abuse/dependence prior to deployment (final sample size=963). Interviews assessed soldiers' alcohol abuse/dependence, depression, PTSD, deployment related factors (e.g., exposure to warzone stressors) and three deployment characteristics (pre-deployment preparedness, unit support during deployment, and post-deployment social support). Associations between the three deployment characteristics and incident alcohol abuse/dependence (defined as abuse or dependence at any point during or after deployment) were estimated using logistic regression. Only pre-deployment preparedness was associated with incident alcohol abuse/dependence (a non-linear inverted-u shaped relation) when controlling for demographics, deployment related factors (e.g., exposure to warzone stressors), and the presence of psychopathology that exhibited peri-/post-deployment. We present these results graphically, plotting incident alcohol abuse/dependence over the levels of pre-deployment preparedness. The association between pre-deployment preparedness and alcohol abuse/dependence may be characterized as an inverted-U shaped function. Suggestions for how and whether to modify pre-deployment preparedness in an effort to reduce peri-/post-deployment alcohol abuse or dependence should await further research. Copyright

  8. Temperature-dependence of phonons, solid state properties and liquid structure of noble metals: A comparison of pair-potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszko, A.; Bose, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    Two groups of effective pair-potentials are studied from the viewpoint of their suitability in being able to describe solid state properties and liquid state structure of noble metals Cu, Ag and Au over a wide temperature range. Since the effective pair-potentials are usually empirical in nature, with parameters obtained by fitting to some reference state properties, the objective of the present study is to determine whether a particular parametrization scheme has any definite advantage over another. We consider Morse potentials with parameters determined by equilibrium lattice parameter, cohesive/sublimation energies as well as bulk modulus values of the solid at low/room temperatures. The other group of potentials considered is Erkoç potentials, where the parameters were determined first by studying dimers and further modified using bulk stability condition and bulk cohesive energy values. The potentials were then used to study the energetics of microclusters containing 3-7 atoms. Quasiharmonic results for the solid obtained at different temperatures and Monte Carlo simulation for the liquid state show that phonon spectra, thermal expansion, temperature-dependence of specific heats and liquid structure are much better described by the latter group. The first group of potentials may have an advantage in reproducing the temperature-dependence of elastic constants and bulk moduli, since they are based on room temperature values of these properties, which show only weak temperature-dependence in general for all metals. It is argued that potentials based on parameters fitted to the properties at a single volume are less versatile in capturing the temperature-dependence of various thermodynamic properties over a wide range. Potentials capable of reproducing the energetics of clusters of different co-ordination numbers and volumes per atom may fare better in this regard.

  9. 7D-folding integral in a density-dependent microscopic optical model potential for nucleon-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H. F.

    2011-09-15

    Microscopic optical model potentials, based on density-dependent effective interactions, involve multidimensional integrals to account for the full Fermi motion of the target struck nucleon throughout the nucleus. If a spherical matter distribution is assumed, then each matrix element of the optical potential requires the evaluation of seven-dimensional integrals. In this work we provide a full account of these integrals, retaining the genuine off-shell structure of the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. The evaluation is based on the asymptotic separation of the optical model potential for nucleon-nucleus scattering in momentum space, where the potential is split into a free t-matrix contribution and another which depends exclusively on the gradient of the density-dependent g matrix. The calculated potentials, based on the Paris nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential, are applied to proton elastic scattering from {sup 16}O and {sup 90}Zr at beam energies between 30 and 65 MeV. The results were compared with two approximations to the unabridged expression, revealing moderate differences among their scattering observables. When comparing with results based on the Argonne v{sub 18} NNpotential, these differences appear smaller than those attainable by the choice of the internucleon potential.

  10. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  11. Efficient methods for linear Schrödinger equation in the semiclassical regime with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Philipp; Iserles, Arieh; Kropielnicka, Karolina; Singh, Pranav

    2016-09-01

    We build efficient and unitary (hence stable) methods for the solution of the linear time-dependent Schrödinger equation with explicitly time-dependent potentials in a semiclassical regime. The Magnus-Zassenhaus schemes presented here are based on a combination of the Zassenhaus decomposition (Bader et al. 2014 Found. Comput. Math. 14, 689-720. (doi:10.1007/s10208-013-9182-8)) with the Magnus expansion of the time-dependent Hamiltonian. We conclude with numerical experiments.

  12. Spike-timing-dependent potentiation of sensory surround in the somatosensory cortex is facilitated by deprivation-mediated disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Frédéric; Holtmaat, Anthony

    2012-08-09

    Functional maps in the cerebral cortex reorganize in response to changes in experience, but the synaptic underpinnings remain uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal cell synapses in mouse barrel cortex can be potentiated upon pairing of whisker-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) with action potentials (APs). This spike-timing-dependent long-term potentiation (STD-LTP) was only effective for PSPs evoked by deflections of a whisker in the neuron's receptive field center, and not its surround. Trimming of all except two whiskers rapidly opened the possibility to drive STD-LTP by the spared surround whisker. This facilitated STD-LTP was associated with a strong decrease in the surrounding whisker-evoked inhibitory conductance and partially occluded picrotoxin-mediated LTP facilitation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that sensory deprivation-mediated disinhibition facilitates STD-LTP from the sensory surround, which may promote correlation- and experience-dependent expansion of receptive fields.

  13. Time-Local Equation for the Exact Optimized Effective Potential in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Sheng-Lun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Chu, Shih-I.

    2017-06-01

    A long-standing challenge in the time-dependent density functional theory is to efficiently solve the exact time-dependent optimized effective potential (TDOEP) integral equation derived from orbital-dependent functionals, especially for the study of nonadiabatic dynamics in time-dependent external fields. In this Letter, we formulate a completely equivalent time-local TDOEP equation that admits a unique real-time solution in terms of time-dependent Kohn-Sham and effective memory orbitals. The time-local formulation is numerically implemented, with the incorporation of exponential memory loss to address the unaccounted for correlation component in the exact-exchange-only functional, to enable the study of the many-electron dynamics of a one-dimensional hydrogen chain. It is shown that the long time behavior of the electric dipole converges correctly and the zero-force theorem is fulfilled in the current implementation.

  14. Potential Dependence of the Conductivity of Highly Oxidized Polythiophenes, Polypyrroles, and Polyaniline: Finite Windows of High Conductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-16

    protonation/deprotonation mechanism . Conductivity increases by at least 108 upon oxidizing polyani-ine from neutral to maximally conducting, and decreases...reversible, potential dependent changes in conductivity in liquid S02/electrolyte in the apparent absence of a protonation/deprotonation mechanism ...polyaniline is similar in 0.5 M H2SO4 ,1 liquid S02 /electrolyte, and poly(vinyl alchohol )/H 3PO4.nH20.8 However, the positive potential limit in aqueous

  15. A terrain-dependent reference atmosphere determination method for available potential energy calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    An iterative technique that determines the reference atmosphere which incorporates the effects of uneven surface topography is presented. This method has been successfully applied in several available potential energy studies. An alternative method due to Taylor is also evaluated. While Taylor presented excellent continuous formulations of the available potential energy that include topography, his method for determining the reference atmosphere distributions failed to provide the accuracy needed to produce reliable available potential energy estimates. Since topography has a significant influence on the general circulation, it is important to employ techniques that incorporate its effects in the determination of available potential energy.

  16. Generalized Sturmians in the time-dependent frame: effect of a fullerene confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Gasaneo, Gustavo; Mitnik, Dario M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we present a novel implementation of the Generalized Sturmian Functions in the time-dependent frame to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We study the effect of the confinement of H atom in a fullerene cage for the 1s → 2p resonant transition of the atom interacting with a finite laser pulse, calculating the population of bound states and spectral density.

  17. Context-dependent symbioses and their potential roles in wildlife diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Alford, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in ecology, evolution and medicine that both the nature (commensal, parasitic and mutualistic) and outcome (symbiont fitness, survival) of symbiotic interactions are often context-dependent. Less is known about the importance of context-dependence in symbioses involved in wildlife disease. We review variable symbioses, and use the amphibian disease chytridiomycosis to demonstrate how understanding context-dependence can improve the understanding and management of wildlife diseases. In chytridiomycosis, the host–pathogen interaction is context-dependent; it is strongly affected by environmental temperature. Skin bacteria can also modify the interaction; some bacteria reduce amphibians' susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. Augmentation of protective microbes is being considered as a possible management tool, but informed application of bioaugmentation requires understanding of how the interactions between host, beneficial bacteria and pathogen depend upon environmental context. The community-level response of the amphibian skin microbiota to environmental conditions may explain the relatively narrow range of environmental conditions in which past declines have occurred. Environmental context affects virulence and the protection provided by mutualists in other host–pathogen systems, including threatened bats and corals. Increased focus on context-dependence in interactions between wildlife and their symbionts is likely to be crucial to the future investigation and management of emerging diseases of wildlife. PMID:22237907

  18. Action potential broadening in capsaicin-sensitive DRG neurons from frequency-dependent reduction of Kv3 current.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin; Blair, Nathaniel T; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-09-06

    Action potential shape is a key determinant of cellular electrophysiological behavior. We found that in small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons corresponding to nociceptors (from rats of either sex), stimulation at frequencies as low as 1 Hz produced progressive broadening of the action potentials. Stimulation at 10 Hz for three seconds resulted in an increase in action potential width by an average of 76 ± 7% at 22 °C and by 38 ± 3% at 35 °C. Action potential clamp experiments showed that spike broadening results from frequency-dependent reduction of potassium current during spike repolarization. The major current responsible for frequency-dependent reduction of overall spike-repolarizing potassium current was identified as Kv3 current by its sensitivity to low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (IC50 <100 μM) and block by the peptide inhibitor BDS-I. There was a small component of Kv1-mediated current during action potential repolarization but this current did not show frequency-dependent reduction. In a small fraction of cells, there was a component of calcium-dependent potassium current that showed frequency-dependent reduction but the contribution to overall potassium current reduction was almost always much smaller than that of Kv3-mediated current. These results show that Kv3 channels make a major contribution to spike repolarization in small diameter DRG neurons and undergo frequency-dependent reduction, leading to spike broadening at moderate firing frequencies. Spike broadening from frequency-dependent reduction in Kv3 current could underlie the frequency-dependent increases in conduction velocity typical of C-fiber axons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTSmall-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons mediating nociception and other sensory modalities express many types of potassium channels, but how they combine to control firing patterns and conduction is not well understood. We find that action potentials of small-diameter rat dorsal root

  19. Existence, uniqueness, and construction of the density-potential mapping in time-dependent density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ruggenthaler, Michael; Penz, Markus; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2015-05-27

    In this work we review the mapping from densities to potentials in quantum mechanics, which is the basic building block of time-dependent density-functional theory and the Kohn-Sham construction. We first present detailed conditions such that a mapping from potentials to densities is defined by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We specifically discuss intricacies connected with the unboundedness of the Hamiltonian and derive the local-force equation. This equation is then used to set up an iterative sequence that determines a potential that generates a specified density via time propagation of an initial state. This fixed-point procedure needs the invertibility of a certain Sturm-Liouville problem, which we discuss for different situations. Based on these considerations we then present a discussion of the famous Runge-Gross theorem which provides a density-potential mapping for time-analytic potentials. Further we give conditions such that the general fixed-point approach is well-defined and converges under certain assumptions. Then the application of such a fixed-point procedure to lattice Hamiltonians is discussed and the numerical realization of the density-potential mapping is shown. We conclude by presenting an extension of the density-potential mapping to include vector-potentials and photons.

  20. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  1. Comment on ``Solution of the Schrödinger equation for the time-dependent linear potential''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkar, H.; Benamira, F.; Maamache, M.

    2003-07-01

    We present the correct way to obtain the general solution of the Schrödinger equation for a particle in a time-dependent linear potential following the approach used in the paper of Guedes [Phys. Rev. A 63, 034102 (2001)]. In addition, we show that, in this case, the solutions (wave packets) are described by the Airy functions.

  2. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  3. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  4. Isolation of Bacteria Whose Growth Is Dependent on High Levels of CO2 and Implications of Their Potential Diversity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kenji; Tagami, Yudai; Kamihara, Yuka; Shiratori, Hatsumi; Takano, Hideaki; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2008-01-01

    Although some bacteria require an atmosphere with high CO2 levels for their growth, CO2 is not generally supplied to conventional screening cultures. Here, we isolated 84 bacterial strains exhibiting high-CO2 dependence. Their phylogenetic affiliations imply that high-CO2 culture has potential as an effective method to isolate unknown microorganisms. PMID:18487395

  5. The dependence of plateau currents in cardiac Purkinje fibres on the interval between action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, O.; Noble, D.; Tsien, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    1. The influence of diastolic interval on ionic currents that may determine the action potential duration in cardiac Purkinje fibres was investigated. As the diastolic interval is shortened from about 5 sec, the first effect on the action potential is to reduce and then abolish the notch at the beginning of the plateau. 2. This effect corresponds to the influence of diastolic interval on the magnitude of a transient outward chloride current known as the `dynamic current'. 3. Further shortening of the diastolic interval produces a slight shortening of the action potential until intervals less than about 500 msec are used. The action potential then becomes considerably shorter. The `time constant' of decay of this major influence of one action potential on the duration of the subsequent action potential is about 200 msec. 4. This effect corresponds to the time course of decay of an outward (mainly K) current known as ix1. 5. It is shown that variations in the magnitude of ix1 may be responsible for the alternation in action potential duration at the beginning of a train of stimuli known as `electrical alternans'. 6. The results in general are consistent with the view that ix1 is the main current involved in determining the interval—duration relation although they cannot exclude the possibility that an inward current with a reavailability time course similar to the decay time course of ix1 might also be involved. PMID:4113958

  6. INTERACTION POTENTIALS FROM THE VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF TOTAL ATOM-ATOM SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Lennard - Jones potential, the depth of the interatomic potential well, epsilon and the interatomic separation at the zero of potential energy, sigma was obtained from these measurements. From the experimental epsilon and sigma, a theoretical Q(V) was computed using a partial wave analysis. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained. In this paper, K-Kr and Li-He are discussed which were studied in the ’low’ velocity region and in the ’’high’’ velocity region, respectively. It is shown that epsilon and sigma may be unambiguously

  7. Rate Dependence and Regulation of Action Potential and Calcium Transient in a Canine Cardiac Ventricular Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Thomas J.; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Background Computational biology is a powerful tool for elucidating arrhythmogenic mechanisms at the cellular level, where complex interactions between ionic processes determine behavior. A novel theoretical model of the canine ventricular epicardial action potential and calcium cycling was developed and used to investigate ionic mechanisms underlying Ca2+ transient (CaT) and action potential duration (APD) rate dependence. Methods and Results The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) regulatory pathway was integrated into the model, which included a novel Ca2+-release formulation, Ca2+ subspace, dynamic chloride handling, and formulations for major ion currents based on canine ventricular data. Decreasing pacing cycle length from 8000 to 300 ms shortened APD primarily because of ICa(L) reduction, with additional contributions from Ito1, INaK, and late INa. CaT amplitude increased as cycle length decreased from 8000 to 500 ms. This positive rate–dependent property depended on CaMKII activity. Conclusions CaMKII is an important determinant of the rate dependence of CaT but not of APD, which depends on ion-channel kinetics. The model of CaMKII regulation may serve as a paradigm for modeling effects of other regulatory pathways on cell function. PMID:15505083

  8. On the construction of coherent states of position dependent mass Schroedinger equation endowed with effective potential

    SciTech Connect

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to construct coherent states for an exactly solvable position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We use point canonical transformation method and obtain ground state eigenfunction of the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We fix the ladder operators in the deformed form and obtain explicit expression of the deformed superpotential in terms of mass distribution and its derivative. We also prove that these deformed operators lead to minimum uncertainty relations. Further, we illustrate our algorithm with two examples, in which the coherent states given for the second example are new.

  9. Quantum many-body system in presence of time-dependent potential and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    In this article, a quantum many-body system is considered. Then two time-dependent interactions have been added to the system. Changing of them is assumed in general form. After that, by using algebraic method, time evolution of this many-body system has been investigated. In order to study the time evolution, Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant and time evolution operator method have been used. Appropriate dynamical invariants are constructed and their Eigenvalues are derived as well as appropriate time evolution operators are constructed. These calculations have been done in general form so there are no limiting assumptions on changing of time-dependent functions.

  10. The pH dependence of the cathodic peak potential of the active sites in bilirubin oxidase.

    PubMed

    Filip, Jaroslav; Tkac, Jan

    2014-04-01

    This is the first study showing pH dependence of three distinct redox sites within bilirubin oxidase (BOD) adsorbed on a nanocomposite modified electrode. The 1st redox centre with the highest redox potential Ec(1st)=404 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (614 mV vs. NHE at pH7.0) exhibited pH dependence with a slope -dEc(1st)/dpH=66(±3) mV under a non-turnover process. The 2nd redox centre with a potential Ec(2nd)=228 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (438 mV vs. NHE at pH7.0) was not dependent on pH in the absence and presence of O2. Finally, the 3rd redox site with a redox potential Ec(3rd)=92 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (302 mV vs. NHE at pH7.0) exhibited pH dependence for a cathodic process with -dEc(3rd)/dpH=70(±6) mV and for anodic process with -dEa(3rd)/dpH=73(±2) mV, respectively. Moreover, two break points for dependence of Ec(1st) or Ec(3rd) on pH were observed for the 1st (T1) site and the 3rd site assigned to involvement of two acidic amino acids (Asp105 and Glu463). A diagram of a potential difference between cathodic peaks of BOD as a dependence on pH is shown. The results obtained can be of interest for construction of biofuel cells based on BOD such as for generation of a low level of electricity from body fluids.

  11. Entrance Channel Mass Asymmetry Effects in Sub-Barrier Fusion Dynamics by Using Energy Dependent Woods-Saxon Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeet Singh, Gautam

    2015-12-01

    The present article highlights the inconsistency of static Woods-Saxon potential and the applicability of energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential to explore the fusion dynamics of {}4822Ti+58,60,6428Ni, {}4622Ti+{}6428Ni,{}5022Ti+{}6028Ni, and {}199F+9341Nb reactions leading to formation of different Sn-isotopes via different entrance channels. Theoretical calculations based upon one-dimensional Wong formula obtained by using static Woods-Saxon potential unable to provide proper explanation for sub-barrier fusion enhancement of these projectile-target combinations. However, the predictions of one-dimensional Wong formula based upon energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) accurately describe the observed fusion dynamics of these systems wherein the significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm is required to address the experimental data in whole range of energy. Therefore, the energy dependence in nucleus-nucleus potential simulates the influence of the nuclear structure degrees of freedom of the colliding pairs. Supported by Dr. D.S. Kothari Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme sponsored by University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India

  12. Optical redox ratio identifies metastatic potential-dependent changes in breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alhallak, Kinan; Rebello, Lisa G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    The development of prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic risk could reduce the number of patients receiving chemotherapy for tumors with low metastatic potential. Recent evidence points to a critical role for cell metabolism in driving breast cancer metastasis. Endogenous fluorescence intensity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) can provide a label-free method for assessing cell metabolism. We report the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD + NADH) of four isogenic triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with varying metastatic potential. Under normoxic conditions, the redox ratio increases with increasing metastatic potential (168FARN>4T07>4T1), indicating a shift to more oxidative metabolism in cells capable of metastasis. Reoxygenation following acute hypoxia increased the redox ratio by 43 ± 9% and 33 ± 4% in the 4T1 and 4T07 cells, respectively; in contrast, the redox ratio decreased 14 ± 7% in the non-metastatic 67NR cell line. These results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio is sensitive to the metabolic adaptability of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential and could potentially be used to measure dynamic functional changes that are indicative of invasive or metastatic potential. PMID:27895979

  13. Theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems: Application to electrode potential dependence of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2014-09-28

    We propose a theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems. The fundamental equation to be solved is based on a time-dependent density functional theory in real-time and real-space in combination with its finite temperature formula treating an electrode potential. Solvation effects are evaluated by a dielectric continuum theory. The approach allows us to treat optical response in electrochemical systems at the atomistic level of theory. We have applied the method to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4-mercaptopyridine on an Ag electrode surface. It is shown that the SERS intensity has a peak as a function of the electrode potential. Furthermore, the real-space computational approach facilitates visualization of variation of the SERS intensity depending on an electrode potential.

  14. Aripiprazole as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant dependence: human laboratory studies with d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W

    2006-11-01

    Amphetamine and cocaine dependence present significant public health concerns, yet no broadly effective pharmacotherapy for stimulant dependence has been developed. Two human laboratory studies are reviewed that tested the ability of aripiprazole, a novel antipsychotic with partial agonist activity at D2 dopamine receptors, to alter the behavioral effects of stimulants using d-amphetamine as a model agent. In each of these experiments, volunteers learned to discriminate 15 mg d-amphetamine (i.e., > or =80% drug-appropriate responding over 4 consecutive sessions). The effects of a range of doses of d-amphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 mg) were then tested alone and following pretreatment with aripiprazole (20 mg in Experiment 1; 10 mg in Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, aripiprazole (20 mg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus and many of the subject-rated effects of amphetamine. Aripiprazole alone produced performance decrements. To determine whether a lower dose of aripiprazole would also attenuate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine without impairing performance, Experiment 2 was conducted. Aripiprazole (10 mg) failed to alter the discriminative-stimulus effects but attenuated some of the subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine. This dose of aripiprazole did not impair performance. The results of these experiments indicate that aripiprazole may have clinical utility in treating stimulant dependence. Future human laboratory research should better model the clinical use of aripiprazole by examining the effects of chronic aripiprazole combined with either methamphetamine or cocaine in dependent individuals. A large-scale clinical trial is also needed to evaluate the efficacy of aripiprazole for the treatment of stimulant dependence.

  15. Vibrational dependence of the anisotropic intermolecular potential of Ar-HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutson, Jeremy M.

    1992-05-01

    A new intermolecular potential for Ar-HF is obtained by fitting to results from high-resolution microwave, far-infrared, and infrared spectroscopy. The new potential, designated H6(4,3,2), is a function of the diatom mass-reduced vibrational quantum number η=(v+ (1)/(2) )/(μHX)1/2 as well as the intermolecular distance R and angle θ, and has 22 adjustable parameters. It reproduces all the available spectroscopic data for levels of Ar-HF correlating with HF, v=0, 1, and 2, and DF, v=0 and 1. The H6(4,3,2) potential is qualitatively similar to previous potentials, with a linear Ar-H-F equilibrium geometry and a secondary minimum at the linear Ar-F-H geometry. Compared to the potential of Nesbitt et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 4855 (1989)], obtained from spectra of Ar-HF (v=1), the H6(4,3,2) potential is rather deeper near the equilibrium geometry (Ar-H-F), but shallower around the secondary minimum (Ar-F-H). The absolute well depth increases by 19 cm-1 between HF v=0 and v=1. The vibrationally averaged induction energy is calculated to be substantially (8.1 cm-1 ) greater for v=1 than for v=0, and is responsible for most of the observed red shift in the complex. Predictions of additional spectroscopic properties that would test the new potential are given, including far-infrared and overtone spectra of Ar-DF and dipole moments of excited states of Ar-HF and Ar-DF.

  16. Potential dependence of cuprous/cupric duplex film growth on copper electrode in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-Bo; Lu, Dao-Yong; Jin, Guan-Ping

    2006-11-01

    The duplex oxide film potentiostatically formed on copper in concentrated alkaline media has been investigated by XRD, XPS, negative-going voltammetry and cathodic chronopotentiometry. The interfacial capacity was also measured using fast triangular voltage method under quasi-stationary condition. The obvious differences in the thickness, composition, passivation degree and capacitance behavior were observed between the duplex film formed in lower potential region (-0.13 to 0.18 V versus Hg|HgO electrode with the same solution as the electrolyte) and that formed in higher potential region (0.18-0.60 V). Cuprous oxides could be formed and exist stably in the inner layer in the both potential regions, and three cupric species, soluble ions and Cu(OH) 2 and CuO, could be independently produced from the direct oxidation of metal copper, as indicated by three pairs of redox voltammetric peaks. One of the oxidation peaks appeared only after the scan was reversed from high potential and could be attributed to CuO formation upon the pre-accumulation of O 2- ions within the film under high anodic potentials. A new mechanism for the film growth on the investigated time scale from 1 to 30 min is proposed, that is, the growth of the duplex film in the lower potential region takes place at the film|solution interface to form a thick Cu(OH) 2 outer layer by field-assisted transfer of Cu 2+ ions through the film to solution, whereas the film in the higher potential region grows depressingly and slowly at the metal|film interface to form Cu 2O and less CuO by the transfer of O 2- ions through the film to electrode.

  17. On the pH Dependence of the Potential of Maximum Entropy of Ir(111) Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ganassin, Alberto; Sebastián, Paula; Climent, Víctor; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Feliu, Juan

    2017-04-28

    Studies over the entropy of components forming the electrode/electrolyte interface can give fundamental insights into the properties of electrified interphases. In particular, the potential where the entropy of formation of the double layer is maximal (potential of maximum entropy, PME) is an important parameter for the characterization of electrochemical systems. Indeed, this parameter determines the majority of electrode processes. In this work, we determine PMEs for Ir(111) electrodes. The latter currently play an important role to understand electrocatalysis for energy provision; and at the same time, iridium is one of the most stable metals against corrosion. For the experiments, we used a combination of the laser induced potential transient to determine the PME, and CO charge-displacement to determine the potentials of zero total charge, (EPZTC). Both PME and EPZTC were assessed for perchlorate solutions in the pH range from 1 to 4. Surprisingly, we found that those are located in the potential region where the adsorption of hydrogen and hydroxyl species takes place, respectively. The PMEs demonstrated a shift by ~30 mV per a pH unit (in the RHE scale). Connections between the PME and electrocatalytic properties of the electrode surface are discussed.

  18. Pulsed magnetic stimulation modifies amplitude of action potentials in vitro via ionic channels-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs) on amplitude of evoked, compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the segments of sciatic nerve in vitro. PMFs were applied for 30 min at frequency of 0.16 Hz and intensity of 15 mT. In confirmation of our previous reports, PMF exposure enhanced amplitude of CAPs. The effect persisted beyond PMF activation period. As expected, CAP amplitude was attenuated by antagonists of sodium channel, lidocaine, and tetrodotoxin. Depression of the potential by sodium channels antagonists was reversed by subsequent exposure to PMFs. The effect of elevated potassium concentration and veratridine on the action potential was modified by exposure to PMFs as well. Neither inhibitors of protein kinase C and protein kinase A, nor known free radicals scavengers had any effects on PMF action. Possible mechanisms of PMF action are discussed.

  19. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni c-AMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA): A Potential New Drug Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-07

    chloroadenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate in breast cancer patients and xenograft bearing mice. Ann Oncol 7: 291-296. 129. Tortora G, Ciardiello F, Pepe S...cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases by using cyclic nucleotide analogs. Eur J Biochem 181: 19-31. 47. Yokozaki H, Tortora G, Pepe S, Maronde E...181: 19-31. 150 28. Ally S, Tortora G, Clair T, Grieco D, Merlo G, et al. (1988) Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site

  1. Current and Potential Pharmacological Treatment Options for Maintenance Therapy in Opioid-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Fiellin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid dependence, manifesting as addiction to heroin and pharmaceutical opioids is increasing. Internationally, there are an estimated 15.6 million illicit opioid users. The global economic burden of opioid dependence is profound both in terms of HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission, direct healthcare costs, and indirectly through criminal activity, absenteeism and lost productivity. Opioid agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine, that stabilize neuronal systems and provide narcotic blockade are the most effective treatments. Prolonged provision of these medications, defined as maintenance treatment, typically produces improved outcomes when compared with short-duration tapers and withdrawal. The benefits of opioid agonist maintenance include decreased illicit drug use, improved retention in treatment, decreased HIV risk behaviours and decreased criminal behaviour. While regulations vary by country, these medications are becoming increasingly available internationally, especially in regions experiencing rapid transmission of HIV due to injection drug use. In this review, we describe the rationale for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, discuss emerging uses of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone, and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone and buprenorphine, and provide a description of the experimental therapies. PMID:22235870

  2. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H2 molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  3. Corticosterone time-dependently modulates β-adrenergic effects on long-term potentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Zhenwei; Krugers, Harm J.; Joëls, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining whether corticosterone exerts opposite effects on LTP depending on the timing of hormone application in the dentate gyrus as well. Moreover, we tested rapid and delayed actions by corticosterone on β-adrenergic-dependent changes in LTP. Unlike the CA1 region, our in vitro field potential recordings show that rapid effects of corticosterone do not influence LTP induced by mild tetanization in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, unless GABAA receptors are blocked. In contrast, the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol does initiate a slow-onset, limited amount of potentiation. When corticosterone was applied concurrently with isoproterenol, a further enhancement of synaptic strength was identified, especially during the early stage of potentiation. Yet, treatment with corticosterone several hours in advance of isoproterenol fully prevented any effect of isoproterenol on LTP. This emphasizes that corticosterone can regulate β-adrenergic modulation of synaptic plasticity in opposite directions, depending on the timing of hormone application. PMID:17522027

  4. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-31

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H{sub 2} molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  5. Potential-dependent action of Anemonia sulcata toxins III and IV on sodium channels in crayfish giant axons.

    PubMed

    Warashina, A; Jiang, Z Y; Ogura, T

    1988-01-01

    Effects of toxins III and IV (ATX III and IV) from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata on the Na current of crayfish giant axons were studied. Both toxins slowed the inactivation of Na channels, producing a maintained Na current during a depolarizing voltage pulse. Using the intensity of the toxin-induced maintained current as an index for the fraction of Na channels to which toxin is bound, the toxin association and dissociation kinetics were analyzed. The dissociation rate of ATX III was increased by two orders of magnitudes by depolarizing the membrane from -70 to -40 mV. This increase of the dissociation rate caused a marked decrease in the binding rate of ATX III to Na channels in the same potential range. ATX IV exhibited association and dissociation kinetics that had a potential dependency quite similar to that of ATX III in spite of different ionic charge distribution in these two toxins. The results support the view that the potential-dependent kinetics of these toxins are not due to an electrostatic interaction between the ionic charges of toxins and the membrane potential but result from a modulation of the binding energy depending on the gate configuration of the Na channel.

  6. LIFE-STAGE DEPENDENT DOSIMETRY AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON RISK ASSESSMENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describi...

  7. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  8. LIFE-STAGE DEPENDENT DOSIMETRY AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON RISK ASSESSMENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describi...

  9. Bacopa monnieri extract enhances learning-dependent hippocampal long-term synaptic potentiation.

    PubMed

    Promsuban, Charkriya; Limsuvan, Suveerawan; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Tilokskulchai, Kanokwan; Tapechum, Sompol; Pakaprot, Narawut

    2017-11-08

    Bacopa monnieri has been used in Ayurvedic medicine as a memory enhancer for a long time; however, its direct effect on synaptic plasticity has not been investigated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the effect of B. monnieri on long-term synaptic potentiation in acute hippocampal slices. Adult male Wistar rats were orally administered either sterile water or the ethanolic extract of B. monnieri for 60 days. The extracellular recording was performed to measure the field excitatory postsynaptic potential in the acute hippocampal slices of these rats. Our results showed that B. monnieri extract significantly increased long-term potentiation magnitude compared with the control group, whereas there was no change in basal synaptic transmission. The data support the beneficial mnemonic effect of B. monnieri, and suggest that this effect might be because of the increase of learning-associated synaptic machinery, resulting in the long-term potentiation enhancement and strengthening of hippocampal synapses, which plays a critical role in learning and memory formation.

  10. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  11. Reverse rate-dependent changes are determined by baseline action potential duration in mammalian and human ventricular preparations.

    PubMed

    Bárándi, László; Virág, László; Jost, Norbert; Horváth, Zoltán; Koncz, István; Papp, Rita; Harmati, Gábor; Horváth, Balázs; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Zaza, Antonio; Varró, András; Nánási, Péter P

    2010-05-01

    Class III antiarrhythmic agents exhibit reverse rate-dependent lengthening of the action potential duration (APD). In spite of the several theories developed so far to explain this reverse rate-dependency (RRD), its mechanism has not yet been clarified. The aim of the present work was to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for RRD in mammalian ventricular myocardium. Action potentials were recorded using conventional sharp microelectrodes from human, canine, rabbit and guinea pig ventricular myocardium in a rate-dependent manner varying the cycle length (CL) between 0.3 and 5 s. Rate-dependent drug effects were studied using agents known to lengthen or shorten action potentials, and these drug-induced changes in APD were correlated with baseline APD values. Both drug-induced lengthening (by dofetilide, sotalol, E-4031, BaCl(2), veratrine, BAY K 8644) and shortening (by mexiletine, tetrodotoxin, lemakalim) of action potentials displayed RRD, i.e., changes in APD were greater at longer than at shorter CLs. In rabbit, where APD is a biphasic function of CL, the drug-induced APD changes were proportional to baseline APD values but not to CL. Similar results were obtained when repolarization was modified by injection of inward or outward current pulses in isolated canine cardiomyocytes. In each case the change in APD was proportional to baseline APD (i.e., that measured before the superfusion of drug or injection of current). Also, the net membrane current (I (net)), determined from the action potential waveform at the middle of the plateau, was inversely proportional to APD and consequently with to CL. The results indicate that RRD is a common characteristic of all the drugs tested regardless of the modified ion current species. Thus, drug-induced RRD can be considered as an intrinsic property of cardiac membranes based on the inverse relationship between I (net) and APD.

  12. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement.

  13. Angular Dependence of Strong Field Ionization of CH3X (X = F, Cl, Br, or I) Using Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction with an Absorbing Potential.

    PubMed

    Hoerner, Paul; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2017-08-10

    Methyl halides have been used to test basis set effects on simulations of strong field ionization using time dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential. Standard atom centered basis sets need to be augmented by several sets of diffuse functions on each atom so that the wave function in the strong field can interact with the absorbing potential used to model ionization. An absorbing basis of 3 s functions, 2 p functions, 3 d functions, and 1 f function is sufficient for CH3F. Large absorbing basis sets with 4 s functions, 3 or 4 p functions, 4 or 5 d functions, and 2 f functions are recommended for the heavier halogens. The simulations used static fields in the 0.035-0.07 au range to explore the angular dependence of ionization of methyl halides. CH3F ionizes mainly from the methyl group; CH3Cl and CH3Br show ionization from both the methyl group and the halogen, and CH3I ionizes almost exclusively from the pπ orbitals of the iodine.

  14. Generalized Fokker Planck Equation with Time-Dependent Transport Coefficients and a Quadratic Potential: Its Application in Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Shun-Jin; Zhang, Hua

    2005-01-01

    In order to control non-equilibrium processes and to describe the fat-tail phenomenon in econophysics, we generalize the traditional the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) by including a quadratic correlation potential, and by making the time-dependent drift-diffusion coefficients. We investigate the su(1,1)⊕u(1) algebraic structure and obtain the exact solutions to the generalized time-dependent FPE by using the algebraic dynamical method. Based on the exact solution, an important issue in modern econophysics, i.e. the fat-tail distribution in stock markets, is analysed.

  15. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-entangled Bose-Einstein condensates in state-dependent potentials: A dynamical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkjian, Hadrien; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Sinatra, Alice

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of nonlocal correlations by atomic interactions in a pair of bimodal Bose-Einstein condensates in state-dependent potentials including spatial dynamics. The wave functions of the four components are described by combining a Fock state expansion with a time-dependent Hartree-Fock ansatz so that both the spatial dynamics and the local and nonlocal quantum correlations are accounted for. We find that despite the spatial dynamics, our protocol generates enough nonlocal entanglement to perform an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering experiment with two spatially separated condensates of a few thousand atoms.

  16. Potential dependent structure of electric double layer faced to solid electrode surfaces analyzed by electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Ken-ichi; Utsunomiya, Toru; Yokota, Yasuyuki

    2017-08-01

    This progress review summarizes recent achievements on the analyses of electric double layer (EDL) formed at electrolyte/electrode interfaces by using electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM), which enables to obtain the liquid side information on the liquid molecules’ structuring as well as the atomic scale resolution of the solid side at low loading forces. Potential and electrolyte dependent EDL structures at aqueous solution/graphite interfaces and strong substrate dependency on the structuring of interfacial ionic liquid are mainly discussed.

  17. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging: current and potential uses in obstetrics and gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, K; Moore, J; Kennedy, S; Tracey, I

    2008-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive technique that has become increasingly popular in the neurosciences. It measures the proportion of oxygenated haemoglobin in specific areas of the brain, mirroring blood flow and therefore function. Here we review how the findings from functional studies impact on areas of gynaecological practice as diverse as chronic pain, continence, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Finally we review some of the more novel applications of the technique, such as imaging of pelvic floor function and the effects of hypoxia on the fetus. PMID:19076956

  18. Expression-dependent pharmacology of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E.; Pless, Stephan A.; Schwarz, Stephan K.W.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 channels are polymodal sensors of noxious stimuli and integral players in thermosensation, inflammation and pain signaling. It has been shown previously that under prolonged stimulation, these channels show dynamic pore dilation, providing a pathway for large and otherwise relatively impermeant molecules. Further, we have shown recently that these nonselective cation channels, when activated by capsaicin, are potently and reversibly blocked by external application of quaternary ammonium compounds and local anesthetics. Here we describe a novel phenomenon in transient receptor potential channel pharmacology whereby their expression levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, as assessed by the magnitude of macroscopic currents, are negatively correlated with extracellular blocker affinity: small current densities give rise to nanomolar blockade by quaternary ammoniums and this affinity decreases linearly as current density increases. Possible mechanisms to explain these data are discussed in light of similar observations in other channels and receptors. PMID:23428812

  19. Temperature dependence of the reduction potential of blue copper in fungal laccase

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Vernon T.; Malmström, Bo G.; Anson, Fred C.; Gray, Harry B.

    1982-01-01

    Thin-layer spectroelectrochemical methods have been employed to measure the reduction potentials of the blue copper in Polyporus versicolor laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) between 7°C and 41°C (0.2 M sodium phosphate, pH 5.4). Thermodynamic parameters are: ΔS° = -13.9 ± 2 cal/mol-K; ΔH° = -22.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol; E° (25°C) = 780 ± 3 mV vs. the normal hydrogen electrode. Comparison of the ΔS° and ΔH° values with those for single-site proteins suggests that the high potential of the blue copper in fungal laccase is attributable mainly to stabilization of the copper (I) center by enhanced ligand binding interactions and that protein solvation effects play a lesser role. PMID:16593193

  20. Multiple cellular cascades participate in long-term potentiation and in hippocampus-dependent learning

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Michel; Zhu, Guoqi; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yubin; Briz, Victor; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery by Bliss and Lomo, the phenomenon of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been extensively studied, as it was viewed as a potential cellular mechanism of learning and memory. Over the years, many signaling cascades have been implicated in its induction, consolidation and maintenance, raising questions regarding its real significance. Here, we review several of the most commonly studies signaling cascades and discuss how they converge on a common set of mechanisms likely to be involved in the maintenance of LTP. We further argue that the existence of cross-talks between these different signaling cascades can not only account for several discrepancies in the literature, but also account for the existence of different forms of LTP, which can be engaged by different types of stimulus parameters under different experimental conditions. Finally, we discuss how the understanding of the diversity of LTP mechanisms can help us understand the diversity of the types of learning and memory. PMID:25482663

  1. Light-dependent cation gradients and electrical potential in Halobacterium halobium cell envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.; Macdonald, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles can be prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes, which contain properly oriented bacteriorhodopsin and which extrude H(+) during illumination. The pH difference that is generated across the membranes is accompanied by an electrical potential of 90 to 100 mV (interior negative) and the movements of other cations. Among these is the efflux of Na(+), which proceeds against its electrochemical potential. The relationship between the size and direction of the light-induced pH gradient and the rate of depletion of Na(+) from the vesicles, as well as other evidence, suggest that the active Na(+) extrusion is facilitated by a membrane component that exchanges H(+) for Na(+) with a stoichiometry greater than 1. The gradients of H(+) and Na(+) are thus coupled to one another. The Na(+) gradient (efflux much larger than influx), which arises during illumination, plays a major role in energizing the active transport of amino acids.

  2. Visual change detection: event-related potentials are dependent on stimulus location in humans.

    PubMed

    Czigler, István; Balázs, László; Pató, Lívia G

    2004-07-08

    Infrequent colored patterns within sequences of patterns of frequent color elicited a posterior negative event-related potential component only in case of lower half-field stimulation. This negativity in the 140-200 ms latency range is considered as a correlate of automatic visual change detection (visual mismatch negativity, vMMN). Retinotopic prestriate visual areas are suggested to be the generating loci of vMMN.

  3. Xenin-25 potentiates glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide action via a novel cholinergic relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wice, Burton M; Wang, Songyan; Crimmins, Dan L; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Althage, Matthew C; Ford, Eric L; Tran, Hung; Ohlendorf, Matthew; Griest, Terry A; Wang, Qiuling; Fisher, Simon J; Ladenson, Jack H; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal peptides GLP-1 and GIP potentiate glucose-mediated insulin release. Agents that increase GLP-1 action are effective therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, GIP action is blunted in T2DM, and GIP-based therapies have not been developed. Thus, it is important to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of GIP action. We developed mice lacking GIP-producing K cells. Like humans with T2DM, "GIP/DT" animals exhibited a normal insulin secretory response to exogenous GLP-1 but a blunted response to GIP. Pharmacologic doses of xenin-25, another peptide produced by K cells, restored the GIP-mediated insulin secretory response and reduced hyperglycemia in GIP/DT mice. Xenin-25 alone had no effect. Studies with islets, insulin-producing cell lines, and perfused pancreata indicated xenin-25 does not enhance GIP-mediated insulin release by acting directly on the beta-cell. The in vivo effects of xenin-25 to potentiate insulin release were inhibited by atropine sulfate and atropine methyl bromide but not by hexamethonium. Consistent with this, carbachol potentiated GIP-mediated insulin release from in situ perfused pancreata of GIP/DT mice. In vivo, xenin-25 did not activate c-fos expression in the hind brain or paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus indicating that central nervous system activation is not required. These data suggest that xenin-25 potentiates GIP-mediated insulin release by activating non-ganglionic cholinergic neurons that innervate the islets, presumably part of an enteric-neuronal-pancreatic pathway. Xenin-25, or molecules that increase acetylcholine receptor signaling in beta-cells, may represent a novel approach to overcome GIP resistance and therefore treat humans with T2DM.

  4. Contribution of Ca2+-dependent conductances to membrane potential fluctuations of medullary respiratory neurons of newborn rats in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ballanyi, Klaus; Homma, Ikuo

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent conductances were studied in respiratory interneurons in the brainstem-spinal cord preparation of newborn rats. ω-Conotoxin-GVIA attenuated evoked postsynaptic potentials, spontaneous or evoked inspiratory spinal nerve activity and blocked spike afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, ω-conotoxin-GVIA augmented rhythmic drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and increased respiratory-related spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells with no effect on inspiratory hyperpolarization. In contrast, ω-agatoxin-IVA depressed drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and attenuated inspiratory hyperpolarization and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells. It did not affect spike shape and exerted only minor, non-significant, attenuating effects on spontaneous or evoked nerve bursts or evoked postsynaptic potentials. Nifedipine diminished drive potentials and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory neurons and shortened drive potentials in some cells. ω-Conotoxin-MVIIC attenuated drive potentials and intraburst firing rate of pre-inspiratory neurons and decreased substantially respiratory frequency. Respiratory rhythm disappeared following combined application of ω-conotoxin-GVIA, ω-conotoxin-MVIIC, ω-agatoxin-IVA and nifedipine. Apamin potentiated drive potentials and abolished spike afterhyperpolarization, whereas charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium prolonged spike duration without effect on shape of drive potentials. The results show that specific sets of voltage-activated L-, N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels determine the activity of particular subclasses of neonatal respiratory neurons, whereas SK- and BK-type K+ channels attenuate drive potentials and shorten spikes, respectively, independent of cell type. We hypothesize that modulation of spontaneous activity of pre-inspiratory neurons via N-, L- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels is important for respiratory rhythm or pattern generation. PMID:12937288

  5. Contribution of Ca2+-dependent conductances to membrane potential fluctuations of medullary respiratory neurons of newborn rats in vitro.

    PubMed

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ballanyi, Klaus; Homma, Ikuo

    2003-11-01

    Ca2+-dependent conductances were studied in respiratory interneurons in the brainstem-spinal cord preparation of newborn rats. omega-Conotoxin-GVIA attenuated evoked postsynaptic potentials, spontaneous or evoked inspiratory spinal nerve activity and blocked spike afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, omega-conotoxin-GVIA augmented rhythmic drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and increased respiratory-related spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells with no effect on inspiratory hyperpolarization. In contrast, omega-agatoxin-IVA depressed drive potentials of pre-inspiratory and inspiratory neurons and attenuated inspiratory hyperpolarization and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory cells. It did not affect spike shape and exerted only minor, non-significant, attenuating effects on spontaneous or evoked nerve bursts or evoked postsynaptic potentials. Nifedipine diminished drive potentials and spike frequency of pre-inspiratory neurons and shortened drive potentials in some cells. omega-Conotoxin-MVIIC attenuated drive potentials and intraburst firing rate of pre-inspiratory neurons and decreased substantially respiratory frequency. Respiratory rhythm disappeared following combined application of omega-conotoxin-GVIA, omega-conotoxin-MVIIC, omega-agatoxin-IVA and nifedipine. Apamin potentiated drive potentials and abolished spike afterhyperpolarization, whereas charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium prolonged spike duration without effect on shape of drive potentials. The results show that specific sets of voltage-activated L-, N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels determine the activity of particular subclasses of neonatal respiratory neurons, whereas SK- and BK-type K+ channels attenuate drive potentials and shorten spikes, respectively, independent of cell type. We hypothesize that modulation of spontaneous activity of pre-inspiratory neurons via N-, L- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels is important for respiratory rhythm or pattern generation.

  6. Indications for acceleration-dependent changes of membrane potential in the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Richter, P R; Schuster, M; Meyer, I; Lebert, M; Häder, D-P

    2006-12-01

    The effects of the calcium sequester EGTA on gravitactic orientation and membrane potential changes in the unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis were investigated during a recent parabolic-flight experiment aboard of an Airbus A300. In the course of a flight parabola, an acceleration profile is achieved which yields subsequently about 20 s of hypergravity (1.8 g(n)), about 20 s of microgravity, and another 20 s of hypergravity phases. The movement behavior of the cells was investigated with real-time, computer-based image analysis. Membrane potential changes were detected with a newly developed photometer which measures absorption changes of the membrane potential-sensitive probe oxonol VI. To test whether the data obtained by the oxonol device were reliable, the signal of non-oxonol-labelled cells was recorded. In these samples, no absorption shift was detected. Changes of the oxonol VI signals indicate that the cells depolarize during acceleration (very obvious in the step from microgravity to hypergravity) and slightly hyperpolarize in microgravity, which can possibly be explained with the action of Ca-ATPases. These signals (mainly the depolarization) were significantly suppressed in the presence of EGTA (5 mM). Gravitaxis in parallel was also inhibited after addition of EGTA. Initially, negative gravitaxis was inverted into a positive one. Later, gravitaxis was almost undetectable.

  7. Seed reserve-dependent growth responses to temperature and water potential in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Finch-Savage, W E; Phelps, K; Steckel, J R; Whalley, W R; Rowse, H R

    2001-11-01

    Both temperature and soil moisture vary greatly in the surface layers of the soil through which seedlings grow following germination. The work presented studied the impact of these environmental variables on post-germination carrot growth to nominal seedling emergence. The rapid pre-crook downward growth of both the hypocotyl and root was consistent with their requirement for establishment in soil drying from the surface. At all temperatures, both hypocotyl and root growth rates decreased as water stress increased and there was a very distinct temperature optimum that tended to occur at lower temperatures as water stress increased. A model based on the thermodynamics of reversible protein denaturation was adapted to include the effects of water potential in order to describe these growth rate responses. In general, the percentage of seedlings that reached the crook stage (start of upward hypocotyl growth) decreased at the extremes of the temperature range used and was progressively reduced by increasing water stress. A model was developed to describe this response based on the idea that each seedling within a population has lower and upper temperature thresholds and a water potential threshold which define the conditions within which it is able to grow. This threshold modelling approach which applies growth rates within a distribution of temperature and water potential thresholds could be used to simulate seedling growth by dividing time into suitable units.

  8. ABCA1-dependent sterol release: sterol molecule specificity and potential membrane domain for HDL biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shinji; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells synthesize various sterol molecules, including the C30 sterol, lanosterol, as cholesterol precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum. The build-up of precursor sterols, including lanosterol, displays cellular toxicity. Precursor sterols are found in plasma HDL. How these structurally different sterols are released from cells is poorly understood. Here, we show that newly synthesized precursor sterols arriving at the plasma membrane (PM) are removed by extracellular apoA-I in a manner dependent on ABCA1, a key macromolecule for HDL biogenesis. Analysis of sterol molecules by GC-MS and tracing the fate of radiolabeled acetate-derived sterols in normal and mutant Niemann-Pick type C cells reveal that ABCA1 prefers newly synthesized sterols, especially lanosterol, as the substrates before they are internalized from the PM. We also show that ABCA1 resides in a cholesterol-rich membrane domain resistant to the mild detergent, Brij 98. Blocking ACAT activity increases the cholesterol contents of this domain. Newly synthesized C29/C30 sterols are transiently enriched within this domain, but rapidly disappear from this domain with a half-life of less than 1 h. Our work shows that substantial amounts of precursor sterols are transported to a certain PM domain and are removed by the ABCA1-dependent pathway. PMID:26497474

  9. Role of energy dependent interaction potential in sub-barrier fusion of S2814i +Z9040r system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2015-08-01

    We have analyzed the importance of the inelastic surface vibrations of colliding nuclei in the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of S2814i +Z9040r system by using the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with one dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel formulation using the code CCFULL. The multi-phonon vibrational states of colliding nuclei seem to impart significant contribution. The coupling between relative motion of reactants and these relevant channels in turn produce anomalously large sub-barrier fusion enhancement over the expectations of one dimensional barrier penetration model. Furthermore, the effects of coupling to inelastic surface excitations are imitated due to energy dependence in the Woods-Saxon potential. In EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameter much larger than the elastic scattering predictions is needed to account the observed fusion enhancement in the close vicinity of Coulomb barrier.

  10. The effects of stimulation rate on calcium-dependent action potentials recorded from chick embryo heart cell aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, E; Standen, N B

    1982-01-01

    1. Action potentials were recorded from aggregates of heart cells prepared from 3- to 7-day chick embryos. At 3 days the maximum rate of rise (+ Vmax) was insensitive to TTX; at 7 days it was considerably reduced by TTX. 2. In the presence of TTX the action potential overshoot was dependent on [Ca]0; the results may be fitted using constant field theory and assuming that the membrane is over a hundred times more permeable to Ca than to Na or K. 3. An increase in stimulation rate in the range 0.2-2 Hz led to an increase in both overshoot and + Vmax. This effect was not seen after addition of 20 mM-tetraethylammonium ions, nor when Sr was substituted for Ca in the external medium. We suggest that these rate-dependent changes may result from partial inactivation of an outward K current. PMID:7097590

  11. Genes and molecules that can potentiate or attenuate psychostimulant dependence: relevance of data from animal models to human addiction.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Minae; Yan, Yijin; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2008-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a variety of molecule products play critical roles in the transitions from recreational drug use to drug abuse, and then to drug dependence. Elucidation of the roles of specific molecules in the development of drug dependence can come from preclinical animal models and/or from clinical data. Among animal models, behavioral sensitization, conditioned place preference, drug discrimination, drug self-administration, and extensions of these basic procedures have been widely used to identify molecule products that might be involved in psychostimulant dependence. Repeated exposure to psychostimulants causes cellular adaptations in specific neuronal populations that are likely to contribute to dependence in some humans. In animal models, molecules that include shati, piccolo, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor can act as antiaddictive factors. In some of these models, other molecules including matrix metalloproteinase and tissue plasminogen activator can act as proaddictive factors. We review evidence that the balance between levels of anti- and proaddictive factors induced by addictive drugs could play important roles in developing drug dependence. We focus on potential risk molecules in animal models for the development of methamphetamine dependence and their relevance to abusers. We propose that dynamic changes in the balance between levels of antiaddictive and proaddictive factors in the brain provide some of the determinants of susceptibility to drug dependence. Exploration of the roles that candidate molecules play in an appropriate repertoire of animal behavioral models, especially drug self-administration and extensions thereof, should thus help us to understand human stimulant dependence.

  12. Sex-dependent behavioral effects of Mthfr deficiency and neonatal GABA potentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Levav-Rabkin, Tamar; Blumkin, Elinor; Galron, Dalia; Golan, Hava M

    2011-01-20

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) gene and/or abnormal homocysteine-folate metabolism are associated with increased risk for birth defects and neuropsychiatric diseases. In addition, disturbances of the GABAergic system in the brain as well as Mthfr polymorphism are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In the present study we performed behavioral phenotyping of male and female Mthfr mice (wild type and their heterozygous littermates). The present study addresses two main questions: (1) genetic susceptibility, as examined by effects of Mthfr deficiency on behavior (Experiment 1) and (2) possible gene-drug interactions as expressed by behavioral phenotyping of Mthfr-deficient mice neonatally exposed to the GABA potentiating drug GVG (Experiment 2). Newborn development was slightly influenced by Mthfr genotype per se (Experiment 1); however the gene-drug interaction similarly affected reflex development in both male and female offspring (Experiment 2). Hyperactivity was demonstrated in Mthfr heterozygous male mice (Experiment 1) and due to GVG treatment in both Wt and Mthfr+/- male and female mice (Experiment 2). The gene-environment interaction did not affect anxiety-related behavior of male mice (Experiment 2). In female mice, gene-treatment interactions abolished the reduced anxiety observed due to GVG treatment and Mthfr genotype (Experiment 2). Finally, recognition memory of adult mice was impaired due to genotype, treatment and the gene-treatment combination in a sex-independent manner (Experiment 2). Overall, Mthfr deficiency and/or GABA potentiation differentially affect a spectrum of behaviors in male and female mice. This study is the first to describe behavioral phenotypes due to Mthfr genotype, GVG treatment and the interaction between these two factors. The behavioral outcomes suggest that Mthfr deficiency modulates the effects of GABA potentiating drugs. These findings suggest that future treatment

  13. Pattern-dependent Role of NMDA receptors in Action Potential Generation: Consequences on ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J. Paige

    2005-01-01

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERKs) with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs, and ERK activation, could be overcome with the addition of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to APV, in contrast to that induced with 5 Hz or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation. PMID:16049179

  14. Electrically evoked compound action potentials are different depending on the site of cochlear stimulation.

    PubMed

    van de Heyning, Paul; Arauz, Santiago L; Atlas, Marcus; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Caversaccio, Marco; Chester-Browne, Ronel; Estienne, Patricia; Gavilan, Javier; Godey, Benoit; Gstöttner, Wolfgang; Han, Demin; Hagen, Rudolph; Kompis, Martin; Kuzovkov, Vlad; Lassaletta, Luis; Lefevre, Franc; Li, Yongxin; Müller, Joachim; Parnes, Lorne; Kleine Punte, Andrea; Raine, Christopher; Rajan, Gunesh; Rivas, Adriana; Rivas, José Antonio; Royle, Nicola; Sprinzl, Georg; Stephan, Kurt; Walkowiak, Adam; Yanov, Yuri; Zimmermann, Kim; Zorowka, Patrick; Skarzynski, Henryk

    2016-11-01

    One of the many parameters that can affect cochlear implant (CI) users' performance is the site of presentation of electrical stimulation, from the CI, to the auditory nerve. Evoked compound action potential (ECAP) measurements are commonly used to verify nerve function by stimulating one electrode contact in the cochlea and recording the resulting action potentials on the other contacts of the electrode array. The present study aimed to determine if the ECAP amplitude differs between the apical, middle, and basal region of the cochlea, if double peak potentials were more likely in the apex than the basal region of the cochlea, and if there were differences in the ECAP threshold and recovery function across the cochlea. ECAP measurements were performed in the apical, middle, and basal region of the cochlea at fixed sites of stimulation with varying recording electrodes. One hundred and forty one adult subjects with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss fitted with a Standard or FLEX(SOFT) electrode were included in this study. ECAP responses were captured using MAESTRO System Software (MED-EL). The ECAP amplitude, threshold, and slope were determined using amplitude growth sequences. The 50% recovery rate was assessed using independent single sequences that have two stimulation pulses (a masker and a probe pulse) separated by a variable inter-pulse interval. For all recordings, ECAP peaks were annotated semi-automatically. ECAP amplitudes were greater upon stimulation of the apical region compared to the basal region of the cochlea. ECAP slopes were steeper in the apical region compared to the basal region of the cochlea and ECAP thresholds were lower in the middle region compared to the basal region of the cochlea. The incidence of double peaks was greater upon stimulation of the apical region compared to the basal region of the cochlea. This data indicates that the site and intensity of cochlear stimulation affect ECAP properties.

  15. Sublattice dependent magnetic response of dual Cr doped graphene monolayer: a full potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Jyoti; Kashyap, Manish K.; Taya, Ankur; Rani, Priti; Saini, Hardev S.

    2017-01-01

    In the present scenario, many researchers are exploring the possibility of inducing a magnetic channel in graphene by introducing various types of defects. To examine the Cr-Cr interactions in dual Cr doped graphene monolayer for magnetic response and spin polarization, the first-principles density functional theory based calculations are performed. Further, the possibility of achieving 100 % spin polarization in various possible configurations of dual Cr-doping have been explored. Dual doping of Cr atoms in graphene monolayer preferring ferromagnetic ordering, generates a spin magnetic state with a local moment of 4.00 µB. Depending upon the relative position of two Cr impurities in graphene, the ground states of doped systems are found be ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic or paramagnetic. The origin of particular magnetic state observed in all possible dual Cr-doping configurations has been explained on the basis of RKKY indirect exchange interactions.

  16. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts.

  17. Nonlinear pressure dependence of the interaction potential of dense protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Martin A; Markgraf, Jonas; Wieland, D C Florian; Sahle, Christoph J; Möller, Johannes; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2011-04-29

    The influence of pressure on the structure and protein-protein interaction potential of dense protein solutions was studied and analyzed using small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with a liquid state theoretical approach. The structural as well as the interaction parameters of dense lysozyme solutions are affected by pressure in a nonlinear way. The structural properties of water lead to a modification of the protein-protein interactions below 4 kbar, which might have significant consequences for the stability of proteins in extreme natural environments.

  18. Complex absorbing potential based Lorentzian fitting scheme and time dependent quantum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hang Kwok, Yanho; Chen, GuanHua; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Xiao

    2014-10-28

    Based on the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, a Lorentzian expansion scheme is developed to express the self-energy. The CAP-based Lorentzian expansion of self-energy is employed to solve efficiently the Liouville-von Neumann equation of one-electron density matrix. The resulting method is applicable for both tight-binding and first-principles models and is used to simulate the transient currents through graphene nanoribbons and a benzene molecule sandwiched between two carbon-atom chains.

  19. Complex absorbing potential based Lorentzian fitting scheme and time dependent quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Kwok, Yanho; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua

    2014-10-28

    Based on the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, a Lorentzian expansion scheme is developed to express the self-energy. The CAP-based Lorentzian expansion of self-energy is employed to solve efficiently the Liouville-von Neumann equation of one-electron density matrix. The resulting method is applicable for both tight-binding and first-principles models and is used to simulate the transient currents through graphene nanoribbons and a benzene molecule sandwiched between two carbon-atom chains.

  20. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    PubMed

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  1. Menaquinone-dependent succinate dehydrogenase of bacteria catalyzes reversed electron transport driven by the proton potential.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, J; Unden, G

    1998-10-01

    Succinate dehydrogenases from bacteria and archaea using menaquinone (MK) as an electron acceptor (succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductases) contain, or are predicted to contain, two heme-B groups in the membrane-anchoring protein(s), located close to opposite sides of the membrane. All succinate/ubiquinone oxidoreductases, however, contain only one heme-B molecule. In Bacillus subtilis and other bacteria that use MK as the respiratory quinone, the succinate oxidase activity (succinate-->O2), and the succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductase activity were specifically inhibited by uncoupler (CCCP, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone) or by agents dissipating the membrane potential (valinomycin). Other parts of the respiratory chains were not affected by the agents. Succinate oxidase or succinate/ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bacteria using ubiquinone as an acceptor were not inhibited. We propose that the endergonic electron transport from succinate (Eo' = +30 mV) to MK (Eo' approximately/= -80 mV) in succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductase includes a reversed electron transport across the cytoplasmic membrane from the inner (negative) to the outer (positive) side via the two heme-B groups. The reversed electron transport is driven by the proton or electrical potential, which provides the driving force for MK reduction.

  2. Accurate conformation-dependent molecular electrostatic potentials for high-throughput in silico drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Puranen, J Santeri; Vainio, Mikko J; Johnson, Mark S

    2010-06-01

    The atom-centered partial charges-approximation is commonly used in current molecular modeling tools as a computationally inexpensive alternative to quantum mechanics for modeling electrostatics. Even today, the use of partial charges remains useful despite significant advances in improving the efficiency of ab initio methods. Here, we report on new parameters for the EEM and SFKEEM electronegativity equalization-based methods for rapidly determining partial charges that will accurately model the electrostatic potential of flexible molecules. The developed parameters cover most pharmaceutically relevant chemistries, and charges obtained using these parameters reproduce the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ reference electrostatic potential of a set of FDA-approved drug molecules at best to an average accuracy of 13 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1); thus, equipped with these parameters electronegativity equalization-based methods rival the current best non-quantum mechanical methods, such as AM1-BCC, in accuracy, yet incur a lower computational cost. Software implementations of EEM and SFKEEM, including the developed parameters, are included in the conformer-generation tool BALLOON, available free of charge at http://web.abo.fi/fak/mnf/bkf/research/johnson/software.php. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. IRS-2 Deficiency Impairs NMDA Receptor-Dependent Long-term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Eduardo D.; Sánchez-Perez, Ana; Trejo, José Luis; Martin-Aldana, Juan Antonio; Cano Jaimez, Marife; Pons, Sebastián; Acosta Umanzor, Carlos; Menes, Lorena; White, Morris F.

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I on cognition have been documented in humans and animal models. Conversely, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and diabetes increase the risk for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms by which insulin regulates synaptic plasticity are not well understood. Here, we report that complete disruption of insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) in mice impairs long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Basal synaptic transmission and paired-pulse facilitation were similar between the 2 groups of mice. Induction of LTP by high-frequency conditioning tetanus did not activate postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in hippocampus slices from Irs2−/− mice, although the expression of NR2A, NR2B, and PSD95 was equivalent to wild-type controls. Activation of Fyn, AKT, and MAPK in response to tetanus stimulation was defective in Irs2−/− mice. Interestingly, IRS2 was phosphorylated during induction of LTP in control mice, revealing a potential new component of the signaling machinery which modulates synaptic plasticity. Given that IRS2 expression is diminished in Type 2 diabetics as well as in AD patients, these data may reveal an explanation for the prevalence of cognitive decline in humans with metabolic disorders by providing a mechanistic link between insulin resistance and impaired synaptic transmission. PMID:21955917

  4. Latex film morphology and electrical potential pattern dependence on serum components: a scanning probe microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Keslarek, Amauri José; Costa, Carlos Alberto Rodrigues; Galembeck, Fernando

    2002-11-01

    Dry films formed by surfactant-stabilized, peroxide-initiated styrene-butyl acrylate latex were examined by atomic and electric force microscopy (AFM and EFM). The effects of latex serum components on the films were observed by subjecting the latex to extensive dialysis prior to film formation, and comparing the results to as-prepared latex. The films formed with the dialyzed latex are smoother (as evidenced by roughness and fractal dimension measurements) than the films from the as-prepared latex, but they display large electric force gradients between neighboring domains. The films made with the as-prepared latex have the highest electric uniformity, with a maximum potential variation lower than 80 mV, while this reaches 200 mV in the dialyzed latex film.

  5. Spin-dependent scattering from gated potential obstacles in graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Mahmoud; Ulloa, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    We study the scattering of Dirac fermions in a sheet of graphene from potential obstacles created by external gates in the presence of both intrinsic and extrinsic Spin-Orbit(SO) interactions. Obtaining an analytical solution in real-space representation for the eigenvectors allows us to calculate the phase shifts generated by a finite-size obstacle in the presence of SO interactions. These states take into account the total angular momentum of the Hamiltonian, which includes spin, pseudo-spin and orbital angular momentum. We find an interesting interplay of both SO interactions, which results in oscillations of the spin-flip cross sections with energy; this also generates a difference between both cross sections for different interaction ranges. These results may open a possibility of obtaining spin-polarized currents that are of importance in the field of spintronics. Supported by NSF PIRE and MWN/CIAM.

  6. Electrochemical loading of TEM grids used for the study of potential dependent morphology of polyaniline nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Bhadu, Gopala Ram; Paul, Anirban; Perween, Mosarrat; Gupta, Rajeev; Chaudhari, Jayesh C; Srivastava, Divesh N

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemical method for loading electroactive materials over the TEM grid is reported. The protocol has been demonstrated using polyaniline as an example. The electroactive polymer was directly deposited over the Au TEM grid, used as working electrode in a 3 electrode electrochemical cell. The undisturbed as-deposited morphologies under the influence of various counter ions and ex situ electrochemical states have been studied and compared. Contrary to behaviour in bulk the individual polyaniline fibre was found thinner at anodic potentials. The movement of counter ions as a function of the electrochemical state of the polymer was studied using STEM-EDX elemental mapping. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Persistence of a Brownian particle in a time-dependent potential.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the persistence probability of a Brownian particle in a harmonic potential, which decays to zero at long times, leading to an unbounded motion of the Brownian particle. We consider two functional forms for the decay of the confinement, an exponential decay and an algebraic decay. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that for the case of the exponential relaxation, the dynamics of Brownian particle at short and long times are independent of the parameters of the relaxation. On the contrary, for the algebraic decay of the confinement, the dynamics at long times is determined by the exponent of the decay. Finally, using the two-time correlation function for the position of the Brownian particle, we construct the persistence probability for the Brownian walker in such a scenario.

  8. Role of different parts of the nucleon-nucleon potential on fragment production in asymmetric collisions and their rapidity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-08-01

    The role of different parts of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction potential on the production of light- and intermediate-mass fragments in different mass asymmetric reactions 120Sn+120Sn (η =0 ), 82Kr+158Gd (η =0.3 ), 56Fe+184W (η =0.5 ), and 35Cl+205Tl (η =0.7 ) (with Atotal=240 units) within different rapidity domains has been investigated using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular-dynamics model. The results indicate that the multiplicity of different fragments changes with the gradual addition of different parts of the NN interaction potential. The comparison between calculations and experimental data for the 120Sn+120Sn reaction reveals that both momentum dependent interactions (MDIs) and symmetry potential are indispensable to explain the charge distribution. The MDI plays a dominant role while the symmetry potential has minor influence on the fragment production, but both together lead to an increase in the multiplicity of light- and intermediate-mass fragments and hence show their significance in the fragment production at intermediate energies.

  9. Temperature dependent optical characterization of Ni-TiO2 thin films as potential photocatalytic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Rajnarayan; Haque, S. Maidul; Tripathi, S.; Rao, K. Divakar; Singh, Ranveer; Som, T.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2017-09-01

    Along with other transition metal doped titanium dioxide materials, Ni-TiO2 is considered to be one of the most efficient materials for catalytic applications due to its suitable energy band positions in the electronic structure. The present manuscript explores the possibility of improving the photocatalytic activity of RF magnetron sputtered Ni-TiO2 films upon heat treatment. Optical, structural and morphological and photocatalytic properties of the films have been investigated in detail for as deposited and heat treated samples. Evolution of refractive index (RI) and total film thickness as estimated from spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization are found to be in agreement with the trend in density and total film thickness estimated from grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurement. Interestingly, the evolution of these macroscopic properties were found to be correlated with the corresponding microstructural modifications realized in terms of anatase to rutile phase transformation and appearance of a secondary phase namely NiTiO3 at high temperature. Corresponding morphological properties of the films were also found to be temperature dependent which leads to modifications in the grain structure. An appreciable reduction of optical band gap from 2.9 to 2.5 eV of Ni-TiO2 thin films was also observed as a result of post deposition heat treatment. Testing of photocatalytic activity of the films performed under UV illumination demonstrates heat treatment under atmospheric ambience to be an effective means to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of transition metal doped titania samples.

  10. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Maize Endosperm and Their Potential Role in Endoreduplication1

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Cintia M.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13Suc1. They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division. PMID:16055680

  11. Evaluating the Age-Dependent Potential for Protein Deposition in Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken.

    PubMed

    Khan, Daulat R; Wecke, Christian; Sharifi, Ahmad R; Liebert, Frank

    2015-01-19

    The introduction of the naked neck gene (Na) into modern meat type chicken is known to be helpful in increasing the tolerance for a high ambient temperature (AT) by reducing the feather coverage which allows for a higher level of heat dissipation compared to normally feathered (na/na) birds. In addition, reduced feather coverage could affect requirements for sulfur containing amino acids. As a prerequisite for further modeling of individual amino acid requirements, the daily N maintenance requirement (NMR) and the threshold value of daily N retention (NRmaxT) were determined. This was carried out using graded dietary protein supply and exponential modeling between N intake (NI) and N excretion (NEX) or N deposition (ND), respectively. Studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% of each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments during both the starter (days 10-20) and the grower period (days 25-35). Birds were randomly allotted to five diets with graded dietary protein supply but constant protein quality. The observed estimates depending on genotype, sex and age varied for NMR and NRmaxT from 224 to 395 and 2881 to 4049 mg N/BWkg(0.67)/day, respectively.

  12. Daytime Alertness in Parkinson’s Disease: Potentially Dose-Dependent, Divergent Effects by Drug Class

    PubMed Central

    Bliwise, Donald L.; Trotti, Lynn Marie; Wilson, Anthony G.; Greer, Sophia A.; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Juncos, Jorge J.; Factor, Stewart A.; Freeman, Alan; Rye, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease experience difficulties maintaining daytime alertness. Controversy exists regarding whether this reflects effects of anti-Parkinsonian medications, the disease itself or other factors such as nocturnal sleep disturbances. In this study we examined the phenomenon by evaluating medicated and unmedicated Parkinson’s patients with objective polysomnographic measurements of nocturnal sleep and daytime alertness. Methods Patients (n = 63) underwent a 48-hour laboratory-based study incorporating 2 consecutive nights of overnight polysomnography and 2 days of Maintenance of Wakefulness Testing. We examined correlates of individual differences in alertness, including demographics, clinical features, nocturnal sleep variables and class and dosage of anti-Parkinson’s medications. Results Results indicated that: 1) relative to unmediated patients, all classes of dopaminergic medications were associated with reduced daytime alertness and this effect was not mediated by disease duration or disease severity; 2) increasing dosages of dopamine agonists were associated with less daytime alertness, whereas higher levels of levodopa were associated with higher levels of alertness. Variables unrelated to Maintenance of Wakefulness Test defined daytime alertness included age, sex, years with diagnosis, motor impairment score and most nocturnal sleep variables. Conclusions Deficits in objectively assessed daytime alertness in Parkinson’s disease appear to be a function of both the disease and the medications and their doses utilized. The apparent divergent dose-dependent effects of drug class in Parkinson’s disease are anticipated by basic science studies of the sleep/wake cycle under different pharmacological agents. PMID:22753297

  13. Growth hormone stimulation of serum insulin concentration in cattle: nutritional dependency and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Gu, Z; Wu, M; Gwazdauskas, F C; Jiang, H

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies on the effect of growth hormone (GH) on serum insulin concentration in cattle had generated seemingly conflicting results, and little was known about the mechanism by which GH affects serum insulin concentration in cattle, if it does. In this study, we determined whether the effect of GH on serum insulin concentration in cattle could be affected by the nutritional levels of the animal and whether GH increased serum insulin concentration in cattle by directly stimulating insulin release or insulin gene expression in the pancreatic islets. Administration of recombinant bovine GH increased serum insulin concentration in nonlactating, nonpregnant beef cows fed a daily concentrate meal in addition to ad libitum hay, but it had no effect in those cows fed hay only. Both GH treatments for 1 and 24h increased insulin concentrations in cultures of pancreatic islets isolated from growing cattle. Growth hormone treatment for 24h increased insulin mRNA expression in cultured bovine pancreatic islets. Growth hormone treatment for 16h increased reporter gene expression directed by a approximately 1,500-bp bovine insulin gene promoter in a rat insulin-producing beta cell line. Taken together, these results suggest that exogenous GH can increase serum insulin concentration in cattle, but this effect depends on the nutritional levels of fed cattle, and that GH increases serum insulin concentration in cattle by stimulating both insulin release and insulin gene expression in the pancreatic islets.

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in maize endosperm and their potential role in endoreduplication.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Cintia M; Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Larkins, Brian A

    2005-08-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13(Suc1). They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division.

  15. The potential for indirect effects between co-flowering plants via shared pollinators depends on resource abundance, accessibility and relatedness.

    PubMed

    Carvalheiro, Luísa Gigante; Biesmeijer, Jacobus Christiaan; Benadi, Gita; Fründ, Jochen; Stang, Martina; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Kaiser-Bunbury, Christopher N; Baude, Mathilde; Gomes, Sofia I F; Merckx, Vincent; Baldock, Katherine C R; Bennett, Andrew T D; Boada, Ruth; Bommarco, Riccardo; Cartar, Ralph; Chacoff, Natacha; Dänhardt, Juliana; Dicks, Lynn V; Dormann, Carsten F; Ekroos, Johan; Henson, Kate S E; Holzschuh, Andrea; Junker, Robert R; Lopezaraiza-Mikel, Martha; Memmott, Jane; Montero-Castaño, Ana; Nelson, Isabel L; Petanidou, Theodora; Power, Eileen F; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Stout, Jane C; Temitope, Kehinde; Tscharntke, Teja; Tscheulin, Thomas; Vilà, Montserrat; Kunin, William E

    2014-11-01

    Co-flowering plant species commonly share flower visitors, and thus have the potential to influence each other's pollination. In this study we analysed 750 quantitative plant-pollinator networks from 28 studies representing diverse biomes worldwide. We show that the potential for one plant species to influence another indirectly via shared pollinators was greater for plants whose resources were more abundant (higher floral unit number and nectar sugar content) and more accessible. The potential indirect influence was also stronger between phylogenetically closer plant species and was independent of plant geographic origin (native vs. non-native). The positive effect of nectar sugar content and phylogenetic proximity was much more accentuated for bees than for other groups. Consequently, the impact of these factors depends on the pollination mode of plants, e.g. bee or fly pollinated. Our findings may help predict which plant species have the greatest importance in the functioning of plant-pollination networks.

  16. Effect of membrane potential on Na/sup +/-dependent sugar transport by ATP-depleted intestinal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Su, C.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the membrane potential as a component of the thermodynamic driving force and as a determinant of kinetic parameters of Na/sup +/-dependent sugar transport was investigated using ATP-depleted isolated chicken intestinal cells. Inside-negative membrane potentials were established by incubating K/sup +/-loaded rotenone-inhibited cells with valinomycin in a low K/sup +/ medium. Overshoots of 3-0-methylglucose (3-OMG) accumulation as high as 10-fold were observed in the presence of valinomycin even in the absence of a Na/sup +/ chemical gradient. The magnitude of overshoot was diminished by decreasing the magnitude of the imposed K/sup +/ gradient and abolished altogether when nigericin was also included. An Eadie-Hofstee plot of initial flux data showed that the imposed membrane potential increases the V/sub max/ of tranport in the absence of a chemical gradient for Na/sup +/ from 3 to 12 nmol 3-OMG.mg protein/sup -1/.min/sup -1/. The K/sub T/ is not significantly altered. Similar kinetic results were obtained when a membrane potential as well as a Na/sup +/ gradient were imposed. These results suggest that the membrane potential is a more important contributor to alterations in the kinetics of transport than the Na/sup +/ chemical potential.

  17. Dependency of global primary bioenergy crop potentials in 2050 on food systems, yields, biodiversity conservation and political stability.

    PubMed

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Plutzar, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The future bioenergy crop potential depends on (1) changes in the food system (food demand, agricultural technology), (2) political stability and investment security, (3) biodiversity conservation, (4) avoidance of long carbon payback times from deforestation, and (5) energy crop yields. Using a biophysical biomass-balance model, we analyze how these factors affect global primary bioenergy potentials in 2050. The model calculates biomass supply and demand balances for eleven world regions, eleven food categories, seven food crop types and two livestock categories, integrating agricultural forecasts and scenarios with a consistent global land use and NPP database. The TREND scenario results in a global primary bioenergy potential of 77 EJ/yr, alternative assumptions on food-system changes result in a range of 26-141 EJ/yr. Exclusion of areas for biodiversity conservation and inaccessible land in failed states reduces the bioenergy potential by up to 45%. Optimistic assumptions on future energy crop yields increase the potential by up to 48%, while pessimistic assumptions lower the potential by 26%. We conclude that the design of sustainable bioenergy crop production policies needs to resolve difficult trade-offs such as food vs. energy supply, renewable energy vs. biodiversity conservation or yield growth vs. reduction of environmental problems of intensive agriculture.

  18. Cancellation of the N -composite-boson correlation energy under a BCS-like potential: A dimensionality-dependent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-09-01

    We use Richardson-Gaudin exact equations to derive the ground-state energy of N composite bosons (cobosons) interacting via a potential which acts between fermion pairs having zero center-of-mass momentum, that is, a potential similar to the reduced BCS potential used in conventional superconductivity. Through a density expansion, we show that while for two-dimensional (2D) systems, the N -coboson correlation energy undergoes a surprising cancellation which leaves the interaction part with an N (N -1 ) dependence only, such a cancellation does not exist in 1D, 3D, or 4D systems (which correspond to 2D parabolic traps) nor when the cobosons interact via a similar short-range potential but between pairs having an arbitrary center-of-mass momentum. This shows that the previously found cancellation which exists for the Cooper-pair correlation energy results not only from the very peculiar form of the reduced BCS potential, but also from a quite mysterious dimensionality effect, the density of states for Cooper pairs feeling the BCS potential being essentially constant, as for 2D systems.

  19. Intracellular Ca2+ and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Mediate Acute Potentiation of Neurotransmitter Release by Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-ping; Yang, Feng; Xie, Zuo-ping; Lu, Bai

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been shown to acutely modulate synaptic transmission in a variety of systems, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for an unusual mechanism that mediates synaptic potentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT3), using Xenopus nerve–muscle co-culture. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires Ca2+ influx for its acute effect, NT3 rapidly enhances spontaneous transmitter release at the developing NMJ even when Ca2+ influx is completely blocked, suggesting that the NT3 effect is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, or blockade of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) or ryanodine receptors, prevents the NT3-induced synaptic potentiation. Blockade of IP3 receptors can not prevent BDNF-induced potentiation, suggesting that BDNF and NT3 use different mechanisms to potentiate transmitter release. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) completely blocks the acute effect of NT3. Furthermore, the NT3-induced potentiation requires a continuous activation of CaMKII, because application of the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 reverses the previously established NT3 effect. Thus, NT3 potentiates neurotransmitter secretion by stimulating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores through IP3 and/or ryanodine receptors, leading to an activation of CaMKII. PMID:10811820

  20. Dependency of global primary bioenergy crop potentials in 2050 on food systems, yields, biodiversity conservation and political stability

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Plutzar, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The future bioenergy crop potential depends on (1) changes in the food system (food demand, agricultural technology), (2) political stability and investment security, (3) biodiversity conservation, (4) avoidance of long carbon payback times from deforestation, and (5) energy crop yields. Using a biophysical biomass-balance model, we analyze how these factors affect global primary bioenergy potentials in 2050. The model calculates biomass supply and demand balances for eleven world regions, eleven food categories, seven food crop types and two livestock categories, integrating agricultural forecasts and scenarios with a consistent global land use and NPP database. The TREND scenario results in a global primary bioenergy potential of 77 EJ/yr, alternative assumptions on food-system changes result in a range of 26–141 EJ/yr. Exclusion of areas for biodiversity conservation and inaccessible land in failed states reduces the bioenergy potential by up to 45%. Optimistic assumptions on future energy crop yields increase the potential by up to 48%, while pessimistic assumptions lower the potential by 26%. We conclude that the design of sustainable bioenergy crop production policies needs to resolve difficult trade-offs such as food vs. energy supply, renewable energy vs. biodiversity conservation or yield growth vs. reduction of environmental problems of intensive agriculture. PMID:23576836

  1. Regulation of mitochondrial morphology by membrane potential, and DRP1-dependent division and FZO1-dependent fusion reaction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Naotada; Jofuku, Akihiro; Eura, Yuka; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2003-02-21

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo frequent fission and fusion or branching. To analyze the mitochondrial fusion reaction, mitochondria were separately labeled with green or red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP, respectively) in HeLa cells, and the cells were fused using hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). The resulting mixing of the fluorescent reporters was then followed using fluorescence microscopy. This system revealed that mitochondria fuse frequently in mammalian cells, and the fusion depends on the membrane potential across the inner membrane. The protonophore, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), led to fragmentation of the mitochondria and inhibited the fusion reaction. Removal of CCCP recovered the fusion activity to reform filamentous mitochondrial networks. Analysis of the effects of GTP-binding proteins, DRP1 and two FZO1 isoforms, and the GTPase-domain mutants on the CCCP-induced mitochondrial morphologic changes revealed that DRP1 and FZO1 are involved in membrane budding and fusion, respectively. Furthermore, a HVJ-dependent cell fusion assay combined with RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that both FZO1 isoforms are essential and must be acting in cis for the mitochondrial fusion reaction to occur.

  2. A Single 2-Spike Burst Induces GluR1-dependent Associative Short-term Potentiation: A Potential Mechanism for Short-term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Martha A.; Maramara, Lauren A.; Lisman, John

    2011-01-01

    Recent work [Sanderson, D., Good, M.A., Skelton, K., Sprengel, R., Seeburg, P. H., Nicholas, J., et al. Enhanced long-term and impaired short-term spatial memory in GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice: Evidence for a dual-process memory model. Learning and Memory, in press] showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon that has received little attention. Here we examined several properties of STP and tested the dependence of STP on GluR1. The minimal requirement for inducing STP was examined using a test pathway and a conditioning pathway. Several closely spaced stimuli in the test pathway, forming a single brief burst, were sufficient to induce STP. Thus, STP is likely to be induced by the similar bursts that occur in vivo. STP induction is associative in nature and dependent on the NMDAR. STP decays with two components, a fast component (1.6 ± 0.26 min) and a slower one (19 ± 6.6 min). To test the role of GluR1 in STP, experiments were conducted on GluR1 knockout mice. We found that STP was greatly reduced. These results, taken together with the behavioral work of D. Sanderson et al. [Sanderson, D., Good, M. A, Skelton, K., Sprengel, R., Seeburg, P. H., Nicholas, J., et al. Enhanced long-term and impaired short-term spatial memory in GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice: Evidence for a dual-process memory model. Learning and Memory, in press], provide genetic evidence that STP is a likely mechanism of STM. PMID:19925206

  3. A single brief burst induces GluR1-dependent associative short-term potentiation: a potential mechanism for short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Martha A; Maramara, Lauren A; Lisman, John

    2010-11-01

    Recent work showed that short-term memory (STM) is selectively reduced in GluR1 knockout mice. This raises the possibility that a form of synaptic modification dependent on GluR1 might underlie STM. Studies of synaptic plasticity have shown that stimuli too weak to induce long-term potentiation induce short-term potentiation (STP), a phenomenon that has received little attention. Here we examined several properties of STP and tested the dependence of STP on GluR1. The minimal requirement for inducing STP was examined using a test pathway and a conditioning pathway. Several closely spaced stimuli in the test pathway, forming a single brief burst, were sufficient to induce STP. Thus, STP is likely to be induced by the similar bursts that occur in vivo. STP induction is associative in nature and dependent on the NMDAR. STP decays with two components, a fast component (1.6 +/- 0.26 min) and a slower one (19 +/- 6.6 min). To test the role of GluR1 in STP, experiments were conducted on GluR1 knockout mice. We found that STP was greatly reduced. These results, taken together with the behavioral work of D. Sanderson et al. [Sanderson, D., Good, M. A., Skelton, K., Sprengel, R., Seeburg, P. H., Nicholas, J., et al. Enhanced long-term and impaired short-term spatial memory in GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice: Evidence for a dual-process memory model. Learning and Memory, 2009], provide genetic evidence that STP is a likely mechanism of STM.

  4. Spatial distribution of cardiac transmembrane potentials around an extracellular electrode: dependence on fiber orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Neunlist, M; Tung, L

    1995-01-01

    Recent theoretical models of cardiac electrical stimulation or defibrillation predict a complex spatial pattern of transmembrane potential (Vm) around a stimulating electrode, resulting from the formation of virtual electrodes of reversed polarity. The pattern of membrane polarization has been attributed to the anisotropic structure of the tissue. To verify such model predictions experimentally, an optical technique using a fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye was used to map the spatial distribution of Vm around a 150-microns-radius extracellular unipolar electrode. An S1-S2 stimulation protocol was used, and vm was measured during an S2 pulse having an intensity equal to 10x the cathodal diastolic threshold of excitation. The recordings were obtained on the endocardial surface of bullfrog atrium in directions parallel and perpendicular to the cardiac fibers. In the longitudinal fiber direction, the membrane depolarized for cathodal pulses (and hyperpolarized for anodal pulses) but only in a region within 445 +/- 112 microns (and 616 +/- 78 microns for anodal pulses) from the center of the electrode (n = 9). Outside this region, vm reversed polarity and reached a local maximum at 922 +/- 136 microns (and 988 +/- 117 microns for anodal pulses) (n = 9). Beyond this point vm decayed to zero over a distance of 1.5-2 mm. In the transverse fiber direction, the membrane depolarized for cathodal pulses (and hyperpolarized for anodal pulses) at all distances from the electrode. The amplitude of the response decreased with distance from the electrode with an exponential decay constant of 343 +/- 110 microns for cathodal pulses and 253 +/- 91 microns for anodal pulses (n = 7). The results were qualitatively similar in both fiber directions when the atrium was bathed in a solution containing ionic channel blockers. A two-dimensional computer model was formulated for the case of highly anisotropic cardiac tissue and qualitatively accounts for nearly all the observed spatial and

  5. Eye color: A potential indicator of alcohol dependence risk in European Americans.

    PubMed

    Sulovari, Arvis; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel; Li, Dawei

    2015-07-01

    In archival samples of European-ancestry subjects, light-eyed individuals have been found to consume more alcohol than dark-eyed individuals. No published population-based studies have directly tested the association between alcohol dependence (AD) and eye color. We hypothesized that light-eyed individuals have a higher prevalence of AD than dark-eyed individuals. A mixture model was used to select a homogeneous sample of 1,263 European-Americans and control for population stratification. After quality control, we conducted an association study using logistic regression, adjusting for confounders (age, sex, and genetic ancestry). We found evidence of association between AD and blue eye color (P = 0.0005 and odds ratio = 1.83 (1.31-2.57)), supporting light eye color as a risk factor relative to brown eye color. Network-based analyses revealed a statistically significant (P = 0.02) number of genetic interactions between eye color genes and AD-associated genes. We found evidence of linkage disequilibrium between an AD-associated GABA receptor gene cluster, GABRB3/GABRG3, and eye color genes, OCA2/HERC2, as well as between AD-associated GRM5 and pigmentation-associated TYR. Our population-phenotype, network, and linkage disequilibrium analyses support association between blue eye color and AD. Although we controlled for stratification we cannot exclude underlying occult stratification as a contributor to this observation. Although replication is needed, our findings suggest that eye pigmentation information may be useful in research on AD. Further characterization of this association may unravel new AD etiological factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 15-deoxy-?(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 as a potential TRPV1-dependent atopic dermatitis enhancer.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takahiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko; Matsubara, Yui; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Mori, Yasuo; Uchida, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by a complex pathogenesis, including skin barrier dysfunctions, allergy/immunology, and pruritus.In AD lesions, mast cells migrate into the epidermis, and exert their biological effects by releasing paracrine mediators. TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel widely expressed in skin tissues, has been shown to contribute to the development of diverse dermatoses and pruritus. In the present study, we identified a TRPV1 agonist as a neuritogenic enhancer produced from mast cells and characterized a possible molecular mechanism for the TRPV1-dependent neuritogenesis in AD. Based on the hypothesis that activated mast cells produce a TRPV1-dependent neuritogenic enhancer,we screened a number of inflammatory mediators for the neuritogenic-promoting activityand identified a PGD2 metabolite, 15-deoxy-?(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), as a potential neuritogenic enhancer derived from mast cells. 15d-PGJ2 significantly enhanced the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis in PC12 cells, and its enhancing potency was attributed to the electrophilic center of 15d-PGJ2. 15d-PGJ2 indeed activated TRPV1, leading to a significant increase in the intracellular Ca(2) level. In addition, the treatment of PC12 cells with biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 resulted in the formation of a 15d-PGJ2-TRPV1 adduct, indicating that 15d-PGJ2 directly modified the TRPV1 in the cells. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ2 facilitated the NGF-dependent signal transductions including ERK and JNK pathways in a Ca(2 ?)-dependent manner. These findings suggest that 15d-PGJ2 enhances NGF signaling via TRPV1-dependent Ca(2) influx, thereby acting as a potential neuritogenic enhancer in AD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Visual information processing in recently abstaining methamphetamine-dependent individuals: evoked potentials study.

    PubMed

    Kremlácek, Jan; Hosák, Ladislav; Kuba, Miroslav; Libiger, Jan; Cízek, Jirí

    2008-11-01

    Methamphetamine (MAP) is an indirect dopamine agonist that can temporarily increase cognitive performance. However, its long-term abuse may cause dopamine depletion and consequent cognitive and attentional impairment. The worsening of visual functions in Parkinson's disease and their improvement after levodopa administration implicates the role of dopamine in the physiology of vision. This provides the rationale for the investigation of visual functions in abstaining MAP abusers. We investigated changes in visually evoked potentials (VEPs) to pattern-reversal and motion-onset stimuli. Such changes serve as indices of visual information processing in the primary and associative areas in a group of recently abstaining MAP abusers (5 females, 18 males, MAP abuse 5.3 +/- 2.8 years) and in 23 age- and gender-paired controls. We did not find differences between the groups in visual acuity. In the group of MAP abusers we observed an attenuation of the early responses around 80 ms and a prolongation of the P1 peak latency after the reversal of high spatial frequency checkerboards (10 and 20 arcmin checks). Furthermore, an attenuation of the latter positive response (170-250 ms) was observed among all the stimuli in parieto-frontal derivations for the MAP abusers. This is the first report suggesting a slowing and attenuation of VEP responses during visual processing in abstaining methamphetamine abusers.

  8. Time-Dependent Effect of Encapsulating Alginate Hydrogel on Neurogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Due to the restricted potential of neural stem cells for regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) after injury, providing an alternative source for neural stem cells is essential. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells with properties suitable for tissue engineering. In addition, alginate hydrogel is a biocompatible polysaccharide polymer that has been used to encapsulate many types of cells. The aim of this study was to assess the proliferation rate and level of expression of neural markers; NESTIN, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in encapsulated human ADSCs (hADSCs) 10 and14 days after neural induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ADSCs isolated from human were cultured in neural induction media and seeded into alginate hydrogel. The rate of proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated cells were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunocytoflourescent and realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyzes 10 and 14 days after induction. Results The rate of proliferation of encapsulated cells was not significantly changed with time passage. The expression of NESTIN and GFAP significantly decreased on day 14 relative to day 10 (P<0.001) but MAP2 expression was increased. Conclusion Alginate hydrogel can promote the neural differentiation of encapsulated hADSCs with time passage. PMID:26199909

  9. The ozone depletion potentials on halocarbons: Their dependence of calculation assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karol, Igor L.; Kiselev, Andrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) is widely used in the evaluation of numerous halocarbons and of their replacement effects on ozone, but the methods, assumptions and conditions used in ODP calculations have not been analyzed adequately. In this paper a model study of effects on ozone of the instantaneous releases of various amounts of CH3CCl3 and of CHF2Cl (HCFC-22) for several compositions of the background atmosphere are presented, aimed at understanding connections of ODP values with the assumptions used in their calculations. To facilitate the ODP computation in numerous versions for the long time periods after their releases, the above rather short-lived gases and the one-dimensional radiative photochemical model of the global annually averaged atmospheric layer up to 50 km height are used. The variation of released gas global mass from 1 Mt to 1 Gt leads to ODP value increase with its stabilization close to the upper bound of this range in the contemporary atmosphere. The same variations are analyzed for conditions of the CFC-free atmosphere of 1960's and for the anthropogenically loaded atmosphere in the 21st century according to the known IPCC 'business as usual' scenario. Recommendations for proper ways of ODP calculations are proposed for practically important cases.

  10. Role of Ca(+)-dependent K-channels in the membrane potential and contractility of aorta from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, E G; Frediani-Neto, E; Ferreira, A T; Paiva, A C; Paiva, T B

    1994-01-01

    1. Contractile responses to KCl and membrane potentials were determined in aortic rings from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), normotensive Wistar rats (NWR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) both in the absence and in the presence of the Ca(2+)-dependent K-channel blockers, apamin and tetraethylammonium (TEA). 2. Compared to NWR, aortic rings from WKY and SHR were less reactive and their Ca2+ uptake after stimulation with K+ was decreased. 3. Smooth muscle cell membrane potentials were higher in aortae from SHR and WKY than in NWR aortae, whereas SHR had higher K+ and lower Na+ intracellular activities than WKY and NWR, suggesting overactivity of the Na+/K+ pump in the hypertensive animals. 4. Treatment with apamin caused depolarization of WKY and SHR aortae, and increased their contractile responses to the same level as those of the NWR. Treatment with TEA also caused depolarization of aortae from WKY and SHR, but in the SHR the depolarization induced by TEA was smaller than that produced by apamin and the contractile responses to KCl did not reach the level of those of aortae from NWR. 5. It is concluded that overactivity of Ca(2+)-dependent K-channels in aortae of WKY and SHR contributes to their higher membrane potentials and lower responsiveness to vasoconstrictor stimuli. In SHR, an overactive Na+/K+ pump is also present, and the contribution of apamin-sensitive Ca(2+)-dependent K-channels to the membrane potential and reactivity appears to be more relevant than that of TEA-sensitive channels. PMID:7858844

  11. Event-related potentials in adolescents with different cognitive styles: field dependence and field independence.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghong; Mao, Wei; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Xiating; Han, Chunyu; Lu, Changfeng; Huang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    Field dependence/independence (FD/FI) is an important dimension of personality and cognitive styles. Different ability in mobilizing and/or allocating mental-attentional capacity was considered to be the most possible explanation for the FDI cognitive style. Many studies on characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of attentional control indicated the existence of a dissociable sub-process of conflict-monitoring and "cognitive control" system. However, little was known about it. We might dissociate "cognitive control" system from conflict processing by taking advantage of the variable of the FDI cognitive style. In addition, essentially cognitive styles (FDI) are often widely studied in psychological and educational fields, but hardly in neuroscience. We speculated that ERP components could help to explain the difference between how FD and FI individuals process information. The purpose of the reported study was to explore the possible relation between the "cognitive control" system and the conflict processing system during stimulus-matching task. We first characterized the standard FD/FI of senior-high-school Han students in grade two in Beijing, China, based on 160 students with similar age, education, living and cultural background. Twenty-six adolescents were selected and divided into two groups (extreme FD group and extreme FI group) according to their Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) results (FD: 5-8; FI: 17-19). They were tested on both Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and stimulus-matching task. ERP was measured while the subjects performed the stimulus-matching tasks by categorizing two figures that were presented sequentially either as a match (same shape) or as a conflict (different shape) conditions. The results showed that the mean amplitude of N270 in FI group was higher relative to that in FD group at nearly all centrofrontal areas in the conflict condition. We conclude that the FDI cognitive styles could influence the conflict processing

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical (TRPC)/Orai1-dependent Store-operated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, Jessica; Bartoli, Fiona; Antigny, Fabrice; Gomez, Ana Maria; Benitah, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) has emerged as an important mechanism in cardiac pathology. However, the signals that up-regulate SOCE in the heart remain unexplored. Clinical trials have emphasized the beneficial role of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling blockade in heart failure and associated arrhythmias. Accumulated evidence suggests that the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone, through activation of its receptor, MR, might be a key regulator of Ca2+ influx in cardiomyocytes. We thus assessed whether and how SOCE involving transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) and Orai1 channels are regulated by aldosterone/MR in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Molecular screening using qRT-PCR and Western blotting demonstrated that aldosterone treatment for 24 h specifically increased the mRNA and/or protein levels of Orai1, TRPC1, -C4, -C5, and stromal interaction molecule 1 through MR activation. These effects were correlated with a specific enhancement of SOCE activities sensitive to store-operated channel inhibitors (SKF-96365 and BTP2) and to a potent Orai1 blocker (S66) and were prevented by TRPC1, -C4, and Orai1 dominant negative mutants or TRPC5 siRNA. A mechanistic approach showed that up-regulation of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 mRNA expression by aldosterone is involved in enhanced SOCE. Functionally, 24-h aldosterone-enhanced SOCE is associated with increased diastolic [Ca2+]i, which is blunted by store-operated channel inhibitors. Our study provides the first evidence that aldosterone promotes TRPC1-, -C4-, -C5-, and Orai1-mediated SOCE in cardiomyocytes through an MR and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 pathway. PMID:27129253

  13. Dynamics of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length and complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Shehou, Abdourahman; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of matter-wave solitons in the one-dimensional (1-D) Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation describing Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with time-dependent scattering length in varying trapping potentials with feeding/loss term. By performing a modified lens-type transformation, we reduce the GP equation into a classical nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with distributed coefficients and find its integrable condition. Under the integrable condition, we apply the generalized Jacobian elliptic function method (GJEFM) and present exact analytical solutions which describe the propagation of a bright and dark solitons in BECs. Their stability is examined using analytic method. The obtained exact solutions show that the amplitude of bright and dark solitons depends on the scattering length, while their motion and the total number of BEC atoms depend on the external trapping potential. Our results also shown that the loss of atoms can dominate the aggregation of atoms by the attractive interaction, and thus the peak density can decrease in time despite that the strength of the attractive interaction is increased.

  14. System-dependent exchange–correlation functional with exact asymptotic potential and ε{sub HOMO} ≈ − I

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, Jonathan D.; Tozer, David J.

    2015-07-14

    Density scaling considerations are used to derive an exchange–correlation explicit density functional that is appropriate for the electron deficient side of the integer and which recovers the exact r → ∞ asymptotic behaviour of the exchange–correlation potential. The functional has an unconventional mathematical form with parameters that are system-dependent; the parameters for an N-electron system are determined in advance from generalised gradient approximation (GGA) calculations on the N- and (N − 1)-electron systems. Compared to GGA results, the functional yields similar exchange–correlation energies, but HOMO energies that are an order of magnitude closer to the negative of the vertical ionisation potential; for anions, the HOMO energies are negative, as required. Rydberg excitation energies are also notably improved and the exchange–correlation potential is visibly lowered towards the near-exact potential. Further development is required to improve valence excitations, static isotropic polarisabilities, and the shape of the potential in non-asymptotic regions. The functional is fundamentally different to conventional approximations.

  15. System-dependent exchange-correlation functional with exact asymptotic potential and ɛHOMO ≈ - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Jonathan D.; Tozer, David J.

    2015-07-01

    Density scaling considerations are used to derive an exchange-correlation explicit density functional that is appropriate for the electron deficient side of the integer and which recovers the exact r → ∞ asymptotic behaviour of the exchange-correlation potential. The functional has an unconventional mathematical form with parameters that are system-dependent; the parameters for an N-electron system are determined in advance from generalised gradient approximation (GGA) calculations on the N- and (N - 1)-electron systems. Compared to GGA results, the functional yields similar exchange-correlation energies, but HOMO energies that are an order of magnitude closer to the negative of the vertical ionisation potential; for anions, the HOMO energies are negative, as required. Rydberg excitation energies are also notably improved and the exchange-correlation potential is visibly lowered towards the near-exact potential. Further development is required to improve valence excitations, static isotropic polarisabilities, and the shape of the potential in non-asymptotic regions. The functional is fundamentally different to conventional approximations.

  16. Generation of matter-wave solitons of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent complicated potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamadou, Alidou; Wamba, Etienne; Kofane, Timoleon C.; Doka, Serge Y.; Ekogo, Thierry B.

    2011-08-15

    We examine the generation of bright matter-wave solitons in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation describing Bose-Einstein condensates with a time-dependent complex potential, which is composed of a repulsive parabolic background potential and a gravitational field. By performing a modified lens-type transformation, an explicit expression for the growth rate of a purely growing modulational instability is presented and analyzed. We point out the effects of the gravitational field, as well as of the parameter related to the feeding or loss of atoms in the condensate, on the instability growth rate. It is evident from numerical simulations that the feeding with atoms and the magnetic trap have opposite effects on the dynamics of the system. It is shown that the feeding or loss parameter can be well used to control the instability domain. Our study shows that the gravitational field changes the condensate trail of the soliton trains during the propagation. We also perform a numerical analysis to solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent complicated potential. The numerical results on the effect of both the gravitational field and the parameter of feeding or loss of atoms in the condensate agree well with predictions of the linear stability analysis. Another result of the present work is the modification of the background wave function in the Thomas-Fermi approximation during the numerical simulations.

  17. Universal steps in quantum dynamics with time-dependent potential-energy surfaces: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albareda, Guillermo; Abedi, Ali; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rubio, Angel

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown [G. Albareda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 083003 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.083003 that within the conditional decomposition approach to the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, the electron-nuclear wave function can be exactly decomposed into an ensemble of nuclear wave packets effectively governed by nuclear conditional time-dependent potential-energy surfaces (C-TDPESs). Employing a one-dimensional model system, we show that for strong nonadiabatic couplings the nuclear C-TDPESs exhibit steps that bridge piecewise adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces. The nature of these steps is identified as an effect of electron-nuclear correlation. Furthermore, a direct comparison with similar discontinuities recently reported in the context of the exact factorization framework allows us to draw conclusions about the universality of these discontinuities, viz., they are inherent to all nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics approaches based on (exact) time-dependent potential-energy surfaces.

  18. Probing the gate--voltage-dependent surface potential of individual InAs nanowires using random telegraph signals.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Paradiso, Nicola; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan; Nair, Selvakumar V; Savelyev, Igor G; Blumin, Marina; Beltram, Fabio; Ruda, Harry E

    2011-03-22

    We report a novel method for probing the gate-voltage dependence of the surface potential of individual semiconductor nanowires. The statistics of electronic occupation of a single defect on the surface of the nanowire, determined from a random telegraph signal, is used as a measure for the local potential. The method is demonstrated for the case of one or two switching defects in indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire field effect transistors at temperatures T=25-77 K. Comparison with a self-consistent model shows that surface potential variation is retarded in the conducting regime due to screening by surface states with density Dss≈10(12) cm(-2) eV(-1). Temperature-dependent dynamics of electron capture and emission producing the random telegraph signals are also analyzed, and multiphonon emission is identified as the process responsible for capture and emission of electrons from the surface traps. Two defects studied in detail had capture activation energies of EB≈50 meV and EB≈110 meV and cross sections of σ∞≈3×10(-19) cm2 and σ∞≈2×10(-17) cm2, respectively. A lattice relaxation energy of Sℏω=187±15 meV was found for the first defect.

  19. Clinical characteristics associated with different strengths of loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Yup; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Chang-Uk; Park, Young-Min; Bae, Sung-Man

    2012-12-30

    Loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), also called as intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials (IDAP), has been proposed as a potential marker for central serotonergic tone and has been noticed for its possible clinical implications in depression. However, its distributions in major depressive disorder (MDD) and factors affecting it are largely unknown. In this study, we examined its distribution and relationships with various demographic and clinical variables in MDD patients. In 143 MDD patients, the LDAEP was measured using five intensities of auditory stimulus. The influences of ten independent variables (age, gender, education years, marital status, psychiatric family history, age of onset, suicide attempt history, depression severity, later augmentation of mood stabilizer, and smoking status) on the LDAEP strength were examined using univariate analyses and data mining method. The mean (±S.D.) LDAEP was 0.90 (±0.73)μV/10dB (-0.78-3.83μV/10dB). Female gender, smoking, and being married were consistently associated with a weaker LDAEP. In the pathway model, sequential combination of being male, living alone, and older age predicted the strongest LDAEP, whereas female gender, older age, and smoking predicted the weakest LDAEP. These variables need to be considered when interpreting the LDAEP.

  20. A plant alkaloid, veratridine, potentiates cancer chemosensitivity by UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of an oncoprotein, mortalin-2.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ammara; Sane, Sanam; Branick, Kate A; Freeling, Jessica L; Wang, Hongmin; Zhang, Dong; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2015-09-15

    Veratridine (VTD), an alkaloid derived from the Liliaceae plant shows anti-tumor effects; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Using a high-throughput drug screen, we found that VTD enhances transactivation of UBXN2A, resulting in upregulation of UBXN2A in the cytoplasm, where UBXN2A binds and inhibits the oncoprotein mortalin-2 (mot-2). VTD-treated cancer cells undergo cell death in UBXN2A- and mot-2-dependent manners. The cytotoxic function of VTD is grade-dependent, and the combined treatment with a sub-optimal dose of the standard chemotherapy, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and etoposide, demonstrated a synergistic effect, resulting in higher therapeutic efficacy. VTD influences the CD44+ stem cells, possibly through UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of mot-2. The VTD-dependent expression of UBXN2A is a potential candidate for designing novel strategies for colon cancer treatment because: 1) In 50% of colon cancer patients, UBXN2A protein levels in tumor tissues are significantly lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues. 2) Cytoplasmic expression of the mot-2 protein is very low in non-cancerous cells; thus, VTD can produce tumor-specific toxicity while normal cells remain intact. 3) Finally, VTD or its modified analogs offer a valuable adjuvant chemotherapy strategy to improve the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for colon cancer patients harboring WT-p53.

  1. A plant alkaloid, veratridine, potentiates cancer chemosensitivity by UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of an oncoprotein, mortalin-2

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Ammara; Sane, Sanam; Branick, Kate A.; Freeling, Jessica L.; Wang, Hongmin; Zhang, Dong; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Veratridine (VTD), an alkaloid derived from the Liliaceae plant shows anti-tumor effects; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Using a high-throughput drug screen, we found that VTD enhances transactivation of UBXN2A, resulting in upregulation of UBXN2A in the cytoplasm, where UBXN2A binds and inhibits the oncoprotein mortalin-2 (mot-2). VTD-treated cancer cells undergo cell death in UBXN2A- and mot-2-dependent manners. The cytotoxic function of VTD is grade-dependent, and the combined treatment with a sub-optimal dose of the standard chemotherapy, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and etoposide, demonstrated a synergistic effect, resulting in higher therapeutic efficacy. VTD influences the CD44+ stem cells, possibly through UBXN2A-dependent inhibition of mot-2. The VTD-dependent expression of UBXN2A is a potential candidate for designing novel strategies for colon cancer treatment because: 1) In 50% of colon cancer patients, UBXN2A protein levels in tumor tissues are significantly lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues. 2) Cytoplasmic expression of the mot-2 protein is very low in non-cancerous cells; thus, VTD can produce tumor-specific toxicity while normal cells remain intact. 3) Finally, VTD or its modified analogs offer a valuable adjuvant chemotherapy strategy to improve the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for colon cancer patients harboring WT-p53. PMID:26188124

  2. Frequency-dependent associative long-term potentiation at the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse.

    PubMed

    Derrick, B E; Martinez, J L

    1994-10-25

    The mossy fiber-CA3 synapse displays an N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor-independent mu-opioid-receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is thought not to display cooperativity or associativity with coactive afferents. However, because mossy fiber LTP requires repetitive synaptic activity for its induction, we reevaluated cooperativity and associativity at this synapse by using trains of mossy fiber stimulation. Moderate-, but not low-, intensity trains induced mossy fiber LTP, indicating cooperativity. Low-intensity mossy fiber trains that were normally ineffective in inducing LTP could induce mossy fiber LTP when delivered in conjunction with trains delivered to commissural-CA3 afferents. Associative mossy fiber LTP also could be induced with single mossy fiber pulses when delivered with commissural trains in the presence of a mu-opioid-receptor agonist. Our findings suggest a frequency-dependent variation of Hebbian associative LTP induction that is regulated by the release of endogenous opioid peptides.

  3. Layer Dependence and Light Tuning Surface Potential of 2D MoS2 on Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Qi, Junjie; Xu, Minxuan; Xiao, Jiankun; Xu, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiankun; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Yue

    2017-04-01

    Here surface potential of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 2D MoS2 with various layers is reported, and the effect of adherent substrate and light illumination on surface potential of monolayer MoS2 are investigated. The surface potential of MoS2 on Si/SiO2 substrate decreases from 4.93 to 4.84 eV with the increase in the number of layer from 1 to 4 or more. Especially, the surface potentials of monolayer MoS2 are strongly dependent on its adherent substrate, which are determined to be 4.55, 4.88, 4.93, 5.10, and 5.50 eV on Ag, graphene, Si/SiO2 , Au, and Pt substrates, respectively. Light irradiation is introduced to tuning the surface potential of monolayer MoS2 , with the increase in light intensity, the surface potential of MoS2 on Si/SiO2 substrate decreases from 4.93 to 4.74 eV, while increases from 5.50 to 5.56 eV on Pt substrate. The I-V curves on vertical of monolayer MoS2 /Pt heterojunction show the decrease in current with the increase of light intensity, and Schottky barrier height at MoS2 /Pt junctions increases from 0.302 to 0.342 eV. The changed surface potential can be explained by trapped charges on surface, photoinduced carriers, charge transfer, and local electric field.

  4. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  5. A major role for calcium-dependent potassium current in action potential repolarization in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Pancrazio, J J; Johnson, P A; Lynch, C

    1994-12-30

    To determine the extent which Ca dependent K current (IKCa) contributes during an action potential (AP), bovine chromaffin cells were voltage-clamped using a pre-recorded AP as the command voltage waveform. Based on (1) differential sensitivity of IKCa and Ca-independent K current (IK) to tetraethylammonium; (2) measurements of AP currents under conditions where Ca activation of IKCa had been abolished; and (3) blockade by charybdotoxin, IKCa comprised 70-90% of the outward K current during AP repolarization. In addition, observations are made concerning the form of AP-evoked Ca current.

  6. On the calculation of the structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions using density-dependent potentials.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Priego, R; Lobaskin, V; Mixteco-Sánchez, J C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Linse, P

    2012-02-15

    The structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions has been studied through a one-component model using a Yukawa potential with density-dependent parameters examined with integral equation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Partial thermodynamic consistency was guaranteed by considering the osmotic pressure of the dispersion from the approximate mean-field renormalized jellium and Poisson-Boltzmann cell models. The colloidal structures could be accurately described by the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Rogers-Young closure by using the osmotic pressure from the renormalized jellium model. Although we explicitly show that the correct effective pair-potential obtained from the inverse Monte Carlo method deviates from the Yukawa shape, the osmotic pressure constraint allows us to have a good description of the colloidal structure without losing information on the system thermodynamics. Our findings are corroborated by primitive model simulations of salt-free colloidal dispersions.

  7. Direction dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene: Parameterization of Stillinger-Weber potential and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhu, Liyan; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-06-01

    A Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential is parameterized for phosphorene. It well reproduces the crystal structure, cohesive energy, and phonon dispersion predicted by first-principles calculations. The thermal conductivity of phosphorene is explored by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations adopting the optimal set of potential parameters. At room temperature, the intrinsic thermal conductivities along zigzag and armchair directions are about 152.7 and 33.0 W/mK, respectively, with a large anisotropy ratio of five. The remarkably directional dependence of thermal conductivity in phosphorene, consistent with previous reports, is mainly due to the strong anisotropy of phonon group velocities, and weak anisotropy of phonon lifetimes as revealed by lattice dynamics calculations. Moreover, the effective phonon mean free paths at zigzag and armchair directions are about 141.4 and 43.4 nm, respectively.

  8. Effects of Electric Potential Treatment of a Chromium Hexacyanoferrate Modified Biosensor Based on PQQ-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ta-Feng; Yang, Yang-Li; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan; Lou, Shyh-Liang

    2010-01-01

    A novel potential treatment technique applied to a glucose biosensor that is based on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and chromium hexacyanoferrate (CrHCF) incorporated into a platinum (Pt) electrode was demonstrated. CrHCF, serving as a mediator, was electrochemically deposited on the Pt electrode as ascertained by CV, SEM, FTIR and XPS measurements. The potential treatment of CrHCF, which converts Fe(II) to Fe(III), enables the glucose detection. The amperometric measurement linearity of the biosensor was up to 20 mM (R = 0.9923), and the detection sensitivity was 199.94 nA/mM per cm2. More importantly, this biosensor remained stable for >270 days. PMID:22163553

  9. Effects of electric potential treatment of a chromium hexacyanoferrate modified biosensor based on PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ta-Feng; Yang, Yang-Li; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan; Lou, Shyh-Liang

    2010-01-01

    A novel potential treatment technique applied to a glucose biosensor that is based on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and chromium hexacyanoferrate (CrHCF) incorporated into a platinum (Pt) electrode was demonstrated. CrHCF, serving as a mediator, was electrochemically deposited on the Pt electrode as ascertained by CV, SEM, FTIR and XPS measurements. The potential treatment of CrHCF, which converts Fe(II) to Fe(III), enables the glucose detection. The amperometric measurement linearity of the biosensor was up to 20 mM (R = 0.9923), and the detection sensitivity was 199.94 nA/mM per cm(2). More importantly, this biosensor remained stable for >270 days.

  10. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-03

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration.

  11. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental measurement of Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and quartz glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul; Walker, Emilie; Ruel, Jean; Yagout, Fuad

    2013-04-01

    High quality frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and glass bead packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electro-magnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i) based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii) treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii) treat the material as a porous medium. In each case we have considered the real and imaginary parts of the complex streaming potential coefficient as well as its magnitude. It is clear from the results that the complex streaming potential coefficient does not follow a Debye-type behaviour, differing from the Debye-type behaviour most markedly for frequencies above the transition frequency. The best fit to all the data was provided by the Pride (1994) model and its simplification by Walker and Glover (2010), which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Theory predicts that the transition frequency is related to the inverse square of the effective pore radius. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with steady-state streaming potential coefficient data measured using a steady-state streaming potential rig as well as the corpus of steady-state determinations for quartz-based samples existing in the literature.

  12. Cathodic Potential Dependence of Electrochemical Reduction of SiO2 Granules in Molten CaCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Yasuda, Kouji; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Rika; Homma, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    As part of an ongoing fundamental study to develop a new process for producing solar-grade silicon, this paper examines the effects of cathodic potential on reduction kinetics, current efficiency, morphology, and purity of Si product during electrolysis of SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 at 1123 K (850 °C). SiO2 granules were electrolyzed potentiostatically at different cathodic potentials (0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 V vs Ca2+/Ca). The reduction kinetics was evaluated based on the growth of the reduced Si layer and the current behavior during electrolysis. The results suggest that a more negative cathodic potential is favorable for faster reduction. Current efficiencies in 60 minutes are greater than 65 pct at all the potentials examined. Si wires with sub-micron diameters are formed, and their morphologies show little dependence on the cathodic potential. The impurities in the Si product can be controlled at low level. The rate-determining step for the electrochemical reduction of SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 changes with time. At the initial stage of electrolysis, the electron transfer is the rate-determining step. At the later stage, the diffusion of O2- ions is the rate-determining step. The major cause of the decrease in reduction rate with increasing electrolysis time is the potential drop from the current collector to the reaction front due to the increased contact resistance among the reduced Si particles.

  13. Fourth order real space solver for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with singular Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorosi, Szilárd; Czirják, Attila

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel numerical method and algorithm for the solution of the 3D axially symmetric time-dependent Schrödinger equation in cylindrical coordinates, involving singular Coulomb potential terms besides a smooth time-dependent potential. We use fourth order finite difference real space discretization, with special formulae for the arising Neumann and Robin boundary conditions along the symmetry axis. Our propagation algorithm is based on merging the method of the split-operator approximation of the exponential operator with the implicit equations of second order cylindrical 2D Crank-Nicolson scheme. We call this method hybrid splitting scheme because it inherits both the speed of the split step finite difference schemes and the robustness of the full Crank-Nicolson scheme. Based on a thorough error analysis, we verified both the fourth order accuracy of the spatial discretization in the optimal spatial step size range, and the fourth order scaling with the time step in the case of proper high order expressions of the split-operator. We demonstrate the performance and high accuracy of our hybrid splitting scheme by simulating optical tunneling from a hydrogen atom due to a few-cycle laser pulse with linear polarization.

  14. Phospholipase C-gamma1 potentiates integrin-dependent cell spreading and migration through Pyk2/paxillin activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Yang, Yong-Ryoul; Lee, Seul Ki; Kim, Il-Shin; Ha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2007-08-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), which generates two second messengers, namely, inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, is implicated in growth factor-mediated chemotaxis. However, the exact role of PLC-gamma1 in integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that PLC-gamma1 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization and cell motility through the regulation of Pyk2 and paxillin activation. After fibronectin stimulation, PLC-gamma1 directly interacted with the cytoplasmic tail of integrin beta1. In PLC-gamma1-silenced cells, integrin-induced Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation were significantly reduced and PLC-gamma1 potentiated the integrin-induced Pyk2/paxillin activation in its enzymatic activity-dependent manner. In addition, specific knock-down of PLC-gamma1 resulted in a failure to form focal adhesions dependent on fibronectin stimulation, which appeared to be caused by the suppression of Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation. Interestingly, PLC-gamma1 potentiated the activations of Rac, thus integrin-induced lamellipodia formation was up-regulated. Consequently, the strength of cell-substratum interaction and cell motility were profoundly up-regulated by PLC-gamma1. Taken together, these results suggest that PLC-gamma1 is a key player in integrin-mediated cell spreading and motility achieved by the activation of Pyk2/paxillin/Rac signaling.

  15. Anion Dependent Potential Pre-Cycling Effects on Lithium Deposition/Dissolution Reaction Studied by Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Smaran, Kumar Sai; Shibata, Sae; Omachi, Asami; Ohama, Ayano; Tomizawa, Eika; Kondo, Toshihiro

    2017-10-05

    The electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance technique was employed to study the initial stage of the electrodeposition and dissolution of lithium utilizing three kinds of electrolyte solutions such as LiPF6, LiTFSI, or LiFSI in tetraglyme. The native-SEI (solid electrolyte interphase) formed by potential pre-scan before the lithium deposition/dissolution in all three solutions. Simultaneous additional SEI (add-SEI) deposition and its dissolution with lithium deposition and dissolution, respectively, were observed in LiPF6 and LiTFSI. Conversely, the add-SEI dissolution with lithium deposition and its deposition with lithium dissolution were observed in LiFSI. With the pre-SEI, only lithium deposition/dissolution were significantly observed in LiTFSI and LiFSI. Based on the potential dependences of the mass and resistance changes, the anion dependent effects of such a pre-SEI layer presence/absence on the lithium deposition/dissolution processes were discussed.

  16. Brownian motion in time-dependent logarithmic potential: Exact results for dynamics and first-passage properties.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Artem; Berestneva, Ekaterina; Holubec, Viktor

    2015-09-21

    The paper addresses Brownian motion in the logarithmic potential with time-dependent strength, U(x, t) = g(t)log(x), subject to the absorbing boundary at the origin of coordinates. Such model can represent kinetics of diffusion-controlled reactions of charged molecules or escape of Brownian particles over a time-dependent entropic barrier at the end of a biological pore. We present a simple asymptotic theory which yields the long-time behavior of both the survival probability (first-passage properties) and the moments of the particle position (dynamics). The asymptotic survival probability, i.e., the probability that the particle will not hit the origin before a given time, is a functional of the potential strength. As such, it exhibits a rather varied behavior for different functions g(t). The latter can be grouped into three classes according to the regime of the asymptotic decay of the survival probability. We distinguish 1. the regular (power-law decay), 2. the marginal (power law times a slow function of time), and 3. the regime of enhanced absorption (decay faster than the power law, e.g., exponential). Results of the asymptotic theory show good agreement with numerical simulations.

  17. Superresolution imaging reveals activity-dependent plasticity of axon morphology linked to changes in action potential conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Chéreau, Ronan; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Angibaud, Julie; Cattaert, Daniel; Nägerl, U Valentin

    2017-02-07

    Axons convey information to nearby and distant cells, and the time it takes for action potentials (APs) to reach their targets governs the timing of information transfer in neural circuits. In the unmyelinated axons of hippocampus, the conduction speed of APs depends crucially on axon diameters, which vary widely. However, it is not known whether axon diameters are dynamic and regulated by activity-dependent mechanisms. Using time-lapse superresolution microscopy in brain slices, we report that axons grow wider after high-frequency AP firing: synaptic boutons undergo a rapid enlargement, which is mostly transient, whereas axon shafts show a more delayed and progressive increase in diameter. Simulations of AP propagation incorporating these morphological dynamics predicted bidirectional effects on AP conduction speed. The predictions were confirmed by electrophysiological experiments, revealing a phase of slowed down AP conduction, which is linked to the transient enlargement of the synaptic boutons, followed by a sustained increase in conduction speed that accompanies the axon shaft widening induced by high-frequency AP firing. Taken together, our study outlines a morphological plasticity mechanism for dynamically fine-tuning AP conduction velocity, which potentially has wide implications for the temporal transfer of information in the brain.

  18. Posttetanic potentiation critically depends on an enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion mediated by presynaptic PKC

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Lou, Xuelin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Activity-dependent enhancement of transmitter release is a common form of presynaptic plasticity, but the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained largely unknown, perhaps because of the inaccessibility of most CNS nerve terminals. Here we investigated the signaling steps that underlie posttetanic potentiation (PTP), a form of presynaptic plasticity found at many CNS synapses. Direct whole-cell recordings from the large calyx of Held nerve terminals with the perforated patch-clamp technique showed that PTP was not mediated by changes in the presynaptic action potential waveform. Ca2+ imaging revealed a slight increase of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient during PTP (≈15%), which, however, was too small to explain a large part of PTP. The presynaptic PKC pathway was critically involved in PTP because (i) PTP was occluded by activation of PKC with phorbol esters, and (ii) PTP was largely (by approximately two-thirds) blocked by the PKC inhibitors, Ro31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide. Activation of PKC during PTP most likely acts directly on the presynaptic release machinery, because in presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging experiments, activation of PKC by phorbol ester greatly increased the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion in a Ro31-8220-sensitive manner (≈300% with small Ca2+ uncaging stimuli), but only slightly increased presynaptic voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (≈15%). We conclude that a PKC-dependent increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion is a key step in the enhancement of transmitter release during PTP. PMID:17884983

  19. Light-dependent delta pH and membrane potential changes in halobacterial vesicles coupled to sodium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kamo, N.; Racanelli, T.; Packer, L.

    1982-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin and Halorhodopsin present in Halobacterium halobium strains have been investigated in relation to Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange in isolated cell envelope vesicles. Upon illumination, these retinal proteins result in extrusion of sodium ions by either an electrogenic Na/sup +//Ha/sup +/ antiporter and/or a direct sodium pump. Since a molecular characterization of these mechanism(s) of sodium extrusion has not yet been realized, it was of interest to measure directly the light- and sodium-dependent changes in delta pH and membrane potential under nearly identical conditions in S9 and R1mR cell membrane vesicles to gain information on the relation of these retinal proteins to sodium extrusion. These activities were evaluated in terms of their dependence on light intensity, and on the inhibitory effect of chemical modifiers of carboxyl groups (carbodiimides); electroneutral exchanges (monensin and triphenyltin); digitoxin and some analogues; and phloretin. Under most of the conditions and treatments employed, light- and sodium-dependent delta pH led to similar effects in both membrane vesicle types. Hence, it is concluded that the delta pH and delta psi which arise from sodium transport occur by either a single mechanism or by one which shares common features.

  20. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  1. Skin sensitizers induce antioxidant response element dependent genes: application to the in vitro testing of the sensitization potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Emter, Roger

    2008-03-01

    Tests for skin sensitization are required prior to the market launch of new cosmetic ingredients and in vitro tests are needed to replace the current animal tests. Protein reactivity is the common feature of skin sensitizers and it is a crucial question whether a cellular in vitro assay can detect protein reactivity of diverse test chemicals. The signaling pathway involving the repressor protein Keap1 and the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2, which binds to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of many phase II detoxification genes, is a potential cellular marker because Keap1 had been shown to be covalently modified by electrophiles which leads to activation of ARE-dependent genes. To evaluate whether this regulatory pathway can be used to develop a predictive cellular in vitro test for sensitization, 96 different chemicals of known skin sensitization potential were added to Hepa1C1C7 cells and the induction of the ARE-regulated quinone reductase (QR) activity was determined. In parallel, 102 chemicals were tested on the reporter cell line AREc32, which contains an eightfold repeat of the ARE sequence upstream of a luciferase gene. Among the strong/extreme skin sensitizers 14 out of 15 and 30 out of 34 moderate sensitizers induced the ARE-dependent luciferase activity and in many cases this response was paralleled by an induction of QR activity in Hepa1C1C7 cells. Sixty percent of the weak sensitizers also induced luciferase activity, and the overall accuracy of the assay was 83 percent. Only four of 30 tested nonsensitizers induced low levels of luciferase activity, indicating a high specificity of the assay. Thus, measurement of the induction of this signaling pathway provides an interesting in vitro test to screen for the skin sensitization potential of novel chemicals.

  2. Variability in projected elevation dependent warming in boreal midlatitude winter in CMIP5 climate models and its potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Miller, James R.

    2016-04-01

    The future rate of climate change in mountains has many potential human impacts, including those related to water resources, ecosystem services, and recreation. Analysis of the ensemble mean response of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) shows amplified warming in high elevation regions during the cold season in boreal midlatitudes. We examine how the twenty-first century elevation-dependent response in the daily minimum surface air temperature [d(ΔTmin)/dz] varies among 27 different GCMs during winter for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. The focus is on regions within the northern hemisphere mid-latitude band between 27.5°N and 40°N, which includes both the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau/Himalayas. We find significant variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz among the individual models ranging from 0.16 °C/km (10th percentile) to 0.97 °C/km (90th percentile), although nearly all of the GCMs (24 out of 27) show a significant positive value for d(ΔTmin)/dz. To identify some of the important drivers associated with the variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz during winter, we evaluate the co-variance between d(ΔTmin)/dz and the differential response of elevation-based anomalies in different climate variables as well as the GCMs' spatial resolution, their global climate sensitivity, and their elevation-dependent free air temperature response. We find that d(ΔTmin)/dz has the strongest correlation with elevation-dependent increases in surface water vapor, followed by elevation-dependent decreases in surface albedo, and a weak positive correlation with the GCMs' free air temperature response.

  3. HDAC dependent transcriptional repression of Bmp-7 potentiates TGF-β mediated renal fibrosis in obstructive uropathy.

    PubMed

    Manson, Scott R; Song, Joseph B; Hruska, Keith A; Austin, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant BMP-7 inhibits the pathogenesis of renal injury in response to various stimuli. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of endogenous BMP-7 and its renal protective functions. We examined transcriptional regulation of Bmp-7 and its role in the pathogenesis of renal injury resulting from urinary tract dysfunction. Obstruction induced renal injury was modeled in vivo in mice by unilateral ureteral obstruction and in vitro in primary kidney cells by treatment with transforming growth factor-β, a profibrotic cytokine that is increased in the obstructed kidney. Unilateral ureteral obstruction resulted in the loss of BMP-7 expression in conjunction with histone deacetylation and transcriptional repression of the Bmp-7 promoter. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A stimulated Bmp-7 expression in primary kidney cells. Trichostatin A also inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-β dependent profibrotic genes in a manner that depended on BMP receptor signaling. These findings extended to the obstructed kidney in vivo, in which trichostatin A treatment restored the expression of Bmp-7 along with BMP-7 mediated suppression of transforming growth factor-β dependent signaling pathways. Finally, trichostatin A stimulated activation of the BMP-7 pathway the ameliorated obstruction induced renal injury by preventing disruption of the renal architecture and the development of renal fibrosis. These findings show that histone deacetylase dependent repression of Bmp-7 transcription is a critical event during the pathogenesis of renal injury in obstructive uropathy. Accordingly, treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors represents a potentially effective strategy to restore BMP-7 expression and its renal protective functions during treatment of obstructive uropathy. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of AMPA and NMDA receptors and back-propagating action potentials in spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Couve, Alejandro; Buño, Washington

    2010-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are largely unknown. We studied in vitro in CA1 pyramidal neurons the contribution of AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) components of Schaffer collateral (SC) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; EPSP(AMPA) and EPSP(NMDA)) and of the back-propagating action potential (BAP) to the long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by a STDP protocol that consisted in pairing an EPSP and a BAP. Transient blockade of EPSP(AMPA) with 7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile (CNQX) during the STDP protocol prevented LTP. Contrastingly LTP was induced under transient inhibition of EPSP(AMPA) by combining SC stimulation, an imposed EPSP(AMPA)-like depolarization, and BAP or by coupling the EPSP(NMDA) evoked under sustained depolarization (approximately -40 mV) and BAP. In Mg(2+)-free solution EPSP(NMDA) and BAP also produced LTP. Suppression of EPSP(NMDA) or BAP always prevented LTP. Thus activation of NMDA receptors and BAPs are needed but not sufficient because AMPA receptor activation is also obligatory for STDP. However, a transient depolarization of another origin that unblocks NMDA receptors and a BAP may also trigger LTP.

  5. Neuronal synchrony and the relation between the blood-oxygen-level dependent response and the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai; Winawer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The most widespread measures of human brain activity are the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal and surface field potential. Prior studies report a variety of relationships between these signals. To develop an understanding of how to interpret these signals and the relationship between them, we developed a model of (a) neuronal population responses and (b) transformations from neuronal responses into the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) BOLD signal and electrocorticographic (ECoG) field potential. Rather than seeking a transformation between the two measures directly, this approach interprets each measure with respect to the underlying neuronal population responses. This model accounts for the relationship between BOLD and ECoG data from human visual cortex in V1, V2, and V3, with the model predictions and data matching in three ways: across stimuli, the BOLD amplitude and ECoG broadband power were positively correlated, the BOLD amplitude and alpha power (8–13 Hz) were negatively correlated, and the BOLD amplitude and narrowband gamma power (30–80 Hz) were uncorrelated. The two measures provide complementary information about human brain activity, and we infer that features of the field potential that are uncorrelated with BOLD arise largely from changes in synchrony, rather than level, of neuronal activity. PMID:28742093

  6. Global analysis of isospin dependent microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potentials in a Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruirui; Ma, Zhongyu; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yuan; van Dalen, E. N. E.; Müther, H.

    2016-09-01

    Background: For the study of exotic nuclei it is important to have an optical model potential that is reliable not only for stable nuclei but can also be extrapolated to nuclear systems with exotic numbers of protons and neutrons. An efficient way to obtain such a potential is to develop a microscopic optical potential (MOP) based on a fundamental theory with a minimal number of free parameters, which are adjusted to describe stable nuclei all over the nuclide chart. Purpose: The choice adopted in the present work is to develop the MOP within a relativistic scheme which provides a natural and consistent relation between the spin-orbit part and the central part of the potential. The Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach provides such a microscopic relativistic scheme, which is based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction and reproduces the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter without any adjustable parameter. Its solution using the projection technique within the subtracted T -matrix representation provides a reliable extension to asymmetric nuclear matter, which is important to describe the features of isospin asymmetric nuclei. The present work performs a global analysis of the isospin dependent nucleon-nucleus MOP based on the DBHF calculation in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. Methods: The DBHF approach is used to evaluate the relativistic structure of the nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter at various densities and asymmetries. The Schrödinger equivalent potentials of finite nuclei are derived from these Dirac components by a local density approximation (LDA). The density distributions of finite nuclei are taken from the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with Gogny D1S force. An improved LDA approach (ILDA) is employed to get a better prediction of the scattering observables. A χ2 assessment system based on the global simulated annealing algorithm is developed to optimize the very few free components in this study. Results

  7. Nicotine-activated descending facilitation on spinal NMDA-dependent reflex potentiation from pontine tegmentum in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shwu-Fen; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Lee, Shin-Da; Cheng, Chen-Li; Shyu, Jyh-Cherng; Liao, Jiuan-Miaw; Chen, Gin-Den; Lin, Tzer-Bin

    2008-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possible neurotransmitter that activates the descending pathways coming from the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DPT) to modulate spinal pelvic-urethra reflex potentiation. External urethra sphincter electromyogram (EUSE) activity in response to test stimulation (TS, 1/30 Hz) and repetitive stimulation (RS, 1 Hz) on the pelvic afferent nerve of 63 anesthetized rats were recorded with or without microinjection of nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) agonists, ACh and nicotine, to the DPT. TS evoked a baseline reflex activity with a single action potential (1.00 +/- 0.00 spikes/stimulation, n = 40), whereas RS produced a long-lasting reflex potentiation (16.14 +/- 0.96 spikes/stimulation, n = 40) that was abolished by d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (1.60 +/- 0.89 spikes/stimulation, n = 40) and was attenuated by 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo (F) quinoxaline (7.10 +/- 0.84 spikes/stimulation, n = 40). ACh and nicotine microinjections to DPT both produced facilitation on the RS-induced reflex potentiation (23.57 +/- 2.23 and 28.29 +/- 2.36 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10 and 20, respectively). Pretreatment of selective nicotinic receptor antagonist, chlorisondamine, reversed the facilitation on RS-induced reflex potentiation caused by nicotine (19.41 +/- 1.21 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10) Intrathecal WAY-100635 and spinal transection at the T(1) level both abolished the facilitation on reflex potentiation resulting from the DPT nicotine injection (12.86 +/- 3.13 and 15.57 +/- 1.72 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10 each). Our findings suggest that activation of nAChR at DPT may modulate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-dependent reflex potentiation via descending serotonergic neurotransmission. This descending modulation may have physiological/pathological relevance in the neural controls of urethral closure.

  8. Nitric Oxide Is Required for L-Type Ca2+ Channel-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, Beatrice M.; Garthwaite, John

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has long been implicated in the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) and other types of synaptic plasticity, a role for which the intimate coupling between NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) is likely to be instrumental in many instances. While several types of synaptic plasticity depend on NMDARs, others do not, an example of which is LTP triggered by opening of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs) in postsynaptic neurons. In CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus, NMDAR-dependent LTP (LTPNMDAR) appears to be primarily expressed postsynaptically whereas L-VGCC-dependent LTP (LTPL−VGCC), which often coexists with LTPNMDAR, appears mainly to reflect enhanced presynaptic transmitter release. Since NO is an excellent candidate as a retrograde messenger mediating post-to-presynaptic signaling, we sought to determine if NO functions in LTPL−VGCC in mouse CA3-CA1 synapses. When elicited by a burst type of stimulation with NMDARs and the associated NO release blocked, LTPL−VGCC was curtailed by inhibition of NO synthase or of the NO-receptor guanylyl cyclase to the same extent as occurred with inhibition of L-VGCCs. Unlike LTPNMDAR at these synapses, LTPL−VGCC was unaffected in mice lacking endothelial NO synthase, implying that the major source of the NO is neuronal. Transient delivery of exogenous NO paired with tetanic synaptic stimulation under conditions of NMDAR blockade resulted in a long-lasting potentiation that was sensitive to inhibition of NO-receptor guanylyl cyclase but was unaffected by inhibition of L-VGCCs. The results indicate that NO, acting through its second messenger cGMP, plays an unexpectedly important role in L-VGCC-dependent, NMDAR-independent LTP, possibly as a retrograde messenger generated in response to opening of postsynaptic L-VGCCs and/or as a signal acting postsynaptically, perhaps to facilitate changes in gene expression. PMID:27445786

  9. Protein Kinase C-dependent Phosphorylation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 (TRPC6) on Serine 448 Causes Channel Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Simon M.; Monet, Michaël; Boulay, Guylain

    2010-01-01

    TRPC6 is a cation channel in the plasma membrane that plays a role in Ca2+ entry following the stimulation of a Gq-protein coupled or tyrosine kinase receptor. A dysregulation of TRPC6 activity causes abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells and glomerulosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of TRPC6 activity by protein kinase C (PKC). We showed that inhibiting PKC with GF1 or activating it with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate potentiated and inhibited agonist-induced Ca2+ entry, respectively, into cells expressing TRPC6. Similar results were obtained when TRPC6 was directly activated with 1-oleyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. Activation of the cells with carbachol increased the phosphorylation of TRPC6, an effect that was prevented by the inhibition of PKC. The target residue of PKC was identified by an alanine screen of all canonical PKC sites on TRPC6. Unexpectedly, all the mutants, including TRPC6S768A (a residue previously proposed to be a target for PKC), displayed PKC-dependent inhibition of channel activity. Phosphorylation prediction software suggested that Ser448, in a non-canonical PKC consensus sequence, was a potential target for PKCδ. Ba2+ and Ca2+ entry experiments revealed that GF1 did not potentiate TRPC6S448A activity. Moreover, activation of PKC did not enhance the phosphorylation state of TRPC6S448A. Using A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells, which endogenously express TRPC6, we observed that a novel PKC isoform is involved in the inhibition of the vasopressin-induced Ca2+ entry. Furthermore, knocking down PKCδ in A7r5 cells potentiated vasopressin-induced Ca2+ entry. In summary, we provide evidence that PKCδ exerts a negative feedback effect on TRPC6 through the phosphorylation of Ser448. PMID:20961851

  10. The potentiation of myeloperoxidase activity by the glycosaminoglycan-dependent binding of myeloperoxidase to proteins of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kubala, Lukáš; Kolářová, Hana; Víteček, Jan; Kremserová, Silvie; Klinke, Anna; Lau, Denise; Chapman, Anna L P; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P

    2013-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant hemoprotein expressed by neutrophil granulocytes that is recognized to play an important role in the development of vascular diseases. Upon degranulation from circulating neutrophil granulocytes, MPO binds to the surface of endothelial cells in an electrostatic-dependent manner and undergoes transcytotic migration to the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the mechanisms governing the binding of MPO to subendothelial ECM proteins, and whether this binding modulates its enzymatic functions are not well understood. We investigated MPO binding to ECM derived from aortic endothelial cells, aortic smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts, and to purified ECM proteins, and the modulation of these associations by glycosaminoglycans. The oxidizing and chlorinating potential of MPO upon binding to ECM proteins was tested. MPO binds to the ECM proteins collagen IV and fibronectin, and this association is enhanced by the pre-incubation of these proteins with glycosaminoglycans. Correspondingly, an excess of glycosaminoglycans in solution during incubation inhibits the binding of MPO to collagen IV and fibronectin. These observations were confirmed with cell-derived ECM. The oxidizing and chlorinating potential of MPO was preserved upon binding to collagen IV and fibronectin; even the potentiation of MPO activity in the presence of collagen IV and fibronectin was observed. Collectively, the data reveal that MPO binds to ECM proteins on the basis of electrostatic interactions, and MPO chlorinating and oxidizing activity is potentiated upon association with these proteins. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction of MPO with ECM proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Epithelium-dependent potentiation of anaphylactic contractions by beta-endorphin in tracheae isolated from actively sensitized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Van Oosterhout, A. J.; Celeda, L.; Delsman, K. C.; de Wied, D.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    1. It has been shown that opioid peptides modulate airway function. In the present study, the effect of beta-endorphin on antigen-induced contractions of isolated tracheal rings from actively sensitized guinea-pigs has been studied. 2. beta-Endorphin had a concentration-dependent bimodal effect on anaphylactic contractions of the trachea. Low concentrations of beta-endorphin (10(-10) and 10(-8) M) significantly potentiated anaphylactic contractions, whereas higher concentrations (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) significantly suppressed anaphylactic contractions of guinea-pig trachea. 3. beta-Endorphin in concentrations of 10(-8) M and 10(-7) M did not affect the responsiveness of the tracheal rings to histamine or leukotriene D4. This indicates that beta-endorphin does not influence the responsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle to anaphylactic mediators. 4. In the presence of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 10(-8) M beta-endorphin still potentiated the anaphylactic contractions of the trachea. In addition, an equimolar concentration of des-Tyr1-beta-endorphin, a fragment of beta-endorphin without opioid-like activity, also potentiated anaphylactic contractions. The potentiation of anaphylactic contraction by 10(-8) M beta-endorphin is not therefore mediated by classical opioid-receptors. 5. In the presence of naloxone, 10(-7) M, beta-endorphin did not suppress anaphylactic contractions of the trachea. Thus, the suppression of anaphylactic contraction is mediated via a classical opioid-receptor. 6. In epithelium-denuded trachea, both 10(-8) and 10(-7) M beta-endorphin suppressed the anaphylactic contractions, whereas 10(-8) and 10(-7) M des-Tyr1-beta-endorphin did not affect anaphylactic contractions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1884103

  12. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  13. pH Dependent Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins, Their Mechanisms of Action and Potential as Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Erum; Dennison, Sarah R.; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent antibiotics of the innate immune system that have been extensively investigated as a potential solution to the global problem of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. A group of AMPs that are increasingly being reported are those that utilise pH dependent antimicrobial mechanisms, and here we review research into this area. This review shows that these antimicrobial molecules are produced by a diverse spectrum of creatures, including vertebrates and invertebrates, and are primarily cationic, although a number of anionic examples are known. Some of these molecules exhibit high pH optima for their antimicrobial activity but in most cases, these AMPs show activity against microbes that present low pH optima, which reflects the acidic pH generally found at their sites of action, particularly the skin. The modes of action used by these molecules are based on a number of major structure/function relationships, which include metal ion binding, changes to net charge and conformational plasticity, and primarily involve the protonation of histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues at low pH. The pH dependent activity of pore forming antimicrobial proteins involves mechanisms that generally differ fundamentally to those used by pH dependent AMPs, which can be described by the carpet, toroidal pore and barrel-stave pore models of membrane interaction. A number of pH dependent AMPs and antimicrobial proteins have been developed for medical purposes and have successfully completed clinical trials, including kappacins, LL-37, histatins and lactoferrin, along with a number of their derivatives. Major examples of the therapeutic application of these antimicrobial molecules include wound healing as well as the treatment of multiple cancers and infections due to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In general, these applications involve topical administration, such as the use of mouth washes, cream formulations and hydrogel

  14. pH Dependent Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins, Their Mechanisms of Action and Potential as Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Malik, Erum; Dennison, Sarah R; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent antibiotics of the innate immune system that have been extensively investigated as a potential solution to the global problem of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. A group of AMPs that are increasingly being reported are those that utilise pH dependent antimicrobial mechanisms, and here we review research into this area. This review shows that these antimicrobial molecules are produced by a diverse spectrum of creatures, including vertebrates and invertebrates, and are primarily cationic, although a number of anionic examples are known. Some of these molecules exhibit high pH optima for their antimicrobial activity but in most cases, these AMPs show activity against microbes that present low pH optima, which reflects the acidic pH generally found at their sites of action, particularly the skin. The modes of action used by these molecules are based on a number of major structure/function relationships, which include metal ion binding, changes to net charge and conformational plasticity, and primarily involve the protonation of histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues at low pH. The pH dependent activity of pore forming antimicrobial proteins involves mechanisms that generally differ fundamentally to those used by pH dependent AMPs, which can be described by the carpet, toroidal pore and barrel-stave pore models of membrane interaction. A number of pH dependent AMPs and antimicrobial proteins have been developed for medical purposes and have successfully completed clinical trials, including kappacins, LL-37, histatins and lactoferrin, along with a number of their derivatives. Major examples of the therapeutic application of these antimicrobial molecules include wound healing as well as the treatment of multiple cancers and infections due to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In general, these applications involve topical administration, such as the use of mouth washes, cream formulations and hydrogel

  15. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death.

  16. Kappa-Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striatum as a Potential Modulator of Dopamine Transmission in Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  17. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  18. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 1014 W/cm2 to 3.5 × 1014 W/cm2. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  19. Highly Efficient Free Energy Calculations of the Fe Equation of State Using Temperature-Dependent Effective Potential Method.

    PubMed

    Mosyagin, Igor; Hellman, Olle; Olovsson, Weine; Simak, Sergei I; Abrikosov, Igor A

    2016-11-03

    Free energy calculations at finite temperature based on ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations have become possible, but they are still highly computationally demanding. Besides, achieving simultaneously high accuracy of the calculated results and efficiency of the computational algorithm is still a challenge. In this work we describe an efficient algorithm to determine accurate free energies of solids in simulations using the recently proposed temperature-dependent effective potential method (TDEP). We provide a detailed analysis of numerical approximations employed in the TDEP algorithm. We show that for a model system considered in this work, hcp Fe, the obtained thermal equation of state at 2000 K is in excellent agreement with the results of standard calculations within the quasiharmonic approximation.

  20. A conservative type-dependent full potential method for the treatment of supersonic flows with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Szema, K.-Y.; Osher, S.

    1983-01-01

    A nonlinear method based on the full potential equation in conservation form, cast in an arbitrary coordinate system, has been developed to treat predominantly supersonic flows with embedded subsonic regions. This type of flow field occurs frequently near the fuselage-canopy junction area and wing leading edge regions for a moderately swept fighter configuration. The method uses the theory of characteristics to accurately monitor the type-dependent flow field. A conservative switching scheme is developed to transition from the supersonic marching algorithm to a subsonic relaxation procedure, and vice versa. An implicit approximate factorization scheme is employed to solve the finite-differenced equation. Results are shown for a few configurations, including a wing-body-wake realistic fighter model having embedded subsonic regions.

  1. Highly Efficient Free Energy Calculations of the Fe Equation of State Using Temperature-Dependent Effective Potential Method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations at finite temperature based on ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations have become possible, but they are still highly computationally demanding. Besides, achieving simultaneously high accuracy of the calculated results and efficiency of the computational algorithm is still a challenge. In this work we describe an efficient algorithm to determine accurate free energies of solids in simulations using the recently proposed temperature-dependent effective potential method (TDEP). We provide a detailed analysis of numerical approximations employed in the TDEP algorithm. We show that for a model system considered in this work, hcp Fe, the obtained thermal equation of state at 2000 K is in excellent agreement with the results of standard calculations within the quasiharmonic approximation. PMID:27700093

  2. Quantitative model of electrochemical Ostwald ripening and its application to the time-dependent electrode potential of nanocrystalline metals.

    PubMed

    Schröder, A; Fleig, J; Gryaznov, D; Maier, J; Sitte, W

    2006-06-29

    The contact of a metastable nanocrystalline metal ensemble with a metal ion electrolyte leads to an electrochemical Ostwald ripening. The kinetics is modeled on the level of irreversible thermodynamics for the case that the rate is controlled by the electrode/electrolyte transfer resistance. In particular, the kinetic behavior of medium-sized particles and the time dependence of the electromotive force is investigated. Even though it is expressed in electrochemical terms (mixed potential), the modeling is also applicable to chemical Ostwald ripening as long as it is interfacially controlled. Under these conditions, the kinetics exhibits, even though not self-accelerating, strong similarities to selection dynamics, with the competition stemming from the cannibalistic nature of the process.

  3. Limits on the Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant on Gravitational Potential from White-Dwarf Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.; Webb, J. K.; Barrow, John D.; Barstow, M. A.; Preval, S. P.; Holberg, J. B.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10-5 and (-6.1±5.8)×10-5 from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δϕ≈5×10-5. With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  4. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-05

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  5. Resting, and rate-dependent depression of Vmax of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by amiodarone and desethylamiodarone.

    PubMed Central

    Pallandi, R. T.; Campbell, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    1 The cellular electrophysiological effects of amiodarone and its metabolite desethylamiodarone (DEA) were studied in guinea-pig ventricular myocardium by use of standard microelectrode techniques. 2 Both compounds produced significant increases in action potential duration (Class III antiarrhythmic effect) and decreases in maximum rate of depolarization (Class I effect), at clinically relevant concentrations. 3 The Class I effects were rate-dependent, with small (0-16%) falls in maximum depolarization rate in the absence of stimulation ('resting block') and progressively larger effects at decreasing interstimulus intervals (range 1200-300 ms). 4 The kinetics of onset and offset of the Class I effect in response to a step change in driving rate were quite fast for both drugs (comparable to those reported for Class Ib agents). 5 It is concluded that this unique combination of Class III action plus Class I effects with fast onset and offset kinetics may help explain the great efficacy of amiodarone in antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:3664094

  6. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic potential energy curves and excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingang; Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom; Cox, Hazel

    2006-07-28

    Orbital energies, ionization potentials, molecular constants, potential energy curves, and the excitation spectrum of O(2) are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The calculated negative highest occupied molecular orbital energy (-epsilon(HOMO)) is compared with the energy difference ionization potential for five exchange correlation functionals consisting of the local density approximation (LDAxc), gradient corrected Becke exchange plus Perdew correlation (B(88X)+P(86C)), gradient regulated asymptotic correction (GRAC), statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP), and van Leeuwen and Baerends asymptotically correct potential (LB94). The potential energy curves calculated using TDDFT with the TDA at internuclear distances from 1.0 to 1.8 A are divided into three groups according to the electron configurations. The 1pi(u) (4)1pi(g) (2) electron configuration gives rise to the X (3)Sigma(g) (-), a (1)Delta(g), and b (1)Sigma(g) (+) states; the 1pi(u) (3)1pi(g) (3) electron configuration gives rise to the c (1)Sigma(u) (-), C (3)Delta(u), and A (3)Sigma(u) (+) states; and the B (3)Sigma(u) (-), A (1)Delta(u), and f (1)Sigma(u) (+) states are determined by the mixing of two or more electron configurations. The excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule, calculated with the aforementioned exchange correlation functionals, shows that the results are quite sensitive to the choice of functional. The LDAxc and the B(88X)+P(86C) functionals produce similar spectroscopic patterns with a single strongly absorbing band positioned at 19.82 and 19.72 eV, respectively, while the asymptotically corrected exchange correlation functionals of the SAOP and the LB94 varieties yield similar excitation spectra where the computed strongly absorbing band is located at 16.09 and 16.42 eV, respectively. However, all of the exchange correlation functionals yield only one strongly absorbing band (oscillator strength

  7. Intensity dependence of auditory-evoked cortical potentials in fibromyalgia patients: a test of the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-de-la-Peña, M T; Vallet, M; Pérez, M I; Gómez-Perretta, C

    2006-07-01

    On the basis of recent evidence concerning the amplification of incoming stimulation in fibromyalgia (FM) patients, it has been proposed that a generalized hypervigilance of painful and nonpainful sensations may be at the root of this disorder. So far, research into this issue has been inconclusive, possibly owing to the lack of agreement as to the operational definition of "generalized hypervigilance" and to the lack of robust objective measures characterizing the sensory style of FM patients. In this study, we recorded auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) elicited by tones of increasing intensity (60, 70, 80, 90, and 105 dB) in 27 female FM patients and 25 healthy controls. Fibromyalgia patients presented shorter N1 and P2 latencies and a stronger intensity dependence of their AEPs. Both results suggest that FM patients may be hypervigilant to sensory stimuli, especially when very loud tones are used. The most noteworthy difference between patients and control subjects is at the highest stimulus intensity, for which far more patients maintained increased N1-P2 amplitudes in relation to the 90-dB tones. The larger AEP amplitudes to the 105-dB tones suggest that defects in an inhibitory system protecting against overstimulation may be a crucial factor in the pathophysiology of FM. Because a stronger loudness dependence of AEPs has been related to weak serotonergic transmission, it is hypothesized that for many FM patients deficient inhibition of the response to noxious and intense auditory stimuli may be due to a serotonergic deficit. The study of auditory-evoked potentials in response to tones of increasing intensity in FM patients may help to clarify the pathophysiology of this disorder, especially regarding the role of inhibition deficits involving serotonergic dysfunction, and may be a useful tool to guide the pharmacologic treatment of FM patients.

  8. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production

    PubMed Central

    Pulliainen, Arto T.; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S.; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:22635269

  9. Dependence receptor involvement in subtilisin-induced long-term depression and in long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W; Darlington, L Gail; Forrest, Caroline M

    2016-11-12

    The serine protease subtilisin induces a form of long-term depression (LTD) which is accompanied by a reduced expression of the axo-dendritic guidance molecule Unco-ordinated-5C (Unc-5C). One objective of the present work was to determine whether a loss of Unc-5C function contributed to subtilisin-induced LTD by using Unc-5C antibodies in combination with the pore-forming agents Triton X-100 (0.005%) or streptolysin O in rat hippocampal slices. In addition we have assessed the effect of subtilisin on the related dependence receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and used antibodies to this protein for functional studies. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in rat hippocampal slices and protein extracts were used for Western blotting. Subtilisin produced a greater loss of DCC than of Unc-5C, but the antibodies had no effect on resting excitability or fEPSPs and did not modify subtilisin-induced LTD. However, antibodies to DCC but not Unc-5C did reduce the amplitude of theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP). In addition, two inhibitors of endocytosis - dynasore and tat-gluR2(3Y) - were tested and, although the former compound had no effect on neurophysiological responses, tat-gluR2(3Y) did reduce the amplitude of subtilisin-induced LTD without affecting the expression of DCC or Unc-5C but with some loss of PostSynaptic Density Protein-95. The results support the view that the dependence receptor DCC may be involved in LTP and suggest that the endocytotic removal of a membrane protein or proteins may contribute to subtilisin-induced LTD, although it appears that neither Unc-5C nor DCC are involved in this process. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Robustness of retrieval properties against imbalance between long-term potentiation and depression of spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Narihisa; Okada, Masato

    2003-12-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has recently been shown in some physiological studies. STDP depends on the precise temporal relationship of presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes. Many authors have indicated that a precise balance between long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of STDP is significant for a stable learning. However, a situation in which the balance is maintained precisely is inconceivable in the brain. Using a method of the statistical neurodynamics, we show robust retrieval properties of spatiotemporal patterns in an associative memory model against the imbalance between LTP and LTD. When the fluctuation of LTD is assumed to obey a Gaussian distribution with mean 0 and variance δ2, the storage capacity takes a finite value even at large δ. This means that the balance between LTP and LTD of STDP need not be maintained precisely, but must be maintained on average. Furthermore, we found that the basin of attraction becomes smaller as δ increases while an initial critical overlap remains unchanged.

  11. Recruitment of resting vesicles into recycling pools supports NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic potentiation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Marra, Vincenzo; Bush, Daniel; Burden, Jemima J; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Most presynaptic terminals in the central nervous system are characterized by two functionally distinct vesicle populations: a recycling pool, which supports action potential-driven neurotransmitter release via vesicle exocytosis, and a resting pool. The relative proportions of these two pools are highly variable between individual synapses, prompting speculation on their specific relationship, and on the possible functions of the resting pool. Using fluorescence imaging of FM-styryl dyes and synaptophysinI-pHluorin (sypHy) as well as correlative electron microscopy approaches, we show here that Hebbian plasticity-dependent changes in synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons can increase the recycling pool fraction at the expense of the resting pool in individual synaptic terminals. This recruitment process depends on NMDA-receptor activation, nitric oxide signalling and calcineurin and is accompanied by an increase in the probability of neurotransmitter release at individual terminals. Blockade of actin-mediated intersynaptic vesicle exchange does not prevent recycling pool expansion demonstrating that vesicle recruitment is intrasynaptic. We propose that the conversion of resting pool vesicles to the functionally recycling pool provides a rapid mechanism to implement long-lasting changes in presynaptic efficacy. PMID:22271866

  12. Short-term memory of motor network performance via activity-dependent potentiation of Na+/K+ pump function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Sillar, Keith T

    2012-03-20

    Brain networks memorize previous performance to adjust their output in light of past experience. These activity-dependent modifications generally result from changes in synaptic strengths or ionic conductances, and ion pumps have only rarely been demonstrated to play a dynamic role. Locomotor behavior is produced by central pattern generator (CPG) networks and modified by sensory and descending signals to allow for changes in movement frequency, intensity, and duration, but whether or how the CPG networks recall recent activity is largely unknown. In Xenopus frog tadpoles, swim bout duration correlates linearly with interswim interval, suggesting that the locomotor network retains a short-term memory of previous output. We discovered an ultraslow, minute-long afterhyperpolarization (usAHP) in network neurons following locomotor episodes. The usAHP is mediated by an activity- and sodium spike-dependent enhancement of electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) pump function. By integrating spike frequency over time and linking the membrane potential of spinal neurons to network performance, the usAHP plays a dynamic role in short-term motor memory. Because Na(+)/K(+) pumps are ubiquitously expressed in neurons of all animals and because sodium spikes inevitably accompany network activity, the usAHP may represent a phylogenetically conserved but largely overlooked mechanism for short-term memory of neural network function.

  13. Time and concentration dependency in the potentially affected fraction of species: the case of hydrogen peroxide treatment of ballast water.

    PubMed

    Smit, Mathijs G D; Ebbens, Eltjo; Jak, Robbert G; Huijbregtst, Mark A J

    2008-03-01

    Transport of large volumes of ballast water contributes greatly to invasions of species. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a disinfectant to prevent the spread of exotic species via ballast water. Instead of using environmental risk assessment techniques for protecting a certain fraction of the species from being affected, the present study aimed to apply these techniques to define treatment regimes of H2O2 and effectively eliminate as many species as possible. Based on time-dependent dose-response curves for five marine species (Corophium volutator, Artemia salina, Brachionus plicatilis, Dunaliella teriolecta, and Skeletonema costatum), time-dependent species-sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were derived for different effect sizes. The present study showed that H2O2 can be used effectively to treat ballast water but that relatively high concentrations and long treatment durations are required to eliminate the vast majority of species in ballast water. The described toxicant effectiveness approach using SSDs also has other potential fields of application, including short-term application of biocides.

  14. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  15. Sound level dependence of auditory evoked potentials: simultaneous EEG recording and low-noise fMRI.

    PubMed

    Thaerig, Stefanie; Behne, Nicole; Schadow, Jeanette; Lenz, Daniel; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2008-03-01

    The simultaneous recording of EEG and fMRI offers the advantage of combining precise spatial information about neuronal processing obtained by fMRI data with the high temporal resolution of EEG data. One problem for the analysis of auditory processing, however, is the noisy environment during fMRI measurements, especially when EPI sequences are employed. While EEG studies outside an MRI scanner repeatedly demonstrated a clear sound level-dependent increase of N1 amplitude, this finding was less obvious in simultaneous recordings inside a scanner. Based on the assumption that this inconsistency might be due to the confounding effect of the rather loud EPI noise, we employed a low-noise fMRI protocol. This method was previously used to reveal level-dependent fMRI activation in auditory cortex areas. We combined this method with simultaneous EEG recordings to investigate the effect of different sound intensities on the auditory evoked potentials. Eight participants without hearing deficits took part in our experiment. Frequency modulated tones (FM) were presented monaurally with two sound intensities (60 and 80 dB HL). The task of the participants was to categorize the FM-direction (rising vs. falling). Our results inside the scanner replicate the sound level dependence of AEPs from previous EEG studies outside the scanner. The data analysis revealed a significant shortening of N1 latency and an increase in the N1-P2 peak-to-peak amplitude for the higher sound intensity. On a descriptive level, the 80 dB HL stimulation yielded more activated voxels in fMRI and stronger activations. This effect was pronounced over the right hemisphere. Our results suggest that low-noise sequences might be advantageous for the examination of auditory processing in simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings.

  16. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  17. Neonatal Tissue Damage Promotes Spike Timing-Dependent Synaptic Long-Term Potentiation in Adult Spinal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence from both humans and rodents suggests that tissue damage during the neonatal period can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways such that a subsequent injury during adulthood causes an exacerbated degree of pain hypersensitivity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this priming effect remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury relaxes the timing rules governing long-term potentiation (LTP) at mouse primary afferent synapses onto mature lamina I projection neurons, which serve as a major output of the spinal nociceptive network and are essential for pain perception. In addition, whereas LTP in naive mice was only observed if the presynaptic input preceded postsynaptic firing, early tissue injury removed this temporal requirement and LTP was observed regardless of the order in which the inputs were activated. Neonatal tissue damage also reduced the dependence of spike-timing-dependent LTP on NMDAR activation and unmasked a novel contribution of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. These results suggest for the first time that transient tissue damage during early life creates a more permissive environment for the production of LTP within adult spinal nociceptive circuits. This persistent metaplasticity may promote the excessive amplification of ascending nociceptive transmission to the mature brain and thereby facilitate the generation of chronic pain after injury, thus representing a novel potential mechanism by which early trauma can prime adult pain pathways in the CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage during early life can “prime” developing nociceptive pathways in the CNS, leading to greater pain severity after repeat injury via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury widens the timing window during which correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity can evoke long-term potentiation (LTP) at sensory synapses onto adult lamina I

  18. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-12-09

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging paired with presynaptic voltage-clamp depolarizations to +80 mV, under pharmacological block of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Such a change in membrane potential did not alter the Ca2+ dependence of transmitter release rates or synaptic delays. We also found, by varying the amount of Ca2+ influx during Ca2+ tail-currents, that the time course of phasic transmitter release is not invariant to changes in release probability. Rather, the time difference between peak Ca2+ current and peak transmitter release became progressively shorter with increasing Ca2+ current amplitude. When this time difference was plotted as a function of the estimated local [Ca2+]i at the sites of vesicle fusion, a slope of approximately 100 micros per 10 microM [Ca2+]i was found, in reasonable agreement with a model of cooperative Ca2+ binding and vesicle fusion. Thus, the amplitude and time course of the [Ca2+]i signal at the sites of vesicle fusion controls the timing and the amount of transmitter release, both under conditions of brief periods of Ca2+ influx, as well as during step-like elevations of [Ca2+]i produced by Ca2+ uncaging.

  19. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging paired with presynaptic voltage-clamp depolarizations to +80 mV, under pharmacological block of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Such a change in membrane potential did not alter the Ca2+ dependence of transmitter release rates or synaptic delays. We also found, by varying the amount of Ca2+ influx during Ca2+ tail-currents, that the time course of phasic transmitter release is not invariant to changes in release probability. Rather, the time difference between peak Ca2+ current and peak transmitter release became progressively shorter with increasing Ca2+ current amplitude. When this time difference was plotted as a function of the estimated local [Ca2+]i at the sites of vesicle fusion, a slope of ≈100 μs per 10 μM [Ca2+]i was found, in reasonable agreement with a model of cooperative Ca2+ binding and vesicle fusion. Thus, the amplitude and time course of the [Ca2+]i signal at the sites of vesicle fusion controls the timing and the amount of transmitter release, both under conditions of brief periods of Ca2+ influx, as well as during step-like elevations of [Ca2+]i produced by Ca2+ uncaging. PMID:14630950

  20. The defense potential of glutathione-ascorbate dependent detoxification pathway to sulfur dioxide exposure in Tagetes erecta.

    PubMed

    Wei, Aili; Fu, Baochun; Wang, Yunshan; Li, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Cao, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Duan, Jiuju

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposure is associated with increased risk of various damages to plants. However, little is known about the defense response in ornamental plants. In this study, an artificial fumigation protocol was carried out to study the defense potential of the glutathione (GSH)-ascorbate (AsA) dependent detoxification pathway to SO2 exposure in Tagetes erecta. The results show that when the plants were exposed to different doses of SO2 (0, 15, 30, 50 or 80 mg m(-3)) for different times (6, 12, 18, 24 or 33 h), SO2 induced oxidative stress was confirmed by the increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and relative conductivity of membrane (RC) in a dose-dependent manner for different exposure times. However, the increased levels for H2O2, MDA and RC were not significant vis-a-vis the control when SO2 doses and exposure times were lower than 15 mg m(-3)/33 h, 30 mg m(-3)/24 h or 50 mg m(-3)/12 h (p>0.05). The results could be explained by the increases in the content of reduced form of glutathione (GSH), total glutathione (TGSH), ascorbate (AsA), ratio of GSH/GSSG (oxidized form of glutathione), activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). On the other hand, exposure to higher doses of SO2 and longer exposure times, the values of the GSH-AsA dependent antioxidative indices decreased significantly (p<0.01), manifested by increased levels of H2O2. Furthermore, the levels of H2O2, MDA and RC varied little when SO2 doses and exposure times reached a 'critical' value (50 mg m(-3)/24 h). The defense ability of T. erecta to SO2 reached nearly extremity. To summarize, the response of T. erecta to elevated SO2 was related to higher H2O2 levels. GSH-AsA dependent detoxification pathway played an important role in against SO2-induced toxicity, although the defense response could not sufficiently alleviate oxidative damage when SO2 doses and exposure times

  1. Co-localisation of K(ir)4.1 and AQP4 in rat and human cochleae reveals a gap in water channel expression at the transduction sites of endocochlear K(+) recycling routes.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Andreas; Gleiser, Corinna; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Arnold, Heinz; Liu, Wei; Mack, Andreas; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert; Hirt, Bernhard

    2012-10-01

    Sensory transduction in the cochlea depends on perilymphatic-endolymphatic potassium (K(+)) recycling. It has been suggested that the epithelial supporting cells (SCs) of the cochlear duct may form the intracellular K(+) recycling pathway. Thus, they must be endowed with molecular mechanisms that facilitate K(+) uptake and release, along with concomitant osmotically driven water movements. As yet, no molecules have been described that would allow for volume-equilibrated transepithelial K(+) fluxes across the SCs. This study describes the subcellular co-localisation of the K(ir)4.1 K(+) channel (K(ir)4.1) and the aquaporin-4 water channel (AQP4) in SCs, on the basis of immunohistochemical double-labelling experiments in rat and human cochleae. The results of this study reveal the expression of K(ir)4.1 in the basal or basolateral membranes of the SCs in the sensory domain of the organ of Corti that are adjacent to hair cells and in the non-sensory domains of the inner and outer sulci that abut large extracellular fluid spaces. The SCs of the inner sulcus (interdental cells, inner sulcus cells) and the outer sulcus (Hensen's cells, outer sulcus cells) display the co-localisation of K(ir)4.1 and AQP4 expression. However, the SCs in the sensory domain of the organ of Corti reveal a gap in the expression of AQP4. The outer pillar cell is devoid of both K(ir)4.1 and AQP4. The subcellular co-localisation of K(ir)4.1 and AQP4 in the SCs of the cochlea described in this study resembles that of the astroglia of the central nervous system and the glial Mueller cells in the retina.

  2. Overdamped motion of interacting particles in general confining potentials: time-dependent and stationary-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Nobre, F. D.; Curado, E. M. F.

    2012-12-01

    By comparing numerical and analytical results, it is shown that a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion is very well described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, which can be associated with nonextensive statistical mechanics. The particle-particle interactions considered are repulsive, motivated by three different physical situations: (i) modified Bessel function, commonly used in vortex-vortex interactions, relevant for the flux-front penetration in disordered type-II superconductors; (ii) Yukawa-like forces, useful for charged particles in plasma, or colloidal suspensions; (iii) derived from a Gaussian potential, common in complex fluids, like polymer chains dispersed in a solvent. Moreover, the system is subjected to a general confining potential, φ( x) = ( α| x| z )/ z ( α > 0 , z > 1), so that a stationary state is reached after a sufficiently long time. Recent numerical and analytical investigations, considering interactions of type (i) and a harmonic confining potential ( z = 2), have shown strong evidence that a q-Gaussian distribution, P( x,t), with q = 0, describes appropriately the particle positions during their time evolution, as well as in their stationary state. Herein we reinforce further the connection with nonextensive statistical mechanics, by presenting numerical evidence showing that: (a) in the case z = 2, different particle-particle interactions only modify the diffusion parameter D of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation; (b) for z ≠ 2, all cases investigated fit well the analytical stationary solution P st( x), given in terms of a q-exponential (with the same index q = 0) of the general external potential φ( x). In this later case, we propose an approximate time-dependent P( x,t) (not known analytically for z ≠ 2), which is in very good agreement with the simulations for a large range of times, including the approach to the stationary state. The present work suggests that a wide variety of physical phenomena

  3. Sensitivity of Electrochemical Adlayer Structure to the Metal Crystallographic Orientation: Potential-Dependent Iodide Adsorption on Au(100) in Comparison with Other Low-Index Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    structural and dynamical factors responsible for this exquisite sensitivity seems poised to enrich our appreciation of adsorptive double-layer properties...Metal Crystallographic Orientation: Potential-Dependent Iodide Adsorption on in Comparison with Other Low-Index Surfaces 1]994 by Xiaoping Gao...34- ABSTRACT The potential-dependent ordered atomic structures formed for iodide adsorption on Au(100) from dilute aqueous alkali iodide electrolytes as

  4. Estimation of nitrogen maintenance requirements and potential for nitrogen deposition in fast-growing chickens depending on age and sex.

    PubMed

    Samadi, F; Liebert, F

    2006-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to estimate daily N maintenance requirements (NMR) and the genetic potential for daily N deposition (ND(max)T) in fast-growing chickens depending on age and sex. In N-balance studies, 144 male and 144 female chickens (Cobb 500) were utilized in 4 consecutive age periods (I: 10 to 25 d; II: 30 to 45 d; III: 50 to 65 d; and IV: 70 to 85 d). The experimental diets contained high-protein soybean meal and crystalline amino acids as protein sources and 6 graded levels of protein supply (N1 = 6.6%; N2 = 13.0%; N3 = 19.6%; N4 = 25.1%; N5 = 31.8%; and N6 = 37.6% CP in DM). The connection between N intake and total N excretion was fitted for NMR determination by an exponential function. The average NMR value (252 mg of N/BW(kg)0.67 per d) was applied for further calculation of ND(max)T as the threshold value of the function between N intake and daily N balance. For estimating the threshold value, the principle of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm within the SPSS program (Version 11.5) was applied. As a theoretical maximum for ND(max)T, 3,592, 2,723, 1,702, and 1,386 mg of N/BW(kg)0.67 per d for male and 3,452, 2,604, 1,501, and 1,286 mg of N/BW(kg)0.67 per d for female fast-growing chickens (corresponding to age periods I to IV) were obtained. The determined model parameters were the precondition for modeling of the amino acid requirement based on an exponential N-utilization model and depended on performance and dietary amino acid efficiency. This procedure will be further developed and applied in the subsequent paper.

  5. Epithelial transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-dependent adrenomedullin upregulates blood flow in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kono, Toru; Kaneko, Atsushi; Omiya, Yuji; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Ohno, Nagisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-02-15

    The functional roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the gastrointestinal tract have garnered considerable attention in recent years. We previously reported that daikenchuto (TU-100), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) via adrenomedullin (ADM) release from intestinal epithelial (IE) cells (Kono T et al. J Crohns Colitis 4: 161-170, 2010). TU-100 contains multiple TRP activators. In the present study, therefore, we examined the involvement of TRP channels in the ADM-mediated vasodilatatory effect of TU-100. Rats were treated intraduodenally with the TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin (CAP), the TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), or TU-100, and jejunum IBF was evaluated using laser-Doppler blood flowmetry. All three compounds resulted in vasodilatation, and the vasodilatory effect of TU-100 was abolished by a TRPA1 antagonist but not by a TRPV1 antagonist. Vasodilatation induced by AITC and TU-100 was abrogated by anti-ADM antibody treatment. RT-PCR and flow cytometry revealed that an IEC-6 cell line originated from the small intestine and purified IE cells expressed ADM and TRPA1 but not TRPV1. AITC increased ADM release in IEC cells remarkably, while CAP had no effect. TU-100 and its ingredient 6-shogaol (6SG) increased ADM release dose-dependently, and the effects were abrogated by a TRPA1 antagonist. 6SG showed similar TRPA1-dependent vasodilatation in vivo. These results indicate that TRPA1 in IE cells may play an important role in controlling bowel microcirculation via ADM release. Epithelial TRPA1 appears to be a promising target for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders.

  6. Nitrous oxide directly inhibits action potential-dependent neurotransmission from single presynaptic boutons adhering to rat hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Kotani, Naoki; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Akaike, Norio

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of N2O on synaptic transmission using a preparation of mechanically dissociated rat hippocampal CA3 neurons that allowed assays of single bouton responses evoked from native functional nerve endings. We studied the effects of N2O on GABAA, glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents (IGABA, IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA) elicited by exogenous application of GABA, glutamate, (S)-AMPA, and NMDA and spontaneous, miniature, and evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (sIPSC, mIPSC, eIPSC, sEPSC, mEPSC and eEPSC) in mechanically dissociated CA3 neurons. eIPSC and eEPSC were evoked by focal electrical stimulation of a single bouton. Administration of 70% N2O altered neither IGABA nor the frequency and amplitude of both sIPSCs and mIPSCs. In contrast, N2O decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs, while increasing failure rates (Rf) and paired-pulse ratios (PPR) in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, N2O decreased IGlu, IAMPA and INMDA. Again N2O did not change the frequency and amplitude of either sEPSCs of mEPSCs. N2O also decreased amplitudes of eEPSCs with increased Rf and PPR. The decay phases of all synaptic responses were unchanged. The present results indicated that N2O inhibits the activation of AMPA/KA and NMDA receptors and also that N2O preferentially depress the action potential-dependent GABA and glutamate releases but had little effects on spontaneous and miniature releases.

  7. Potential role for extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, M M; Woods, J P

    2001-12-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s).

  8. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  9. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are heavily dependent on type I hair cell activity of the saccular macula in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Lue, June-Horng; Day, An-Shiou; Cheng, Po-Wen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2009-01-01

    This study applied the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test to guinea pigs coupled with electronic microscopic examination to determine whether VEMPs are dependent on type I or II hair cell activity of the saccular macula. An amount of 0.05 ml of gentamicin (40 mg/ml) was injected directly overlaying, but not through, the round window membrane of the left ear in guinea pigs.One week after surgery, auditory brainstem response test revealed normal responses in 12 animals (80%), and elevated thresholds in 3 animals (20%). The VEMP test using click stimulation showed absent responses in all 15 animals (100%). Another 6 gentamicin-treated animals underwent the VEMP test using galvanic stimulation and all 6 also displayed absent responses. Ultrathin sections of the saccular macula in the gentamicin-treated ears displayed morphologic alterations in type I or II hair cells, including shrinkage and/or vacuolization in the cytoplasm, increased electron density of the cytoplasm and nuclear chromatin, and cellular lucency. However, extrusion degeneration was rare and only present in type II hair cells. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that the histological density of intact type I hair cells was 1.1 +/- 1.2/4000 microm(2) in the gentamicin-treated ears, showing significantly less than that in control ears (4.5 +/- 1.8/4000 microm(2)). However, no significant difference was observed in the densities of intact type II hair cells and supporting cells between treated and control ears. Furthermore, the calyx terminals surrounding the damaged type I hair cells were swollen and disrupted, while the button afferents contacting the damaged type II hair cells were not obviously deformed. Based on the above results, we therefore conclude that VEMPs are heavily dependent on type I hair cell activity of the saccular macula in guinea pigs.

  10. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of polymeric enteric nanoparticles as dermal carriers with pH-dependent targeting potential.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Fitsum Feleke; Balzus, Benjamin; Gerecke, Christian; Kleuser, Burkhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2016-09-20

    pH-sensitive nanoparticles which release in a controlled fashion on the skin or dissolve in the hair follicle could significantly improve treatment effectiveness and make transfollicular drug delivery a success. Dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation from an organic drug-polymer solution. Their toxicity potential was assessed using isolated human fibroblasts. pH-dependent swelling and erosion kinetics of the nanoparticles were investigated by dynamic light scattering and viscosity measurements and its effect on drug release was assessed in vitro with Franz diffusion cells. Stable, 100-550nm-sized dexamethasone-loaded Eudragit® L 100 nanoparticles with drug loading capacity and entrapment efficiency as high as 8.3% and 85%, respectively, were obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizer and ethanol as organic solvent. The nanoparticles showed little or no toxicity on isolated normal human fibroblasts. Dexamethasone existed in the nanoparticles as solid solution or in amorphous form. The nanoparticles underwent extensive swelling and slow drug release in media with a low buffer capacity (as low as 10mM) and a higher pH or at a pH close to the dissolution pH of the polymer (pH6) and a higher buffer capacity. In 40mM buffer and above pH6.8, the nanoparticles eroded fast or dissolved completely and thus released the drug rapidly. pH-sensitive nanoparticles which potentially release in a controlled manner on the stratum corneum but dissolve in the hair follicle could be prepared.

  11. Relationship between SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction and central serotonergic activity based on the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min

    2014-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction can occur more frequently in patients with higher central serotonergic activity, and that this higher serotonergic activity can induce inhibition of sexual desire, ejaculation, and orgasm. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction and increased serotonin. Event-related potentials for the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) were measured in 46 patients at a single time point. The subjects' scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist were also determined by the investigators at the same time point. All patients had received SSRI monotherapy. Overall, 37 % (17/46) of the patients experienced some form of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction: lack of sexual desire, impotence, orgasm, and menstrual abnormality or mastalgia were experienced by 21.7, 8.3, 15.2, and 20.6 % of the patients, respectively. The subjects were thus divided into two groups-those with and without sexual dysfunction-and their data were compared. There was a tendency for the LDAEP to be lower in the group with sexual dysfunction (1.04 ± 0.77 μV) than the group without sexual dysfunction (1.45 ± 0.86 μV), although the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.086). Furthermore, the distribution of the frequency of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction differed marginally significantly between patients with low and high LDAEP, dichotomized according to the median LDAEP on the Cz electrode (χ (2) = 3.664, p = 0.056). There was a relatively high frequency of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in patients with low LDAEP.

  12. Liposome dependent delivery of S-adenosyl methionine to cells by liposomes: a potential treatment for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Eric J; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Heath, Timothy D

    2009-02-01

    The present study demonstrates that the nutritional supplement S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe), the primary methyl donor in mammalian cells, is delivered selectively to cells by anionic liposomes, and is, therefore, a liposome dependent drug. Contrary to our expectations, free SAMe chloride was growth inhibitory in cultured cells. The growth inhibitory potency of SAMe chloride in anionic liposomes composed of distearoylphosphatidylglycerol/cholesterol 2:1 was fivefold greater than that of free SAMe. Neutral liposomes composed of distearoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not increase the potency of the drug. An improved anionic liposome SAMe formulation was produced by use of the 1,4-butanedisulfonate salt (SD4), adding a metal chelator (EDTA), and lowering the buffer pH from pH 7.0 to pH 4.0. This formulation was 15-fold more potent than free SD4, and was active after more than 28 days at 4 degrees C. SAMe and its potential degradation products were screened for toxicity. Formaldehyde was determined to have potency similar to that of free SAMe chloride in CV1-P cells, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effects of SAMe may partly arise from the formation of formaldehyde. The cytotoxic effects of formaldehyde and the less stable forms of SAMe, (SAMe chloride and SAMe tosylate) were decreased in the presence of 3 mM GSH (IC(50) approximately 0.44 mM). The cytotoxic effects of SD4 were not reduced by GSH, suggesting that this more stable form of SAMe is not toxic through the production of formaldehyde. SD4 in anionic DSPG liposomes stimulated murine IL-6 production in RAW 264 cells at concentrations 25- to 30-fold lower than free drug. This increase in potency for IL-6 production was in keeping with the increase in potency observed in our growth inhibition experiments. These results suggest that SD4 in liposomes may be a potential treatment for acute or chronic liver failure.

  13. Higher diet-dependent renal acid load associates with higher glucocorticoid secretion and potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Esche, Jonas; Shi, Lijie; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Remer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic acidosis induces elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels. However, the influence of less strong daily acid loads on GCs is largely unexplored. To investigate this, we studied whether higher acid loads in children, fully within the normal range of habitual diets, associate with endogenous GCs. In a specific quasi-experimental design, we examined 200 6- to 10-year-old healthy participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study equally divided to either high or low 24-hour renal net acid excretion. Major urinary GC metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to assess daily adrenal GC secretion and metabolites of tissue cortisol catabolism (6β-hydroxycortisol and 20α-dihydrocortisol). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify urinary free cortisol and cortisone. After confounder adjustment, significant positive associations were unmasked for urinary potential renal acid load and net acid excretion with adrenal GC secretion, free cortisone, free cortisone plus cortisol, 6β-hydroxycortisol, and 20α-dihydrocortisol. An inverse association emerged for an enzymatic marker (5β-reductase) of irreversible GC inactivation. Our data suggest that existing moderate elevations in diet-dependent acid loads suffice to raise GCs and affect cortisol metabolism. Thus, potential detrimental effects of high acid loading appear to be mediated, in part, by increased GC activity via increased GC secretion and/or reduced GC inactivation. Higher cortisone levels, directly available for intracrine activation to cortisol may play a special role. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Polar polycyclic aromatic compounds from different coal types show varying mutagenic potential, EROD induction and bioavailability depending on coal rank.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wiebke; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Püttmann, Wilhelm; Hollert, Henner; Achten, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of the bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have rarely considered the heterogeneity of coals and the impact of more polar PAC besides polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Earlier, we investigated the toxicity of eight heterogeneous coals and their extracts. In the present study, the hazard potential with respect to mechanism-specific toxicity of polar fractions of dichloromethane extracts from coals was studied. Polar extract fractions of all coal types except for anthracite induced EROD activity (determined in RTL-W1 cells), independent of coal type (Bio-TEQs between 23 ± 16 and 52 ± 22 ng/g). The polar fractions of all bituminous coal extracts revealed mutagenic activity (determined using the Ames Fluctuation test). No significant mutation induction was detected for the polar extract fractions from the lignite, sub-bituminous coal and anthracite samples, which indicates a higher dependency on coal type for polar PAC here. Additionally, information on bioavailability was derived from a bioaccumulation test using the deposit-feeding oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus which was exposed for 28 days to ground coal samples. Despite the high toxic potential of most coal extracts and a reduced biomass of Lumbriculus in bituminous coal samples, bioaccumulation of PAH and mortality after 28 days were found to be low. Limited bioaccumulation of PAH (up to 3.6 ± 3.8 mg/kg EPA-PAH) and polar PAC were observed for all coal samples. A significant reduction of Lumbriculus biomass was observed in the treatments containing bituminous coals (from 0.019 ± 0.004 g to 0.046 ± 0.011 g compared to 0.080 ± 0.025 g per replicate in control treatments). We conclude that bioavailability of native PAC from coals including polar PAC is low for all investigated coal types. In comparison to lignite, sub-bituminous coals and anthracite, the bioavailability of PAC from bituminous coals is slightly increased.

  15. Density-dependent groundwater flow and dissolution potential along a salt diapir in the Transylvanian Basin, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, Eric; Danchiv, Alex; Dresmann, Horst; Mocuţa, Marius; Huggenberger, Peter; Scheidler, Stefan; Wiesmeier, Stefan; Popa, Iulian; Zlibut, Alexandru; Zamfirescu, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Salt diapirs and the surrounding sediments are often involved in a variety of human activities, such as salt mining, exploration and storage of hydrocarbons, and also storage of radioactive waste material. The presence of highly soluble evaporitic rocks, a complex tectonic setting related to salt diapirsm, and human activities can lead to significant environmental problems, e.g. land subsidence, sinkhole development, salt cavern collapse, and contamination of water resources with brines. In the Transylvanian town of Ocna Mures. rock salt of a near-surface diapir has been explored since the Roman ages in open excavations, and up to the 20th century in galleries and with solution mining. Most recently, in 2010 a sudden collapse in the adjacent Quaternary unconsolidated sediments led to the formation of a 70-90m wide salt lake with a max. depth of 23m. Over the last 3 years a Romanian-Swiss research project has led to the development of 3D geological and hydrogeological information systems in order to improve knowledge on possible hazards related to uncontrolled salt dissolution. One aspect which has been investigated is the possibility of density-driven flow along permeable subvertical zones next to the salt dome, and the potential for subsaturated groundwater to dissolve the upper sides of the diapir. Structural 3D models of the salt diapir, the adjacent basin sediments, and the mining galleries, led to the development of 2D numerical vertical density-dependent models of flow and transport along the diapir. Results show that (1) increased rock permeability due to diapirsm, regional tectonic thrusting and previous dissolution, and (2) more permeable sandstone layers within the adjacent basin sediments may lead to freshwater intrusion towards the top of the diapir, and, therefore, to increased potential for salt dissolution.

  16. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, Ireneusz Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam; Fabiano, Eduardo; Teale, Andrew M.; Sala, Fabio Della

    2014-07-14

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of scaling the same- and opposite- spin components is investigated in detail comparing OEP results with Kohn–Sham (KS) quantities determined via an inversion procedure using accurate ab initio electronic densities. Special attention is dedicated in particular to the recently proposed scaled-opposite–spin OEP functional [I. Grabowski, E. Fabiano, and F. Della Sala, Phys. Rev. B 87, 075103 (2013)] which is the most advantageous from a computational point of view. We find that for high accuracy, a careful, system dependent, selection of the scaling coefficient is required. We analyse several size-extensive approaches for this selection. Finally, we find that a composite approach, named OEP2-SOSh, based on a post-SCF rescaling of the correlation energy can yield high accuracy for many properties, being comparable with the most accurate OEP procedures previously reported in the literature but at substantially reduced computational effort.

  17. Anaplerotic input is sufficient to induce time-dependent potentiation of insulin release in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Liu, Yi-Jia; Macdonald, Michael J; Straub, Susanne G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G

    2004-11-01

    Nutrients that induce biphasic insulin release, such as glucose and leucine, provide acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic input in the beta-cell. The first phase of release requires increased ATP production leading to increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The second phase requires increased [Ca(2+)](i) and anaplerosis. There is strong evidence to indicate that the second phase is due to augmentation of Ca(2+)-stimulated release via the K(ATP) channel-independent pathway. To test whether the phenomenon of time-dependent potentiation (TDP) has similar properties to the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel-independent pathway, we monitored the ability of different agents that provide acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic input or both of these inputs to induce TDP. The results show that anaplerotic input is sufficient to induce TDP. Interestingly, among the agents tested, the nonsecretagogue glutamine, the nonhydrolyzable analog of leucine aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, and succinic acid methyl ester all induced TDP, and all significantly increased alpha-ketoglutarate levels in the islets. In conclusion, anaplerosis that enhances the supply and utilization of alpha-ketoglutarate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle appears to play an essential role in the generation of TDP.

  18. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Melanie A; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2015-07-07

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up.

  19. Spontaneous glutamatergic activity induces a BDNF-dependent potentiation of GABAergic synapses in the newborn rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Langlois, Anais; Fiorentino, Hervé; Bonnet, Stéphanie; Marissal, Thomas; Diabira, Diabe; Ferrand, Nadine; Porcher, Christophe; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous ongoing synaptic activity is thought to play an instructive role in the maturation of the neuronal circuits. However the type of synaptic activity involved and how this activity is translated into structural and functional changes is not fully understood. Here we show that ongoing glutamatergic synaptic activity triggers a long-lasting potentiation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated synaptic activity (LLPGABA-A) in the developing rat hippocampus. LLPGABA-A induction requires (i) the activation of AMPA receptors and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels, (ii) the release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and (iii) the activation of postsynaptic tropomyosin-related kinase receptors B (TrkB). We found that spontaneous glutamatergic activity is required to maintain a high level of native BDNF in the newborn rat hippocampus and that application of exogenous BDNF induced LLPGABA-A in the absence of glutamatergic activity. These results suggest that ongoing glutamatergic synaptic activity plays a pivotal role in the functional maturation of hippocampal GABAergic synapses by means of a cascade involving BDNF release and downstream signalling through postsynaptic TrkB receptor activation. PMID:18772203

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor–dependent enrichment of a megakaryocytic precursor with a high potential to produce proplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Nathalie; Mallo, Lea; Receveur, Nicolas; Mangin, Pierre; Eckly, Anita; Bieche, Ivan; Tarte, Karin; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating megakaryopoiesis and platelet production (thrombopoiesis) are still incompletely understood. Identification of a progenitor with enhanced thrombopoietic capacity would be useful to decipher these mechanisms and to improve our capacity to produce platelets in vitro. Differentiation of peripheral blood CD34+ cells in the presence of bone marrow–human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhanced the production of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelet-like elements. This was accompanied by enrichment in a MK precursor population exhibiting an intermediate level of CD41 positivity while maintaining its expression of CD34. Following sorting and subculture with MSCs, this CD34+CD41low population was able to efficiently generate proplatelet-bearing MKs and platelet-like particles. Similarly, StemRegenin 1 (SR1), an antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor known to maintain CD34 expression of progenitor cells, led to an enriched CD34+CD41low fraction and to an increased capacity to generate proplatelet-producing MKs and platelet-like elements ultrastructurally and functionally similar to circulating platelets. The effect of MSCs, like that of SR1, appeared to be mediated by an AhR-dependent mechanism because both culture conditions resulted in repression of its downstream effector CYP1B1. This newly described isolation of a precursor exhibiting strong MK potential could be exploited to study normal and abnormal thrombopoiesis and for in vitro platelet production. PMID:26966088

  1. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Ireneusz; Fabiano, Eduardo; Teale, Andrew M.; Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam; Della Sala, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of scaling the same- and opposite- spin components is investigated in detail comparing OEP results with Kohn-Sham (KS) quantities determined via an inversion procedure using accurate ab initio electronic densities. Special attention is dedicated in particular to the recently proposed scaled-opposite-spin OEP functional [I. Grabowski, E. Fabiano, and F. Della Sala, Phys. Rev. B 87, 075103 (2013)] which is the most advantageous from a computational point of view. We find that for high accuracy, a careful, system dependent, selection of the scaling coefficient is required. We analyse several size-extensive approaches for this selection. Finally, we find that a composite approach, named OEP2-SOSh, based on a post-SCF rescaling of the correlation energy can yield high accuracy for many properties, being comparable with the most accurate OEP procedures previously reported in the literature but at substantially reduced computational effort.

  2. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Ireneusz; Fabiano, Eduardo; Teale, Andrew M; Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam; Della Sala, Fabio

    2014-07-14

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of scaling the same- and opposite- spin components is investigated in detail comparing OEP results with Kohn-Sham (KS) quantities determined via an inversion procedure using accurate ab initio electronic densities. Special attention is dedicated in particular to the recently proposed scaled-opposite-spin OEP functional [I. Grabowski, E. Fabiano, and F. Della Sala, Phys. Rev. B 87, 075103 (2013)] which is the most advantageous from a computational point of view. We find that for high accuracy, a careful, system dependent, selection of the scaling coefficient is required. We analyse several size-extensive approaches for this selection. Finally, we find that a composite approach, named OEP2-SOSh, based on a post-SCF rescaling of the correlation energy can yield high accuracy for many properties, being comparable with the most accurate OEP procedures previously reported in the literature but at substantially reduced computational effort.

  3. Surface-Facet-Dependent Phonon Deformation Potential in Individual Strained Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuan; Zhou, Xu; Jin, Han; Li, Cai-Zhen; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Dressel, Martin; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2015-10-27

    Strain is an important method to tune the properties of topological insulators. For example, compressive strain can induce superconductivity in Bi2Se3 bulk material. Topological insulator nanostructures are the superior candidates to utilize the unique surface states due to the large surface to volume ratio. Therefore, it is highly desirable to monitor the local strain effects in individual topological insulator nanostructures. Here, we report the systematical micro-Raman spectra of single strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons with different thicknesses and different surface facets, where four optical modes are resolved in both Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectral lines. A striking anisotropy of the strain dependence is observed in the phonon frequency of strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons grown along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction. The frequencies of the in-plane Eg(2) and out-of-plane A1g(1) modes exhibit a nearly linear blue-shift against bending strain when the nanoribbon is bent along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction with the curved {0001} surface. In this case, the phonon deformation potential of the Eg(2) phonon for 100 nm-thick Bi2Se3 nanoribbon is up to 0.94 cm(–1)/%, which is twice of that in Bi2Se3 bulk material (0.52 cm(–1)/%). Our results may be valuable for the strain modulation of individual topological insulator nanostructures.

  4. Androgen receptor is a potential novel prognostic marker and oncogenic target in osteosarcoma with dependence on CDK11

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yunfei; Sassi, Slim; Halvorsen, Stefan; Feng, Yong; Shen, Jacson; Gao, Yan; Cote, Gregory; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and adolescents. Previously, we have found that cyclin-dependent kinase 11 (CDK11) signaling was essential for osteosarcoma cell growth and survival. Subsequently, CDK11 siRNA gene targeting, expression profiling, and network reconstruction of differentially expressed genes were performed between CDK11 knock down and wild type osteosarcoma cells. Reconstructed network of the differentially expressed genes pointed to the AR as key to CDK11 signaling in osteosarcoma. CDK11 increased transcriptional activation of AR gene in osteosarcoma cell lines. AR protein was highly expressed in various osteosarcoma cell lines and patient tumor tissues. Tissue microarray analysis showed that the disease-free survival rate for patients with high-expression of AR was significantly shorter than for patients with low-expression of AR. In addition, AR gene expression knockdown via siRNA greatly inhibited cell growth and viability. Similar results were found in osteosarcoma cells treated with AR inhibitor. These findings suggest that CDK11 is involved in the regulation of AR pathway and AR can be a potential novel prognostic marker and therapeutic target for osteosarcoma treatment. PMID:28262798

  5. The potential of antagonistic fungi for control of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium crookwellense varies depending on the experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, A; Musa, T; Voegele, R T; Vogelgsang, S

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential of fungal antagonists to control Fusarium head blight (FHB) causing pathogens (Fusarium graminearum and F. crookwellense) with two different experimental approaches. Using two in vitro tests, Clonostachys rosea, Cladosporium cladosporioides and 10 Trichoderma strains were screened. In a co-culture assay, all Trichoderma strains significantly reduced the colony area of F. graminearum and F. crookwellense by 45-93%, whereas C. rosea and C. cladosporioides were not effective. In another assay, all antagonists from a chosen subset reduced the number of perithecia and ascospores on wheat straw by 88-100% when inoculated before the pathogen. Only C. rosea, a weak antagonist in the co-culture assay, was effective when inoculated after the pathogen, reducing perithecia and ascospore production by 73 and 100%, respectively. For screening antagonists and to avoid sorting out highly effective strains, it is crucial to consider different experimental approaches since the efficacy might differ substantially depending on the incubation conditions. By using two distinct experimental set-ups, we identified promising biological control agents. FHB is one of the most devastating fungal cereal diseases worldwide. As the pathogen overwinters on crop residues, application of antagonists on residues of the previous crop during harvest could be a promising approach to efficiently control FHB in cereals as an essential part of an integrated disease management. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  7. Vorticity vector-potential method for 3D viscous incompressible flows in time-dependent curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Xie, Xilin

    2016-05-01

    E and Liu [J. Comput. Phys. 138 (1997) 57-82] put forward a finite difference method for 3D viscous incompressible flows in the vorticity-vector potential formulation on non-staggered grids. In this paper, we will extend this method to the case of flows in the presence of a deformable surface. By use of two kinds of surface differential operators, the implementation of boundary conditions on a plane is generalized to a curved smooth surface with given velocity distribution, whether this be an inflow/outflow interface or a curved wall. To deal with the irregular and varying physical domain, time-dependent curvilinear coordinates are constructed and the corresponding tensor analysis is adopted in deriving the component form of the governing equations. Therefore, the equations can be discretized and solved in a regular and fixed parametric domain. Numerical results are presented for a 3D lid-driven cavity with a deforming surface and a 3D duct flow with a deforming boundary. A new way to validate numerical simulations is proposed based on an expression for the rate-of-strain tensor on a deformable surface.

  8. Temperature-dependent evaluation of Nd:LiCAF optical properties as potential vacuum ultraviolet laser material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Yuki; Arita, Ren; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Pham, Minh Hong; Empizo, Melvin John Fernandez; Luong, Mui Viet; Hori, Tatsuhiro; Takabatake, Masahiro; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Mori, Kazuyuki; Yamanoi, Kohei; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature-dependent optical properties of Nd3+-doped LiCaAlF6 (Nd:LiCAF) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region. The 172-nm absorption edge does not seem to experience any significant blue shift as temperature is decreased from room temperature down to 30 K. This is confirmed by excitation spectra for the same temperature range. Several energy levels in the excited state configuration are observed. Based on these energy levels, the dominant emission peak at 177 nm is assigned to the allowed dipole transition from the 4f25d configuration of Nd3+ and the 4I11/2 level of the 4f3 ground state configuration. The position of the dominant 177-nm emission peak appears to be fixed across the temperature range considered. Our results suggest that the spectral overlap between the excitation and emission spectra should not increase as temperature is raised, possibly making Nd:LiCAF a potential VUV laser gain medium operating at room temperature.

  9. Temperature dependence of three-body hydrophobic interactions: potential of mean force, enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and nonadditivity.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maria Sabaye; Shimizu, Seishi; Chan, Hue Sun

    2005-01-12

    Temperature-dependent three-body hydrophobic interactions are investigated by extensive constant-pressure simulations of methane-like nonpolar solutes in TIP4P model water at six temperatures. A multiple-body hydrophobic interaction is considered to be (i) additive, (ii) cooperative, or (iii) anti-cooperative if its potential of mean force (PMF) is (i) equal to, (ii) smaller than, or (iii) larger than the corresponding pairwise sum of two-methane PMFs. We found that three-methane hydrophobic interactions at the desolvation barrier are anti-cooperative at low to intermediate T, and vary from essentially additive to slightly cooperative at high T. Interactions at the contact minimum are slightly anti-cooperative over a wider temperature range. Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity are estimated from the computed PMFs. Contrary to the common expectation that burial of solvent-accessible nonpolar surface area always leads to a decrease in heat capacity, the present results show that the change in heat capacity upon three-methane association is significantly positive at the desolvation barrier and slightly positive at the contact minimum. This suggests that the heat capacity signature of a hydrophobic polymer need not vary uniformly nor monotonically with conformational compactness. Ramifications for protein folding are discussed.

  10. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  11. The Loudness Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials (LDAEP) in individuals at risk for developing bipolar disorders and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hagenmuller, Florence; Heekeren, Karsten; Meier, Magali; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Walitza, Susanne; Haker, Helene; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    The Loudness Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials (LDAEP) is considered as an indicator of central serotonergic activity. Alteration of serotonergic neurotransmission was reported in bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. In line with previous reports on clinically manifest disorders, we expected a weaker LDAEP in subjects at risk for bipolar disorders and schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. We analyzed LDAEP of individuals at risk for developing bipolar disorders (n=27), with high-risk status (n=74) and ultra-high-risk status for schizophrenia (n=86) and healthy controls (n=47). The LDAEP did not differ between subjects at risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorders and controls. Among subjects without medication (n=122), the at-risk-bipolar group showed a trend towards a weaker LDAEP than both the high-risk and the ultra-high-risk groups for schizophrenia. The LDAEP did not appear as a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. This suggests that an altered LDAEP may not be measurable until the onset of clinically manifest disorder. However, the hypothesis that pathogenic mechanisms leading to bipolar disorders may differ from those leading to schizophrenia is supported. This is the first study investigating LDAEP in a population at risk for bipolar disorders. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Serotonergic Dysfunction in Patients with Bipolar Disorder Assessed by the Loudness Dependence of the Auditory Evoked Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Sang; Park, Young-Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective The loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) is suggested to be a marker of serotonin system function. This study explored the LDAEP of multiple mood statuses (depression, mania, and euthymia) and its clinical implication in bipolar disorder patients. Methods A total of 89 subjects, comprising 35 patients with bipolar disorder, 32 patients with schizophrenia, and 22 healthy controls were evaluated. The bipolar disorder cases comprised 10 depressed patients, 15 patients with mania, and 10 euthymic patients. The N1/P2 peak-to-peak amplitudes were measured at 5 stimulus intensities, and the LDAEP was calculated as the slope of the linear regression. Both cortical and source LDAEP values were calculated. Results LDAEP varied according to mood statuses, and was significantly stronger in cases of euthymia, depression, and mania. Cortical LDAEP was significantly stronger in patients with bipolar euthymia compared with schizophrenia, stronger in bipolar depression than in schizophrenia, stronger in healthy controls than in schizophrenia patients, and stronger in healthy controls than in patients with bipolar mania. Source LDAEP was significantly stronger in patients with bipolar euthymia, bipolar depression, and bipolar mania compared with schizophrenia, stronger in bipolar euthymia than in bipolar mania. Psychotic features weakened the source LDAEP relative to nonpsychotic features. The severity of the depressive symptom was negatively correlated with source LDAEP. Conclusion These findings suggest that the serotonin activity of patients with bipolar disorder may vary according to mood status. A longitudinal follow-up study should be pursued using drug-naive subjects. PMID:22993531

  13. Energy dependence of the optical potentials for the 9Be +208Pb and 9Be +209Bi systems at near-Coulomb-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Yu, N.; Zhang, H. Q.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Jia, H. M.; Lubian, J.; Lin, C. J.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the energy dependence of the interacting optical potential, at near barrier energies, for two systems involving the weakly bound projectile 9Be and the heavy 208Pb and 209Bi targets, by the simultaneous fit of elastic scattering angular distributions and fusion excitation functions. The approach used consists of dividing the optical potential into two parts. A short-range potential VF+i WF that is responsible for fusion, and a superficial potential VDR+i WDR for direct reactions. It is found, for both systems studied, that the fusion imaginary potential WF presents the usual threshold anomaly (TA) observed in tightly bound systems, whereas the direct reaction imaginary potential WDR shows a breakup threshold anomaly (BTA) behavior. Both potentials satisfy the dispersion relation. The direct reaction polarization potential predominates over the fusion potential and so a net overall behavior is found to follow the BTA phenomenon.

  14. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  15. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O2 exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O2 isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O3 potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged "reef" structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  16. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O2 exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2014-08-01

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O2 isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O3 potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged "reef" structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  17. Vanishing rainbows near orbiting and the energy dependence of rainbow scattering - Relation to properties of the potential. [molecular beam scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. F.; Hall, R. B.; Mason, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The energy threshold behavior of elastic rainbow scattering near the transition to orbiting is derived. Analysis of the energy dependence of the rainbow angle shows that the full range from high energies down to orbiting can be fitted with two parameters. Thus, measurements of the rainbow angle can give essentially only two pieces of information about the potential. For potentials of common shapes, such measurements are sensitive to regions of the potential just beyond the minimum and give information about the shape of the potential in this range. However, neither a minimum nor a point of inflection in the potential is necessary for rainbow scattering.

  18. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr).

    PubMed

    Doss, Michael Xavier; Di Diego, José M; Goodrow, Robert J; Wu, Yuesheng; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Urrutia, Janire; Desai, Mayurika; Treat, Jacqueline A; Sachinidis, Agapios; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP) from spontaneously beating clusters (BC) micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C) and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21) or BaCl(2) (n = 22). Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr) and I(K1) from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C). Spontaneous cycle length (CL) and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21) increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (p<0.001) and generated early afterdepolarizations in 8/21 preparations. In 13/21 BC, E-4031 rapidly depolarized the clusters leading to inexcitability. BaCl(2), at concentrations that selectively block I(K1) (50-100 µM), failed to depolarize the majority of clusters (13/22). Patch-clamp experiments revealed very low or negligible I(K1) in 53% (20/38) of the cells studied, but presence of I(Kr) in all (11/11). Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1) in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr.) In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd). The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr) due to the

  19. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of coronary sinus-dependent atrial flutter guided by fractionated mid-diastolic coronary sinus potentials

    PubMed Central

    De Sisti, Antonio; Amara, Walid; Frank, Robert; Hidden-Lucet, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Background The efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation of an uncommon coronary sinus (CS)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL) was evaluated using conventional electrophysiological criteria in a highly selected subset of patients with typical and atypical AFL. Methods Fourteen patients with atrial flutter (11 males, mean age 69 ± 9 years) without previous right or left atrial RF ablation were included. Heart disease was present in eight patients. Baseline ECG suggested typical AFL in 12 patients and atypical AFL in two. Mean AFL cycle length was 324 ± 64 ms at the time of RF ablation in the CS. Lateral right atrium activation was counterclockwise (CCW) in 13 patients and clockwise in one. CS activation was CCW in all. Criteria for CS ablation included the presence of CS mid-diastolic fractionated atrial potentials (APs) associated with concealed entrainment with a postpacing interval within 20 ms. Success was defined as termination of AFL and subsequent noninducibility. Results The initial target for ablation was the cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) in 11 patients and the CS with further CTI ablation in three. AP duration at the CS target site was 122 ± 33 ms, spanning 40 ± 12% of the AFL cycle length. CS ablation site was located 1–4 cm from the CS ostium. Ablation was successful in all patients. Mean time to AFL termination during CS ablation was 39 ± 52 s (<20 s in eight patients). No recurrence of ablated arrhythmia occurred during a follow-up of 18 ± 8 months. Conclusions The CS musculature is a critical part of some AFL circuits in patients with typical and atypical AFL. AFL can be terminated in patients with CS or CTI/CS AFL reentrant circuits by targeting CS mid-diastolic fragmented APs. PMID:20814733

  1. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches

  2. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches

  3. Caspase Dependent Programmed Cell Death in Developing Embryos: A Potential Target for Therapeutic Intervention against Pathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Alok Das; Kumar, Sunil; Satapathy, Ashok Kumar; Ravindran, Balachandran

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful embryogenesis is a critical rate limiting step for the survival and transmission of parasitic worms as well as pathology mediated by them. Hence, blockage of this important process through therapeutic induction of apoptosis in their embryonic stages offers promise for developing effective anti-parasitic measures against these extra cellular parasites. However, unlike in the case of protozoan parasites, induction of apoptosis as a therapeutic approach is yet to be explored against metazoan helminth parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings For the first time, here we developed and evaluated flow cytometry based assays to assess several conserved features of apoptosis in developing embryos of a pathogenic filarial nematode Setaria digitata, in-vitro as well as ex-vivo. We validated programmed cell death in developing embryos by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy and scoring expression profile of nematode specific proteins related to apoptosis [e.g. CED-3, CED-4 and CED-9]. Mechanistically, apoptotic death of embryonic stages was found to be a caspase dependent phenomenon mediated primarily through induction of intracellular ROS. The apoptogenicity of some pharmacological compounds viz. DEC, Chloroquine, Primaquine and Curcumin were also evaluated. Curcumin was found to be the most effective pharmacological agent followed by Primaquine while Chloroquine displayed minimal effect and DEC had no demonstrable effect. Further, demonstration of induction of apoptosis in embryonic stages by lipid peroxidation products [molecules commonly associated with inflammatory responses in filarial disease] and demonstration of in-situ apoptosis of developing embryos in adult parasites in a natural bovine model of filariasis have offered a framework to understand anti-fecundity host immunity operational against parasitic helminths. Conclusions/Significance Our observations have revealed for the first time, that induction of apoptosis in developing embryos can

  4. Response prediction to antidepressants using scalp and source-localized loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) slopes.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Natalia; Blondeau, Claude; Tessier, Pierre; Norris, Sandhaya; Fusee, Wendy; Blier, Pierre; Knott, Verner

    2013-07-01

    The loudness-dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) slope may be inversely related to serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. Thus, steep LDAEPs tend to predict a positive response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, which augment 5-HT. However, LDAEPs also predict outcome to antidepressants indirectly altering 5-HT (e.g. bupropion). Hence, the LDAEP's predicative specificity and sensitivity to antidepressant response/outcome remains elusive. Scalp N1, P2 and N1/P2 LDAEP slopes and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA)-localized N1 and P2 LDAEP slopes were assessed in depressed individuals (N=51) at baseline, 1 and 12 weeks post-treatment with one of three antidepressant regimens [escitalopram (ESC)+bupropion (BUP), ESC or BUP]. Clinical response was greatest with ESC+BUP at week 1. Treatment responders had steep N1 sLORETA-LDAEP baseline slopes while non-responders had shallow ones. P2 sLORETA-LDAEP slope increases at 1 week existed in responders; decreases were noted in non-responders. Exploratory analyses indicated that more BUP and ESC responders versus non-responders had steep baseline N1 sLORETA-LDAEP slopes. Additionally, slight decreases in scalp P2 LDAEP by week 1 existed for ESC treatment, while slope increases existed with ESC+BUP treatment. Only baseline N1 sLORETA-LDAEP discriminated treatment responders/non-responders. This work confirms that certain LDAEP measures are associated with treatment outcome and appear to be differentially modulated with varying antidepressant drug regimens, though this should be confirmed using larger samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A self-consistent, microenvironment modulated screened coulomb potential approximation to calculate pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, E L; Guarnieri, F

    1999-01-01

    An improved approach is presented for calculating pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins using sigmoidally screened Coulomb potentials (SCP). It is hypothesized that a key determinant of seemingly aberrant behavior in pKa shifts is due to the properties of the unique microenvironment around each residue. To help demonstrate this proposal, an approach is developed to characterize the microenvironments using the local hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity around each residue of the protein. The quantitative characterization of the microenvironments shows that the protein is a complex mosaic of differing dielectric regions that provides a physical basis for modifying the dielectric screening functions: in more hydrophobic microenvironments the screening decreases whereas the converse applies to more hydrophilic regions. The approach was applied to seven proteins providing more than 100 measured pKa values and yielded a root mean square deviation of 0.5 between calculated and experimental values. The incorporation of the local hydrophobicity characteristics into the algorithm allowed the resolution of some of the more intractable problems in the calculation of pKa. Thus, the divergent shifts of the pKa of Glu-35 and Asp-66 in hen egg white lysozyme, which are both about 90% buried, was correctly predicted. Mechanistically, the divergence occurs because Glu-35 is in a hydrophobic microenvironment, while Asp-66 is in a hydrophilic microenvironment. Furthermore, because the calculation of the microenvironmental effects takes very little CPU time, the computational speed of the SCP formulation is conserved. Finally, results from different crystal structures of a given protein were compared, and it is shown that the reliability of the calculated pKa values is sufficient to allow identification of conformations that may be more relevant for the solution structure. PMID:10388736

  6. Therapeutic potential of targeting IRES-dependent c-myc translation in multiple myeloma cells during ER stress.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Yang, Y; Hoang, B; Bardeleben, C; Holmes, B; Gera, J; Lichtenstein, A

    2016-02-25

    Protein translation is inhibited by the unfolded protein response (UPR)-induced eIF-2α phosphorylation to protect against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In addition, we found additional inhibition of protein translation owing to diminished mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex1) activity in ER-stressed multiple myeloma (MM) cells. However, c-myc protein levels and myc translation was maintained. To ascertain how c-myc was maintained, we studied myc IRES (internal ribosome entry site) function, which does not require mTORC1 activity. Myc IRES activity was upregulated in MM cells during ER stress induced by thapsigargin, tunicamycin or the myeloma therapeutic bortezomib. IRES activity was dependent on upstream MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and MNK1 (MAPK-interacting serine/threonine kinase 1) signaling. A screen identified hnRNP A1 (A1) and RPS25 as IRES-binding trans-acting factors required for ER stress-activated activity. A1 associated with RPS25 during ER stress and this was prevented by an MNK inhibitor. In a proof of principle, we identified a compound that prevented binding of A1 to the myc IRES and specifically inhibited myc IRES activity in MM cells. This compound, when used alone, was not cytotoxic nor did it inhibit myc translation or protein expression. However, when combined with ER stress inducers, especially bortezomib, a remarkable synergistic cytotoxicity ensued with associated inhibition of myc translation and expression. These results underscore the potential for targeting A1-mediated myc IRES activity in MM cells during ER stress.

  7. Slow recovery from inactivation of Na+ channels underlies the activity-dependent attenuation of dendritic action potentials in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Colbert, C M; Magee, J C; Hoffman, D A; Johnston, D

    1997-09-01

    Na+ action potentials propagate into the dendrites of pyramidal neurons driving an influx of Ca2+ that seems to be important for associative synaptic plasticity. During repetitive (10-50 Hz) firing, dendritic action potentials display a marked and prolonged voltage-dependent decrease in amplitude. Such a decrease is not apparent in somatic action potentials. We investigated the mechanisms of the different activity dependence of somatic and dendritic action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons of adult rats using whole-cell and cell-attached patch-clamp methods. There were three main findings. First, dendritic Na+ currents decreased in amplitude when repeatedly activated by brief (2 msec) depolarizations. Recovery was slow and voltage-dependent. Second, Na+ currents decreased much less in somatic than in dendritic patches. Third, although K+ currents remained constant during trains, K+ currents were necessary for dendritic action potential amplitude to decrease in whole-cell experiments. These results suggest that regional differences in Na+ and K+ channels determine the differences in the activity dependence of somatic and dendritic action potential amplitudes.

  8. A Context-Dependent View on the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis: Language Use and SES as Potential Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevoo, Mariëlle J. L.; Malda, Maike; Emmen, Rosanneke A. G.; Yeniad, Nihal; Mesman, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The linguistic interdependence hypothesis states that the development of skills in a second language (L2) partly depends on the skill level in the first language (L1). It has been suggested that the theory lacked attention for differential interdependence. In this study we test what we call the hypothesis of context-dependent linguistic…

  9. A Context-Dependent View on the Linguistic Interdependence Hypothesis: Language Use and SES as Potential Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevoo, Mariëlle J. L.; Malda, Maike; Emmen, Rosanneke A. G.; Yeniad, Nihal; Mesman, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The linguistic interdependence hypothesis states that the development of skills in a second language (L2) partly depends on the skill level in the first language (L1). It has been suggested that the theory lacked attention for differential interdependence. In this study we test what we call the hypothesis of context-dependent linguistic…

  10. RING finger-dependent ubiquitination by PRAJA is dependent on TGF-beta and potentially defines the functional status of the tumor suppressor ELF.

    PubMed

    Saha, T; Vardhini, D; Tang, Y; Katuri, V; Jogunoori, W; Volpe, E A; Haines, D; Sidawy, A; Zhou, X; Gallicano, I; Schlegel, R; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    2006-02-02

    In gastrointestinal cells, biological signals for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) are transduced through transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors that signal to Smad proteins. Smad4, a tumor suppressor, is often mutated in human gastrointestinal cancers. The mechanism of Smad4 inactivation, however, remains uncertain and could be through E3-mediated ubiquitination of Smad4/adaptor protein complexes. Disruption of ELF (embryonic liver fodrin), a Smad4 adaptor protein, modulates TGF-beta signaling. We have found that PRAJA, a RING-H2 protein, interacts with ELF in a TGF-beta-dependent manner, with a fivefold increase of PRAJA expression and a subsequent decrease in ELF and Smad4 expression, in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines (P < 0.05). Strikingly, PRAJA manifests substantial E3-dependent ubiquitination of ELF and Smad3, but not Smad4. Delta-PRAJA, which has a deleted RING finger domain at the C terminus, abolishes ubiquitination of ELF. A stable cell line that overexpresses PRAJA exhibits low levels of ELF in comparison to a Delta-PRAJA stable cell line, where ELF expression is high compared to normal controls. The alteration of ELF and/or Smad4 expression and/or function in the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be induced by enhancement of ELF degradation, which is mediated by a high-level expression of PRAJA in gastrointestinal cancers. In hepatocytes, half-life (t(1/2)) and rate constant for degradation (k(D)) of ELF is 1.91 h and 21.72 min(-1) when coupled with ectopic expression of PRAJA in cells stimulated by TGF-beta, compared to PRAJA-transfected unstimulated cells (t(1/2) = 4.33 h and k(D) = 9.6 min(-1)). These studies reveal a mechanism for tumorigenesis whereby defects in adaptor proteins for Smads, such as ELF, can undergo degradation by PRAJA, through the ubiquitin-mediated pathway.

  11. Two strictly polyphosphate-dependent gluco(manno)kinases from diazotrophic Cyanobacteria with potential to phosphorylate hexoses from polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2015-05-01

    The single-copy genes encoding putative polyphosphate-glucose phosphotransferases (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) from two nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria, Nostoc sp. PCC7120 and Nostoc punctiforme PCC73102, were cloned and functionally characterized. In contrast to their actinobacterial counterparts, the cyanobacterial PPGKs have shown the ability to phosphorylate glucose using strictly inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) as phosphoryl donors. This has proven to be an economically attractive reagent in contrast to the more costly ATP. Cyanobacterial PPGKs had a higher affinity for medium-long-sized polyP (greater than ten phosphoryl residues). Thus, longer polyP resulted in higher catalytic efficiency. Also in contrast to most their homologs in Actinobacteria, both cyanobacterial PPGKs exhibited a modest but significant polyP-mannokinase activity as well. Specific activities were in the range of 180-230 and 2-3 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with glucose and mannose as substrates, respectively. No polyP-fructokinase activity was detected. Cyanobacterial PPGKs required a divalent metal cofactor and exhibited alkaline pH optima (approx. 9.0) and a remarkable thermostability (optimum temperature, 45 °C). The preference for Mg(2+) was noted with an affinity constant of 1.3 mM. Both recombinant PPGKs are homodimers with a subunit molecular mass of ca. 27 kDa. Based on database searches and experimental data from Southern blots and activity assays, closely related PPGK homologs appear to be widespread among unicellular and filamentous mostly nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. Overall, these findings indicate that polyP may be metabolized in these photosynthetic prokaryotes to yield glucose (or mannose) 6-phosphate. They also provide evidence for a novel group-specific subfamily of strictly polyP-dependent gluco(manno)kinases with ancestral features and high biotechnological potential, capable of efficiently using polyP as an alternative and cheap source of energy-rich phosphate instead of costly ATP

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent modulation of giant depolarizing potentials by metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Strata, F; Sciancalepore, M; Cherubini, E

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were used to study the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in modulating GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in immature rat hippocampal CA3 neurones. 2. The mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 1 mM) reduced the frequency of GDPs. The broad-spectrum ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (1 mM) blocked GDPs. 3. In the presence of kynurenic acid, both tetanic stimulation of the hilus or bath application of quisqualic acid (1 microM) and trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (t-ACPD, 20 microM) induced the appearance of GDPs. These effects were antagonized by MCPG (1 mM) or L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3) and blocked by bicuculline (10 microM). 4. 8-Bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP, 0.3 mM), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 200 microM) or forskolin (30 microM) mimicked the effects of mGluR agonists on GDPs. The forskolin analogue 1,9-dideoxyforskolin (30 microM), which does not activate adenylate cyclase, was ineffective. 5. Incubation of slices in the presence of the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine (Rp-cAMPS) (500 microM) or superfusion of Rp-cAMPS (20 microM) prevented the effects of forskolin or t-ACPD on GDPs. In the presence of kynurenic acid, the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12,13-diacetate (2 microM) induced the appearance of GDPs. This effect was prevented by staurosporine (1 microM). However, staurosporine (1-3 microM) did not modify the effects of t-ACPD on GDPs. 6. It is suggested that, during development, mGluRs enhance the synchronous release of GABA, responsible for GDPs, through cAMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:8583396

  13. Avoidance of a potential tracheoinnominate fistula by innominate artery re-implantation in a four year old girl with tracheostomy dependence and Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael D; Boesch, R Paul; Duncan, Audra A; Cofer, Shelagh A

    2016-02-01

    A 4 year old tracheostomy dependent girl with Pfeiffer syndrome was noted on bronchoscopy to have a pulsatile tracheostomal mass. CT chest angiography was consistent with the innominate artery crossing anterior to the trachea and superior to the sternal notch. The patient underwent reimplantation of the innominate artery via a median sternotomy approach. Tracheoinnominate fistula is a potentially devastating complication of tracheostomy. We report discovery of a near tracheoinnominate fistula in order to highlight the importance of regular interval surveillance endoscopy in tracheostomy dependent children and to discuss a preventative surgical intervention employed in prevention of this potentially devastating complication.

  14. Investigation of Nonadiabatic Effects for the Vibrational Spectrum of a Triatomic Molecule: The Use of a Single Potential Energy Surface with Distance-Dependent Masses for H3().

    PubMed

    Jaquet, Ralph; Khoma, Mykhaylo V

    2017-09-21

    On the basis of first-principles, the influence of nonadiabatic effects on the vibrational bound states of H3(+) has been investigated using distance-dependent reduced masses and only one single potential energy surface. For these new vibrational calculations, potentials based on explicitly correlated wave functions are used where, in addition, adiabatic corrections and relativistic contributions are taken into account. For the first time, several different fully distance-dependent reduced mass surfaces in three dimensions have been incorporated in the vibrational calculations.

  15. The effect of adrenaline on the temperature dependency of cardiac action potentials in pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, S; Hanson, L M; Farrell, A P

    2012-04-01

    Using sharp electrode impalement, action potentials recorded from atrial and ventricular tissue of pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha generally decreased in duration with increasing test temperature (6, 10, 16 and 20° C). Stimulation of the tissue using 500 nM adrenaline had no significant effect on the duration of the atrial action potential at any test temperature but lengthened the ventricular action potential by ~17%.

  16. Temperature dependence of the ligand field strength in systems with modulated potential-energy surfaces. A suggestion for interpreting spectroscopic properties of metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, M.

    1984-07-01

    The structural and spectroscopic properties of physical systems having different potential-energy wells are strongly affected by temperature where energy barriers are comparable to the thermal energy. A theoretical analysis has been performed using an asymmetric double-well potential and, on the basis of the results obtained, an interpretation of the temperature-dependent properties of some real systems, such as the active sites in copper proteins, is proposed.

  17. Modeling of matter-wave solitons in a nonlinear inductor-capacitor network through a Gross-Pitaevskii equation with time-dependent linear potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, E.; Lakhssassi, A.; Liu, W. M.

    2017-08-01

    A lossless nonlinear L C transmission network is considered. With the use of the reductive perturbation method in the semidiscrete limit, we show that the dynamics of matter-wave solitons in the network can be modeled by a one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation with a time-dependent linear potential in the presence of a chemical potential. An explicit expression for the growth rate of a purely growing modulational instability (MI) is presented and analyzed. We find that the potential parameter of the GP equation of the system does not affect the different regions of the MI. Neglecting the chemical potential in the GP equation, we derive exact analytical solutions which describe the propagation of both bright and dark solitary waves on continuous-wave (cw) backgrounds. Using the found exact analytical solutions of the GP equation, we investigate numerically the transmission of both bright and dark solitary voltage signals in the network. Our numerical studies show that the amplitude of a bright solitary voltage signal and the depth of a dark solitary voltage signal as well as their width, their motion, and their behavior depend on (i) the propagation frequencies, (ii) the potential parameter, and (iii) the amplitude of the cw background. The GP equation derived in this paper with a time-dependent linear potential opens up different ideas that may be of considerable theoretical interest for the management of matter-wave solitons in nonlinear L C transmission networks.

  18. INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENTAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    Genetically increasing the function of oncogenes or knocking out the function of a tumor supressor gene has dramatically increased the...

  19. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  20. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  1. INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENTAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTERPRETATION OF THE CANCER RESPONSE TO POTENTIAL RENAL CARCINOGENS IN THE TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT IS DEPENDENT ON LENGTH OF TREATMENT.

    Genetically increasing the function of oncogenes or knocking out the function of a tumor supressor gene has dramatically increased the...

  2. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  3. Quantization of time-dependent non-central singular potential systems in three dimensions by using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menouar, Salah; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-01

    Quantum solutions of a time-dependent Hamiltonian for the motion of a time-varying mass subjected to time-dependent singular potentials in three dimensions are investigated. A time-dependent inverse quadratic potential and a Coulomb-like potential are considered as the components of the singular potential of the system. Because the Hamiltonian is a function of time, special techniques for deriving quantum solutions of the system are necessary. A quadratic invariant operator is introduced, and its eigenstates are derived using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method together with a unitary transformation method. The Nikiforov-Uvarov method enables us to solve the eigenvalue equations of the invariant operator, which are second-order linear diffierential equations, by reducing the original equation to a hypergeometric type. According to the invariant operator theory, the wave functions of the system are represented in terms of the eigenstates obtained in such a way. The difference of the wave functions from the eigenstates of the invariant operator is that the wave functions have time-dependent phases while the eigenstates do not. By determining the phases of the wave functions via the help of the Schr¨odinger equation, we identify the full wave functions of the system and address their physical implications.

  4. Surface spectral function of momentum-dependent pairing potentials in a topological insulator: application to CuxBi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Wan, Shaolong

    2013-05-29

    We propose three possible momentum-dependent pairing potentials as candidates for topological superconductors (for example CuxBi2Se3), and calculate the surface spectral function and surface density of states with these pairing potentials. We find that the first two can give the same spectral functions as the fully gapped and node-contacted pairing potentials given by Fu and Berg (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 097001), and that the third one can obtain a topological non-trivial case in which there exists a flat Andreev bound state and which preserves the threefold rotation symmetry. We hope our proposals and results will be assessed by future experiment.

  5. Cue exposure in the treatment of drug dependence: the potential of a new method for preventing relapse.

    PubMed

    Heather, N; Greeley, J

    1990-01-01

    Cue exposure has been used successfully in the treatment of neurotic disorders. Its application to the treatment of drug dependence is founded on the premise that craving for drugs can become classically conditioned to internal and external drug-related cues and that such conditioned craving responses play an important part in relapse to drug use. This article reviews the theoretical background for the use of cue exposure, research on cue reactivity in samples of drug-dependent persons and the role of cue reactivity in relapse. What evidence exists on the clinical effectiveness of cue exposure is reviewed in some detail and a number of clinical issues relating to its practical application are discussed. It is concluded that controlled trials of the effectiveness of cue exposure treatment for drug dependence should be implemented without further delay.

  6. Monitoring of PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase substrate specificity for its potential use in biocatalysis and bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Streďanský, Miroslav; Monošík, Rastislav; Mastihuba, Vladimír; Sturdík, Ernest

    2013-10-01

    Substrate specificity of 2,7,9-tricarboxypyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase was investigated in biosensor arrangement for understanding the suitability and the limitations of its use in bioanalysis and bioproduction of chemicals. The study demonstrated a very broad substrate specificity of biosensor utilising soluble form of PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase. Nineteen saccharides out of 31 were oxidised by the sensor. Investigation confirmed strong importance of hydroxyl configuration in the positions 2 and 5 of oxidised saccharides. The broad specificity suggests that the PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase could be utilised for analysis of other sugars than glucose in food samples for various production processes and for biofuel cells. In addition, the results showed that the substrate specificity of enzymes can be effectively and generally studied by biosensor arrangement for research purposes. This layout utilising immobilised enzyme allowed performing comprehensive study using a small amount of enzymes and thus saving the costs and time.

  7. Dynamic subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40, a potential new mechanism of ABA-dependent transcription factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Geilen, Katja; Böhmer, Maik

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ABA plays a major role during plant development, e.g. seed maturation and seed germination, and during adaptation to abiotic stresses like stomatal aperture regulation. The three closely related WRKY transcription factors WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 function in ABA signal transduction. We recently demonstrated that WRKY18 and WRKY40 but not WRKY60 localize to nuclear bodies in A. thaliana mesophyll protoplasts. WRKY40, a negative regulator of ABA-dependent inhibition of seed germination, relocalizes from PNBs to the nucleoplasm in the presence of ABA in a dynamic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40 might constitute a new regulatory mechanism of ABA-dependent modulation of transcription factor activity.

  8. The Sortase-Dependent Fimbriome of the Genus Bifidobacterium: Extracellular Structures with Potential To Modulate Microbe-Host Dialogue.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Mangifesta, Marta; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancino, Walter; Viappiani, Alice; Faccini, Andrea; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco; Turroni, Francesca

    2017-10-01

    Bifidobacteria are important gut commensals of mammals, including humans, of any age. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these microorganisms establish themselves in the mammalian gut and persist in this environment are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the predicted arsenal of sortase-dependent pili of known and sequenced members of the Bifidobacterium genus and constructed a bifidobacterial sortase-dependent fimbriome database. Our analyses revealed considerable genetic variability of the sortase-dependent fimbriome among bifidobacterial (sub)species, which appears to have been due to horizontal gene transfer events and for which we were able to perform evolutionary mapping. Functional assessment by transcriptome analysis and binding assays involving different substrates demonstrates how bifidobacterial pili are pivotal in promoting various abilities for adhesion to glycans and extracellular matrix proteins, thereby supporting the ecological success of bifidobacteria in the mammalian gut.IMPORTANCE Adhesion of bifidobacterial cells to the mucosa of the large intestine is considered a hallmark for the persistence and colonization of these bacteria in the human gut. In this context, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the predicted arsenal of sortase-dependent pili of known and sequenced members of the Bifidobacterium genus, and constructed a bifidobacterial sortase-dependent fimbriome database. Our analyses revealed considerable genetic variability of the sortase-dependent fimbriome among bifidobacterial (sub)species, which appears to have been due to horizontal gene transfer events. In addition, functional assessment by transcriptome analysis and binding assays involving different substrates demonstrates how bifidobacterial pili are crucial in promoting various abilities for adhesion to glycans and extracellular matrix proteins, thereby supporting the ecological success of bifidobacteria in the mammalian gut. This study

  9. Frequency-dependent effects of 4-aminopyridine and almokalant on action-potential duration of adult and neonatal rabbit ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Elizalde, A; Barajas, H; Navarro-Polanco, R; Sánchez-Chapula, J

    1999-03-01

    The effects of 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) and almokalant (1 microM) on action-potential duration of neonatal and adult rabbit ventricular multicellular preparations and plateau membrane currents of single ventricular myocytes were studied. In adult ventricular preparations, 4-aminopyridine increased action-potential duration in a frequency-dependent manner, with a greater effect at low stimulation frequencies ("reverse" use dependence). In neonatal preparations, the increase in action-potential duration by 4-aminopyridine was significantly smaller than in adults, and the effect was frequency independent. Almokalant increased the action-potential duration more in neonatal than in adult myocytes. The effect of almokalant was frequency independent between 0.5 and 2 Hz. The block of transient outward current and delayed rectifier current in single myocytes was quantitatively similar. We propose that differences in the kinetic behavior of the transient outward current between adult and neonatal ventricular preparations, slower inactivation, and recovery from inactivation in adults determine differences in the frequency-dependent changes induced by 4-aminopyridine and almokalant on action-potential duration.

  10. Kinetics of rate-dependent shortening of action potential duration in guinea-pig ventricle; effects of IK1 and IKr blockade.

    PubMed

    Williams, B A; Dickenson, D R; Beatch, G N

    1999-03-01

    1. The kinetics of shortening of action potential duration (APD) following an increase in pacing rate, from 2 to 3.3 Hz, was characterized in guinea-pig ventricular preparations. Terikalant (RP62719), an inhibitor of the inwardly rectifying K+ current (IK1), and dofetilide, a specific inhibitor of the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier current (IKr), were applied to determine the effect of inhibition of these ion currents on slow APD shortening. 2. Action potentials were recorded from isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the perforated-patch patch-clamp technique, and monophasic action potentials were recorded from Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig ventricles using a contact epicardial probe. 3. Under control conditions, after an increase in pacing rate, APD immediately