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Sample records for endocrine signaling underlies

  1. Purinergic signalling in endocrine organs.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2014-03-01

    There is widespread involvement of purinergic signalling in endocrine biology. Pituitary cells express P1, P2X and P2Y receptor subtypes to mediate hormone release. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) regulates insulin release in the pancreas and is involved in the secretion of thyroid hormones. ATP plays a major role in the synthesis, storage and release of catecholamines from the adrenal gland. In the ovary purinoceptors mediate gonadotrophin-induced progesterone secretion, while in the testes, both Sertoli and Leydig cells express purinoceptors that mediate secretion of oestradiol and testosterone, respectively. ATP released as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline is involved in activities of the pineal gland and in the neuroendocrine control of the thymus. In the hypothalamus, ATP and adenosine stimulate or modulate the release of luteinising hormone-releasing hormone, as well as arginine-vasopressin and oxytocin. Functionally active P2X and P2Y receptors have been identified on human placental syncytiotrophoblast cells and on neuroendocrine cells in the lung, skin, prostate and intestine. Adipocytes have been recognised recently to have endocrine function involving purinoceptors.

  2. Purinergic Signaling Pathways in Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5′-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5′-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5′-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5′-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5′-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. PMID:25960051

  3. Purinergic signaling pathways in endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5'-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5'-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5'-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A Transgenerational Endocrine Signaling Pathway in Crustacea

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Gerald A.; Wang, Ying H.; Holmes, Charisse N.; Kwon, Gwijun; Medlock, Elizabeth K.

    2013-01-01

    to important population metrics (sex ratios, fecundity of females). A model is provided that describes how these signaling processes can facilitate population sustainability under normal conditions or threaten sustainability when perturbed by environmental chemicals. PMID:23613913

  5. Estrogen signaling crosstalk: implications for endocrine resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Jennifer R.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to anti-estrogen therapies is a prominent challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Tumors develop endocrine resistance by acquiring adaptations that help them rely on alternative oncogenic signaling cascades, which crosstalk with estrogen signaling pathways. An understanding of estrogen signaling crosstalk with these growth promoting cascades is essential in order to maximize efficacy of anti-estrogen treatments in ovarian cancer. Herein, we provide an overview of estrogen signaling in ovarian cancer and discuss the major challenges associated with anti-estrogen therapies. We also review what is currently known about how genomic and non-genomic estrogen signaling pathways crosstalk with several major oncogenic signaling cascades. The insights provided here illustrate existing strategies for targeting endocrine resistant ovarian tumors and may help identify new strategies to improve the treatment of this disease. PMID:24565562

  6. FGF21 is an endocrine signal of protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Laeger, Thomas; Henagan, Tara M; Albarado, Diana C; Redman, Leanne M; Bray, George A; Noland, Robert C; Münzberg, Heike; Hutson, Susan M; Gettys, Thomas W; Schwartz, Michael W; Morrison, Christopher D

    2014-09-01

    Enhanced fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) production and circulation has been linked to the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Here, we demonstrated that hepatic FGF21 expression is induced by dietary protein restriction, but not energy restriction. Circulating FGF21 was increased 10-fold in mice and rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. In these animals, liver Fgf21 expression was increased within 24 hours of reduced protein intake. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels increased dramatically following 28 days on a LP diet. LP-induced increases in FGF21 were associated with increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) in the liver, and both baseline and LP-induced serum FGF21 levels were reduced in mice lacking the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2). Finally, while protein restriction altered food intake, energy expenditure, and body weight gain in WT mice, FGF21-deficient animals did not exhibit these changes in response to a LP diet. These and other data demonstrate that reduced protein intake underlies the increase in circulating FGF21 in response to starvation and a ketogenic diet and that FGF21 is required for behavioral and metabolic responses to protein restriction. FGF21 therefore represents an endocrine signal of protein restriction, which acts to coordinate metabolism and growth during periods of reduced protein intake.

  7. Endocrine hormones and local signals during the development of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Brisken, Cathrin; Ataca, Dalya

    2015-01-01

    Most of mammary gland development occurs postnatally under the control of female reproductive hormones, which in turn interact with other endocrine factors. While hormones impinge on many tissues and trigger very complex biological responses, tissue recombination experiments with hormone receptor-deficient mammary epithelia revealed eminent roles for estrogens, progesterone, and prolactin receptor (PrlR) signaling that are intrinsic to the mammary epithelium. A subset of the luminal mammary epithelial cells expresses the estrogen receptor α (ERα), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the PrlR and act as sensor cells. These cells convert the detected systemic signals into local signals that are developmental stage-dependent and may be direct, juxtacrine, or paracrine. This setup ensures that the original input is amplified and that the biological responses of multiple cell types can be coordinated. Some key mediators of hormone action have been identified such as Wnt, EGFR, IGFR, and RANK signaling. Multiple signaling pathways such as FGF, Hedgehog, and Notch signaling participate in driving different aspects of mammary gland development locally but how they link to the hormonal control remains to be elucidated. An increasing number of endocrine factors are appearing to have a role in mammary gland development, the adipose tissue is increasingly recognized to play a role in endocrine regulation, and a complex role of the immune system with multiple different cell types is being revealed. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-01-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought. PMID:15121509

  9. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-05-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought.

  10. 77 FR 15101 - Results From Inert Ingredient Test Orders Issued Under EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... systems. Extensive background on the Agency's endocrine program is available at http://www.epa.gov/endo... AGENCY Results From Inert Ingredient Test Orders Issued Under EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program... EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA...

  11. Photocatalytic degradation of endocrine disruptor compounds under simulated solar light.

    PubMed

    Maroga Mboula, Vanessa; Héquet, Valérie; Andrès, Yves; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa Maria; Doña-Rodríguez, José Miguel; Silva, Adrián M T; Falaras, Polycarpos

    2013-08-01

    Nanostructured titanium materials with high UV-visible activity were synthesized in the collaborative project Clean Water FP7. In this study, the efficiency of some of these catalysts to degrade endocrine disruptor compounds, using bisphenol A as the model compound, was evaluated. Titanium dioxide P25 (AEROXIDE(®) TiO2, Evonik Degussa) was used as the reference. The photocatalytic degradation was carried out under the UV part of a simulated solar light (280-400 nm) and under the full spectrum of a simulated solar light (200 nm-30 μm). Catalytic efficiency was assessed using several indicators such as the conversion yield, the mineralization yield, by-product formation and the endocrine disruption effect of by-products. The new synthesized catalysts exhibited a significant degradation of bisphenol A, with the so-called ECT-1023t being the most efficient. The intermediates formed during photocatalytic degradation experiments with ECT-1023t as catalyst were monitored and identified. The estrogenic effect of the intermediates was also evaluated in vivo using a ChgH-GFP transgenic medaka line. The results obtained show that the formation of intermediates is related to the nature of the catalyst and depends on the experimental conditions. Moreover, under simulated UV, in contrast with the results obtained using P25, the by-products formed with ECT-1023t as catalyst do not present an estrogenic effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans regulates both endocrine-like and cell-autonomous outputs.

    PubMed

    Iser, Wendy B; Gami, Minaxi S; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2007-03-15

    In C. elegans, insulin signaling affects development, lifespan and stress resistance. Several studies have shown that insulin signaling affects lifespan in an endocrine-like manner from different cells, while the major downstream target of insulin, the FOXO transcription factor encoded by daf-16, may act preferentially in intestinal cells to prolong lifespan. This discrepancy raised the possibility that insulin may have both endocrine and cell-intrinsic outputs. Here, we further investigated the types of cells capable of producing endocrine outputs of insulin and also identified a new cell-intrinsic insulin output. We found that insulin signaling within groups of neurons promoted wildtype lifespan, showing that the endocrine outputs of insulin were not restricted to specific cells. In contrast, DAF-16 appeared to have a greater effect on lifespan when expressed in a combination of tissues. These results suggest that insulin signaling may regulate DAF-16 through cell-intrinsic and endocrine pathways. We also found that an insulin-dependent response to fasting in intestinal cells was preferentially regulated by intestinal insulin signaling and was less responsive to insulin signaling from non-intestinal cells. Together, these results show that C. elegans insulin signaling has endocrine as well as tissue-specific outputs which could influence lifespan in a combinatorial fashion.

  13. Enhancing Endocrine Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: Cotargeting Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephen R D

    2015-10-01

    Overcoming primary or secondary endocrine resistance in breast cancer remains critical to further enhancing the benefit of existing therapies such as tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor (AI). Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular biology associated with secondary endocrine resistance. Cotargeting the estrogen receptor, together with various key intracellular proliferation and cell survival signaling pathways, has been explored as a strategy either to treat endocrine resistance once it develops in the second-line setting or to enhance first-line endocrine responsiveness by preventing secondary resistance from developing via blockade of specific pathways from the outset. While attempts to improve endocrine therapy by adding growth factor inhibitors have been disappointing, success resulting in new drug approvals has been seen in secondary endocrine resistance by treating patients with the mTOR antagonist everolimus in combination with the AI exemestane and, more recently, in the first-line setting, by the addition of the CDK 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib to the AI letrozole. Numerous other therapeutics are being evaluated in combination with endocrine therapies based on supportive preclinical evidence, including inhibitors of PI3K, Akt, HDAC, Src, IGFR-1, and FGFR. Appropriate clinical trial design and patient selection based on prior therapy exposure, together with predictive biomarkers derived through real-time molecular profiling, are needed to enrich future trials and maximize any additional benefit that cotargeting may bring to current endocrine therapies for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

  14. Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L.; Ortiz, Paola A.; Ying, Chong T.; Moridzadeh, Rameen; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the developmental-genetic steps that shape the entero-endocrine system of Drosophila melanogaster from the embryo to the adult. The process starts in the endoderm of the early embryo where precursors of endocrine cells and enterocytes of the larval midgut, as well as progenitors of the adult midgut, are specified by a Notch signaling-dependent mechanism. In a second step that occurs during the late larval period, enterocytes and endocrine cells of a transient pupal midgut are selected from within the clusters of adult midgut progenitors. As in the embryo, activation of the Notch pathway triggers enterocyte differentiation, and inhibits cells from further proliferation or choosing the endocrine fate. The third step of entero-endocrine cell development takes place at a mid-pupal stage. Before this time point, the epithelial layer destined to become the adult midgut is devoid of endocrine cells. However, precursors of the intestinal midgut stem cells (pISCs) are already present. After an initial phase of symmetric divisions which causes an increase in their own population size, pISCs start to spin off cells that become postmitotic and express the endocrine fate marker, Prospero. Activation of Notch in pISCs forces these cells into an enterocyte fate. Loss of Notch function causes an increase in the proliferatory activity of pISCs, as well as a higher ratio of Prospero-positive cells. PMID:21382366

  15. Intramuscular Anabolic Signaling and Endocrine Response Following Resistance Exercise: Implications for Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fukuda, David H; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining skeletal muscle mass and function is critical for disease prevention, mobility and quality of life, and whole-body metabolism. Resistance exercise is known to be a major regulator for promoting muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass accretion. Manipulation of exercise intensity, volume, and rest elicit specific muscular adaptations that can maximize the magnitude of muscle growth. The stimulus of muscle contraction that occurs during differing intensities of resistance exercise results in varying biochemical responses regulating the rate of protein synthesis, known as mechanotransduction. At the cellular level, skeletal muscle adaptation appears to be the result of the cumulative effects of transient changes in gene expression following acute bouts of exercise. Thus, maximizing the resistance exercise-induced anabolic response produces the greatest potential for hypertrophic adaptation with training. The mechanisms involved in converting mechanical signals into the molecular events that control muscle growth are not completely understood; however, skeletal muscle protein synthesis appears to be regulated by the multi-protein phosphorylation cascade, mTORC1 (mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1). The purpose of this review is to examine the physiological response to resistance exercise, with particular emphasis on the endocrine response and intramuscular anabolic signaling through mTORC1. It appears that resistance exercise protocols that maximize muscle fiber recruitment, time-under-tension, and metabolic stress will contribute to maximizing intramuscular anabolic signaling; however, the resistance exercise parameters for maximizing the anabolic response remain unclear.

  16. Retinol Dehydrogenase-10 Regulates Pancreas Organogenesis and Endocrine Cell Differentiation via Paracrine Retinoic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Arregi, Igor; Climent, Maria; Iliev, Dobromir; Strasser, Jürgen; Gouignard, Nadège; Johansson, Jenny K; Singh, Tania; Mazur, Magdalena; Semb, Henrik; Artner, Isabella; Minichiello, Liliana; Pera, Edgar M

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin A-derived retinoic acid (RA) signals are critical for the development of several organs, including the pancreas. However, the tissue-specific control of RA synthesis in organ and cell lineage development has only poorly been addressed in vivo. Here, we show that retinol dehydrogenase-10 (Rdh10), a key enzyme in embryonic RA production, has important functions in pancreas organogenesis and endocrine cell differentiation. Rdh10 was expressed in the developing pancreas epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme. Rdh10 null mutant mouse embryos exhibited dorsal pancreas agenesis and a hypoplastic ventral pancreas with retarded tubulogenesis and branching. Conditional disruption of Rdh10 from the endoderm caused increased mortality, reduced body weight, and lowered blood glucose levels after birth. Endodermal Rdh10 deficiency led to a smaller dorsal pancreas with a reduced density of early glucagon(+) and insulin(+) cells. During the secondary transition, the reduction of Neurogenin3(+) endocrine progenitors in the mutant dorsal pancreas accounted for fewer α- and β-cells. Changes in the expression of α- and β-cell-specific transcription factors indicated that Rdh10 might also participate in the terminal differentiation of endocrine cells. Together, our results highlight the importance of both mesenchymal and epithelial Rdh10 for pancreogenesis and the first wave of endocrine cell differentiation. We further propose a model in which the Rdh10-expressing exocrine tissue acts as an essential source of RA signals in the second wave of endocrine cell differentiation.

  17. Primary cilia: a link between hormone signalling and endocrine-related cancers?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Samuel M; Chapple, J Paul

    2016-10-15

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that play a role as signalling hubs. Disruption of primary cilia structure and function is increasingly recognised in a range of cancers, with a growing body of evidence suggesting that ciliary disruption contributes to tumourigenesis. This review considers the role of primary cilia in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers.

  18. Environmental signaling: a biological context for endocrine disruption.

    PubMed Central

    Cheek, A O; Vonier, P M; Oberdörster, E; Burow, B C; McLachlan, J A

    1998-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous chemical signals have evolved as a means for organisms to respond to physical or biological stimuli in the environment. Sensitivity to these signals can make organisms vulnerable to inadvertent signals from xenobiotics. In this review we discuss how various chemicals can interact with steroid-like signaling pathways, especially estrogen. Numerous compounds have estrogenic activity, including steroids, phytoestrogens, and synthetic chemicals. We compare bioavailability, metabolism, interaction with receptors, and interaction with cell-signaling pathways among these three structurally diverse groups in order to understand how these chemicals influence physiological responses. Based on their mechanisms of action, chemical steroid mimics could plausibly be associated with recent adverse health trends in humans and animals. PMID:9539003

  19. The gut microbial endocrine organ: bacterially derived signals driving cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Brown, J Mark; Hazen, Stanley L

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, which vastly outnumber host cells in the body. Although generally overlooked in the field of endocrinology, gut microbial symbionts organize to form a key endocrine organ that converts nutritional cues from the environment into hormone-like signals that impact both normal physiology and chronic disease in the human host. Recent evidence suggests that several gut microbial-derived products are sensed by dedicated host receptor systems to alter cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. In fact, gut microbial metabolism of dietary components results in the production of proatherogenic circulating factors that act through a meta-organismal endocrine axis to impact CVD risk. Whether pharmacological interventions at the level of the gut microbial endocrine organ will reduce CVD risk is a key new question in the field of cardiovascular medicine. Here we discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in targeting meta-organismal endocrinology for CVD prevention.

  20. The Gut Microbial Endocrine Organ: Bacterially-Derived Signals Driving Cardiometabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, which vastly outnumber host cells in the body. Although generally overlooked in the field of endocrinology, gut microbial symbionts organize to form a key endocrine organ that convert nutritional cues from the environment into hormone-like signals that impact both normal physiology and chronic disease in the human host. Recent evidence suggests that several gut microbial-derived products are sensed by dedicated host receptor systems to alter cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. In fact, gut microbial metabolism of dietary components results in the production of proatherogenic circulating factors that act through a meta-organismal endocrine axis to impact CVD risk. Whether pharmacological interventions at the level of the gut microbial endocrine organ will reduce CVD risk is a key new question in the field of cardiovascular medicine. Here we discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in targeting meta-organismal endocrinology for CVD prevention. PMID:25587655

  1. [Changes of plasma endocrine hormone in pilots under Coriolis acceleration].

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Huang, Y; Sun, X; Dai, F

    1998-04-01

    Plasma endocrine hormones were studied in both 24 motion sickness (orthostatic intolerance) and healthy pilots. Coriolis acceleration of 3.75, 5.00 and 6.25 pi 2 cm/s2 were given with intervals of 3-4 min AT-II, insulin, cortisol, Aldosterone and gastrin were determined by radioimmunoassay. It was found that aldosterone, AT-II, gastrin increased with increase of coriolis acceleration in all pilots. (P < 0.05), but cortisol and insulin only increased in healthy pilots (P < 0.05). It suggests excitation of the autonomic nervous system might be insufficient in orthostatic intolerant pilots and that determination of endocrine hormones may be useful in the evaluation of autonomic nervous activities.

  2. Different levels of Notch signaling regulate quiescence, renewal and differentiation in pancreatic endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Ninov, Nikolay; Borius, Maxim; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies have implicated Notch signaling in the maintenance of pancreatic progenitors. However, how Notch signaling regulates the quiescent, proliferative or differentiation behaviors of pancreatic progenitors at the single-cell level remains unclear. Here, using single-cell genetic analyses and a new transgenic system that allows dynamic assessment of Notch signaling, we address how discrete levels of Notch signaling regulate the behavior of endocrine progenitors in the zebrafish intrapancreatic duct. We find that these progenitors experience different levels of Notch signaling, which in turn regulate distinct cellular outcomes. High levels of Notch signaling induce quiescence, whereas lower levels promote progenitor amplification. The sustained downregulation of Notch signaling triggers a multistep process that includes cell cycle entry and progenitor amplification prior to endocrine differentiation. Importantly, progenitor amplification and differentiation can be uncoupled by modulating the duration and/or extent of Notch signaling downregulation, indicating that these processes are triggered by distinct levels of Notch signaling. These data show that different levels of Notch signaling drive distinct behaviors in a progenitor population. PMID:22492351

  3. Betaine supplementation enhances anabolic endocrine and Akt signaling in response to acute bouts of exercise.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Jenna M; Lee, Elaine C; Bailey, Brooke L; Saenz, Catherine; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Craig, Stuart A S; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to examine the effect of betaine supplementation on selected circulating hormonal measures and Akt muscle signaling proteins after an acute exercise session. Twelve trained men (age 19.7 ± 1.23 years) underwent 2 weeks of supplementation with either betaine (B) (1.25 g BID) or placebo (P). Following a 2-week washout period, subjects underwent supplementation with the other treatment (B or P). Before and after each 2-week period, subjects performed an acute exercise session (AES). Circulating GH, IGF-1, cortisol, and insulin were measured. Vastus lateralis samples were analyzed for signaling proteins (Akt, p70 S6k, AMPK). B (vs. P) supplementation approached a significant increase in GH (mean ± SD (Area under the curve, AUC), B: 40.72 ± 6.14, P: 38.28 ± 5.54, p = 0.060) and significantly increased IGF-1 (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 106.19 ± 13.45, P: 95.10 ± 14.23, p = 0.010), but significantly decreased cortisol (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 1,079.18 ± 110.02, P: 1,228.53 ± 130.32, p = 0.007). There was no difference in insulin (AUC). B increased resting Total muscle Akt (p = 0.003). B potentiated phosphorylation (relative to P) of Akt (Ser(473)) and p70 S6 k (Thr(389)) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.005, respectively). Phosphorylation of AMPK (Thr(172)) decreased during both treatments (both p = 0.001). Betaine (vs. placebo) supplementation enhanced both the anabolic endocrine profile and the corresponding anabolic signaling environment, suggesting increased protein synthesis.

  4. A dissection of biological pathways underlying transcriptional responses to endocrine disrupting chemicals in zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genome-wide gene expression profiling under a variety of perturbations is a powerful tool to explore the dynamics of fish responses to exposures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Using Agilent zebrafish two-color genome microarryas, we profiled zebrafish responses under ...

  5. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Play a Phylogenetically Conserved Role in Endocrine Pancreas Morphogenesis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Heximer, Scott; Beis, Dimitris; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During development pancreatic endocrine cells migrate in a coordinated fashion. This migration is necessary to form fully functional islets, but the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therapeutic strategies to restore β-cell mass and islet functionality by reprogramming endogenous exocrine cells would be strengthened from simultaneous treatments that enhance endocrine cell clustering. We found that endocrine progenitors respond to and regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in order to cluster in islets. Rgs4, a dedicated regulator of GPCR signaling, was specifically expressed in early epithelial endocrine progenitors of both zebrafish and mouse, and its expression in the mouse endocrine progenitors was strictly dependent upon Ngn3, the key specification gene of the endocrine lineage. Rgs4 loss of function resulted in defects in islet cell aggregation. By genetically inactivating Gαi-mediated GPCR signaling in endocrine progenitors, we established its role in islet cell aggregation in both mouse and zebrafish. Finally, we identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as a ligand mediating islet cell aggregation in both species acting through distinct but closely related receptors. PMID:21911471

  6. Epithelial BMP signaling is required for proper specification of epithelial cell lineages and gastric endocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Maloum, Faïza; Allaire, Joannie M.; Gagné-Sansfaçon, Jessica; Roy, Evelyne; Belleville, Karine; Sarret, Philippe; Morisset, Jean; Carrier, Julie C.; Mishina, Yuji; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling within the gastrointestinal tract is complex. BMP ligands and their receptors are expressed in both epithelial and mesenchymal compartments, suggesting bidirectional signaling between these two entities. Despite an increasing interest in BMP signaling in gut physiology and pathologies, the distinct contribution of BMP signaling in the epithelium vs. the mesenchyme in gastrointestinal homeostasis remains to be established. We aimed to investigate the role of epithelial BMP signaling in gastric organogenesis, gland morphogenesis, and maintenance of epithelial cell functions. Using the Cre/loxP system, we generated a mouse model with an early deletion during development of BMP receptor 1A (Bmpr1a) exclusively in the foregut endoderm. Bmpr1aΔGEC mice showed no severe abnormalities in gastric organogenesis, gland epithelial proliferation, or morphogenesis, suggesting only a minor role for epithelial BMP signaling in these processes. However, early loss of BMP signaling in foregut endoderm did impact on gastric patterning, leading to an anteriorization of the stomach. In addition, numbers of parietal cells were reduced in Bmpr1aΔGEC mice. Epithelial BMP deletion significantly increased the numbers of chromogranin A-, ghrelin-, somatostatin-, gastrin-, and serotonin-expressing gastric endocrine cells. Cancer never developed in young adult (<100 days) Bmpr1a-inactivated mice although a marker of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia was upregulated. Using this model, we have uncovered that BMP signaling negatively regulates the proliferation and commitment of endocrine precursor cells. Our data also indicate that loss of BMP signaling in epithelial gastric cells alone is not sufficient to induce gastric neoplasia. PMID:21415412

  7. Environmental signaling: from environmental estrogens to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and beyond.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, J A

    2016-07-01

    The landmark report (Herbst et al. 1971) linking prenatal treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), to cancer at puberty in women whose mothers took the drug while pregnant ushered in an era of research on delayed effects of such exposures on functional outcomes in offspring. An animal model developed in our laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences confirmed that DES was the carcinogen and exposure to DES caused, as well, functional alterations in the reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems of male and female mice treated in utero. DES was also being used in agriculture and we discovered, at the first meeting on Estrogens in the Environment in 1979 (Estrogens in the Environment, 1980), that many environmental contaminants were also estrogenic. Many laboratories sought to discern the basis for estrogenicity in environmental chemicals and to discover other hormonally active xenobiotics. Our laboratory elucidated how DES and other estrogenic compounds worked by altering differentiation through epigenetic gene imprinting, helping explain the transgenerational effects found in mice and humans. At the Wingspread Conference on the Human-Wildlife Connection in 1991 (Advances in Modern Environmental Toxicology, 1992), we learned that environmental disruption of the endocrine system occurred in many species and phyla, and the term endocrine disruption was introduced. Further findings of transgenerational effects of environmental agents that mimicked or blocked various reproductive hormones and the ubiquity of environmental signals, such as bisphenol A increased concern for human and ecological health. Scientists began to look at other endocrine system aspects, such as cardiovascular and immune function, and other nuclear receptors, with important observations regarding obesity and metabolism. Laboratories, such as ours, are now using stem cells to try to understand the mechanisms by which various environmental signals

  8. Unfolding the Role of Stress Response Signaling in Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Robert; Cook, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an ancient stress response that enables a cell to manage the energetic stress that accompanies protein folding. There has been a significant recent increase in our understanding of the UPR, how it integrates physiological processes within cells, and how this integration can affect cancer cells and cell fate decisions. Recent publications have highlighted the role of UPR signaling components on mediating various cell survival pathways, cellular metabolism and bioenergenics, and autophagy. We address the role of UPR on mediating endocrine therapy resistance and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell survival. PMID:26157705

  9. Neuroendocrine targets of endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Gore, Andrea C

    2010-01-01

    The central neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, as well as stress responsiveness. These processes are initiated by signals in the central nervous system, specifically the hypothalamus, and are conveyed first by neural and then by endocrine effectors. The neuroendocrine systems, as the links between the brain and peripheral endocrine organs, play critical roles in the ability of an organism to respond to its environment under normal circumstances. When neuroendocrine homeostasis is disrupted by environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a variety of perturbations can ensue, particularly when endocrine disruption occurs during critical developmental time periods. This article will discuss the evidence for environmental endocrine disruption of neuroendocrine systems and the effects on endocrine and reproductive functions.

  10. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  11. An Integrated Serotonin and Octopamine Neuronal Circuit Directs The Release of An Endocrine Signal to Control C. elegans Body Fat

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Tallie; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an ancient and conserved neuromodulator of energy balance. Despite its importance, the neural circuits and molecular mechanisms underlying 5-HT-mediated control of body fat remain poorly understood. Here we decipher the serotonergic neural circuit for body fat loss in C. elegans and show that the effects of 5-HT require signaling from octopamine, the invertebrate analog of adrenaline, to sustain body fat loss. Our results provide a potential molecular explanation for the long-observed potent effects of combined serotonergic and adrenergic weight loss drugs. In metabolic tissues we find that the conserved regulatory adipocyte triglyceride lipase ATGL-1 drives serotonergic fat loss. We show that the serotonergic chloride channel MOD-1 relays a long-range endocrine signal via C. elegans body cavity neurons to control distal ATGL-1 function, via the nuclear receptor NHR-76. Our findings establish a conserved neuroendocrine axis operated by neural serotonergic and adrenergic-like signaling, to regulate body fat. PMID:24120942

  12. An integrated serotonin and octopamine neuronal circuit directs the release of an endocrine signal to control C. elegans body fat.

    PubMed

    Noble, Tallie; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2013-11-05

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an ancient and conserved neuromodulator of energy balance. Despite its importance, the neural circuits and molecular mechanisms underlying 5-HT-mediated control of body fat remain poorly understood. Here, we decipher the serotonergic neural circuit for body fat loss in C. elegans and show that the effects of 5-HT require signaling from octopamine, the invertebrate analog of adrenaline, to sustain body fat loss. Our results provide a potential molecular explanation for the long-observed potent effects of combined serotonergic and adrenergic weight loss drugs. In metabolic tissues, we find that the conserved regulatory adipocyte triglyceride lipase ATGL-1 drives serotonergic fat loss. We show that the serotonergic chloride channel MOD-1 relays a long-range endocrine signal from C. elegans body cavity neurons to control distal ATGL-1 function, via the nuclear receptor NHR-76. Our findings establish a conserved neuroendocrine axis operated by neural serotonergic and adrenergic-like signaling to regulate body fat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Methods of analysis for chemicals that disrupt cellular signaling pathways: risk assessment for potential endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Yoshio; Ozawa, Takeaki; Sato, Moritoshi; Inadera, Hidekuni; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kunimoto, Manabu; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a basic concept and several examples of methods of analysis for chemicals that disrupt cellular signaling pathways, in view of risk assessment for potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The key cellular signaling pathways include 1) ER/coactivator interaction, 2) AR translocation into the nucleus, 3) ER/NO/sGC/cGMP, 4) ER/Akt, 5) ER/Src, 6)ER/Src/Grb2, and 7) ER/Ca2+/CaM/CaMK pathways. These were visualized in relevant live cells using newly developed fluorescent and bioluminescent probes. Changes in cellular signals were thereby observed in nongenomic pathways of steroid hormones upon treatment of the target cells with steroid hormones and related chemicals. This method of analysis appears to be a rational approach to high-throughput prescreening (HTPS) of biohazardous chemicals, EDCs, in particular. Also described was the screening of gene expression by serial analysis of gene expression and gene chips upon applying EDCs to breast cancer cells, mouse livers, and human neuroblastoma NB-1 cells.

  14. [Intracellular signal transduction of endocrine organs and expanded DNA fragment size in myotonic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M; Hasegawa, T; Komori, T; Hirose, K; Tanabe, H

    1995-06-01

    The Ellsworth-Howard (EH) test was performed in 16 patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM), who were divided into two groups according to serum calcium level; Group I showing normal serum calcium (8 patients) and Group II with hypocalcemia (8 patients). Patients in Group II were recognized as having pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type II and those in Group I as normal. Therefore, it was suggested that an abnormality of A kinase might be present in Group II patients. We additionally performed the thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) tolerance test in the same patients and 7 normal controls to examine an abnormality of C kinase. delta TSH (delta TSH: peak minus pre TSH) values in DM patients were significantly lower than those in normal controls. Moreover, delta TSH values in Group II were significantly lower than those in Group I. It was suggested that the abnormality of C kinase might be present in Group II patients. Taken together, our results indicated that some patients with DM might possess abnormalities of signal transduction of both A and C kinases. We compared the degree of endocrine involvement determined by both the EH test and the TRH tolerance test with expanded DNA fragment (EF) size determined by standard Southern blot analysis using an appropriate cDNA probe (cDNA25 probe). There was significant negative correlation between EF size and the results of the EH test and negative correlation between the EF size and the results of the TRH tolerance test. These findings suggested that EF size might be correlated with disease severity in affected endocrine organs.

  15. Roles of FGFs As Paracrine or Endocrine Signals in Liver Development, Health, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays important roles in multiple processes including metabolism, the immune system, and detoxification and also has a unique capacity for regeneration. FGFs are growth factors that have diverse functions in development, health, and disease. The FGF family now comprises 22 members. Several FGFs have been shown to play roles as paracrine signals in liver development, health, and disease. FGF8 and FGF10 are involved in embryonic liver development, FGF7 and FGF9 in repair in response to liver injury, and FGF5, FGF8, FGF9, FGF17, and FGF18 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. In contrast, FGF15/19 and FGF21 are endocrine signals. FGF15/19, which is produced in the ileum, is a negative regulator of bile acid metabolism and a stimulator of gallbladder filling. FGF15/19 is a postprandial, insulin-independent activator of hepatic protein and glycogen synthesis. It is also required for hepatocellular carcinoma and liver regeneration. FGF21 is a hepatokine produced in the liver. FGF21 regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in white adipose tissue. Serum FGF21 levels are elevated in non-alcoholic fatty liver. FGF21 also protects against non-alcoholic fatty liver. These findings provide new insights into the roles of FGFs in the liver and potential therapeutic strategies for hepatic disorders. PMID:27148532

  16. Fetal signaling through placental structure and endocrine function: illustrations and implications from a nonhuman primate model.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Julienne N

    2009-01-01

    The placenta is a transmitter of fetal need and fetal quality, interfacing directly with maternal physiology and ecology. Plasticity of placental structure and function across the developmental timeframe of gestation may serve as an important tool by which a fetus calibrates its growth to shifting maternal ecology and resource availability, and thereby signals its quality and adaptability to a changing environment. Signals of this quality may be conveyed by the size of the placental interface, an important marker of fetal access to maternal resources, or by production of placental insulin-like growth factor-II, a driver of fetoplacental growth. Litter size variation in the common marmoset monkey offers the opportunity to explore intrauterine resource allocation and placental plasticity in an important nonhuman primate model. Triplet marmosets are born at lower birth weights and have poorer postnatal outcomes and survivorship than do twins; triplet placentas differ in placental efficiency, microscopic morphology, and endocrine function. Through placental plasticity, triplet fetuses are able to adjust functional access to maternal resources in a way that allows pregnancy to proceed. However, the costs of such mechanisms may relate to reduced fetal growth and altered postnatal outcomes, with the potential to lead to adverse adult health consequences, suggesting an important link between the placenta itself and the developmental origins of health and disease.

  17. Integration of endocrine and mechanical signals in the regulation of myometrial functions during pregnancy and labour.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Tsui, Prudence; Jaffer, Shabana; Lye, Stephen J

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we describe a new model to explain the regulation of myometrial function during pregnancy and labour. We propose that the myometrium undergoes dramatic changes in phenotype from early pregnancy until the onset of labour, characterized by an early proliferative phase, an intermediate phase of cellular hypertrophy and matrix elaboration, a third phase in which the cells assume a contractile phenotype and the final phase in which cells become highly active and committed to labour. The last phase of myometrial differentiation is postpartum uterine involution, completing the reproductive cycle following pregnancy and labour by returning the uterus to its non-pregnant receptive state. We further propose that phenotypic modulation of the uterine myocytes is the result of integration of endocrine signals and mechanical stimulation of the uterus by the growing fetus. Our previous studies have shown that these signals are important in regulating the onset of labour and we now have indications that they regulate earlier myometrial smooth muscle differentiation. We show that the high rate of myometrial cell proliferation in early pregnancy which reflects important aspects of many smooth muscle populations during development. The proliferative phenotype was associated with dramatic changes in the expression of IGF family proteins and coincided with an up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic pathway. Preliminary evidence suggests that myometrial hyperplasia was controlled by the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. The modulation of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin blocked the proliferative activity of the uterine myocytes. The growth and remodeling of the myometrium during pregnancy was associated with increased synthesis of extra cellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their corresponding integrin receptors. Our results show a decrease in expression of fibrillar collagens and a coordinated temporal increase in expression of components of the basement membrane near term

  18. Insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor signaling in breast cancer cell growth: focus on endocrine resistant disease.

    PubMed

    Voudouri, Kallirroi; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Tzardi, Maria; Tzanakakis, George N; Nikitovic, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer for women worldwide with a lifetime risk amounting to a staggering total of 10%. It is well established that the endogenous synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) polypeptide growth factors are closely correlated to malignant transformation and all the steps of the breast cancer metastatic cascade. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both estrogens and growth factors stimulate the proliferation of steroid-dependent tumor cells, and that the interaction between these signaling pathways occurs at several levels. Importantly, the majority of breast cancer cases are estrogen receptor- (ER-) positive which have a more favorable prognosis and pattern of recurrence with endocrine therapy being the backbone of treatment. Unfortunately, the majority of patients progress to endocrine therapy resistant disease (acquired resistance) whereas a proportion of patients may fail to respond to initial therapy (de novo resistance). The IGF-I and EGF downstream signaling pathways are closely involved in the process of progression to therapy resistant disease. Modifications in the bioavailability of these growth factors contribute critically to disease progression. In the present review therefore, we will discuss in depth how IGF and EGF signaling participate in breast cancer pathogenesis and progression to endocrine resistant disease.

  19. The effect of temperature gradients on endocrine signaling and antioxidant gene expression during Chironomus riparius development.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2014-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors affecting the biological processes of aquatic species. To investigate the potential effects of temperature on the developmental processes of aquatic invertebrates, we analyzed biological and molecular transcriptional responses during Chironomus riparius development, including five stages spanning from embryo to adult stages. We assessed the temperature change-induced reduction of survival rate, changes in biological development including the male:female ratio in emerged adults, the success rates of pupation and emergence, and the developmental timing of pupation and emergence. The increased temperature induced expression of endocrine signaling genes, such as the ecdysone receptor, ultraspiracle (ortholog of the RXR), and the estrogen-related receptor in the fourth-instar larval and pupal stages of C. riparius development. Altered temperature also affected the activity of antioxidant genes, including catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase during the fourth-instar larval to adult stages of C. riparius development, as a result of altered development. Increased temperature during the fourth-instar larval stage increased oxidative stress in pupae and adults. Responses of antioxidant genes to increased temperature occurred in a developmental stage-dependent manner. However, reduced temperature did not induce the expression of antioxidant genes in a developmental stage-dependent manner, although it did induce oxidative stress during C. riparius development. Increased temperature also caused greater toxicity of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in fourth-instar larvae. Our findings suggest that altered temperatures may disturb the invertebrate hormone system and developmental processes by inducing oxidative stress in aquatic environments.

  20. Minireview: Role of Intracellular Scaffolding Proteins in the Regulation of Endocrine G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The majority of hormones stimulates and mediates their signal transduction via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The signal is transmitted into the cell due to the association of the GPCRs with heterotrimeric G proteins, which in turn activates an extensive array of signaling pathways to regulate cell physiology. However, GPCRs also function as scaffolds for the recruitment of a variety of cytoplasmic protein-interacting proteins that bind to both the intracellular face and protein interaction motifs encoded by GPCRs. The structural scaffolding of these proteins allows GPCRs to recruit large functional complexes that serve to modulate both G protein-dependent and -independent cellular signaling pathways and modulate GPCR intracellular trafficking. This review focuses on GPCR interacting PSD95-disc large-zona occludens domain containing scaffolds in the regulation of endocrine receptor signaling as well as their potential role as therapeutic targets for the treatment of endocrinopathies. PMID:25942107

  1. A dynamic Gli code interprets Hh signals to regulate induction, patterning, and endocrine cell specification in the zebrafish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Devine, Christine A; Sbrogna, Jennifer L; Guner, Burcu; Osgood, Marcey; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Karlstrom, Rolf O

    2009-02-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is necessary for the induction and functional patterning of the pituitary placode, however the mechanisms by which Hh signals are interpreted by placodal cells are unknown. Here we show distinct temporal requirements for Hh signaling in endocrine cell differentiation and describe a dynamic Gli transcriptional response code that interprets these Hh signals within the developing adenohypophysis. Gli1 is required for the differentiation of selected endocrine cell types and acts as the major activator of Hh-mediated pituitary induction, while Gli2a and Gli2b contribute more minor activator functions. Intriguingly, this Gli response code changes as development proceeds. Gli1 continues to be required for the activation of the Hh response anteriorly in the pars distalis. In contrast, Gli2b is required to repress Hh target gene expression posteriorly in the pars intermedia. Consistent with these changing roles, gli1, gli2a, and gli2b, but not gli3, are expressed in pituitary precursor cells at the anterior neural ridge. Later in development, gli1 expression is maintained throughout the adenohypophysis while gli2a and gli2b expression are restricted to the pars intermedia. Given the link between Hh signaling and pituitary adenomas in humans, our data suggest misregulation of Gli function may contribute to these common pituitary tumors.

  2. Hormone signaling pathways under stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are continuously exposed to various environmental stresses. In contrast to the controlled conditions employed in many researches, more than one or more abiotic and/or biotic stresses simultaneously occur and highly impact growth of plants and crops in the field environments. Therefore, an urgent need to generate crops with enhanced tolerance to stress combinations exists. Researchers, however, focused on the mechanisms underlying acclimation of plants to combined stresses only in recent studies. Plant hormones might be a key regulator of the tailored responses of plants to different stress combinations. Co-ordination between different hormone signaling, or hormone signaling and other pathways such as ROS regulatory mechanisms could be flexible, being altered by timing and types of stresses, and could be different depending on plant species under the stress combinations. In this review, update on recent studies focusing on complex-mode of hormone signaling under stress combinations will be provided.

  3. Male primer endocrine responses to preovulatory female cyprinids under natural conditions in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Stacey, N E; Van Der Kraak, G J; Olsén, K H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated two related aspects of male-female reproductive interactions in the family Cyprinidae: (1) whether ovulating female rudd Scardinius erythrophthalmus (subfamily Leuciscinae) induce endocrine and gonadal priming responses in conspecific males, a phenomenon which has been described only in species from the subfamily Cyprininae such as goldfish, Carassius auratus, crucian carp Carassius carassius and common carp, Cyprinus carpio and (2) whether the stimuli mediating these responses are species-specific. Field studies of three sympatric European cyprinids, two leuciscins (S. erythrophthalmus and white bream Blicca bjoerkna) and one cyprinin (C. carassius), were conducted on fishes captured in Sweden in the spawning season and held in net pens under natural conditions. As previously reported in C. carassius, male S. erythrophthalmus increased milt (sperm and seminal fluid) volume and plasma concentrations of the sperm maturation hormone 4-pregnen-17,20β-diol-3-one (17,20β-P) when they were held with female S. erythrophthalmus induced to ovulate by injection of Ovaprim (GnRH analogue plus dopamine antagonist). Male S. erythrophthalmus had larger milt volumes than male C. carassius prior to and following exposure to ovulatory conspecifics, but exhibited a smaller proportional milt increase in response to stimulation, suggesting species differences in sperm allocation at spawning. The presence of female S. erythrophthalmus and B. bjoerkna did not affect milt volumes of C. carassius under two experimental conditions: (1) ovulating S. erythrophthalmus and B. bjoerkna did not increase the milt volumes of C. carassius and (2) S. erythrophthalmus and B. bjoerkna did not interfere with the milt volume increase induced in male C. carassius by ovulating conspecifics. These results suggest that, as in C. auratus, C. carassius and C. carpio (subfamily Cyprininae), female S. erythrophthalmus (subfamily Leuciscinae) release a preovulatory pheromone that exerts

  4. Vhnf1 acts downstream of Bmp, Fgf, and RA signals to regulate endocrine beta cell development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Kim, Hyon J; Gong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Ning-Ai; Lin, Shuo

    2007-03-15

    Bmp, Fgf, and retinoic acid (RA) signals have been implicated as regulators of pancreas development. However, the integration of these signaling pathways in vivo is not fully understood. Variant hnf1 (Vhnf1) is a transcription factor involved in pancreas, liver, and kidney development and its mutation in zebrafish causes underdeveloped pancreas and liver. We investigated the signaling pathways that regulate vhnf1 expression during pancreas development. First, we showed that Bmp activity is required for vhnf1 expression in the endoderm. In chordin (a Bmp antagonist) morpholino (MO)-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in endoderm and in endocrine beta cells is expanded. On the other hand, in alk8 (a type I TGFbeta receptor) MO-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in the endoderm is significantly reduced. Second, we showed that Fgf signaling participates in regulation of pancreas development through the vhnf1 pathway. Third, we demonstrated that RA fails to rescue reduction of insulin expression in vhnf1 mutants, whereas overexpression of vhnf1 restores insulin expression that is repressed by treatment with a RA receptor inhibitor. And finally, we revealed that both Bmp and Fgf signals act genetically upstream of RA in directing pancreas development. Taken together, our data establish that vhnf1 acts downstream of the signaling pathways of RA, Bmp, and Fgf to regulate pancreas development in zebrafish.

  5. Comparative Physiology of Energy Metabolism: Fishing for Endocrine Signals in the Early Vertebrate Pool.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Iris; Flik, Gert; Gorissen, Marnix

    2017-01-01

    Energy is the common currency of life. To guarantee a homeostatic supply of energy, multiple neuro-endocrine systems have evolved in vertebrates; systems that regulate food intake, metabolism, and distribution of energy. Even subtle (lasting) dysregulation of the delicate balance of energy intake and expenditure may result in severe pathologies. Feeding-related pathologies have fueled research on mammals, including of course the human species. The mechanisms regulating food intake and body mass are well-characterized in these vertebrates. The majority of animal life is ectothermic, only birds and mammals are endotherms. What can we learn from a (comparative) study on energy homeostasis in teleostean fishes, ectotherms, with a very different energy budget and expenditure? We present several adaptation strategies in fish. In recent years, the components that regulate food intake in fishes have been identified. Although there is homology of the major genetic machinery with mammals (i.e., there is a vertebrate blueprint), in many cases this does not imply analogy. Although both mammals and fish must gain their energy from food, the expenditure of the energy obtained is different. Mammals need to spend vast amounts of energy to maintain body temperature; fishes seem to utilize a broader metabolic range to their advantage. In this review, we briefly discuss ecto- and endothermy and their consequences for energy balance. Next, we argue that the evolution of endothermy and its (dis-)advantages may explain very different strategies in endocrine regulation of energy homeostasis among vertebrates. We follow a comparative and evolutionary line of thought: we discuss similarities and differences between fish and mammals. Moreover, given the extraordinary radiation of teleostean fishes (with an estimated number of 33,400 contemporary species, or over 50% of vertebrate life forms), we also compare strategies in energy homeostasis between teleostean species. We present recent

  6. Comparative Physiology of Energy Metabolism: Fishing for Endocrine Signals in the Early Vertebrate Pool

    PubMed Central

    van de Pol, Iris; Flik, Gert; Gorissen, Marnix

    2017-01-01

    Energy is the common currency of life. To guarantee a homeostatic supply of energy, multiple neuro-endocrine systems have evolved in vertebrates; systems that regulate food intake, metabolism, and distribution of energy. Even subtle (lasting) dysregulation of the delicate balance of energy intake and expenditure may result in severe pathologies. Feeding-related pathologies have fueled research on mammals, including of course the human species. The mechanisms regulating food intake and body mass are well-characterized in these vertebrates. The majority of animal life is ectothermic, only birds and mammals are endotherms. What can we learn from a (comparative) study on energy homeostasis in teleostean fishes, ectotherms, with a very different energy budget and expenditure? We present several adaptation strategies in fish. In recent years, the components that regulate food intake in fishes have been identified. Although there is homology of the major genetic machinery with mammals (i.e., there is a vertebrate blueprint), in many cases this does not imply analogy. Although both mammals and fish must gain their energy from food, the expenditure of the energy obtained is different. Mammals need to spend vast amounts of energy to maintain body temperature; fishes seem to utilize a broader metabolic range to their advantage. In this review, we briefly discuss ecto- and endothermy and their consequences for energy balance. Next, we argue that the evolution of endothermy and its (dis-)advantages may explain very different strategies in endocrine regulation of energy homeostasis among vertebrates. We follow a comparative and evolutionary line of thought: we discuss similarities and differences between fish and mammals. Moreover, given the extraordinary radiation of teleostean fishes (with an estimated number of 33,400 contemporary species, or over 50% of vertebrate life forms), we also compare strategies in energy homeostasis between teleostean species. We present recent

  7. An endocrine role for brown adipose tissue?

    PubMed

    Villarroya, Joan; Cereijo, Rubén; Villarroya, Francesc

    2013-09-01

    White adipose tissue is recognized as both a site of energy storage and an endocrine organ that produces a myriad of endocrine factors called adipokines. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the main site of nonshivering thermogenesis in mammals. The amount and activity of brown adipocytes are associated with protection against obesity and associated metabolic alterations. These effects of BAT are traditionally attributed to its capacity for the oxidation of fatty acids and glucose to sustain thermogenesis. However, recent data suggest that the beneficial effects of BAT could involve a previously unrecognized endocrine role through the release of endocrine factors. Several signaling molecules with endocrine properties have been found to be released by brown fat, especially under conditions of thermogenic activation. Moreover, experimental BAT transplantation has been shown to improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity mainly by influencing hepatic and cardiac function. It has been proposed that these effects are due to the release of endocrine factors by brown fat, such as insulin-like growth factor I, interleukin-6, or fibroblast growth factor-21. Further research is needed to determine whether brown fat plays an endocrine role and, if so, to comprehensively identify which endocrine factors are released by BAT. Such research may reveal novel clues for the observed association between brown adipocyte activity and a healthy metabolic profile, and it could also enlarge a current view of potential therapeutic tools for obesity and associated metabolic diseases.

  8. Endocrine interactions between plants and animals: Implications of exogenous hormone sources for the evolution of hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley E M; Heyland, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Hormones are central to animal physiology, metabolism and development. Details on signal transduction systems and regulation of hormone synthesis, activation and release have only been studied for a small number of animal groups, notably arthropods and chordates. However, a significant body of literature suggests that hormonal signaling systems are not restricted to these phyla. For example, work on several echinoderm species shows that exogenous thyroid hormones (THs) affect larval development and metamorphosis and our new data provide strong evidence for endogenous synthesis of THs in sea urchin larvae. In addition to these endogenous sources, these larvae obtain THs when they consume phytoplankton. Another example of an exogenously acquired hormone or their precursors is in insect and arthropod signaling. Sterols from plants are essential for the synthesis of ecdysteroids, a crucial group of insect morphogenic steroids. The availability of a hormone or hormone precursor from food has implications for understanding hormone function and the evolution of hormonal signaling in animals. For hormone function, it creates an important link between the environment and the regulation of internal homeostatic systems. For the evolution of hormonal signaling it helps us to better understand how complex endocrine mechanisms may have evolved.

  9. Transcriptomics and in vivo tests reveal novel mechanisms underlying endocrine disruption in an ecological sentinel, Nucella lapillus.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Sonia; Carvalho, Gary; Vasieva, Olga; Hughes, Roger; Cossins, Andrew; Fang, Yongxiang; Ashelford, Kevin; Olohan, Lisa; Barroso, Carlos; Mendo, Sonia; Creer, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Anthropogenic endocrine disruptors now contaminate all environments globally, with concomitant deleterious effects across diverse taxa. While most studies on endocrine disruption (ED) have focused on vertebrates, the superimposition of male sexual characteristics in the female dogwhelk, Nucella lapillus (imposex), caused by organotins, provides one of the most clearcut ecological examples of anthropogenically induced ED in aquatic ecosystems. To identify the underpinning mechanisms of imposex for this 'nonmodel' species, we combined Roche 454 pyrosequencing with custom oligoarray fabrication inexpensively to both generate gene models and identify those responding to chronic tributyltin (TBT) treatment. The results supported the involvement of steroid, neuroendocrine peptide hormone dysfunction and retinoid mechanisms, but suggested additionally the involvement of putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathways. Application of rosiglitazone, a well-known vertebrate PPARγ ligand, to dogwhelks induced imposex in the absence of TBT. Thus, while TBT-induced imposex is linked to the induction of many genes and has a complex phenotype, it is likely also to be driven by PPAR-responsive pathways, hitherto not described in invertebrates. Our findings provide further evidence for a common signalling pathway between invertebrate and vertebrate species that has previously been overlooked in the study of endocrine disruption.

  10. [State of the endocrine system in rats of various ages under immobilization stress and influence of adaptogenic biomos].

    PubMed

    Alesina, M Iu; Sukachova, O O; Zilberman, S Ts; Konovalenko, O O; Nesterenko, G O; Beskrovnyĭ, O M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of administration, of BIOMOS-VJ on the concentration of thyroxine, triiodothyronine, corticosterone, insulin and glucose in the blood serum of the normal state and under conditions of immobilization stress of young and aged Wistar's rats has been studied. The experiments have shown that the administration of preparation prevents the appearance of disturbances in endocrine system of the organism typical of stress such as a decrease in concentration of thyroid hormones and insulin and also a considerable increase in corticosterone and glucose concentration in the blood serum. On the basis of the results indicating the influence of BIOMOS-VJ on the endocrine system of young and aged Wistar's rats it is assumed that this preparation has gero-protected properties.

  11. Thyroid hormone signaling during early neurogenesis and its significance as a vulnerable window for endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Préau, Laetitia; Fini, Jean Baptiste; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Demeneix, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The essential roles of thyroid hormone (TH) in perinatal brain development have been known for decades. More recently, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of TH on proliferation, differentiation, migration, synaptogenesis and myelination in the developing nervous system have been elucidated. At the same time data from both epidemiological studies and animal models have revealed that the influence of thyroid signaling on development of the nervous system, extends to all periods of life, from early embryogenesis to neurogenesis in the adult brain. This review focuses on recent insights into the actions of TH during early neurogenesis. A key concept is that, in contrast to the previous ideas that only the unliganded receptor was implicated in these early phases, a critical role of the ligand, T3, is increasingly recognized. These findings are considered in the light of increasing knowledge of cell specific control of T3 availability as a function of deiodinase activity and transporter expression. These requirements for TH in the early stages of neurogenesis take on new relevance given the increasing epidemiological data on adverse effects of TH lack in early pregnancy on children's neurodevelopmental outcome. These ideas lead logically into a discussion on how the actions of TH during the first phases of neurogenesis can be potentially disrupted by gestational iodine lack and/or chemical pollution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  12. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations.

  13. Pre-earthquake signals: Underlying physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2011-06-01

    Prior to large earthquakes the Earth sends out transient signals, sometimes strong, more often subtle and fleeting. These signals may consist of local magnetic field variations, electromagnetic emissions over a wide range of frequencies, a variety of atmospheric and ionospheric phenomena. Great uncertainty exists as to the nature of the processes that could produce such signals, both inside the Earth's crust and at the surface. The absence of a comprehensive physical mechanism has led to a patchwork of explanations, which are not internally consistent. The recognition that most crustal rocks contain dormant electronic charge carriers in the form of peroxy defects, OSi/⧹SiO, holds the key to a deeper understanding of these pre-earthquake signals from a solid state physics perspective. When rocks are stressed, peroxy links break, releasing electronic charge carriers, h ·, known as positive holes. The positive holes are highly mobile and can flow out of the stressed subvolume. The situation is similar to that in a battery. The h · outflow is possible when the battery circuit closes. The h · outflow constitutes an electric current, which generates magnetic field variations and low frequency EM emissions. When the positive holes arrive at the Earth's surface, they lead to ionization of air at the ground-air interface. Under certain conditions corona discharges occur, which cause RF emission. The upward expansion of ionized air may be the reason for perturbations in the ionosphere. Recombination of h · charge carriers at the surface leads to a spectroscopically distinct, non-thermal IR emission.

  14. GnRH signaling, the gonadotrope and endocrine control of fertility.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart P; Navratil, Amy M; Xie, Jianjun; Roberson, Mark S

    2010-07-01

    Mammalian reproductive cycles are controlled by an intricate interplay between the hypothalamus, pituitary and gonads. Central to the function of this axis is the ability of the pituitary gonadotrope to appropriately respond to stimulation by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). This review focuses on the role of cell signaling and in particular, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities regulated by GnRH that are necessary for normal fertility. Recently, new mouse models making use of conditional gene deletion have shed new light on the relationships between GnRH signaling and fertility in both male and female mice. Within the reproductive axis, GnRH signaling is initiated through discrete membrane compartments in which the receptor resides leading to the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs 1/2). As defined by gonadotrope-derived cellular models, the ERKs appear to play a central role in the regulation of a cohort of immediate early genes that regulate the expression of late genes that, in part, define the differentiated character of the gonadotrope. Recent data would suggest that in vivo, conditional, pituitary-specific disruption of ERK signaling by GnRH leads to a gender-specific perturbation of fertility. Double ERK knockout in the anterior pituitary leads to female infertility due to LH biosynthesis deficiency and a failure in ovulation. In contrast, male mice are modestly LH deficient; however, this does not have an appreciable impact on fertility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GnRH signaling, the gonadotrope and endocrine control of fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Stuart P.; Navratil, Amy M.; Xie, Jianjun; Roberson, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive cycles are controlled by an intricate interplay between the hypothalamus, pituitary and gonads. Central to the function of this axis is the ability of the pituitary gonadotrope to appropriately respond to stimulation by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). This review focuses on the role of cell signaling and in particular, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities regulated by GnRH that are necessary for normal fertility. Recently, new mouse models making use of conditional gene deletion have shed new light on the relationships between GnRH signaling and fertility in both male and female mice. Within the reproductive axis, GnRH signaling is initiated through discrete membrane compartments in which the receptor resides leading to the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs 1/2). As defined by gonadotrope-derived cellular models, the ERKs appear to play a central role in the regulation of a cohort of immediate early genes that regulate the expression of late genes that, in part, define the differentiated character of the gonadotrope. Recent data would suggest that in vivo, conditional, pituitary-specific disruption of ERK signaling by GnRH leads to a gender-specific perturbation of fertility. Double ERK knockout in the anterior pituitary leads to female infertility due to LH biosynthesis deficiency and a failure in ovulation. In contrast, male mice are modestly LH deficient; however, this does not have an appreciable impact on fertility. PMID:20451543

  16. Comparison of growth and endocrine changes in Thoroughbred colts and fillies reared under different climate conditions

    PubMed Central

    MIZUKAMI, Hirotoshi; SUZUKI, Tsuyoshi; NAMBO, Yasuo; ISHIMARU, Mutsuki; NAITO, Hiroshi; KOROSUE, Kenji; AKIYAMA, Kentaro; MIYATA, Kenji; YAMANOBE, Akira; NAGAOKA, Kentaro; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development and endocrine changes in Thoroughbreds colts and fillies were compared between those reared at two facilities of the Japan Racing Association, the Hidaka Training and Research Center (Hidaka) and Miyazaki Yearling Training Farm (Miyazaki). Thoroughbred colts and fillies born in Japan between 2003 and 2010 were used. Each colt group and filly group was divided into 2 groups, respectively, and raised in Hidaka or Miyazaki for 7 months from September at 1 year old to April at 2 years old. For the growth parameters, the body weight, height at withers, and girth and cannon circumferences were measured once a month. For parameters of endocrine function, circulating prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, progesterone, and estradiol-17β levels were measured. Regarding growth, the rate of increase over the 7-month period was significantly higher in both colts and fillies raised in Miyazaki than in Hidaka in all 4 parameters: body weight, height at withers, and girth and cannon circumferences. The endocrine changes of the colts and fillies born in 2007 were as follows. In colts, although circulating prolactin tended to be higher in colts reared in Hidaka from October to April, circulating LH, FSH, testosterone, estradiol-17β and IGF-1 tended to be higher in colts reared in Miyazaki than in Hidaka, suggesting that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-LH/FSH system and the growth hormone-IGF-1 system were more active in colts reared in Miyazaki as compared with those reared in Hidaka. In fillies, circulating prolactin tended to be higher in fillies reared in Hidaka in February and March, but no significant difference was noted in the serum LH, FSH, IGF-1, or progesterone level between the 2 groups. Circulating estradiol-17β tended to be higher in fillies reared in Miyazaki than in Hidaka in October and November. Regarding ovarian function, the initial ovulation occurred

  17. Predictive endocrine testing in the 21st century using in vitro assays of estrogen receptor signaling responses.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Martin, Matt T; Dix, David J; Filer, Dayne L; Houck, Keith A; Knudsen, Thomas B; Sipes, Nisha S; Reif, David M; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Judson, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of environmental chemicals are subject to regulatory review for their potential to be endocrine disruptors (ED). In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have emerged as a potential tool for prioritizing chemicals for ED-related whole-animal tests. In this study, 1814 chemicals including pesticide active and inert ingredients, industrial chemicals, food additives, and pharmaceuticals were evaluated in a panel of 13 in vitro HTS assays. The panel of in vitro assays interrogated multiple end points related to estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, namely binding, agonist, antagonist, and cell growth responses. The results from the in vitro assays were used to create an ER Interaction Score. For 36 reference chemicals, an ER Interaction Score >0 showed 100% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity for classifying potential ER activity. The magnitude of the ER Interaction Score was significantly related to the potency classification of the reference chemicals (p < 0.0001). ERα/ERβ selectivity was also evaluated, but relatively few chemicals showed significant selectivity for a specific isoform. When applied to a broader set of chemicals with in vivo uterotrophic data, the ER Interaction Scores showed 91% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Overall, this study provides a novel method for combining in vitro concentration response data from multiple assays and, when applied to a large set of ER data, accurately predicted estrogenic responses and demonstrated its utility for chemical prioritization.

  18. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... and nervous systems work very closely together. The brain continuously sends instructions to the endocrine system, and ... master switchboard because it's the part of the brain that controls the endocrine system. The pituitary gland, ...

  19. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They ... levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They ...

  20. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  1. Intramuscular anabolic signaling and endocrine response following high volume and high intensity resistance exercise protocols in trained men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Mangine, Gerald T; Robinson, Edward H; Church, David D; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Willoughby, Darryn S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise paradigms are often divided into high volume (HV) or high intensity (HI) protocols, however, it is unknown whether these protocols differentially stimulate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to examine mTORC1 signaling in conjunction with circulating hormone concentrations following a typical HV and HI lower-body resistance exercise protocol. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7 ± 3.4 years; 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) performed each resistance exercise protocol in a random, counterbalanced order. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), 1 h (1H), 2 h (2H), and 5 h (5H) postexercise. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at BL, 1H, and 5H. Electromyography of the vastus lateralis was also recorded during each protocol. HV and HI produced a similar magnitude of muscle activation across sets. Myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were significantly greater following HI compared to HV (P = 0.01–0.02), whereas the lactate response was significantly higher following HV compared to HI (P = 0.003). The growth hormone, cortisol, and insulin responses were significantly greater following HV compared to HI (P = 0.0001–0.04). No significant differences between protocols were observed for the IGF-1 or testosterone response. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed a significantly greater (P = 0.03) phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor at 1H following HV compared to HI. Phosphorylation status of all other signaling proteins including mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6 were not significantly different between trials. Despite significant differences in markers of muscle damage and the endocrine response following HV and HI, both protocols appeared to elicit similar mTORC1 activation in resistance-trained men. PMID:26197935

  2. Metabolic and endocrine profiles and reproductive parameters in dairy cows under grazing conditions: effect of polymorphisms in somatotropic axis genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The present study hypothesized that GH-AluI and IGF-I-SnabI polymorphisms do change the metabolic/endocrine profiles in Holstein cows during the transition period, which in turn are associated with productive and reproductive parameters. Methods Holstein cows (Farm 1, primiparous cows, n = 110, and Farm 2, multiparous cows, n = 76) under grazing conditions were selected and GH and IGF-I genotypes were determined. Blood samples for metabolic/endocrine determinations were taken during the transition period and early lactation in both farms. Data was analyzed by farm using a repeated measures analyses including GH and IGF-I genotypes, days and interactions as fixed effects, sire and cow as random effects and calving date as covariate. Results and Discussion Frequencies of GH and IGF-I alleles were L:0.84, V:0.16 and A:0.60, B:0.40, respectively. The GH genotype was not associated with productive or reproductive variables, but interaction with days affected FCM yield in multiparous (farm 2) cows (LL yielded more than LV cows) in early lactation. The GH genotype affected NEFA and IGF-I concentrations in farm 1 (LV had higher NEFA and lower IGF-I than LL cows) suggesting a better energy status of LL cows. There was no effect of IGF-I genotype on productive variables, but a trend was found for FCM in farm 2 (AB cows yielded more than AA cows). IGF-I genotype affected calving first service interval in farm 1, and the interaction with days tended to affect FCM yield (AB cows had a shorter interval and yielded more FCM than BB cows). IGF-I genotype affected BHB, NEFA, and insulin concentrations in farm 1: primiparous BB cows had lower NEFA and BHB and higher insulin concentrations. In farm 2, there was no effect of IGF-I genotype, but there was an interaction with days on IGF-I concentration, suggesting a greater uncoupling somatropic axis in AB and BB than AA cows, being in accordance with greater FCM yield in AB cows. Conclusion The GH and IGF-I genotypes had no

  3. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-05-15

    In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO₂ nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO₂ nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron-hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  4. ABA signal in rice under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ever since its discovery, abscisic acid (ABA) has been intensively studied due to its versatile functions in plant developmental and physiological processes. Many signaling details of ABA have been well elucidated and reviewed. The identification of ABA receptors is a great breakthrough in the field of ABA study, whereas the discovery of ABA transporter has changed our concept that ABA is delivered solely by passive transport. The intensity of ABA signaling pathway is well known to be controlled by multi-regulators. Nonetheless, the interaction and coordination among ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, conjugation and transportation are seldom discussed. Here, we summarize the biological functions of ABA in response to different stresses, especially the roles of ABA in plant defense to pathogen attack, and discuss the possible relationships of these determinants in controlling the specificity and intensity of ABA signaling pathway in the rice. PMID:24764501

  5. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  6. Predictive Endocrine Testing in the 21st Century Using In Vitro Assays of Estrogen Receptor Signaling Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of environmental chemicals are subject to regulatory review for their potential to be endocrine disruptors (ED). In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have emerged as a potential tool for prioritizing chemicals for ED-related whole-animal tests. In this study,...

  7. Predictive Endocrine Testing in the 21st Century Using In Vitro Assays of Estrogen Receptor Signaling Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of environmental chemicals are subject to regulatory review for their potential to be endocrine disruptors (ED). In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have emerged as a potential tool for prioritizing chemicals for ED-related whole-animal tests. In this study,...

  8. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  9. Effects of in vivo exposure to UV filters (4-MBC, OMC, BP-3, 4-HB, OC, OD-PABA) on endocrine signaling genes in the insect Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that several UV filters might have endocrine disruptive effects. Numerous studies have evaluated hormonal effects in vertebrates, mainly reporting estrogenic and androgenic activities in mammals and fishes. There is only limited knowledge about potential endocrine activity in invertebrate hormonal systems. In this work, the effects on endocrine signaling genes of six frequently used UV filters were investigated in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. The UV filters studied were: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also called 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC); benzophenone-3 (BP-3); 4-hidroxybenzophenone (4-HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). After in vivo exposure at different dosages, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR), the ultraspiracle (usp, ortholog of the RXR) and the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) were quantified by Real Time PCR. The EcR gene was significantly upregulated by 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA, with a dose-related response following 24h exposure. In contrast, the benzophenones, BP-3 and 4-HB, as well as OC did not alter this gene at the same exposure conditions. The transcription profiles of the usp and ERR genes were not significantly affected, except for BP-3 that inhibited the usp gene at the highest concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence in invertebrates of a direct effect of UV filters on endocrine-related genes, and is consistent with the known effects on vertebrate hormonal receptor genes. The capability of 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA to stimulate the expression of the ecdysone receptor, a key transcription factor for the ecdysone-genomic response in arthropods, suggests the possibility of a broad and long-term effect on this hormonal pathway. These findings strengthen the need for further research about the ecotoxicological implications

  10. Endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Pombo, M; Castro-Feijóo, L

    2005-12-01

    Man does not come into the world pre-determined. The lifetime set of environmental conditions impinging on a given individual has been termed the ambiome, which together with the genome and the proteome determines each individual's development and construction. Among the most important elements making up the ambiome are endocrine disruptors. An endocrine disruptor is a chemical substance that has adverse effects on an organism or its progeny, through the endocrine system. The number of known endocrine disruptors is large and continuously increasing, and includes both naturally occurring and synthetic substances. We are convinced that they entail genuine problems; although it is difficult to assess their magnitude and real significance, and we will certainly need some time, probably several decades, to obtain conclusive results; but even so, we consider that the existing body of evidence about effects of endocrine disruptors on human health is sufficiently worrying to justify precautionary measures.

  11. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  12. Endocrine System (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Teens > Endocrine System A A A ... is called the endocrine system . What Is the Endocrine System? Although we rarely think about the endocrine system, ...

  13. Endocrine Disruptors

    MedlinePlus

    ... plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. The NIEHS supports studies to determine whether exposure to endocrine disruptors may result in human health effects including lowered fertility and an increased incidence of ...

  14. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  15. Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Law and science combine in the estimation of risks from endocrine disruptors (EDs) and actions for their regulation. For both, dose–response models are the causal link between exposure and probability (or percentage change) of adverse response. The evidence that leads to either regulations or judicial decrees is affected by uncertainty and limited knowledge, raising difficult policy issues that we enumerate and discuss. In the United States, some courts have dealt with EDs, but causation based on animal studies has been a stumbling block for plaintiffs seeking compensation, principally because those courts opt for epidemiological evidence. The European Union (EU) has several regulatory tools and ongoing research on the risks associated with bisphenol A, under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation and other regulations or directives. The integration of a vast (in kind and in scope) number of research papers into a statement of causation for either policy or to satisfy legal requirements, in both the United States and the EU, relies on experts. We outline the discursive dilemma and issues that may affect consensus-based results and a Bayesian causal approach that accounts for the evolution of information, yielding both value of information and flexibility associated with public choices. PMID:26740809

  16. Appetite-Controlling Endocrine Systems in Teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Rønnestad, Ivar; Gomes, Ana S.; Murashita, Koji; Angotzi, Rita; Jönsson, Elisabeth; Volkoff, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian studies have shaped our understanding of the endocrine control of appetite and body weight in vertebrates and provided the basic vertebrate model that involves central (brain) and peripheral signaling pathways as well as environmental cues. The hypothalamus has a crucial function in the control of food intake, but other parts of the brain are also involved. The description of a range of key neuropeptides and hormones as well as more details of their specific roles in appetite control continues to be in progress. Endocrine signals are based on hormones that can be divided into two groups: those that induce (orexigenic), and those that inhibit (anorexigenic) appetite and food consumption. Peripheral signals originate in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, adipose tissue, and other tissues and reach the hypothalamus through both endocrine and neuroendocrine actions. While many mammalian-like endocrine appetite-controlling networks and mechanisms have been described for some key model teleosts, mainly zebrafish and goldfish, very little knowledge exists on these systems in fishes as a group. Fishes represent over 30,000 species, and there is a large variability in their ecological niches and habitats as well as life history adaptations, transitions between life stages and feeding behaviors. In the context of food intake and appetite control, common adaptations to extended periods of starvation or periods of abundant food availability are of particular interest. This review summarizes the recent findings on endocrine appetite-controlling systems in fish, highlights their impact on growth and survival, and discusses the perspectives in this research field to shed light on the intriguing adaptations that exist in fish and their underlying mechanisms. PMID:28458653

  17. The impact of endocrine disruptors on endocrine targets.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, E; Palioura, E; Kandarakis, S A; Koutsilieris, M

    2010-07-01

    Endocrine disruption represents one of the most controversial environmental issues of our époque. So far, many substances, both natural and artificial, have been recognized to interfere with endocrine signaling pathways. In intact laboratory animals, this interaction has been documented to generate adverse health outcomes by impairing normal functions. With regard to humans, evidence is limited and inconsistent to clearly establish a causal inference, however, accumulating data incriminate endocrine disrupting chemicals to reproductive disorders and disturbed thyroid homeostasis. Recently, as a result of animal models and preliminary human studies, a new area of interest has arisen concerning the implication of endocrine disruptors in the etiology of obesity and diabetes, the two major, life-threatening, epidemics of modern world. This article reviews the evidence linking endocrine disrupting chemicals to a broad spectrum of clinical perturbations from reproduction and thyroid to metabolic regulation.

  18. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  19. The Novel Endocrine Disruptor Tolylfluanid Impairs Insulin Signaling in Primary Rodent and Human Adipocytes through a Reduction in Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M.; Neel, Brian A.; Brock, Clifton O.; Lin, Yuxi; Hickey, Allison T.; Carlton, Daniel A.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes. In prior work, the phenylsulfamide fungicide tolylfluanid (TF) was shown to augment adipocyte differentiation, yet its effects on mature adipocyte metabolism remain unknown. Because of the central role of adipose tissue in global energy regulation, the present study tested the hypothesis that TF modulates insulin action in primary rodent and human adipocytes. Alterations in insulin signaling in primary mammalian adipocytes were determined by the phosphorylation of Akt, a critical insulin signaling intermediate. Treatment of primary murine adipose tissue in vitro with 100 nM TF for 48 h markedly attenuated acute insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a strain- and species-independent fashion. Perigonadal, perirenal, and mesenteric fat were all sensitive to TF-induced insulin resistance. A similar TF-induced reduction in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was observed in primary human subcutaneous adipose tissue. TF-treatment led to a potent and specific reduction in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA and protein levels, a key upstream mediator of insulin’s diverse metabolic effects. In contrast, insulin receptor-β, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Akt expression were unchanged, indicating a specific abrogation of insulin signaling. Additionally, TF-treated adipocytes exhibited altered endocrine function with a reduction in both basal and insulin-stimulated leptin secretion. These studies demonstrate that TF induces cellular insulin resistance in primary murine and human adipocytes through a reduction of IRS-1 expression and protein stability, raising concern about the potential for this fungicide to disrupt metabolism and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:22387882

  20. Endocrine therapy initiation, discontinuation and adherence and breast imaging among 21-gene recurrence score assay-eligible women under age 65.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Suzanne C; Isaacs, Claudine; Lynce, Filipa; Graham, Deena Mary Atieh; Chao, Calvin; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Zhou, Yingjun; Liu, Chunfu; Selvam, Nandini; Schwartz, Marc D; Potosky, Arnold L

    2017-03-31

    Aside from chemotherapy utilization, limited data are available on the relationship between gene expression profiling (GEP) testing and breast cancer care. We assessed the relationship between GEP testing and additional variables and the outcomes of endocrine therapy initiation, discontinuation and adherence, and breast imaging exams in women under age 65 years. Data from five state cancer registries were linked with claims data and GEP results. We assessed variables associated with survivorship care outcomes in an incident cohort of 5014 commercially insured women under age 65 years, newly diagnosed with stage I or II hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) non-positive breast cancer from 2006 to 2010. Among tested women, those with high Oncotype DX® Breast Recurrence Score® (RS) were significantly less likely to initiate endocrine therapy than women with low RS tumors (OR 0.40 (95% CI 0.20 to 0.81); P = 0.01). Among all test-eligible women, receipt of Oncotype DX testing was associated with a greater likelihood of endocrine therapy initiation (OR 2.48 (95% CI 2.03 to 3.04); P <0.0001). The odds of initiation were also significantly higher for tested vs. untested women among women who did not initiate chemotherapy within six months of diagnosis (OR 3.25 (95% CI 2.53 to 4.16)), with no effect in women who received chemotherapy. Discontinuation and adherence and breast imaging exams were unrelated to tested status or RS. Lower endocrine therapy initiation rates among women with high RS tumors and among untested women not receiving chemotherapy are concerning, given its established efficacy. Additional research is needed to suggest mechanisms to close this gap.

  1. Endocrine System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Parents > Endocrine System A A A ... to help the body function properly. About the Endocrine System The foundations of the endocrine system are the ...

  2. Single-cell approaches for molecular classification of endocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sosa, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review In this review, we summarize recent developments in single-cell technologies that can be employed for the functional and molecular classification of endocrine cells in normal and neoplastic tissue. Recent findings The emergence of new platforms for the isolation, analysis, and dynamic assessment of individual cell identity and reactive behavior enables experimental deconstruction of intratumoral heterogeneity and other contexts, where variability in cell signaling and biochemical responsiveness inform biological function and clinical presentation. These tools are particularly appropriate for examining and classifying endocrine neoplasias, as the clinical sequelae of these tumors are often driven by disrupted hormonal responsiveness secondary to compromised cell signaling. Single-cell methods allow for multidimensional experimental designs incorporating both spatial and temporal parameters with the capacity to probe dynamic cell signaling behaviors and kinetic response patterns dependent upon sequential agonist challenge. Summary Intratumoral heterogeneity in the provenance, composition, and biological activity of different forms of endocrine neoplasia presents a significant challenge for prognostic assessment. Single-cell technologies provide an array of powerful new approaches uniquely well suited for dissecting complex endocrine tumors. Studies examining the relationship between clinical behavior and tumor compositional variations in cellular activity are now possible, providing new opportunities to deconstruct the underlying mechanisms of endocrine neoplasia. PMID:26632769

  3. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  4. Signals of New Physics in the Underlying Event

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    LHC searches for new physics focus on combinations of hard physics objects. In this work we propose a qualitatively different soft signal for new physics at the LHC - the 'anomalous underlying event'. Every hard LHC event will be accompanied by a soft underlying event due to QCD and pile-up effects. Though it is often used for QCD and monte carlo studies, here we propose the incorporation of an underlying event analysis in some searches for new physics. An excess of anomalous underlying events may be a smoking-gun signal for particular new physics scenarios such as 'quirks' or 'hidden valleys' in which large amounts of energy may be emitted by a large multiplicity of soft particles. We discuss possible search strategies for such soft diffuse signals in the tracking system and calorimetry of the LHC experiments. We present a detailed study of the calorimetric signal in a concrete example, a simple quirk model motivated by folded supersymmetry. In these models the production and radiative decay of highly excited quirk bound states leads to an 'antenna pattern' of soft unclustered energy. Using a dedicated simulation of a toy detector and a 'CMB-like' multipole analysis we compare the signal to the expected backgrounds.

  5. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  6. Developmental effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wildlife and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, T; vom Saal, F S; Soto, A M

    1993-01-01

    Large numbers and large quantities of endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been released into the environment since World War II. Many of these chemicals can disturb development of the endocrine system and of the organs that respond to endocrine signals in organisms indirectly exposed during prenatal and/or early postnatal life; effects of exposure during development are permanent and irreversible. The risk to the developing organism can also stem from direct exposure of the offspring after birth or hatching. In addition, transgenerational exposure can result from the exposure of the mother to a chemical at any time throughout her life before producing offspring due to persistence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in body fat, which is mobilized during egg laying or pregnancy and lactation. Mechanisms underlying the disruption of the development of vital systems, such as the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, are discussed with reference to wildlife, laboratory animals, and humans. PMID:8080506

  7. Influence of intrinsic signals and environmental cues on the endocrine control of feeding in fish: potential application in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Volkoff, Hélène; Hoskins, Leah J; Tuziak, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Optimization of food consumption and ultimately growth are major concerns for aquaculture. In fish, food intake is regulated by several hormones produced by both brain and peripheral tissues. Changes in feeding behavior and appetite usually occur through the modulation of the gene expression and/or action of these appetite-regulating hormones and can be due not only to variations in intrinsic factors such as nutritional/metabolic or reproductive status, but also to changes in environmental factors, such as temperature and photoperiod. In addition, the gene expression and/or plasma levels of appetite-regulating hormones might also display daily as well as circannual (seasonal) rhythms. Despite recent advances, our current understanding of the regulation of feeding in fish is still limited. We give here a brief overview of our current knowledge of the endocrine regulation of feeding in fish and describe how a better understanding of appetite-related hormones in fish might lead to the development of sustainable aquaculture.

  8. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2013-10-15

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable to pathogenic mutations in both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA creates a complex and heterogeneous catalogue of disease which can be difficult to navigate for novices and experts alike. In this article we provide an overview of the endocrine disorders associated with mitochondrial disease, the way in which the underlying mitochondrial disorder influences the clinical presentation, and how these factors influence subsequent management. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Endocrine Proxies Can Simplify Endocrine Complexity to Enable Evolutionary Prediction.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Goggy

    2016-08-01

    It is well understood that much of evolutionary change is mediated through the endocrine system with growing interest to identify how this occurs. This however, causes a conflict of sorts. To understand endocrine mechanism, a focus on detail is required. In contrast, to understand evolutionary change, reduction to a few key traits is essential. Endocrine proxies, measurable traits that accurately reflect specific hormonal titers or the timing of specific hormonal events, can reduce endocrine complexity to a few traits that enable predictions of how the endocrine system regulates evolutionary change. In the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta, Sphingidae), three endocrine proxies, measured on 5470 individuals, were used to test explicit predictions of how the endocrine system regulates the response to 10 generations of simultaneous selection on body size and development time. The critical weight (CW) reflects the variation in the cessation of juvenile hormone (JH) secretion in the last larval instar, the interval to cessation of growth (ICG) reflects the variation in prothoracicotropic hormone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Growth rate (GR) reflects the nutrient signaling pathways, primarily the insulin and TOR This is a standard identity similar to DNA signaling pathways. These three endocrine proxies explained 99% and 93% of the variation in body size and development time, respectively, following the 10 generations of simultaneous selection. When the two focal traits, body size and development time, were selected in the same direction, both to either increase or both to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the CW and the ICG, proxies for the developmental hormones JH and 20E, and constrained by GR. In contrast, when the two focal traits were selected in opposite directions, one to increase and the other to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the insulin and TOR signaling pathways as measured by their proxy, GR, and

  10. Biochemical mechanisms of signaling: perspectives in plants under arsenic stress.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ejazul; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Irem, Samra

    2015-04-01

    Plants are the ultimate food source for humans, either directly or indirectly. Being sessile in nature, they are exposed to various biotic and abiotic stresses because of changing climate that adversely effects their growth and development. Contamination of heavy metals is one of the major abiotic stresses because of anthropogenic as well as natural factors which lead to increased toxicity and accumulation in plants. Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid toxin present in the earth crust. Due to its presence in terrestrial and aquatic environments, it effects the growth of plants. Plants can tolerate arsenic using several mechanisms like phytochelation, vacuole sequestration and activation of antioxidant defense systems. Several signaling mechanisms have evolved in plants that involve the use of proteins, calcium ions, hormones, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide as signaling molecules to cope with arsenic toxicity. These mechanisms facilitate plants to survive under metal stress by activating their defense systems. The pathways by which these stress signals are perceived and responded is an unexplored area of research and there are lots of gaps still to be filled. A good understanding of these signaling pathways can help in raising the plants which can perform better in arsenic contaminated soil and water. In order to increase the survival of plants in contaminated areas there is a strong need to identify suitable gene targets that can be modified according to needs of the stakeholders using various biotechnological techniques. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of plants grown under arsenic stress and will give an insight of the different sensory systems in plants. Furthermore, it provides the knowledge about several pathways that can be exploited to develop plant cultivars which are resistant to arsenic stress or can reduce its uptake to minimize the risk of arsenic toxicity through food chain thus ensuring food security.

  11. Weight control, endocrine hormones and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    King, Brenee; Jiang, Yu; Su, Xiaoyu; Xu, Jianteng; Xie, Linglin; Standard, Joseph; Wang, Weiqun

    2013-05-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing which becomes worrisome due to its association with several diseases and certain types of cancers. While weight control through dietary caloric restriction and/or physical activity protects against cancer in animal models, the underlying mechanisms are not fully defined. Weight loss due to negative energy balance is associated with alterations of multiple growth factors and endocrine hormones. The altered hormones and hormone-related functions appear to be responsible for anti-cancer mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the recent studies related to weight loss and the altered endocrine hormones, focusing on the reduced levels of the mitogenic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and adipokine leptin as well as the raised levels of adiponectin and glucocorticoids. The potential molecular targets of these hormone-dependent signalling pathways are also discussed. Considering the increasing trends of obesity throughout the world, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms between body weight, endocrine hormones and cancer risk may lead to novel approaches to cancer prevention and treatment.

  12. Coherent optical array receiver for PPM signals under atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Fernandez, Michela

    The performance of a coherent free-space optical communications system operating in the presence of turbulence is investigated. Maximum Likelihood Detection techniques are employed to optimally detect Pulse Position Modulated signals with a focal-plane detector array and to reconstruct the turbulence-degraded signals. Laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are described. The key components include two lasers operating at 1064 nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16 element (4 X 4) InGaAs focal-plane detector array, and a data-acquisition and signal-processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In the first part of the experimental results we show convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The second part of the experimental results shows adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed. The third part of the experimental results, in which the main goal of this thesis is achieved, includes an investigation of the performance of the Coherent Optical Receiver Experiment (CORE) at JPL. Bit Error Rate (BER) results are presented for single and multichannel optical receivers where quasi shot noise-limited performance is achieved under simulated turbulence conditions using noncoherent postdetection processing techniques. Theoretical BER expressions are

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A in the presence of prepared CexZn1-xO nanocomposites under irradiation of sunlight.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, M; Ranjith, K S; Sivaraj, Rajeshwari; Kumar, R T Rajendra; Abdul Salam, Hasna

    2014-11-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of Bisphenol A (BPA), a representative endocrine disruptor chemical, was carried out under irradiation of sunlight in the presence of CexZn1-xO nanophotocatalyst. Cerium (Ce) ions were successfully incorporated into the bulk lattice of ZnO by simple co-precipitation process. The CexZn1-xO composite nanostructures exhibited higher photocatalytic efficiency than pure ZnO in the degradation of BPA under sunlight irradiation and nearly complete mineralization of BPA was achieved. The degradation rate was strongly dependent on factors such as the size and structure of catalyst, doping material concentration, BPA concentration, catalyst load, irradiation time and pH levels. This work suggested that the CexZn1-xO assisted photocatalytic degradation is a versatile, economic, environmentally benign and efficient method for BPA removal in the aqueous environment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  15. [Endocrine function in obesity].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Castro, Paula; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Brandón-Sandá, Iria; Cordido, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    Obesity is associated to significant disturbances in endocrine function. Hyper insulinemia and insulin resistance are the best known changes in obesity, but their mechanisms and clinical significance are not clearly established. Adipose tissue is considered to be a hormone-secreting endocrine organ; and increased leptin secretion from the adipocyte, a satiety signal, is a well-established endocrine change in obesity. In obesity there is a decreased GH secretion. Impairment of somatotropic function in obesity is functional and may be reversed in certain circumstances. The pathophysiological mechanism responsible for low GH secretion in obesity is probably multifactorial. There are many data suggesting that a chronic state of somatostatin hypersecretion results in inhibition of GH release. Increased FFA levels, as well as a deficient ghrelin secretion, probably contribute to the impaired GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated to hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men, particularly those with morbid obesity, have decreased testosterone and gonadotropin levels. Obesity is associated to an increased cortisol production rate, which is compensated for by a higher cortisol clearance, resulting in plasma free cortisol levels that do not change when body weight increases. Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic factor, and has been found to be decreased in obese people. In obesity there is also a trend to increased TSH and free T3 levels. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypothalamic Integration of Metabolic, Endocrine, and Circadian Signals in Fish: Involvement in the Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, María J.; Cerdá-Reverter, José M.; Soengas, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of food intake in fish is a complex process carried out through several different mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) with hypothalamus being the main regulatory center. As in mammals, a complex hypothalamic circuit including two populations of neurons: one co-expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and the second one population co-expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is involved in the integration of information relating to food intake control. The production and release of these peptides control food intake, and the production results from the integration of information of different nature such as levels of nutrients and hormones as well as circadian signals. The present review summarizes the knowledge and recent findings about the presence and functioning of these mechanisms in fish and their differences vs. the known mammalian model. PMID:28694769

  17. To modulate and be modulated: estrogenic influences on auditory processing of communication signals within a socio-neuro-endocrine framework.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kathleen M; Vicario, David S

    2012-02-01

    Gonadal hormones modulate behavioral responses to sexual stimuli, and communication signals can also modulate circulating hormone levels. In several species, these combined effects appear to underlie a two-way interaction between circulating gonadal hormones and behavioral responses to socially salient stimuli. Recent work in songbirds has shown that manipulating local estradiol levels in the auditory forebrain produces physiological changes that affect discrimination of conspecific vocalizations and can affect behavior. These studies provide new evidence that estrogens can directly alter auditory processing and indirectly alter the behavioral response to a stimulus. These studies show that: 1) Local estradiol action within an auditory area is necessary for socially relevant sounds to induce normal physiological responses in the brains of both sexes; 2) These physiological effects occur much more quickly than predicted by the classical time-frame for genomic effects; 3) Estradiol action within the auditory forebrain enables behavioral discrimination among socially relevant sounds in males; and 4) Estradiol is produced locally in the male brain during exposure to particular social interactions. The accumulating evidence suggests a socio-neuro-endocrinology framework in which estradiol is essential to auditory processing, is increased by a socially relevant stimulus, acts rapidly to shape perception of subsequent stimuli experienced during social interactions, and modulates behavioral responses to these stimuli. Brain estrogens are likely to function similarly in both songbird sexes because aromatase and estrogen receptors are present in both male and female forebrain. Estrogenic modulation of perception in songbirds and perhaps other animals could fine-tune male advertising signals and female ability to discriminate them, facilitating mate selection by modulating behaviors.

  18. Fkbp52 heterozygosity alters behavioral, endocrine and neurogenetic parameters under basal and chronic stress conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jakob; Wagner, Klaus V; Dedic, Nina; Marinescu, Daria; Scharf, Sebastian H; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Deussing, Jan M; Hausch, Felix; Rein, Theo; Schmidt, Ulrike; Holsboer, Florian; Müller, Marianne B; Schmidt, Mathias V

    2012-12-01

    Aversive life events represent one of the main risk factors for the development of many psychiatric diseases, but the interplay between environmental factors and genetic predispositions is still poorly understood. One major finding in many depressed patients is an impaired regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The negative feedback loop of the HPA axis is mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor. The co-chaperones FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) and FK506-binding protein 52 (FKBP52) are components of the heat shock protein 90-receptor-heterocomplex and are functionally divergent regulators of both receptors. Here, we characterized heterozygous Fkbp52 knockout (Fkbp52(+/-)) mice under basal or chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) conditions with regard to physiological, neuroendocrine, behavioral and mRNA expression alterations. Fkbp52(+/-) mice displayed symptoms of increased stress sensitivity in a subset of behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters. These included increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze and an enhanced neuroendocrine response to a forced swim test (FST), possibly mediated by reduced GR sensitivity. At the same time, Fkbp52(+/-) mice also demonstrated signs of stress resilience in other behavioral and neuroendocrine aspects, such as reduced basal corticosterone levels and more active stress-coping behavior in the FST following CSDS. These contrasting results are in line with previous reports showing that FKBP52 is not involved in all branches of GR signaling, but rather acts in a gene-specific manner to regulate GR transcriptional activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Liao, Hong; Lucas, William J

    2014-03-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobilization and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed locally by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of developmental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to globally regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies.

  20. Opioids and endocrine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine effects of opioids used for the management of persistent pain are poorly understood by clinicians and patients, and hormone levels are rarely measured. It is recognized that opioids exert this effect via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Additional effects on adrenal hormones, weight, blood pressure and bone density may also occur. Symptoms and signs of sex hormone deficiency occur in both men and women but are under-reported and are often clinically unrecognized. The potential effects of long term opioid therapy on the endocrine system should be explained to patients before opioid therapy is commenced. Monitoring of sex hormones is recommended; if there are deficiencies opioids should be tapered and withdrawn, if this is clinically acceptable. If opioid therapy has to continue, hormone replacement therapy should be initiated and monitored by an endocrinologist. PMID:26516462

  1. Coordinated changes in hepatic amino acid metabolism and endocrine signals support hepatic glucose production during fetal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Houin, Satya S; Rozance, Paul J; Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W; Wilkening, Randall B; Thorn, Stephanie R

    2015-02-15

    Reduced fetal glucose supply, induced experimentally or as a result of placental insufficiency, produces an early activation of fetal glucose production. The mechanisms and substrates used to fuel this increased glucose production rate remain unknown. We hypothesized that in response to hypoglycemia, induced experimentally with maternal insulin infusion, the fetal liver would increase uptake of lactate and amino acids (AA), which would combine with hormonal signals to support hepatic glucose production. To test this hypothesis, metabolic studies were done in six late gestation fetal sheep to measure hepatic glucose and substrate flux before (basal) and after [days (d)1 and 4] the start of hypoglycemia. Maternal and fetal glucose concentrations decreased by 50% on d1 and d4 (P < 0.05). The liver transitioned from net glucose uptake (basal, 5.1 ± 1.5 μmol/min) to output by d4 (2.8 ± 1.4 μmol/min; P < 0.05 vs. basal). The [U-¹³C]glucose tracer molar percent excess ratio across the liver decreased over the same period (basal: 0.98 ± 0.01, vs. d4: 0.89 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Total hepatic AA uptake, but not lactate or pyruvate uptake, increased by threefold on d1 (P < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout the study. This AA uptake was driven largely by decreased glutamate output and increased glycine uptake. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin were 50% lower, while cortisol and glucagon concentrations increased 56 and 86% during hypoglycemia (P < 0.05 for basal vs. d4). Thus increased hepatic AA uptake, rather than pyruvate or lactate uptake, and decreased fetal plasma insulin and increased cortisol and glucagon concentrations occur simultaneously with increased fetal hepatic glucose output in response to fetal hypoglycemia.

  2. Coordinated changes in hepatic amino acid metabolism and endocrine signals support hepatic glucose production during fetal hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Houin, Satya S.; Rozance, Paul J.; Brown, Laura D.; Hay, William W.; Wilkening, Randall B.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced fetal glucose supply, induced experimentally or as a result of placental insufficiency, produces an early activation of fetal glucose production. The mechanisms and substrates used to fuel this increased glucose production rate remain unknown. We hypothesized that in response to hypoglycemia, induced experimentally with maternal insulin infusion, the fetal liver would increase uptake of lactate and amino acids (AA), which would combine with hormonal signals to support hepatic glucose production. To test this hypothesis, metabolic studies were done in six late gestation fetal sheep to measure hepatic glucose and substrate flux before (basal) and after [days (d)1 and 4] the start of hypoglycemia. Maternal and fetal glucose concentrations decreased by 50% on d1 and d4 (P < 0.05). The liver transitioned from net glucose uptake (basal, 5.1 ± 1.5 μmol/min) to output by d4 (2.8 ± 1.4 μmol/min; P < 0.05 vs. basal). The [U-13C]glucose tracer molar percent excess ratio across the liver decreased over the same period (basal: 0.98 ± 0.01, vs. d4: 0.89 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Total hepatic AA uptake, but not lactate or pyruvate uptake, increased by threefold on d1 (P < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout the study. This AA uptake was driven largely by decreased glutamate output and increased glycine uptake. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin were 50% lower, while cortisol and glucagon concentrations increased 56 and 86% during hypoglycemia (P < 0.05 for basal vs. d4). Thus increased hepatic AA uptake, rather than pyruvate or lactate uptake, and decreased fetal plasma insulin and increased cortisol and glucagon concentrations occur simultaneously with increased fetal hepatic glucose output in response to fetal hypoglycemia. PMID:25516551

  3. The Evolutionary Consequences of Disrupted Male Mating Signals: An Agent-Based Modelling Exploration of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in the Guppy

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Alistair McNair; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Grimm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Females may select a mate based on signalling traits that are believed to accurately correlate with heritable aspects of male quality. Anthropogenic actions, in particular chemicals released into the environment, are now disrupting the accuracy of mating signals to convey information about male quality. The long-term prediction for disrupted mating signals is most commonly loss of female preference. Yet, this prediction has rarely been tested using quantitative models. We use agent-based models to explore the effects of rapid disruption of mating signals. In our model, a gene determines survival. Males signal their level of genetic quality via a signal trait, which females use to select a mate. We allowed this system of sexual selection to become established, before introducing a disruption between the male signal trait and quality, which was similar in nature to that induced by exogenous chemicals. Finally, we assessed the capacity of the system to recover from this disruption. We found that within a relatively short time frame, disruption of mating signals led to a lasting loss of female preference. Decreases in mean viability at the population-level were also observed, because sexual-selection acting against newly arising deleterious mutations was relaxed. The ability of the population to recover from disrupted mating signals was strongly influenced by the mechanisms that promoted or maintained genetic diversity in traits under sexual selection. Our simple model demonstrates that environmental perturbations to the accuracy of male mating signals can result in a long-term loss of female preference for those signals within a few generations. What is more, the loss of this preference can have knock-on consequences for mean population fitness. PMID:25047080

  4. The evolutionary consequences of disrupted male mating signals: an agent-based modelling exploration of endocrine disrupting chemicals in the guppy.

    PubMed

    Senior, Alistair McNair; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Grimm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Females may select a mate based on signalling traits that are believed to accurately correlate with heritable aspects of male quality. Anthropogenic actions, in particular chemicals released into the environment, are now disrupting the accuracy of mating signals to convey information about male quality. The long-term prediction for disrupted mating signals is most commonly loss of female preference. Yet, this prediction has rarely been tested using quantitative models. We use agent-based models to explore the effects of rapid disruption of mating signals. In our model, a gene determines survival. Males signal their level of genetic quality via a signal trait, which females use to select a mate. We allowed this system of sexual selection to become established, before introducing a disruption between the male signal trait and quality, which was similar in nature to that induced by exogenous chemicals. Finally, we assessed the capacity of the system to recover from this disruption. We found that within a relatively short time frame, disruption of mating signals led to a lasting loss of female preference. Decreases in mean viability at the population-level were also observed, because sexual-selection acting against newly arising deleterious mutations was relaxed. The ability of the population to recover from disrupted mating signals was strongly influenced by the mechanisms that promoted or maintained genetic diversity in traits under sexual selection. Our simple model demonstrates that environmental perturbations to the accuracy of male mating signals can result in a long-term loss of female preference for those signals within a few generations. What is more, the loss of this preference can have knock-on consequences for mean population fitness.

  5. Activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the tumor stroma drives endocrine therapy-dependent breast tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Polo, María Laura; Riggio, Marina; May, María; Rodríguez, María Jimena; Perrone, María Cecilia; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Kaen, Diego; Frost, Marlene; Goetz, Matthew; Boughey, Judy; Lanari, Claudia; Radisky, Derek; Novaro, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Improved efficacy of neoadjuvant endocrine-targeting therapies in luminal breast carcinomas could be achieved with optimal use of pathway targeting agents. In a mouse model of ductal breast carcinoma we identify a tumor regressive stromal reaction that is induced by neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. This reparative reaction is characterized by tumor neovascularization accompanied by infiltration of immune cells and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts that stain for phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (pS6), downstream the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. While tumor variants with higher PI3K/Akt/mTOR activity respond well to a combination of endocrine and PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, tumor variants with lower PI3K/Akt/mTOR activity respond more poorly to the combination therapy than to the endocrine therapy alone, associated with inhibition of stromal pS6 and the reparative reaction. In human breast cancer xenografts we confirm that such differential sensitivity to therapy is primarily determined by the level of PI3K/Akt/mTOR in tumor cells. We further show that the clinical response of breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is associated with the reparative stromal reaction. We conclude that tumor level and localization of pS6 are associated with therapeutic response in breast cancer and represent biomarkers to distinguish which tumors will benefit from the incorporation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. PMID:26098779

  6. Endocrine Tumor: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Endocrine Tumor Endocrine Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Endocrine Tumor. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Endocrine Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs ...

  7. Developmental effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wildlife and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T. ); vom Saal, F.S. ); Soto, A.M. )

    1993-10-01

    Large numbers and large quantities of endoncrine-disrupting chemicals have been released into the environment since World War II. Many of these chemicals can disturb development of the endocrine system and of the organs that respond to endocrine signals in organisms indirectly exposed during prenatal and/or early postnatal life; effects of exposure during development are permanent and irreversible. The risk to the developing organism can also stem from direct exposure of the offspring after birth or hatching. In addition, trangenerational exposure can result from the exposure of the mother to a chemical at any time throughout her life before producing offspring due to persistent of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in body fat, which is mobilized during egg laying or pregnancy and lactation. Mechanisms underlying the disruption of the development of vital systems, such as the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, are discussed with reference to wildlife, laboratory animals, and humans.

  8. Reproductive status, endocrine physiology and chemical signaling in the Neotropical, swarm-founding eusocial wasp Polybia micans

    PubMed Central

    Kelstrup, Hans C.; Hartfelder, Klaus; Nascimento, Fabio S.; Riddiford, Lynn M.

    2014-01-01

    In the evolution of caste-based societies in Hymenoptera, the classical insect hormones juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids were co-opted into new functions. Social wasps, which show all levels of sociality and lifestyles, are an ideal group in which to study such functional changes. Virtually all studies on the physiological mechanisms underlying reproductive division of labor and caste functions in wasps have been done on independent-founding paper wasps, and the majority of these studies have focused on species specially adapted for overwintering. The relatively little-studied tropical swarm-founding wasps of the Epiponini (Vespidae) are a diverse group of permanently social wasps, with some species maintaining caste flexibility well into the adult phase. We investigated the behavior, reproductive status, JH and ecdysteroid titers in hemolymph, ecdysteroid content of the ovary and cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the caste-monomorphic, epiponine wasp Polybia micans Ducke. We found that the JH titer was not elevated in competing queens from established multiple-queen nests, but increased in lone queens that lack direct competition. In queenless colonies, JH titer rose transiently in young potential reproductives upon challenge by nestmates, suggesting that JH may prime the ovaries for further development. Ovarian ecdysteroids were very low in workers but higher and correlated with the number of vitellogenic oocytes in the queens. Hemolymph ecdysteroid levels were low and variable in both workers and queens. Profiles of P. micans CHCs reflected caste, age and reproductive status, but were not tightly linked to either hormone. These findings show a significant divergence in hormone function in swarm-founding wasps compared with independently founding ones. PMID:24744417

  9. Reproductive status, endocrine physiology and chemical signaling in the Neotropical, swarm-founding eusocial wasp Polybia micans.

    PubMed

    Kelstrup, Hans C; Hartfelder, Klaus; Nascimento, Fabio S; Riddiford, Lynn M

    2014-07-01

    In the evolution of caste-based societies in Hymenoptera, the classical insect hormones juvenile hormone (JH) and ecdysteroids were co-opted into new functions. Social wasps, which show all levels of sociality and lifestyles, are an ideal group in which to study such functional changes. Virtually all studies on the physiological mechanisms underlying reproductive division of labor and caste functions in wasps have been done on independent-founding paper wasps, and the majority of these studies have focused on species specially adapted for overwintering. The relatively little-studied tropical swarm-founding wasps of the Epiponini (Vespidae) are a diverse group of permanently social wasps, with some species maintaining caste flexibility well into the adult phase. We investigated the behavior, reproductive status, JH and ecdysteroid titers in hemolymph, ecdysteroid content of the ovary and cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the caste-monomorphic, epiponine wasp Polybia micans Ducke. We found that the JH titer was not elevated in competing queens from established multiple-queen nests, but increased in lone queens that lack direct competition. In queenless colonies, JH titer rose transiently in young potential reproductives upon challenge by nestmates, suggesting that JH may prime the ovaries for further development. Ovarian ecdysteroids were very low in workers but higher and correlated with the number of vitellogenic oocytes in the queens. Hemolymph ecdysteroid levels were low and variable in both workers and queens. Profiles of P. micans CHCs reflected caste, age and reproductive status, but were not tightly linked to either hormone. These findings show a significant divergence in hormone function in swarm-founding wasps compared with independently founding ones. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Forebrain circuits underlying the social modulation of vocal communication signals.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Laura E; Sun, Herie; Sakata, Jon T

    2016-01-01

    Across vertebrate species, signalers alter the structure of their communication signals based on the social context. For example, male Bengalese finches produce faster and more stereotyped songs when directing song to females (female-directed [FD] song) than when singing in isolation (undirected [UD] song), and such changes have been found to increase the attractiveness of a male's song. Despite the importance of such social influences, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the social modulation of communication signals. To this end, we analyzed differences in immediate early gene (EGR-1) expression when Bengalese finches produced FD or UD song. Relative to silent birds, EGR-1 expression was elevated in birds producing either FD or UD song throughout vocal control circuitry, including the interface nucleus of the nidopallium (NIf), HVC, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), Area X, and the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN). Moreover, EGR-1 expression was higher in HVC, RA, Area X, and LMAN in males producing UD song than in males producing FD song, indicating that social context modulated EGR-1 expression in these areas. However, EGR-1 expression was not significantly different between males producing FD or UD song in NIf, the primary vocal motor input into HVC, suggesting that context-dependent changes could arise de novo in HVC. The pattern of context-dependent differences in EGR-1 expression in the Bengalese finch was highly similar to that in the zebra finch and suggests that social context affects song structure by modulating activity throughout vocal control nuclei.

  11. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection.

    PubMed

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin

    2011-11-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent theme. In recent years substantial progress has been made towards this goal, spurred by the possibility of applying genome-wide, sequencing-based analysis. We now have a large collection of high-resolution datasets identifying locations of TSSs, protein-DNA interactions, and chromatin features over whole genomes; the field is now faced with the daunting challenge of translating these descriptive maps into quantitative and predictive models describing the underlying biology. We review here the genomic and chromatin features that underlie TSS selection and usage, focusing on the differences between the major classes of core promoters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Arterial hypertension secondary to endocrine disorders].

    PubMed

    Minder, Anna; Zulewski, Henryk

    2015-06-01

    Endocrine hypertension offers a potentially curative therapy if the underlying cause is identified and treated accordingly. In contrast to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension especially in the elderly, the classical endocrine causes remain a rare entity. Among patients with arterial hypertension the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome or pheochromocytoma is less than 1%. Primary hyperaldosteronism is more frequent with a reported prevalence of up to 9%. In order to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially harmful evaluations and therapies due to the limited sensitivity and specificity of the critical endocrine tests it is mandatory to limit the exploration for endocrine causes to preselected patients with high pretest probability for an endocrine disorder. Younger age at manifestation of arterial hypertension or drug resistant hypertension together with other clinical signs of an endocrine disorder should raise the suspicion and prompt the appropriate evaluation.

  13. Altered mental status and endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Abraham, Michael K

    2014-05-01

    Although the altered mental status is a common presentation in the emergency department, altered mental status caused by endocrine emergencies is rare. The altered patient could have an endocrine cause that can quickly improve with appropriate diagnosis and interventions. When dealing with limited information and an obtunded patient, it is important to have a broad differential diagnosis, pick up on the physical examination findings, and evaluate laboratory abnormalities that could suggest an underlying endocrine emergency. This article outlines the findings and provides a description of altered patients with endocrine emergencies to facilitate the diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department.

  14. Endocrine FGFs: Evolution, Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Konishi, Morichika

    2015-01-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family comprises 22 structurally related polypeptides that play crucial roles in neuronal functions, development, and metabolism. FGFs are classified as intracrine, paracrine, and endocrine FGFs based on their action mechanisms. Paracrine and endocrine FGFs are secreted signaling molecules by acting via cell-surface FGF receptors (FGFRs). Paracrine FGFs require heparan sulfate as a cofactor for FGFRs. In contrast, endocrine FGFs, comprising FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23, require α-Klotho or β-Klotho as a cofactor for FGFRs. Endocrine FGFs, which are specific to vertebrates, lost heparan sulfate-binding affinity and acquired a systemic signaling system with α-Klotho or β-Klotho during early vertebrate evolution. The phenotypes of endocrine FGF knockout mice indicate that they play roles in metabolism including bile acid, energy, and phosphate/active vitamin D metabolism. Accumulated evidence for the involvement of endocrine FGFs in human genetic and metabolic diseases also indicates their pathophysiological roles in metabolic diseases, potential risk factors for metabolic diseases, and useful biomarkers for metabolic diseases. The therapeutic utility of endocrine FGFs is currently being developed. These findings provide new insights into the physiological and pathophysiological roles of endocrine FGFs and potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for metabolic diseases. PMID:26483756

  15. Designing Endocrine Disruption Out of the Next Generation of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Schug, T.T; Abagyan, R.; Blumberg, B.; Collins, T.J.; Crews, D.; DeFur, P.L.; Dickerson, S.M.; Edwards, T.M.; Gore, A.C.; Guillette, L.J.; Hayes, T.; Heindel, J.J.; Moores, A.; Patisaul, H.B.; Tal, T.L.; Thayer, K.A.; Vandenberg, L.N.; Warner, J.; Watson, C.S.; Saal, F.S. vom; Zoeller, R.T.; O’Brien, K.P.; Myers, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of green chemistry is to avoid hazard in the design of new chemicals. This objective is best achieved when information about a chemical’s potential hazardous effects is obtained as early in the design process as feasible. Endocrine disruption is a type of hazard that to date has been inadequately addressed by both industrial and regulatory science. To aid chemists in avoiding this hazard, we propose an endocrine disruption testing protocol for use by chemists in the design of new chemicals. The Tiered Protocol for Endocrine Disruption (TiPED) has been created under the oversight of a scientific advisory committee composed of leading representatives from both green chemistry and the environmental health sciences. TiPED is conceived as a tool for new chemical design, thus it starts with a chemist theoretically at “the drawing board.” It consists of five testing tiers ranging from broad in silico evaluation up through specific cell- and whole organism-based assays. To be effective at detecting endocrine disruption, a testing protocol must be able to measure potential hormone-like or hormone-inhibiting effects of chemicals, as well as the many possible interactions and signaling sequellae such chemicals may have with cell-based receptors. Accordingly, we have designed this protocol to broadly interrogate the endocrine system. The proposed protocol will not detect all possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption, because scientific understanding of these phenomena is advancing rapidly. To ensure that the protocol remains current, we have established a plan for incorporating new assays into the protocol as the science advances. In this paper we present the principles that should guide the science of testing new chemicals for endocrine disruption, as well as principles by which to evaluate individual assays for applicability, and laboratories for reliability. In a ‘proof-of-principle’ test, we ran 6 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that act

  16. Designing Endocrine Disruption Out of the Next Generation of Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Schug, T T; Abagyan, R; Blumberg, B; Collins, T J; Crews, D; DeFur, P L; Dickerson, S M; Edwards, T M; Gore, A C; Guillette, L J; Hayes, T; Heindel, J J; Moores, A; Patisaul, H B; Tal, T L; Thayer, K A; Vandenberg, L N; Warner, J; Watson, C S; Saal, F S Vom; Zoeller, R T; O'Brien, K P; Myers, J P

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of green chemistry is to avoid hazard in the design of new chemicals. This objective is best achieved when information about a chemical's potential hazardous effects is obtained as early in the design process as feasible. Endocrine disruption is a type of hazard that to date has been inadequately addressed by both industrial and regulatory science. To aid chemists in avoiding this hazard, we propose an endocrine disruption testing protocol for use by chemists in the design of new chemicals. The Tiered Protocol for Endocrine Disruption (TiPED) has been created under the oversight of a scientific advisory committee composed of leading representatives from both green chemistry and the environmental health sciences. TiPED is conceived as a tool for new chemical design, thus it starts with a chemist theoretically at "the drawing board." It consists of five testing tiers ranging from broad in silico evaluation up through specific cell- and whole organism-based assays. To be effective at detecting endocrine disruption, a testing protocol must be able to measure potential hormone-like or hormone-inhibiting effects of chemicals, as well as the many possible interactions and signaling sequellae such chemicals may have with cell-based receptors. Accordingly, we have designed this protocol to broadly interrogate the endocrine system. The proposed protocol will not detect all possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption, because scientific understanding of these phenomena is advancing rapidly. To ensure that the protocol remains current, we have established a plan for incorporating new assays into the protocol as the science advances. In this paper we present the principles that should guide the science of testing new chemicals for endocrine disruption, as well as principles by which to evaluate individual assays for applicability, and laboratories for reliability. In a 'proof-of-principle' test, we ran 6 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that act via

  17. Speckle reduction based on signal decorrelation under different strain states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pai-Chi; Wu, Chi-Lin; Chen, Mei-Ju

    2001-05-01

    Low contrast detectability of diagnostic ultrasound is fundamentally limited by speckle brightness variations. Several compounding techniques have been proposed for speckle reduction by incoherently averaging partially correlated measurements. The conventional approaches obtain partially correlated measurements by imaging the same object from different spatial positions or within different frequency ranges. In this paper, a new technique based on signal decorrelation under different strain states is proposed. The different strain states can be created using external applied forces. By correcting on ly the in-plane motion, images under different strain states have identical characteristics except for speckle appearance due to the un- corrected out-of-plane motion. Therefore, these images can be combined for speckle reduction without significantly affecting the in-plane spatial resolution. Efficacy of the new compounding technique was previously tested using data acquired by a single crystal transducer. However, only the axial motion was corrected and RF data were used to estimate the displacement fields. In this paper, results are extended to full two-dimensional motion correction using post-detection images from a commercial array system. Images from human thyroids and gelatin based phantoms are investigated. It is shown that speckle brightness variation's can be effectively reduced without significant degradation in spatial resolution.

  18. [Molecular diagnostics in endocrine diseases].

    PubMed

    Berg, Jens P; Bjerknes, Robert

    2005-11-03

    Molecular diagnostic techniques provide an unsurpassed opportunity to understand the pathophysiological basis of endocrine disorders. Diseases have been associated with mutations in almost every gene known to have a role in either the production or secretion of a hormone or the mediators of hormone signalling. Even though most of these mutations are rare and account for only a small fraction of endocrine diseases, molecular diagnostics offers a valuable tool for the clinician in these cases. The most common endocrine disorders such as autoimmune thyroiditis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, growth disorders, and obesity have all major genetic components, but these are mostly unknown. In this review the clinical implications of molecular diagnostics are illustrated for some endocrine diseases: congenital adrenal hyperplasia, congenital hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone resistance, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia, growth hormone deficiency and resistance, and monogenic obesity. Improved diagnostic specificity has direct implications for treatment and follow up in these syndromes. Molecular diagnostics in endocrine tumours and diabetes are presented in two other articles in this series.

  19. Chronobiology in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Haus, Erhard

    2007-08-31

    Biological signaling occurs in a complex web with participation and interaction of the central nervous system, the autonomous nervous system, the endocrine glands, peripheral endocrine tissues including the intestinal tract and adipose tissue, and the immune system. All of these show an intricate time structure with rhythms and pulsatile variations in multiple frequencies. Circadian (about 24-hour) and circannual (about 1-year) rhythms are kept in step with the cyclic environmental surrounding by the timing and length of the daily light span. Rhythmicity of many endocrine variables is essential for their efficacy and, even in some instances, for the qualitative nature of their effects. Indeed, the continuous administration of certain hormones and their synthetic analogues may show substantially different effects than expected. In the design of drug-delivery systems and treatment schedules involving directly or indirectly the endocrine system, consideration of the human time organization is essential. A large amount of information on the endocrine time structure has accumulated, some of which is discussed in this review.

  20. Salinity and sensitivity to endocrine disrupting chemicals: A comparison of reproductive endpoints in small-bodied fish exposed under different salinities.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Thijs; Santoro, Giacomo; Melvin, Steven D

    2017-09-01

    The influence of salinity on toxicity outcomes has been demonstrated for various contaminants, but has received limited attention for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Short-term laboratory tests using small-bodied fish are an important tool for evaluating impacts of EDCs on reproduction. Tests have been developed for both freshwater and estuarine/marine species, providing an opportunity to assess whether concentrations at which small-bodied fish respond to EDCs may be influenced by salinity. We conducted a semi-quantitative review of short-term laboratory tests with small-bodied fish exposed to EDCs, including 59 studies under freshwater conditions (7 species) and 23 studies conducted under saline conditions (5 species). We focused on two model estrogens [17α-ethinylestradiol and 17β-estradiol (E2)], and three androgens (17β-trenbolone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone and 17α-methyltestosterone). The lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAECLOW) for key reproductive endpoints was recorded, including sex-steroid and vitellogenin (VTG) levels, fecundity and fertilization. In 65.2% of cases, responses occurred at lower doses under freshwater compared to saline conditions, compared to only 4.3% of cases where fish responded to lower doses under saline conditions. The potential influence of salinity was more pronounced when estrogenic compounds were considered separately, with fish responding to lower doses under fresh compared to saline conditions in 90.5% of cases. Fecundity and E2 level were identified as the most sensitive endpoints for evaluating EDCs regardless of salinity. Interestingly, female VTG levels were a sensitive endpoint under freshwater but not saline conditions. Overall, our results suggest that salinity may be an important factor influencing how small-bodied fish respond to environmental EDCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Circadian rhythms and endocrine functions in adult insects.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Hazan, Esther; Rafaeli, Ada

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral and physiological processes in adult insects are influenced by both the endocrine and circadian systems, suggesting that these two key physiological systems interact. We reviewed the literature and found that experiments explicitly testing these interactions in adult insects have only been conducted for a few species. There is a shortage of measurements of hormone titers throughout the day under constant conditions even for the juvenile hormones (JHs) and ecdysteroids, the best studied insect hormones. Nevertheless, the available measurements of hormone titers coupled with indirect evidence for circadian modulation of hormone biosynthesis rate, and the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in hormone biosynthesis, binding or degradation are consistent with the hypothesis that the circulating levels of many insect hormones are influenced by the circadian system. Whole genome microarray studies suggest that the modulation of farnesol oxidase levels is important for the circadian regulation of JH biosynthesis in honey bees, mosquitoes, and fruit flies. Several studies have begun to address the functional significance of circadian oscillations in endocrine signaling. The best understood system is the circadian regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) titers which is important for the temporal organization of sexual behavior in female moths. The evidence that the circadian and endocrine systems interact has important implications for studies of insect physiology and behavior. Additional studies on diverse species and physiological processes are needed for identifying basic principles underlying the interactions between the circadian and endocrine systems in insects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  3. On the Signals Underlying Conscious Awareness of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obhi, Sukhvinder S.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Scantlebury, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether conscious judgments of movement onset are based solely on pre-movement signals (i.e., premotor or efference copy signals) or whether sensory feedback (i.e., reafferent) signals also play a role, participants judged the onset of finger and toe movements that were either active (i.e., self initiated) or passive (i.e.,…

  4. On the Signals Underlying Conscious Awareness of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obhi, Sukhvinder S.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Scantlebury, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether conscious judgments of movement onset are based solely on pre-movement signals (i.e., premotor or efference copy signals) or whether sensory feedback (i.e., reafferent) signals also play a role, participants judged the onset of finger and toe movements that were either active (i.e., self initiated) or passive (i.e.,…

  5. Generating strain signals under consideration of road surface profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, T. E.; Abdullah, S.; Schramm, D.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Bruckmann, T.

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to develop the mechanism for generating strain signal utilising computer-based simulation. The strain data, caused by the acceleration, were undertaken from a fatigue data acquisition involving car movements. Using a mathematical model, the measured strain signals yielded to acceleration data used to describe the bumpiness of road surfaces. The acceleration signals were considered as an external disturbance on generating strain signals. Based on this comparison, both the actual and simulated strain data have similar pattern. The results are expected to provide new knowledge to generate a strain signal via a simulation.

  6. Functional Connectivity of EEG Signals Under Laser Stimulation in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    de Tommaso, Marina; Trotta, Gabriele; Vecchio, Eleonora; Ricci, Katia; Van de Steen, Frederik; Montemurno, Anna; Lorenzo, Marta; Marinazzo, Daniele; Bellotti, Roberto; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, migraine patients showed abnormalities in pain-related evoked responses, as reduced habituation to repetitive stimulation. In this study, we aimed to apply a novel analysis of EEG bands synchronization and directed dynamical influences under painful stimuli in migraine patients compared to non-migraine healthy volunteers. Thirty-one migraine without aura outpatients (MIGR) were evaluated and compared to 19 controls (CONT). The right hand was stimulated by means of 30 consecutive CO2 laser stimuli. EEG signal was examined by means of Morlet wavelet, synchronization entropy (SE), and Granger causality (GC), and the statistically validated results were mapped on the corresponding scalp locations. The vertex complex of averaged laser-evoked responses (LEPs) showed reduced habituation compared to CONT. In the prestimulus phase, enhanced SE in the 0, 5–30 Hz range was present in MIGR and CONT between the bilateral temporal–parietal and the frontal regions around the midline. Migraine patients showed an anticipation of EEG changes preceding the painful stimulation compared to CONT. In the poststimulus phase, the same cortical areas were more connected in MIGR vs CONT. In both groups of patients and CONT, the habituation index was negatively correlated with the GC scores. A different pattern of cortical activation after painful stimulation was present in migraine. The increase in cortical connections during repetitive painful stimulation may subtend the phenomenon of LEPs reduced habituation. Brain network analysis may give an aid in understanding subtle changes of pain processing under laser stimuli in migraine patients. PMID:26635589

  7. Blind signal processing algorithms under DC biased Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namyong; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Distortions caused by the DC-biased laser input can be modeled as DC biased Gaussian noise and removing DC bias is important in the demodulation process of the electrical signal in most optical communications. In this paper, a new performance criterion and a related algorithm for unsupervised equalization are proposed for communication systems in the environment of channel distortions and DC biased Gaussian noise. The proposed criterion utilizes the Euclidean distance between the Dirac-delta function located at zero on the error axis and a probability density function of biased constant modulus errors, where constant modulus error is defined by the difference between the system out and a constant modulus calculated from the transmitted symbol points. From the results obtained from the simulation under channel models with fading and DC bias noise abruptly added to background Gaussian noise, the proposed algorithm converges rapidly even after the interruption of DC bias proving that the proposed criterion can be effectively applied to optical communication systems corrupted by channel distortions and DC bias noise.

  8. Endocrine Disruption and In Vitro Ecotoxicology: Recent Advances and Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Kienle, Cornelia; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Oehlmann, Jörg

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling. Omnipresent in the environment, they can cause adverse effects in a wide range of wildlife. Accordingly, Endocrine Disruption is one focal area of ecotoxicology. Because EDCs induce complex response patterns in vivo via a wide range of mechanisms of action, in vitro techniques have been developed to reduce and understand endocrine toxicity. In this review we revisit the evidence for endocrine disruption in diverse species and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Based on this, we examine the battery of in vitro bioassays currently in use in ecotoxicological research and discuss the following key questions. Why do we use in vitro techniques? What endpoints are we looking at? Which applications are we using in vitro bioassays for? How can we put in vitro data into a broader context? And finally, what is the practical relevance of in vitro data? In critically examining these questions, we review the current state-of-the-art of in vitro (eco)toxicology, highlight important limitations and challenges, and discuss emerging trends and future research needs.

  9. The clandestine organs of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia

    2017-08-16

    This review analyzes what could be regarded as the "clandestine organs" of the endocrine system: the gut microbiome, the immune system, and the stress system. The immune system is very closely related to the endocrine system, with many intertwined processes and signals. Many researchers now consider the microbiome as an 'organ' that affects the organism at many different levels. While stress is certainly not an organ, it affects so many processes, including endocrine-related processes, that the stress response system deserved a special section in this review. Understanding the connections, effects, and feedback mechanisms between the different "clandestine organs" and the endocrine system will provide us with a better understanding of how an organism functions, as well as reinforce the idea that there are no independent organs or systems, but a complex, interacting network of molecules, cells, tissues, signaling pathways, and mechanisms that constitute an individual. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Endocrine and milt responses of male crucian carp (Carassius carassius L.) to periovulatory females under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Olsén, K H; Sawisky, G R; Stacey, N E

    2006-12-01

    Laboratory studies in domesticated goldfish (Carassius auratus) show that, during the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge, females release a complex steroidal pheromone that induces in males a rapid increase of plasma LH, which in turn increases strippable milt (sperm and seminal fluid) prior to ovulation and spawning. The objective of this study was to determine if the same phenomenon occurs in a wild congener, the crucian carp (Carassius carassius), under field conditions where fish are held in natural waters under ambient temperature and photoperiod. During the spawning season in June 2003, crucian carp were trapped in a small pond near Uppsala, Sweden, and held separately by sex in floating net pens. Addition of untreated females to male pens did not change male LH concentrations or milt volume during the 17 h sampling period. In contrast, addition of females injected with Ovaprim (to induce an LH surge and ovulation) increased male LH concentrations at all sample times (5, 9, 13, and 17h) following female addition and increased milt volumes at all but the first (5h) sample time. Similar increases in male LH and milt that also occurred when untreated females ovulated spontaneously after addition to male pens suggest it is female ovulatory condition, rather than injection of ovaprim per se, that induced male LH and milt responses. Males also increased LH and milt 9h after addition of females injected with the goldfish pheromonal steroid 4-pregnen-17,20beta-diol-3-one (17,20betaP), suggesting that similar responses to ovaprim-injected females were due, at least in part, to release of preovulatory pheromonal steroid(s). The clear and consistent effects of ovulatory females on male LH and milt, and the fact that crucian carp adapted well to confinement, ovulated spontaneously, and exhibited apparently normal spawning behavior, all suggest that this species can serve as a useful cyprinid model to study reproductive processes in natural conditions.

  11. Potential Mechanisms Underlying Intercortical Signal Regulation via Cholinergic Neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Miles A.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the cortex is extremely complex, with different areas and even different layers of a cortical column displaying different temporal patterns. A major open question is how the signals from different layers and different brain regions are coordinated in a flexible manner to support function. Here, we considered interactions between primary auditory cortex and adjacent association cortex. Using a biophysically based model, we show how top-down signals in the beta and gamma regimes can interact with a bottom-up gamma rhythm to provide regulation of signals between the cortical areas and among layers. The flow of signals depends on cholinergic modulation: with only glutamatergic drive, we show that top-down gamma rhythms may block sensory signals. In the presence of cholinergic drive, top-down beta rhythms can lift this blockade and allow signals to flow reciprocally between primary sensory and parietal cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Flexible coordination of multiple cortical areas is critical for complex cognitive functions, but how this is accomplished is not understood. Using computational models, we studied the interactions between primary auditory cortex (A1) and association cortex (Par2). Our model is capable of replicating interaction patterns observed in vitro and the simulations predict that the coordination between top-down gamma and beta rhythms is central to the gating process regulating bottom-up sensory signaling projected from A1 to Par2 and that cholinergic modulation allows this coordination to occur. PMID:26558772

  12. Removal and fate of endocrine disruptors chemicals under lab-scale postreatment stage. Removal assessment using light, oxygen and microalgae.

    PubMed

    Abargues, M R; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of light, oxygen and microalgae on micropollutants removal. The studied micropollutants were 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (OP), technical-nonylphenol (t-NP), 4-n-nonylphenol (4-NP), Bisphenol-A (BPA). In order to study the effect of the three variables on the micropollutants removal, a factorial design was developed. The experiments were carried out in four batch reactors which treated the effluent of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry was used for the measurement of the micropollutants. The results showed that light, oxygen and microalgae affected differently to the degradation ratios of each micropollutant. The results showed that under aerated conditions removal ratios higher than 91% were achieved, whereas for non-aerated conditions the removal ratios were between 50% and 80%, except for 4-NP which achieved removal ratios close to 100%. Besides, mass balance showed that the degradation processes were more important than the sorption processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  14. Integration and Modulation of Intercellular Signaling Underlying Blood Flow Control

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular resistance networks control tissue blood flow in concert with regulating arterial perfusion pressure. In response to increased metabolic demand, vasodilation arising in arteriolar networks ascends to encompass proximal feed arteries. By reducing resistance upstream, ascending vasodilation (AVD) increases blood flow into the microcirculation. Once initiated [e.g., through local activation of K+ channels in endothelial cells (ECs)], hyperpolarization is conducted through gap junctions along the endothelium. Via EC projections through the internal elastic lamina, hyperpolarization spreads into the surrounding smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJs) to promote their relaxation. Intercellular signaling through electrical signal transmission (i.e., cell-to-cell conduction) can thereby coordinate vasodilation along and among the branches of microvascular resistance networks. Perivascular sympathetic nerve fibers course through the adventitia and release norepinephrine to stimulate SMCs via α-adrenoreceptors to produce contraction. In turn, SMCs can signal ECs through MEGJs to activate K+ channels and attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction. Activation of K+ channels along the endothelium will dissipate electrical signal transmission and inhibit AVD, thereby restricting blood flow into the microcirculation while maintaining peripheral resistance and perfusion pressure. This review explores the origins and nature of intercellular signaling governing blood flow control in skeletal muscle with respect to the interplay between AVD and sympathetic innervation. Whereas these interactions are integral to physical daily activity and athletic performance, resolving the interplay between respective signaling events provides insight into how selective interventions can improve tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery during vascular disease. PMID:26368324

  15. GATA factors in endocrine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Färkkilä, Anniina; Soini, Tea; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors are structurally-related zinc finger proteins that recognize the consensus DNA sequence WGATAA (the GATA motif), an essential cis-acting element in the promoters and enhancers of many genes. These transcription factors regulate cell fate specification and differentiation in a wide array of tissues. As demonstrated by genetic analyses of mice and humans, GATA factors play pivotal roles in the development, homeostasis, and function of several endocrine organs including the adrenal cortex, ovary, pancreas, parathyroid, pituitary, and testis. Additionally, GATA factors have been shown to be mutated, overexpressed, or underexpressed in a variety of endocrine tumors (e.g., adrenocortical neoplasms, parathyroid tumors, pituitary adenomas, and sex cord stromal tumors). Emerging evidence suggests that GATA factors play a direct role in the initiation, proliferation, or propagation of certain endocrine tumors via modulation of key developmental signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis, such as the WNT/β-catenin and TGFβ pathways. Altered expression or function of GATA factors can also affect the metabolism, ploidy, and invasiveness of tumor cells. This article provides an overview of the role of GATA factors in endocrine neoplasms. Relevant animal models are highlighted. PMID:26027919

  16. Endocrine Disruptors and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Darbre, Philippa D

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarise current evidence that some environmental chemicals may be able to interfere in the endocrine regulation of energy metabolism and adipose tissue structure. Recent findings demonstrate that such endocrine-disrupting chemicals, termed "obesogens", can promote adipogenesis and cause weight gain. This includes compounds to which the human population is exposed in daily life through their use in pesticides/herbicides, industrial and household products, plastics, detergents, flame retardants and as ingredients in personal care products. Animal models and epidemiological studies have shown that an especially sensitive time for exposure is in utero or the neonatal period. In summarising the actions of obesogens, it is noteworthy that as their structures are mainly lipophilic, their ability to increase fat deposition has the added consequence of increasing the capacity for their own retention. This has the potential for a vicious spiral not only of increasing obesity but also increasing the retention of other lipophilic pollutant chemicals with an even broader range of adverse actions. This might offer an explanation as to why obesity is an underlying risk factor for so many diseases including cancer.

  17. The Effects of Nanomaterials as Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Leso, Veruscka; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nanoparticles have been increasingly used in several industrial, consumer and medical applications because of their unique physico-chemical properties. However, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that these properties are also closely associated with detrimental health effects. There is a serious lack of information on the potential nanoparticle hazard to human health, particularly on their possible toxic effects on the endocrine system. This topic is of primary importance since the disruption of endocrine functions is associated with severe adverse effects on human health. Consequently, in order to gather information on the hazardous effects of nanoparticles on endocrine organs, we reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the endocrine effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to different types of nanoparticles. Our aim was to understand the potential endocrine disrupting risks posed by nanoparticles, to assess their underlying mechanisms of action and identify areas in which further investigation is needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the role of nanoparticles as endocrine disruptors. Current data support the notion that different types of nanoparticles are capable of altering the normal and physiological activity of the endocrine system. However, a critical evaluation of these findings suggests the need to interpret these results with caution since information on potential endocrine interactions and the toxicity of nanoparticles is quite limited. PMID:23949635

  18. Metabolic syndrome - dysregulation of adipose tissue endocrine function.

    PubMed

    Horská, Kateřina; Kučerová, Jana; Suchý, Pavel; Kotolová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome, acondition increasing cardiovascular morbidity, mortality and risk for diabetes mellitus type 2, is currently worldwide reaching epidemic proportions. This complex disorder represents an urgent challenge for new pharmacotherapeutic strategies formulation. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying metabolic syndrome are not completely understood, nevertheless growing evidence is supporting the hypothesis that multiple metabolic dysregulations do contribute to its development. Apotential target for pharmacological intervention is considered to be dysregulation of adipose tissue endocrine/paracrine function. Specific adipokines, proteins secreted by the adipose tissue, with some pleiotropic effects, have been identified with strong association to regulation of energy metabolism, appetite, insulin signaling, tissue insulin sensitivity and the proinflammatory state related to metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of endocrine/paracrine functions of the adipose tissue with regard to metabolic syndrome development and pathophysiology and particular adipokines as potential targets for innovative pharmacotherapeutic approaches.

  19. Dopamine D1 signaling organizes network dynamics underlying working memory.

    PubMed

    Roffman, Joshua L; Tanner, Alexandra S; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Rodriguez-Thompson, Anais; Silverstein, Noah J; Ho, New Fei; Nitenson, Adam Z; Chonde, Daniel B; Greve, Douglas N; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Buckner, Randy L; Manoach, Dara S; Rosen, Bruce R; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-06-01

    Local prefrontal dopamine signaling supports working memory by tuning pyramidal neurons to task-relevant stimuli. Enabled by simultaneous positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI), we determined whether neuromodulatory effects of dopamine scale to the level of cortical networks and coordinate their interplay during working memory. Among network territories, mean cortical D1 receptor densities differed substantially but were strongly interrelated, suggesting cross-network regulation. Indeed, mean cortical D1 density predicted working memory-emergent decoupling of the frontoparietal and default networks, which respectively manage task-related and internal stimuli. In contrast, striatal D1 predicted opposing effects within these two networks but no between-network effects. These findings specifically link cortical dopamine signaling to network crosstalk that redirects cognitive resources to working memory, echoing neuromodulatory effects of D1 signaling on the level of cortical microcircuits.

  20. Dopamine D1 signaling organizes network dynamics underlying working memory

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, Joshua L.; Tanner, Alexandra S.; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Rodriguez-Thompson, Anais; Silverstein, Noah J.; Ho, New Fei; Nitenson, Adam Z.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Greve, Douglas N.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Buckner, Randy L.; Manoach, Dara S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-01-01

    Local prefrontal dopamine signaling supports working memory by tuning pyramidal neurons to task-relevant stimuli. Enabled by simultaneous positron emission tomography–magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI), we determined whether neuromodulatory effects of dopamine scale to the level of cortical networks and coordinate their interplay during working memory. Among network territories, mean cortical D1 receptor densities differed substantially but were strongly interrelated, suggesting cross-network regulation. Indeed, mean cortical D1 density predicted working memory–emergent decoupling of the frontoparietal and default networks, which respectively manage task-related and internal stimuli. In contrast, striatal D1 predicted opposing effects within these two networks but no between-network effects. These findings specifically link cortical dopamine signaling to network crosstalk that redirects cognitive resources to working memory, echoing neuromodulatory effects of D1 signaling on the level of cortical microcircuits. PMID:27386561

  1. Endocrine consequences of an acute stress under different thermal conditions: A study of corticosterone, prolactin, and thyroid hormones in the pigeon (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Parenteau, Charline; Ruault, Stéphanie; Angelier, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    In the context of global change, the physiological and hormonal stress responses have received much attention because of their implications in terms of allostasis. However, most studies have focused on glucocorticoids only as the "common" response to stressors while neglecting other endocrine axes and hormones (e.g. prolactin, thyroid hormones) that play a crucial role in metabolic adjustments. Interestingly, the responsiveness of all these endocrine axes to stress may depend on the energetic context and this context-dependent stress response has been overlooked so far. In the wild, temperature can vary to a large extent within a short time window and ambient temperature may affect these metabolic-related endocrine axes, and potentially, their responsiveness to an acute stressor. Here, we explicitly tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of a standardized stress protocol on multiple hormonal responses in the rock pigeon (Columbia livia). We tested the effect of an acute restraint stress on (1) corticosterone levels, (2) prolactin levels, and (3) thyroid hormone levels (triiodothyronine, thyroxine) in pigeons that were held either at cool temperature (experimental birds) or at room temperature (control birds) during the stress protocol. Although we found a significant influence of restraint stress on most hormone levels (corticosterone, prolactin, and thyroxine), triiodothyronine levels were not affected by the restraint stress. This demonstrates that stressors can have significant impact on multiple endocrine mechanisms. Importantly, all of these hormonal responses to stress were not affected by temperature, demonstrating that the exposure to cold temperature does not affect the way these hormone levels change in response to handling stress. This suggests that some endocrine responses to temperature decreases may be overridden by the endocrine responses to an acute restraint stress.

  2. Are mammal olfactory signals hiding right under our noses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apps, Peter James

    2013-06-01

    Chemical communication via olfactory semiochemicals plays a central role in the social behaviour and reproduction of mammals, but even after four decades of research, only a few mammal semiochemicals have been chemically characterized. Expectations that mammal chemical signals are coded by quantitative relationships among multiple components have persisted since the earliest studies of mammal semiochemistry, and continue to direct research strategies. Nonetheless, the chemistry of mammal excretions and secretions and the characteristics of those semiochemicals that have been identified show that mammal semiochemicals are as likely to be single compounds as to be mixtures, and are as likely to be coded by the presence and absence of chemical compounds as by their quantities. There is very scant support for the view that mammal semiochemicals code signals as specific ratios between components, and no evidence that they depend on a Gestalt or a chemical image. Of 31 semiochemicals whose chemical composition is known, 15 have a single component and 16 are coded by presence/absence, one may depend on a ratio between two compounds and none of them are chemical images. The expectation that mammal chemical signals have multiple components underpins the use of multivariate statistical analyses of chromatographic data, but the ways in which multivariate statistics are commonly used to search for active mixtures leads to single messenger compounds and signals that are sent by the presence and absence of compounds being overlooked. Research on mammal semiochemicals needs to accommodate the possibility that simple qualitative differences are no less likely than complex quantitative differences to encode chemical signals.

  3. Plasticity underlies tumor progression: Role of Nodal signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bodenstine, Thomas M.; Chandler, Grace S.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Hendrix, Mary J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily member Nodal is an established regulator of early embryonic development, with primary roles in endoderm induction, left-right asymmetry and primitive streak formation. Nodal signals through TGFβ family receptors at the plasma membrane and induces signaling cascades leading to diverse transcriptional regulation. While conceptually simple, the regulation of Nodal and its molecular effects are profoundly complex and context dependent. Pioneering work by developmental biologists has characterized the signaling pathways, regulatory components, and provided detailed insight into the mechanisms by which Nodal mediates changes at the cellular and organismal levels. Nodal is also an important factor in maintaining pluripotency of embryonic stem cells through regulation of core transcriptional programs. Collectively, this work has led to an appreciation for Nodal as a powerful morphogen capable of orchestrating multiple cellular phenotypes. Although Nodal is not active in most adult tissues, its re-expression and signaling have been linked to multiple types of human cancer, and Nodal has emerged as a driver of tumor growth and cellular plasticity. In vitro and in vivo experimental evidence has demonstrated that inhibition of Nodal signaling reduces cancer cell aggressive characteristics, while clinical data have established associations with Nodal expression and patient outcomes. As a result, there is great interest in the potential targeting of Nodal activity in a therapeutic setting for cancer patients that may provide new avenues for suppressing tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we evaluate our current understanding of the complexities of Nodal function in cancer and highlight recent experimental evidence that sheds light on the therapeutic potential of its inhibition. PMID:26951550

  4. Are mammal olfactory signals hiding right under our noses?

    PubMed

    Apps, Peter James

    2013-06-01

    Chemical communication via olfactory semiochemicals plays a central role in the social behaviour and reproduction of mammals, but even after four decades of research, only a few mammal semiochemicals have been chemically characterized. Expectations that mammal chemical signals are coded by quantitative relationships among multiple components have persisted since the earliest studies of mammal semiochemistry, and continue to direct research strategies. Nonetheless, the chemistry of mammal excretions and secretions and the characteristics of those semiochemicals that have been identified show that mammal semiochemicals are as likely to be single compounds as to be mixtures, and are as likely to be coded by the presence and absence of chemical compounds as by their quantities. There is very scant support for the view that mammal semiochemicals code signals as specific ratios between components, and no evidence that they depend on a Gestalt or a chemical image. Of 31 semiochemicals whose chemical composition is known, 15 have a single component and 16 are coded by presence/absence, one may depend on a ratio between two compounds and none of them are chemical images. The expectation that mammal chemical signals have multiple components underpins the use of multivariate statistical analyses of chromatographic data, but the ways in which multivariate statistics are commonly used to search for active mixtures leads to single messenger compounds and signals that are sent by the presence and absence of compounds being overlooked. Research on mammal semiochemicals needs to accommodate the possibility that simple qualitative differences are no less likely than complex quantitative differences to encode chemical signals.

  5. Is nitrate an ecologically relevant endocrine disruptor in vertebrates?

    PubMed

    Guillette, Louis J; Edwards, Thea M

    2005-01-01

    The last three decades have brought clear recognition that many populations of animals are experiencing severe declines or local and global extinctions. Many examples have become common knowledge to the general public, such as worldwide declines in amphibian populations and extensive loss of coral reefs. The mechanisms underlying these and other changes are poorly understood. However, a growing literature indicates that a wide array of chemical contaminants have the potential to disrupt normal cell-to-cell signaling mechanisms. A global pollutant of most aquatic systems, nitrate has the potential to be an endocrine disrupting contaminant. This paper reviews studies performed on vertebrates demonstrating that nitrate and/or nitrite have the potential to alter endocrine function. Further, a retrospective study of our work on alligators from various lakes in Florida suggests that nitrate could contribute to some of the altered endocrine parameters previously reported in juvenile animals. We propose hypotheses suggesting that nitrate could alter steroidogenesis by 1) conversion to nitrite and nitric oxide in the mitochondria, the site of initial steroid synthesis, 2) altering Cl(-) ion concentrations in the cell by substituting for Cl(-) in the membrane transport pump or 3) binding to the heme region of various P450 enzymes associated with steroidogenesis and altering enzymatic action. Future studies are needed to examine the endocrine disruptive action of this ubiquitous pollutant. A growing literature indicates that all biologists studying natural systems, whether they choose to or not, must now consider contaminant exposure as a direct influence on their studies. That is, ubiquitous global contamination has the potential to alter the endocrine, nervous and immune systems of all organisms with resulting changes in gene expression and phenotypes.

  6. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  7. Phosphodiesterases in endocrine physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2011-08-01

    The cAMP-protein kinase A pathway plays a central role in the development and physiology of endocrine tissues. cAMP mediates the intracellular effects of numerous peptide hormones. Various cellular and molecular alterations of the cAMP-signaling pathway have been observed in endocrine diseases. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are key regulatory enzymes of intracellular cAMP levels. Indeed, PDEs are the only known mechanism for inactivation of cAMP by catalysis to 5'-AMP. It has been suggested that disruption of PDEs could also have a role in the pathogenesis of many endocrine diseases. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning the role of the PDEs in the physiopathology of endocrine diseases. The potential significance of this knowledge can be easily envisaged by the development of drugs targeting specific PDEs.

  8. Circadian clock control of endocrine factors.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Karen L; Berry, Ryan; Frank, Stuart J; Young, Martin E

    2014-08-01

    Organisms experience dramatic fluctuations in demands and stresses over the course of the day. In order to maintain biological processes within physiological boundaries, mechanisms have evolved for anticipation of, and adaptation to, these daily fluctuations. Endocrine factors have an integral role in homeostasis. Not only do circulating levels of various endocrine factors oscillate over the 24 h period, but so too does responsiveness of target tissues to these signals or stimuli. Emerging evidence suggests that these daily endocrine oscillations do not occur solely in response to behavioural fluctuations associated with sleep-wake and feeding-fasting cycles, but are orchestrated by an intrinsic timekeeping mechanism known as the circadian clock. Disruption of circadian clocks by genetic and/or environmental factors seems to precipitate numerous common disorders, including the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Collectively, these observations suggest that strategies designed to realign normal circadian rhythmicities hold potential for the treatment of various endocrine-related disorders.

  9. Modeling intracellular signaling underlying striatal function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anu G; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Blackwell, Kim T; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    Striatum, which is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia, integrates cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs with dopaminergic afferents from the substantia nigra pars compacta. The combination of dopamine and glutamate strongly modulates molecular and cellular properties of striatal neurons and the strength of corticostriatal synapses. These actions are performed via intracellular signaling networks, containing several intertwined feedback loops. Understanding the role of dopamine and other neuromodulators requires the development of quantitative dynamical models for describing the intracellular signaling, in order to provide precise unambiguous descriptions and quantitative predictions. Building such models requires integration of data from multiple data sources containing information regarding the molecular interactions, the strength of these interactions, and the subcellular localization of the molecules. Due to the uncertainty, variability, and sparseness of these data, parameter estimation techniques are critical for inferring or constraining the unknown parameters, and sensitivity analysis evaluates which parameters are most critical for a given observed macroscopic behavior. Here, we briefly review the modeling approaches and tools that have been used to investigate biochemical signaling in the striatum, along with some of the models built around striatum. We also suggest a future direction for the development of such models from the, now becoming abundant, high-throughput data. PMID:24560149

  10. Signaling mechanisms underlying the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kenneth K Y; Lam, Karen S L; Wang, Baile; Xu, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing adipokine with protective effects against a cluster of obesity-related metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The adipokine exerts its insulin-sensitizing effects by alleviation of obesity-induced ectopic lipid accumulation, lipotoxicity and chronic inflammation, as well as by direct cross-talk with insulin signaling cascades. Adiponectin and insulin signaling pathways converge at the adaptor protein APPL1. On the one hand, APPL1 interacts with adiponectin receptors and mediates both metabolic and vascular actions of adiponectin through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 MAP kinase. On the other hand, APPL1 potentiates both the actions and secretion of insulin by fine-tuning the Akt activity in multiple insulin target tissues. In obese animals, reduced APPL1 expression contributes to both insulin resistance and defective insulin secretion. This review summarizes recent advances on the molecular mechanisms by which adiponectin sensitizes insulin actions, and discusses the roles of APPL1 in regulating both adiponectin and insulin signaling cascades.

  11. Commonly used endocrine drugs.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mário Miguel; Dias, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine drugs are agents directed to a malfunctioning endocrine path. Several agents are secreted in or target the nervous system, and are thus more prone to cause neurologic adverse events (AEs). This chapter focuses on commonly used endocrine agents directed to the hypothalamus-pituitary axis, thyroid, and antidiabetic agents. The therapeutic agents are discussed in terms of indication, mechanism of action, description, and frequency of AEs, and risk factors for occurrence where available. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Endocrine System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... System The major glands that make up the human endocrine system are the hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroids, adrenals, pineal body, and the reproductive glands, which include the ovaries ...

  13. Endocrine glands (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Endocrine glands release hormones (chemical messengers) into the bloodstream to be transported to various organs and tissues throughout the body. For instance, the pancreas secretes insulin, which ...

  14. Endocrine system: part 1.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  15. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  16. Viewpoint: Policy Requirements for Protecting Wildlife from Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Gwynne

    2006-01-01

    Man-made endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) present a threat to biodiversity, even in remote areas. To date, numerous wildlife species have been affected by EDCs in the environment, but it is likely that many more species are suffering effects that have not yet been reported. Impaired reproduction, damaged brain function, and deficits of the immune system are of particular concern. In order to bring all endocrine-disrupting chemicals under control, the development of screens and tests to identify EDCs must be expedited. However, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) considers that sufficient information is already available to merit action on several such substances. In addition, it must be recognized that proving the mechanism of action for some chemicals may take decades. Therefore, it is important to enable certain chemicals to be brought under stricter control on the basis of strong suspicion of endocrine disruption or biochemical signaling disruption. Furthermore, the risk assessment process itself also must be modified, and some suggestions are discussed in this article. WWF maintains that any effect that could reasonably be expected to affect the population level should be taken forward in environmental risk characterization, in particular, behavioral effects should be given more consideration. Current chemical management policies are not protective, and we argue for modifications in them to be made. PMID:16818260

  17. Neuroprotective effects of hydrogen sulfide and the underlying signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Lin; Niu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wei-Zheng; Tang, Hui-Lan; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Qi-Ming; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gas that represents a novel third gaseous signaling molecule, neurotransmitter and cytoprotectant. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase with cysteine aminotransferase (3-MST/CAT) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase with d-amino acid oxidase (3-MST/DAO) pathways are involved in the generation of endogenous H2S despite the ubiquitous or restricted distribution of those enzymes. CBS, 3-MST/CAT and 3-MST/DAO can be found in the brain, while CSE is widely located in other organs. There also exist up-taking or recycling and scavenging mechanisms in H2S metabolism to maintain its persistence for physiological function. In recent years, investigating the role that H2S plays in the central nervous system and cardiovascular system has always been a hotspot. To date, effects of H2S are at least partially verified in multiple animal models or neuron cell lines of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cerebral ischemia, major depression disorders and febrile seizure, although subsequent studies are still badly needed. This article presents an overview of current knowledge of H2S focusing on its neuroprotective effects and corresponding signaling pathways, together with connections to potential therapeutic strategies in the clinic.

  18. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The endocrine system produces hormones which are powerful natural chemicals that regulate important life processes. Endocrine disruptors are human-made chemicals distributed globally which have the potential to interfere with the endocrine system and produce serious biological e...

  19. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The endocrine system produces hormones which are powerful natural chemicals that regulate important life processes. Endocrine disruptors are human-made chemicals distributed globally which have the potential to interfere with the endocrine system and produce serious biological e...

  20. Ecological risk assessment of endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, T H; Brown, R; Brugger, K E; Campbell, P M; Holt, M; Länge, R; McCahon, P; Tattersfield, L J; van Egmond, R

    2000-01-01

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals proposes a tiered approach for the ecological risk assessment of endocrine disruptors, integrating exposure and hazard (effects) characterization. Exposure assessment for endocrine disruptors should direct specific tests for wildlife species, placing hazard data into a risk assessment context. Supplementing the suite of mammalian screens now under Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) validation, high priority should be given to developing a fish screening assay for detecting endocrine activity in oviparous species. Taking into account both exposure characterization and alerts from endocrine screening, higher tier tests are also a priority for defining adverse effects. We propose that in vivo mammalian and fish assays provide a comprehensive screening battery for diverse hormonal functions (including androgen, estrogen, and thyroid hormone), whereas Amphibia should be considered at higher tiers if there are exposure concerns. Higher tier endocrine-disruptor testing should include fish development and fish reproduction tests, whereas a full life-cycle test could be subsequently used to refine aquatic risk assessments when necessary. For avian risk assessment, the new OECD Japanese quail reproduction test guideline provides a valuable basis for developing a test to detecting endocrine-mediated reproductive effects; this species could be used, where necessary, for an avian life-cycle test. For aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, data from existing developmental and reproductive tests remain of high value for ecological risk assessment. High priority should be given to research into comparative endocrine physiology of invertebrates to support data extrapolation to this diverse fauna. PMID:11102288

  1. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies: thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Richard; Matfin, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is a common endocrine condition that may be secondary to a number of underlying processes. Thyroid storm (also known as thyroid or thyrotoxic crisis) represents the severe end of the spectrum of thyrotoxicosis and is characterized by compromised organ function. Whilst rare in the modern era, the mortality rate remains high, and prompt consideration of this endocrine emergency, with specific treatments, can improve outcomes. PMID:23148158

  2. Sensory signals in neural populations underlying tactile perception and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Antony W; Wheat, Heather E

    2004-01-01

    For humans to manipulate an object successfully, the motor control system must have accurate information about parameters such as the shape of the stimulus, its position of contact on the skin, and the magnitude and direction of contact force. The same information is required for perception during haptic exploration of an object. Much of these data are relayed by the mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the digits. Single afferent responses are modulated by all the relevant stimulus parameters. Thus, only in complete population reconstructions is it clear how each of the parameters can be signaled to the brain independently when many are changing simultaneously, as occurs in most normal movements or haptic exploration. Modeling population responses reveals how resolution is affected by neural noise and intrinsic properties of the population such as the pattern and density of innervation and the covariance of response variability.

  3. Mechanisms and pharmacogenetic signals underlying thiazide diuretics blood pressure response

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Mohamed H; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide (TZD) diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed antihypertensives globally; however their chronic blood pressure (BP) lowering mechanism remains unclear. Herein we discuss the current evidence regarding specific mechanisms regulating the antihypertensive effects of TZDs, suggesting that TZDs act via multiple complex and interacting mechanisms, including natriuresis with short term use and direct vasodilatory effects chronically. Additionally, we review pharmacogenomics signals that have been associated with TZDs BP-response in several cohorts (i.e. NEDD4L, PRKCA, EDNRA-GNAS, and YEATS4) and discuss how these genes might be related to TZD BP-response mechanism. Understanding the association between these genes and TZD BP mechanism might facilitate the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches based on a deeper understanding of the determinants of BP-response. PMID:26874237

  4. Mechanisms and pharmacogenetic signals underlying thiazide diuretics blood pressure response.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Mohamed H; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-04-01

    Thiazide (TZD) diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed antihypertensives globally; however their chronic blood pressure (BP) lowering mechanism remains unclear. Herein we discuss the current evidence regarding specific mechanisms regulating the antihypertensive effects of TZDs, suggesting that TZDs act via multiple complex and interacting mechanisms, including natriuresis with short term use and direct vasodilatory effects chronically. Additionally, we review pharmacogenomics signals that have been associated with TZDs BP-response in several cohorts (i.e. NEDD4L, PRKCA, EDNRA-GNAS, and YEATS4) and discuss how these genes might be related to TZD BP-response mechanism. Understanding the association between these genes and TZD BP mechanism might facilitate the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches based on a deeper understanding of the determinants of BP-response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The endocrine quiz.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Nagesh, V Sri

    2014-05-01

    With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject.

  6. Endocrine system and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Pediatric endocrine surgery.

    PubMed

    Telander, R L; Zimmerman, D; Kaufman, B H; van Heerden, J A

    1985-12-01

    The pediatric surgeon is in a unique position to understand endocrine surgery and, therefore, is expected to develop considerable expertise in this area. In recent years numerous advances and changes have occurred in pediatric endocrine surgery that have led to greater understanding of the disease processes and syndromes and the development of new diagnostic techniques and surgical approaches.

  8. The endocrine quiz

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Nagesh, V. Sri

    2014-01-01

    With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject. PMID:24944922

  9. Endocrine Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa Update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder with serious endocrine consequences, including dysregulation of the gonadal, adrenal, and GH axes, and severe bone loss. This Update reviews recent advances in the understanding of the endocrine dysregulation observed in this state of chronic starvation, as well as the mechanisms underlying the disease itself. Evidence Acquisition: Findings of this update are based on a PubMed search and the author's knowledge of this field. Evidence Synthesis: Recent studies have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying endocrine dysregulation in states of chronic starvation as well as the etiology of anorexia nervosa itself. This includes a more complex understanding of the pathophysiologic bases of hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, GH resistance, appetite regulation, and bone loss. Nevertheless, the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown, and effective therapies for the endocrine complications and for the disease itself are lacking. Conclusions: Despite significant progress in the field, further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia nervosa and its endocrine complications. Such investigations promise to yield important advances in the therapeutic approach to this disease as well as to the understanding of the regulation of endocrine function, skeletal biology, and appetite regulation. PMID:21976742

  10. Rare and unusual endocrine cancer syndromes with mutated genes.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-12-01

    The study of a number of rare familial syndromes associated with endocrine tumor development has led to the identification of genes involved in the development of these tumors. Major advances have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these rare endocrine tumors, resulting in the elucidation of causative genes in rare familial diseases and a better understanding of the signaling pathways implicated in endocrine cancers. Recognition of the familial syndrome associated with a particular patient's endocrine tumor has important implications in terms of prognosis, screening of family members, and screening for associated conditions.

  11. Direct observation of the dynamic process underlying allosteric signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Schanda, Paul; Kloiber, Karin; Brutscher, Bernhard; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    2009-03-04

    Allosteric regulation is an effective mechanism of control in biological processes. In allosteric proteins a signal originating at one site in the molecule is communicated through the protein structure to trigger a specific response at a remote site. Using NMR relaxation dispersion techniques we directly observe the dynamic process through which the KIX domain of CREB binding protein communicates allosteric information between binding sites. KIX mediates cooperativity between pairs of transcription factors through binding to two distinct interaction surfaces in an allosteric manner. We show that binding the activation domain of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) transcription factor to KIX induces a redistribution of the relative populations of KIX conformations toward a high-energy state in which the allosterically activated second binding site is already preformed, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (WMC) model of allostery. The structural rearrangement process that links the two conformers and by which allosteric information is communicated occurs with a time constant of 3 ms at 27 degrees C. Our dynamic NMR data reveal that an evolutionarily conserved network of hydrophobic amino acids constitutes the pathway through which information is transmitted.

  12. Effects of environmental endocrine disruptors and phytoestrogens on the kisspeptin system.

    PubMed

    Patisaul, Heather B

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones, most notably estradiol, play a pivotal role in the sex-specific organization and function of the kisspeptin system. Endocrine--disrupting compounds are anthropogenic or naturally occurring compounds that interact with steroid hormone signaling. Thus, these compounds have the potential to disrupt the sexually dimorphic ontogeny and function of kisspeptin signaling pathways, resulting in adverse effects on neuroendocrine physiology. This chapter reviews the small but growing body of evidence for endocrine disruption of the kisspeptin system by the exogenous estrogenic compounds bisphenol A, polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures, and the phytoestrogen genistein. Disruption is region, sex, and compound specific, and associated with shifts in the timing of pubertal onset, irregular estrous cycles, and altered sociosexual behavior. These effects highlight that disruption of kisspeptin signaling pathways could have wide ranging effects across multiple organ systems, and potentially underlies a suite of adverse human health trends including precocious female puberty, idiopathic infertility, and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Disruption of the endocrine control of final oocyte maturation in teleosts by xenobiotic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Final oocyte maturation (FOM) in fish and other vertebrates is under precise endocrine control and involves changes in hormone secretion at all levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several potential sites and mechanisms of chemical disruption of the endocrine system controlling FOM by are discussed. Neurotoxic chemicals such as lead and PCBs can alter monoamine neurotransmitter function and xenoestrogens can interfere with steroid feedback mechanisms at the hypothalamus and pituitary to impair the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion. Chemicals which disrupt calcium homeostasis such as cadmium can interfere with calcium-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by reproductive hormones in the pituitary and gonads. Other xenobiotics may disrupt maturation-inducing steroid (MIS) function by impairing its synthesis or receptor binding. The problems in assessing endocrine disruption of FOM are discussed. The relatively few investigations reported in the literature on endocrine disruption of FOM in fishes by chemicals indicate that organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides at concentrations less than one ppb can impair induction of FOM in response to gonadotropin and the MIS. Moreover, evidence is presented that certain organochlorine pesticides block MIS action by binding to the MIS receptor which is localized on the oocyte plasma membrane. Steroid membrane receptor function may be particularly susceptible to interference by hydrophilic chemicals. Finally, an in vitro bioassay capable of screening many chemicals simultaneously for their ability to disrupt the endocrine control of FOM is described.

  14. Interpopulational Variations in Sexual Chemical Signals of Iberian Wall Lizards May Allow Maximizing Signal Efficiency under Different Climatic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sexual signals used in intraspecific communication are expected to evolve to maximize efficacy under a given climatic condition. Thus, chemical secretions of lizards might evolve in the evolutionary time to ensure that signals are perfectly tuned to local humidity and temperature conditions affecting their volatility and therefore their persistence and transmission through the environment. We tested experimentally whether interpopulational altitudinal differences in chemical composition of femoral gland secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanicus) have evolved to maximize efficacy of chemical signals in different environmental conditions. Chemical analyses first showed that the characteristics of chemical signals of male lizards differed between two populations inhabiting environments with different climatic conditions in spite of the fact that these two populations are closely related genetically. We also examined experimentally whether the temporal attenuation of the chemical stimuli depended on simulated climatic conditions. Thus, we used tongue-flick essays to test whether female lizards were able to detect male scent marks maintained under different conditions of temperature and humidity by chemosensory cues alone. Chemosensory tests showed that chemical signals of males had a lower efficacy (i.e. detectability and persistence) when temperature and dryness increase, but that these effects were more detrimental for signals of the highest elevation population, which occupies naturally colder and more humid environments. We suggest that the abiotic environment may cause a selective pressure on the form and expression of sexual chemical signals. Therefore, interpopulational differences in chemical profiles of femoral secretions of male P. hispanicus lizards may reflect adaptation to maximize the efficacy of the chemical signal in different climates. PMID:26121693

  15. Interpopulational Variations in Sexual Chemical Signals of Iberian Wall Lizards May Allow Maximizing Signal Efficiency under Different Climatic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Martín, José; Ortega, Jesús; López, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Sexual signals used in intraspecific communication are expected to evolve to maximize efficacy under a given climatic condition. Thus, chemical secretions of lizards might evolve in the evolutionary time to ensure that signals are perfectly tuned to local humidity and temperature conditions affecting their volatility and therefore their persistence and transmission through the environment. We tested experimentally whether interpopulational altitudinal differences in chemical composition of femoral gland secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanicus) have evolved to maximize efficacy of chemical signals in different environmental conditions. Chemical analyses first showed that the characteristics of chemical signals of male lizards differed between two populations inhabiting environments with different climatic conditions in spite of the fact that these two populations are closely related genetically. We also examined experimentally whether the temporal attenuation of the chemical stimuli depended on simulated climatic conditions. Thus, we used tongue-flick essays to test whether female lizards were able to detect male scent marks maintained under different conditions of temperature and humidity by chemosensory cues alone. Chemosensory tests showed that chemical signals of males had a lower efficacy (i.e. detectability and persistence) when temperature and dryness increase, but that these effects were more detrimental for signals of the highest elevation population, which occupies naturally colder and more humid environments. We suggest that the abiotic environment may cause a selective pressure on the form and expression of sexual chemical signals. Therefore, interpopulational differences in chemical profiles of femoral secretions of male P. hispanicus lizards may reflect adaptation to maximize the efficacy of the chemical signal in different climates.

  16. Common alleles of predisposition in endocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Eng, Charis

    2010-06-01

    The identification of germline high penetrance gain-of-function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene as causative of multiple endocrine neoplasia led to accurate molecular diagnosis, predictive testing and gene-informed preventative medicine. Many syndromic endocrine neoplasias fell under this clinically utile model, although not all endocrine neoplasias were accounted for by these high penetrance predisposition genes associated with the validated practice of clinical cancer genetics. The past decade has seen the identification of low penetrance alleles for various endocrine neoplasias, including medullary and epithelial thyroid carcinomas and isolated pituitary adenomas. Functional characterisation of these effects, which range from subtle expressional or micro-RNA regulation, and the analysis of the conferred risks, which are typically low and below the threshold for medical actionability, remain scientific challenges before these may be incorporated into routine clinical practice.

  17. The signal processing architecture underlying subjective reports of sensory awareness

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, Brian; Lau, Hakwan

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between perceptual information processing and subjective perceptual experience? Empirical dissociations between stimulus identification performance and subjective reports of stimulus visibility are crucial for shedding light on this question. We replicated a finding that metacontrast masking can produce such a dissociation (Lau and Passingham, 2006), and report a novel finding that this paradigm can also dissociate stimulus identification performance from the efficacy with which visibility ratings predict task performance. We explored various hypotheses about the relationship between perceptual task performance and visibility rating by implementing them in computational models and using formal model comparison techniques to assess which ones best captured the unusual patterns in the data. The models fell into three broad categories: Single Channel models, which hold that task performance and visibility ratings are based on the same underlying source of information; Dual Channel models, which hold that there are two independent processing streams that differentially contribute to task performance and visibility rating; and Hierarchical models, which hold that a late processing stage generates visibility ratings by evaluating the quality of early perceptual processing. Taking into account the quality of data fitting and model complexity, we found that Hierarchical models perform best at capturing the observed behavioral dissociations. Because current theories of visual awareness map well onto these different model structures, a formal comparison between them is a powerful approach for arbitrating between the different theories. PMID:27499929

  18. The signal processing architecture underlying subjective reports of sensory awareness.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, Brian; Lau, Hakwan

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between perceptual information processing and subjective perceptual experience? Empirical dissociations between stimulus identification performance and subjective reports of stimulus visibility are crucial for shedding light on this question. We replicated a finding that metacontrast masking can produce such a dissociation (Lau and Passingham, 2006), and report a novel finding that this paradigm can also dissociate stimulus identification performance from the efficacy with which visibility ratings predict task performance. We explored various hypotheses about the relationship between perceptual task performance and visibility rating by implementing them in computational models and using formal model comparison techniques to assess which ones best captured the unusual patterns in the data. The models fell into three broad categories: Single Channel models, which hold that task performance and visibility ratings are based on the same underlying source of information; Dual Channel models, which hold that there are two independent processing streams that differentially contribute to task performance and visibility rating; and Hierarchical models, which hold that a late processing stage generates visibility ratings by evaluating the quality of early perceptual processing. Taking into account the quality of data fitting and model complexity, we found that Hierarchical models perform best at capturing the observed behavioral dissociations. Because current theories of visual awareness map well onto these different model structures, a formal comparison between them is a powerful approach for arbitrating between the different theories.

  19. Selenium and endocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Geoffrey J; Arthur, John R

    2005-03-01

    The trace element selenium (Se) is capable of exerting multiple actions on endocrine systems by modifying the expression of at least 30 selenoproteins, many of which have clearly defined functions. Well-characterized selenoenzymes are the families of glutathione peroxidases (GPXs), thioredoxin reductases (TRs) and iodothyronine deiodinases (Ds). These selenoenzymes are capable of modifying cell function by acting as antioxidants and modifying redox status and thyroid hormone metabolism. Se is also involved in cell growth, apoptosis and modifying the action of cell signalling systems and transcription factors. During thyroid hormone synthesis GPX1, GPX3 and TR1 are up-regulated, providing the thyrocytes with considerable protection from peroxidative damage. Thyroidal D1 in rats and both D1 and D2 in humans are also up-regulated to increase the production of bioactive 3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T3). In the basal state, GPX3 is secreted into the follicular lumen where it may down-regulate thyroid hormone synthesis by decreasing hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The deiodinases are present in most tissues and provide a mechanism whereby individual tissues may control their exposure to T3. Se is also able to modify the immune response in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Low sperm production and poor sperm quality are consistent features of Se-deficient animals. The pivotal link between Se, sperm quality and male fertility is GPX4 since the enzyme is essential to allow the production of the correct architecture of the midpiece of spermatozoa. Se also has insulin-mimetic properties, an effect that is probably brought about by stimulating the tyrosine kinases involved in the insulin signalling cascade. Furthermore, in the diabetic rat, Se not only restores glycaemic control but it also prevents or alleviates the adverse effects that diabetes has on cardiac, renal and platelet function.

  20. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eugene T.; Borski, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Compensatory growth (CG) is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. CG is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production, and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting) that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding) when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of the prerequisite of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin, and leptin. PMID:23847591

  1. The changing role of ER in endocrine resistance.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Agostina; De Angelis, Carmine; Trivedi, Meghana V; Osborne, C Kent; Schiff, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is expressed in approximately 70% of newly diagnosed breast tumors. Although endocrine therapy targeting ER is highly effective, intrinsic or acquired resistance is common, significantly jeopardizing treatment outcomes and minimizing overall survival. Even in the presence of endocrine resistance, a continued role of ER signaling is suggested by several lines of clinical and preclinical evidence. Indeed, inhibition or down-regulation of ER reduces tumor growth in preclinical models of acquired endocrine resistance, and many patients with recurrent ER+ breast tumors progressing on one type of ER-targeted treatment still benefit from sequential endocrine treatments that target ER by a different mechanism. New insights into the nature and biology of ER have revealed several mechanisms sustaining altered ER signaling in endocrine-resistant tumors, including deregulated growth factor receptor signaling that results in ligand-independent ER activation, unbalanced ER co-regulator activity, and genomic alterations involving the ER gene ESR1. Therefore, biopsies of recurrent lesions are needed to assess the changes in epi/genomics and signaling landscape of ER and associated pathways in order to tailor therapies to effectively overcome endocrine resistance. In addition, more completely abolishing the levels and activity of ER and its co-activators, in combination with selected signal transduction inhibitors or agents blocking the upstream or downstream targets of the ER pathway, may provide a better therapeutic strategy in combating endocrine resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-renewal of CD133hi cells by IL6/Notch3 signalling regulates endocrine resistance in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Berishaj, Marjan; Chang, Qing; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Perna, Fabiana; Bowman, Robert L.; Vidone, Michele; Daly, Laura; Nnoli, Jennifer; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Shih, Natalie N. C.; Feldman, Michael; Mao, Jun J.; Colameco , Christopher; Chen, Jinbo; DeMichele, Angela; Fabbri, Nicola; Healey, John H.; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Lyden, David; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of metastatic progression from hormonal therapy (HT) are largely unknown in luminal breast cancer. Here we demonstrate the enrichment of CD133hi/ERlo cancer cells in clinical specimens following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and in HT refractory metastatic disease. We develop experimental models of metastatic luminal breast cancer and demonstrate that HT can promote the generation of HT-resistant, self-renewing CD133hi/ERlo/IL6hi cancer stem cells (CSCs). HT initially abrogates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) generating self-renewal-deficient cancer cells, CD133hi/ERlo/OXPHOSlo. These cells exit metabolic dormancy via an IL6-driven feed-forward ERlo-IL6hi-Notchhi loop, activating OXPHOS, in the absence of ER activity. The inhibition of IL6R/IL6-Notch pathways switches the self-renewal of CD133hi CSCs, from an IL6/Notch-dependent one to an ER-dependent one, through the re-expression of ER. Thus, HT induces an OXPHOS metabolic editing of luminal breast cancers, paradoxically establishing HT-driven self-renewal of dormant CD133hi/ERlo cells mediating metastatic progression, which is sensitive to dual targeted therapy. PMID:26858125

  4. Self-renewal of CD133(hi) cells by IL6/Notch3 signalling regulates endocrine resistance in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Berishaj, Marjan; Chang, Qing; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Perna, Fabiana; Bowman, Robert L; Vidone, Michele; Daly, Laura; Nnoli, Jennifer; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Shih, Natalie N C; Feldman, Michael; Mao, Jun J; Colameco, Christopher; Chen, Jinbo; DeMichele, Angela; Fabbri, Nicola; Healey, John H; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Lyden, David; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2016-02-09

    The mechanisms of metastatic progression from hormonal therapy (HT) are largely unknown in luminal breast cancer. Here we demonstrate the enrichment of CD133(hi)/ER(lo) cancer cells in clinical specimens following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and in HT refractory metastatic disease. We develop experimental models of metastatic luminal breast cancer and demonstrate that HT can promote the generation of HT-resistant, self-renewing CD133(hi)/ER(lo)/IL6(hi) cancer stem cells (CSCs). HT initially abrogates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) generating self-renewal-deficient cancer cells, CD133(hi)/ER(lo)/OXPHOS(lo). These cells exit metabolic dormancy via an IL6-driven feed-forward ER(lo)-IL6(hi)-Notch(hi) loop, activating OXPHOS, in the absence of ER activity. The inhibition of IL6R/IL6-Notch pathways switches the self-renewal of CD133(hi) CSCs, from an IL6/Notch-dependent one to an ER-dependent one, through the re-expression of ER. Thus, HT induces an OXPHOS metabolic editing of luminal breast cancers, paradoxically establishing HT-driven self-renewal of dormant CD133(hi)/ER(lo) cells mediating metastatic progression, which is sensitive to dual targeted therapy.

  5. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... metabolism (how the body converts food to fuel), reproduction, growth and development, and the way your body ... body. It controls overall endocrine system functions including reproduction, stress responses, growth, lactation (production and secretion of ...

  6. Research on Endocrine Disruptors

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA researchers are developing innovative approaches, tools, models and data to improve the understanding of potential risks to human health and wildlife from chemicals that could disrupt the endocrine system.

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Leal, A M O; Foss, N T

    2009-01-01

    Leprosy is still an endemic disease, especially in Third World countries, and, because of migration, it still persists in Europe and the United States. The disease affects the peripheral nerves, skin, and multiple internal organs, making its clinical recognition difficult. In particular, the endocrine manifestations caused by leprosy have been underestimated, even by specialists. The endocrine changes present in leprosy include hypogonadism, sterility, and osteoporosis. In addition, the spectral immune nature of leprosy offers an attractive model to investigate the pathogenetic correlation between the patterns of inflammation in the poles of its spectrum and the hormonal disarrangements observed in this disease. It is important that those involved in leprosy management be aware of the potential endocrine changes and their treatment to address the disease in all of its aspects. In this article, we review the findings on endocrine dysfunction in leprosy, including a survey of the literature and of our own work.

  8. Endocrine Drugs in Aircrew

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    stresses. common endocrine diseases are diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism, nodular goiter , The human adrenal consists of an outer cortex...about 40% goiter or thyroid carcinoma. of patients with primary hypothyroidism. Insulin requirements in diabetics are frequently increased in

  9. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison’s disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet. PMID:27784959

  10. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  11. Endocrine system: part 2.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Johnstone, Carolyn

    2014-06-03

    This article, the last in the life sciences series, is the second of two articles on the endocrine system. It discusses human growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands. The relationships between hormones and their unique functions are also explored. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health to provide effective care to patients. Several disorders caused by human growth hormone or that affect the pancreas and adrenal glands are examined.

  12. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    McGown, Christine; Birerdinc, Aybike; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most important health challenges faced by developed countries and is increasingly affecting adolescents and children. Obesity is also a considerable risk factor for the development of numerous other chronic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The epidemic proportions of obesity and its numerous comorbidities are bringing into focus the highly complex and metabolically active adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is increasingly being considered as a functional endocrine organ. This article discusses the endocrine effects of adipose tissue during obesity and the systemic impact of this signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. No effect of juvenile hormone on task performance in a bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) supports an evolutionary link between endocrine signaling and social complexity.

    PubMed

    Shpigler, Hagai Y; Siegel, Adam J; Huang, Zachary Y; Bloch, Guy

    2016-09-01

    A hallmark of insect societies is a division of labor among workers specializing in different tasks. In bumblebees the division of labor is related to body size; relatively small workers are more likely to stay inside the nest and tend ("nurse") brood, whereas their larger sisters are more likely to forage. Despite their ecological and economic importance, very little is known about the endocrine regulation of division of labor in bumblebees. We studied the influence of juvenile hormone (JH) on task performance in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. We first used a radioimmunoassay to measure circulating JH titers in workers specializing in nursing and foraging activities. Next, we developed new protocols for manipulating JH titers by combining a size-adjusted topical treatment with the allatotoxin Precocene-I and replacement therapy with JH-III. Finally, we used this protocol to test the influence of JH on task performance. JH levels were either similar for nurses and foragers (three colonies), or higher in nurses (two colonies). Nurses had better developed ovaries and JH levels were typically positively correlated with ovarian state. Manipulation of JH titers influenced ovarian development and wax secretion, consistent with earlier allatectomy studies. These manipulations however, did not affect nursing or foraging activity, or the likelihood to specialize in nursing or foraging activity. These findings contrast with honeybees in which JH influences age-related division of labor but not adult female fertility. Thus, the evolution of complex societies in bees was associated with modifications in the way JH influences social behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Insect Mating Behavior: Endocrine Control of a Chemical Communication System.

    PubMed

    Barth, R H

    1965-08-20

    Experiments on several species of moths and cockroaches indicate that the production of sex pheromone (a male attractant) in virgin females is under endocrine control in some species but not in others. The presence or absence of endocrine control over pheromone production may be correlated with the type of life cycle exhibited.

  15. Acquisition technology research of EEG and related physiological signals under +Gz acceleration.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhang, T; Deng, L; Wang, B

    2014-06-01

    With the continuous improvement of maneuvering performance of modern high-performance aircraft, the protection problem of flight personnel under high G acceleration, the development as well as research on monitoring system and the equipment for human physiological signals processing which include electroencephalogram (EEG) have become more and more important. Due to the particularity of +Gz experimental conditions, the high-risk of human experiments and the great difficulty of dynamic measurement, there is little research on the synchronous acquisition technology of EEG and related physiological signals under +Gz acceleration environment. We propose a framework to execute human experiments using the three-axial high-performance human centrifuge, develop reasonable operation mode and design a new experimental research method for EEG signal acquisition and variation characteristics on three-axial high-performance human centrifuge under the environment of +Gz acceleration. We also propose to build the synchronous real-time acquisition plan of EEG, electrocardiogram, brain blood pressure, ear pulse and related physiological signals under centrifuge +Gz acceleration with different equipments and methods. The good profiles of EEG, heart rate, brain blood pressure and ear pulse are obtained and analyzed comparatively. In addition, the FMS hop-by-hop continuous blood pressure and hemodynamic measurement system Portapres are successfully applied to the ambulatory blood pressure measure under centrifuge +Gz acceleration environment. The proposed methods establish the basis and have an important guiding significance for follow-up experiment development, EEG features spectral analysis and correlation research of all signals.

  16. Endocrine causes of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P

    2003-02-01

    Although endocrinopathies are not often seen in infertile men, these disorders are clinically significant; they often have potentially serious medical significance, regardless of fertility issues. Correction of these disorders represents a possible way to restore normal fertility for the male partner. Male fertility is critically dependent upon a normal hormonal milieu. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is quite sensitive to disruption by endocrine disorders and other generalized medical disorders. Thus, male infertility is occasionally the presenting sign for significant underlying medical disease; it is important to properly evaluate these patients.

  17. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant–pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25657213

  18. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant-pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  19. The environmental endocrine disruptor p-nitrophenol interacts with FKBP51, a positive regulator of androgen receptor and inhibits androgen receptor signaling in human cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Chen, Zhi-Peng; Han, Jian-Ting; Jia, Wen-Juan; Zhu, Ning; Li, Xiangkai; Wang, Zhiping; He, Yong-Xing

    2016-04-15

    The compound p-nitrophenol, which shows the anti-androgenic activity, can easily become anthropogenic pollutants and pose a threat to the environment and human health. Previous work indicates that the anti-androgenic mechanism of p-nitrophenol is complex and may involve several components in the AR signaling pathway, but the molecular details of how p-nitrophenol inhibits AR signaling are still not quite clear. Here, we characterized p-nitrophenol binds to the FK1 domain of an AR positive regulator FKBP51 with micromolar affinity and structural analysis of FK1 domain in complex with p-nitrophenol revealed that p-nitrophenol occupies a hydrophobic FK1 pocket that is vital for AR activity enhancement. Molecular dynamics simulation indicated that p-nitrophenol is stably bound to the FK1 pocket and the hotspot residues that involved p-nitrophenol binding are mainly hydrophobic and overlap with the AR interaction site. Furthermore, we showed that p-nitrophenol inhibits the androgen-dependent growth of human prostate cancer cells, possibly through down-regulating the expression levels of AR activated downstream genes. Taken together, our data suggests that p-nitrophenol suppresses the AR signaling pathway at least in part by blocking the interaction between AR and its positive regulator FKBP51. We believe that our findings could provide new guidelines for assessing the potential health effects of p-nitrophenol.

  20. Obesity: an endocrine tumor?

    PubMed

    Dizdar, Omer; Alyamaç, Evrim

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most common disorders in clinical practice. The prevalance of obesity has increased by more than 60% since 1990. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ secreting many factors into the blood, known as adipokines, including leptin, adipsin, acylation-stimulating protein, adiponectin, etc. This article examines the hypothesis that obesity may be evaluated as an endocrine tumor, regarding its genetic basis, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes, neovascularisation within the adipose tissue associated with growth, and beneficisal metabolic effects of surgical removal of excess adipose tissue by liposuction. Assuming obesity as an endocrine tumor may bring out new treatment modalities. Liposuction as "cytoreductive surgery", antiangiogenic teraphy or anti-neoplastic drugs may be important components of obesity treatment in future.

  1. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment.

  2. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pont, Allan

    1980-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes consist of three distinct disease entities. They have in common adenomatous, carcinomatous or hyperplastic involvement of a variety of endocrine glands, and an autosomal dominant inheritance. MEN I includes hyperparathyroidism, islet cell and pituitary tumors. The components of MEN IIa are hyperparathyroidism, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. MEN IIb includes multiple neuromas, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. Effective tests are available for the early detection of components of the syndromes in potentially affected patients. Screening can lead to therapeutic intervention before clinical sequelae ensue. PMID:6247851

  3. Analysis of signals under compositional noise with applications to SONAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J. Derek; Wu, Wei; Srivastava, Anuj

    2013-07-09

    In this paper, we consider the problem of denoising and classification of SONAR signals observed under compositional noise, i.e., they have been warped randomly along the x-axis. The traditional techniques do not account for such noise and, consequently, cannot provide a robust classification of signals. We apply a recent framework that: 1) uses a distance-based objective function for data alignment and noise reduction; and 2) leads to warping-invariant distances between signals for robust clustering and classification. We use this framework to introduce two distances that can be used for signal classification: a) a y-distance, which is the distance between the aligned signals; and b) an x-distance that measures the amount of warping needed to align the signals. We focus on the task of clustering and classifying objects, using acoustic spectrum (acoustic color), which is complicated by the uncertainties in aspect angles at data collections. Small changes in the aspect angles corrupt signals in a way that amounts to compositional noise. As a result, we demonstrate the use of the developed metrics in classification of acoustic color data and highlight improvements in signal classification over current methods.

  4. Analysis of signals under compositional noise with applications to SONAR data

    DOE PAGES

    Tucker, J. Derek; Wu, Wei; Srivastava, Anuj

    2013-07-09

    In this paper, we consider the problem of denoising and classification of SONAR signals observed under compositional noise, i.e., they have been warped randomly along the x-axis. The traditional techniques do not account for such noise and, consequently, cannot provide a robust classification of signals. We apply a recent framework that: 1) uses a distance-based objective function for data alignment and noise reduction; and 2) leads to warping-invariant distances between signals for robust clustering and classification. We use this framework to introduce two distances that can be used for signal classification: a) a y-distance, which is the distance between themore » aligned signals; and b) an x-distance that measures the amount of warping needed to align the signals. We focus on the task of clustering and classifying objects, using acoustic spectrum (acoustic color), which is complicated by the uncertainties in aspect angles at data collections. Small changes in the aspect angles corrupt signals in a way that amounts to compositional noise. As a result, we demonstrate the use of the developed metrics in classification of acoustic color data and highlight improvements in signal classification over current methods.« less

  5. Environmental endocrine disruptors: New diabetogens?

    PubMed

    Fénichel, Patrick; Chevalier, Nicolas

    2017-08-18

    The prevalence of type-2 diabetes has dramatically increased worldwide during the last few decades. While lifestyle factors (sedentariness, noxious food), together with genetic susceptibility, are well-known actors, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may also play a pathophysiological role in the occurrence of metabolic diseases. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence support a role for early and chronic exposure to low doses of chemical pollutants with endocrine and metabolic disrupting effects. Most are present in the food chain and accumulate in the fat mass after absorption. In rodents, bisphenol A stimulates synthesis and secretion of pancreatic β cells and disturbs insulin signaling in liver, muscle and adipose tissue through epigenetic changes leading to insulin resistance and β cell impairment. In humans, epidemiological reports show statistical link between exposure to pesticides, polychlorinated bisphenyls, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins or aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbides or heavy metals and DT2 after acute accidental releases or early in life and/or chronic, low doses exposure. More prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the importance of such environmental risk factors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. 77 FR 12297 - Petition To Demonstrate Paperwork Reduction Act Compliance of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... endocrine system or not; (2) has practical utility before proceeding with more Tier 1 screening orders for... AGENCY Petition To Demonstrate Paperwork Reduction Act Compliance of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening... Request (ICR) of the first list of 67 chemicals to receive orders under the Endocrine Disruptor...

  7. Using short-term bioassays to evaluate the endocrine disrupting capacity of the pesticides linuron and fenoxycarb.

    PubMed

    Spirhanzlova, Petra; De Groef, Bert; Nicholson, Freda E; Grommen, Sylvia V H; Marras, Giulia; Sébillot, Anthony; Demeneix, Barbara A; Pallud-Mothré, Sophie; Lemkine, Gregory F; Tindall, Andrew J; Du Pasquier, David

    2017-10-01

    Several short-term whole-organism bioassays based on transgenic aquatic models are now under validation by the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) to become standardized test guidelines for the evaluation of the endocrine activity of substances. Evaluation of the endocrine disrupting capacity of pesticides will be a domain of applicability of these future reference tests. The herbicide linuron and the insecticide fenoxycarb are two chemicals commonly used in agricultural practices. While numerous studies indicate that linuron is likely to be an endocrine disruptor, there is little information available on the effect of fenoxycarb on vertebrate endocrine systems. Using whole-organism bioassays based on transgenic Xenopus laevis tadpoles and medaka fry we assessed the potential of fenoxycarb and linuron to disrupt thyroid, androgen and estrogen signaling. In addition we used in silico approach to simulate the affinity of these two pesticides to human hormone receptors. Linuron elicited thyroid hormone-like activity in tadpoles at all concentrations tested and, showed an anti-estrogenic activity in medaka at concentrations 2.5mg/L and higher. Our experiments suggest that, in addition to its previously established anti-androgenic action, linuron exhibits thyroid hormone-like responses, as well as acting at the estrogen receptor level to inhibit estrogen signaling. Fenoxycarb on the other hand, did not cause any changes in thyroid, androgen or estrogen signaling at the concentrations tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endocrine treatment in breast cancer: Cure, resistance and beyond.

    PubMed

    Tryfonidis, Konstantinos; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Piccart, Martine

    2016-11-01

    Hormone receptor positive breast cancer (HR-positive BC) is the most frequent BC subtype (∼70%), with endocrine treatment constituting its therapeutic cornerstone; despite its efficacy, endocrine resistance can develop, clinically as a relapse or a progression of the early or advanced disease respectively, hence necessitating alternative treatments. Over the last two decades, improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of endocrine resistance has been achieved, with numerous targeted agents undergoing clinical development. Despite the multifactorial genesis of endocrine resistance, fuelled not only by alternative oncogenic signaling pathways of tumor cells, but also by tumor microenvironment-mediated mechanisms, successful clinical development of new agents has been recently noted. However, predictive biomarkers for accurate 'navigation' across the different treatment options are urgently needed. In this article, we present a thorough overview of the different clinical scenarios of BC endocrine resistance, and the recent advances in endocrine treatment, we describe the basic molecular mediators of endocrine resistance and the respective targeted agents undergoing clinical development; finally, we provide our perspective on the future of BC endocrine treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Hedgehog signaling in bone regulates whole-body energy metabolism through a bone-adipose endocrine relay mediated by PTHrP and adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Cheng, Qianni; Wang, Yixiang; Leung, Po Sing; Mak, Kinglun Kingston

    2017-02-01

    Bone plays a role in energy metabolism, but the interplay between bone and other organs in this process is not completely understood. Here, we show that upregulated Hh signaling in bones results in increased whole-body energy expenditure, white adipose tissue (WAT) browning, hypoglycemia and skeletal muscle atrophy. We found that Hh signaling induces PTHrP secretion from bones and causes WAT browning. Injection of PTHrP-neutralizing antibody attenuates WAT browning and improves the circulating blood glucose level while high-fat diet treatment only rescues hypoglycemia. Furthermore, bone-derived PTHrP stimulates adiponectin secretion in WAT and results in systemic increase of fatty acid oxidation and glucose uptake. Mechanistically, PTHrP activates both PKA/cAMP and Akt/Foxo pathways for Ucp1 expression in WAT. PTHrP couples adiponectin actions to activate the AMPK pathway in the skeletal muscles and liver, respectively, for fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new bone-adipose hormonal relay that regulates whole-body energy metabolism.

  10. Ophthalmic clues to the endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Chen, Y; Lin, Z; Shi, X

    2017-01-01

    Eye is a vital sense organ and reflects the physical and mental wellbeing of a person. Detailed examination of the eye is an essential part in the clinical evaluation of patients with any systemic disorder. The interaction between ophthalmologists and endocrinologists is often limited to Graves' ophthalmopathy and diabetic retinopathy. However, there are many ophthalmic manifestations, which are characteristically seen in endocrine disorders. In this review, we shall discuss the ocular manifestations of the endocrine syndromes excluding the Graves' ophthalmopathy and diabetic retinopathy. We performed a PubMed search of articles published in English showing the ophthalmic features in the endocrine disorders. Relevant cited articles were also retrieved. Most of the publications included in the review were case reports and review articles. Many endocrine disorders have characteristic manifestations pertaining to the various structures of the eye. The involvement is seen from the external structures of the eye to the inner most layers of the retina. Many ocular-endocrine syndromes also exist with characteristic clues to the clinical diagnosis. The endocrinologists need to be aware of these ocular signs that help in the early diagnosis of the underlying disorder. A syndromic approach is essential in the diagnosis of endocrinopathy in patients presenting with ophthalmic features.

  11. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Stability of X-band EPR signals from fingernails under vacuum storage.

    PubMed

    Sholom, Sergey; McKeever, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    EPR signals of different origin have been tested in human finger- and toe-nails with an X-band EPR technique for different conditions of nail storage. Three different signals were identified, namely a singlet at g=2.005, a doublet at g=2.004 with a splitting constant A=1.8 mT, and an anisotropic signal at g1=2.057, g2=2.029 and g3=2.003 (positions of local extrema). All EPR spectra from nails, whether irradiated or mechanically stressed, can be described as a superposition of these three signals. The singlet is responsible for the background signal (BG), is the main component of radiation-induced signals (RIS) for low doses (100 Gy or lower) and also contributes to mechanically-induced signals (MIS). This signal is quite stable under vacuum storage, but can be reduced almost to zero by soaking in water. The behavior of this signal under ambient conditions depends on many factors, such as absorbed dose, air humidity, and ambient illumination intensity at the place of storage. The doublet arises after exposure of nails to high (few hundreds Gy and higher) doses or after mechanical stress of samples. Depending on how this signal was obtained, it may have bulk or surface locations with quite different stability properties. The surface-located doublet (generated on the nail edges during cutting or clipping) is quite unstable and decays over about two hours for samples stored at ambient conditions and within several seconds for samples immersed in water. The volume-distributed doublet decays within a few minutes in water, several hours at ambient conditions and several days in vacuum. The anisotropic signal may also be generated by both ionizing radiation and mechanical stress; this signal is quite stable in vacuum and decays over several days at ambient conditions or a few tens of minutes in water. The reference lines for the above-described three EPR signals were obtained and a procedure of spectra deconvolution was developed and tested on samples exposed to both

  13. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Tier 1 Assessments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has completed weight-of-evidence (WoE) assessments under the Endocrine Distruptor Screening Program (EDSP) for 52 pesticides included in the final list of chemicals for Tier 1 screening. See weight of evidence reports and data evaluation records.

  14. Sleep and the Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Your Endocrine System (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Endocrine System A A A en español Tu sistema endocrino ... a pea, is the "master gland" of the endocrine system. It makes and releases a bunch of hormones ...

  17. Signal transduction pathways in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z X; Li, H C; Wei, Y P; Chu, W Y; Chong, Y L; Long, X H; Liu, Z P; Qin, S; Shao, H B

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria have developed various response mechanisms in long evolution to sense and adapt to external or internal changes under abiotic stresses. The signal transduction system of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 includes mainly two-component signal transduction systems of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinases (STKs), on which most have been investigated at present. These two-component systems play a major role in regulating cell activities in cyanobacteria. More and more co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among signal transduction systems had been discovered due to increasing experimental data, and they are of great importance in corresponding to abiotic stresses. However, mechanisms of their functions remain unknown. Nevertheless, the two signal transduction systems function as an integral network for adaption in different abiotic stresses. This review summarizes available knowledge on the signal transduction network in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under various stresses, with focuses on the co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among various stress-responding signal transduction systems.

  18. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  19. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments. PMID:26473858

  20. The Endocrine Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillman, David

    1987-01-01

    Promotes a reductionist approach to teaching about the endocrine system in high school biology and anatomy courses. Encourages the study of how hormones travel to the cells and affect them. Provides suggestions for activities and discussion questions, along with sample diagrams and flow charts. (TW)

  1. The Endocrine Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillman, David

    1987-01-01

    Promotes a reductionist approach to teaching about the endocrine system in high school biology and anatomy courses. Encourages the study of how hormones travel to the cells and affect them. Provides suggestions for activities and discussion questions, along with sample diagrams and flow charts. (TW)

  2. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; its occurrence in the real world; and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. Mu...

  3. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; its occurrence in the real world; and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. Mu...

  4. [The immuno-endocrine system. A new endocrine theory: the problem of the packed transport].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2011-05-15

    Since the eighties of the last century hormone content was justified in immune cells (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells), which produce, store and secrete these hormones. Although the amount of these materials in immune cells is relatively small, the mass of the producers (immune cells) is so large, that the phenomenon must be considered from endocrinological point of view, underlying the important differences between the "classical" and immuno-endocrine systems. Cells of the classic (built-in) endocrine system are mono-producers, while immune cells can synthesize many types of hormones (polyproducers). In addition, these cells can transport the whole hormone-producing machinery to the site of need, producing a local effect. This can be observed, for example, in the case of endorphin producing immune cells during inflammation and during early pregnancy around the chorionic villi. Hormone producing immune cells also have receptors for many hormones, so that they are poly-receivers. Via hormone producing and receiving capacity there is a bidirectional connection between the neuro-endocrine and immuno-endocrine systems. In addition, there is a network inside the immuno-endocrine system. The packed transport theory attempts to explain the mechanism and importance of the immuno-endocrine system.

  5. New direction of arrival estimation of coherent signals based on reconstructing matrix under unknown mutual coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    A direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm for coherent signals in the presence of unknown mutual coupling is proposed. A group of auxiliary sensors in a uniform linear array are applied to eliminate the effects on the orthogonality of subspaces brought by mutual coupling. Then, a Toeplitz matrix, whose rank is independent of the coherency between impinging signals, is reconstructed to eliminate the rank loss of the spatial covariance matrix. Therefore, the signal and noise subspaces can be estimated properly. This method can estimate the DOAs of coherent signals under unknown mutual coupling accurately without any iteration and calibration sources. It has a low computational burden and high accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  6. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    DOEpatents

    Giese, R.W.; Wang, P.

    1996-04-30

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula shown in the accompanying diagram. 4 figs.

  7. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    DOEpatents

    Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang

    1996-01-01

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula ##STR1##

  8. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Schug, Thaddeus T.; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products– including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption. PMID:21899826

  9. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2011-11-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products--including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption.

  10. The analysis of signal-to-noise ratio of airborne LIDAR system under state of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Huang; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Yingchao; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This article gives an overview of airborne LIDAR (laser light detection and ranging) system and its application. By analyzing the transmission and reception process of laser signal, the article constructs a model of echo signal of the LIDAR system, and gives some basic formulas which make up the relationship of signal-to-noise ratio, for example, the received power, the dark noise power and so on. And this article carefully studies and analyzes the impact of some important parameters in the equation on the signal-to-noise ratio, such as the atmospheric transmittance coefficient, the work distance. And the matlab software is used to simulate the detection environment, and obtains a series values of signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio under different circumstances such as sunny day, cloudy day, day, night. And the figures which describe how the SNR of LIDAR system is influenced by the critical factors are shown in the article. Finally according to the series values of signal-to-noise ratio and the figures, the SNR of LIDAR system decreases as the distance increases, and the atmospheric transmittance coefficient caused by bad weather, and also high work temperature drops the SNR. Depending on these conclusions, the LIDAR system will work even better.

  11. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Römer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of −21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and “novelty detection” to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same “cocktail party problem,” when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one

  12. Endocrine manifestations of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Warren, Michelle P

    2011-02-01

    The endocrinopathies associated with eating disorders involve multiple systems and mechanisms designed to preserve energy and protect essential organs. Those systems that are most affected are in need of significant energy, such as the reproductive and skeletal systems. The changes in neuropeptides and in the hypothalamic axis that mediate these changes also receive input from neuroendocrine signals sensitive to satiety and food intake and in turn may be poised to provide significant energy conservation. These adaptive changes are described, including the thyroid, GH, and cortisol axes, as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Articles were found via PubMed search for both original articles and reviews summarizing current understanding of the endocrine changes of eating disorders based on peer review publications on the topic between 1974 and 2009. The signals that control weight and food intake are complex and probably involve multiple pathways that appear to have as a central control the hypothalamus, in particular the medial central area. The hypothalamic dysfunction of eating disorders provides a reversible experiment of nature that gives insight into understanding the role of various neuropeptides signaling nutritional status, feeding behavior, skeletal repair, and reproductive function.

  13. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  14. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  15. Endocrine oncology in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A; Rees, D A

    2011-12-01

    Endocrine tumours occur rarely in pregnant women but present clinicians with unique challenges. A high index of suspicion is often required to make a diagnosis since the symptoms and signs associated with many of these tumours, including insulinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma, mimic those of normal pregnancy or its complications, such as pre-eclampsia. The evidence base which informs management is very limited hence decisions on investigation and therapy must be individualised and undertaken jointly by the multidisciplinary medical team and the patient. The optimal strategy will depend on the nature and stage of the endocrine tumour, gestational stage, treatments available and patient wishes. Thus, surgical intervention, appropriately timed, may be considered in pregnancy for resectable adrenocortical carcinoma or phaeochromocytoma, but delayed until the postpartum period for well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Medical therapy may be required to reduce the drive to tumour growth, control symptoms of hormone excess and to minimise the risks of surgery, anaesthesia or labour.

  16. [Endocrine disease symptoms].

    PubMed

    Reincke, M

    2013-10-01

    Diseases of the endocrine system can be classified according to the prevalence into two categories: very frequent endocrinopathies, which affect a population of several millions in Germany and include diabetes mellitus, endemic goiter, osteoporosis and obesity. On the other hand there are a large number of rare endocrine diseases which share the paradox of other rare diseases: they are also often falsely suspected in patients who are not affected but at the same time there are sometimes long delays in diagnosis in those who do have the disease. In cases of adrenal insufficiency, absolute glucocorticoid deficiency can progress to an adrenal crisis which is fatal if not treated. Patients with de Quervain thyroiditis often suffer from prolonged episodes of fever with tender, diffuse goiter and neck pain. Pheochromocytomas should be recognized early in the course of disease because of life-threatening cardiovascular complications. This article highlights the essential characteristics in order to increase awareness.

  17. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens

    PubMed Central

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity. PMID:19433244

  18. [Xenoestrogens: endocrine disrupting compounds].

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Milena; Murias, Marek

    2008-11-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to the issues of chemicals that disrupt the normal function of endocrine system, namely xenoestrogens. These chemicals can mimic the activity of endogenous estrogens, antagonize their interaction with estrogen receptors or disrupt the synthesis, metabolism and functions of endogenous female hormones. Due to the fact that they act thanks to many different mechanisms, it is very difficult to estimate their estrogenic activity by means of a simple tests. The important issue remains the fact that xenoestrogens may have a positive or negative influence on the function of the endocrine system. It seems to be very important that there are many sources of xenoestrogens, that is not only vegetables and fruit (phytoestrogens), but also metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb), dental appliances (alkilphenols), food containers or blood containers (PVC--polyvinyl chloride, DEHP--di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), cosmetics (parabens) and pesticides (DDT--dichlor-diphenyl-trichlorethylane, endosulfane).

  19. Bromocriptine and endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Spark, R F; Dickstein, G

    1979-06-01

    Bromocriptine, a dopaminergic agonist, has been used to treat many endocrine disorders. In hyperprolactinemia associated with galactorrhea, amenorrhea, oligospermia, and impotence, bromocriptine reduces prolactin levels to normal and allows for satisfactory return of sexual and reproductive function in 90% of patients. In acromegaly, bromocriptine brings about subjective improvement in 75% of patients with reduction in growth-hormone levels to normal in 22% of patients. Bromocriptine has been used in premenstrual tension, functional infertility, Nelson's syndrome, and Cushing's disease with variable benefit. In low doses, side-effects are minimal. In higher doses, digital vasospasm and gastrointestinal bleeding have occurred. Although bromocriptine has been used in a wide variety of endocrine disorders, it appears to be most useful in treatment of male and female infertility associated with hyperprolactinemia.

  20. Pancreatic endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Asa, Sylvia L

    2011-04-01

    The endocrine cells of the pancreas and their related cells throughout the gastrointestinal tract give rise to a variety of tumors that pose a diagnostic challenge. There has been progress in understanding their histogenesis, morphology, immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and classifications. This review will focus on nomenclature/terminology, classification, the role of immunohistochemistry, molecular advances, including genetic predisposition, and potential therapeutic targets to define the role of pathology in the application of prognostic and predictive markers for this disease.

  1. Actin cytoskeleton mediates BMP2-Smad signaling via calponin 1 in preosteoblast under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Hongyu; Yang, Chao; Li, Kai; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Honghui; Liu, Yue; Ding, Bai; Tan, Yingjun; Yuan, Ming; Li, Yinghui; Dai, Zhongquan

    2017-07-01

    Microgravity influences the activity of osteoblast, induces actin microfilament disruption and leads to bone loss during spaceflight. Mechanical stress such as gravity, regulates cell function, response and differentiation through dynamic cytoskeleton changes, but the mechanotransduction mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Previous, we demonstrated actin microfilament mediated osteoblast Cbfa1 responsiveness to BMP2 under simulated microgravity (SMG). Here, we explored a potential molecular and its detailed mechanism of actin cytoskeleton functioning on BMP2-Smad signaling in MC3T3-E1 under SMG. Results showed that the actin microfilament-disrupting agent, cytochalasin B (CB), reduced BMP2-induced activation, translocation of Smad1/5/8 and Runx2 expression. SMG also inhibited BMP2-Smad signaling, which was rescued by actin cytoskeleton stabilizing agent, Jasplakinolide (JAS). Furthermore, we found that siRNA mediated knockdown of calponin 1 (CNN1), an actin binding protein, markedly promoted BMP2-Smad signaling and abolished both inhibition of CB, SMG on BMP2-Smad signaling and the rescue action of JAS. Overexpression of CNN1 inhibited the p-Smad induced by BMP2. Bidirectional Co-IP experiments demonstrated CNN1 could interacted with Smad or p-Smad protein. Furthermore, CB or SMG decreased the phosphorylated CNN1 and increased its interaction with Smad or p-Smad. Combined with the phosphorylation of CNN1 inhibites its actin binding activity, these results indicate that actin cytoskeleton depolymerization inhibites BMP2 signaling via blocking of Smad by dephosphorylated CNN1 in osteoblast cells. Thus, we provide new important insights into the mechanism of mechanotransduction under SMG condition, which probably contribute to bone formation decrease induced by SMG. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Dissecting the signaling mechanisms underlying recognition and preference of food odors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Gareth; Shen, Yu; Ha, Heonick; Donato, Alessandra; Wallis, Samuel; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-07-09

    Food is critical for survival. Many animals, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, use sensorimotor systems to detect and locate preferred food sources. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying food-choice behaviors are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the molecular signaling that regulates recognition and preference between different food odors in C. elegans. We show that the major olfactory sensory neurons, AWB and AWC, play essential roles in this behavior. A canonical Gα-protein, together with guanylate cyclases and cGMP-gated channels, is needed for the recognition of food odors. The food-odor-evoked signal is transmitted via glutamatergic neurotransmission from AWC and through AMPA and kainate-like glutamate receptor subunits. In contrast, peptidergic signaling is required to generate preference between different food odors while being dispensable for the recognition of the odors. We show that this regulation is achieved by the neuropeptide NLP-9 produced in AWB, which acts with its putative receptor NPR-18, and by the neuropeptide NLP-1 produced in AWC. In addition, another set of sensory neurons inhibits food-odor preference. These mechanistic logics, together with a previously mapped neural circuit underlying food-odor preference, provide a functional network linking sensory response, transduction, and downstream receptors to process complex olfactory information and generate the appropriate behavioral decision essential for survival.

  3. Dissecting the Signaling Mechanisms Underlying Recognition and Preference of Food Odors

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Gareth; Shen, Yu; Ha, Heonick; Donato, Alessandra; Wallis, Samuel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Food is critical for survival. Many animals, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, use sensorimotor systems to detect and locate preferred food sources. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying food-choice behaviors are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the molecular signaling that regulates recognition and preference between different food odors in C. elegans. We show that the major olfactory sensory neurons, AWB and AWC, play essential roles in this behavior. A canonical Gα-protein, together with guanylate cyclases and cGMP-gated channels, is needed for the recognition of food odors. The food-odor-evoked signal is transmitted via glutamatergic neurotransmission from AWC and through AMPA and kainate-like glutamate receptor subunits. In contrast, peptidergic signaling is required to generate preference between different food odors while being dispensable for the recognition of the odors. We show that this regulation is achieved by the neuropeptide NLP-9 produced in AWB, which acts with its putative receptor NPR-18, and by the neuropeptide NLP-1 produced in AWC. In addition, another set of sensory neurons inhibits food-odor preference. These mechanistic logics, together with a previously mapped neural circuit underlying food-odor preference, provide a functional network linking sensory response, transduction, and downstream receptors to process complex olfactory information and generate the appropriate behavioral decision essential for survival. PMID:25009271

  4. Endocrine receptors as targets for new drugs.

    PubMed

    Altman, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly detailed knowledge of cellular signalling pathways is providing a sound basis for the development of specific drugs aimed at selected components of the pathways. Many of these targets are receptors and the multitude of hormone receptors makes endocrine functions a rich proving ground for this research. This article reviews a recent meeting (Insights into Receptor Function and New Drug Development Targets; 5th Endocrinology Colloquium of the Fondation Ipsen, Paris, December 5, 2005) where progress in defining suitable targets for drug therapies in the endocrine system and in designing drugs for some of these targets was discussed. Although the family of G-protein-coupled receptors, ubiquitous in the endocrine system, was the central focus, comparisons with other receptor families were made. Many mutations affecting genes coding for receptors or other components of signalling pathways have been found in a wide range of endocrine disorders including obesity, parathyroid malfunction, disorders involving thyroid-stimulating hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, and tumours in the anterior pituitary, as well as in many types of cancer. These are being used to dissect the normal control mechanisms as well as to provide information for the development of selective drugs. Recently identified mutations that affect the intracellular traffic in newly synthesised receptors open up possibilities of another dimension of cellular regulation of signalling. Both the discovery of hormones such as apelin and its pairing with an 'orphan' receptor, and the unexpected action of a drug against cannabinoid receptors point to further levels of complexity in cardiovascular regulation. Deeper understanding of the evolution of receptor families and of the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction is enabling the design of highly specific agonists and antagonists. Pharmacological intervention is not limited to the ligand-receptor interaction but can extend to inhibition of

  5. Signal polymorphism under a constant environment: the odd cross in a web decorating spider.

    PubMed

    Walter, André; Elgar, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    The quality of many animal signals varies, perhaps through their use in different contexts or by representing an adaptive response to reduce the risk of exploitation. Spiders of the orb weaver genus Argiope add linear, cruciate or circular silk structures to their orb webs, creating inter- and intra-specific polymorphic visual signals. Different decoration patterns are frequently attributed to different signal effects, but this view is contradicted by commonly observed intraspecific variation in decorating behaviour. Adults of Argiope mascordi are bimodal web decorators, building two distinct patterns, circular and cruciate silk structures. We investigated the variation of patterns under controlled, invariant laboratory conditions. Circular decorations were most frequent, but individuals often switch to the other pattern. This variation neither increased nor decreased over time, suggesting that pattern variability is primarily intrinsic rather than an exclusive response to environmental changes. Accordingly, we discuss the evolutionary implications in the light of the conservation of a single signal function through maintaining the variation of its quality and the alternative view that silk decorations may not represent adaptive signals at all.

  6. A new approach for improving reliability of personal navigation devices under harsh GNSS signal conditions.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Anup; Bancroft, Jared B; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-11-07

    In natural and urban canyon environments, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals suffer from various challenges such as signal multipath, limited or lack of signal availability and poor geometry. Inertial sensors are often employed to improve the solution continuity under poor GNSS signal quality and availability conditions. Various fault detection schemes have been proposed in the literature to detect and remove biased GNSS measurements to obtain a more reliable navigation solution. However, many of these methods are found to be sub-optimal and often lead to unavailability of reliability measures, mostly because of the improper characterization of the measurement errors. A robust filtering architecture is thus proposed which assumes a heavy-tailed distribution for the measurement errors. Moreover, the proposed filter is capable of adapting to the changing GNSS signal conditions such as when moving from open sky conditions to deep canyons. Results obtained by processing data collected in various GNSS challenged environments show that the proposed scheme provides a robust navigation solution without having to excessively reject usable measurements. The tests reported herein show improvements of nearly 15% and 80% for position accuracy and reliability, respectively, when applying the above approach.

  7. Signal polymorphism under a constant environment: the odd cross in a web decorating spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, André; Elgar, Mark A.

    2016-12-01

    The quality of many animal signals varies, perhaps through their use in different contexts or by representing an adaptive response to reduce the risk of exploitation. Spiders of the orb weaver genus Argiope add linear, cruciate or circular silk structures to their orb webs, creating inter- and intra-specific polymorphic visual signals. Different decoration patterns are frequently attributed to different signal effects, but this view is contradicted by commonly observed intraspecific variation in decorating behaviour. Adults of Argiope mascordi are bimodal web decorators, building two distinct patterns, circular and cruciate silk structures. We investigated the variation of patterns under controlled, invariant laboratory conditions. Circular decorations were most frequent, but individuals often switch to the other pattern. This variation neither increased nor decreased over time, suggesting that pattern variability is primarily intrinsic rather than an exclusive response to environmental changes. Accordingly, we discuss the evolutionary implications in the light of the conservation of a single signal function through maintaining the variation of its quality and the alternative view that silk decorations may not represent adaptive signals at all.

  8. A New Approach for Improving Reliability of Personal Navigation Devices under Harsh GNSS Signal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Anup; Bancroft, Jared B.; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    In natural and urban canyon environments, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals suffer from various challenges such as signal multipath, limited or lack of signal availability and poor geometry. Inertial sensors are often employed to improve the solution continuity under poor GNSS signal quality and availability conditions. Various fault detection schemes have been proposed in the literature to detect and remove biased GNSS measurements to obtain a more reliable navigation solution. However, many of these methods are found to be sub-optimal and often lead to unavailability of reliability measures, mostly because of the improper characterization of the measurement errors. A robust filtering architecture is thus proposed which assumes a heavy-tailed distribution for the measurement errors. Moreover, the proposed filter is capable of adapting to the changing GNSS signal conditions such as when moving from open sky conditions to deep canyons. Results obtained by processing data collected in various GNSS challenged environments show that the proposed scheme provides a robust navigation solution without having to excessively reject usable measurements. The tests reported herein show improvements of nearly 15% and 80% for position accuracy and reliability, respectively, when applying the above approach. PMID:24212120

  9. Small signal gain measurement of liquid oxygen under different wavelength laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhe; Li, Hui; Zhou, Canhua; Liu, Jinbo; Cai, Xianglong; Hu, Shu; Gai, Baodong; Zhou, Dongjian; Liu, Dong; Guo, Jingwei; Jin, Yuqi

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen molecules existed in pairs under liquid condition, the radiation from vibrational ground state of 1 Δ state to the first vibrational excited state of 3 ∑ state was electronic dipole moment transition allowed, and a photon with wavelength of 1580 nm was emitted. In our experiment, dye laser with wavelength of 581 nm, 634 nm, 764 nm was used to excite liquid oxygen to different excited states, while a tunable OPO was used as the seeder laser, and the small signal gain was measured to be 0.23 cm-1, 0.3 cm-1 and 0.076 cm-1 respectively. The small signal gain (pump by photon of 634 nm) was significantly higher than that of common solid state lasers and chemical lasers. When the fundamental output of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used as the pump source, the corresponding small signal gain was 0.12 cm-1. The profiles of small signal gain form 1579.2 nm to 1580.8 nm were also presented. These results were consistent with theoretical calculation. The high positive gain indicated that the liquid oxygen was a potential medium for high energy laser. A comprehensive parameter optimization was still necessary in order to improve the mall signal gain.

  10. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  11. Hematologic, Biochemical, and Endocrine Parameters in Horses With Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis.

    PubMed

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer R; Baratt, Robert M; Galloway, Stephen S; Smedley, Rebecca C; Scarlett, Janet M; Refsal, Kent R; Dotzel, Allison R; Cox, Victor S; Perkins, Gillian A

    2017-09-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a frequently diagnosed condition in adult horses. The underlying etiology is still unknown. Hematologic, biochemical, and endocrine values have not been reported in EOTRH-affected horses. The main objective of the study was to describe the hematologic, biochemical, and endocrine parameters in horses with EOTRH. Descriptive cross-sectional study of client-owned animals with EOTRH. A complete blood count, biochemistry panel, and endocrine profile were performed in horses diagnosed with EOTRH. Diagnosis was based on oral and radiographic examination findings and confirmed with histopathology. Eighteen horses with EOTRH aged 10 to 32 years from various regions of the United States were sampled. The only consistent abnormality on the complete blood cell count and chemistry panel was hypoalbuminemia (88%). Endocrine parameters demonstrated no major abnormalities in the functioning of the thyroid and pituitary pars intermedia. The parathyroid hormone concentration was increased in 7 (47%) of 15 horses with an elevated 25-hydroxy vitamin D in 3 (17%) of 17 horses. Main Limitations: The main limitations of this study are the small sample size and lack of age-matched and management-matched control horses. The relevance of elevated parathyroid hormone in this study cannot be determined due to the lack of age-based controls and large population studies. With the small population evaluated in this study, there are no obvious hematological, biochemical, and endocrine changes evident. Further evaluation with signalment-matched controls will be necessary to evaluate some trends noted in the laboratory values.

  12. Central metabolic-sensing remotely controls nutrient -sensitive endocrine response in Drosophila via Sir2/Sirt1-upd2-IIS axis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kushal K; Deshpande, Rujuta S; Koppula, Pranavi; Ayyub, Champakali; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas

    2017-01-19

    Endocrine signaling is central in coupling organismal nutrient status with maintenance of systemic metabolic homeostasis. While local nutrient sensing within the insulinogenic tissue is well-studied, distant mechanisms that relay organismal nutrient status in controlling metabolic-endocrine signaling are less understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism underlying the distant regulation of metabolic endocrine response in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the communication between fat-body and insulin producing cells (IPCs), important for the secretion of dILPs, is regulated by the master metabolic sensor Sir2/Sirt1. This communication involves a fat body-specific direct regulation of the JAK/STAT cytokine upd2, by Sir2/Sirt1. We have also uncovered the importance of this regulation in coupling nutrient-inputs with dILP-secretion, and distantly controlling intestinal insulin signaling. Our results provide fundamental mechanistic insights into the top-down control involving tissues that play key roles in metabolic sensing, endocrine signaling and nutrient uptake.

  13. A steady tracking technology adopted to fast FH/BPSK signal under satellite channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, SuLi; Lou, Zhigang; Wang, XiDuo; Xia, ShuangZhi

    2015-07-01

    In order to survive under the conditions with great jamming and interference, fast frequency hopped signal are employed in satellite communication system. This paper discusses the nonlinear phases induced by the equipment and atmosphere, and their influence on the FFH/BPSK tracking loop. Two methods are developed including compensating phase which is based on channel estimation and compensating Doppler frequency based on velocity normalization. Simulation results for a real circuit with proper parameters shows that the degradation due to the demodulation of frequency-hopped is only a fraction of one dB in an AWGN environment under satellite channel.

  14. Presence of quorum sensing signal molecules in minced beef stored under various temperature and packaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Nychas, George-John E

    2014-03-03

    The presence of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-like activity was observed in meat stored under various temperatures (0, 5, 10 and 15°C) and packaging (air, modified atmospheres and modified atmospheres with oregano essential oil) conditions, and correlated with the ephemeral spoilage organisms that comprise the microbial community generally associated with this product. Quorum sensing signal molecules were found to be affected by the packaging conditions e.g. temperature and atmosphere used for meat preservation as a consequence of the development of a distinct microbial community. AHL signal molecules were detected at all incubation temperatures in minced beef samples, both stored aerobically and under modified atmospheres, when both pseudomonads and Enterobacteriaceae populations ranged from 10(7) to 10(9)CFU/g, but no signal molecules were detected in minced beef stored under modified atmospheres in the presence of volatile compounds of oregano essential oil, where both these groups failed to grow in high numbers. Additionally, no significant AI-2 activity was observed in the tested cell-free meat extracts (CFME), regardless of the indigenous bacterial populations. The presence of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-homoserine lactone was confirmed with TLC analysis of CFME.

  15. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, Susan L.; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4–stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechanosensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking. PMID:16172263

  16. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, Susan L; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2005-09-19

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4-stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechano-sensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking.

  17. Neurological Complications of Endocrine Disease.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Karen S; Grunwald, Tal; De Luca, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The endocrine system is a complex group of organs and glands that relates to multiple other organs and systems in the body with the ultimate goal of maintaining homeostasis. This complex network functions through hormones excreted by several glands and released in the blood, targeting different body tissues and modulating their function. Any primary disorders affecting the endocrine glands and altering the amount of hormones synthesized and released will lead to disruption in the functions of multiple organs. The central nervous system of a developing child is particularly sensitive to endocrine disorders. A variety of neurological manifestations have been described as features of several endocrine diseases in childhood. Their knowledge may contribute to an early diagnosis of a particular endocrine condition, especially when more typical features are not present yet. In this article, we discuss specific neurological manifestations found in various endocrine disorders in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Developmental Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors and the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Retha R.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Snyder, Ryan J.; Phillips, Terry M.; Jefferson, Wendy N.

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotic and dietary compounds with hormone-like activity can disrupt endocrine signaling pathways that play important roles during perinatal differentiation and result in alterations that are not apparent until later in life. Evidence implicates developmental exposure to environmental hormone-mimics with a growing list of health problems. Obesity is currently receiving needed attention since it has potential to overwhelm health systems worldwide with associated illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the literature that proposes an association of exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals with the development of obesity. We describe an animal model of developmental exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), a potent perinatal endocrine disruptor with estrogenic activity, to study mechanisms involved in programming an organism for obesity. This experimental animal model provides an example of the growing scientific field termed “the developmental origins of adult disease” and suggests new targets of abnormal programming by endocrine disrupting chemicals. PMID:17321108

  19. FOXO factors and breast cancer: outfoxing endocrine resistance.

    PubMed

    Bullock, M

    2016-02-01

    The majority of metastatic breast cancers cannot be cured and present a major public health problem worldwide. Approximately 70% of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor, and endocrine-based therapies have significantly improved patient outcomes. However, the development of endocrine resistance is extremely common. Understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the hormone sensitivity of breast cancer cells is important to improving the efficacy of endocrine therapy. It is becoming clearer that the PI3K-AKT-forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling axis is a key player in the hormone-independent growth of many breast cancers. Constitutive PI3K-AKT pathway activation, a driver of breast cancer growth, causes down-regulation of FOXO tumor suppressor functions. This review will summarize what is currently known about the role of FOXOs in endocrine-resistance mechanisms. It will also suggest potential therapeutic strategies for the restoration of normal FOXO transcriptional activity.

  20. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  1. Radiological imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baruah, Manash P.; Baruah, Upasana M.

    2011-01-01

    While different generations of assays have played important role in elucidating causes of different endocrine disorders, radiological techniques are instrumental in localizing the pathology. This statement cannot be truer in any disease entity other than endocrine hypertension. This review makes an effort to highlight the role of different radiological modalities, especially ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the evaluation of different causes of endocrine hypertension. PMID:22145144

  2. Endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Gail S

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence both from epidemiology studies and animal models that specific endocrine-disrupting compounds may influence the development or progression of prostate cancer. In large part, these effects appear to be linked to interference with estrogen signaling, either through interacting with ERs or by influencing steroid metabolism and altering estrogen levels within the body. In humans, epidemiologic evidence links specific pesticides, PCBs and inorganic arsenic exposures to elevated prostate cancer risk. Studies in animal models also show augmentation of prostate carcinogenesis with several other environmental estrogenic compounds including cadmium, UV filters and BPA. Importantly, there appears to be heightened sensitivity of the prostate to these endocrine disruptors during the critical developmental windows including in utero and neonatal time points as well as during puberty. Thus infants and children may be considered a highly susceptible population for ED exposures and increased risk of prostate cancers with aging. PMID:18524946

  3. Endocrine disruptors and thyroid hormone physiology.

    PubMed

    Jugan, Mary-Line; Levi, Yves; Blondeau, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine disruptors are man-made chemicals that can disrupt the synthesis, circulating levels, and peripheral action of hormones. The disruption of sex hormones was subject of intensive research, but thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling are now also recognized as important targets of endocrine disruptors. The neurological development of mammals is largely dependent on normal thyroid hormone homeostasis, and it is likely to be particularly sensitive to disruption of the thyroid axis. Here, we survey the main thyroid-disrupting chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, perchlorates, and brominated flame-retardants, that are characteristic disruptors of thyroid hormone homeostasis, and look at their suspected relationships to impaired development of the human central nervous system. The review then focuses on disrupting mechanisms known to be directly or indirectly related to the transcriptional activity of the thyroid hormone receptors.

  4. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and skin manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that have the ability to disrupt the production and actions of hormones through direct or indirect interaction with hormone receptors, thus acting as agonists or antagonists. Human health is affected after either individual occupation or dietary and environmental exposure to EDCs. On the other hand, skin is one of the largest organs of the body and its main function is protection from noxious substances. EDCs perturb the endocrine system, and they are also carcinogenic, immunotoxic, and hepatotoxic to human skin. In addition, their effects on keratinocytes, melanocytes, sebocytes, inflammatory and immunological cells, and skin stem cells produce inflammatory and allergic skin diseases, chloracne, disorders of skin pigmentation, skin cancer, and skin aging. Mechanisms, which EDCs use to induce these skin disorders are complicated, and involve the interference of endogenous hormones and most importantly the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signal pathway. Further studies on EDCs and skin diseases are necessary to elucidate these mechanisms.

  5. Do endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias?

    PubMed

    Botta, Sisir; Cunha, Gerald R; Baskin, Laurence S

    2014-12-01

    Endocrine disruptors or environmental agents, disrupt the endocrine system, leading to various adverse effects in humans and animals. Although the phenomenon has been noted historically in the cases of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), the term "endocrine disruptor" is relatively new. Endocrine disruptors can have a variety of hormonal activities such as estrogenicity or anti-androgenicity. The focus of this review concerns on the induction of hypospadias by exogenous estrogenic endocrine disruptors. This has been a particular clinical concern secondary to reported increased incidence of hypospadias. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed as to whether endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias. A literature search was performed for studies involving both humans and animals. Studies within the past 5 years were reviewed and categorized into basic science, clinical science, epidemiologic, or review studies. Forty-three scientific articles were identified. Relevant sentinel articles were also reviewed. Additional pertinent studies were extracted from the reference of the articles that obtained from initial search results. Each article was reviewed and results presented. Overall, there were no studies which definitely stated that endocrine disruptors caused hypospadias. However, there were multiple studies which implicated endocrine disruptors as one component of a multifactorial model for hypospadias. Endocrine disruption may be one of the many critical steps in aberrant development that manifests as hypospadias.

  6. Do endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias?

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Sisir; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine disruptors or environmental agents, disrupt the endocrine system, leading to various adverse effects in humans and animals. Although the phenomenon has been noted historically in the cases of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), the term “endocrine disruptor” is relatively new. Endocrine disruptors can have a variety of hormonal activities such as estrogenicity or anti-androgenicity. The focus of this review concerns on the induction of hypospadias by exogenous estrogenic endocrine disruptors. This has been a particular clinical concern secondary to reported increased incidence of hypospadias. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed as to whether endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias. Methods A literature search was performed for studies involving both humans and animals. Studies within the past 5 years were reviewed and categorized into basic science, clinical science, epidemiologic, or review studies. Results Forty-three scientific articles were identified. Relevant sentinel articles were also reviewed. Additional pertinent studies were extracted from the reference of the articles that obtained from initial search results. Each article was reviewed and results presented. Overall, there were no studies which definitely stated that endocrine disruptors caused hypospadias. However, there were multiple studies which implicated endocrine disruptors as one component of a multifactorial model for hypospadias. Conclusions Endocrine disruption may be one of the many critical steps in aberrant development that manifests as hypospadias. PMID:26816789

  7. Alcohol-Induced Disruption of Endocrine Signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article contains the proceedings of a symposium at the 2006 ISBRA Meeting in Sydney Australia, organized and co-chaired by Martin J. Ronis and Thomas M. Badger. The presentations were (1) Effects of long term ethanol consumption on liver injury and repair, by Jack R. Wands; (2) Alcohol-induced...

  8. Adaptive reception of aggregate frequency signals in an underwater acoustic communications channel under different types of interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovskii, I. V.; Rybina, M. S.; Melent'ev, V. D.; Yagotinets, V. P.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental research on a multichannel underwater acoustic communications system that increases the digital information rate by aggregate frequency signals under deepsea conditions with multipath signal propagation. Quantitative estimates of information reception quality under various types of interference are given.

  9. Ontogeny of rapid estrogen-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the rat cerebellar cortex: potent nongenomic agonist and endocrine disrupting activity of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Zsarnovszky, Attila; Le, Hoa H; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Belcher, Scott M

    2005-12-01

    In addition to regulating estrogen receptor-dependent gene expression, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) can directly influence intracellular signaling. In primary cultured cerebellar neurons, E(2) was previously shown to regulate growth and oncotic cell death via rapid stimulation of ERK1/2 signaling. Here we show that ERK1/2 signaling in the cerebellum of neonatal and mature rats was rapidly responsive to E(2) and during development to the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA). In vivo dose-response analysis for each estrogenic compound was performed by brief (6-min) intracerebellar injection, followed by rapid fixation and phosphorylation-state-specific immunohistochemistry to quantitatively characterize changes in activated ERK1/2 (pERK) immunopositive cell numbers. Beginning on postnatal d 8, E(2) significantly influenced the number of pERK-positive cells in a cell-specific manner that was dependent on concentration and age but not sex. In cerebellar granule cells on postnatal d 10, E(2) or BPA increased pERK-positive cell numbers at low doses (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) and at higher (10(-7) to 10(-6) M) concentrations. Intermediate concentrations of either estrogenic compound did not modify basal ERK signaling. Rapid E(2)-induced increases in pERK immunoreactivity were specific to the ERK1/2 pathway as demonstrated by coinjection of the mitogen-activated, ERK-activating kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U0126. Coadministration of BPA (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) with 10(-10) M E(2) dose-dependently inhibited rapid E(2)-induced ERK1/2 activation in developing cerebellar neurons. The ability of BPA to act as a highly potent E(2) mimetic and to also disrupt the rapid actions of E(2) at very low concentrations during cerebellar development highlights the potential low-dose impact of xenoestrogens on the developing brain.

  10. The Response of wnt/ ß-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Osteocytes Under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Liang, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Nan; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-11-01

    Osteocytes were considered as potential sensors of mechanical loading and orchestrate the bone remodeling adapted to mechanical loading. On the other hand, osteocytes are also considered as the unloading sensors in vivo. Previous studies showed that the mechanosensation and mechanotransduction of osteocytes may play an essential role in mediating bone response to microgravity, and one of the most important molecular signaling pathway involved in the mechanotransduction is the Wnt/ ß-catenin signaling pathway. In order to investigate the effect of simulated microgravity on the Wnt/ ß-catenin signaling pathway in osteocytes, MLO-Y4 cells (an osteocyte-like cell line) were cultured under controlled rotation to simulate microgravity for 5 days. The cytoskeleton and ß-catenin nuclear translocation of MLO-Y4 cells were detected by laser scanning confocal microscope and the fluorescence intensity was quantified; the mRNA expressions of upstream and downstream key components in Wnt canonical signaling were detected with RT-PCR. Two regulators of the Wnt/ ß-catenin pathway, NMP4/CIZ and Smads, were also investigated by RT-PCR; finally the expression of Wnt target genes and Sost protein level were detected with the absence or presence of the Sclerostin antibody (Scl-AbI) under simulated microgravity. The results showed that under simulated microgravity, (1) F-actin filaments were disassembled and some short dendritic processes appeared at the cell periphery; (2) the gene expression of Wnt3a, Wnt5a, DKK1, CyclinD1, LEF-1 and CX43 in the simulated microgravity group were significantly lower whereas Wnt1 and Sost in the simulated microgravity group were significantly higher than the control group; (3) the gene and protein level of ß-catenin were reduced, and no ß-catenin nuclear translocation observed; (4) the gene expression of Smad1, Smad4 and Smad7 were significantly lower whereas NMP4/CIZ and Smad3 in the simulated microgravity were significantly higher than the

  11. Lineage determinants in early endocrine development

    PubMed Central

    Rieck, Sebastian; Bankaitis, Eric D.; Wright, Christopher V.E.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine cells are produced from a dynamic epithelium in a process that, as in any developing organ, is driven by interacting programs of spatiotemporally regulated intercellular signals and autonomous gene regulatory networks. These algorithms work to push progenitors and their transitional intermediates through a series of railroad-station-like switching decisions to regulate flux along specific differentiation tracks. Extensive research on pancreas organogenesis over the last 20 years, greatly spurred by the potential to restore functional β-cell mass in diabetic patients by transplantation therapy, is advancing our knowledge of how endocrine lineage bias is established and allocation is promoted. The field is working towards the goal of generating a detailed blueprint of how heterogeneous cell populations interact and respond to each other, and other influences such as the extracellular matrix, to move into progressively refined and mature cell states. Here, we highlight how signaling codes and transcriptional networks might determine endocrine lineage within a complex and dynamic architecture, based largely on studies in the mouse. The process begins with the designation of multipotent progenitor cells (MPC) to pancreatic buds that subsequently move through a newly proposed period involving epithelial plexus formation-remodeling, and ends with formation of clustered endocrine islets connected to the vascular and peripheral nervous systems. Developing this knowledge base, and increasing the emphasis on direct comparisons between mouse and human, will yield a more complete and focused picture of pancreas development, and thereby inform β-cell-directed differentiation from human embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC, iPSC). Additionally, a deeper understanding may provide surprising therapeutic angles by defining conditions that allow the controllable reprogramming of endodermal or pancreatic cell populations. PMID:22728667

  12. The effects of ongoing distraction on the neural processes underlying signal detection

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Elise; De Alburquerque, Daniela; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2016-01-01

    Distraction can impede our ability to detect and effectively process task-relevant stimuli in our environment. Here we leveraged the high temporal resolution of event-related potentials (ERPs) to study the neural consequences of a global, continuous distractor on signal-detection processes. Healthy, young adults performed the dSAT task, a translational sustained-attention task that has been used across different species and in clinical groups, in the presence and absence of ongoing distracting stimulation. We found the presence of distracting stimuli impaired participants’ ability to behaviorally detect task-relevant signal stimuli and greatly affected the neural cascade of processes underlying signal detection. Specifically, we found distraction reduced an anterior and a posterior early-latency N2 ERP component (~140–220 ms) and modulated long-latency, detection-related P3 subcomponents (P3a: ~200–330 ms, P3b: 300–700 ms), even to correctly detected targets. These data provide evidence that distraction can induce powerful alterations in the neural processes related to signal detection, even when stimuli are behaviorally detected. PMID:27378439

  13. Detection and Correction of Under-/Overexposed Optical Soundtracks by Coupling Image and Audio Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Jonathan; Besserer, Bernard; Hassaine, Abdelali; Decenciere, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    Film restoration using image processing, has been an active research field during the last years. However, the restoration of the soundtrack has been mainly performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, despite the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. While the very few published approaches focus on removing dust particles or concealing larger corrupted areas, no published works are devoted to the restoration of soundtracks degraded by substantial underexposure or overexposure. Digital restoration of optical soundtracks is an unexploited application field and, besides, scientifically rich, because it allows mixing both image and signal processing approaches. After introducing the principles of optical soundtrack recording and playback, this contribution focuses on our first approaches to detect and cancel the effects of under and overexposure. We intentionally choose to get a quantification of the effect of bad exposure in the 1D audio signal domain instead of 2D image domain. Our measurement is sent as feedback value to an image processing stage where the correction takes place, building up a "digital image and audio signal" closed loop processing. The approach is validated on both simulated alterations and real data.

  14. Pervasive translational regulation of the cell signalling circuitry underlies mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kotaro; Shi, Zhen; Zhulyn, Olena; Denans, Nicolas; Barna, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The degree and dynamics of translational control during mammalian development remain poorly understood. Here we monitored translation of the mammalian genome as cells become specified and organize into tissues in vivo. This identified unexpected and pervasive translational regulation of most of the core signalling circuitry including Shh, Wnt, Hippo, PI3K and MAPK pathways. We further identify and functionally characterize a complex landscape of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) across 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) of key signalling components. Focusing on the Shh pathway, we demonstrate the importance of uORFs within the major SHH receptor, Ptch1, in control of cell signalling and neuronal differentiation. Finally, we show that the expression of hundreds of mRNAs underlying critical tissue-specific developmental processes is largely regulated at the translation but not transcript levels. Altogether, this work reveals a new layer of translational control to major signalling components and gene regulatory networks that diversifies gene expression spatially across developing tissues. PMID:28195124

  15. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response of Acupuncture via PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huili; Zhang, Xuhui; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Jing; Yang, Xinjing; Zhao, Bingcong; Zhang, Chuntao; Yu, Miao; Xu, Mingmin; Yu, Qiuyun; Liang, Xingchen; Li, Xiang; Shi, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway, contributing to impaired neurogenesis parallel to depressive-like behaviors, has been identified as the crucial factor involved in the antidepressant response of acupuncture. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with antidepressant response of acupuncture, neurogenesis, and depressive-like behaviors ameliorating remain unexplored. The objective was to identify the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response of acupuncture through PKA signaling pathway in depression rats by employing the PKA signaling pathway inhibitor H89 in in vivo experiments. Our results indicated that the expression of hippocampal PKA-α and p-CREB was significantly downregulated by chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) procedures. Importantly, acupuncture reversed the downregulation of PKA-α and p-CREB. The expression of PKA-α was upregulated by fluoxetine, but not p-CREB. No significant difference was found between Acu and FLX groups on the expression of PKA-α and p-CREB. Interestingly, H89 inhibited the effects of acupuncture or fluoxetine on upregulating the expression of p-CREB, but not PKA-α. There was no significant difference in expression of CREB among the groups. Conclusively, our findings further support the hypothesis that acupuncture could ameliorate depressive-like behaviors by regulating PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which might be mainly mediated by regulating the phosphorylation level of CREB. PMID:28523193

  16. Extraembryonic signals under the control of MGA, Max, and Smad4 are required for dorsoventral patterning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tseng, Wei-Chia; Fan, Xiang; Ball, Rebecca; Dougan, Scott T

    2014-02-10

    In vertebrates, extraembryonic tissues can act as signaling centers that impose a reproducible pattern of cell types upon the embryo. Here, we show that the zebrafish yolk syncytial layer (YSL) secretes a ventralizing signal during gastrulation. This activity is mediated by Bmp2b/Swirl (Swr) expressed under the control of Max's giant associated protein (MGA) and its binding partners, Max and Smad4. MGA coimmunoprecipitates with both Max and Smad4 in embryo extracts, and the three proteins form a complex in vitro. Furthermore, all three proteins bind to a DNA fragment upstream of the bmp2b transcription start site. Targeted depletion of MGA, its binding partners, or Bmp2b/Swr from the YSL reduces BMP signaling throughout the embryo, resulting in a mildly dorsalized phenotype. We conclude that MGA, Max, and Smad4 act in the extraembryonic YSL to initiate a positive feedback loop of Bmp signaling within the embryo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SoxB1-driven transcriptional network underlies neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signals.

    PubMed

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Ensterö, Mats; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2013-04-30

    The reiterative deployment of a small cadre of morphogen signals underlies patterning and growth of most tissues during embyogenesis, but how such inductive events result in tissue-specific responses remains poorly understood. By characterizing cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with genes regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), retinoids, or bone morphogenetic proteins in the CNS, we provide evidence that the neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signaling reflects a direct integration of these pathways with SoxB1 proteins at the CRM level. Moreover, expression of SoxB1 proteins in the limb bud confers on mesodermal cells the potential to activate neural-specific target genes upon Shh, retinoid, or bone morphogenetic protein signaling, and the collocation of binding sites for SoxB1 and morphogen-mediatory transcription factors in CRMs faithfully predicts neural-specific gene activity. Thus, an unexpectedly simple transcriptional paradigm appears to conceptually explain the neural-specific interpretation of pleiotropic signaling during vertebrate development. Importantly, genes induced in a SoxB1-dependent manner appear to constitute repressive gene regulatory networks that are directly interlinked at the CRM level to constrain the regional expression of patterning genes. Accordingly, not only does the topology of SoxB1-driven gene regulatory networks provide a tissue-specific mode of gene activation, but it also determines the spatial expression pattern of target genes within the developing neural tube.

  18. Experimental test of genuine multipartite nonlocality under the no-signalling principle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Cheng-Jie; Huang, Yun-Feng; Hou, Zhi-Bo; Liu, Bi-Heng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    Genuine multipartite nonlocality (GMN) has been recognized as the strongest form of multipartite quantum correlation. However, there exist states that cannot violate the Svetlichny inequality derived from the standard definition of GMN, even though they possess GMN properties. The reason is that the standard definition of GMN allows correlations that permit signalling among parties, which is inconsistent with an operational definition. Here, for the first time, we present an experimental test of GMN in the no-signalling scenario, with a three-photon pure state |ψs〉 and a noisy W state. The experimental results show that these states cannot violate the Svetlichny inequality. However, our results also demonstrate that they do violate a new inequality derived from the definition of GMN based on the no-signalling principle, i.e., these states can exhibit GMN under the requirement of no-signalling. Our results will be useful for the study and applications of GMN in quantum communications and quantum computation. PMID:27996055

  19. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  20. Intraspecific evolution of the intercellular signaling network underlying a robust developmental system.

    PubMed

    Milloz, Josselin; Duveau, Fabien; Nuez, Isabelle; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2008-11-01

    Many biological systems produce an invariant output when faced with stochastic or environmental variation. This robustness of system output to variation affecting the underlying process may allow for "cryptic" genetic evolution within the system without change in output. We studied variation of cell fate patterning of Caenorhabditis elegans vulva precursors, a developmental system that relies on a simple intercellular signaling network and yields an invariant output of cell fates and lineages among C. elegans wild isolates. We first investigated the system's genetic variation in C. elegans by means of genetic tools and cell ablation to break down its buffering mechanisms. We uncovered distinct architectures of quantitative variation along the Ras signaling cascade, including compensatory variation, and differences in cell sensitivity to induction along the anteroposterior axis. In the unperturbed system, we further found variation between isolates in spatio-temporal dynamics of Ras pathway activity, which can explain the phenotypic differences revealed upon perturbation. Finally, the variation mostly affects the signaling pathways in a tissue-specific manner. We thus demonstrate and characterize microevolution of a developmental signaling network. In addition, our results suggest that the vulva genetic screens would have yielded a different mutation spectrum, especially for Wnt pathway mutations, had they been performed in another C. elegans genetic background.

  1. Endocrine side effects induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Barnabei, Agnese; Marchetti, Paolo; De Vecchis, Liana; Salvatori, Roberto; Torino, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, progress has been made in cancer immunotherapy by the development of drugs acting as modulators of immune checkpoint proteins, such as the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), two co-inhibitory receptors that are expressed on T cells upon activation. These molecules play crucial roles in maintaining immune homeostasis by down-regulating T-cell signaling, thereby preventing unbridled T-cell proliferation while maintaining tolerance to self-antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens. CTLA4 blockade through systemic administration of the CTLA4-blocking antibody ipilimumab was shown to confer significant survival benefit and prolonged stable disease in patients affected by advanced cutaneous melanoma. Other immune checkpoint inhibitors are under clinical evaluation. However, immune checkpoint blockade can lead to the breaking of immune self-tolerance, thereby inducing a novel syndrome of autoimmune/autoinflammatory side effects, designated as "immune-related adverse events," mainly including rash, colitis, hepatitis, and endocrinopathies. We searched the medical literature using the words "hypophysitis," "hypopituitarism," "thyroid," "adrenal insufficiency," and "endocrine adverse events" in association with "immune checkpoint inhibitors," "ipilimumab," "tremelimumab," "PD-1," and "PD-1-L." The spectrum of endocrine disease experienced by patients treated with ipilimumab includes most commonly hypophysitis, more rarely thyroid disease or abnormalities in thyroid function tests, and occasionally primary adrenal insufficiency. Hypophysitis has emerged as a distinctive side effect of CTLA4-blocking antibodies, establishing a new form of autoimmune pituitary disease. This condition, if not promptly recognized, may be life-threatening (due to secondary hypoadrenalism). Hypopituitarism caused by these agents is rarely reversible, and prolonged or lifelong substitutive hormonal treatment is often required. The precise

  2. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  3. Spatiotemporal Properties of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Osteocytic and Osteoblastic Cell Networks under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Lu, X. Lucas; Luo, Erping; Sajda, Paul; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium (Ca2+) responses in osteocytes and osteoblasts. Successful construction of bone cell networks necessitates more elaborate and systematic analysis for the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ signaling in the networks. In the present study, an unsupervised algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) was employed to extract the Ca2+ signals of bone cells in the network. We demonstrated that the ICA-based technology could yield higher signal fidelity than the manual region of interest (ROI) method. Second, the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ signaling in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell networks under laminar and steady fluid flow stimulation were systematically analyzed and compared. MLO-Y4 cells exhibited much more active Ca2+ transients than MC3T3-E1 cells, evidenced by more Ca2+ peaks, less time to the 1st peak and less time between the 1st and 2nd peaks. With respect to temporal properties, MLO-Y4 cells demonstrated higher spike rate and Ca2+ oscillating frequency. The spatial intercellular synchronous activities of Ca2+ signaling in MLO-Y4 cell networks were higher than those in MC3T3-E1 cell networks and also negatively correlated with the intercellular distance, revealing faster Ca2+ wave propagation in MLO-Y4 cell networks. Our findings show that the unsupervised ICA-based technique results in more sensitive and quantitative signal extraction than traditional ROI analysis, with the potential to be widely employed in Ca2+ signaling extraction in the cell networks. The present study also revealed a dramatic spatiotemporal difference in Ca2+ signaling for osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks in processing the mechanical stimulus. The higher intracellular Ca2+ oscillatory behaviors and intercellular coordination of MLO-Y4 cells provided further evidences that osteocytes may behave as the major mechanical sensor in bone modeling and remodeling processes. PMID:23328496

  4. Diabetic and endocrine emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, T; Dang, C

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine emergencies constitute only a small percentage of the emergency workload of general doctors, comprising about 1.5% of all hospital admission in England in 2004–5. Most of these are diabetes related with the remaining conditions totalling a few hundred cases at most. Hence any individual doctor might not have sufficient exposure to be confident in their management. This review discusses the management of diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, hypoglycaemia, hypercalcaemia, thyroid storm, myxoedema coma, acute adrenal insufficiency, phaeochromocytoma hypertensive crisis and pituitary apoplexy in the adult population. PMID:17308209

  5. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Reports to Congress

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page includes EPA reports to congress on pesticide licensing and endocrine disruptor screening activities, Endocrine Disruptor Methods Validation Subcomittee (EDMVS) progress, and Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) implementation progress.

  6. Nile blue fluorescence signals from cut single muscle fibers under voltage or current clamp conditions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for recording extrinsic optical signals from segments of single skeletal muscle fibers under current or voltage clamp conditions. Such segments, which are cut from intact fibers, are maintained in a relaxed state, while exhbiting otherwise normal physiological properties, including healthy delayed rectifier currents. Extrinsic fluorescence changes are demonstrated, using the permeant potentiometric probe, Nile Blue A. These changes vary nonlinearly with the controlled surface membrane potential, in a manner which suggests that they arise from potential changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. According to this interpretation, a simple model based on the gating charge movement implicated in excitation-contraction coupling, provides a self-consistent description of the voltage dependence of the signal that requires no additional parameters. PMID:310445

  7. Generalized proportional integral control for periodic signals under active disturbance rejection approach.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Romero, John; Ramos, Germán A; Coral-Enriquez, Horacio

    2014-11-01

    Conventional repetitive control has proven to be an effective strategy to reject/track periodic signals with constant frequency; however, it shows poor performance in varying frequency applications. This paper proposes an active disturbance rejection methodology applied to a large class of uncertain flat systems for the tracking and rejection of periodic signals, in which the possibilities of the generalized proportional integral (GPI) observer-based control to address repetitive control problems are studied. In the proposed scheme, model uncertainties and external disturbances are lumped together in a general additive disturbance input that is estimated and rejected on-line. An illustrative case study of mechatronic nature is considered. Experimental results show that the proposed GPI observer-based control successfully rejects periodic disturbances even under varying speed conditions.

  8. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  9. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  10. Immunologic endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Eisenbarth, George S

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA-like molecules determining tissue-specific targeting that, with the loss of tolerance, leads to organ-specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Graves disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Addison disease, and many others result from autoimmune-mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in patients with type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. Although therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunologic Endocrine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Aaron W.; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-like molecules determining tissue specific targeting that with the loss of tolerance leads to organ specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Addison's disease, and many others result from autoimmune mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. While therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. PMID:20176260

  12. Cytosolic calcium and pH signaling in plants under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Kader, Md Abdul; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2010-03-01

    Calcium is one of the essential nutrients for growth and development of plants. It is an important component of various structures in cell wall and membranes. Besides some fundamental roles under normal condition, calcium functions as a major secondary-messenger molecule in plants under different developmental cues and various stress conditions including salinity stress. Also changes in cytosolic pH, pH(cyt), either individually, or in coordination with changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, [Ca(2+)](cyt), evoke a wide range of cellular functions in plants including signal transduction in plant-defense responses against stresses. It is believed that salinity stress, like other stresses, is perceived at cell membrane, either extra cellular or intracellular, which then triggers an intracellular-signaling cascade including the generation of secondary messenger molecules like Ca(2+) and protons. The variety and complexity of Ca(2+) and pH signaling result from the nature of the stresses as well as the tolerance level of the plant species against that specific stress. The nature of changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) concentration, in terms of amplitude, frequency and duration, is likely very important for decoding the specific downstream responses for salinity stress tolerance in planta. It has been observed that the signatures of [Ca(2+)](cyt) and pH differ in various studies reported so far depending on the techniques used to measure them, and also depending on the plant organs where they are measured, such as root, shoot tissues or cells. This review describes the recent advances about the changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) and pH(cyt) at both cellular and whole-plant levels under salinity stress condition, and in various salinity-tolerant and -sensitive plant species.

  13. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  14. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-10-07

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Linda C.; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26423840

  16. Noise figure of microwave photonic links operating under large-signal modulation and its application to optoelectronic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Esmail; Banai, Ali

    2014-10-01

    The noise performance of intensity-modulation direct-detection microwave photonic links (MWPL) operating under large-signal conditions has been studied in this paper. A sinusoidal signal plus narrowband white Gaussian noise is applied at the radio frequency input of the link, and the output spectrum is derived using a nonlinear analytical approach. We show that the output SNR can be severely affected by the interaction of signal and noise due to the nonlinearity of the MWPL combined with the large input modulating signal. It is shown that the large-signal noise figure (NF) of an MWPL depends on the input power, a dependence that is not readily apparent under small-signal conditions, due to two unavoidable issues appearing in the large-signal conditions: (1) the link power gain is a function of its input power, and (2) the link power gain is not the same for the signal and noise due to the capture effect. We also have observed that if shot noise or laser relative intensity noise (RIN) is the dominant source of noise, link large-signal NF increases as the input signal power increases. We have shown that, when the MWPL is operating in the linear regime, our theoretical predictions approach the already published results on small-signal NF, which are verified by experimental data. We have shown that large-signal NF affects the noise performance of optoelectronic oscillators because they contain MWPLs at saturation.

  17. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia.

  18. A new mechanism for metastability of under-saturated traffic responsible for time-delayed traffic breakdown at the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Gao, Zi-You

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce a new mechanism of metastability of under-saturated traffic at the signal that is responsible for a time-delayed traffic breakdown revealed by Kerner (2011). In our model, we assume that the metastability of under-saturated traffic at the signal is caused by a dependence of the mean time of driver acceleration from a queue at the signal on the driver's stopped time within the queue. With the use of Nagel-Schreckenberg model, we demonstrate that this mechanism of the metastability of city traffic can lead to the time-delayed traffic breakdown at the signal.

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase Mule targets β-catenin under conditions of hyperactive Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Khatun, Rahima; Elia, Andrew J.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Ramachandran, Parameswaran; Baniasadi, Shakiba P.; Hao, Zhenyue; Jones, Lisa D.; Haight, Jillian; Sheng, Yi; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling, named after the secreted proteins that bind to cell surface receptors to activate the pathway, plays critical roles both in embryonic development and the maintenance of homeostasis in many adult tissues. Two particularly important cellular programs orchestrated by Wnt signaling are proliferation and stem cell self-renewal. Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway resulting from mutation or improper modulation of pathway components contributes to cancer development in various tissues. Colon cancers frequently bear inactivating mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, whose product is an important component of the destruction complex that regulates β-catenin levels. Stabilization and nuclear localization of β-catenin result in the expression of a panel of Wnt target genes. We previously showed that Mule/Huwe1/Arf-BP1 (Mule) controls murine intestinal stem and progenitor cell proliferation by modulating the Wnt pathway via c-Myc. Here we extend our investigation of Mule’s influence on oncogenesis by showing that Mule interacts directly with β-catenin and targets it for degradation under conditions of hyperactive Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that Mule uses various mechanisms to fine-tune the Wnt pathway and provides multiple safeguards against tumorigenesis. PMID:28137882

  20. Leptin signal transduction underlies the differential metabolic response of LEW and WKY rats to cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Micaelo, N; González-Abuín, N; Ardévol, A; Pinent, M; Petretto, E; Behmoaras, J; Blay, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the effect of genetic background on obesity-related phenotypes is well established, the main objective of this study is to determine the phenotypic responses to cafeteria diet (CAF) of two genetically distinct inbred rat strains and give insight into the molecular mechanisms that might be underlying. Lewis (LEW) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were fed with either a standard or a CAF diet. The effects of the diet and the strain in the body weight gain, food intake, respiratory quotient, biochemical parameters in plasma as well as in the expression of genes that regulate leptin signalling were determined. Whereas CAF diet promoted weight gain in LEW and WKY rats, as consequence of increased energy intake, metabolic management of this energy surplus was significantly affected by genetic background. LEW and WKY showed a different metabolic profile, LEW rats showed hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and high FFA levels, ketogenesis, high adiposity index and inflammation, but WKY did not. Leptin signalling, and specifically the LepRb-mediated regulation of STAT3 activation and Socs3 gene expression in the hypothalamus were inversely modulated by the CAF diet in LEW (upregulated) and WKY rats (downregulated). In the present study, we show evidence of gene-environment interactions in obesity exerted by differential phenotypic responses to CAF diet between LEW and WKY rats. Specifically, we found the leptin-signalling pathway as a divergent point between the strain-specific adaptations to diet. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Kyu; Hyeon, Changbong; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, the cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, our computational demonstration of thermally induced resonance in RNA hairpin dynamics is a direct realization of the phenomena called stochastic resonance and resonant activation. Our study, amenable to experimental tests using optical tweezers, is of great significance to the folding of biopolymers in vivo that are subject to the broad spectrum of cellular noises. PMID:22908254

  2. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Kyu; Hyeon, Changbong; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-09-04

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, the cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, our computational demonstration of thermally induced resonance in RNA hairpin dynamics is a direct realization of the phenomena called stochastic resonance and resonant activation. Our study, amenable to experimental tests using optical tweezers, is of great significance to the folding of biopolymers in vivo that are subject to the broad spectrum of cellular noises.

  3. Analysis and compensation for code Doppler effect of BDS II signal under high dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Fangling

    2016-01-01

    In high dynamic circumstances, the acquisition of BDS (BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) signal would be affected by the pseudo-code Doppler. The pseudo-code frequency shift is more prominent and complex when BOC modulation has been adopted by BDS-II, but is not yet involved in current compensation algorithm. In addition, the most frequently used code Doppler compensation algorithm is modifying the sampling rate or local bit rate, which not only increases the complexity of the acquisition and tracking, but also is barely realizable for the hardware receiver to modify the local frequency. Therefore, this paper proposes a code Doppler compensation method based on double estimator receiver, which simultaneously controls NCO delay of code tracking loop and subcarrier tracking loop to compensate for pseudo-code frequency shift. The simulation and test are implemented with BDS-II BOC signal. The test results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively compensate for pseudo-code Doppler of BOC signal and has detection probability 3dB higher than the uncompensated situation when the false alarm rate is under 0.01 and the coherent integration time is 1ms.

  4. Progesterone Inhibition of Neuronal Calcium Signaling Underlies Aspects of Progesterone-Mediated Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, Jessie I; Stern, Christopher M; Mermelstein, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone is being utilized as a therapeutic means to ameliorate neuron loss and cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury Although there have been numerous attempts to determine the means by which progesterone exerts neuroprotective effects, studies describing the underlying molecular mechanisms are lacking What has become clear, however, is the notion that progesterone can thwart several physiological processes that are detrimental to neuron function and survival, including inflammation, edema, demyelination and excitotoxicity One clue regarding the means by which progesterone has restorative value comes from the notion that these aforementioned biological processes all share the common theme of eliciting pronounced increases in intracellular calcium. Thus, we propose the hypothesis that progesterone regulation of calcium signaling underlies its ability to mitigate these cellular insults, ultimately leading to neuroprotection. Further, we describe recent findings that indicate neuroprotection is achieved via progesterone block of voltage-gated calcium channels, although additional outcomes may arise from blockade of various other ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. PMID:22101209

  5. New targets and therapeutic approaches for endocrine malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Kreissl, Michael C; Weismann, Dirk; Allolio, Bruno

    2009-07-01

    In endocrine malignancies (thyroid carcinoma, parathyroid carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, malignant pheochromocytoma) surgery is currently the treatment of choice, in case of differentiated thyroid carcinomas followed by 131-I-radioiodine administration. This approach is often successful in early disease; however, treatment options for advanced endocrine malignancies remain unsatisfactory and prognosis is poor. In particular, cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation therapy often show only limited and transient efficacy and are associated with significant toxicity. Thus, new treatment options are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathology of endocrine malignancies has recently led to identification of key events in endocrine oncogenesis (e.g. oncogenic RET mutations in medullary thyroid carcinoma or RET/PTC rearrangements in papillary thyroid carcinoma). These new insights are increasingly matched by new compounds (e.g. tyrosine kinase inhibitors) targeting signaling pathways essential for tumor cell survival, proliferation and metastases. Accordingly, a rapidly growing number of preclinical investigations and early clinical trials in endocrine malignancies have been initiated. First results of "targeted therapies" in medullary and differentiated thyroid carcinoma are impressive: phase II trials targeting RET or VEGF receptor kinases led to objective tumor response in up to 50% of patients. This review covers these recent molecular and clinical advances which most likely will dramatically alter the treatment of endocrine malignancies within the coming decade.

  6. Circadian Clock Control of Endocrine Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Berry, Ryan; Frank, Stuart J.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms experience dramatic fluctuations in demands/stresses over the course of the day. In order to maintain biological processes within physiologic boundaries, it is imperative that mechanisms have evolved for anticipation of, and adaptation to, these daily fluctuations. Endocrine factors undoubtedly play an integral role in homeostasis. Not only do circulating levels of various endocrine factors oscillate over the 24 period, but so too does responsiveness of target tissues to these signals/stimuli. Emerging evidence suggests that these daily oscillations do not occur solely in response to behavioral fluctuations associated with sleep/wake and feeding/fasting cycles, but are orchestrated in part by an intrinsic timekeeping mechanism known as the circadian clock. Disruption of circadian clocks, through genetic and/or environmental means, appears to precipitate numerous common disorders, including cardiometabolic diseases and cancer. Collectively, these observations, which are reviewed within the current article, have led to suggestion that strategies designed to realign normal circadian rhythmicities hold a therapeutic potential for the treatment of various endocrine-related disorders. PMID:24863387

  7. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal has been neglected in endocrine disruption regulatory testing strategy. The adrenal is a vital organ, adrenocortical insufficiency is recognised in life threatening "adrenal crises" and Addison's disease, and the consequences of off-target toxicological inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenesis is well recognised in clinical medicine, where drugs such as aminoglutethimide and etomidate killed patients via unrecognised inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP11B1) along the cortisol and aldosterone pathways. The consequences of adrenocortical dysfunction during early development are also recognised in the congenital salt wasting and adrenogenital syndromes presenting neonatally, yet despite a remit to focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity mechanisms of endocrine disruption by many regulatory agencies (USEPA EDSTAC; REACH) the assessment of adrenocortical function has largely been ignored. Further, every step in the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathway (ACTH receptor, StAR, CYP's 11A1, 17, 21, 11B1, 11B2, and 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Δ4,5 isomerase) is known to be a potential target with multiple examples of chemicals inhibiting these targets. Many of these chemicals have been detected in human and wildlife tissues. This raises the question of whether exposure to low level environmental chemicals may be affecting adrenocortical function. This review examines the omission of adrenocortical testing in the current regulatory frameworks; the characteristics that make the adrenal cortex particularly vulnerable to toxic insult; chemicals and their toxicological targets within the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathways; the typical manifestations of adrenocortical toxicity (e.g. human iatrogenically induced pharmacotoxicological adrenal insufficiency, manifestations in typical mammalian regulatory general toxicology studies, manifestations in wildlife) and models of adrenocortical functional assessment. The utility of the

  8. [Content of Osmolytes and Flavonoids under Salt Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Defective in Jasmonate Signaling].

    PubMed

    Yastreb, T O; Kolupaev, Yu E; Lugovaya, A A; Dmitriev, A P

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the salt stress (200 mM NaCl) and exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) on levels of osmolytes and flavonoids in leaves of four-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants of the wild-type (WT) Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the mutant jin1 (jasmonate insensitive 1) with impaired jasmonate signaling were studied. The increase in proline content caused by the salt stress was higher in the Col-0 plants than in the mutant jin1. This difference was especially marked if the plants had been pretreated with exogenous 0.1 µM JA. The sugar content increased in response to the salt stress in the JA-treated WT plants but decreased in the jin1 mutant. Leaf treatment with JA of the WT plants but not mutant defective in jasmonate signaling also enhanced the levels of anthocyanins and flavonoids absorbed in UV-B range. The presence of JA increased salinity resistance of the Col-0 plants, since the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and growth inhibition caused by NaCl were less pronounced. Under salt stress, JA almost did not render a positive effect on the jin1 plants. It is concluded that the protein JIN1/MYC2 is involved in control of protective systems under salt stress.

  9. Nonlinear Bayesian Estimation of BOLD Signal under Non-Gaussian Noise

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ali Fahim; Younis, Muhammad Shahzad; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF. PMID:25691911

  10. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang; Xinmiao, Lu; Guangyi, Wang; Yongcai, Hu; Jiangtao, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372156 and 61405053) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province of China (Grant No. LZ13F04001).

  11. Downregulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies hepatic autophagy impairment in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Anduaga, Javier; Choi, Eui-Ju; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2017-05-01

    A deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and metabolic manifestations including hepatomegaly caused by increased glycogen and neutral fat accumulation. A recent report showed that G6Pase-α deficiency causes impairment in autophagy, a recycling process important for cellular metabolism. However, the molecular mechanism underlying defective autophagy is unclear. Here we show that in mice, liver-specific knockout of G6Pase-α (L-G6pc-/-) leads to downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) signaling that activates autophagy via deacetylation of autophagy-related (ATG) proteins and forkhead box O (FoxO) family of transcriptional factors which transactivate autophagy genes. Consistently, defective autophagy in G6Pase-α-deficient liver is characterized by attenuated expressions of autophagy components, increased acetylation of ATG5 and ATG7, decreased conjugation of ATG5 and ATG12, and reduced autophagic flux. We further show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency results in activation of carbohydrate response element-binding protein, a lipogenic transcription factor, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), a lipid regulator, and suppressed expression of PPAR-α, a master regulator of fatty acid β-oxidation, all contributing to hepatic steatosis and downregulation of SIRT1 expression. An adenovirus vector-mediated increase in hepatic SIRT1 expression corrects autophagy defects but does not rectify metabolic abnormalities associated with G6Pase-α deficiency. Importantly, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression corrects metabolic abnormalities, restores SIRT1-FoxO signaling, and normalizes defective autophagy. Taken together, these data show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated down-regulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies defective hepatic autophagy in GSD-Ia.

  12. Inferior frontal gyrus preserves working memory and emotional learning under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Benjamin; Androsch, Lucas; Jahn, Ralph T.; Alich, Therese; Striepens, Nadine; Markett, Sebastian; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2013-01-01

    Compensation has been widely applied to explain neuroimaging findings in neuropsychiatric patients. Functional compensation is often invoked when patients display equal performance and increased neural activity in comparison to healthy controls. According to the compensatory hypothesis increased activity allows the brain to maintain cognitive performance despite underlying neuropathological changes. Due to methodological and pathology-related issues, however, the functional relevance of the increased activity and the specific brain regions involved in the compensatory response remain unclear. An experimental approach that allows a transient induction of compensatory responses in the healthy brain could help to overcome these issues. To this end we used the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol to pharmacologically induce sub-optimal noradrenergic signaling in healthy participants. In two independent functional MRI (fMRI) experiments participants received either placebo or propranolol before they underwent a cognitive challenge (Experiment 1: working memory; Experiment 2: emotional learning: Pavlovian fear conditioning). In Experiment 1 propranolol had no effects on working memory performance, but evoked stronger activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In Experiment 2 propranolol produced no effects on emotional memory formation, but evoked stronger activity in the right IFG. The present finding that sub-optimal beta-adrenergic signaling did not disrupt performance and concomitantly increased IFG activity is consistent with, and extends, current perspectives on functional compensation. Together, our findings suggest that under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling, heightened activity in brain regions located within the cognitive control network, particularly the IFG, may reflect compensatory operations subserving the maintenance of behavioral performance. PMID:24381546

  13. Analysis of weak signal detection based on tri-stable system under Levy noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Fang, He; Ying-Ying, Cui; Tian-Qi, Zhang; Gang, Zhang; Ying, Song

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic resonance system is an effective method to extract weak signal. However, system output is directly influenced by system parameters. Aiming at this, the Levy noise is combined with a tri-stable stochastic resonance system. The average signal-to-noise ratio gain is regarded as an index to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. The characteristics of tri-stable stochastic resonance under Levy noise is analyzed in depth. First, the method of generating Levy noise, the effect of tri-stable system parameters on the potential function and corresponding potential force are presented in detail. Then, the effects of tri-stable system parameters w, a, b, and Levy noise intensity amplification factor D on the resonant output can be explored with different Levy noises. Finally, the tri-stable stochastic resonance system is applied to the bearing fault detection. Simulation results show that the stochastic resonance phenomenon can be induced by tuning the system parameters w, a, and b under different distributions of Levy noise, then the weak signal can be detected. The parameter intervals which can induce stochastic resonances are approximately equal. Moreover, by adjusting the intensity amplification factor D of Levy noise, the stochastic resonances can happen similarly. In bearing fault detection, the detection effect of the tri-stable stochastic resonance system is superior to the bistable stochastic resonance system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371164), the Chongqing Municipal Distinguished Youth Foundation, China (Grant No. CSTC2011jjjq40002), and the Research Project of Chongqing Municipal Educational Commission, China (Grant No. KJ130524).

  14. The Hirschsprung's-multiple endocrine neoplasia connection.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sam W; Zaahl, Monique

    2012-01-01

    The risk of patients with Hirschsprung's disease later developing multiple endocrine neoplasia remains a matter of concern. The multiple endocrine neoplasia 2-Hirschsprung's disease association has been shown to cosegregate in Hirschsprung's disease patients with both short- and long-segment aganglionosis, although patients with long-segment aganglionosis a to carry the greatest risk. The Hirschsprung's disease-medullary thyroid carcinoma relationship also appears to be bi-directional, and activation or suppression of the rearranged during transfection gene appeared to vary over succeeding generations within the same family. Rearranged during transfection gene variations are associated with both conditions. The cosegregation of Hirschsprung's disease and multiple endocrine neoplasia 2 is particularly interesting as it involves both "switch off" and "switch on" of the rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene in the same patient. This cosegregation mostly relates to the cysteine-rich area on RET620 (the "Janus gene"). The mechanism whereby rearranged during transfection influences gene activation in multiple endocrine neoplasia 2 is complex, but genetic variations impair the rearranged during transfection tyrosine kinase response to tyrosine kinase activation, thus appearing to dictate downstream signaling cascade responses. Better understanding of the RET-620 relationship allows for a more cost-effective method of identifying those at risk by focusing rearranged during transfection gene testing to this specific area as a "hot spot". The clinical awareness of possible medullary thyroid carcinoma has led to timely intervention and early treatment of this chemo- and radioresistant tumor with poor prognosis. Establishment of "risk" by genetic testing has become a classic model of molecular medicine being integrated into patient care and offering rearranged during transfection directed prophylactic surgical management. In addition, novel approaches to treatment

  15. Adrenomedullin and endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Letizia, C; Rossi, G; Cerci, S

    2003-12-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a recently discovered potent vasodilatory peptide, originally isolated in extracts of human pheochromocytoma, with activities including maintenance of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis through vasodilatation, diuresis and natriuresis. Human AM consists of 52 amino acids with a 6-member ring structure linked by a disulfide bond and amidated COOH terminal, which belongs to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and amylin. The main sites of AM production are the lungs, vascular tissues (both endothelial and smooth muscle cells), heart, kidney, adrenal glands, pancreatic islets, placenta, anterior pituitary gland and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine system. Intravenous injection of AM increases blood flow predominantly in the tissues with the highest AM expression, suggesting that AM functions primarily as a paracrine/autocrine hormone, but it is also important as circulating hormone. The objective of this review is to analyze the evidence that AM may play a role in some endocrine disorders.

  16. [Acne vulgaris: endocrine aspects].

    PubMed

    Dekkers, O M; Thio, B H; Romijn, J A; Smit, J W A

    2006-06-10

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development of acne. The skin contains enzymes that convert precursor hormones to the more potent androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Androgen synthesis can therefore be regulated locally. The effects of androgens on the skin are the result of circulating androgens and enzyme activity in local tissues and androgen receptors. Acne is a clinical manifestation of some endocrine diseases. The polycystic ovary syndrome has the highest prevalence. In women with acne that persists after puberty, in 10-200% of cases polycystic ovary syndrome is later diagnosed. The mechanism of hormonal anti-acne therapy may work by blocking the androgen-production (oestrogens) or by blocking the androgen receptor (cyproterone, spironolactone).

  17. [Multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Ludwig; Raue, Friedhelm

    2017-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and 2 are hereditary cancer syndromes. They are characterized by the occurrence of many benign and malignant tumor types, in MEN1 parathyroid tumors, pituitary tumors, and pancreas tumors, in MEN2 medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid tumors. The autosomal dominant inherited tumor syndromes are caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, a tumor suppressor gene, and mutations in the RET gene, an activated oncogene, in MEN2. The clinical expression of the different tumors can vary within and between families, with a good genotype-phenotype correlation in MEN2. Early diagnosis and therapy is possible by using biochemical and imaging screening in the families. Early thyroidectomy in young patients with MEN2 results in a high cure rate of MTC. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Photocatalytic activity of ZnO doped with Ag on the degradation of endocrine disrupting under UV irradiation and the investigation of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechambi, Olfa; Chalbi, Manel; Najjar, Wahiba; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-08-01

    Ag-doped ZnO photocatalysts with different Ag molar content (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0%) were prepared via hydrothermal method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Nitrogen physisorption at 77 K, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV--Visible spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectra (PL) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural, textural and optical properties of the samples. The results showed that Ag-doping does not change the average crystallite size with the Ag low content (≤1.0%) but slightly decreases with Ag high content (>1.0%). The specific surface area (SBET) increases with the increase of the Ag content. The band gap values of ZnO are decreased with the increase of the Ag doping level. The results of the photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) in aqueous solutions under UV irradiation and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) showed that silver ions doping greatly improved the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO. The TOC conversion BPA and NP are 72.1% and 81.08% respectively obtained using 1% Ag-doped ZnO. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the fact that the modification of ZnO with an appropriate amount of Ag can increase the separation efficiency of the photogenerated electrons-holes in ZnO. The antibacterial activity of the catalysts which uses Escherichia coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria confirmed that Ag-doped ZnO possessed more antibacterial activity than the pure ZnO.

  19. Heritable variation in circulating glucocorticoids and endocrine flexibility in a free-living songbird.

    PubMed

    Stedman, J M; Hallinger, K K; Winkler, D W; Vitousek, M N

    2017-09-01

    Phenotypic flexibility is a central way that organisms cope with challenging and changing environments. As endocrine signals mediate many phenotypic traits, heritable variation in hormone levels, or their context-dependent flexibility, could present an important target for selection. Several studies have estimated the heritability of circulating glucocorticoid levels under acute stress conditions, but little is known about the potential for either baseline hormone levels or rapid endocrine flexibility to evolve. Here, we assessed the potential for selection to operate on the elevation (circulating hormone levels) and flexibility of glucocorticoid reaction norms to acute restraint stress. Multivariate animal models revealed low but significant heritability in baseline (h(2)  = 0.13-0.14) and stress-induced glucocorticoids (h(2)  = 0.18), and moderate heritability in glucocorticoid flexibility in response to acute stress (h(2)  = 0.38) in free-living juvenile tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor; n = 408). Baseline glucocorticoids were not genetically correlated with either stress-induced glucocorticoids or glucocorticoid flexibility. These findings indicate that baseline glucocorticoids and the acute stress response are distinct traits that can be independently shaped by selection. Microevolutionary changes that influence the expression or flexibility of these endocrine mediators of phenotype may be an important way that populations adapt to changing environments and novel threats. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytokines in Endocrine Dysfunction of Plasma Cell Disorders.

    PubMed

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are classically associated with lytic bone lesions, hypercalcemia, anemia, and renal insufficiency. However, in some cases, symptoms of endocrine dysfunction are more prominent than these classical signs and misdiagnosis can thus be possible. This concerns especially the situation where the presence of M-protein is limited and the serum protein electrophoresis (sPEP) appears normal. To understand the origin of the endocrine symptoms associated with MG, we overview here the current knowledge on the complexity of interactions between cytokines and the endocrine system in MG and discuss the perspectives for both the diagnosis and treatments for this class of diseases. We also illustrate the role of major cytokines and growth factors such as IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and VEGF in the endocrine system, as these tumor-relevant signaling molecules not only help the clonal expansion and invasion of the tumor cells but also influence cellular metabolism through autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine mechanisms. We further discuss the broader impact of these tumor environment-derived molecules and proinflammatory state on systemic hormone signaling. The diagnostic challenges and clinical work-up are illustrated from the point of view of an endocrinologist.

  2. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Environment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Liguo; Meng, Qinghao; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Wu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth.

  3. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Liguo; Meng, Qinghao; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Wu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time–frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth. PMID:26121469

  4. Before and beyond ABA: upstream sensing and internal signals that determine ABA accumulation and response under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Verslues, P E; Zhu, J-K

    2005-04-01

    Sensing and signalling events that detect abiotic stress-induced changes in plant water status and initiate downstream stress responses such as ABA (abscisic acid) accumulation and osmoregulation remain uncharacterized in plants. Although conclusive results are lacking, recent results from plants, and analogies to signalling in other organisms, suggest possible mechanisms for sensing altered water status and initial transduction of that signal. Internal signals that act downstream of ABA and modulate stress responses to reflect the type and severity of the stress and the metabolic status of the plant are also not well understood. Two specific types of signalling, sugar sensing and reactive oxygen signalling, are likely to be modulators of ABA response under stress. For both upstream sensing and signalling of plant water status as well as downstream modulation of ABA response, present results suggest several genetic strategies with high potential to increase our understanding of the molecular basis by which plants sense and respond to altered water status.

  5. Signaling pathway underlying the octopaminergic modulation of myogenic contraction in the cricket lateral oviduct.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    Octopamine (OA), a biogenic monoamine, is a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in invertebrates. Here, we report the effect of OA on the spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) of the lateral oviduct of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the possible signaling pathway involved. Application of OA increased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of OA was inhibited by subsequent application of the OA receptor antagonist epinastine, indicating that the action of OA is mediated by OA receptor. To investigate the predominant signaling pathway underlying the action of OA, we first examined a possible involvement of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Application of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP had little effect on SRCs and the effect of OA was not influenced by subsequent application of the PKA inhibitor H89, indicating that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is not the predominant pathway in the action of OA. Next, we examined a possible involvement of the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the action of OA. The effect of OA on SRCs was inhibited by subsequent application of the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, indicating that the PLC pathway is involved in the action of OA. The OA-induced increase in the frequency of SRCs was inhibited by pretreatment of the cell with the ryanodine receptor antagonist tetracaine but was not significantly affected by the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). On the other hand, the OA-induced increase in the amplitude of SRCs was inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with 2-APB but was not significantly affected by tetracaine. Taken together, these results suggest that the OA-induced excitatory effect on SRCs is mediated by the PLC signaling pathway: Ca2+ release from IP3 receptors may contribute to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs, whereas Ca2+ release from ryanodine

  6. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  7. Endocrine Surgery: A Hopkins Legacy.

    PubMed

    Udelsman, Robert

    2017-09-06

    : The field of Endocrine Surgery is linked to extraordinary contributions made by Hopkins leaders in surgery including William Stewart Halsted, Harvey Cushing, and John L Cameron. Halsted's contributions to the anatomic basis of thyroid and parathyroid surgery were based on his experimental and clinical work performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Halsted's disciple, Harvey Cushing, created the field of modern neurosurgery and recognized the disease and syndrome that are immortalized with his name. The Halstedian principles promulgated and transmitted by John L Cameron to subsequent generations of endocrine surgeons at Hopkins have transformed the field of Endocrine Surgery with the stamp of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  8. Notch signaling deficiency underlies age-dependent depletion of satellite cells in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunhui; Wen, Yefei; Kuroda, Kazuki; Hannon, Kevin; Rudnicki, Michael A; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease characterized by muscle wasting, loss of mobility and death in early adulthood. Satellite cells are muscle-resident stem cells responsible for the repair and regeneration of damaged muscles. One pathological feature of DMD is the progressive depletion of satellite cells, leading to the failure of muscle repair. Here, we attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell ablation in the dystrophin mutant mdx mouse, a well-established model for DMD. Initial muscle degeneration activates satellite cells, resulting in increased satellite cell number in young mdx mice. This is followed by rapid loss of satellite cells with age due to the reduced self-renewal ability of mdx satellite cells. In addition, satellite cell composition is altered even in young mdx mice, with significant reductions in the abundance of non-committed (Pax7+ and Myf5-) satellite cells. Using a Notch-reporter mouse, we found that the mdx satellite cells have reduced activation of Notch signaling, which has been shown to be necessary to maintain satellite cell quiescence and self-renewal. Concomitantly, the expression of Notch1, Notch3, Jag1, Hey1 and HeyL are reduced in the mdx primary myoblast. Finally, we established a mouse model to constitutively activate Notch signaling in satellite cells, and show that Notch activation is sufficient to rescue the self-renewal deficiencies of mdx satellite cells. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling is essential for maintaining the satellite cell pool and that its deficiency leads to depletion of satellite cells in DMD.

  9. Notch signaling deficiency underlies age-dependent depletion of satellite cells in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunhui; Wen, Yefei; Kuroda, Kazuki; Hannon, Kevin; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease characterized by muscle wasting, loss of mobility and death in early adulthood. Satellite cells are muscle-resident stem cells responsible for the repair and regeneration of damaged muscles. One pathological feature of DMD is the progressive depletion of satellite cells, leading to the failure of muscle repair. Here, we attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell ablation in the dystrophin mutant mdx mouse, a well-established model for DMD. Initial muscle degeneration activates satellite cells, resulting in increased satellite cell number in young mdx mice. This is followed by rapid loss of satellite cells with age due to the reduced self-renewal ability of mdx satellite cells. In addition, satellite cell composition is altered even in young mdx mice, with significant reductions in the abundance of non-committed (Pax7+ and Myf5−) satellite cells. Using a Notch-reporter mouse, we found that the mdx satellite cells have reduced activation of Notch signaling, which has been shown to be necessary to maintain satellite cell quiescence and self-renewal. Concomitantly, the expression of Notch1, Notch3, Jag1, Hey1 and HeyL are reduced in the mdx primary myoblast. Finally, we established a mouse model to constitutively activate Notch signaling in satellite cells, and show that Notch activation is sufficient to rescue the self-renewal deficiencies of mdx satellite cells. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling is essential for maintaining the satellite cell pool and that its deficiency leads to depletion of satellite cells in DMD. PMID:24906372

  10. Effects of Response-Signal Temporal Separation on Behavior Maintained under Temporally Defined Schedules of Delayed Signaled Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulido, Marco A.; Martinez, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of systematically separating the cue from the response in temporally defined schedules of delayed signaled reinforcement. Identical schedules were used to study the effects of the independent variable on response acquisition and response maintenance. In the first experiment, 8 groups of 3 naive rats were…

  11. Thermal research of infrared sight signal processing circuit board under temperature shock environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Youtang; Ding, Huang; Qiao, Jianliang; Xu, Yuan; Niu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Thermal stability technology of signal processing circuit infrared sight is studied under temperature shock. Model parameters and geometry is configured for FPGA devices (EP1C20F400C8), solder material and PCB. Signal circuit boards of full array BGA distribution are simulated and analyzed by thermal shock and waveform through engineering finite element analysis software. Because solders of the whole model have strong stress along Y direction, initial stress constraints along Y direction are primarily considered when the partial model of single solder is imposed by thermal load. When absolute thermal loads stresses of diagonal nodes with maximum strains are separated from the whole model, interpolation is processed according to thermal loads circulation. Plastic strains and thermal stresses of nodes in both sides of partial model are obtained. The analysis results indicate that with thermal load circulation, maximum forces of each circulation along Y direction are increasingly enlarged and with the accumulation of plastic strains of danger point, the composition will become invalid in the end.

  12. A proposed model for the flowering signaling pathway of sugarcane under photoperiodic control.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C P; Costa Netto, A P; Colasanti, J; Chalfun-Júnior, A

    2013-04-25

    Molecular analysis of floral induction in Arabidopsis has identified several flowering time genes related to 4 response networks defined by the autonomous, gibberellin, photoperiod, and vernalization pathways. Although grass flowering processes include ancestral functions shared by both mono- and dicots, they have developed their own mechanisms to transmit floral induction signals. Despite its high production capacity and its important role in biofuel production, almost no information is available about the flowering process in sugarcane. We searched the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags database to look for elements of the flowering signaling pathway under photoperiodic control. Sequences showing significant similarity to flowering time genes of other species were clustered, annotated, and analyzed for conserved domains. Multiple alignments comparing the sequences found in the sugarcane database and those from other species were performed and their phylogenetic relationship assessed using the MEGA 4.0 software. Electronic Northerns were run with Cluster and TreeView programs, allowing us to identify putative members of the photoperiod-controlled flowering pathway of sugarcane.

  13. Road crossing behavior under traffic light conflict: Modulating effects of green light duration and signal congruency.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Haiduk, Michael; Boos, Moritz; Tinschert, Peter; Schwarze, Anke; Eggert, Frank

    2016-10-01

    A large number of pedestrians and cyclists regularly ignore the traffic lights to cross the road illegally. In a recent analysis, illegal road crossing behavior has been shown to be enhanced in the presence of incongruent stimulus configurations. Pedestrians and cyclists are more likely to cross against a red light when exposed to an irrelevant conflicting green light. Here, we present experimental and observational data on the factors moderating the risk associated with incongruent traffic lights. In an observational study, we demonstrated that the conflict-related increase in illegal crossing rates is reduced when pedestrian and cyclist green light periods are long. In a laboratory experiment, we manipulated the color of the irrelevant signals to expose participants to different degrees of incongruency. Results revealed that individuals' performance gradually varied as a function of incongruency, suggesting that the negative impact of a conflicting green light can be reduced by slightly adjusting its color. Our findings highlight that the observation of real-world behavior at intersections and the experimental analysis of psychological processes under controlled laboratory conditions can complement each other in identifying risk factors of risky road crossing behavior. Based on this combination, our study elaborates on promising measures to improve safety at signalized intersections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assembly of the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 Ternary Signaling Complex Is Under Allosteric Control

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    Allostery has evolved as a form of local communication between interacting protein partners allowing them to quickly sense changes in their immediate vicinity in response to external cues. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in conjunction with circular dichroism (CD) and macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that the binding of Grb2 adaptor — a key signaling molecule involved in the activation of Ras GTPase — to its downstream partners Sos1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor and Gab1 docker is under tight allosteric regulation. Specifically, our findings reveal that the binding of one molecule of Sos1 to the nSH3 domain allosterically induces a conformational change within Grb2 such that the loading of a second molecule of Sos1 onto the cSH3 domain is blocked and, in so doing, allows Gab1 access to the cSH3 domain in an exclusively non-competitive manner to generate the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 ternary signaling complex. PMID:20005866

  15. Global quantitative analysis of phosphorylation underlying phencyclidine signaling and sensorimotor gating in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    McClatchy, Daniel B.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Park, Sung Kyu; Maher, Pamela; Powell, Susan B.; Yates, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is an example of sensorimotor gating and deficits in PPI have been demonstrated in schizophrenia patients. Phencyclidine (PCP) suppression of PPI in animals has been studied to elucidate the pathological elements of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCP treatment or PPI in the brain are still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on the prefrontal cortex from rats that were subjected to PPI after being systemically injected with PCP or saline. PCP down-regulated phosphorylation events were significantly enriched in proteins associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, this dataset identifies functionally novel phosphorylation sites on known LTP-associated signaling molecules. In addition, mutagenesis of a significantly altered phosphorylation site on xCT (SLC7A11), the light chain of system xc-, the cystine/glutamate antiporter, suggests that PCP also regulates the activity of this protein. Finally, new insights were also derived on PPI signaling independent of PCP treatment. This is the first quantitative phosphorylation proteomic analysis providing new molecular insights into sensorimotor gating. PMID:25869802

  16. Global quantitative analysis of phosphorylation underlying phencyclidine signaling and sensorimotor gating in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, D B; Savas, J N; Martínez-Bartolomé, S; Park, S K; Maher, P; Powell, S B; Yates, J R

    2016-02-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is an example of sensorimotor gating and deficits in PPI have been demonstrated in schizophrenia patients. Phencyclidine (PCP) suppression of PPI in animals has been studied to elucidate the pathological elements of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCP treatment or PPI in the brain are still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on the prefrontal cortex from rats that were subjected to PPI after being systemically injected with PCP or saline. PCP downregulated phosphorylation events were significantly enriched in proteins associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, this data set identifies functionally novel phosphorylation sites on known LTP-associated signaling molecules. In addition, mutagenesis of a significantly altered phosphorylation site on xCT (SLC7A11), the light chain of system xc-, the cystine/glutamate antiporter, suggests that PCP also regulates the activity of this protein. Finally, new insights were also derived on PPI signaling independent of PCP treatment. This is the first quantitative phosphorylation proteomic analysis providing new molecular insights into sensorimotor gating.

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades Underlying Visceral Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Balemans, Dafne; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Talavera, Karel; Wouters, Mira M

    2017-04-06

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important mechanism underlying increased abdominal pain perception in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease in remission. Although the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, recent studies described upregulation and altered functions of nociceptors and their signaling pathways in aberrant visceral nociception, in particular the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family. A variety of TRP channels are present in the gastrointestinal tract (TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPA1, TRPM2, TRPM5 and TRPM8) and modulation of their function by increased activation or sensitization (decreased activation threshold) or altered expression in visceral afferents, have been reported in visceral hypersensitivity. TRP channels directly detect or transduce osmotic, mechanical, thermal and chemosensory stimuli. In addition, pro-inflammatory mediators released in tissue damage or inflammation can activate receptors of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily leading to TRP channel sensitization and activation, which amplify pain and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on the functional roles of neuronal TRP channels in visceral hypersensitivity and discuss the signaling pathways that underlie TRP channel modulation. We propose that a better understanding of TRP channels and their modulators may facilitate the development of more selective and effective therapies to treat visceral hypersensitivity.

  18. Exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections with protected left turn under different traffic control strategies.

    PubMed

    Midenet, Sophie; Saunier, Nicolas; Boillot, Florence

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes an original definition of the exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections and discusses the results of a real world experiment. This exposure is defined as the duration of situations where the stream that is given the right-of-way goes through the conflict zone while road users are waiting in the cross-traffic approach. This measure, obtained from video sensors, makes it possible to compare different operating conditions such as different traffic signal strategies. The data from a real world experiment is used, where the adaptive real-time strategy CRONOS (ContRol Of Networks by Optimization of Switchovers) and a time-plan strategy with vehicle-actuated ranges alternately controlled an isolated intersection near Paris. Hourly samples with similar traffic volumes are compared and the exposure to lateral collision is different in various areas of the intersection and various traffic conditions for the two strategies. The total exposure under peak hour traffic conditions drops by roughly 5 min/h with the CRONOS strategy compared to the time-plan strategy, which occurs mostly on entry streams. The results are analyzed through the decomposition of cycles in phase sequences and recommendations are made for traffic control strategies.

  19. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses. PMID:27200043

  20. Insulin signalling underlies both plasticity and divergence of a reproductive trait in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Green, Delbert A.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a single genotype to yield distinct phenotypes in different environments. The molecular mechanisms linking phenotypic plasticity to the evolution of heritable diversification, however, are largely unknown. Here, we show that insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS) underlies both phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary diversification of ovariole number, a quantitative reproductive trait, in Drosophila. IIS activity levels and sensitivity have diverged between species, leading to both species-specific ovariole number and species-specific nutritional plasticity in ovariole number. Plastic range of ovariole number correlates with ecological niche, suggesting that the degree of nutritional plasticity may be an adaptive trait. This demonstrates that a plastic response conserved across animals can underlie the evolution of morphological diversity, underscoring the potential pervasiveness of plasticity as an evolutionary mechanism. PMID:24500165

  1. Reconstruction of fetal vector electrocardiogram from maternal abdominal signals under fetus body rotations.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Yuji; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Ito, Takuro; Ohwada, Kazunari; Karashima, Akihiro; Katayama, Norihiro; Nakao, Mitsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) and its vector form (fVECG) could provide significant clinical information concerning physiological conditions of a fetus. So far various independent component analysis (ICA)-based methods for extracting fECG from maternal abdominal signals have been proposed. Because full extraction of component waves such as P, Q, R, S, and T, is difficult to be realized under noisy and nonstationary situations, the fVECG is further hard to be reconstructed, where different projections of the fetal heart vector are required. In order to reconstruct fVECG, we proposed a novel method for synthesizing different projections of the heart vector, making good use of the fetus movement. This method consists of ICA, estimation of rotation angles of fetus, and synthesis of projections of the heart vector. Through applications to the synthetic and actual data, our method is shown to precisely estimate rotation angle of the fetus and to successfully reconstruct the fVECG.

  2. Integrative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Signaling Networks and Bioenergetics Pathways Underlying T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Yang, Kai; Li, Yuxin; Shaw, Timothy I; Wang, Yanyan; Blanco, Daniel Bastardo; Wang, Xusheng; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Wang, Hong; Rankin, Sherri; Guy, Cliff; Peng, Junmin; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-03-21

    The molecular circuits by which antigens activate quiescent T cells remain poorly understood. We combined temporal profiling of the whole proteome and phosphoproteome via multiplexed isobaric labeling proteomics technology, computational pipelines for integrating multi-omics datasets, and functional perturbation to systemically reconstruct regulatory networks underlying T cell activation. T cell receptors activated the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome with discrete kinetics, marked by early dynamics of phosphorylation and delayed ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial activation. Systems biology analyses identified multiple functional modules, active kinases, transcription factors and connectivity between them, and mitochondrial pathways including mitoribosomes and complex IV. Genetic perturbation revealed physiological roles for mitochondrial enzyme COX10-mediated oxidative phosphorylation in T cell quiescence exit. Our multi-layer proteomics profiling, integrative network analysis, and functional studies define landscapes of the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome and reveal signaling and bioenergetics pathways that mediate lymphocyte exit from quiescence.

  3. Neuronal and Astroglial Correlates Underlying Spatiotemporal Intrinsic Optical Signal in the Rat Hippocampal Slice

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Ildikó; Nyitrai, Gabriella; Kardos, Julianna; Héja, László

    2013-01-01

    Widely used for mapping afferent activated brain areas in vivo, the label-free intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is mainly ascribed to blood volume changes subsequent to glial glutamate uptake. By contrast, IOS imaged in vitro is generally attributed to neuronal and glial cell swelling, however the relative contribution of different cell types and molecular players remained largely unknown. We characterized IOS to Schaffer collateral stimulation in the rat hippocampal slice using a 464-element photodiode-array device that enables IOS monitoring at 0.6 ms time-resolution in combination with simultaneous field potential recordings. We used brief half-maximal stimuli by applying a medium intensity 50 Volt-stimulus train within 50 ms (20 Hz). IOS was primarily observed in the str. pyramidale and proximal region of the str. radiatum of the hippocampus. It was eliminated by tetrodotoxin blockade of voltage-gated Na+ channels and was significantly enhanced by suppressing inhibitory signaling with gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. We found that IOS was predominantly initiated by postsynaptic Glu receptor activation and progressed by the activation of astroglial Glu transporters and Mg2+-independent astroglial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Under control conditions, role for neuronal K+/Cl− cotransporter KCC2, but not for glial Na+/K+/Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 was observed. Slight enhancement and inhibition of IOS through non-specific Cl− and volume-regulated anion channels, respectively, were also depicted. High-frequency IOS imaging, evoked by brief afferent stimulation in brain slices provide a new paradigm for studying mechanisms underlying IOS genesis. Major players disclosed this way imply that spatiotemporal IOS reflects glutamatergic neuronal activation and astroglial response, as observed within the hippocampus. Our model may help to better interpret in vivo IOS and support diagnosis in the future. PMID:23469218

  4. Neuronal and astroglial correlates underlying spatiotemporal intrinsic optical signal in the rat hippocampal slice.

    PubMed

    Pál, Ildikó; Nyitrai, Gabriella; Kardos, Julianna; Héja, László

    2013-01-01

    Widely used for mapping afferent activated brain areas in vivo, the label-free intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is mainly ascribed to blood volume changes subsequent to glial glutamate uptake. By contrast, IOS imaged in vitro is generally attributed to neuronal and glial cell swelling, however the relative contribution of different cell types and molecular players remained largely unknown. We characterized IOS to Schaffer collateral stimulation in the rat hippocampal slice using a 464-element photodiode-array device that enables IOS monitoring at 0.6 ms time-resolution in combination with simultaneous field potential recordings. We used brief half-maximal stimuli by applying a medium intensity 50 Volt-stimulus train within 50 ms (20 Hz). IOS was primarily observed in the str. pyramidale and proximal region of the str. radiatum of the hippocampus. It was eliminated by tetrodotoxin blockade of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and was significantly enhanced by suppressing inhibitory signaling with gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. We found that IOS was predominantly initiated by postsynaptic Glu receptor activation and progressed by the activation of astroglial Glu transporters and Mg(2+)-independent astroglial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Under control conditions, role for neuronal K(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2, but not for glial Na(+)/K(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 was observed. Slight enhancement and inhibition of IOS through non-specific Cl(-) and volume-regulated anion channels, respectively, were also depicted. High-frequency IOS imaging, evoked by brief afferent stimulation in brain slices provide a new paradigm for studying mechanisms underlying IOS genesis. Major players disclosed this way imply that spatiotemporal IOS reflects glutamatergic neuronal activation and astroglial response, as observed within the hippocampus. Our model may help to better interpret in vivo IOS and support diagnosis in the future.

  5. Subthreshold membrane responses underlying sparse spiking to natural vocal signals in auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Krista Eva; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural acoustic communication signals, such as speech, are typically high-dimensional with a wide range of co-varying spectro-temporal features at multiple timescales. The synaptic and network mechanisms for encoding these complex signals are largely unknown. We are investigating these mechanisms in high-level sensory regions of the songbird auditory forebrain, where single neurons show sparse, object-selective spiking responses to conspecific songs. Using whole-cell in-vivo patch clamp techniques in the caudal mesopallium and the caudal nidopallium of starlings, we examine song-driven subthreshold and spiking activity. We find that both the subthreshold and the spiking activity are reliable (i.e., the same song drives a similar response each time it is presented) and specific (i.e. responses to different songs are distinct). Surprisingly, however, the reliability and specificity of the sub-threshold response was uniformly high regardless of when the cell spiked, even for song stimuli that drove no spikes. We conclude that despite a selective and sparse spiking response, high-level auditory cortical neurons are under continuous, non-selective, stimulus-specific synaptic control. To investigate the role of local network inhibition in this synaptic control, we then recorded extracellularly while pharmacologically blocking local GABA-ergic transmission. This manipulation modulated the strength and the reliability of stimulus-driven spiking, consistent with a role for local inhibition in regulating the reliability of network activity and the stimulus specificity of the subthreshold response in single cells. We discuss these results in the context of underlying computations that could generate sparse, stimulus-selective spiking responses, and models for hierarchical pooling. PMID:25728189

  6. Evolution of male life histories and age-dependent sexual signals under female choice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection theory models evolution of sexual signals and preferences using simple life histories. However, life-history models predict that males benefit from increasing sexual investment approaching old age, producing age-dependent sexual traits. Age-dependent traits require time and energy to grow, and will not fully mature before individuals enter mating competition. Early evolutionary stages pose several problems for these traits. Age-dependent traits suffer from strong viability selection and gain little benefit from mate choice when rare. Few males will grow large traits, and they will rarely encounter choosy females. The evolutionary origins of age-dependent traits therefore remain unclear. I used numerical simulations to analyze evolution of preferences, condition (viability) and traits in an age-structured population. Traits in the model depended on age and condition (“good genes”) in a population with no genetic drift. I asked (1) if age-dependent indicator traits and their preferences can originate depending on the strength of selection and the size of the trait; (2) which mode of development (age-dependent versus age-independent) eventually predominates when both modes occur in the population; and (3) if age-independent traits can invade a population with age-dependent traits. Age-dependent traits evolve under weaker selection and at smaller sizes than age-independent traits. This result held in isolation and when the types co-occur. Evolution of age-independent traits depends only on trait size, whereas evolution of age-dependent traits depends on both strength of selection and growth rate. Invasion of age-independence into populations with established traits followed a similar pattern with age-dependence predominating at small trait sizes. I suggest that reduced adult mortality facilitates sexual selection by favoring the evolution of age-dependent sexual signals under weak selection. PMID:24392289

  7. [Endocrine xenoestrogenics disrupters: molecular mechanisms and detection methods].

    PubMed

    Mnif, Wissem; Pillon, Arnaud; Balaguer, Patrick; Bartegi, Aghleb

    2007-01-01

    The attention paid to endocriniens modulators for purpose micropolluants (endocrine disrupters) has been increasingly studied these last years particularly on animals. The results of this study raised big concerns from Doctors and Biologists on the eventual risks human health can face. Indeed, endocrine systems of the body play an essential and pervasive role in both the short- and long-term regulation of metabolic processes. Nutritional, behavioural, and reproductive processes are intricately regulated by endocrine systems, as are growth (including bone growth/remodelling), gut, cardiovascular, and kidney function and responses to all forms of stress. Disorders of any of the endocrine system, involving both over- and under-active hormone secretion, result inevitably in disease, the effects of which may extend to many different organs and functions and are often debilitating or life-threatening. Viewed from this general perspective, the threat posed from environmental chemicals with endocrine activity (either agonist or antagonistic) is potentially serious. However, the fact that humans and wildlife are exposed to such chemicals does not necessarily mean that clinically manifest disturbance of the relevant endocrine system will result, because much depends on the level and duration of exposure and on the timing of exposure. Indeed, a large numbers of environmental estrogens are suspected of altering human health as well as the marine ecosystem balance. The objective of this review is to study the different molecular mechanisms of these xenoestrogenes micropolluants, in order to emphasize their potential risk and to present some of the different experimental methods for their detection.

  8. The hidden life of NAD+-consuming ectoenzymes in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Fabio; Deaglio, Silvia; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Audrito, Valentina; Serra, Sara; Gandione, Marina; Zitella, Andrea; Tizzani, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Ectoenzymes are a family of cell surface molecules whose catalytic domain lies in the extracellular region. A subset of this family, nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes, are key components in the regulation of the extracellular balance between nucleotides (e.g. NAD(+) or ATP) and nucleosides (e.g. adenosine). Their substrates and products are signalling molecules that act by binding to specific receptors, triggering signals that regulate a variety of functions, ranging from the migration of immune cells, to synaptic transmission in the brain, to hormone/receptor interactions in the glands. Almost two decades of accumulated data indicate that these regulatory processes significantly affect the endocrine system, a tightly controlled information signal complex with clear evidence of fine regulation. Functional models discussed in this review include insulin secretion, bone modelling and the association between hormones and behaviour. The emerging pattern is one of a system operating as a scale-free network that hinges around hubs of key molecules, such as NAD(+) or ATP. The underlying natural link between nucleotides, ectoenzymes and the endocrine system is far from being clearly demonstrated. However, the body of evidence supporting the existence of such connection is growing exponentially. This review will try to read the available evidence in a hypothesis-oriented perspective, starting from the description of NAD(+) and of ecto- and endoenzymes involved in its metabolism.

  9. Overview of the endocrine response to critical illness: how to measure it and when to treat.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki; Cooper, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    The assessment and manipulation of the endocrine system in patients with critical illness is one of the most complex and controversial areas in endocrinology. Severe acute illness causes dramatic changes in most endocrine systems. This can lead to considerable difficulty in recognising pre-existing endocrine disorders in severely ill patients. Critical care itself might also induce types of endocrine dysfunction not seen outside the critical care unit. It is important to clarify whether or not such endocrine dysfunction occurs. Where it does occur it is also important to determine whether endocrine intervention is useful in improving outcome. There is also the issue of whether endocrine manipulation in critically ill patients without endocrine dysfunction could benefit from endocrine intervention, e.g. to improve haemodynamics or reverse a catabolic state. This review will discuss some of these contentious issues. It will highlight how endocrine assessment of a patient with critical illness differs from that in other types of patient. It will emphasise the added need to place the biochemical assessment and its interpretation in the context of the patients underlying condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New aspects of cadmium as endocrine disruptor.

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Masufumi; Yoshihara, Shin'ichi

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an industrial and environmental pollutant that exerts adverse effects on a number of organs in humans and animals. Reproductive organs, such as the testis and placenta, are sensitive to the toxic effects of Cd. In animal experiments, high-dose exposure to Cd induced severe testicular interstitial hemorrhage with edema, and increased incidence of fetal death and placental necrosis. Low-dose exposure to Cd affects steroid synthesis in male and female reproductive organs. In 1998, the Ministry of Environment in Japan listed Cd in the strategy plan SPEED98 as one of the chemicals suspected of having possible endocrine disrupting activity. Recently, it has been shown that Cd has potent estrogen- and androgen-like activities in vivo and in vitro, by directly binding to estrogen and androgen receptors. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the effects of Cd as an endocrine disruptor remain to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss evidence thus far presented concerning the effects of Cd on the endocrine system.

  11. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and neurodevelopmental alterations.

    PubMed

    Pinson, A; Bourguignon, J P; Parent, A S

    2016-07-01

    The developing brain is remarkably malleable as neural circuits are formed and these circuits are strongly dependent on hormones for their development. For those reasons, the brain is very vulnerable to the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during critical periods of development. This review focuses on three ubiquitous endocrine disruptors that are known to disrupt the thyroid function and are associated with neurobehavioral deficits: polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and bisphenol A. The human and rodent data suggesting effects of those EDCs on memory, cognition, and social behavior are discussed. Their mechanisms of action go beyond relative hypothyroidism with effects on neurotransmitter release and calcium signaling.

  13. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Debra; Dhall, Deepti; Yu, Run

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults, which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery. α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia. Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge. Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:21245985

  14. Autophagy in the endocrine glands.

    PubMed

    Weckman, Andrea; Di Ieva, Antonio; Rotondo, Fabio; Syro, Luis V; Ortiz, Leon D; Kovacs, Kalman; Cusimano, Michael D

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy is an important cellular process involving the degradation of intracellular components. Its regulation is complex and while there are many methods available, there is currently no single effective way of detecting and monitoring autophagy. It has several cellular functions that are conserved throughout the body, as well as a variety of different physiological roles depending on the context of its occurrence in the body. Autophagy is also involved in the pathology of a wide range of diseases. Within the endocrine system, autophagy has both its traditional conserved functions and specific functions. In the endocrine glands, autophagy plays a critical role in controlling intracellular hormone levels. In peptide-secreting cells of glands such as the pituitary gland, crinophagy, a specific form of autophagy, targets the secretory granules to control the levels of stored hormone. In steroid-secreting cells of glands such as the testes and adrenal gland, autophagy targets the steroid-producing organelles. The dysregulation of autophagy in the endocrine glands leads to several different endocrine diseases such as diabetes and infertility. This review aims to clarify the known roles of autophagy in the physiology of the endocrine system, as well as in various endocrine diseases.

  15. Noncoding RNAs in endocrine malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kentwell, Jessica; Gundara, Justin S; Sidhu, Stan B

    2014-05-01

    Only recently has it been uncovered that the mammalian transcriptome includes a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs, have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have only recently been implicated in playing a key regulatory role in cancer biology. The deregulation of ncRNAs has been demonstrated to have important roles in the regulation and progression of cancer development. In this review, we describe the roles of both short noncoding RNAs (including microRNAs, small nuclear RNAs, and piwi-interacting RNAs) and lncRNAs in carcinogenesis and outline the possible underlying genetic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on clinical applications. The focus of our review includes studies from the literature on ncRNAs in traditional endocrine-related cancers, including thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal gland, and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine malignancies. The current and potential future applications of ncRNAs in clinical cancer research is also discussed, with emphasis on diagnosis and future treatment.

  16. Endocrine disorders & female infertility.

    PubMed

    Unuane, David; Tournaye, Herman; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Poppe, Kris

    2011-12-01

    Female infertility occurs in about 37% of all infertile couples and ovulatory disorders account for more than half of these. The ovaries are in continuous interaction with the other endocrine organs. The interplay may account for infertility occurring at different levels and may render the diagnosis of infertility a difficult exercise for the involved physician. A hypothalamic cause of female infertility should be considered in an appropriate clinical context, with tests pointing to a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It can be functional, physiological or related to organic causes. Hyperprolactinemia has well characterized effects on the normal gonadal function and treatment is well established. Acromegaly and Cushing's disease may impair fertility at different levels, mechanisms involved however remain ill defined. Thyroid disorders, both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, can interact with the ovaries, through a direct effect on ovarian function, but autoimmunity may be involved, as well as alterations of the sex hormone binding protein levels. Primary ovarian disorders, such as the polycystic ovary syndrome and primary ovarian insufficiency are frequent diseases, for which novel treatments are currently being developed and discussed. We will propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and approach of the female patient presenting with infertility on the basis of the available evidence in literature.

  17. Putrescine as a signal to modulate the indispensable ABA increase under cold stress

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Juan C; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    Polyamines have been found to correlate frequently with biotic and abiotic insults, and their functional involvement in the plant responses to several stresses has been shown genetically with both gain and loss of function mutations. In spite of a large body of physiological and genetic data, the mode of action for polyamines at the molecular level still remains elusive. We have recently performed a detailed integrated analysis of polyamine metabolism under cold stress by means of metabolic studies, quantitative gene expression analyses, and gene inactivations, to characterize in more detail the role of polyamines in response to low temperature. Our data show a unique accumulation profile for putrescine compared to other polyamines, with a progressive increase upon cold stress treatment coincident with a similar transcriptional upregulation for the two arginine decarboxylase genes ADC1 and ADC2. Loss of function mutants adc1 and adc2 display reduced freezing tolerance and alterations in ABA content and ABA-dependent signalling pathways under low temperature, compared to wild type plants. Phenotypical reverse complementation tests for both adc and ABA-defective mutants support our conclusion that putrescine modulates ABA biosynthesis at the transcriptional level in response to low temperature thus uncovering a novel mode of action for polyamines as regulators of hormone biosynthesis. PMID:19721755

  18. Zebrafish in endocrine systems: recent advances and implications for human disease.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Heiko; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction as a genetic vertebrate model system approximately 30 years ago, the focus of zebrafish research has increasingly shifted to questions that are also relevant for human development and disease. Here, we review the potential of the zebrafish as a model for human endocrine systems. A recent review compared the functions of the different endocrine systems and glands in zebrafish with those in other vertebrates, including humans, coming to the conclusion that major aspects are conserved. Here, we present an updated overview of this rapidly growing field of zebrafish research, focusing on the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, which links the central nervous system with the endocrine systems, and on major processes that are under (neuro)endocrine control and are the subject of intensive current research in other endocrine model organisms, such as feeding circuits and energy homeostasis, sleep, stress, reproduction, osmoregulation, and calcium homeostasis. Finally, we summarize the strengths and weaknesses of zebrafish as a model for studying endocrine systems.

  19. Presenilins, Notch dose control the fate of pancreatic endocrine progenitors during a narrow developmental window.

    PubMed

    Cras-Méneur, Corentin; Li, Lin; Kopan, Raphael; Permutt, M Alan

    2009-09-01

    Canonical Notch signaling is thought to control the endocrine/exocrine decision in early pancreatic progenitors. Later, RBP-Jkappa interacts with Ptf1a and E12 to promote acinar differentiation. To examine the involvement of Notch signaling in selecting specific endocrine lineages, we deregulated this pathway by targeted deletion of presenilin1 and presenilin2, the catalytic core of gamma-secretase, in Ngn3- or Pax6-expressing endocrine progenitors. Surprisingly, whereas Pax6(+) progenitors were irreversibly committed to the endocrine fate, we discovered that Ngn3(+) progenitors were bipotential in vivo and in vitro. When presenilin amounts are limiting, Ngn3(+) progenitors default to an acinar fate; subsequently, they expand rapidly to form the bulk of the exocrine pancreas. gamma-Secretase inhibitors confirmed that enzymatic activity was required to block acinar fate selection by Ngn3 progenitors. Genetic interactions identified Notch2 as the substrate, and suggest that gamma-secretase and Notch2 act in a noncanonical titration mechanism to sequester RBP-Jkappa away from Ptf1a, thus securing selection of the endocrine fate by Ngn3 progenitors. These results revise the current view of pancreatic cell fate hierarchy, establish that Ngn3 is not in itself sufficient to commit cells to the endocrine fate in the presence of Ptf1a, reveal a noncanonical action for Notch2 protein in endocrine cell fate selection, and demonstrate that acquisition of an endocrine fate by Ngn3(+) progenitors is gamma-secretase-dependent until Pax6 expression begins.

  20. Extra- and intracellular signaling pathways under red blood cell aggregation and deformability changes.

    PubMed

    Muravyov, Alexei V; Tikhomirova, Irina A; Maimistova, Alla A; Bulaeva, Svetlana V

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of red blood cells (RBCs) to catecholamines (epinephrine, phenylephrine, an agonist of alpha1-adrenergic receptors, clonidine, an agonist of alpha2-adrenergic receptors and isoproterenol, an agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors) led to change in the RBC microrheological properties. When forskolin (10 microM), an AC stimulator was added to RBC suspension, the RBC deformability (RBCD) was increased by 17% (p<0.05). Somewhat more significant deformability rise appeared after RBC incubation with dB-AMP (by 27%; p<0.01). Red blood cell aggregation (RBCA) was significantly decreased under these conditions (p<0.01). All drugs having PDE activity increased red cell deformability similarly. Some more changes of deformability was found after RBC incubation with pentoxifylline--25% (p<0.05) and IBMX incubation was accompanied only by 15% rise of RBC deformability. The drugs with PDE inhibitory activity reduced red cell aggregation. The most significant RBCA reduction effect was found under cell incubation with pentoxifylline and inhibitor PDE1-vinpocetine. On the whole RBCA reduction averaged 36% (p<0.05) under RBCs incubation with PDE inhibitors. The rise of Ca2+ influx, stimulated by A23187, was accompanied by an increase of RBCA, whereas red cell deformability was changed insignificantly. At the same time Ca2+ entry blocking into the red cells by verapamil or its chelating in medium by EGTA led to significant RBCA decrease and deformability rise (p<0.05).On the whole the total data clearly show that the red cell aggregation and deformation changes were connected with an activation of the different intracellular signaling pathways. It seems reasonable to suppose that RBCA decrease was mainly associated with an activation of the adenylyl-cyclase-cAMP system, while the red cell deformability was closely associated with Ca2+ control mechanisms.

  1. A structural view of nuclear hormone receptor: endocrine disruptor interactions.

    PubMed

    le Maire, Albane; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a broad class of exogenous substances that cause adverse effects in the endocrine system by interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action. The molecular mechanisms of EDCs involve different pathways including interactions with nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) which are primary targets of a large variety of environmental contaminants. Here, based on the crystal structures currently available in the Protein Data Bank, we review recent studies showing the many ways in which EDCs interact with NHRs and impact their signaling pathways. Like the estrogenic chemical diethylstilbestrol, some EDCs mimic the natural hormones through conserved protein-ligand contacts, while others, such as organotins, employ radically different binding mechanisms. Such structure-based knowledge, in addition to providing a better understanding of EDC activities, can be used to predict the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental pollutants and may have applications in drug discovery.

  2. Carcinogenetic mechanisms of endocrine disruptors in female cancers (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Del Pup, Lino; Mantovani, Alberto; Cavaliere, Carla; Facchini, Gaetano; Luce, Amalia; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Caraglia, Michele; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are pollutants that alter the endocrine system and are involved in carcinogenesis. EDs have multiple and complex levels of action. They can affect the synthesis, release and transport of natural hormones. In target tissues, EDs can reduce or increase the effects of natural hormones on their receptors and change signaling cascades. When ED exposure happens at critical periods of life, from embryo to puberty, they can act at doses considered safe for an adult. Furthermore, their epigenetic effects can also influence the cancer risk of future generations. The cancer mechanisms of known EDs are hereby reviewed, There are thousands of newly introduced substances whose potential endocrine-disrupting and cancer effects are completely unknown. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge, these data support the urgent need for health and environmental policies aimed at protecting the public and in particular, the developing fetus and women of reproductive age. PMID:27349723

  3. Insulin signaling as a mechanism underlying developmental plasticity: the role of FOXO in a nutritional polyphenism.

    PubMed

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Moczek, Armin P

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether insulin signaling, known to mediate physiological plasticity in response to changes in nutrition, also facilitates discrete phenotypic responses such as polyphenisms. We test the hypothesis that the gene FOXO--which regulates growth arrest under nutrient stress--mediates a nutritional polyphenism in the horned beetle, Onthophagus nigriventris. Male beetles in the genus Onthophagus vary their mating strategy with body size: large males express horns and fight for access to females while small males invest heavily in genitalia and sneak copulations with females. Given that body size and larval nutrition are linked, we predicted that 1) FOXO expression would differentially scale with body size (nutritional status) between males and females, and 2) manipulation of FOXO expression would affect the nutritional polyphenism in horns and genitalia. First, we found that FOXO expression varied with body size in a tissue- and sex-specific manner, being more highly expressed in the abdominal tissue of large (horned) males, in particular in regions associated with genitalia development. Second, we found that knockdown of FOXO through RNA-interference resulted in the growth of relatively larger copulatory organs compared to control-injected individuals and significant, albeit modest, increases in relative horn length. Our results support the hypothesis that FOXO expression in the abdominal tissue limits genitalia growth, and provides limited support for the hypothesis that FOXO regulates relative horn length through direct suppression of horn growth. Both results support the idea that tissue-specific FOXO expression may play a general role in regulating scaling relationships in nutritional polyphenisms by signaling traits to be relatively smaller.

  4. Wnt signaling underlies evolution and development of the butterfly wing pattern symmetry systems.

    PubMed

    Martin, Arnaud; Reed, Robert D

    2014-11-15

    Most butterfly wing patterns are proposed to be derived from a set of conserved pattern elements known as symmetry systems. Symmetry systems are so-named because they are often associated with parallel color stripes mirrored around linear organizing centers that run between the anterior and posterior wing margins. Even though the symmetry systems are the most prominent and diverse wing pattern elements, their study has been confounded by a lack of knowledge regarding the molecular basis of their development, as well as the difficulty of drawing pattern homologies across species with highly derived wing patterns. Here we present the first molecular characterization of symmetry system development by showing that WntA expression is consistently associated with the major basal, discal, central, and external symmetry system patterns of nymphalid butterflies. Pharmacological manipulations of signaling gradients using heparin and dextran sulfate showed that pattern organizing centers correspond precisely with WntA, wingless, Wnt6, and Wnt10 expression patterns, thus suggesting a role for Wnt signaling in color pattern induction. Importantly, this model is supported by recent genetic and population genomic work identifying WntA as the causative locus underlying wing pattern variation within several butterfly species. By comparing the expression of WntA between nymphalid butterflies representing a range of prototypical symmetry systems, slightly deviated symmetry systems, and highly derived wing patterns, we were able to infer symmetry system homologies in several challenging cases. Our work illustrates how highly divergent morphologies can be derived from modifications to a common ground plan across both micro- and macro-evolutionary time scales.

  5. Molecular signaling underlying bulleyaconitine A (BAA)-induced microglial expression of prodynorphin.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Fei; Wu, Hai-Yun; Wang, Yi-Rui; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2017-03-22

    Bulleyaconitine (BAA) has been shown to possess antinociceptive activities by stimulation of dynorphin A release from spinal microglia. This study investigated its underlying signal transduction mechanisms. The data showed that (1) BAA treatment induced phosphorylation of CREB (rather than NF-κB) and prodynorphin expression in cultured primary microglia, and antiallodynia in neuropathy, which were totally inhibited by the CREB inhibitor KG-501; (2) BAA upregulated phosphorylation of p38 (but not ERK or JNK), and the p38 inhibitor SB203580 (but not ERK or JNK inhibitor) and p38β gene silencer siRNA/p38β (but not siRNA/p38α) completely blocked BAA-induced p38 phosphorylation and/or prodynorphin expression, and antiallodynia; (3) BAA stimulated cAMP production and PKA phosphorylation, and the adenylate cyclase inhibitor DDA and PKA inhibitor H-89 entirely antagonized BAA-induced prodynorphin expression and antiallodynia; (4) The Gs-protein inhibitor NF449 completely inhibited BAA-increased cAMP level, prodynorphin expression and antiallodynia, whereas the antagonists of noradrenergic, corticotrophin-releasing factor, A1 adenosine, formyl peptide, D1/D2 dopamine, and glucagon like-peptide-1 receptors failed to block BAA-induced antiallodynia. The data indicate that BAA-induced microglial expression of prodynorphin is mediated by activation of the cAMP-PKA-p38β-CREB signaling pathway, suggesting that its possible target is a Gs-protein-coupled receptor - "aconitine receptor", although the chemical identity is not illustrated.

  6. Beamforming of Ultrasound Signals from 1-D and 2-D Arrays under Challenging Imaging Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovljevic, Marko

    Beamforming of ultrasound signals in the presence of clutter, or partial aperture blockage by an acoustic obstacle can lead to reduced visibility of the structures of interest and diminished diagnostic value of the resulting image. We propose new beamforming methods to recover the quality of ultrasound images under such challenging conditions. Of special interest are the signals from large apertures, which are more susceptible to partial blockage, and from commercial matrix arrays that suffer from low sensitivity due to inherent design/hardware limitations. A coherence-based beamforming method designed for suppressing the in vivo clutter, namely Short-lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) Imaging, is first implemented on a 1-D array to enhance visualization of liver vasculature in 17 human subjects. The SLSC images show statistically significant improvements in vessel contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio over the matched B-mode images. The concept of SLSC imaging is then extended to matrix arrays, and the first in vivo demonstration of volumetric SLSC imaging on a clinical ultrasound system is presented. The effective suppression of clutter via volumetric SLSC imaging indicates it could potentially compensate for the low sensitivity associated with most commercial matrix arrays. The rest of the dissertation assesses image degradation due to elements blocked by ribs in a transthoracic scan. A method to detect the blocked elements is demonstrated using simulated, ex vivo, and in vivo data from the fully-sampled 2-D apertures. The results show that turning off the blocked elements both reduces the near-field clutter and improves visibility of anechoic/hypoechoic targets. Most importantly, the ex vivo data from large synthetic apertures indicates that the adaptive weighing of the non-blocked elements can recover the loss of focus quality due to periodic rib structure, allowing large apertures to realize their full resolution potential in transthoracic ultrasound.

  7. Molecular signaling underlying bulleyaconitine A (BAA)-induced microglial expression of prodynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Teng-Fei; Wu, Hai-Yun; Wang, Yi-Rui; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Bulleyaconitine (BAA) has been shown to possess antinociceptive activities by stimulation of dynorphin A release from spinal microglia. This study investigated its underlying signal transduction mechanisms. The data showed that (1) BAA treatment induced phosphorylation of CREB (rather than NF-κB) and prodynorphin expression in cultured primary microglia, and antiallodynia in neuropathy, which were totally inhibited by the CREB inhibitor KG-501; (2) BAA upregulated phosphorylation of p38 (but not ERK or JNK), and the p38 inhibitor SB203580 (but not ERK or JNK inhibitor) and p38β gene silencer siRNA/p38β (but not siRNA/p38α) completely blocked BAA-induced p38 phosphorylation and/or prodynorphin expression, and antiallodynia; (3) BAA stimulated cAMP production and PKA phosphorylation, and the adenylate cyclase inhibitor DDA and PKA inhibitor H-89 entirely antagonized BAA-induced prodynorphin expression and antiallodynia; (4) The Gs-protein inhibitor NF449 completely inhibited BAA-increased cAMP level, prodynorphin expression and antiallodynia, whereas the antagonists of noradrenergic, corticotrophin-releasing factor, A1 adenosine, formyl peptide, D1/D2 dopamine, and glucagon like-peptide-1 receptors failed to block BAA-induced antiallodynia. The data indicate that BAA-induced microglial expression of prodynorphin is mediated by activation of the cAMP-PKA-p38β-CREB signaling pathway, suggesting that its possible target is a Gs-protein-coupled receptor – “aconitine receptor”, although the chemical identity is not illustrated. PMID:28327597

  8. Survivable Lightpath Provisioning in WDM Mesh Networks Under Shared Path Protection and Signal Quality Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Shen, Lu; Ramamurthy, Byrav

    2005-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of survivable lightpath provisioning in wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) mesh networks, taking into consideration optical-layer protection and some realistic optical signal quality constraints. The investigated networks use sparsely placed optical-electrical-optical (O/E/O) modules for regeneration and wavelength conversion. Given a fixed network topology with a number of sparsely placed O/E/O modules and a set of connection requests, a pair of link-disjoint lightpaths is established for each connection. Due to physical impairments and wavelength continuity,both the working and protection lightpaths need to be regenerated at some intermediate nodes to overcome signal quality degradation and wavelength contention. In the present paper, resource-efficient provisioning solutions are achieved with the objective of maximizing resource sharing. The authors propose a resource-sharing scheme that supports three kinds of resource-sharing scenarios, including a conventional wavelength-link sharing scenario, which shares wavelength links between protection lightpaths, and two new scenarios, which share O/E/O modules between protection lightpaths and between working and protection lightpaths. An integer linear programming (ILP)-based solution approach is used to find optimal solutions. The authors also propose a local optimization heuristic approach and a tabu search heuristic approach to solve this problem for real-world,large mesh networks. Numerical results show that our solution approaches work well under a variety of network settings and achieves a high level of resource-sharing rates (over 60% for O/E/O modules and over 30% for wavelength links), which translate into great savings in network costs.

  9. Subharmonic contrast microbubble signals for noninvasive pressure estimation under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Leodore, Lauren M; Eisenbrey, John R; Park, Suhyun; Hall, Anne L; Thomenius, Kai; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-07-01

    Our group has proposed the concept of subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) utilizing microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agent signals for the noninvasive estimation of hydrostatic blood pressures. An experimental system for in vitro SHAPE was constructed based on two single-element transducers assembled confocally at a 60 degree angle to each other. Changes in the first, second and subharmonic amplitudes of five different ultrasound contrast agents were measured in vitro at static hydrostatic pressures from 0-186 mmHg, acoustic pressures from 0.35-0.60 MPa peak-to-peak and frequencies of 2.5-6.6 MHz. The most sensitive agent and optimal parameters for SHAPE were determined using linear regression analysis and implemented on a Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). This implementation of SHAPE was then tested under dynamic-flow conditions and compared to pressure-catheter measurements. Over the pressure range studied, the first and second harmonic amplitudes reduced approximately 2 dB for all contrast agents. Over the same pressure range, the subharmonic amplitudes decreased by 9-14 dB and excellent linear regressions were achieved with the hydrostatic pressure variations (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). Optimal sensitivity was achieved at a transmit frequency of 2.5 MHz and acoustic pressure of 0.35 MPa using Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway). A Logiq 9 scanner was modified to implement SHAPE on a convex transducer with a frequency range from 1.5-4.5 MHz and acoustic pressures from 0-3.34 MPa. Results matched the pressure catheter (r2 = 0.87). In conclusion, subharmonic contrast signals are a good indicator of hydrostatic pressure. Out of the five ultrasound contrast agents tested, Sonazoid was the most sensitive for subharmonic pressure estimation. Real-time SHAPE has been implemented on a commercial scanner and offers the possibility of allowing pressures in the heart and elsewhere to be obtained noninvasively.

  10. Chemical communication threatened by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer E

    2004-01-01

    Communication on a cellular level--defined as chemical signaling, sensing, and response--is an essential and universal component of all living organisms and the framework that unites all ecosystems. Evolutionarily conserved signaling "webs," existing both within an organism and between organisms, rely on efficient and accurate interpretation of chemical signals by receptors. Therefore, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which have been shown to disrupt hormone signaling in laboratory animals and exposed wildlife, may have broader implications for disrupting signaling webs that have yet to be identified as possible targets. In this article, I explore common evolutionary themes of chemical signaling (e.g., estrogen signaling in vertebrates and phytoestrogen signaling from plants to symbiotic soil bacteria) and show that such signaling systems are targets of disruption by EDCs. Recent evolutionary phylogenetic data have shown that the estrogen receptor (ER) is the ancestral receptor from which all other steroid receptors have evolved. In addition to binding endogenous estrogens, ERs also bind phytoestrogens, an ability shared in common with nodulation D protein (NodD) receptors found in Rhizobium soil bacteria. Recent data have shown that many of the same synthetic and natural environmental chemicals that disrupt endocrine signaling in vertebrates also disrupt phytoestrogen-NodD receptor signaling in soil bacteria, which is necessary for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Bacteria-plant symbiosis is an unexpected target of EDCs, and other unexpected nontarget species may also be vulnerable to EDCs found in the environment. PMID:15121505

  11. Chemical communication threatened by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E

    2004-05-01

    Communication on a cellular level--defined as chemical signaling, sensing, and response--is an essential and universal component of all living organisms and the framework that unites all ecosystems. Evolutionarily conserved signaling "webs," existing both within an organism and between organisms, rely on efficient and accurate interpretation of chemical signals by receptors. Therefore, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which have been shown to disrupt hormone signaling in laboratory animals and exposed wildlife, may have broader implications for disrupting signaling webs that have yet to be identified as possible targets. In this article, I explore common evolutionary themes of chemical signaling (e.g., estrogen signaling in vertebrates and phytoestrogen signaling from plants to symbiotic soil bacteria) and show that such signaling systems are targets of disruption by EDCs. Recent evolutionary phylogenetic data have shown that the estrogen receptor (ER) is the ancestral receptor from which all other steroid receptors have evolved. In addition to binding endogenous estrogens, ERs also bind phytoestrogens, an ability shared in common with nodulation D protein (NodD) receptors found in Rhizobium soil bacteria. Recent data have shown that many of the same synthetic and natural environmental chemicals that disrupt endocrine signaling in vertebrates also disrupt phytoestrogen-NodD receptor signaling in soil bacteria, which is necessary for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Bacteria-plant symbiosis is an unexpected target of EDCs, and other unexpected nontarget species may also be vulnerable to EDCs found in the environment.

  12. Signal formation and decay in CdTe x-ray detectors under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, A; Matz, R

    1999-01-01

    The response of Cd(Zn)Te Schottky and resistive detectors to intense x-rays is investigated in a commercial computed tomography (CT) system to assess their potential for medical diagnostics. To describe their signal height, responsivity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and detective quantum efficiency the devices are modeled as solid-state ionization chambers with spatially varying electric field and charge collection efficiency. The thicknesses and pixel areas of the discrete detector elements are 0.5-2 mm and a few mm2, respectively. The incident spectrum extends from 26 to 120 keV and comprises 10(10) quanta/s cm2. It photogenerates a carrier concentration in the semiconductor that is two to three orders of magnitude above the intrinsic concentration, but remains to a similar extent below the charge densities on the device electrodes. Stable linear operation is achieved with the Schottky-type devices under high bias. Their behavior can be modeled well if negatively charged near-midgap bulk defects with a concentration of 10(11)-10(13) cm-3 are assumed. The bulk defects explain the amount and time constant (about 100 ms) of the detrapping current measured after x-ray pulses (afterglow). To avoid screening by the trapped space charge the bias voltage should exceed 100(V) x [detector thickness/mm]2. Dark currents are of the order of the generation-recombination current, i.e., 300 pA/mm3 detector volume. With proper device design the signal height approaches the theoretical maximum of 0.2 A/W. This high responsivity, however, is not exploited in CT since the SNR is determined here by the incident quantum noise. As a consequence of the detrapping current, the response speed does not meet CT requirements. A medium-term effort for crystal growth appears necessary to achieve the required reduction of the trap density by an order of magnitude. Scintillation based detectors are, therefore, still preferred in fast operating medical diagnostic systems.

  13. Biological impact of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ePAHs) as endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Dong, Sijun; Wang, Hongou; Tao, Shu; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are often detected in the environment and are regarded as endocrine disruptors. We here designated mixtures of PAHs in the environment as environmental PAHs (ePAHs) to discuss their effects collectively, which could be different from the sum of the constituent PAHs. We first summarized the biological impact of environmental PAHs (ePAHs) found in the atmosphere, sediments, soils, and water as a result of human activities, accidents, or natural phenomena. ePAHs are characterized by their sources and forms, followed by their biological effects and social impact, and bioassays that are used to investigate their biological effects. The findings of the bioassays have demonstrated that ePAHs have the ability to affect the endocrine systems of humans and animals. The pathways that mediate cell signaling for the endocrine disruptions induced by ePAHs and PAHs have also been summarized in order to obtain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms responsible for these effects without animal tests; they include specific signaling pathways (MAPK and other signaling pathways), regulatory mechanisms (chromatin/epigenetic regulation, cell cycle/DNA damage control, and cytoskeletal/adhesion regulation), and cell functions (apoptosis, autophagy, immune responses/inflammation, neurological responses, and development/differentiation) induced by specific PAHs, such as benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, benz[l]aceanthrylene, cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, 3-methylcholanthrene, perylene, phenanthrene, and pyrene as well as their derivatives. Estrogen signaling is one of the most studied pathways associated with the endocrine-disrupting activities of PAHs, and involves estrogen receptors and aryl hydrocarbon receptors. However, some of the actions of PAHs are contradictory, complex, and unexplainable. Although several possibilities have been suggested, such as direct interactions between PAHs and

  14. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders. PMID:25654063

  15. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-12-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders.

  16. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Health disparities in endocrine disorders: biological, clinical, and nonclinical factors--an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A; Chin, Marshall H; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E; Anton, Blair

    2012-09-01

    Outreach Core Committee; and 2) suggestions offered by the Council and members of The Endocrine Society. Several themes emerged in the statement, including a need for basic science, population-based, translational and health services studies to explore underlying mechanisms contributing to endocrine health disparities. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks have worse outcomes and higher mortality from certain disorders despite having a lower (e.g. macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus and osteoporotic fractures) or similar (e.g. thyroid cancer) incidence of these disorders. Obesity is an important contributor to diabetes risk in minority populations and to sex disparities in thyroid cancer, suggesting that population interventions targeting weight loss may favorably impact a number of endocrine disorders. There are important implications regarding the definition of obesity in different race/ethnic groups, including potential underestimation of disease risk in Asian-Americans and overestimation in non-Hispanic black women. Ethnic-specific cut-points for central obesity should be determined so that clinicians can adequately assess metabolic risk. There is little evidence that genetic differences contribute significantly to race/ethnic disparities in the endocrine disorders examined. Multilevel interventions have reduced disparities in diabetes care, and these successes can be modeled to design similar interventions for other endocrine diseases.

  18. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy and Public Outreach Core Committee; and 2) suggestions offered by the Council and members of The Endocrine Society. Conclusions: Several themes emerged in the statement, including a need for basic science, population-based, translational and health services studies to explore underlying mechanisms contributing to endocrine health disparities. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks have worse outcomes and higher mortality from certain disorders despite having a lower (e.g. macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus and osteoporotic fractures) or similar (e.g. thyroid cancer) incidence of these disorders. Obesity is an important contributor to diabetes risk in minority populations and to sex disparities in thyroid cancer, suggesting that population interventions targeting weight loss may favorably impact a number of endocrine disorders. There are important implications regarding the definition of obesity in different race/ethnic groups, including potential underestimation of disease risk in Asian-Americans and overestimation in non-Hispanic black women. Ethnic-specific cut-points for central obesity should be determined so that clinicians can adequately assess metabolic risk. There is little evidence that genetic differences contribute significantly to race/ethnic disparities in the endocrine disorders examined. Multilevel interventions have reduced disparities in diabetes care, and these successes can be modeled to design similar interventions for other endocrine diseases. PMID:22730516

  19. Signaling pathways underlying the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in mice.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Neis, Vivian Binder; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Lopes, Mark William; Heinrich, Isabella A; Costa, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Kaster, Manuella P; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2016-12-13

    Inosine is a purine nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine that elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice through activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. However, the signaling pathways underlying this effect are largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study investigated the influence of extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2, Ca(2+)/calmoduline-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), protein kinase A (PKA), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β) modulation in the antiimmobility effect of inosine in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. In addition, we attempted to verify if inosine treatment was capable of altering the immunocontent and phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphatate (cAMP) response-binding element protein (CREB) in mouse prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Intracerebroventricular administration of U0126 (5 μg/mouse, MEK1/2 inhibitor), KN-62 (1 μg/mouse, CaMKII inhibitor), H-89 (1 μg/mouse, PKA inhibitor), and wortmannin (0.1 μg/mouse, PI3K inhibitor) prevented the antiimmobility effect of inosine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) in the TST. Also, administration of a sub-effective dose of inosine (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of AR-A014418 (0.001 μg/mouse, GSK-3β inhibitor) induced a synergic antidepressant-like effect. None of the treatments altered locomotor activity of mice. Moreover, 24 h after a single administration of inosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), CREB phosphorylation was increased in the hippocampus. Our findings provided new evidence that the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the TST involves the activation of PKA, PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and CaMKII and the inhibition of GSK-3β. These results contribute to the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the purinergic system modulation and indicate the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant-like effect of inosine

  20. 76 FR 49473 - Petition to Maximize Practical Utility of List 1 Chemicals Screened Through EPA's Endocrine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... AGENCY Petition to Maximize Practical Utility of List 1 Chemicals Screened Through EPA's Endocrine... decisions on data received in response to the test orders issued under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening...'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the...

  1. Endocrine disorders and medically assisted procreation.

    PubMed

    Luk, J

    2011-04-01

    A normal endocrine environment is imperative to maintain normal reproduction in women. The major endocrine organs that play a part in the reproductive system include hypothalamic pituitary axis, adrenal gland, thyroid gland, and the ovary. Each endocrine organ is in close communication and relationship with one another. Any endocrine disorders that significantly affect any of these organs would disrupt reproduction resulting in infertility. In this review, we will provide an overview of the common endocrine disorders and the available medical management including assisted reproductive technology (ART) and hormonal supplementation to overcome the endocrine disorders in order to achieve fertility for the female patients.

  2. Silicon: a duo synergy for regulating crop growth and hormonal signaling under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as salinity, heavy metals and drought, are some of the most devastating factors hindering sustainable crop production today. Plants use their own defensive strategies to cope with the adverse effects of these stresses, via the regulation of the expression of essential phytohormones, such as gibberellins (GA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonates (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene (ET). However, the efficacy of the endogenous defensive arsenals of plants often falls short if the stress persists over an extended period. Various strategies are developed to improve stress tolerance in plants. For example, silicon (Si) is widely considered to possess significant potential as a substance which ameliorate the negative effects of abiotic stresses, and improves plant growth and biomass accumulation. This review aims to explain how Si application influences the signaling of the endogenous hormones GA, SA, ABA, JA and ET during salinity, wounding, drought and metal stresses in crop plants. Phytohormonal cross talk plays an important role in the regulation of induced defences against stress. However, detailed molecular and proteomic research into these interactions is needed in order to identify the underlying mechanisms of stress tolerance that is imparted by Si application and uptake.

  3. Insulin Signaling Misregulation underlies Circadian and Cognitive Deficits in a Drosophila Fragile X Model

    PubMed Central

    Monyak, Rachel E.; Emerson, Danielle; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Chambers, Daniel B.; Rosenfelt, Cory; Langer, Steven; Hinchey, Paul; Choi, Catherine H.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Sehgal, Amita; McBride, Sean M.J.; Jongens, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an undertreated neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ and a wide range of other symptoms including disordered sleep and autism. Although FXS is the most prevalent inherited cause of intellectual disability, its mechanistic underpinnings are not well understood. Using Drosophila as a model of FXS, we showed that select expression of dfmr1 in the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the brain was sufficient to restore normal circadian behavior and to rescue the memory deficits in the fragile X mutant fly. Examination of the insulin-signaling (IS) pathway revealed elevated levels of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2) in the IPCs and elevated IS in the dfmr1 mutant brain. Consistent with a causal role for elevated IS in dfmr1 mutant phenotypes, expression of dfmr1 specifically in the IPCs reduced IS, and genetic reduction of the insulin pathway also led to amelioration of circadian and memory defects. Furthermore we showed that treatment with the FDA approved drug metformin also rescued memory. Finally, we showed that reduction of IS is required at different time points to rescue circadian behavior and memory. Our results indicate that insulin misregulation underlies the circadian and cognitive phenotypes displayed by the Drosophila fragile X model, and thus reveal a metabolic pathway that can be targeted by new and already approved drugs to treat fragile X patients. PMID:27090306

  4. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-07-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress.

  5. Statistical characteristics of suction pressure signals for a centrifugal pump under cavitating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Benxu; Ji, Yucheng; Lu, Jiaxin; Yuan, Shouqi

    2017-02-01

    Centrifugal pumps are often used in operating conditions where they can be susceptible to premature failure. The cavitation phenomenon is a common fault in centrifugal pumps and is associated with undesired effects. Among the numerous cavitation detection methods, the measurement of suction pressure fluctuation is one of the most used methods to detect or diagnose the degree of cavitation in a centrifugal pump. In this paper, a closed loop was established to investigate the pump cavitation phenomenon, the statistical parameters for PDF (Probability Density Function), Variance and RMS (Root Mean Square) were used to analyze the relationship between the cavitation performance and the suction pressure signals during the development of cavitation. It is found that the statistical parameters used in this research are able to capture critical cavitation condition and cavitation breakdown condition, whereas difficult for the detection of incipient cavitation in the pump. At part-load conditions, the pressure fluctuations at the impeller inlet show more complexity than the best efficiency point (BEP). Amplitude of PDF values of suction pressure increased steeply when the flow rate dropped to 40 m3/h (the design flow rate was 60 m3/h). One possible reason is that the flow structure in the impeller channel promotes an increase of the cavitation intensity when the flow rate is reduced to a certain degree. This shows that it is necessary to find the relationship between the cavitation instabilities and flow instabilities when centrifugal pumps operate under part-load flow rates.

  6. Fetal and Neonatal Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are substances commonly encountered in every setting and condition in the modern world. It is virtually impossible to avoid the contact with these chemical compounds in our daily life. Molecules defined as endocrine disruptors constitute an extremely heterogeneous group and include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants and their by-products. Natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens) also act as endocrine disruptors. Different from adults, children are not exposed only to chemical toxins in the environment but may also be exposed during their intrauterine life. Hundreds of toxic substances, which include neuro-immune and endocrine toxic chemical components that may influence the critical steps of hormonal, neurological and immunological development, may affect the fetus via the placental cord and these substances may be excreted in the meconium. Children and especially newborns are more sensitive to environmental toxins compared to adults. Metabolic pathways are immature, especially in the first months of life. The ability of the newborn to metabolize, detoxify and eliminate many toxins is different from that of the adults. Although exposures occur during fetal or neonatal period, their effects may sometimes be observed in later years. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects of these substances on the endocrine system and to provide evidence for preventive measures. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22672860

  7. Endocrine disruption in aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kloas, Werner; Urbatzka, Ralph; Opitz, Robert; Würtz, Sven; Behrends, Thomas; Hermelink, Björn; Hofmann, Frauke; Jagnytsch, Oana; Kroupova, Hana; Lorenz, Claudia; Neumann, Nadja; Pietsch, Constanze; Trubiroha, Achim; Van Ballegooy, Christoph; Wiedemann, Caterina; Lutz, Ilka

    2009-04-01

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. The main sink of such substances, called endocrine disrupters (ED), are surface waters. Thus, aquatic vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, are most endangered. ED can adversely affect reproductive biology and the thyroid system. ED act by (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic modes of action, resulting in abnormal sexual differentiation and impaired reproduction. These effects are mainly driven by direct interferences of ED with sex steroid receptors rather than indirectly by impacting synthesis and bioavailability of sex steroids, which in turn might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Recent findings reveal that, in addition to the human-produced waste of ED, natural sources, such as parasites and decomposition of leaves, also might act as ED, markedly affecting sexual differentiation and reproduction in fish and amphibians. Although the thyroid system has essential functions in both fish and amphibians, amphibian metamorphosis has been introduced as the most sensitive model to detect thyroidal ED; no suitable fish model exists. Whereas ED may act primarily on only one specific endocrine target, all endocrine systems will eventually be deregulated as they are intimately connected to each other. The recent ecotoxicological issue of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) present in the aquatic environment indicates a high potential for further endocrine modes of action on aquatic vertebrates by ED derived from PhACs, such as glucocorticoids, progestins, and beta-agonists.

  8. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  9. Mesodiencephalic Dopaminergic Neuronal Differentiation Does Not Involve GLI2A-Mediated SHH-Signaling and Is under the Direct Influence of Canonical WNT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mesman, Simone; von Oerthel, Lars; Smidt, Marten P.

    2014-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and WNT proteins are key regulators in many developmental processes, like embryonic patterning and brain development. In the brain, SHH is expressed in a gradient starting in the floor plate (FP) progressing ventrally in the midbrain, where it is thought to be involved in the development and specification of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons. GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling induces the expression of Gli1, which is inhibited when cells start expressing SHH themselves. To determine whether mdDA neurons receive GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling during differentiation, we used a BAC-transgenic mouse model expressing eGFP under the control of the Gli1 promoter. This mouse-model allowed for mapping of GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling temporal and spatial in the mouse midbrain. Since mdDA neurons are born from E10.5, peaking at E11.0–E12.0, we examined Gli1-eGFP embryos at E11.5, E12.5, and E13.5, indicating whether Gli1 was induced before or during mdDA development and differentiation. Our data indicate that GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling is not involved in mdDA neuronal differentiation. However, it appears to be involved in the differentiation of neurons which make up a subset of the red nucleus (RN). In order to detect whether mdDA neuronal differentiation may be under the control of canonical WNT-signaling, we used a transgenic mouse-line expressing LacZ under the influence of stable β-catenin. Here, we show that TH+ neurons of the midbrain receive canonical WNT-signaling during differentiation. Therefore, we suggest that early SHH-signaling is indirectly involved in mdDA development through early patterning of the midbrain area, whereas canonical WNT-signaling is directly involved in the differentiation of the mdDA neuronal population. PMID:24865218

  10. Risk assessment of 'endocrine substances': guidance on identifying endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard W

    2013-12-16

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) and other related legislation only support the marketing and use of chemical products on the basis that they do not induce endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. This legislation would appear to make the assumption that endocrine active chemicals should be managed differently from other chemicals presumably due to an assumed lack of a threshold for adverse effects. In the absence of agreed scientific criteria and guidance on how to identify and evaluate endocrine activity and disruption within these pieces of legislation, a European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) task force was formed to provide scientific criteria that may be used within the context of these three legislative documents. The first ECETOC technical report and associated workshop, held in 2009, presented a science-based concept on how to identify endocrine activity and disrupting properties of chemicals for both human health and the environment. Specific scientific criteria for the determination of endocrine activity and disrupting properties that integrate information from both regulatory toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies were proposed. These criteria combined the nature of the adverse effects detected in studies which give concern for endocrine toxicity with an understanding of the mode of action of toxicity so that adverse effects can be explained scientifically. A key element in the data evaluation is the consideration of all available information in a weight-of-evidence approach. Both sets of data (evidence of the adverse effect in apical studies and conclusive mode of action knowledge) are essential in order to correctly identify endocrine disruption according to accepted definitions. As the legislation seeks to regulate chemicals on a mode of action rather than the more traditional approach of adverse endpoints, then conclusive evidence of the mode of action of concern

  11. Secure chaotic transmission of electrocardiography signals with acousto-optic modulation under profiled beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Almehmadi, Fares S; Chatterjee, Monish R

    2015-01-10

    Electrocardiography (ECG) signals are used for both medical purposes and identifying individuals. It is often necessary to encrypt this highly sensitive information before it is transmitted over any channel. A closed-loop acousto-optic hybrid device acting as a chaotic modulator is applied to ECG signals to achieve this encryption. Recently improved modeling of this approach using profiled optical beams has shown it to be very sensitive to key parameters that characterize the encryption and decryption process, exhibiting its potential for secure transmission of analog and digital signals. Here the encryption and decryption is demonstrated for ECG signals, both analog and digital versions, illustrating strong encryption without significant distortion. Performance analysis pertinent to both analog and digital transmission of the ECG waveform is also carried out using output signal-to-noise, signal-to-distortion, and bit-error-rate measures relative to the key parameters and presence of channel noise in the system.

  12. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  13. Endocrine controls of keratin expression.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Paus, Ralf; Tiede, Stephan; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2009-04-01

    Keratins are a family of intermediate filaments that serve various crucial roles in skin physiology. For mammalian skin to function properly, and to produce epidermal and hair keratins that are optimally adapted for their environment, it is critical that keratin gene and protein expression are stringently controlled. Given that the skin is not only targeted by multiple hormones, but also constitutes a veritable peripheral endocrine organ, it is not surprizing that intracutaneous keratin expression is underlined by tight endocrine controls. These controls encompass thyroid hormones, steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids (GCs), retinoic acid (RA) and vitamin D, and several neuroendocrine mediators. Here, we review why a better understanding of the endocrine controls of keratin expression is not only required for an improved insight into normal human skin and hair function, but may also open new therapeutic avenues in a wide range of skin and hair diseases.

  14. Endocrine disrupters and menopausal health.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip; Rumsby, Paul; Harrison, Paul T C

    2004-06-01

    Chemicals known to disrupt the endocrine system of animal models are assessed for their potential impact on the health of menopausal and postmenopausal women. These "endocrine disrupters" consist of two groups of compounds - man-made and naturally occurring. There is some evidence to suggest that the naturally occurring phytoestrogens, derived from plant material, may have some beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms and the risk of breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Further studies are required to confirm these possibilities. Some man-made environmental pollutants appear to increase the risk of breast cancer, although again the evidence is inconclusive. Mechanistic experiments indicate that these chemicals interact with oestrogen receptors and alter metabolism in a number of different ways, some of which may be important in postmenopausal women. Further investigation of the differences in mode of action between the man-made and the natural endocrine disrupters may lead to important insights into their effects on women's health.

  15. A real-time traffic control method for the intersection with pre-signals under the phase swap sorting strategy.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yiming; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yinhai

    2017-01-01

    To deal with the conflicts between left-turn and through traffic streams and increase the discharge capacity, this paper addresses the pre-signal which is implemented at a signalized intersection. Such an intersection with pre-signal is termed as a tandem intersection. For the tandem intersection, phase swap sorting strategy is deemed as the most effective phasing scheme in view of some exclusive merits, such as easier compliance of drivers, and shorter sorting area. However, a major limitation of the phase swap sorting strategy is not considered in previous studies: if one or more vehicle is left at the sorting area after the signal light turns to red, the capacity of the approach would be dramatically dropped. Besides, previous signal control studies deal with a fixed timing plan that is not adaptive with the fluctuation of traffic flows. Therefore, to cope with these two gaps, this paper firstly takes an in-depth analysis of the traffic flow operations at the tandem intersection. Secondly, three groups of loop detectors are placed to obtain the real-time vehicle information for adaptive signalization. The lane selection behavior in the sorting area is considered to set the green time for intersection signals. With the objective of minimizing the vehicle delay, the signal control parameters are then optimized based on a dynamic programming method. Finally, numerical experiments show that average vehicle delay and maximum queue length can be reduced under all scenarios.

  16. A real-time traffic control method for the intersection with pre-signals under the phase swap sorting strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Yiming; Wang, Yinhai

    2017-01-01

    To deal with the conflicts between left-turn and through traffic streams and increase the discharge capacity, this paper addresses the pre-signal which is implemented at a signalized intersection. Such an intersection with pre-signal is termed as a tandem intersection. For the tandem intersection, phase swap sorting strategy is deemed as the most effective phasing scheme in view of some exclusive merits, such as easier compliance of drivers, and shorter sorting area. However, a major limitation of the phase swap sorting strategy is not considered in previous studies: if one or more vehicle is left at the sorting area after the signal light turns to red, the capacity of the approach would be dramatically dropped. Besides, previous signal control studies deal with a fixed timing plan that is not adaptive with the fluctuation of traffic flows. Therefore, to cope with these two gaps, this paper firstly takes an in-depth analysis of the traffic flow operations at the tandem intersection. Secondly, three groups of loop detectors are placed to obtain the real-time vehicle information for adaptive signalization. The lane selection behavior in the sorting area is considered to set the green time for intersection signals. With the objective of minimizing the vehicle delay, the signal control parameters are then optimized based on a dynamic programming method. Finally, numerical experiments show that average vehicle delay and maximum queue length can be reduced under all scenarios. PMID:28531198

  17. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    PubMed Central

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In our daily lives, we form some impressions of other people. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a tentative concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region. PMID:22837740

  18. Effects of signal light on the fuel consumption and emissions under car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Yi, Zhi-Yan; Lin, Qing-Feng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a car-following model is utilized to study the effects of signal light on each vehicle's fuel consumption, CO, HC and NOX. The numerical results show that each vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions are influenced by the signal light and that the effects are related to the green split of the signal light and the vehicle's time headway at the origin, which can help drivers adjust their micro driving behavior on the road with a signal light to reduce their fuel consumption and emissions.

  19. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Falchetti, Alberto; Monte, Francesca Del; Sala, Silvia Carbonell; Gozzini, Alessia; Luzi, Ettore; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours) within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions) is recommended. PMID:17014705

  20. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of endocrine disruptor chemicals in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Caserta, D; Maranghi, L; Mantovani, A; Marci, R; Maranghi, F; Moscarini, M

    2008-01-01

    The potential hazardous effects that estrogen- and androgen-like chemicals may have both on wildlife and human health have attracted much attention from the scientific community. Endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are chemicals that have the capacity to interfere with normal signalling systems. EDCs may mimic, block or modulate the synthesis, release, transport, metabolism and binding or elimination of natural hormones. Even though potential EDCs may be present in the environment at only very low levels, they may still cause harmful effects, especially when several different compounds act on one target. EDCs include persistent pollutants, agrochemicals and widespread industrial compounds. Not all EDCs are man-made compounds; many plants produce substances (phytoestrogens) that can have different endocrine effects either adverse or beneficial in certain circumstances. Natural substances such as sex hormones from urban or farm wastes can become concentrated in industrial, agricultural and urban areas; thus, such wastes may be considered potential 'EDCs' for humans and/or wildlife. Much attention has focussed on changing trends in male reproductive parameters in relation to EDC exposure; however, studies on the female reproductive system have been less comprehensive. We have focussed this article on four major aspects of female reproductive health: fertility and fecundability, endometriosis, precocious puberty and breast and endometrial cancer.

  2. Endocrine Control of Exaggerated Trait Growth in Rhinoceros Beetles.

    PubMed

    Zinna, R; Gotoh, H; Brent, C S; Dolezal, A; Kraus, A; Niimi, T; Emlen, D; Lavine, L C

    2016-08-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key insect growth regulator frequently involved in modulating phenotypically plastic traits such as caste determination in eusocial species, wing polymorphisms in aphids, and mandible size in stag beetles. The jaw morphology of stag beetles is sexually-dimorphic and condition-dependent; males have larger jaws than females and those developing under optimum conditions are larger in overall body size and have disproportionately larger jaws than males raised under poor conditions. We have previously shown that large males have higher JH titers than small males during development, and ectopic application of fenoxycarb (JH analog) to small males can induce mandibular growth similar to that of larger males. What remains unknown is whether JH regulates condition-dependent trait growth in other insects with extreme sexually selected structures. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that JH mediates the condition-dependent expression of the elaborate horns of the Asian rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus. The sexually dimorphic head horn of this beetle is sensitive to nutritional state during larval development. Like stag beetles, male rhinoceros beetles receiving copious food produce disproportionately large horns for their body size compared with males under restricted diets. We show that JH titers are correlated with body size during the late feeding and early prepupal periods, but this correlation disappears by the late prepupal period, the period of maximum horn growth. While ectopic application of fenoxycarb during the third larval instar significantly delayed pupation, it had no effect on adult horn size relative to body size. Fenoxycarb application to late prepupae also had at most a marginal effect on relative horn size. We discuss our results in context of other endocrine signals of condition-dependent trait exaggeration and suggest that different beetle lineages may have co-opted different physiological signaling mechanisms to

  3. Acoustic emission signals frequency-amplitude characteristics of sandstone after thermal treated under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Biao; Wang, Enyuan; Li, Zenghua; Wang, Xiaoran; Niu, Yue; Kong, Xiangguo

    2017-01-01

    Thermally treated sandstone deformation and fracture produced abundant acoustic emission (AE) signals. The AE signals waveform contained plentiful precursor information of sandstone deformation and fracture behavior. In this paper, uniaxial compression tests of sandstone after different temperature treatments were conducted, the frequency-amplitude characteristics of AE signals were studied, and the main frequency distribution at different stress level was analyzed. The AE signals frequency-amplitude characteristics had great difference after different high temperature treatment. Significant differences existed of the main frequency distribution of AE signals during thermal treated sandstone deformation and fracture. The main frequency band of the largest waveforms proportion was not unchanged after different high temperature treatments. High temperature caused thermal damage to the sandstone, and sandstone deformation and fracture was obvious than the room temperature. The number of AE signals was larger than the room temperature during the initial loading stage. The low frequency AE signals had bigger proportion when the stress was 0.1, and the maximum value of the low frequency amplitude was larger than high frequency signals. With the increase of stress, the low and high frequency AE signals were gradually increase, which indicated that different scales ruptures were broken in sandstone. After high temperature treatment, the number of high frequency AE signals was significantly bigger than the low frequency AE signals during the latter loading stage, this indicates that the small scale rupture rate of recurrence and frequency were more than large scale rupture. The AE ratio reached the maximum during the sandstone instability failure period, and large scale rupture was dominated in the failure process. AE amplitude increase as the loading increases, the deformation and fracture of sandstone was increased gradually. By comparison, the value of the low frequency

  4. A hypothetical role for vitamin K2 in the endocrine and exocrine aspects of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Southward, Ken

    2015-03-01

    The growing interest in oral/systemic links demand new paradigms to understand disease processes. New opportunities for dental research, particularly in the fields of neuroscience and endocrinology will emerge. The role of the hypothalamus portion of the brain cannot be underestimated. Under the influence of nutrition, it plays a significant role in the systemic model of dental caries. Currently, the traditional theory of dental caries considers only the oral environment and does not recognize any significant role for the brain. The healthy tooth, however, has a centrifugal fluid flow to nourish and cleanse it. This is moderated by the hypothalamus/parotid axis which signals the endocrine portion of the parotid glands. High sugar intake creates an increase in reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus. When this signaling mechanism halts or reverses the dentinal fluid flow, it renders the tooth vulnerable to oral bacteria, which can now attach to the tooth's surface. Acid produced by oral bacteria such as Strep Mutans and lactobacillus can now de-mineralize the enamel and irritate the dentin. The acid attack stimulates an inflammatory response which results in dentin breakdown from the body's own matrix metalloproteinases. Vitamin K2 (K2) has been shown to have an antioxidant potential in the brain and may prove to be a potent way to preserve the endocrine controlled centrifugal dentinal fluid flow. Stress, including oxidative stress, magnifies the body's inflammatory response. Sugar can not only increase oral bacterial acid production but it can concurrently reduce the tooth's defenses through endocrine signaling. Saliva production is the exocrine function of the salivary glands. The buffering capacity of saliva is critical to neutralizing the oral environment. This minimizes the de-mineralization of enamel and enhances its re-mineralization. K2, such as that found in fermented cheese, improves salivary buffering through its influence on

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors are a class of chemicals of growing interest to the environmental community. USEPA's Risk Assessment Forum defined an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) as "an exogenous agent that interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elim...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors are a class of chemicals of growing interest to the environmental community. USEPA's Risk Assessment Forum defined an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) as "an exogenous agent that interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elim...

  7. ANALYTICAL CHALLENGES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported increases in the incidence of endocrine-related conditions have led to speculation about environmental causes. Environmental scientists are focusing increased research effort into understanding the mechanisms by which endocrine disruptors affect human and ecological h...

  8. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ...

  9. ANALYTICAL CHALLENGES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported increases in the incidence of endocrine-related conditions have led to speculation about environmental causes. Environmental scientists are focusing increased research effort into understanding the mechanisms by which endocrine disruptors affect human and ecological h...

  10. The timing of control signals underlying fast point-to-point arm movements.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, M; Feldman, A G

    2001-04-01

    It is known that proprioceptive feedback induces muscle activation when the facilitation of appropriate motoneurons exceeds their threshold. In the suprathreshold range, the muscle-reflex system produces torques depending on the position and velocity of the joint segment(s) that the muscle spans. The static component of the torque-position relationship is referred to as the invariant characteristic (IC). According to the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis, control systems produce movements by changing the activation thresholds and thus shifting the IC of the appropriate muscles in joint space. This control process upsets the balance between muscle and external torques at the initial limb configuration and, to regain the balance, the limb is forced to establish a new configuration or, if the movement is prevented, a new level of static torques. Taken together, the joint angles and the muscle torques generated at an equilibrium configuration define a single variable called the EP. Thus by shifting the IC, control systems reset the EP. Muscle activation and movement emerge following the EP resetting because of the natural physical tendency of the system to reach equilibrium. Empirical and simulation studies support the notion that the control IC shifts and the resulting EP shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements are gradual rather than step-like. However, controversies exist about the duration of these shifts. Some studies suggest that the IC shifts cease with the movement offset. Other studies propose that the IC shifts end early in comparison to the movement duration (approximately, at peak velocity). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the duration of the IC shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements. Subjects made fast (hand peak velocity about 1.3 m/s) planar arm movements toward different targets while grasping a handle. Hand forces applied to the handle and shoulder/elbow torques were, respectively, measured from a force sensor placed

  11. Attenuated orexinergic signaling underlies depression-like responses induced by daytime light deficiency.

    PubMed

    Deats, S P; Adidharma, W; Lonstein, J S; Yan, L

    2014-07-11

    Light has profound effects on mood, as exemplified by seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and the beneficial effects of bright light therapy. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. Our previous work has developed the diurnal grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus, as an animal model of SAD (Leach et al., 2013a,b). By utilizing a 12:12-h dim light:dark (DLD) paradigm that simulates the lower light intensity of winter, we showed that the animals housed in DLD exhibited increased depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and sweet solution preference (SSP) compared to animals housed in bright light during the day (BLD). The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that light affects mood by acting on the brain orexinergic system in the diurnal grass rat model of SAD. First, orexin A immunoreactivity (OXA-ir) was examined in DLD and BLD grass rats. Results revealed a reduction in the number of OXA-ir neurons in the hypothalamus and attenuated OXA-ir fiber density in the dorsal raphe nucleus of animals in the DLD compared to those in the BLD group. Then, the animals in BLD were treated systemically with SB-334867, a selective orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist, which led to a depressive phenotype characterized by increased immobility in the FST and a decrease in SSP compared to vehicle-treated controls. Results suggest that attenuated orexinergic signaling is associated with increased depression-like behaviors in grass rats, and support the hypothesis that the orexinergic system mediates the effects of light on mood.

  12. Attenuated orexinergic signaling underlies depression-like responses induced by daytime light deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deats, Sean P.; Adidharma, Widya; Lonstein, Joseph S.; Yan, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Light has profound effects on mood, as exemplified by seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and the beneficial effects of bright light therapy. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. Our previous work has developed the diurnal grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus, as an animal model of SAD (Leach et al., 2013a, Leach et al., 2013b). By utilizing a 12:12hr Dim Light:Dark (DLD) paradigm that simulates the lower light intensity of winter, we showed that the animals housed in DLD exhibited increased depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and sweet solution preference (SSP) compared to animals housed in bright light during the day (BLD). The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that light affects mood by acting on the brain orexinergic system in the diurnal grass rat model of SAD. First, orexinA immunoreactivity (OXA-ir) was examined in DLD and BLD grass rats. The results revealed a reduction in the number of OXA-ir neurons in the hypothalamus and attenuated OXA-ir fiber density in the dorsal raphe nucleus of animals in the DLD compared to those in the BLD group. Then, the animals in BLD were treated systemically with SB-334867, a selective orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist, which led to a depressive phenotype characterized by increased immobility in the FST and a decrease in SSP compared to vehicle-treated controls. The results suggest that attenuated orexinergic signaling is associated with increased depression-like behaviors in grass rats, and support the hypothesis that the orexinergic system mediates the effects of light on mood. PMID:24813431

  13. Gibberellic Acid Signaling Is Required to Induce Flowering of Chrysanthemums Grown under Both Short and Long Days.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Deng, Ye; Wang, Haibin; Gao, Ri; Stephen, Githeng'u K; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2017-06-12

    Flower bud formation and flowering in chrysanthemums occur under short day conditions (SD), but the molecular basis for the switch to reproductive growth is less well understood than in model plants. Here, a spontaneous mutant able to flower under long days is described. In an attempt to reveal the pathway(s) involved in the formation of flower buds under contrasting daylengths, transcriptome sequencing was carried out in plants grown both under SD and long day conditions (LD). A number of differentially transcribed genes involved in the various known flowering pathways were identified. Both circadian clock genes and Chrysanthemum FLOWERING LOCUS T Like3 (CmFTL3) were up-regulated under SD, thereby inducing floral bud formation and flowering. The gibberellin (GA) signaling pathway-related genes Gibberellin 20-oxidase (GA20ox) and Gibberellin receptor (GID1) were up-regulated in the mutant under LD, while the catabolic genes Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) and GA-INSENSITIVE (GAI) were down-regulated, thereby inducing the transcription of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and LEAFY (LFY). The GA content of the leaf was higher in the mutant than in the wild type (WT) under LD and SD, and the mutant has more branching than WT plants under LD or SD. When treated with GA, the mutant flowered earlier under both SD and LD relative to WT, but there was no detectable phenotype difference between the two lines. The indication was that the photoperiod pathway majorly regulates flower bud formation and flowering time in chrysanthemums under SD. The GA signaling pathway only plays a subsidiary role for flowering. However, the GA signaling pathway predominated for flowering under LD.

  14. A circuit-based mechanism underlying familiarity signaling and the preference for novelty.

    PubMed

    Molas, Susanna; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; Liu, Liwang; DeGroot, Steven R; Gardner, Paul D; Tapper, Andrew R

    2017-09-01

    Novelty preference (NP) is an evolutionarily conserved, essential survival mechanism often dysregulated in neuropsychiatric disorders. NP is mediated by a motivational dopamine signal that increases in response to novel stimuli, thereby driving exploration. However, the mechanism by which once-novel stimuli transition to familiar stimuli is unknown. Here we describe a neuroanatomical substrate for familiarity signaling, the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) of the midbrain, which is activated as novel stimuli become familiar with multiple exposures. In mice, optogenetic silencing of IPN neurons increases salience of and interaction with familiar stimuli without affecting novelty responses, whereas photoactivation of the same neurons reduces exploration of novel stimuli mimicking familiarity. Bidirectional control of NP by the IPN depends on familiarity signals and novelty signals arising from excitatory habenula and dopaminergic ventral tegmentum inputs, which activate and reduce IPN activity, respectively. These results demonstrate that familiarity signals through unique IPN circuitry that opposes novelty seeking to control NP.

  15. UWB doublet signal generation and modulation based on DFB laser under optical pulses injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dalei; Wang, Rong; Xiang, Peng; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zhou, Hua; Zhao, Jiyong; Huang, Long; Zhu, Huatao; Wang, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to generate ultra-wideband (UWB) doublet signals based on the cross-gain modulation (XGM) effect in the DFB lasers is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, the modulation and transmission of the generated UWB doublet signals are also researched. In the proposed system, a gain-switched laser (GSL) is used as a master laser (ML) and the optical pulses from the ML are optically injected into two paralleled DFB lasers, which are used as slave lasers (SL). Then the outputs from the SLs are detected by a balanced photodiode (BPD) to generate the Bi-phased UWB signals. By properly setting the system parameters, UWB signals with various modulation formats such as on-off keying (OOK), pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) as well as the phase-shift keying (PSK) can be generated. In addition, fiber transmission of the modulated UWB signals is also experimentally investigated.

  16. Prion-like Polymerization Underlies Signal Transduction in Antiviral Immune Defense and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Chen, Jueqi; Xu, Hui; Liu, Siqi; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Halfmann, Randal; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pathogens and cellular danger signals activate sensors such as RIG-I and NLRP3 to produce robust immune and inflammatory responses through respective adaptor proteins MAVS and ASC, which harbor essential N-terminal CARD and PYRIN domains, respectively. Here, we show that CARD and PYRIN function as bona fide prions in yeast and their prion forms are inducible by their respective upstream activators. Likewise, a yeast prion domain can functionally replace CARD and PYRIN in mammalian cell signaling. Mutations in MAVS and ASC that disrupt their prion activities in yeast also abrogate their ability to signal in mammalian cells. Furthermore, fibers of recombinant PYRIN can convert ASC into functional polymers capable of activating caspase-1. Remarkably, a conserved fungal NOD-like receptor and prion pair can functionally reconstitute signaling of NLRP3 and ASC PYRINs in mammalian cells. These results indicate that prion-like polymerization is a conserved signal transduction mechanism in innate immunity and inflammation. PMID:24630723

  17. Endocrine emergencies in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Amie

    2013-07-01

    Success in treatment of endocrine emergencies is contingent on early recognition and treatment. Many endocrine diseases presenting emergently have nonspecific signs and symptoms. In addition, these endocrine crises are often precipitated by concurrent disease, further making early identification difficult. This article concentrates on recognition and emergency management of the most common endocrine crises in dogs and cats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bidirectional Signaling of Mammary Epithelium and Stroma: Implications for Breast Cancer—Preventive Actions of Dietary Factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mammary gland is composed of two major cellular compartments: a highly dynamic epithelium that undergoes cycles of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to local and endocrine signals and the underlying stroma comprised of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and adipocytes that c...

  19. Endocrine factors in the etiology of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Daly, Robert C; Rubinow, David R

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the literature regarding endocrine factors postulated or presumed to be relevant in postpartum depression (PPD), a condition affecting at least 10% of childbearing women. The phenomenology and epidemiology of PPD are also described. Data suggest that parturition-related endocrine changes are causally implicated in PPD in a vulnerable subgroup of women. More specifically, studies by our group and others suggest a role for changes in estradiol and progesterone in precipitating mood symptoms among women with PPD. The mechanisms underlying such differential sensitivities remain undetermined. Future directions for research are explored.

  20. Signal characteristics of the surface bonded fiber Bragg grating sensors by bonding length under different load types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyunseok; Park, Yurim; Shrestha, Pratik; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2017-04-01

    The surface-bonding method of the fiber Bragg grating(FBG) sensor is easier to handle than embedding method. However surface bonded FBG sensors have the limitation of the signal characteristics being affected by the bonding layer. In this study, the effects of the bonding length on the surface installed FBG sensor signal characteristics under various load types were empirically investigated. To evaluate the stability of the signal characteristics of the FBG sensors, the strain transfer rate and the multiple peaks ratio of the reflected spectrum were calculated and compared. From the experimental results, the strain transfer ratio and multiple peaks ratio varied because of the different strain gradients formed depending on the applied load type. Therefore, it was found that the effective bonding length for respective load types need to be determined to get a stable signal from the surface bonded FBG sensors.

  1. mTORC1 signaling under hypoxic conditions is controlled by ATM-dependent phosphorylation of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Cam, Hakan; Easton, John B; High, Anthony; Houghton, Peter J

    2010-11-24

    The mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) coordinates cell growth and metabolism, acting as a restriction point under stress conditions such as low oxygen tension (hypoxia). Hypoxia suppresses mTORC1 signaling. However, the signals by which hypoxia suppresses mTORC1 are only partially understood, and a direct link between hypoxia-driven physiological stress and the regulation of mTORC1 signaling is unknown. Here we show that hypoxia results in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent phosphorylation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) on serine(696) and mediates downregulation of mTORC1 signaling. Deregulation of these pathways in pediatric solid tumor xenografts suggests a link between mTORC1 dysregulation and solid tumor development and points to an important role for hypoxic regulation of mTORC1 activity in tumor development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hormones in the city: endocrine ecology of urban birds.

    PubMed

    Bonier, Frances

    2012-05-01

    Urbanization dramatically changes the landscape, presenting organisms with novel challenges and often leading to reduced species diversity. Urban ecologists have documented numerous biotic and abiotic consequences of urbanization, such as altered climate, species interactions, and community composition, but we lack an understanding of the mechanisms underlying organisms' responses to urbanization. Here, I review findings from the nascent field of study of the endocrine ecology of urban birds. Thus far, no clear or consistent patterns have been revealed, but we do have evidence that urban habitat can shape endocrine traits, and that those traits might contribute to adaptation to the urban environment. I suggest strong approaches for future work addressing exciting questions about the role of endocrine traits in mediating responses to urbanization within species across the globe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Alzaraa, Ahmed; Udom, Valeri; Mousa, Husam; Alzein, Abdulhalem; Benhamida, Abduljalil; Dalal, Neha

    2007-09-14

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas comprise 10%-15% of pancreatic cystic lesions, with the serous cystadenoms being the commonest. The association of exocrine and endocrine tumours of the pancreas unrelated to Von Hipple Lindau disease is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. We present another case of both these tumours in one patient. A female patient was seen in the surgical clinic for a pain in the right groin. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed a diagnosis of combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. She underwent surgery and is under regular follow-up in the surgical clinic. Biphasic differentiation of pancreatic stem cell during embryological development could happen and may result in combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. Imaging studies are excellent in diagnosing theses lesions. Surgery has a central role and could be curative.

  4. Combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Alzaraa, Ahmed; Udom, Valeri; Mousa, Husam; Alzein, Abdulhalem; Benhamida, Abduljalil; Dalal, Neha

    2007-01-01

    Background Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas comprise 10%–15% of pancreatic cystic lesions, with the serous cystadenoms being the commonest. The association of exocrine and endocrine tumours of the pancreas unrelated to Von Hipple Lindau disease is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. We present another case of both these tumours in one patient. Case presentation A female patient was seen in the surgical clinic for a pain in the right groin. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed a diagnosis of combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. She underwent surgery and is under regular follow-up in the surgical clinic. Conclusion Biphasic differentiation of pancreatic stem cell during embryological development could happen and may result in combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. Imaging studies are excellent in diagnosing theses lesions. Surgery has a central role and could be curative. PMID:17868437

  5. A Non-Uniformly Under-Sampled Blade Tip-Timing Signal Reconstruction Method for Blade Vibration Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT) have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes. PMID:25621612

  6. A non-uniformly under-sampled blade tip-timing signal reconstruction method for blade vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zheng; Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Li, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-22

    High-speed blades are often prone to fatigue due to severe blade vibrations. In particular, synchronous vibrations can cause irreversible damages to the blade. Blade tip-timing methods (BTT) have become a promising way to monitor blade vibrations. However, synchronous vibrations are unsuitably monitored by uniform BTT sampling. Therefore, non-equally mounted probes have been used, which will result in the non-uniformity of the sampling signal. Since under-sampling is an intrinsic drawback of BTT methods, how to analyze non-uniformly under-sampled BTT signals is a big challenge. In this paper, a novel reconstruction method for non-uniformly under-sampled BTT data is presented. The method is based on the periodically non-uniform sampling theorem. Firstly, a mathematical model of a non-uniform BTT sampling process is built. It can be treated as the sum of certain uniform sample streams. For each stream, an interpolating function is required to prevent aliasing in the reconstructed signal. Secondly, simultaneous equations of all interpolating functions in each sub-band are built and corresponding solutions are ultimately derived to remove unwanted replicas of the original signal caused by the sampling, which may overlay the original signal. In the end, numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the reconstructed signal depends on the sampling frequency, the blade vibration frequency, the blade vibration bandwidth, the probe static offset and the number of samples. In practice, both types of blade vibration signals can be particularly reconstructed by non-uniform BTT data acquired from only two probes.

  7. Blood Contrast Agents Enhance Intrinsic Signals in the Retina: Evidence for an Underlying Blood Volume Component

    PubMed Central

    Ts'o, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the extent to which neurovascular coupling contributes to stimulus-evoked intrinsic signals in the retina. Methods. The retinas of five adult cats were examined in vivo. Animals were anesthetized and paralyzed for imaging stability. The retinas were imaged through a modified fundus camera capable of presenting patterned visual stimuli simultaneous with a diffuse near infrared (NIR). Results. Injections of nigrosin increased signal strength by as much as 36.3%, and indocyanine green (ICG) increased signal magnitudes by as much as 38.1%. In both cases, intrinsic signals maintained a colocalized pattern of activation corresponding to the visual stimulus presented. The time course of the evoked signals remained unaltered. The spectral dependency of signal enhancement mirrored the absorption spectra of the injected dyes. Conclusions. The data are consistent with a neurovascular coupling effect in the retina. Patterned visual stimuli evoke colocalized NIR reflectance changes. The patterned decrease in reflectance was enhanced after nigrosin or ICG was injected into the systemic circulation. These findings suggest stimulus-evoked changes in blood volume underlie a component of the retinal intrinsic signals. PMID:21051719

  8. The Vitamin D Endocrine System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the physiology and biochemistry of the vitamin D endocrine system, including role of biological calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D metabolism, and related diseases. A 10-item, multiple-choice test which can be used to obtain continuing medical education credit is included. (JN)

  9. The Vitamin D Endocrine System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the physiology and biochemistry of the vitamin D endocrine system, including role of biological calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D metabolism, and related diseases. A 10-item, multiple-choice test which can be used to obtain continuing medical education credit is included. (JN)

  10. CURRENT CHALLENGES ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For over ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; the occurrence of this in the real world and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. ...

  11. CURRENT CHALLENGES ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For over ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; the occurrence of this in the real world and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. ...

  12. The Intersection of Neurotoxicology and Endocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruption, the guiding theme of the 27th International Neurotoxicology Conference, merged into the neurotoxicology agenda largely because hormones help steer the process of brain development. Although the disruption motif first attracted public health attention because of reproductive anomalies in both wildlife and humans, the neurobehavioral implications had been planted decades earlier. They stemmed from the principle that sex differences in behavior are primarily the outcomes of differences in how the brain is sexually differentiated during early development by gonadal hormones (the Organizational Hypothesis). We also now understand that environmental chemicals are capable of altering these underlying events and processes. Among those chemicals, the group labeled as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) offers the clearest evidence of such selectivity, a consequence of their actions on the endogenous sex steroids, androgens and estrogens. Two EDCs in particular offer useful and intriguing examples. One is phthalate esters. The other is bisphenol A. Both agents are used extensively in plastics manufacture, and are pervasive in the environment. Both are produced in immense quantities. Both are found in almost all humans. Phthalates are considered to function in essence as anti-androgens, while bisphenol A is labeled as an estrogen. Their associations with brain sexual differentiation are reviewed and further questions noted. Both EDCs produce a wider spectrum of health effects, however, than would be extrapolated simply from their properties as anti-androgens and estrogens. Obesity is one example. Further complicating their assessment as health risks are questions about nonmonotonic dose-response functions and about transgenerational effects incurred via epigenetic mechanisms. All these facets of endocrine disruption are pieces of a puzzle that challenge neurotoxicologists for solutions. PMID:22659293

  13. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marcel Cerqueira Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Surgical approaches to pancreatic endocrine tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may differ greatly from those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Presurgical diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is therefore crucial to plan a proper intervention. Of note, hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be surgically treated before pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 resection, apart from insulinoma. Non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 >1 cm have a high risk of malignancy and should be treated by a pancreatic resection associated with lymphadenectomy. The vast majority of patients with gastrinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 present with tumor lesions at the duodenum, so the surgery of choice is subtotal or total pancreatoduodenectomy followed by regional lymphadenectomy. The usual surgical treatment for insulinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is distal pancreatectomy up to the mesenteric vein with or without spleen preservation, associated with enucleation of tumor lesions in the pancreatic head. Surgical procedures for glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, and vipomas/ multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are similar to those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Some of these surgical strategies for pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 still remain controversial as to their proper extension and timing. Furthermore, surgical resection of single hepatic metastasis secondary to pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may be curative and even in multiple liver metastases surgical resection is possible. Hepatic trans-arterial chemo-embolization is usually associated with surgical resection. Liver transplantation may be needed for select cases. Finally, pre-surgical clinical and genetic diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and localization of

  14. Toxicological assessment of drugs that affect the endocrine system in puberty-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Maranghi, Francesca; Tassinari, Roberta; Mantovani, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Toxicologists must ensure that clinical risk-to-benefit analysis should be made both for genders and age groups, with any treatment. Puberty concerns physiological changes leading to organism's maturation. Pubertal growth disorders are increasing in last decades: besides causing physical and psychological distress, they may signal underlying endocrine-metabolic abnormalities with serious health consequences later on. Therapeutic approaches for some health conditions in childhood and adolescence are considered. The authors discuss how some diseases and treatments can impact pubertal growth. The authors look at particular immunological disorders such as asthma and how both the disease and treatment affects pubertal growth. They also discuss how the provision of available data can help to assess the dose-response of the drug, in these cases, and minimize the chance of side effects. The authors also discuss pediatric inflammatory bowel disease and how both the disease and treatment can mitigate the growth delay. Last, but not least, the authors discuss how the effects of the drugs used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders may accentuate endocrine issues in juvenile patients. Hyperprolactinemia induction by some antipsychotics is highlighted as an example. Appropriate risk-benefit analysis of drugs prescribed during childhood and adolescence and intended to be used in the long term is required. Furthermore, future treatment strategies and safer compounds development should be supported by the knowledge of mechanisms underlying adverse side effects in pubertal growth and development.

  15. The Role of Endocrine G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Ovarian Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyu; Madden, Nadine Ellen; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Chow, Billy Kwok Chong; Lee, Leo Tsz On

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women and the most lethal gynecological cancer, causing over 151,000 deaths worldwide each year. Dysregulated production of endocrine hormones, known to have pluripotent effects on cell function through the activation of receptor signaling pathways, is believed to be a high-risk factor for ovarian cancer. An increasing body of evidence suggests that endocrine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the progression and metastasis of ovarian neoplasms. GPCRs are attractive drug targets because their activities are regulated by more than 25% of all drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Therefore, understanding the role of endocrine GPCRs during ovarian cancer progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel strategies to design effective chemotherapeutic drugs against malignant ovarian tumors. In this review, we address the signaling pathways and functional roles of several key endocrine GPCRs that are related to the cause, progression, and metastasis of ovarian cancer.

  16. Three-phase theory of city traffic: Moving synchronized flow patterns in under-saturated city traffic at signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2014-03-01

    Three-phase traffic flow theory of city traffic has been developed. Based on simulations of a stochastic microscopic traffic flow model, features of moving synchronized flow patterns (MSP) have been studied, which are responsible for a random time-delayed breakdown of a green-wave (GW) organized in a city. A possibility of GW control leading to the prevention of GW breakdown has been demonstrated. A diagram of traffic breakdown in under-saturated traffic (transition from under- to over-saturated city traffic) at the signal has been found; the diagram presents regions of the average arrival flow rate, within which traffic breakdown can occur, in dependence of parameters of the time-function of the arrival flow rate or/and signal parameters. Physical reasons for a crucial difference between results of classical theory of city traffic and three-phase theory are explained. In particular, we have found that under-saturated traffic at the signal can exist during a long time interval, when the average arrival flow rate is larger than the capacity of the classical theory; the classical capacity is equal to a minimum capacity in three-phase theory. Within a range of the average arrival flow rate between the minimum and maximum signal capacities, under-saturated traffic is in a metastable state with respect to traffic breakdown. We have distinguished the following possible causes for the metastability of under-saturated traffic: (i) The arrival flow rate during the green phase is larger than the saturation flow rate. (ii) The length of the upstream front of a queue at the signal is a finite value. (iii) The outflow rate from a MSP (the rate of MSP discharge) is larger than the saturation flow rate.

  17. Evaluation of fixed momentary dro schedules under signaled and unsignaled arrangements.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Jennifer L; Iwata, Brian A; Fritz, Jennifer N; Dempsey, Carrie M

    2011-01-01

    Fixed momentary schedules of differential reinforcement of other behavior (FM DRO) generally have been ineffective as treatment for problem behavior. Because most early research on FM DRO included presentation of a signal at the end of the DRO interval, it is unclear whether the limited effects of FM DRO were due to (a) the momentary response requirement of the schedule per se or (b) discrimination of the contingency made more salient by the signal. To separate these two potential influences, we compared the effects of signaled versus unsignaled FM DRO with 4 individuals with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by social-positive reinforcement. During signaled FM DRO, the experimenter presented a visual stimulus 3 s prior to the end of the DRO interval and delivered reinforcement contingent on the absence of problem behavior at the second the interval elapsed. Unsignaled DRO was identical except that interval termination was not signaled. Results indicated that signaled FM DRO was effective in decreasing 2 subjects' problem behavior, whereas an unsignaled schedule was required for the remaining 2 subjects. These results suggest that the response requirement per se of FM DRO may not be problematic if it is not easily discriminated.

  18. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-02-23

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency.

  19. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature

    PubMed Central

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  20. Review of the reproductive biology of amphipods and their endocrine regulation: identification of mechanistic pathways for reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Hyne, Ross V

    2011-12-01

    The reproductive biology of amphipods is reviewed to update the knowledge of the male and female reproductive processes of oogenesis and spermatogenesis as well as the endocrine systems of amphipods with the aim of advancing studies of reproductive toxicology. The ovarian and reproduction cycles of female gammaridean amphipods are closely correlated with the molt cycle, which is under direct control by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. The ability of males to copulate and subsequently for females to ovulate is restricted to the early postmolt period of the females. New developments in our understanding of the molt cycle and the endocrine regulatory pathways for reproduction using genomics techniques on other crustacean species are also discussed. The arthropod sterol ponasterone A or xenobiotics such as the fungicide fenarimol have been shown to elicit endocrine disruption in some crustaceans by acting as an agonist for 20-hydroxyecdysone at the ecdysone receptor or by inhibiting the synthesis of 20-hydroxyecdysone, respectively, resulting in disruption of molting and reproduction. Recent studies suggest that cadmium can inhibit secondary vitellogenesis in amphipods. Experimental approaches for examining the metabolic pathways associated with ecdysteroid hormonal signaling or metabolism, exoskeleton maintenance and molting, and the regulation of vitellogenin in amphipods are discussed. This information should aid in the identification of useful biomarkers for reproductive toxicity. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  1. Correlation between stimulation strength and onset time of signal traveling within the neocortical neural circuits under caffeine application.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2011-08-01

    In general, strength of input to neocortical neural circuits affects the amplitude of postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), thereby modulating the way signals are transmitted within the circuits. Caffeine is one of the pharmacological agents able to modulate synaptic activities. The present study investigated how strength of input affects signal propagation in neocortical circuits under the application of caffeine. Spatio-temporal neural activities were observed from visual cortical slices of rats using optical recording methods with voltage-sensitive dye. Electrical stimulations were applied to white matter in the primary visual cortex with bath-application of caffeine. When the strength of stimulation was 0.3mA, signals propagated from the site of stimulation in the primary visual cortex toward the secondary visual cortex along vertical and horizontal pathways. When stimulation strength was reduced from 0.3mA to 0.07mA, start of signal propagation was delayed about 25ms without affecting field PSP amplitude or the manner of signal propagation. Conversely, co-application of caffeine and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-AP5) did not induce delays in signal start. These findings suggest that conversion of neural code from amplitude code to temporal code is inducible at the level of neocortical circuits in an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity-dependent manner.

  2. Relation between stability and resilience determines the performance of early warning signals under different environmental drivers.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Korolev, Kirill S; Gore, Jeff

    2015-08-11

    Shifting patterns of temporal fluctuations have been found to signal critical transitions in a variety of systems, from ecological communities to human physiology. However, failure of these early warning signals in some systems calls for a better understanding of their limitations. In particular, little is known about the generality of early warning signals in different deteriorating environments. In this study, we characterized how multiple environmental drivers influence the dynamics of laboratory yeast populations, which was previously shown to display alternative stable states [Dai et al., Science, 2012]. We observed that both the coefficient of variation and autocorrelation increased before population collapse in two slowly deteriorating environments, one with a rising death rate and the other one with decreasing nutrient availability. We compared the performance of early warning signals across multiple environments as "indicators for loss of resilience." We find that the varying performance is determined by how a system responds to changes in a specific driver, which can be captured by a relation between stability (recovery rate) and resilience (size of the basin of attraction). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the positive correlation between stability and resilience, as the essential assumption of indicators based on critical slowing down, can break down in this system when multiple environmental drivers are changed simultaneously. Our results suggest that the stability-resilience relation needs to be better understood for the application of early warning signals in different scenarios.

  3. Relation between stability and resilience determines the performance of early warning signals under different environmental drivers

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lei; Korolev, Kirill S.; Gore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Shifting patterns of temporal fluctuations have been found to signal critical transitions in a variety of systems, from ecological communities to human physiology. However, failure of these early warning signals in some systems calls for a better understanding of their limitations. In particular, little is known about the generality of early warning signals in different deteriorating environments. In this study, we characterized how multiple environmental drivers influence the dynamics of laboratory yeast populations, which was previously shown to display alternative stable states [Dai et al., Science, 2012]. We observed that both the coefficient of variation and autocorrelation increased before population collapse in two slowly deteriorating environments, one with a rising death rate and the other one with decreasing nutrient availability. We compared the performance of early warning signals across multiple environments as “indicators for loss of resilience.” We find that the varying performance is determined by how a system responds to changes in a specific driver, which can be captured by a relation between stability (recovery rate) and resilience (size of the basin of attraction). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the positive correlation between stability and resilience, as the essential assumption of indicators based on critical slowing down, can break down in this system when multiple environmental drivers are changed simultaneously. Our results suggest that the stability–resilience relation needs to be better understood for the application of early warning signals in different scenarios. PMID:26216946

  4. Dopaminergic signaling mediates the motivational response underlying the opponent process to chronic but not acute nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grieder, Taryn E; Sellings, Laurie H; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; Siu, Eric C; Tyndale, Rachel F; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-03-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is implicated in the processing of the positive reinforcing effect of all drugs of abuse, including nicotine. It has been suggested that the dopaminergic system is also involved in the aversive motivational response to drug withdrawal, particularly for opiates, however, the role for dopaminergic signaling in the processing of the negative motivational properties of nicotine withdrawal is largely unknown. We hypothesized that signaling at dopaminergic receptors mediates chronic nicotine withdrawal aversions and that dopaminergic signaling would differentially mediate acute vs dependent nicotine motivation. We report that nicotine-dependent rats and mice showed conditioned place aversions to an environment paired with abstinence from chronic nicotine that were blocked by the DA receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol (alpha-flu) and in DA D(2) receptor knockout mice. Conversely, alpha-flu pretreatment had no effect on preferences for an environment paired with abstinence from acute nicotine. Taken together, these results suggest that dopaminergic signaling is necessary for the opponent motivational response to nicotine in dependent, but not non-dependent, rodents. Further, signaling at the DA D(2) receptor is critical in mediating withdrawal aversions in nicotine-dependent animals. We suggest that the alleviation of nicotine withdrawal primarily may be driving nicotine motivation in dependent animals.

  5. Mechanism underlying the inner membrane retention of Escherichia coli lipoproteins caused by Lol avoidance signals.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2003-10-10

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the residue at position 2. The inner membrane retention signal, Asp at position 2 in combination with certain residues at position 3, functions as a Lol avoidance signal, i.e. the signal inhibits the recognition of lipoproteins by LolCDE that releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane. To understand the role of the residue at position 2, outer membrane-specific lipoproteins with Cys at position 2 were subjected to chemical modification followed by the release reaction in reconstituted proteoliposomes. Sulfhydryl-specific introduction of nonprotein molecules or a negative charge to Cys did not inhibit the LolCDE-dependent release. In contrast, oxidation of Cys to cysteic acid resulted in generation of the Lol avoidance signal, indicating that the Lol avoidance signal requires a critical length of negative charge at the second residue. Furthermore, not only modification of the carboxylic acid of Asp at position 2 but also that of the amine of phosphatidylethanolamine abolished the Lol avoidance function. Based on these results, the Lol avoidance mechanism is discussed.

  6. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners. PMID:26726998

  7. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners.

  8. Endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer: current status, possible mechanisms and overcoming strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weimin; Chang, Jinjia; Fu, Peifeng

    2015-08-01

    Endocrine therapy has become one of most effective forms of targeted adjuvant therapy for hormone-sensitive breast cancer and may be given after surgery or radiotherapy, and also prior, or subsequent to chemotherapy. Current commonly used drugs for adjuvant endocrine therapy can be divided into following three classes: selective estrogen receptor modulators, aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor downregulators. Tumor cells can develop resistance to endocrine therapy, a major obstacle limiting the success of breast cancer treatment. The complicated crosstalk, both genomic and nongenomic, between estrogen receptors and growth factors was considered to be a crucial factor contributing to endocrine resistance. However, resistance to this therapy is thought to be a progressive, step-wise process, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this review, we summarize the possible biological and molecular mechanisms that underlie endocrine resistance, and discuss some novel strategies to overcoming these issues.

  9. Endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer: current status, possible mechanisms and overcoming strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weimin; Chang, Jinjia; Fu, Peifeng

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapy has become one of most effective forms of targeted adjuvant therapy for hormone-sensitive breast cancer and may be given after surgery or radiotherapy, and also prior, or subsequent to chemotherapy. Current commonly used drugs for adjuvant endocrine therapy can be divided into following three classes: selective estrogen receptor modulators, aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor downregulators. Tumor cells can develop resistance to endocrine therapy, a major obstacle limiting the success of breast cancer treatment. The complicated crosstalk, both genomic and nongenomic, between estrogen receptors and growth factors was considered to be a crucial factor contributing to endocrine resistance. However, resistance to this therapy is thought to be a progressive, step-wise process, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this review, we summarize the possible biological and molecular mechanisms that underlie endocrine resistance, and discuss some novel strategies to overcoming these issues. PMID:26306654

  10. EADB: an estrogenic activity database for assessing potential endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Lei; Fang, Hong; Richard, Ann M; Bray, Jeffrey D; Judson, Richard S; Zhou, Guangxu; Colatsky, Thomas J; Aungst, Jason L; Teng, Christina; Harris, Steve C; Ge, Weigong; Dai, Susie Y; Su, Zhenqiang; Jacobs, Abigail C; Harrouk, Wafa; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2013-10-01

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body's endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many endocrine disruptors are estrogenic and affect the normal estrogen signaling pathways. However, ERs can also serve as therapeutic targets for various medical conditions, such as menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, and ER-positive breast cancer. Because of the decades-long interest in the safety and therapeutic utility of estrogenic chemicals, a large number of chemicals have been assayed for estrogenic activity, but these data exist in various sources and different formats that restrict the ability of regulatory and industry scientists to utilize them fully for assessing risk-benefit. To address this issue, we have developed an Estrogenic Activity Database (EADB; http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools/EstrogenicActivityDatabaseEADB/default.htm) and made it freely available to the public. EADB contains 18,114 estrogenic activity data points collected for 8212 chemicals tested in 1284 binding, reporter gene, cell proliferation, and in vivo assays in 11 different species. The chemicals cover a broad chemical structure space and the data span a wide range of activities. A set of tools allow users to access EADB and evaluate potential endocrine activity of chemicals. As a case study, a classification model was developed using EADB for predicting ER binding of chemicals.

  11. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Chávez García, Ana Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset. PMID:22701119

  12. Endocrine fibroblast growth factor FGF19 promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu; Dakhova, Olga; Creighton, Chad J; Ittmann, Michael

    2013-04-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in US men. There is broad evidence that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are important in prostate cancer initiation and progression, but the contribution of particular FGFs in this disease is not fully understood. The FGF family members FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 comprise a distinct subfamily that circulate in serum and act in an endocrine manner. These endocrine FGFs require α-Klotho (KL) and/or β-Klotho (KLB), two related single-pass transmembrane proteins restricted in their tissue distribution, to act as coreceptors along with classic FGF receptors (FGFR) to mediate potent biologic activity. Here we show that FGF19 is expressed in primary and metastatic prostate cancer tissues, where it functions as an autocrine growth factor. Exogenous FGF19 promoted the growth, invasion, adhesion, and colony formation of prostate cancer cells at low ligand concentrations. FGF19 silencing in prostate cancer cells expressing autocrine FGF19 decreased invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Consistent with these observations, KL and/or KLB were expressed in prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, raising the possibility that additional endocrine FGFs may also exert biologic effects in prostate cancer. Our findings support the concept that therapies targeting FGFR signaling may have efficacy in prostate cancer and highlight FGF19 as a relevant endocrine FGF in this setting.

  13. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  14. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  15. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  16. Nonlinear Estimation of Discrete-Time Signals Under Random Observation Delay

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Aguila, R.; Jimenez-Lopez, J. D.; Nakamori, S.

    2008-11-06

    This paper presents an approximation to the nonlinear least-squares estimation problem of discrete-time stochastic signals using nonlinear observations with additive white noise which can be randomly delayed by one sampling time. The observation delay is modelled by a sequence of independent Bernoulli random variables whose values, zero or one, indicate that the real observation arrives on time or it is delayed and, hence, the available measurement to estimate the signal is not up-to-date. Assuming that the state-space model generating the signal is unknown and only the covariance functions of the processes involved in the observation equation are ready for use, a filtering algorithm based on linear approximations of the real observations is proposed.

  17. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  18. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deymier, P. A.; Swinteck, N.; Runge, K.; Deymier-Black, A.; Hoying, J. B.

    2015-11-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  19. Entropy of seismic electric signals: Analysis in natural time under time reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P.A.; Skordas, E.S.; Sarlis, N.V.; Lazaridou, M.S.; Tanaka, H.K.

    2006-03-15

    Electric signals have been recently recorded at the Earth's surface with amplitudes appreciably larger than those hitherto reported. Their entropy in natural time is smaller than that of a 'uniform' distribution. The same holds for their entropy upon time reversal. Such a behavior, which is also found by numerical simulations in fractional Brownian motion time series and in an on-off intermittency model, stems from infinitely ranged long range temporal correlations and hence these signals are probably seismic electric signal activities (critical dynamics). This classification is strikingly confirmed since three strong nearby earthquakes occurred (which is an extremely unusual fact) after the original submission of the present paper. The entropy fluctuations are found to increase upon approaching bursting, which is reminiscent of the behavior identifying sudden cardiac death individuals when analyzing their electrocardiograms.

  20. Entropy of seismic electric signals: Analysis in natural time under time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Tanaka, H. K.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2006-03-01

    Electric signals have been recently recorded at the Earth’s surface with amplitudes appreciably larger than those hitherto reported. Their entropy in natural time is smaller than that of a “uniform” distribution. The same holds for their entropy upon time reversal. Such a behavior, which is also found by numerical simulations in fractional Brownian motion time series and in an on-off intermittency model, stems from infinitely ranged long range temporal correlations and hence these signals are probably seismic electric signal activities (critical dynamics). This classification is strikingly confirmed since three strong nearby earthquakes occurred (which is an extremely unusual fact) after the original submission of the present paper. The entropy fluctuations are found to increase upon approaching bursting, which is reminiscent of the behavior identifying sudden cardiac death individuals when analyzing their electrocardiograms.

  1. Molecular switches under TGFβ signalling during progression from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Heger, J; Schulz, R; Euler, G

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a mechanism to compensate for increased cardiac work load, that is, after myocardial infarction or upon pressure overload. However, in the long run cardiac hypertrophy is a prevailing risk factor for the development of heart failure. During pathological remodelling processes leading to heart failure, decompensated hypertrophy, death of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis or necroptosis and fibrosis as well as a progressive dysfunction of cardiomyocytes are apparent. Interestingly, the induction of hypertrophy, cell death or fibrosis is mediated by similar signalling pathways. Therefore, tiny changes in the signalling cascade are able to switch physiological cardiac remodelling to the development of heart failure. In the present review, we will describe examples of these molecular switches that change compensated hypertrophy to the development of heart failure and will focus on the importance of the signalling cascades of the TGFβ superfamily in this process. In this context, potential therapeutic targets for pharmacological interventions that could attenuate the progression of heart failure will be discussed.

  2. Metabolic, endocrine, and other genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Dahmoush, Hisham M; Melhem, Elias R; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic, endocrine, and genetic diseases of the brain include a very large array of disorders caused by a wide range of underlying abnormalities and involving a variety of brain structures. Often these disorders manifest as recognizable, though sometimes overlapping, patterns on neuroimaging studies that may enable a diagnosis based on imaging or may alternatively provide enough clues to direct further diagnostic evaluation. The diagnostic workup can include various biochemical laboratory or genetic studies. In this chapter, after a brief review of normal white-matter development, we will describe a variety of leukodystrophies resulting from metabolic disorders involving the brain, including mitochondrial and respiratory chain diseases. We will then describe various acidurias, urea cycle disorders, disorders related to copper and iron metabolism, and disorders of ganglioside and mucopolysaccharide metabolism. Lastly, various other hypomyelinating and dysmyelinating leukodystrophies, including vanishing white-matter disease, megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, and oculocerebrorenal syndrome will be presented. In the following section on endocrine disorders, we will examine various disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, including developmental, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. Neonatal hypoglycemia will also be briefly reviewed. In the final section, we will review a few of the common genetic phakomatoses. Throughout the text, both imaging and brief clinical features of the various disorders will be discussed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Endocrine disrupting properties of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    White, Sally S; Fenton, Suzanne E; Hines, Erin P

    2011-10-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have attracted attention in recent years for their environmental ubiquity, as well as their toxicity. Several PFAAs are found in human tissues globally, as humans are exposed on a daily basis through intake of contaminated food, water, and air, irrespective of proximity to industry. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a PFAA shown to be developmentally toxic in mice, with broad and varied health consequences that may include long-lasting effects in reproductive tissues and metabolic reprogramming. To date, the only demonstrated mode of action by which the health effects of PFOA are mediated is via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The endogenous roles for this receptor, as well as the adverse outcomes of activation by exogenous agents during development, are currently under investigation. Recent studies suggest that PFOA may alter steroid hormone production or act indirectly, via ovarian effects, as a novel means of endocrine disruption. Here we review the existing literature on the known health effects of PFOA in animal models, focusing on sensitive developmental periods. To complement this, we also present epidemiologic health data, with the caveat that these studies largely address only associations between adult exposures and outcomes, rarely focusing on endocrine-specific endpoints, susceptible subpopulations, or windows of sensitivity. Further research in these areas is needed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Modeling Cellular Noise Underlying Heterogeneous Cell Responses in the Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazunari; Shindo, Yuki; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity, which plays an essential role in biological phenomena, such as drug resistance and migration, is considered to arise from intrinsic (i.e., reaction kinetics) and extrinsic (i.e., protein variability) noise in the cell. However, the mechanistic effects of these types of noise to determine the heterogeneity of signal responses have not been elucidated. Here, we report that the output of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling activity is modulated by cellular noise, particularly by extrinsic noise of particular signaling components in the pathway. We developed a mathematical model of the EGF signaling pathway incorporating regulation between extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is necessary for switch-like activation of the nuclear ERK response. As the threshold of switch-like behavior is more sensitive to perturbations than the graded response, the effect of biological noise is potentially critical for cell fate decision. Our simulation analysis indicated that extrinsic noise, but not intrinsic noise, contributes to cell-to-cell heterogeneity of nuclear ERK. In addition, we accurately estimated variations in abundance of the signal proteins between individual cells by direct comparison of experimental data with simulation results using Apparent Measurement Error (AME). AME was constant regardless of whether the protein levels varied in a correlated manner, while covariation among proteins influenced cell-to-cell heterogeneity of nuclear ERK, suppressing the variation. Simulations using the estimated protein abundances showed that each protein species has different effects on cell-to-cell variation in the nuclear ERK response. In particular, variability of EGF receptor, Ras, Raf, and MEK strongly influenced cellular heterogeneity, while others did not. Overall, our results indicated that cellular heterogeneity in response to EGF is strongly driven by extrinsic noise, and that such heterogeneity

  5. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Giudice, Linda C.; Hauser, Russ; Prins, Gail S.; Soto, Ana M.; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in the possible health threat posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are substances in our environment, food, and consumer products that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. In this first Scientific Statement of The Endocrine Society, we present the evidence that endocrine disruptors have effects on male and female reproduction, breast development and cancer, prostate cancer, neuroendocrinology, thyroid, metabolism and obesity, and cardiovascular endocrinology. Results from animal models, human clinical observations, and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant concern to public health. The mechanisms of EDCs involve divergent pathways including (but not limited to) estrogenic, antiandrogenic, thyroid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, retinoid, and actions through other nuclear receptors; steroidogenic enzymes; neurotransmitter receptors and systems; and many other pathways that are highly conserved in wildlife and humans, and which can be modeled in laboratory in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, EDCs represent a broad class of molecules such as organochlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals, plastics and plasticizers, fuels, and many other chemicals that are present in the environment or are in widespread use. We make a number of recommendations to increase understanding of effects of EDCs, including enhancing increased basic and clinical research, invoking the precautionary principle, and advocating involvement of individual and scientific society stakeholders in communicating and implementing changes in public policy and awareness. PMID:19502515

  6. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Giudice, Linda C; Hauser, Russ; Prins, Gail S; Soto, Ana M; Zoeller, R Thomas; Gore, Andrea C

    2009-06-01

    There is growing interest in the possible health threat posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are substances in our environment, food, and consumer products that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. In this first Scientific Statement of The Endocrine Society, we present the evidence that endocrine disruptors have effects on male and female reproduction, breast development and cancer, prostate cancer, neuroendocrinology, thyroid, metabolism and obesity, and cardiovascular endocrinology. Results from animal models, human clinical observations, and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant concern to public health. The mechanisms of EDCs involve divergent pathways including (but not limited to) estrogenic, antiandrogenic, thyroid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, retinoid, and actions through other nuclear receptors; steroidogenic enzymes; neurotransmitter receptors and systems; and many other pathways that are highly conserved in wildlife and humans, and which can be modeled in laboratory in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, EDCs represent a broad class of molecules such as organochlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals, plastics and plasticizers, fuels, and many other chemicals that are present in the environment or are in widespread use. We make a number of recommendations to increase understanding of effects of EDCs, including enhancing increased basic and clinical research, invoking the precautionary principle, and advocating involvement of individual and scientific society stakeholders in communicating and implementing changes in public policy and awareness.

  7. BENCH-SCALE STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the formsation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from precursors, such as phenol and chlorobenzens, under various combustion conditions. It gives results of an exploration of the effects of precursor and catalysys composition on homologue production an...

  8. Nonruminant Nutrition Symposium: Involvement of gut neural and endocrine systems in pathological disorders of the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Furness, J B; Poole, D P

    2012-04-01

    The functioning of the gastrointestinal tract is under the control of the most extensive system of peripheral neurons in the body, the enteric nervous system, and the largest endocrine system of the body, the GEP endocrine system. The enteric nervous system in large mammals contains 500 million neurons, and the GEP endocrine system produces more than 30 hormones. Numerous enteric neuropathies affecting both humans and animals have been described and digestive disorders affect commercially important species, such as horses and cattle. The most severe enteric neuropathies (e.g., lethal white syndrome in horses or Hirschsprung's disease in humans) can be fatal. Also, horses with ileus or other digestive disorders are commonly euthanized. In this review we discuss examples of enteric neuropathies that affect agricultural animals and humans: prion disease, postoperative ileus, distal enteric aganglionosis, and infective diarrhea. Enteric neurons and glia are a location of prion proteins and are involved in transmission of the infection from gut to brain and brain to gut. Postoperative ileus is a complex disorder involving the local inhibitory effects of sympathetic nervous system activation and the release of opioids, presumably from enteric neurons. Intestinal inflammation, especially of the external muscle that includes enteric ganglia, also occurs in ileus. Congenital distal bowel aganglionosis, responsible for lethal white syndrome in horses, Hirschsprung's disease in humans, and similar conditions in mice and rats, is a fatal condition if untreated. Mutations of the same genes can cause the condition in each of these species. The only effective current treatment is surgical removal of the aganglionic bowel. Infectious diarrheas involve activation of enteric secretomotor neurons by pathogens and the toxins they produce, which causes substantial fluid loss. Strategies to target enteric neurons in the treatment of secretory diarrheas have not been developed. Disorders

  9. [A role of some intracellular signaling cascades in planarian regeneration activated under irradiation with low-temperature argon plasma].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Maevskiĭ, E I

    2014-01-01

    Using inhibitory analysis the role of some intracellular signaling pathways in activation of planarian regeneration under the influence of low-temperature argon plasma (LTAP) has been investigated. Inactivation of specific inhibitors of intracellular signaling enzymes such as the receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR), TGF β receptor, calmodulin, adenylate cyclase, phospholipase A2, phospholipase C, cyclin-dependent protein kinase, JAK2-protein kinase, JNK-protein kinase MEK-protein kinase led to inhibition of the head growth during its regeneration in planarians. Pretreatment with LTAP irradiation provided no inhibitory action of some cascades regulating proliferation. However, the inhibitors of the key regulators of regeneration: TGF β receptor, calmodulin and MEK-protein kinase completely suppressed the activating effect of plasma. Thus, by the example of regenerating planarians it is shown, that biological activity of low-temperature argon plasma LTAP is caused by modulation of a plurality of cellular signaling systems.

  10. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  11. Array Signal Processing Under Model Errors With Application to Speech Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-31

    Acoust. Speech Sig. Proc., pp. 1149-1152, Alburqueque NM, 1990. [37] E. A. Patrick , Fundamentals of Pattern Recognition, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1972...Proc., Toronto, pp. 1365-1368, 1991. [411 S. U. Pillai , Array Signal Processing, Springer Verlag, NY, 1989. [42] B. Porat and B. Friedlander

  12. Evaluation of Fixed Momentary DRO Schedules under Signaled and Unsignaled Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Jennifer L.; Iwata, Brian A.; Fritz, Jennifer N.; Dempsey, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    Fixed momentary schedules of differential reinforcement of other behavior (FM DRO) generally have been ineffective as treatment for problem behavior. Because most early research on FM DRO included presentation of a signal at the end of the DRO interval, it is unclear whether the limited effects of FM DRO were due to (a) the momentary response…

  13. Monopolar electromyographic signals recorded by a current amplifier in air and under water without insulation.

    PubMed

    Whitting, John W; von Tscharner, Vinzenz

    2014-12-01

    It was recently proposed that one could use signal current instead of voltage to collect surface electromyography (EMG). With EMG-current, the electrodes remain at the ground potential, thereby eliminating lateral currents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EMG-currents can be recorded in Tap and Salt water, as well as in air, without electrically shielding the electrodes. It was hypothesized that signals would display consistent information between experimental conditions regarding muscle responses to changes in contraction effort. EMG-currents were recorded from the flexor digitorum muscles as participant's squeezed a pre-inflated blood pressure cuff bladder in each experimental condition at standardized efforts. EMG-current measurements performed underwater showed no loss of signal amplitude when compared to measurements made in air, although some differences in amplitude and spectral components were observed between conditions. However, signal amplitudes and frequencies displayed consistent behavior across contraction effort levels, irrespective of the experimental condition. This new method demonstrates that information regarding muscle activity is comparable between wet and dry conditions when using EMG-current. Considering the difficulties imposed by the need to waterproof traditional bipolar EMG electrodes when underwater, this new methodology is tremendously promising for assessments of muscular function in aquatic environments.

  14. Root gravitropism: an experimental tool to investigate basic cellular and molecular processes underlying mechanosensing and signal transmission in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Guan, C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of plant organs to use gravity as a guide for growth, named gravitropism, has been recognized for over two centuries. This growth response to the environment contributes significantly to the upward growth of shoots and the downward growth of roots commonly observed throughout the plant kingdom. Root gravitropism has received a great deal of attention because there is a physical separation between the primary site for gravity sensing, located in the root cap, and the site of differential growth response, located in the elongation zones (EZs). Hence, this system allows identification and characterization of different phases of gravitropism, including gravity perception, signal transduction, signal transmission, and curvature response. Recent studies support some aspects of an old model for gravity sensing, which postulates that root-cap columellar amyloplasts constitute the susceptors for gravity perception. Such studies have also allowed the identification of several molecules that appear to function as second messengers in gravity signal transduction and of potential signal transducers. Auxin has been implicated as a probable component of the signal that carries the gravitropic information between the gravity-sensing cap and the gravity-responding EZs. This has allowed the identification and characterization of important molecular processes underlying auxin transport and response in plants. New molecular models can be elaborated to explain how the gravity signal transduction pathway might regulate the polarity of auxin transport in roots. Further studies are required to test these models, as well as to study the molecular mechanisms underlying a poorly characterized phase of gravitropism that is independent of an auxin gradient.

  15. Root gravitropism: an experimental tool to investigate basic cellular and molecular processes underlying mechanosensing and signal transmission in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Guan, C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of plant organs to use gravity as a guide for growth, named gravitropism, has been recognized for over two centuries. This growth response to the environment contributes significantly to the upward growth of shoots and the downward growth of roots commonly observed throughout the plant kingdom. Root gravitropism has received a great deal of attention because there is a physical separation between the primary site for gravity sensing, located in the root cap, and the site of differential growth response, located in the elongation zones (EZs). Hence, this system allows identification and characterization of different phases of gravitropism, including gravity perception, signal transduction, signal transmission, and curvature response. Recent studies support some aspects of an old model for gravity sensing, which postulates that root-cap columellar amyloplasts constitute the susceptors for gravity perception. Such studies have also allowed the identification of several molecules that appear to function as second messengers in gravity signal transduction and of potential signal transducers. Auxin has been implicated as a probable component of the signal that carries the gravitropic information between the gravity-sensing cap and the gravity-responding EZs. This has allowed the identification and characterization of important molecular processes underlying auxin transport and response in plants. New molecular models can be elaborated to explain how the gravity signal transduction pathway might regulate the polarity of auxin transport in roots. Further studies are required to test these models, as well as to study the molecular mechanisms underlying a poorly characterized phase of gravitropism that is independent of an auxin gradient.

  16. Male reprotoxicity and endocrine disruption

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Catlin, Natasha; Heger, Nicholas; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Pacheco, Sara E.; Saffarini, Camelia; Sandrof, Moses A.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive tract development is a tightly regulated process that can be disrupted following exposure to drugs, toxicants, endocrine disrupting chemicals or other compounds via alterations to gene and protein expression or epigenetic regulation. Indeed, the impacts of developmental exposure to certain toxicants may not be fully realized until puberty or adulthood when the reproductive tract becomes sexually mature and altered functionality is manifested. Exposures that occur later in life, once development is complete, can also disrupt the intricate hormonal and paracrine interactions responsible for adult functions, such as spermatogenesis. In this chapter, the biology and toxicology of the male reproductive tract is explored, proceeding through the various life stages including in utero development, puberty, adulthood and senescence. Special attention is given to the discussion of endocrine disrupting chemicals, chemical mixtures, low dose effects, transgenerational effects, and potential exposure-related causes of male reproductive tract cancers. PMID:22945574

  17. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  18. [Endocrine disruptors and reproductive health].

    PubMed

    Colacurci, N; De Franciscis, P

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are dangerous chemicals widely used daily and spread in the environment and able to impair male and female fertility by interfering with the endocrine regulation of reproductive system. Many epidemiological studies showed the role of the EDs in the pathogenesis of reproductive pathologies such as infertility, recurrent abortions, malformations and endometriosis. Personal data show a significant correlation between phthalates and bisphenols and endometriosis. Further studies are needed to assess a clear relationship between environmental exposure to ED and reproductive pathologies and to find exposure's markers for environmental pollutants in biological fluids with the aim to have useful instruments for monitoring and preserving the reproductive health of women at risk of occupational/environmental exposure to ED.

  19. Female infertility of endocrine origin.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Rita Vasconcellos; Clapauch, Ruth

    2014-03-01

    Infertility is defined as the failure to conceive, with no contraception, after one year of regular intercourse in women<35 years and after 6 months in women>35 years. A review on causes, management and treatment of endocrine causes of was performed. Epidemiological data suggest that around 10% to 15% of couples are infertile. Anovulatory problems are responsible from 25% to 50% of causes of . Advanced age, obesity, and drugs, have a negative effect on fertility. Different hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, and ovarian disorders may affect fertility as well. Infertility is a growing phenomenon in developed societies. We here provide information about how to identify endocrine patients with ovulatory dysfunction. Women must be advised about limiting factors to be avoided, in order to protect their fertility.

  20. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized by variable penetrance of medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC), pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). MEN2 consists of two clinical subtypes, MEN2A and MEN2B. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is now viewed as a phenotypic variant of MEN2A with decreased penetrance for PHEO and PHPT rather than a distinct entity. All subtypes are caused by gain-of-function mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. Recognition of the clinical entity in individuals and families at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation is crucial for the management and prevention of associated malignancies. Recent guidelines released by the American Thyroid Association regarding the management of MTC will be summarized in this chapter.