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Sample records for endocrine system organs

  1. Endocrine system: part 1.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  2. Endocrine system and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients.

  3. Endocrine system: part 2.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Johnstone, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    This article, the last in the life sciences series, is the second of two articles on the endocrine system. It discusses human growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands. The relationships between hormones and their unique functions are also explored. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health to provide effective care to patients. Several disorders caused by human growth hormone or that affect the pancreas and adrenal glands are examined.

  4. [Disperse endocrine system and APUD concept].

    PubMed

    Mil'to, I V; Sukhodolo, I V; Gereng, E A; Shamardina, L A

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the problems of disperse endocrine system and APUD-system morphology, summarizes some debatable issues of single endocrine cell biology. The data presented refer to the history of both systems discovery, morphological methods of their study, developmental sources, their structural organization and physiological roles of their cells. The significance of single endocrine cells in the regulation of the organism functions is discussed.

  5. Chronobiology in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Haus, Erhard

    2007-08-31

    Biological signaling occurs in a complex web with participation and interaction of the central nervous system, the autonomous nervous system, the endocrine glands, peripheral endocrine tissues including the intestinal tract and adipose tissue, and the immune system. All of these show an intricate time structure with rhythms and pulsatile variations in multiple frequencies. Circadian (about 24-hour) and circannual (about 1-year) rhythms are kept in step with the cyclic environmental surrounding by the timing and length of the daily light span. Rhythmicity of many endocrine variables is essential for their efficacy and, even in some instances, for the qualitative nature of their effects. Indeed, the continuous administration of certain hormones and their synthetic analogues may show substantially different effects than expected. In the design of drug-delivery systems and treatment schedules involving directly or indirectly the endocrine system, consideration of the human time organization is essential. A large amount of information on the endocrine time structure has accumulated, some of which is discussed in this review.

  6. Age and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Noth, R H; Mazzaferri, E L

    1985-02-01

    The pattern of age-induced changes in each endocrine system is unique. Both hormone levels and target organ responsivity are altered in the aging endocrine-cardiovascular system. Serum levels of vasopressor hormones both increase (norepinephrine) and decrease (renin, aldosterone). Target organ responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation in the heart and probably also in vascular smooth muscle decrease due to postreceptor changes. These effects contribute to the clinical problems of hypertension and orthostatic hypotension which characterize the elderly. Aging produces mild carbohydrate intolerance and a minimal increase in fasting serum glucose in healthy, nonobese individuals, primarily due to decreasing postreceptor responsiveness to insulin. Aging decreases the metabolism of thyroxine, including its conversion to triiodothyronine, but clinically significant alterations of thyroid hormone levels do not occur. Changes in the end-organ response to thyroid hormones, however, significantly alter the clinical presentation of thyroid diseases. Aging shifts the serum vasopressin-serum osmolality relationship toward higher serum vasopressin levels probably due to altered baroreceptor input, probably contributing to the tendency toward hyponatremia in the elderly. Aging slows the metabolism of cortisol, but glucocorticoid levels in the human are essentially unaltered by age. However, recent data indicate that delta-5 adrenal steroids decrease markedly in both men and women. Nodules in the anterior pituitary, the thyroid, and the adrenal increase in frequency with aging. Finally, the reproductive system is primarily altered by endocrine cell death, by unknown mechanisms, resulting in decreased estrogen and testosterone levels in women and men. This most obvious age-related endocrine change turns out to be incompletely understood and is not representative of most age-related endocrine changes. Despite characterization of these many age-related alterations in endocrine systems

  7. The skeleton as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J; Clemens, Thomas L; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-11-01

    Surprising new discoveries in the field of skeletal biology show that bone cells produce endocrine hormones that regulate phosphate and glucose homeostasis. In this Review, we examine the features of these new endocrine pathways and discuss their physiological importance in the context of our current understanding of energy metabolism and mineral homeostasis. Consideration of evolutionary and comparative biology provides clues that a key driving force for the emergence of these hormonal pathways was the development of a large, energy-expensive musculoskeletal system. Specialized bone cells also evolved and produced endocrine hormones to integrate the skeleton in global mineral and nutrient homeostasis. The recognition of bone as a true endocrine organ represents a fertile area for further research and should improve the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Your Endocrine System (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Endocrine System Print A A A Text Size en español ... a pea, is the "master gland" of the endocrine system. It makes and releases a bunch of hormones ...

  9. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    McGown, Christine; Birerdinc, Aybike; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most important health challenges faced by developed countries and is increasingly affecting adolescents and children. Obesity is also a considerable risk factor for the development of numerous other chronic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The epidemic proportions of obesity and its numerous comorbidities are bringing into focus the highly complex and metabolically active adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is increasingly being considered as a functional endocrine organ. This article discusses the endocrine effects of adipose tissue during obesity and the systemic impact of this signaling.

  10. Genetic testing by cancer site: endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, Robert; Nagy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Numerous hereditary syndromes, caused by mutations in multiple tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, can cause tumors in organs of the endocrine system. The primary syndromes (and genes) addressed here include multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2 (MEN1 and RET genes), Cowden syndrome (PTEN), hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndromes (multiple genes), and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL). Clinical genetic testing is available for each of these syndromes and is generally directed to individuals with endocrine or other tumors and additional features suggestive of a hereditary syndrome. However, for some endocrine tumors, the proportion because of heredity is so high that genetic testing may be appropriate for all affected individuals. Management for hereditary cases typically involves aggressive screening and/or surgical protocols, starting at young ages to minimize morbidity and mortality. Endocrine tumors can be less commonly seen in a number of other hereditary syndromes (eg, neurofibromatosis), which are not reviewed in this section.

  11. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma.

  12. [The vitamin D endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Castro, Luiz Claudio Gonçalves de

    2011-11-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system comprises a group of 7-dehydrocholesterol-derived secosteroid molecules, including its active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D), its precursors and other metabolites, its binding protein (DBP) and nuclear receptor (VDR), as well as cytochrome P450 complex enzymes participating in activation and inactivation pathways of those molecules. The biologic effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D are mediated by VDR, a ligand-activated transcription factor which is a member of the nuclear receptors family, spread in almost all human cells. In addition to its classic role in the regulation of calcium metabolism and bone health, evidence suggests that 1,25(OH)(2)D directly or indirectly modulates about 3% of the human genome, participating in the regulation of chief functions of systemic homeostasis, such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis, regulation of immune, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems, and insulin metabolism. Given the critical influence of the vitamin D endocrine system in many processes of systemic metabolic equilibrium, the laboratory assays available for the evaluation of this system have to present high accuracy and reproducibility, enabling the establishment of cutoff points that, beyond being consensually accepted, reliably express the vitamin D status of the organism, and the respective clinical-metabolic impacts on the global health of the individual.

  13. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrine System Fact Sheet Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System February, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors John ... could have both benefits and risks for your endocrine system—the network of glands that produce, store, and ...

  14. Skeletal muscle: an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandra; Tarantini, Francesca; Di Bari, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and efficiency of skeletal muscle depend on the complex balance between anabolic and catabolic factors. This balance gradually deteriorates with aging, leading to an age-related decline in muscle quantity and quality, called sarcopenia: this condition plays a central role in physical and functional impairment in late life. The knowledge of the mechanisms that induce sarcopenia and the ability to prevent or counteract them, therefore, can greatly contribute to the prevention of disability and probably also mortality in the elderly. It is well known that skeletal muscle is the target of numerous hormones, but only in recent years studies have shown a role of skeletal muscle as a secretory organ of cytokines and other peptides, denominated myokines (IL6, IL8, IL15, Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and leukaemia inhibitory factor), which have autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine actions and are deeply involved in inflammatory processes. Physical inactivity promotes an unbalance between these substances towards a pro-inflammatory status, thus favoring the vicious circle of sarcopenia, accumulation of fat - especially visceral - and development of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, dementia and depression, according to what has been called "the diseasome of physical inactivity". PMID:23858303

  15. Purinergic signaling pathways in endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5'-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5'-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5'-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling.

  16. Purinergic Signaling Pathways in Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5′-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5′-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5′-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5′-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5′-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. PMID:25960051

  17. Effects of Alcohol on the Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The endocrine system ensures a proper communication between various organs of the body to maintain a constant internal environment. The endocrine system also plays an essential role in enabling the body to respond and appropriately cope with changes in the internal or external environments, such as respond to stress and injury. These functions of the endocrine system to maintain body homeostasis are aided by its communication with the nervous system, immune system and body’s circadian mechanism. Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiological and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system. PMID:24011889

  18. The Vitamin D Endocrine System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the physiology and biochemistry of the vitamin D endocrine system, including role of biological calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D metabolism, and related diseases. A 10-item, multiple-choice test which can be used to obtain continuing medical education credit is included. (JN)

  19. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  20. Skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Kenji; Machida, Takuji; Hirafuji, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle plays a key role in postural retention as well as locomotion for maintaining the physical activities of human life. Skeletal muscle has a second role as an elaborate energy production and consumption system that influences the whole body's energy metabolism. Skeletal muscle is a specific organ that engenders a physical force, and exercise training has been known to bring about multiple benefits for human health maintenance and/or improvement. The mechanisms underlying the improvement of the human physical condition have been revealed: skeletal muscle synthesizes and secretes multiple factors, and these muscle-derived factors, so-called as myokines, exert beneficial effects on peripheral and remote organs. In this short review, we focus on the third aspect of skeletal muscle function - namely, the release of multiple types of myokines, which constitute a broad network for regulating the function of remote organs as well as skeletal muscle itself. We conclusively show that skeletal muscle is one of the endocrine organs and that understanding the mechanisms of production and secretion of myokines may lead to a new pharmacological approach for treatment of clinical disorders.

  1. Sleep and the Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. PMID:26972038

  2. Sleep and the Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed.

  3. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed.

  4. The past 10 years-new hormones, new functions, new endocrine organs.

    PubMed

    Bouillon, Roger; Drucker, Daniel J; Ferrannini, Ele; Grinspoon, Steven; Rosen, Clifford J; Zimmet, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the first issue of this journal in November 2005, our understanding of the endocrine system has evolved, with the identification of novel hormones and novel endocrine roles for previously identified molecules. Here, we have asked six of our Advisory Board Members to comment on how these insights have led to the recognition that many organs and tissues that were not widely considered part of the classic endocrine system in the past have important endocrine functions.

  5. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs.

  6. The heart as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tsuneo; de Bold, Adolfo J

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the heart as an endocrine organ arises from the observation that the atrial cardiomyocytes in the mammalian heart display a phenotype that is partly that of endocrine cells. Investigations carried out between 1971 and 1983 characterised, by virtue of its natriuretic properties, a polypeptide referred to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Another polypeptide isolated from brain in 1988, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), was subsequently characterised as a second hormone produced by the mammalian heart atria. These peptides were associated with the maintenance of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Later work demonstrated a plethora of other properties for ANF and BNP, now designated cardiac natriuretic peptides (cNPs). In addition to the cNPs, other polypeptide hormones are expressed in the heart that likely act upon the myocardium in a paracrine or autocrine fashion. These include the C-type natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal peptide and endothelin-1. Expression and secretion of ANF and BNP are increased in various cardiovascular pathologies and their levels in blood are used in the diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular disease. In addition, therapeutic uses for these peptides or related substances have been found. In all, the discovery of the endocrine heart provided a shift from the classical functional paradigm of the heart that regarded this organ solely as a blood pump to one that regards this organ as self-regulating its workload humorally and that also influences the function of several other organs that control cardiovascular function.

  7. Developing brain as an endocrine organ: a paradoxical reality.

    PubMed

    Ugrumov, M V

    2010-06-01

    The maintaining of homeostasis in the organism in response to a variable environment is provided by the highly hierarchic neuroendocrine-immune system. The crucial component of this system is the hypothalamus providing the endocrine regulation of key peripheral organs, and the adenohypophysis. In this case, neuron-derived signaling molecules (SM) are delivered to the blood vessels in hypothalamic "neurohaemal organs" lacking the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the posterior lobe of the pituitary and the median eminence. The release of SM to the blood vessels in most other brain regions is prohibited by BBB. According to the conventional concept, the development of the neuroendocrine system in ontogenesis begins with the "maturation" of peripheral endocrine glands which first are self-governed and then operate under the adenohypophysial control. Meantime, the brain maturation is under the control of SM secreted by endocrine glands of the developing organism and coming from the placenta and maternal organism. The hypothalamus is involved in the neuroendocrine regulation only after its full maturation that is followed by the conversion of the opened-looped neuroendocrine system to the closed-looped system as in adulthood. Neurons of the developing brain begin to secrete SM shortly after their origin and long before the establishment of specific interneuronal relations providing initially autocrine and paracrine morphogenetic influence on differentiating target neurons. Taking into account that the brain lacks BBB over this ontogenetic period, we hypothesized that it operates as the multipotent endocrine gland secreting SM to the general circulation and thereby providing the endocrine regulation of peripheral organs and the brain. The term "multipotent" means that the spectrum of the brain-derived circulating SM and their occupancy at the periphery in the developing organism should greatly exceed those in adulthood. In order to test this hypothesis, gonadotropin

  8. Bone Regulates Glucose Metabolism as an Endocrine Organ through Osteocalcin.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jin; Wang, Zhi; Yang, Tieyi; Ying, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Skeleton was considered as a dynamic connective tissue, which was essential for mobility, calcium homeostasis, and hematopoietic niche. However more and more evidences indicate that skeleton works not only as a structural scaffold but also as an endocrine organ, which regulates several metabolic processes. Besides osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and Dickopf (DKK) which play essential roles in bone formation, modelling, remodelling, and homeostasis, bone can also secret hormones, such as osteocalcin (OCN), which promotes proliferation of β cells, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. Additionally OCN can also regulate the fat cells and male gonad endocrine activity and be regulated by insulin and the neural system. In summary, skeleton has endocrine function via OCN and plays an important role in energy metabolism, especially in glucose metabolism. PMID:25873961

  9. Telomerase and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Furio; Cantara, Silvia; Capezzone, Marco; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2011-03-29

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of chromosomes that have a critical role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. This involvement is based on complex secondary and tertiary structures that rely on DNA-DNA, DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. De novo synthesis and maintenance of telomere repeats is controlled by telomerase, a specialized complex that consists of a telomerase RNA component and a protein component--telomerase reverse transcriptase. When telomerase is silent (its default state in differentiated somatic cells), chromosomes shorten with every cell division, thus limiting the lifespan of the cells (the process of senescence) and preventing unlimited cell proliferation, which might eventually lead to the development of cancer. During this process, occasionally, a cell can activate telomerase, which stabilizes short telomeres and enables immortalization-a process essential for malignant transformation. Thus, although telomere erosion is a barrier to malignant progression, paradoxically, in certain circumstances it might also trigger tumorigenesis. A number of studies have demonstrated unequivocally that reactivation of telomerase in the presence of short telomeres is one of the most common features of human cancers, including those of the endocrine system.

  10. Analyzing endocrine system conservation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing variation in rates of evolution can provide important insights into the factors that constrain trait evolution, as well as those that promote diversification. Metazoan endocrine systems exhibit apparent variation in evolutionary rates of their constituent components at multiple levels, yet relatively few studies have quantified these patterns and analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. This may be in part due to historical and current data limitations for many endocrine components and taxonomic groups. However, recent technological advancements such as high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity to collect large-scale comparative data sets for even non-model species. Such ventures will produce a fertile data landscape for evolutionary analyses of nucleic acid and amino acid based endocrine components. Here I summarize evolutionary rate analyses that can be applied to categorical and continuous endocrine traits, and also those for nucleic acid and protein-based components. I emphasize analyses that could be used to test whether other variables (e.g., ecology, ontogenetic timing of expression, etc.) are related to patterns of rate variation and endocrine component diversification. The application of phylogenetic-based rate analyses to comparative endocrine data will greatly enhance our understanding of the factors that have shaped endocrine system evolution.

  11. The endocrine system in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alrefai, Hisham; Allababidi, Hisham; Levy, Shiri; Levy, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is complex and not fully understood. However, it emerges as an abnormal metabolic condition associated with a systemic damage to the vascular bed. Cumulative evidence also reveals that the endocrine system is not intact in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is not clear whether the changes observed in the endocrine system represent a primary defect or reflect the effects of the impaired insulin action and abnormal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism on the hormonal milieu. Review of the literature reveals that the function of the entire endocrine system including the functions of hormones from the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, the vitamin D system, the gonads, and the endocrine function of the adipose tissue, is impaired. Good metabolic control and insulin treatment may reverse some of these abnormalities. It remains unanswered as to what extent these changes in the endocrine system contribute to the vascular pathologies observed in individuals affected by diabetes mellitus and whether part of the abnormalities observed in the endocrine system reflect a basic cellular defect in the diabetic syndrome.

  12. The endocrine system and connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, J L

    1990-01-01

    The face of many endocrine diseases is rapidly changing as early detection and intervention is achieved. Nevertheless, certain musculoskeletal symptoms can suggest a possible endocrinopathy. The clinician can expect the appearance of particular rheumatic problems during the course of a chronic endocrine disorder. This is especially germaine for diabetes and acromegaly, in which the disorder is controlled but not cured. Clearly hormones play a critical role in the development and expression of immunologic disease. Sex hormones and calcitriol have a direct effect on basic immunobiology (3). The rheumatoid synovium responds to parathyroid hormone and calcitriol in concert with local signals such as prostaglandins, interleukins, and interferon (2,77). Finally, the immune system plays a central role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases. The thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease are best studied. The mechanisms of Ia expression leading to immune destruction and lymphocytic infiltration of the gland will be applied to other endocrine disorders.

  13. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Galic, Sandra; Oakhill, Jon S; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2010-03-25

    Obesity is characterized by increased storage of fatty acids in an expanded adipose tissue mass and is closely associated with the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle and the liver. In addition to being the largest source of fuel in the body, adipose tissue and resident macrophages are also the source of a number of secreted proteins. Cloning of the obese gene and the identification of its product, leptin, was one of the first discoveries of an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule and established an important role for adipose tissue as an endocrine organ. Since then, leptin has been found to have a profound role in the regulation of whole-body metabolism by stimulating energy expenditure, inhibiting food intake and restoring euglycemia, however, in most cases of obesity leptin resistance limits its biological efficacy. In contrast to leptin, adiponectin secretion is often diminished in obesity. Adiponectin acts to increase insulin sensitivity, fatty acid oxidation, as well as energy expenditure and reduces the production of glucose by the liver. Resistin and retinol binding protein-4 are less well described. Their expression levels are positively correlated with adiposity and they are both implicated in the development of insulin resistance. More recently it has been acknowledged that macrophages are an important part of the secretory function of adipose tissue and the main source of inflammatory cyokines, such as TNFalpha and IL-6. An increase in circulating levels of these macrophage-derived factors in obesity leads to a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that has been linked to the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. These proteins commonly known as adipokines are central to the dynamic control of energy metabolism, communicating the nutrient status of the organism with the tissues responsible for controlling both energy intake and expenditure as well as insulin sensitivity. PMID:19723556

  14. Effects of alcohol on the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2013-09-01

    Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine, and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiologic and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease, and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system.

  15. Nanotoxicity: a growing need for study in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefei; Liu, Ying; Kong, Xiangjun; Lobie, Peter E; Chen, Chunying; Zhu, Tao

    2013-05-27

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are engineered for commercial purposes such as semiconductors, building materials, cosmetics, and drug carriers, while natural nanoparticles (NPs) already exist in the environment. Due to their unique physicochemical properties, they may interact actively with biological systems. Some of these interactions might be detrimental to human health, and therefore studies on the potential 'nanotoxicity' of these materials in different organ systems are warranted. The purpose of developing the concept of nanotoxicity is to recognize and evaluate the hazards and risks of NMs and evaluate safety. This review will summarize and discuss recent reports derived from cell lines or animal models concerning the effects of NMs on, and their application in, the endocrine system of mammalian and other species. It will present an update on current studies of the effects of some typical NMs-such as metal-based NMs, carbon-based NMs, and dendrimers-on endocrine functions, in which some effects are adverse or unwanted and others are favorable or intended. Disruption of endocrine function is associated with adverse health outcomes including reproductive failure, metabolic syndrome, and some types of cancer. Further investigations are therefore required to obtain a thorough understanding of any potential risk of pathological endocrine disruption from products containing NMs. This review aims to provide impetus for further studies on the interactions of NMs with endocrine functions.

  16. Introduction to the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources Featured Resource Digital Toolkit ... with other organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone ...

  17. Systemic Effects of Non-Endocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James D.; Rona, George

    1964-01-01

    Tumours of non-endocrine origin may exert deleterious effects by elaborating active principles which disturb body regulation. Systemic manifestations are fairly common with neoplasms of the lung, kidney, gastro-intestinal tract and thymus. The secretion of these tumours may have a known chemical structure (serotonin), may present hormone-like action (parathormone, antidiuretic hormone, insulinoid), or have well-defined biological properties (erythropoietin, gastrin-like principle). Tumours may stimulate endocrine glands by an unknown mechanism, producing disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, hypercalcemia, gynecomastia and hypoglycemia. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune diseases. Tumours may extensively utilize or excrete some metabolite (glucose) or electrolyte (Na or K). Awareness of the systemic effects of various neoplasms may lead to an early diagnosis and proper treatment of these manifestations. PMID:14204555

  18. Alterations in development of reproductive and endocrine systems of wildlife populations exposed to endocrine-disrupting contaminants.

    PubMed

    Guillette, L J; Gunderson, M P

    2001-12-01

    Wildlife and human populations are affected by contaminants in natural settings. This problem has been a growing concern over the last decade with the realization that various environmental chemicals can alter the development and functioning of endocrine organs, cells and target tissues. Documented disruptions or alterations in reproductive activity, morphology or physiology in wildlife populations have been correlated with contaminant-induced modifications in endocrine system functioning. Alterations of the endocrine system are complex, and not limited to a particular organ or molecular mechanism. For instance, contaminants have been shown to (1) act as hormone receptor agonists or antagonists, (2) alter hormone production at its endocrine source, (3) alter the release of stimulatory or inhibitory hormones from the pituitary or hypothalamus, (4) alter hepatic enzymatic biotransformation of hormones, and (5) alter the concentration or functioning of serum-binding proteins, altering free hormone concentrations in the serum. This review focuses on two of these alterations, altered hormone synthesis and hepatic biotransformation, as a number of recent studies indicate that these actions are important components of endocrine disruption in developing organisms. The possible role of contaminants in altering sex determination mechanisms is also examined.

  19. [The heart as an endocrine organ].

    PubMed

    Mezősi, Emese; Bajnok, László; Tóth, Kálmán

    2012-12-23

    The discovery of cardiac hormone production significantly changed the evaluation of the function of the heart, which is rather regarded as a determining factor of the electrolyte and hemodynamic homeostasis cooperating with other organ systems instead of a mechanical pump. The most important hormones produced by the heart are the natriuretic peptides that have the primary role of protection against volume overload through natriuretic, diuretic, vasodilator and antiproliferative effects. They are integrative markers of the cardiac, vascular and renal functions and marking cardiorenal distress. Brain natriuretic peptide and the N-terminal pro-hormone (NT-proBNP) became generally accepted markers of heart failure exceeding traditional pathophysiological significance of those. They are useful in the diagnosis, estimation of prognosis and therapy guidance and their therapeutic administration is also available. Although the detection of extraadrenal aldosterone production is an exciting new discovery, intracardial aldosterone production is not significant in human beings. The intracardial thyroid hormone production is regulated by deiodinase activity. The role of elevated T3 concentration was suggested in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, while low T3 is assumed to be important in adaptation to hypoxia. An unexpected, complex relation can be determined between epicardial adipose tissue and coronary artery diseases, cytokine and adipokine production of adipocytes might be a part of the self-enhancing process of atherosclerosis.

  20. The Gut Microbial Endocrine Organ: Bacterially-Derived Signals Driving Cardiometabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, which vastly outnumber host cells in the body. Although generally overlooked in the field of endocrinology, gut microbial symbionts organize to form a key endocrine organ that convert nutritional cues from the environment into hormone-like signals that impact both normal physiology and chronic disease in the human host. Recent evidence suggests that several gut microbial-derived products are sensed by dedicated host receptor systems to alter cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. In fact, gut microbial metabolism of dietary components results in the production of proatherogenic circulating factors that act through a meta-organismal endocrine axis to impact CVD risk. Whether pharmacological interventions at the level of the gut microbial endocrine organ will reduce CVD risk is a key new question in the field of cardiovascular medicine. Here we discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in targeting meta-organismal endocrinology for CVD prevention. PMID:25587655

  1. Carcinoma of endocrine organs: results of the RARECARE project.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Mallone, Sandra; van Dijk, Boukje; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Otter, Renée; Foschi, Roberto; Baudin, Eric; Links, Thera P

    2012-09-01

    The rarity or the asymptomatic character of endocrine tumours results in a lack of epidemiological studies on their incidence and survival patterns. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of endocrine tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) with follow-up until 31st December 2003. These data give an unique overview of the burden of endocrine carcinomas in Europe. A list of tumour entities based on the third International Classification of Diseases for Oncology was provided by the project Surveillance of rare cancer in Europe (RARECARE) project. Over 33,594 cases of endocrine carcinomas were analysed in this study. Incidence rates increased with age and were highest in patients 65 years of age or older. In 2003, more than 315,000 persons in the EU (27 countries) were alive with a past diagnosis of a carcinoma of endocrine organs. The incidence of pituitary carcinoma equalled four per 1,000,000 person years and showed the strongest decline in survival with increasing age. Thyroid cancer showed the highest crude incidence rates (four per 100,000 person years) and was the only entity with a gender difference: (female-to-male ratio: 2:9). Parathyroid carcinoma was the rarest endocrine entity with two new cases per 10,000,000 person years. For adrenal carcinoma, the most remarkable observations were a higher survival for women compared to men (40% compared to 32%, respectively) and a particularly low relative survival of 24% in patients 65 years of age or older. More high quality studies on rare cancers, with additional information, e.g. on stage and therapeutic approach, are needed and may be of help in partly explaining the observed variation in survival.

  2. Adipose tissues as endocrine target organs.

    PubMed

    Lanthier, Nicolas; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2014-08-01

    In the context of obesity, white adipocyte hypertrophy and adipose tissue macrophage infiltration result in the production of pro-inflammatory adipocytokines inducing insulin resistance locally but also in distant organs and contributing to low grade inflammatory status associated with the metabolic syndrome. Visceral adipose tissue is believed to play a prominent role. Brown and beige adipose tissues are capable of energy dissipation, but also of cytokine production and their role in dysmetabolic syndrome is emerging. This review focuses on metabolic and inflammatory changes in these adipose depots and contribution to metabolic syndrome. Also we will review surgical and pharmacological procedures to target adiposity as therapeutic interventions to treat obesity-associated disorders.

  3. Adipose tissue: from lipid storage compartment to endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Philipp E

    2006-06-01

    Adipose tissue, when carried around in excessive amounts, predisposes to a large number of diseases. Epidemiological data show that the prevalence of obesity has significantly increased over the past 20 years and continues to do so at an alarming rate. Here, some molecular aspects of the key constituent of adipose tissue, the adipocyte, are reviewed. While the adipocyte has been studied for many years and remarkable insights have been gained about some processes, many areas of the physiology of the fat cell remain unexplored. Our understanding of how cellular events in the adipocyte affect the local environment through paracrine interactions and how systemic effects are achieved through endocrine interactions is rudimentary. While storage and release of lipids are major functions of adipocytes, the adipocyte also uses specific lipid molecules for intracellular signaling and uses a host of protein factors to communicate with essentially every organ system in the body. The intensity and complexity of these signals are highly regulated, differ in each fat pad, and are dramatically affected by various disease states. PMID:16731815

  4. Developing brain as an endocrine organ: secretion of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Ugrumov, Michael V; Saifetyarova, Julia Y; Lavrentieva, Antonina V; Sapronova, Anna Y

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to test our hypothesis that the developing brain operates as an endocrine organ before the establishment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in rats up to the first postnatal week. Dopamine (DA) was selected as a marker of the brain endocrine activity. The hypothesis was supported by the observations in rats of: (i) the physiological concentration of DA in peripheral blood of fetuses and neonates, before the BBB establishment, and its drop by prepubertal period, after the BBB development; (ii) a drop of the DA concentration in the brain for 54% and in blood for 74% on the 3rd postnatal day after the intraventricular administration of 50 μg of α-methyl-p-tyrosine, an inhibitor of DA synthesis, with no changes in the DA metabolism in peripheral DA-producing organs. Thus, the developing brain is a principal source of circulating DA which is capable of providing an endocrine regulation of peripheral organs and the brain.

  5. The heart as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Sagnella, Guiseppe A

    2002-12-01

    The discovery of atrial natruietic peptide firmly established that the heart was not just a pump and provided the long-sought-after link between the heart and the kidney in the control of soduim balance. Pharmacological targeting of the natruiretic peptide system is now leading to novel advances in the treatment of hypertension and of heart failure - two of the most common causes of human disability and death.

  6. [The immuno-endocrine system. A new endocrine theory: the problem of the packed transport].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2011-05-15

    Since the eighties of the last century hormone content was justified in immune cells (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells), which produce, store and secrete these hormones. Although the amount of these materials in immune cells is relatively small, the mass of the producers (immune cells) is so large, that the phenomenon must be considered from endocrinological point of view, underlying the important differences between the "classical" and immuno-endocrine systems. Cells of the classic (built-in) endocrine system are mono-producers, while immune cells can synthesize many types of hormones (polyproducers). In addition, these cells can transport the whole hormone-producing machinery to the site of need, producing a local effect. This can be observed, for example, in the case of endorphin producing immune cells during inflammation and during early pregnancy around the chorionic villi. Hormone producing immune cells also have receptors for many hormones, so that they are poly-receivers. Via hormone producing and receiving capacity there is a bidirectional connection between the neuro-endocrine and immuno-endocrine systems. In addition, there is a network inside the immuno-endocrine system. The packed transport theory attempts to explain the mechanism and importance of the immuno-endocrine system.

  7. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals use distinct mechanisms of action to modulate endocrine system function.

    PubMed

    Henley, Derek V; Korach, Kenneth S

    2006-06-01

    The term endocrine-disrupting chemicals is used to define a structurally diverse class of synthetic and natural compounds that possess the ability to alter various components of the endocrine system and potentially induce adverse health effects in exposed individuals and populations. Research on these compounds has revealed that they use a variety of both nuclear receptor-mediated and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms to modulate different components of the endocrine system. This review will describe in vitro and in vivo studies that highlight the spectrum of unique mechanisms of action and biological effects of four endocrine-disrupting chemicals--diethylstilbestrol, genistein, di(n-butyl)phthalate, and methoxyacetic acid--to illustrate the diverse and complex nature of this class of compounds.

  8. Update: Systemic Diseases and the Cardiovascular System (II). The endocrine system and the heart: a review.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo S; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2011-03-01

    Normal endocrine function is essential for cardiovascular health. Disorders of the endocrine system, consisting of hormone hyperfunction and hypofunction, have multiple effects on the cardiovascular system. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands, with respect to the impact of endocrine dysfunction on the cardiovascular system. We also review the cardiovascular benefits of restoring normal endocrine function.

  9. VEGF-targeted cancer therapeutics-paradoxical effects in endocrine organs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yihai

    2014-09-01

    Systemic administration of antiangiogenic drugs that target components of the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A; VEGF) signal transduction pathway has become a viable therapeutic option for patients with various types of cancer. Nevertheless, these drugs can drive alterations in healthy vasculatures, which in turn are associated with adverse effects in healthy tissues. VEGF is crucial for vascular homeostasis and the maintenance of vascular integrity and architecture in endocrine organs. Given these critical physiological functions, systemic delivery of drugs that target VEGF signalling can block VEGF-mediated vascular functions in endocrine organs, such as the thyroid gland, and lead to endocrine dysfunction, including hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and altered insulin sensitivity. This Review discusses emerging evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that contributes to understanding the mechanisms that underlie the vascular changes and subsequent modulations of endocrine function that are induced by targeted inhibition of VEGF signalling. Understanding these mechanisms is crucial for the design of antiangiogenic drugs with minimal associated adverse effects that will enable effective treatment of patients with cancer.

  10. Evolution of the reproductive endocrine system in chordates.

    PubMed

    Kubokawa, Kaoru; Tando, Yukiko; Roy, Sonali

    2010-07-01

    The cephalochordate, amphioxus, is phylogenetically placed at the most primitive position in the chordate clade. Despite many studies on the endocrine system of amphioxus, definitive evidence has not been reported for the presence an endocrine system comparable to the pituitary-gonadal axis, which is important in the regulation of reproduction in vertebrates. Recent genome analyses in the amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae, showed that it does not have any pituitary hormone genes except the thyrostimulin gene. Thyrostimulin is a heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone consisting of α and β subunits, and is present in various organs of vertebrates. Analyses of a phylogenetic tree and a synteny suggest that amphioxus' thyrostimulin is an ancestral type of the glycoprotein hormones in chordates. In addition, genes for sex steroidogenic enzymes belonging to the CYP family were found in the genome sequences. The conversion pathway of sex steroids from cholesterol to estrogen, androgen, and major sex steroids was also identified in the gonads of amphioxus in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated the expression of genes encoding thyrostimulin and sex steroidogenic enzymes by an in situ hybridization technique. Here, we discuss the evolution of hormones and reproductive functions in the neuroendocrine control system of chordates.

  11. [Regeneration of endocrine gastroenteropancreatic system in experimental and clinical pathology: concept development and current problems].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V F

    2013-01-01

    Literature review contains the literature data and the results of author's own investigations describing the coming into being and the development of the concepts on the regeneration of endocrine gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system under the conditions of norm, experimental and clinical pathology. Data analysis permitted to reveal the similarities and differences in the course of this process in various organs of the digestive system. Endocrine GEP system renewal occurs at different levels of its organization. At the tissue level, the endocrine cells renewal occurs via the transformation of exocrine cells into the endocrine ones and as a result of differentiation from stem cells via the "agranular" cell stage which are precursors of the endocrine cells. This pathway of regeneration is the major one after the damage. Regeneration at cellular level occurs through mitotic division of the differentiated endocrine cells (early stage of regeneration) and as a result of the formation granules with different hormonal profile in D-cells. At the intracellular level, the regeneration is realized through the intracellular structure restoration after their damage induced by the increase of cell functional activity accompanied by degranulation and dystrophic changes development

  12. Endocannabinoids and the Endocrine System in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Cecilia J

    2015-01-01

    Some of the earliest reports of the effects of cannabis consumption on humans were related to endocrine system changes. In this review, the effects of cannabinoids and the role of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the regulation of the following endocrine systems are discussed: the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, prolactin and oxytocin, thyroid hormone and growth hormone, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Preclinical and human study results are presented.

  13. The heart is the center of a new endocrine, paracrine, and neuroendocrine system.

    PubMed

    Forssmann, W G; Nokihara, K; Gagelmann, M; Hock, D; Feller, S; Schulz-Knappe, P; Herbst, F

    1989-01-01

    This review indicates that the heart is a polypeptide-producing organ which should be classified among the traditional endocrine tissues. Cardiac hormones have only been known for a few years, the discovery of their endocrine functions, however, occurred in the 1950ies when Gauer, Henry and Kisch observed specific physiological and morphological features of the heart atria indicative of an endocrine activity. Because of their basic effects many target organs involved in the regulation of body fluid pressure and composition are related to this endocrine organ located in the atrial appendages of the heart. The compact endocrine portion of the heart is built up by myoendocrine cells which form the functional endocrine units and produce a variety of polypeptide hormones called cardiodilatin (CDD) or atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP), which belong to one family. Also, co-storage of a partially homologous regulatory polypeptide called brain natriuretic polypeptide (BNP) occurs, as has been determined by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay. CDD and/or BNP are found in numerous organs where they exert paracrine and neurocrine functions, e.g., in the brain, peripheral nervous system, kidney, and adrenal medulla. In these organs, a differential post-translational processing of cardiac polypeptides is observed, resulting in different functional activities according to discriminating receptor interactions and degrading metabolism. Some of the extra-auricular sites of synthesis and storage of CDD-like peptides are briefly mentioned. In summary the heart constitutes the center of a multilocal and multifunctional system of specific cardiac polypeptides of endocrine, paraneuronal, and neuronal character.

  14. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses.

  15. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. PMID:27474216

  16. Environmental endocrine disruptors: Effects on the human male reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, M F; Hasan, N; Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C

    2015-12-01

    Incidences of altered development and neoplasia of male reproductive organs have increased during the last 50 years, as shown by epidemiological data. These data are associated with the increased presence of environmental chemicals, specifically "endocrine disruptors," that interfere with normal hormonal action. Much research has gone into testing the effects of specific endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the development of male reproductive organs and endocrine-related cancers in both in vitro and in vivo models. Efforts have been made to bridge the accruing laboratory findings with the epidemiological data to draw conclusions regarding the relationship between EDCs, altered development and carcinogenesis. The ability of EDCs to predispose target fetal and adult tissues to neoplastic transformation is best explained under the framework of the tissue organization field theory of carcinogenesis (TOFT), which posits that carcinogenesis is development gone awry. Here, we focus on the available evidence, from both empirical and epidemiological studies, regarding the effects of EDCs on male reproductive development and carcinogenesis of endocrine target tissues. We also critique current research methodology utilized in the investigation of EDCs effects and outline what could possibly be done to address these obstacles moving forward.

  17. Environmental endocrine disruptors: Effects on the human male reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, M F; Hasan, N; Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C

    2015-12-01

    Incidences of altered development and neoplasia of male reproductive organs have increased during the last 50 years, as shown by epidemiological data. These data are associated with the increased presence of environmental chemicals, specifically "endocrine disruptors," that interfere with normal hormonal action. Much research has gone into testing the effects of specific endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the development of male reproductive organs and endocrine-related cancers in both in vitro and in vivo models. Efforts have been made to bridge the accruing laboratory findings with the epidemiological data to draw conclusions regarding the relationship between EDCs, altered development and carcinogenesis. The ability of EDCs to predispose target fetal and adult tissues to neoplastic transformation is best explained under the framework of the tissue organization field theory of carcinogenesis (TOFT), which posits that carcinogenesis is development gone awry. Here, we focus on the available evidence, from both empirical and epidemiological studies, regarding the effects of EDCs on male reproductive development and carcinogenesis of endocrine target tissues. We also critique current research methodology utilized in the investigation of EDCs effects and outline what could possibly be done to address these obstacles moving forward. PMID:26847433

  18. The endocrine system and sarcopenia: potential therapeutic benefits.

    PubMed

    McIntire, Kevin L; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2011-12-01

    Age related muscle loss, known as sarcopenia, is a major factor in disability, loss of mobility and quality of life in the elderly. There are many proposed mechanisms of age-related muscle loss that include the endocrine system. A variety of hormones regulate growth, development and metabolism throughout the lifespan. Hormone activity may change with age as a result of reduced hormone secretion or decreased tissue responsiveness. This review will focus on the complex interplay between the endocrine system, aging and skeletal muscle and will present possible benefits of therapeutic interventions for sarcopenia.

  19. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is primarily composed of glands that produce chemical messengers called hormones. Glands of the endocrine system include the pituitary gland, the thyroid gland, the parathyroid glands, the thymus, ...

  20. [Novel concepts in biology of diffuse endocrine system: results and future investigations].

    PubMed

    Iaglov, V V; Iaglova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse endocrine system is a largest part of endocrine system of vertebrates. Recend findings showed that DES-cells are not neuroectodermal but have ectodermal, mesodermal, and entodermal ontogeny. The article reviews novel concept of diffuse endocrine system anatomy and physiology, functional role of DES hormones and poorly investigated aspects like DES-cell morphology, hormones secretion in normal and pathologic conditions. Further research of diffuse endocrine system has a great significance for biochemistry, morphology, and clinical medicine.

  1. [Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ: role in pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and insulin independent diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Lapchyns'ka, I I; Stefaniuk, M F

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review of the modern literature is devoted to the problem of regarding the adipose tissue as not only a repository of energy supplies but an active endocrine organ as well whose activity exerts a definite effect on the function of many bodily systems. Specific emphasis is directed toward aspects of the function of certain secretory proteins involved in the process of the arterial pressure regulation and/or organs injuring.

  2. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F.; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers. PMID:25560704

  3. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers.

  4. Syndrome-Associated Tumors by Organ System.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Riddle, Nicole D

    2016-06-01

    Certain tumors suggest the possibility of a patient harboring a genetic syndrome, particularly in children. Syndrome-associated tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, gynecologic tract, heart, lungs, brain, eye, endocrine organs, and hematopoietic system will be briefly discussed.

  5. Early outgrowth cells release soluble endocrine antifibrotic factors that reduce progressive organ fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Zhang, Yanling; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, Golam; Kepecs, David; Spring, Christopher; Smith, Christopher; Batruch, Ihor; Kosanam, Hari; Advani, Andrew; Diamandis, Eleftherios; Marsden, Philip A; Gilbert, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived cells can improve organ function in chronic disease models, ostensibly by the release of paracrine factors. It has, however, been difficult to reconcile this prevailing paradigm with the lack of cell retention within injured organs and their rapid migration to the reticuloendothelial system. Here, we provide evidence that the salutary antifibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived early outgrowth cells (EOCs) are more consistent with an endocrine mode of action, demonstrating not only the presence of antifibrotic factors in the plasma of EOC-treated rats but also that EOC conditioned medium (EOC-CM) potently attenuates both TGF-β- and angiotensin II-induced fibroblast collagen production in vitro. To examine the therapeutic relevance of these findings in vivo, 5/6 subtotally nephrectomized rats, a model of chronic kidney and heart failure characterized by progressive fibrosis of both organs, were randomized to receive i.v. injections of EOC-CM, unconditioned medium, or 10(6) EOCs. Rats that received unconditioned medium developed severe kidney injury with cardiac diastolic dysfunction. In comparison, EOC-CM-treated rats demonstrated substantially improved renal and cardiac function and structure, mimicking the changes found in EOC-treated animals. Mass spectrometric analysis of EOC-CM identified proteins that regulate cellular functions implicated in fibrosis. These results indicate that EOCs secrete soluble factor(s) with highly potent antifibrotic activity, that when injected intravenously replicate the salutary effects of the cells themselves. Together, these findings suggest that an endocrine mode of action may underlie the effectiveness of cell therapy in certain settings and portend the possibility for systemic delivery of cell-free therapy.

  6. Remote preconditioning-endocrine factors in organ protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Craig S; Liao, Siyun; Gross, Garrett J; Schultz, Jo El J

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and developing world. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a number of interventions including brief periods of ischemia or hypoxia and certain endogenous factors such as opioids, bradykinin, growth factors or pharmacological agents are capable of protecting the heart against post-ischemic contractile dysfunction, arrhythmias and myocardial infarction. This conventional cardioprotection occurs via an autocrine or paracrine action in which these protective factors are released from the heart to act upon itself. Over the last ten years, a growing body of evidence indicates that a brief ischemic insult on one organ releases endogenous factors that protect other organs against a prolonged ischemic insult. This phenomenon, termed remote preconditioning or preconditioning at a distance, implicates an endocrine action, and may involve humoral or neural-endocrine signaling. This review will summarize the endocrine factors identified and implicated in this inter-organ cytoprotection. PMID:17897043

  7. The gut microbiome as a virtual endocrine organ with implications for farm and domestic animal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, T F; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Clarke, G

    2016-07-01

    The gut microbiome exerts a marked influence on host physiology, and manipulation of its composition has repeatedly been shown to influence host metabolism and body composition. This virtual endocrine organ also has a role in the regulation of the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, an essential amino acid and precursor to serotonin, a key neurotransmitter within both the enteric and central nervous systems. Control over the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis also appears to be under the influence of the gut microbiota. This is clear from studies in microbiota-deficient germ-free animals with exaggerated responses to psychological stress that can be normalized by monocolonization with certain bacterial species including Bifidobacterium infantis. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota may thus be useful in treating or preventing stress-related microbiome-gut-brain axis disorders and metabolic diseases, much the same way as redirections of metabolopathies can be achieved through more traditional endocrine hormone-based interventions. Moreover, the implications of these findings need to be considered in the context of farm and domestic animal physiology, behavior, and food safety. PMID:27345323

  8. Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Impacts on Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobling, Susan

    2014-07-01

    We often talk about the importance of water, but one area that's often overlooked is the safety of our water supply. How many people actually think about the purity of their water when they turn on the tap? We may have real reason to be concerned because our water delivery systems and treatment technology seem to be stuck in the past, relying on old water treatment and water delivery systems. While these systems still do a great job filtering out particles, parasites and bacteria, they usually fail to remove 21st century contaminants like pesticides, industrial chemicals, lead, pharmaceuticals and arsenic. Indeed our water contains already a whole plethora of things in daily commerce and pharmaceuticals are increasingly showing up in the water supply, including antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood altering medications and sex hormones. As the world's dependence on chemicals grows, our water supplies will continue to feel the effects, which inevitably will touch every person on this planet...

  9. ALTERATIONS IN DEVELOPMENT OF REPRODUCTIVE AND ENDOCRINE SYSTEMS OF WILDLIFE POPULATIONS EXPOSED TO ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CONTAMINANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wildlife and human populations are affected by contaminants in natural settings. This problem has been a growing concern over the last decade with the realization that various environmental chemicals can alter the development and functioning of endocrine organs, cells and target ...

  10. Endocrine Tumor: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... a roadmap to this full guide. About the endocrine system The endocrine system is made up of cells that produce hormones. ... of sugar in the blood. Part of the endocrine system is the neuroendocrine system, which is made up ...

  11. Artificial endocrine controller for power management in robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Sauzé, Colin; Neal, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The robots that operate autonomously for extended periods in remote environments are often limited to gather only small amounts of power through photovoltaic solar panels. Such limited power budgets make power management critical to the success of the robot's mission. Artificial endocrine controllers, inspired by the mammalian endocrine system, have shown potential as a method for managing competing demands, gradually switching between behaviors, synchronizing behavior with external events, and maintaining a stable internal state of the robot. This paper reports the results obtained using these methods to manage power in an autonomous sailing robot. Artificial neural networks are used for sail and rudder control, while an artificial endocrine controller modulates the magnitude of actuator movements in response to battery or sunlight levels. Experiments are performed both in simulation and using a real robot. In simulation a 13-fold reduction in median power consumption is achieved; in the robot this is reduced to a twofold reduction because of the limitations of the simulation model. Additional simulations of a long term mission demonstrate the controller's ability to make gradual behavioral transitions and to synchronize behaviors with diurnal and seasonal changes in sunlight levels.

  12. Artificial endocrine controller for power management in robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Sauzé, Colin; Neal, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The robots that operate autonomously for extended periods in remote environments are often limited to gather only small amounts of power through photovoltaic solar panels. Such limited power budgets make power management critical to the success of the robot's mission. Artificial endocrine controllers, inspired by the mammalian endocrine system, have shown potential as a method for managing competing demands, gradually switching between behaviors, synchronizing behavior with external events, and maintaining a stable internal state of the robot. This paper reports the results obtained using these methods to manage power in an autonomous sailing robot. Artificial neural networks are used for sail and rudder control, while an artificial endocrine controller modulates the magnitude of actuator movements in response to battery or sunlight levels. Experiments are performed both in simulation and using a real robot. In simulation a 13-fold reduction in median power consumption is achieved; in the robot this is reduced to a twofold reduction because of the limitations of the simulation model. Additional simulations of a long term mission demonstrate the controller's ability to make gradual behavioral transitions and to synchronize behaviors with diurnal and seasonal changes in sunlight levels. PMID:24805216

  13. The endocrine system in chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Félix; Moreno, Juan Manuel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    The experimental model of chronic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production has proven to be a useful tool to study cardiovascular and renal lesions produced by this type of hypertension, which are similar to those found in human hypertension. It also offers a unique opportunity to study the interaction of NO with the humoral systems, known to have a role in the normal physiology of vascular tone and renal function. This review provides a thorough and updated analysis of the interactions of NO with the endocrine system. There is special focus on the main vasoactive factors, including the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, catecholamines, vasopressin, and endothelin among others. Recent discoveries of crosstalk between the endocrine system and NO are also reported. Study of these humoral interactions indicates that NO is a molecule with ubiquitous function and that its inhibition alters virtually to all other known regulatory systems. Thus, hypothyroidism attenuates the pressor effect of NO inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, whereas hyperthyroidism aggravates the effects of NO synthesis inhibition; the sex hormone environment determines the blood pressure response to NO blockade; NO may play a homeostatic role against the prohypertensive effects of mineralocorticoids, thyroid hormones and insulin; and finally, NO deficiency affects not only blood pressure but also glucose and lipid homeostasis, mimicking the human metabolic syndrome X, suggesting that NO deficiency may be a link between metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

  14. MYSID CRUSTACEANS AS POTENTIAL TEST ORGANISMS FOR THE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verslycke, Tim A., Nancy Fockedey, Charles L. McKenney, Jr., Stephen D. Roast, Malcolm B. Jones, Jan Mees and Colin R. Janssen. 2004. Mysid Crustaceans as Potential Test Organisms for the Evaluation of Environmental Endocrine Disruption: A Review. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 23(5):12...

  15. In vitro steroid profiling system for the evaluation of endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yosuke; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine disruptors (ED) are chemicals that affect various aspects of the endocrine system, often leading to the inhibition of steroidogenesis. Current chemical safety policies that restrict human exposure to such chemicals describe often time-consuming and costly methods for the evaluation of ED effects. We aimed to develop an effective tool for accurate phenotypic chemical toxicology studies. We developed an in vitro ED evaluation system using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods for metabolomic analysis of multi-marker profiles. Accounting for sample preparation and GC/MS/MS conditions, we established a screening method that allowed the simultaneous analysis of 17 steroids with good reproducibility and a linear calibration curve. Moreover, we applied the developed system to H295R human adrenocortical cells exposed to forskolin and prochloraz in accordance with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines and observed dose-dependent variations in steroid profiles. While the OECD guidelines include only testosterone and 17β-estradiol, our system enabled a comprehensive and highly sensitive analysis of steroid profile alteration due to ED exposure. The application of our ED evaluation screen could be economical and provide novel insights into the hazards of ED exposure to the endocrine system.

  16. In vitro steroid profiling system for the evaluation of endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yosuke; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine disruptors (ED) are chemicals that affect various aspects of the endocrine system, often leading to the inhibition of steroidogenesis. Current chemical safety policies that restrict human exposure to such chemicals describe often time-consuming and costly methods for the evaluation of ED effects. We aimed to develop an effective tool for accurate phenotypic chemical toxicology studies. We developed an in vitro ED evaluation system using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods for metabolomic analysis of multi-marker profiles. Accounting for sample preparation and GC/MS/MS conditions, we established a screening method that allowed the simultaneous analysis of 17 steroids with good reproducibility and a linear calibration curve. Moreover, we applied the developed system to H295R human adrenocortical cells exposed to forskolin and prochloraz in accordance with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines and observed dose-dependent variations in steroid profiles. While the OECD guidelines include only testosterone and 17β-estradiol, our system enabled a comprehensive and highly sensitive analysis of steroid profile alteration due to ED exposure. The application of our ED evaluation screen could be economical and provide novel insights into the hazards of ED exposure to the endocrine system. PMID:26979344

  17. Mechanisms of arsenic disruption on gonadal, adrenal and thyroid endocrine systems in humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Xiang, Ping; Luo, Jun; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun; Li, Hong-Bo; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-01

    Due to its toxicity as a carcinogen and wide distribution in the environment, arsenic (As) exposure in humans is of public concern globally. Many studies have manifested that As exposure induces cancers besides pathological effects in humans. Animal studies showed that chronic As exposure induces serious neurological effects. Based on recent studies, researchers proposed that As, including arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII), is also an endocrine disruptor. This review discusses the mechanisms of As toxicity on three endocrine systems including gonadal, adrenal and thyroid endocrine systems. Arsenic methylation and oxidative stress are responsible for As-induced disorders of endocrine systems, however, strong binding of AsIII to thiols also play an important role. Some studies showed AsV toxicity on endocrine systems, but mechanistic investigation is lacking. Research is needed to look into their toxicity mechanisms to help cure the illnesses caused by As-induced endocrine system disorders.

  18. Mechanisms of arsenic disruption on gonadal, adrenal and thyroid endocrine systems in humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Xiang, Ping; Luo, Jun; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun; Li, Hong-Bo; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-01

    Due to its toxicity as a carcinogen and wide distribution in the environment, arsenic (As) exposure in humans is of public concern globally. Many studies have manifested that As exposure induces cancers besides pathological effects in humans. Animal studies showed that chronic As exposure induces serious neurological effects. Based on recent studies, researchers proposed that As, including arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII), is also an endocrine disruptor. This review discusses the mechanisms of As toxicity on three endocrine systems including gonadal, adrenal and thyroid endocrine systems. Arsenic methylation and oxidative stress are responsible for As-induced disorders of endocrine systems, however, strong binding of AsIII to thiols also play an important role. Some studies showed AsV toxicity on endocrine systems, but mechanistic investigation is lacking. Research is needed to look into their toxicity mechanisms to help cure the illnesses caused by As-induced endocrine system disorders. PMID:27502899

  19. Maternal bisphenol A alters fetal endocrine system: Thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    Because bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in animals, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of maternal BPA exposure on the fetal endocrine system (thyroid-adipokine axis). BPA (20 or 40 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In both treated groups, the dams and their fetuses had lower serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and higher thyrotropin (TSH) level than control dams and fetuses at GD 20. Some histopathological changes in fetal thyroid glands were observed in both maternal BPA groups at embryonic day (ED) 20, including fibroblast proliferation, hyperplasia, luminal obliteration, oedema, and degeneration. These disorders resulted in the suppression of fetal serum growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF1) and adiponectin (ADP) levels, and the elevation of fetal serum leptin, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels in both treated groups with respect to control. The depraved effects of both treated groups were associated with reduced maternal and fetal body weight compared to the control group. These alterations were dose dependent. Thus, BPA might penetrate the placental barrier and perturb the fetal thyroid adipokine axis to influence fat metabolism and the endocrine system. PMID:27326465

  20. Maternal bisphenol A alters fetal endocrine system: Thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    Because bisphenol A (BPA) has been detected in animals, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of maternal BPA exposure on the fetal endocrine system (thyroid-adipokine axis). BPA (20 or 40 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In both treated groups, the dams and their fetuses had lower serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and higher thyrotropin (TSH) level than control dams and fetuses at GD 20. Some histopathological changes in fetal thyroid glands were observed in both maternal BPA groups at embryonic day (ED) 20, including fibroblast proliferation, hyperplasia, luminal obliteration, oedema, and degeneration. These disorders resulted in the suppression of fetal serum growth hormone (GH), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF1) and adiponectin (ADP) levels, and the elevation of fetal serum leptin, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels in both treated groups with respect to control. The depraved effects of both treated groups were associated with reduced maternal and fetal body weight compared to the control group. These alterations were dose dependent. Thus, BPA might penetrate the placental barrier and perturb the fetal thyroid adipokine axis to influence fat metabolism and the endocrine system.

  1. [The hypothesis of environmental causes of damage to the endocrine system: science of sensationalism?].

    PubMed

    Ezratty, V

    1999-04-10

    AN EMERGING TOPIC: It has been hypothesized that exposure to certain chemical compounds in the environment could lead to reproduction and development anomalies. VARIABLE MECHANISMS OF ACTION, SUSCEPTIBILITIES AND EFFECTS: The incriminated environmental agents could have several targets in the endocrine system. As hormones play a cardinal role in regulating differentiation during early stages of life, developing organisms would be particularly vulnerable. AN EVALUATION METHODOLOGY: Although the hypothesis of endocrine perturbation is theoretically plausible, solid scientific data is still lacking to conclude that environmental compounds have a deleterious effect in humans after low-dose exposure. The ubiquitous nature of the intermediary metabolism of these compounds, the existence of critical periods of life, the complexity of the cell processes involved, and the differed timing of the effects make it difficult to assess risk. Current research is being conducted to develop specific methodologies to better understand this risk. AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT: Different international and national entities have organized scientific committees with the task of identifying chemical compounds susceptible of perturbing endocrine function. In 1998, an international convention set up regulatory control of sales of certain chemical compounds. PMID:10230419

  2. 78 FR 57859 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Endocrine Disruption Potential of Drugs: Nonclinical Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... determine the potential for a drug to disrupt the endocrine system. This draft guidance also discusses... compounds that have the potential to interfere with some aspect of the endocrine system of an organism or its progeny. Any component of the endocrine system can be a target of endocrine disruptors,...

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  4. [The role of selenium in endocrine system diseases].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Csaba; Rácz, Károly

    2013-10-13

    Oxygen derived free radicals, generated by a number of cellular reactions, include superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. They exert their cytotoxic effects mainly via peroxidation of the cell membrane resulting in the loss of membrane integrity. The essential trace element, selenium exerts complex effects on the endocrine systems, partly due to its antioxidant capacity. Well-characterized selenoproteins include iodothyronine deiodinases, glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases involved in thyroid hormone metabolism and protection from oxidative damage. The value of selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid disorders has been investigated and most studies confirmed the beneficial effect of selenium supplementation in Hashimoto's and Graves's diseases. Recently, selenium proved to be effective in mild inflammatory orbitopathy. There are a number of reports about the effect of selenium in diabetes mellitus, but the data are controversial as both insulin-like and diabetes-inducing effects of selenium have been described. Selenium was successfully used in both female and male infertility of autoimmune origin.

  5. Ex situ bioengineering of bioartificial endocrine glands: a new frontier in regenerative medicine of soft tissue organs.

    PubMed

    Toni, Roberto; Tampieri, Anna; Zini, Nicoletta; Strusi, Valentina; Sandri, Monica; Dallatana, Davide; Spaletta, Giulia; Bassoli, Elena; Gatto, Andrea; Ferrari, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2011-10-20

    Ex situ bioengineering is one of the most promising perspectives in the field of regenerative medicine allowing for organ reconstruction outside the living body; i.e. on the laboratory bench. A number of hollow viscera of the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and digestive systems have been successfully bioengineered ex situ, exploiting biocompatible scaffolds with a 3D morphology that recapitulates that of the native organ (organomorphic scaffold). In contrast, bioengineering of entire soft tissue organs and, in particular endocrine glands still remains a substantial challenge. Primary reasons are that no organomorphic scaffolding for endocrine viscera have as yet been entirely assembled using biocompatible materials, nor is there a bioreactor performance capable of supporting growth within the thickness range of the regenerating cell mass which has proven to be reliable enough to ensure formation of a complete macroscopic gland ex situ. Current technical options for reconstruction of endocrine viscera include either biocompatible 3D reticular scaffolds lacking any organomorphic geometry, or allogenic/xenogenic acellular 3D matrices derived from a gland similar to that to be bioengineered, eventually recellularized by autologous/heterologous cells. In 2007, our group designed, using biocompatible material, an organomorphic scaffold-bioreactor unit for bioengineering ex situ the human thyroid gland, chosen as a model for its simple anatomical organization (repetitive follicular cavities). This unit reproduces both the 3D native geometry of the human thyroid stromal/vascular scaffold, and the natural thyrocyte/vascular interface. It is now under intense investigation as an experimental tool to test cellular 3D auto-assembly of thyroid tissue and its related vascular system up to the ex situ generation of a 3D macroscopic thyroid gland. We believe that these studies will lay the groundwork for a new concept in regenerative medicine of soft tissue and

  6. In vivo endocrine disruption assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluents with small organisms.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luis; Seriki, Kemi; Mateos, Stéphanie; Loire, Nicolas; Guédon, Nathalie; Lemkine, Gregory F; Demeneix, Barbara A; Tindall, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Surface water receives a variety of micro-pollutants that could alter aquatic organisms' reproduction and development. It is known that a few nanograms per litre of these compounds can induce endocrine-disrupting effects in aquatic species. Many compounds are released daily in wastewater, and identifying the compounds responsible for inducing such disruption is difficult. Methods using biological analysis are therefore an alternative to chemical analysis, as the endocrine disruption potential of the stream as a whole is considered. To detect hormonal disruption of thyroid and oestrogenic functions, fluorescent Xenopus laevis tadpoles and medaka (Oryzias latipes) fish larvae bearing genetic constructs integrating hormonal responsive elements were used for physiological screens for potential endocrine disruption in streams from an urban wastewater treatment plant. The Xenopus model was used to assess thyroid disruption and the medaka model oestrogenic disruption in wastewater samples. Assays using the genetically modified organisms were conducted on 9 influent and 32 effluent samples. The thyroidal effect of wastewater was either reduced or removed by the treatment plant; no oestrogenic effect was detected in any of the wastewater samples. PMID:23823564

  7. Endocrine Disruptors (Chapter 14) in Mammalian Toxicology Book

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that alter endocrine system function(s) and consequently cause adverse health effects in intact organisms or its progeny. The endocrine system is important for a wide range of biological processes, from normal cell si...

  8. Proteomic Analysis of the Reproductive Organs of the Hermaphroditic Gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis Exposed to Different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Arnaud; Leprince, Pierre; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Lagadic, Laurent; Ducrot, Virginie; Joaquim-Justo, Célia

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported perturbations of mollusc reproduction following exposure to low concentrations (ng/L range) of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). However, the mechanisms of action of these molecules on molluscs are still poorly understood. Investigation of the modifications of protein expression in organisms exposed to chemicals using proteomic methods can provide a broader and more comprehensive understanding of adverse impacts of pollution on organisms than conventional biochemical biomarkers (e.g., heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, GST, EROD). In this study we have investigated the impacts of four chemicals, which exhibit different endocrine disrupting properties in vertebrates, on the proteome of the hermaphroditic freshwater pulmonate gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis after 21 days of exposure. Testosterone, tributyltin, chlordecone and cyproterone acetate were chosen as tested compounds as they can induce adverse effects on the reproduction of this snail. The 2D-DIGE method was used to identify proteins whose expression was affected by these compounds. In addition to modifying the expression of proteins involved in the structure and function of the cytoskeleton, chemicals had impacts on the expression of proteins involved in the reproduction of L. stagnalis. Exposure to 19.2 µg/L of chlordecone increased the abundance of ovipostatin, a peptide transmitted during mating through seminal fluid, which reduces oviposition in this species. The expression of yolk ferritin, the vitellogenin equivalent in L. stagnalis, was reduced after exposure to 94.2 ng Sn/L of tributyltin. The identification of yolk ferritin and the modification of its expression in snails exposed to chemicals were refined using western blot analysis. Our results showed that the tested compounds influenced the abundance of yolk ferritin in the reproductive organs. Alteration in proteins involved in reproductive pathways (e.g., ovipostatin and yolk ferritin) could constitute relevant

  9. Catecholamines, cardiac natriuretic peptides and chromogranin A: evolution and physiopathology of a 'whip-brake' system of the endocrine heart.

    PubMed

    Tota, Bruno; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Gattuso, Alfonsina

    2010-09-15

    In the past 50 years, extensive evidence has shown the ability of vertebrate cardiac non-neuronal cells to synthesize and release catecholamines (CA). This formed the mindset behind the search for the intrinsic endocrine heart properties, culminating in 1981 with the discovery of the natriuretic peptides (NP). CA and NP, co-existing in the endocrine secretion granules and acting as major cardiovascular regulators in health and disease, have become of great biomedical relevance for their potent diagnostic and therapeutic use. The concept of the endocrine heart was later enriched by the identification of a growing number of cardiac hormonal substances involved in organ modulation under normal and stress-induced conditions. Recently, chromogranin A (CgA), a major constituent of the secretory granules, and its derived cardio-suppressive and antiadrenergic peptides, vasostatin-1 and catestatin, were shown as new players in this framework, functioning as cardiac counter-regulators in 'zero steady-state error' homeostasis, particularly under intense excitatory stimuli, e.g. CA-induced myocardial stress. Here, we present evidence for the hypothesis that is gaining support, particularly among human cardiologists. The actions of CA, NP and CgA, we argue, may be viewed as a hallmark of the cardiac capacity to organize 'whip-brake' connection-integration processes in spatio-temporal networks. The involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/nitric oxide (NO) system in this configuration is discussed. The use of fish and amphibian paradigms will illustrate the ways that incipient endocrine-humoral agents have evolved as components of cardiac molecular loops and important intermediates during evolutionary transitions, or in a distinct phylogenetic lineage, or under stress challenges. This may help to grasp the old evolutionary roots of these intracardiac endocrine/paracrine networks and how they have evolved from relatively less complicated designs. The latter can also be used

  10. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels.

  11. [Chronic heart failure and cachexia: role of endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Dei Cas, A; Muoio, A; Zavaroni, I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a major health problem that carries a devastating prognosis. The prognosis worsens considerably once cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed. Neurohormonal, metabolic, hemodynamic and immunological alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of cardiac cachexia. Cachexia is characterized by a hypothalamic inappropriate response to the mechanisms controlling energy homeostasis. Levels of the anorexigenic hormone leptin are decreased whereas the orexigenic gherlin hormone levels are normal or elevated. Nevertheless, energy intake is not increased as expected due to a persistent activation of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) system (anorexigenic) paralleled by a decreased activity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY, orexigenic) neurons. Cachexia is also characterized by an imbalance in anabolic (impairment in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I axis, insulin resistance) and catabolic (increased levels of catecholamines, increased cortisol/dehydroepiandrosterone ratio and activation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleuchin-6, interleuchin-1') at the basis of the wasting process. This review discusses the complex role of the endocrine system in modulating energy balance, appetite and metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure. A joint multidisciplinary effort of the cardiologists, immunologists and endocrinologists might be useful to identify the precise mechanisms involved in the neuroendocrine alteration and to develop therapeutic strategies able to improve the prognosis of CHF patients.

  12. Fate of endocrine disrupting compounds in membrane bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Y; Chen, X; Tao, G; Kekred, K

    2007-06-01

    Yeast estrogen screen (YES) bioassay and liquid chromatography-mass spectrum-mass spectrum (LC-MS-MS) analysis were performed to investigate the fate of active and potential endocrine disrupting compounds in 3 pilot-scale and 2 lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems. Compared with the overall estrogenicities of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents from references, the MBR systems studied have relatively good performance in the removal of estrogenicity. Estrone (E1) was removed with relatively high efficiency (80.2-91.4%), but 17beta-estradiol (E2) was removed with moderate efficiency (49.3-66.5%) by the MBRs. However, the experimental results indicated that after the treatment by MBR, substantial amounts of E1, estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S), estrone-3-glucuronide (E1-3G), and 17beta-estradiol-glucuronides (E2-G) passed through treatment systems and entered into the aquatic environment. The reduction in the levels of overall equivalent E1 (68.4%) and that of overall equivalent E2 (80.8%) was demonstrated for the pilot-scale MBR-B. For alkylphenol compounds, bisphenol A (BPA) was removed well with a removal efficiency of 68.9 -90.1%, but 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) concentration was amplified (removal efficiency of -439.5 to -161.1%) after MBR treatment which could be caused by the transformation of its parent compounds, nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPnEOs). The amounts of adsorbed estrogens per kg dry mass was relatively low, due to short hydraulic retention time and high mixed liquor suspended solids in MBRs, compared to that in STPs. PMID:17612196

  13. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia.

  14. Syndrome-Associated Tumors by Organ System.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Riddle, Nicole D

    2016-06-01

    Certain tumors suggest the possibility of a patient harboring a genetic syndrome, particularly in children. Syndrome-associated tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, gynecologic tract, heart, lungs, brain, eye, endocrine organs, and hematopoietic system will be briefly discussed. PMID:27617151

  15. Endocrine Problems After Childhood Cancer: Precocious Puberty

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Precocious Puberty Version 3.0 - 10/08 Endocrine Problems after Childhood Cancer: Precocious Puberty Children treated ... the complex system of glands known as the endocrine system. What is the endocrine system? The endocrine ...

  16. Radiologic manifestations in the musculoskeletal system of miscellaneous endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Chew, F S

    1991-01-01

    The manifestations of endocrine derangements in the musculoskeletal system in infancy and childhood are disturbances in growth and maturation and in adulthood are disturbances in maintenance and metabolism. Hypercortisolism during skeletal immaturity suppresses growth. In the adult, hypercortisolism leads to osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, and muscle wasting. Deficiency of growth hormone during skeletal development results in short stature. An excess of growth hormone in a skeletally immature individual results in gigantism, an excess in a skeletally mature individual results in acromegaly. Patients with gigantism have extreme height with normal body proportions. Musculoskeletal manifestations of acromegaly include soft-tissue thickening, vertebral body enlargement, characteristic hand and foot changes, and enthesal bony proliferation. Hyperthyroidism causes catabolism of protein and loss of connective tissue, which manifest as muscle wasting. Deficient levels of thyroid hormone cause defects in growth and development. Severe growth retardation from congenital hypothyroidism is rare because neonatal screening recognizes the disorder and leads to early treatment. The skeletal manifestation of hypergonadism in children is precocious growth and early skeletal maturation. Although the initial precocious growth spurt results in a tall child, early closure of the growth plates results in a short adult. Hypogonadism in the prepubertal child results in delayed adolescence and delayed skeletal maturation. Diabetes mellitus in childhood results in decreased growth, a phenomenon presumed to be secondary to nutritional abnormalities. Generalized osteoporosis and short stature are common. In the adult, generalized osteoporosis may accompany insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus if obesity is absent. Calcification of interdigital arteries of the foot is common in diabetics and uncommon in other conditions. Additional skeletal manifestations relate to complications of diabetes such as

  17. Microchimerism in endocrine pathology.

    PubMed

    Rust, Daniel W; Bianchi, Diana W

    2009-01-01

    Chimerism in an individual refers to the coexistence of cells arising from two distinct organisms. It can arise iatrogenically via transplant or blood transfusion, and physiologically via twin to twin transfer, or from trafficking between mother and fetus during pregnancy. Many of the diseases associated with microchimerism affect the endocrine system (e.g., autoimmune thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus type 1). Microchimerism is relevant to endocrine pathology because (a) it is associated with pregnancy, a condition of complex endocrine physiology; (b) materno-fetal and feto-maternal cellular migration must involve the placenta, itself an endocrine organ; and (c) in some species, chimerism results in states of intersexuality, a condition intimately involved with endocrine physiology. Studies of feto-maternal microchimerism in the thyroid have documented the presence of fetal cells in association with Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid adenoma, and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Studies of materno-fetal microchimerism have documented the presence of maternal cells in juvenile diabetes and other pediatric conditions. Microchimerism plays a potential role in the repair of diseased thyroid and pancreatic tissues.

  18. The Endocrine System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Endocrine System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the endocrine system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  19. Medical consequences of Chernobyl with focus on the endocrine system: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Foley, Thomas P; Límanová, Zdeňka; Potluková, Eliška

    2015-01-01

    In the last 70 years, atomic disasters have occurred several times. The nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl in 1986 in North-Central Ukraine was a unique experience in population exposures to radiation by all ages, and ongoing studies have brought a large amount of information on effects of radiation on human organism. Concerning the deteriorating global security situation and the strong rhetoric of some of the world leaders, the knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the preventive measures designed to decrease the detrimental effects of radiation gains a new dimension, and involves all of us. This review focuses on the long-term effects of Chernobyl catastrophe especially on the endocrine system in children and in adults, and includes a summary of preventive measures in case of an atomic disaster.

  20. Medical Consequences of Chernobyl with Focus on the Endocrine System - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Foley, Thomas P; Límanová, Zdeňka; Potluková, Eliška

    2015-01-01

    In the last 70 years, atomic disasters have occurred several times. The nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl in 1986 in North-Central Ukraine was a unique experience in population exposures to radiation by all ages, and ongoing studies have brought a large amount of information effects of radiation on human organism. Concerning the deteriorating global security situation and the strong rhetoric of some of the world leaders, the knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the preventive measures designed to decrease the detrimental effects of radiation gains a new dimension, and involves all of us. This review focuses on the long-term effects of Chernobyl catastrophe especially on the endocrine system in children and in adults, and includes a summary of preventive measures in case of an atomic disaster.

  1. Medical Consequences of Chernobyl with Focus on the Endocrine System - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Foley, Thomas P; Límanová, Zdeňka; Potluková, Eliška

    2015-01-01

    In the last 70 years, atomic disasters have occurred several times. The nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl in 1986 in North-Central Ukraine was a unique experience in population exposures to radiation by all ages, and ongoing studies have brought a large amount of information effects of radiation on human organism. Concerning the deteriorating global security situation and the strong rhetoric of some of the world leaders, the knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the preventive measures designed to decrease the detrimental effects of radiation gains a new dimension, and involves all of us. This review focuses on the long-term effects of Chernobyl catastrophe especially on the endocrine system in children and in adults, and includes a summary of preventive measures in case of an atomic disaster. PMID:26750625

  2. Vitamin D endocrine system after short-term space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoten, William B. (Principal Investigator); Sergeev, Igor N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca(2+) metabolism, yet the cellular/molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. There is some evidence for microgravity-induced alterations in the vitamin D endocrine system, which is known to be primarily involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) metabolism. Vitamin D-dependent Ca(2+) binding proteins, or calbindins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. We used immunocytochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D(sub 28k) and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in kidneys and intestines of rats flown for 9 days aboard the Spacelab 3 mission. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats in space vs. 'grounded' animals (synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls and tail suspension controls) were compared. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant decrease in calbindin-D(sub 28k) content in kidneys and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in the intestine of flight and suspended animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in kidneys and intestine, and insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease in the distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 28k) and absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 9k) immunoreactivity in the space and suspension kidneys and intestine, as compared with matched ground controls. No consistent differences in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space, suspension and ground controls was observed. There were significant correlations between results by quantitative ICC and ELISA. Western blot analysis showed no consistent changes in the low levels of intestinal and renal vitamin D receptors. These findings suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins after a short

  3. Neurotensin. Immunohistochemical localization in central and peripheral nervous system and in endocrine cells and its functional role as neurotransmitter and endocrine hormone.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M

    1985-01-01

    The present study attempts to compile information on the possible physiologic role of the endogenous peptide neurotensin (NT) as a hormone and/or neurotransmitter. The methodological approach is immunohistochemical localization of NT in the entero-endocrine system as well as in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The results found in the three systems are first related to the pharmalogical and physiological findings in the literature. Subsequently their significance is discussed for each organ separately before attempting a final overall interpretation. Briefly, the present study reveals the following essential findings: The occurrence and distribution of NT-IR entero-endocrine cells (N-cells) in different mammals including man, as well as in representative members of all classes of vertebrates and higher invertebrates, are analyzed and evaluated morphometrically. The NT-IR cells in all investigated species are demonstrated to be of the open type. The innervation of paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia by NT-IR fibers is described; at least a portion of these fibers is thought to originate in NT-IR perikarya of the substantia intermedia of the spinal cord. The involvement of these NT-IR fibers in the regulation of systemic blood flow (hypertension) is suggested. The existence of NT-IR innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract is considered to be a general phenomenon. This notion is reaffirmed by phylogenetic investigation of the NT-IR enteric nerves. The pharmacological effects of NT in different portions of the gastro-intestinal tract, reported in the literature are related to the immunohistochemical localization of NT. In light of the present results, some of the effects of NT which were previously considered to be of an endocrine or paracrine nature - such as contraction of the guinea-pig ileum - are interpreted as effects of NT of neuronal origin. The specific NT-IR innervation of target cells in the exocrine pancreas (vascular smooth muscle, acinar

  4. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health. PMID:21776230

  5. Effect of endocrine disruptor pesticides: a review.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

  6. Skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ: PGC-1α, myokines and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Svenia; Handschin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An active lifestyle is crucial to maintain health into old age; inversely, sedentariness has been linked to an elevated risk for many chronic diseases. The discovery of myokines, hormones produced by skeletal muscle tissue, suggests the possibility that these might be molecular mediators of the whole body effects of exercise originating from contracting muscle fibers. Even though less is known about the sedentary state, the lack of contraction-induced myokines or the production of a distinct set of hormones in the inactive muscle could likewise contribute to pathological consequences in this context. In this review, we try to summarize the most recent developments in the study of muscle as an endocrine organ and speculate about the potential impact on our understanding of exercise and sedentary physiology, respectively. PMID:26453501

  7. Update on the biologic role of the vitamin D endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Dusso, Adriana S

    2014-03-01

    The integrity of the vitamin D endocrine system is essential for human health. Nutritional vitamin D deficiency in otherwise healthy individuals, associates with a higher risk of mortality for all causes, despite normal serum calcitriol. These deadly causes extend beyond the recognized adverse impact of vitamin D deficiency on calcium and phosphate homeostasis predisposing to secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and vascular calcification. Vitamin D deficiency also associates with an early onset of disorders of aging, including hypertension, proteinuria, insulin resistance, immune abnormalities that enhance the propensity for viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune disorders, cancer, and multiple organ damage due to excessive systemic inflammation causing atherosclerosis, vascular stiffness, renal lesions, and impaired DNA-damage responses. The frequency and severity of all of these disorders markedly increase in chronic kidney disease (CKD) because the kidney is essential to maintain serum levels of calcitriol, the most potent endogenous endocrine activator of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and also of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, for local rather than systemic VDR activation. The goal of this review is to update the current understanding of the pathophysiology behind the classical and non-classical actions of VDR activation that help prevent the onset and/or attenuate the progression of renal and cardiovascular damage in CKD. This knowledge is essential to identify non-invasive, sensitive and accurate biomarkers of the severity of these disorders, a first step to generate evidence-based recommendations for a safe correction of vitamin D and/or calcitriol deficiency in the course of CKD that effectively improves outcomes.

  8. The adipocyte as an endocrine organ in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Harwood, H James

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade and a half it has become increasingly clear that adipose tissue is a much more complex organ than was initially considered and that its metabolic functions extend well beyond the classical actions of thermoregulation and of storage and release of fatty acids. In fact, it is now well established that adipose tissue plays a critical role in maintenance of energy homeostasis through secretion of a large number of adipokines that interact with central as well as peripheral organs such as the brain, liver, pancreas, and skeletal muscle to control diverse processes, such as food intake, energy expenditure, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, blood coagulation, and inflammation. While many of these adipokines are adipocyte-derived and have a variety of endocrine functions, others are produced by resident macrophages and interact in a paracrine fashion to control adipocyte metabolism. It is also abundantly clear that the dysregulation of adipokine secretion and action that occurs in obesity plays a fundamental role in the development of a variety of cardiometabolic disorders, including the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory disorders, and vascular disorders, that ultimately lead to coronary heart disease. Described herein are the traditional as well as endocrine roles of adipose tissue in controlling energy metabolism and their dysregulation in obesity that leads to development of cardiometabolic disorders, with a focus on what is currently known regarding the characteristics and roles in both health and disease of the adipocyte-derived adipokines, adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and retinol binding protein 4, and the resident macrophage-derived adipokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  9. Further EST analysis of endocrine genes that are preferentially expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis: receptor and enzyme genes associated with endocrine system in the neural complex.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kawashima, Takeshi; Satou, Yutaka; Satoh, Nori

    2007-01-15

    Identification of orthologs of vertebrate neuropeptides and hypothalamic hormones in the neural complex of ascidians suggests integral roles of the ascidian neural complex in the endocrine system. In the present study, we investigated endocrine-related genes expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis. Comprehensive analyses of 3'-end sequences of the neural complex cDNAs placed 10,029 clones into 4051 independent clusters or genes, 1524 of them being expressed preferentially in this organ. Comparison of the 1524 genes with the human proteome databank demonstrated that 476 matched previously identified human proteins with distinct functions. Further analyses of sequence similarity of the 476 genes demonstrated that 21 genes are candidates for those involved in the endocrine system. Although we cannot detect hormone or peptide candidates, we found 21 genes such as receptors for peptide ligands, receptor-modulating proteins, and processing enzymes. We then characterized the Ciona prohormone convertase 2 (Ci-PC2) and carboxypeptidase E (Ci-CPE), which are associated with endoproteolytic processing of peptide hormone precursors. Furthermore, genes encoding these transcripts are expressed specifically in the neural complex of young adult ascidians. These data provide the molecular basis for further functional studies of the endocrine role of the neural complex of ascidians.

  10. [Outstanding problems of normal and pathological morphology of the diffuse endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Iaglov, V V; Iaglova, N V

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse endocrine system (DES)--a mosaic-cellular endoepithelial gland--is the biggest part of the human endocrine system. Scientists used to consider cells of DES as neuroectodermal. According to modem data cells of DES are different cytogenetic types because they develop from the different embryonic blastophyllum. So that any hormone-active tumors originated from DES of the digestive, respiratory and urogenital system shouldn't be considered as neuroendocrinal tumors. The basic problems of DES morphology and pathology are the creation of scientifically substantiated histogenetic classification of DES tumors.

  11. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  12. Influences of the environment on the endocrine and paracrine fish growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I system.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M

    2010-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key component of the complex system that regulates differentiation, development, growth and reproduction of fishes. The IGF-I gene is mainly expressed in the liver that represents the principal source of endocrine IGF-I but also in numerous other organs where the hormone most probably acts in an autocrine-paracrine manner. The primary stimulus for synthesis and release of IGF-I is growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. Thus, in analogy to mammals, it is usual to speak of a fish 'GH-IGF-I axis'. The GH-IGF-I system is affected by changes in the environment and probably represents a target of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) that impair many physiological processes in fishes. Thus, the review deals with the influences of changes in different environmental factors, such as food availability, temperature, photoperiod, season, salinity and EDCs, on GH gene expression in pituitary, IGF-I gene expression in liver and extrahepatic sites and the physiological effects resulting from the evoked alterations in endocrine and local IGF-I. Environmental influences certainly interact with each other but for convenience of the reader they will be dealt with in separate sections. Current trends in GH-IGF-I research are analysed and future focuses are suggested at the end of the sections. PMID:20537012

  13. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants--Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose-dependent hormonal responses of H295R cells. However, with the partitioning-controlled freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree) as dose metrics, dose-response curves were left-shifted by two orders of magnitude relative to spiked concentrations. Partitioning-controlled dosing of POPs resulted in up to 2-fold increases in progestagen and corticosteroid levels at Cfree of individual POPs in or below the femtomolar range. Silicone acted not only as source of the POPs but also as a sorption sink for lipophilic hormones, stimulating the cellular hormone production. Methodologically, the study showed that silicone can be used as reference partitioning phase to transfer in vivo exposure in humans (silicone implants) to in vitro assays (partition-controlled dosing). The main finding was that POPs at the levels at which they are found in humans can interfere with steroidogenesis in a human adrenocortical cell line. PMID:26264162

  14. Contaminant impacts to the endocrine system in largemouth bass in northeast U.S. rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.B.; Sorenson, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    The National Biological Service (NBS) in cooperation with the USGS-National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program conducted a reconnaissance investigation of potential disruption of the endocrine system in carp and largemouth bass (LMB) from streams and rivers across the US. Chemical analysis of sediment and fish tissue, from agricultural and industrial sites in NAWQA study units, indicated the potential for impacts to the endocrine system of fish. Collections of 39 male and 28 female LMB were made in fall 1994 from contaminated and reference sites in three major river systems in the Northeast US (Potomac, Hudson, and Connecticut rivers). Additional fish collections will be made at these same sites in Spring 1995. Blood and gonadal tissue samples will give a triad of bioindicators (17B-estradiol/11-ketotestosterone ratios, vitellogenin, and gonad histopathology) of potential endocrine disruption. Chemical residue for tissue will also be made from selected LMB to compare with the bioindicators. Comparisons of contaminated sites and reference site indicated a significantly lower E/T ratio in female LMB from two contaminated sites (Housatonic River in the Connecticut River system and the Anacostia River in the Potomac River system). Additionally, significantly higher E/T ratios in male LMB were found from each of the three river systems. These E/T ratios indicate that endocrine disruption is both estrogenic to male LMB (feminization) and potentially androgenic to the female LMB (masculinization).

  15. The Effects of Electromagnetic Field on the Endocrine System in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sangün, Özlem; Dündar, Bumin; Çömlekçi, Selçuk; Büyükgebiz, Attila

    2015-12-01

    Children are exposed to various kind of non-ionizan radiation in their daily life involuntarily. The potential sensitivity of developing organism to the effects of radiofrequency (RF) signals, the higher estimated specific absorption rate (SAR) values of children and greater lifetime cumulative risk raised the scientific interest for children's vulnerability to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). In modern societies, children are being exposed to EMFs in very early ages. There are many researches in scientific literature investigating the alterations of biological parameters in living organisms after EMFs. Although the international guidelines did not report definite, convincing data about the causality, there are unignorable amount of studies indicating the increased risk of cancer, hematologic effects and cognitive impairment. Although they are less in amount; growing number of studies reveal the impacts on metabolism and endocrine function. Reproductive system and growth look like the most challenging fields. However there are also some concerns on detrimental effects of EMFs on thyroid functions, adrenal hormones, glucose homeostasis and melatonin levels. It is not easy to conduct a study investigating the effects of EMFs on a fetus or child due to ethical issues. Hence, the studies are usually performed on virtual models or animals. Although the results are conflicting and cannot be totally matched with humans; there is growing evidence to distress us about the threats of EMF on children.

  16. The Use of Metabolising Systems for In Vitro Testing of Endocrine Disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legislation and prospective proposals in for instance the USA, Europe, and Japan require, or may require that chemicals are tested for their ability to disrupt the hormonal systems of mammals. Chemicals found to test positive are considered to be endocrine active substances (EAS...

  17. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 7.0: Endocrine System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the endocrine system is the seventh of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory epxerience. Module objectives are for students to…

  18. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  19. A COMPUTATIONAL LIBRARY OF THE BIOMOLECULAR TARGETS FOR TOXICITY: RECEPTORS IN THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Computational Library of the Biomolecular Targets for Toxicity: Receptors in the Endocrine System

    Authors: James R. Rabinowitz and Stephen B. Little, MTB/ECD/NHEERL/ORD, and Huajun Fan, Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina
    Structure activity models ...

  20. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE KINETICS OF THE MALE REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this presentation a model for the hormonal regulation of the reproductive endocrine system in the adult male rat will be discussed. The model includes a description of the kinetics of the androgenic hormones testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, as well as the receptor-mediate...

  1. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    PubMed

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  2. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    PubMed

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health. PMID:26821056

  3. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D’Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health. PMID:26821056

  4. Potential endocrine disrupting organic chemicals in treated municipal wastewater and river water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    Select endocrine disrupting organic chemicals were measured in treated wastewater from Chicago, IL, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN, Detroit, MI, and Milwaukee, WI, and in the Des Plaines, Illinois, and Minnesota Rivers during the fall of 1997 and the spring of 1998. Emphasis was given to alkylphenolpolyethoxylate (APEO) derived compounds, although 17-??-estradiol, bisphenol A, caffeine, total organic carbon, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and other compounds also were measured. Contaminants were isolated by continuous liquid-liquid extraction (CLLE) with methylene chloride and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full scan and selected ion monitoring modes. The extracts were derivatized to form the methyl esters of alkylphenolethoxycarboxylates (APEC), and EDTA was isolated by evaporation and derivatized to form the tetrapropyl ester. The mass spectra of nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) compounds are complex and show variations among the different ethoxylate and carboxylate homologs, reflecting variations in the ethylene oxide chain length. Recoveries for target compounds and surrogate standards ranged from 20-130%, with relative standard deviations of 9.9-53%. Detection limits for the various compounds ranged from 0.06-0.35 ??g/L. Analysis of the wastewater effluents detected a number of compounds including NP, NPEO, OP, OPEO, NPEC, caffeine, and EDTA at concentrations ranging from <1-439 ??g/L, with EDTA and NPEC being most abundant. There was variability in compound distributions and concentrations between the various sewage treatment plants, indicating differences in treatment type and influent composition. Several wastewater-derived compounds were detected in the river samples, with EDTA and NPEC persisting for considerable distance downstream from wastewater discharges, and NP and NPEO being attenuated more rapidly.

  5. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus

    Endocrine glands release (secrete) hormones into the bloodstream. The endocrine glands include: Adrenal Hypothalamus Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas Ovaries Parathyroid Pineal Pituitary Testes Thyroid

  6. Removal of a combination of endocrine disruptors from aqueous systems by seedlings of radish and ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Gattullo, C Eliana; Cunha, Bruno Barboza; Rosa, André H; Loffredo, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are widespread in the environment, especially aquatic systems, and cause dangerous effects on wildlife and humans. This work was aimed to assess the capacity of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) seedlings to tolerate and remove two combinations of EDs containing bisphenol A (BPA), 17alpha-ethynilestradiol (EE2), and linuron from four aqueous media: distilled water, a solution of natural organic matter (NOM), a lake water and a river water. Seeds of the two species were germinated in each contaminated medium and, at the end of germination, the seedling growth was evaluated by biometric measurements and residual EDs were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Biometric measurements revealed that the phytotoxicity of the two combinations of EDs depended on the medium used. Radish showed a discrete tolerance in distilled water and lake water but was inhibited in the solution of NOM and river water. Ryegrass was negatively affected mainly in river water. The concentration of each ED appeared significantly reduced in all media in the presence of seedlings of both species, but not in the blanks without plants. In 5 days, radish removed up to 88% of BPA, 100% of EE2 and 42% of linuron, and in 6 days ryegrass removed up to 92% of BPA, 74% of EE2 and 16% of linuron. The considerable removal capacity of radish and ryegrass in all media tested encourages the use of phytoremediation to remove EDs from waters. PMID:24617071

  7. Removal of a combination of endocrine disruptors from aqueous systems by seedlings of radish and ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Gattullo, C Eliana; Cunha, Bruno Barboza; Rosa, André H; Loffredo, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are widespread in the environment, especially aquatic systems, and cause dangerous effects on wildlife and humans. This work was aimed to assess the capacity of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) seedlings to tolerate and remove two combinations of EDs containing bisphenol A (BPA), 17alpha-ethynilestradiol (EE2), and linuron from four aqueous media: distilled water, a solution of natural organic matter (NOM), a lake water and a river water. Seeds of the two species were germinated in each contaminated medium and, at the end of germination, the seedling growth was evaluated by biometric measurements and residual EDs were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Biometric measurements revealed that the phytotoxicity of the two combinations of EDs depended on the medium used. Radish showed a discrete tolerance in distilled water and lake water but was inhibited in the solution of NOM and river water. Ryegrass was negatively affected mainly in river water. The concentration of each ED appeared significantly reduced in all media in the presence of seedlings of both species, but not in the blanks without plants. In 5 days, radish removed up to 88% of BPA, 100% of EE2 and 42% of linuron, and in 6 days ryegrass removed up to 92% of BPA, 74% of EE2 and 16% of linuron. The considerable removal capacity of radish and ryegrass in all media tested encourages the use of phytoremediation to remove EDs from waters.

  8. The effects of nanomaterials as endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Leso, Veruscka; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-08-14

    In recent years, nanoparticles have been increasingly used in several industrial, consumer and medical applications because of their unique physico-chemical properties. However, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that these properties are also closely associated with detrimental health effects. There is a serious lack of information on the potential nanoparticle hazard to human health, particularly on their possible toxic effects on the endocrine system. This topic is of primary importance since the disruption of endocrine functions is associated with severe adverse effects on human health. Consequently, in order to gather information on the hazardous effects of nanoparticles on endocrine organs, we reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the endocrine effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to different types of nanoparticles. Our aim was to understand the potential endocrine disrupting risks posed by nanoparticles, to assess their underlying mechanisms of action and identify areas in which further investigation is needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the role of nanoparticles as endocrine disruptors. Current data support the notion that different types of nanoparticles are capable of altering the normal and physiological activity of the endocrine system. However, a critical evaluation of these findings suggests the need to interpret these results with caution since information on potential endocrine interactions and the toxicity of nanoparticles is quite limited.

  9. The Effects of Nanomaterials as Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Leso, Veruscka; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nanoparticles have been increasingly used in several industrial, consumer and medical applications because of their unique physico-chemical properties. However, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that these properties are also closely associated with detrimental health effects. There is a serious lack of information on the potential nanoparticle hazard to human health, particularly on their possible toxic effects on the endocrine system. This topic is of primary importance since the disruption of endocrine functions is associated with severe adverse effects on human health. Consequently, in order to gather information on the hazardous effects of nanoparticles on endocrine organs, we reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the endocrine effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to different types of nanoparticles. Our aim was to understand the potential endocrine disrupting risks posed by nanoparticles, to assess their underlying mechanisms of action and identify areas in which further investigation is needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the role of nanoparticles as endocrine disruptors. Current data support the notion that different types of nanoparticles are capable of altering the normal and physiological activity of the endocrine system. However, a critical evaluation of these findings suggests the need to interpret these results with caution since information on potential endocrine interactions and the toxicity of nanoparticles is quite limited. PMID:23949635

  10. The effects of nanomaterials as endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Leso, Veruscka; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nanoparticles have been increasingly used in several industrial, consumer and medical applications because of their unique physico-chemical properties. However, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that these properties are also closely associated with detrimental health effects. There is a serious lack of information on the potential nanoparticle hazard to human health, particularly on their possible toxic effects on the endocrine system. This topic is of primary importance since the disruption of endocrine functions is associated with severe adverse effects on human health. Consequently, in order to gather information on the hazardous effects of nanoparticles on endocrine organs, we reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the endocrine effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to different types of nanoparticles. Our aim was to understand the potential endocrine disrupting risks posed by nanoparticles, to assess their underlying mechanisms of action and identify areas in which further investigation is needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the role of nanoparticles as endocrine disruptors. Current data support the notion that different types of nanoparticles are capable of altering the normal and physiological activity of the endocrine system. However, a critical evaluation of these findings suggests the need to interpret these results with caution since information on potential endocrine interactions and the toxicity of nanoparticles is quite limited. PMID:23949635

  11. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    PubMed Central

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  12. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis.

  13. Possible Involvement of Photoperiodic Regulation in Reproductive Endocrine System of Female Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Chi Hoon; Hur, Sung Pyu; Kim, Byeong Hoon; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Young Don

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of female olive flounder. To investigate the influence on brain-pituitary axis in endocrine system by regulating photoperiod, compared expression level of Kisspeptin and sbGnRH mRNA in brain and FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA in pituitary before and after spawning. Photoperiod was treated natural photoperiod and long photoperiod (15L:9D) conditions from Aug. 2013 to Jun. 2014. Continuous long photoperiod treatment from Aug. (post-spawning phase) was inhibited gonadal development of female olive flounder. In natural photoperiod group, the Kiss2 expression level a significant declined in Mar. (spawning period). And also, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels were increasing at this period. However, in long photoperiod group, hypothalamic Kiss2, FSH-β, LH-β and GH mRNA expression levels did not show any significant fluctuation. These results suggest that expression of hypothalamic Kiss2, GtH and GH in the pituitary would change in response to photoperiod and their possible involvement of photoperiodic regulation in reproductive endocrine system of the BPG axis. PMID:25949205

  14. Diffuse endocrine system, neuroendocrine tumors and immunity: what's new?

    PubMed

    Ameri, Pietro; Ferone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, research into the modulation of immunity by the neuroendocrine system has flourished, unravelling significant effects of several neuropeptides, including somatostatin (SRIH), and especially cortistatin (CST), on immune cells. Scientists have learnt that the diffuse neuroendocrine system can regulate the immune system at all its levels: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and maintenance of immune tolerance. Compelling studies with animal models have demonstrated that some neuropeptides may be effective in treating inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, and T helper 1-driven autoimmune diseases, like Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, the latest findings concerning the neuroendocrine control of the immune system are discussed, with emphasis on SRIH and CST. The second part of the review deals with the immune response to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The anti-NET immune response has been described in the last years and it is still being characterized, similarly to what is happening for several other types of cancer. In parallel with investigations addressing the mechanisms by which the immune system contrasts NET growth and spreading, ground-breaking clinical trials of dendritic cell vaccination as immunotherapy for metastatic NETs have shown in principle that the immune reaction to NETs can be exploited for treatment.

  15. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future. PMID:19923096

  16. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  17. The consequences of mutations in the reproductive endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donchan

    2012-12-01

    The reproductive activity in male mammals is well known to be regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary- gonad axis. The hypothalamic neurons secreting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) govern the reproductive neuroendocrine system by integrating all the exogenous information impinging on themselves. The GnRH synthesized and released from the hypothalamus arrives at the anterior pituitary through the portal vessels, provoking the production of the gonadotropins(follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)) at the same time. The gonadotropins affect the gonads to promote spermatogenesis and to secret testosterone. Testosterone acts on the GnRH neurons by a feedback loop through the circulatory system, resulting in the balance of all the hormones by regulating reproductive activities. These hormones exert their effects by acting on their own receptors, which are included in the signal transduction pathways as well. Unexpected aberrants are arised during this course of action of each hormone. This review summarizes these abnormal phenomena, including various mutations of molecules and their actions related to the reproductive function.

  18. The Consequences of Mutations in the Reproductive Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donchan

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive activity in male mammals is well known to be regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary- gonad axis. The hypothalamic neurons secreting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) govern the reproductive neuroendocrine system by integrating all the exogenous information impinging on themselves. The GnRH synthesized and released from the hypothalamus arrives at the anterior pituitary through the portal vessels, provoking the production of the gonadotropins(follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)) at the same time. The gonadotropins affect the gonads to promote spermatogenesis and to secret testosterone. Testosterone acts on the GnRH neurons by a feedback loop through the circulatory system, resulting in the balance of all the hormones by regulating reproductive activities. These hormones exert their effects by acting on their own receptors, which are included in the signal transduction pathways as well. Unexpected aberrants are arised during this course of action of each hormone. This review summarizes these abnormal phenomena, including various mutations of molecules and their actions related to the reproductive function. PMID:25949097

  19. Once and for all, LXRα and LXRβ are gatekeepers of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Trousson, Amalia; Tauveron, Igor; Volle, David H; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) α and β are nuclear receptors whose transcriptional activity is regulated by oxysterols, the oxidized forms of cholesterol. Described in the late 1990s as lipid sensors, both LXRs regulate cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Over the years, deep phenotypic analyses of mouse models deficient for LXRα and/or LXRβ have pointed out various other physiological functions including glucose homeostasis, immunology, and neuroprotection. This review enlightens the "endocrine" functions of LXRs; they deeply impact plasma glucose directly and by modulating insulin signaling, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis, thyroid and pituitary hormone levels, and bone homeostasis. Besides, LXR signaling is also involved in adrenal physiology, steroid synthesis, and male and female reproduction. Hence, LXRs are definitely involved in the endocrine system and could thus be considered as endocrine receptors, even though oxysterols do not fully correspond to the definition of hormones. Finally, because they are ligand-regulated transcription factors, LXRs are potential pharmacological targets with promising beneficial metabolic effects.

  20. Once and for all, LXRα and LXRβ are gatekeepers of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Trousson, Amalia; Tauveron, Igor; Volle, David H; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) α and β are nuclear receptors whose transcriptional activity is regulated by oxysterols, the oxidized forms of cholesterol. Described in the late 1990s as lipid sensors, both LXRs regulate cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Over the years, deep phenotypic analyses of mouse models deficient for LXRα and/or LXRβ have pointed out various other physiological functions including glucose homeostasis, immunology, and neuroprotection. This review enlightens the "endocrine" functions of LXRs; they deeply impact plasma glucose directly and by modulating insulin signaling, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis, thyroid and pituitary hormone levels, and bone homeostasis. Besides, LXR signaling is also involved in adrenal physiology, steroid synthesis, and male and female reproduction. Hence, LXRs are definitely involved in the endocrine system and could thus be considered as endocrine receptors, even though oxysterols do not fully correspond to the definition of hormones. Finally, because they are ligand-regulated transcription factors, LXRs are potential pharmacological targets with promising beneficial metabolic effects. PMID:27091047

  1. Mammalian development in a changing environment: exposure to endocrine disruptors reveals the developmental plasticity of steroid-hormone target organs.

    PubMed

    Markey, Caroline M; Coombs, Macall A; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2003-01-01

    Recent findings in the field of environmental endocrine disruption have revealed that developmental exposure to estrogenic chemicals induces morphological, functional, and behavioral anomalies associated with reproduction. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of in utero exposure to low doses of the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of the female reproductive tissues and mammary glands in CD-1 mice. Humans are exposed to BPA, which leaches from dental materials and plastic food and beverage containers. Here we report that prenatal exposure to BPA induces alterations in tissue organization within the ovaries and mammary glands and disrupts estrous cyclicity in adulthood. Because estrogen receptors are expressed developmentally in these estrogen-target organs, we propose that BPA may directly affect the expression of genes involved in their morphogenesis. In addition, alterations in the sexual differentiation of the brain, and thus the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, may further contribute to the observed phenotype. The emerging field of endocrine disruptors promises to provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of hormone-target organs and demonstrates that the environment plays important roles in the making of phenotypes.

  2. Steroidogenic factor-1: its role in endocrine organ development and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, G D; Ingraham, H A

    1999-07-01

    The cloning of the first steroid hormone receptor over a decade ago provided vital insight into the mechanisms by which steroid hormones activate gene transcription. When bound by hormone, these receptors function as ligand-dependent transcription factors by binding to unique response elements in the promoter of specific target genes. Over 60 receptors have now been characterized in this superfamily of steroid receptors. Many receptors known as orphan receptors have been cloned by homology and have no known ligands but appear to be mediators of endocrine function in the adult and in many cases are essential developmental regulators in endocrine organogenesis. One such receptor is steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1). While initially cloned as a transcriptional regulator of the various steroidogenic enzyme genes in the adrenal and gonad, it has become clear through genetic ablation experiments in mice that SF-1 is an essential factor in adrenal and gonadal development and for the proper functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In addition, these studies have revealed that SF-1 is necessary for the formation of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. While we have learned much since the initial cloning of SF-1, the mechanisms by which SF-1 regulates these various developmental programs remain elusive. This article focuses on the characterization of SF-1 and its emerging role in endocrine homeostasis. Specific attention is placed on the mechanisms of action of this unique member of the nuclear receptor superfamily.

  3. [Environmental contaminants and endocrine disruptors].

    PubMed

    Fontenele, Eveline Gadelha Pereira; Martins, Manoel Ricardo Alves; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães

    2010-02-01

    The toxicity of various pollutants has been routinely investigated according to their teratogenic and carcinogenic effects. In the last few decades, however, many of such pollutants have been shown to adversely affect the endocrine system of human beings and other species. Currently, more than eleven million chemical substances are known in the world, and approximately 3,000 are produced on a large scale. Numerous chemical composites of domestic, industrial and agricultural use have been shown to influence hormonal activity. Examples of such chemical products with estrogenic activity are substances used in cosmetics, anabolizing substances for animal feeding, phytoestrogens and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These agents are seen in residential, industrial and urban sewerage system effluents and represent an important source of environmental contamination. The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) defines as endocrine disruptors substances or mixtures seen in the environment capable of interfering with endocrine system functions resulting in adverse effects in an intact organism or its offspring. In this article the authors present a current literature review about the role of these pollutants in endocrine and metabolic diseases, probable mechanisms of action, and suggest paths of investigation and possible strategies for prevention and reduction of its possible damages. PMID:20414542

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Bonnie HY; Wan, Hin T; Law, Alice YS

    2011-01-01

    In the past 200 years, an enormous number of synthetic chemicals with diverse structural features have been produced for industrial, medical and domestic purposes. These chemicals, originally thought to have little or no biological toxicity, are widely used in our daily lives as well as are commonly present in foods. It was not until the first World Wildlife Federation Wingspread Conference held in 1994 were concerns about the endocrine disrupting (ED) effects of these chemicals articulated. The potential hazardous effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on human health and ecological well-being are one of the global concerns that affect the health and propagation of human beings. Considerable numbers of studies indicated that endocrine disruption is linked to “the developmental basis of adult disease,” highlighting the significant effects of EDC exposure on a developing organism, leading to the propensity of an individual to develop a disease or dysfunction in later life. In this review, we intend to provide environmental, epidemiological and experimental data to associate pollutant exposure with reproductive disorders, in particular on the development and function of the male reproductive system. Possible effects of pollutant exposure on the processes of embryonic development, like sex determination and masculinization are described. In addition, the effects of pollutant exposure on hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, testicular signaling, steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis are also discussed. PMID:22319671

  5. Use of external metabolizing systems when testing for endocrine disruption in the T-screen assay

    SciTech Connect

    Taxvig, Camilla Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Nellemann, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Although, it is well-established that information on the metabolism of a substance is important in the evaluation of its toxic potential, there is limited experience with incorporating metabolic aspects into in vitro tests for endocrine disrupters. The aim of the current study was a) to study different in vitro systems for biotransformation of ten known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs): five azole fungicides, three parabens and 2 phthalates, b) to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDs to bind and activate the thyroid receptor (TR) in the in vitro T-screen assay after biotransformation and c) to investigate the endogenous metabolic capacity of the GH3 cells, the cell line used in the T-screen assay, which is a proliferation assay used for the in vitro detection of agonistic and antagonistic properties of compounds at the level of the TR. The two in vitro metabolizing systems tested the human liver S9 mix and the PCB-induced rat microsomes gave an almost complete metabolic transformation of the tested parabens and phthalates. No marked difference the effects in the T-screen assay was observed between the parent compounds and the effects of the tested metabolic extracts. The GH3 cells themselves significantly metabolized the two tested phthalates dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). Overall the results and qualitative data from the current study show that an in vitro metabolizing system using liver S9 or microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic and toxicokinetic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.

  6. Organic watermelon production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Research investigating certified organic production requires a systems approach to determine the optimum combination of individual components to max...

  7. The hidden life of NAD+-consuming ectoenzymes in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Fabio; Deaglio, Silvia; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Audrito, Valentina; Serra, Sara; Gandione, Marina; Zitella, Andrea; Tizzani, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Ectoenzymes are a family of cell surface molecules whose catalytic domain lies in the extracellular region. A subset of this family, nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes, are key components in the regulation of the extracellular balance between nucleotides (e.g. NAD(+) or ATP) and nucleosides (e.g. adenosine). Their substrates and products are signalling molecules that act by binding to specific receptors, triggering signals that regulate a variety of functions, ranging from the migration of immune cells, to synaptic transmission in the brain, to hormone/receptor interactions in the glands. Almost two decades of accumulated data indicate that these regulatory processes significantly affect the endocrine system, a tightly controlled information signal complex with clear evidence of fine regulation. Functional models discussed in this review include insulin secretion, bone modelling and the association between hormones and behaviour. The emerging pattern is one of a system operating as a scale-free network that hinges around hubs of key molecules, such as NAD(+) or ATP. The underlying natural link between nucleotides, ectoenzymes and the endocrine system is far from being clearly demonstrated. However, the body of evidence supporting the existence of such connection is growing exponentially. This review will try to read the available evidence in a hypothesis-oriented perspective, starting from the description of NAD(+) and of ecto- and endoenzymes involved in its metabolism.

  8. Medical comorbidity in bipolar disorder: relationship between illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, David E; Gao, Keming; Chan, Philip; Ganocy, Stephen J; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    Objective The present study examined the relationship between medical burden in bipolar disorder and several indicators of illness severity and outcome. It was hypothesized that illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system would be associated with greater psychiatric symptom burden and would impact the response to treatment with lithium and valproate. Method Data were analyzed from two studies evaluating lithium and valproate for rapid-cycling presentations of bipolar I and II disorder. General medical comorbidity was assessed by the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between medical burden, body mass index (BMI), substance use disorder status, and depressive symptom severity. Results Of 225 patients enrolled, 41.8% had a recent substance use disorder, 50.7% were male, and 69.8% had bipolar I disorder. The mean age of the sample was 36.8 (SD = 10.8) years old. The mean number of comorbid medical disorders per patient was 2.5 (SD = 2.5), and the mean CIRS total score was 4.3 (SD = 3.1). A significant positive correlation was observed between baseline depression severity and the number of organ systems affected by medical illness (p = 0.04). Illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system were inversely correlated with remission from depressive symptoms (p = 0.02), and obesity was specifically associated with poorer treatment outcome. For every 1-unit increase in BMI, the likelihood of response decreased by 7.5% [odds ratio (OR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87–0.99; p = 0.02] and the likelihood of remission decreased by 7.3% (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87–0.99; p = 0.03). The effect of comorbid substance use on the likelihood of response differed significantly according to baseline BMI. The presence of a comorbid substance use disorder resulted in a lower odds of response, but only among patients with a BMI ≥ 23 (p = 0.02). Conclusion Among patients with

  9. Spatial and temporal patterns of endocrine active chemicals in small streams indicate differential exposure to aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.E.; Barber, L.B.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    Alkylphenolic chemicals (APCs) and hormones were measured six times from February through October 2007 in three Minnesota streams receiving wastewater to identify spatial and temporal patterns in concentrations and in estrogen equivalency. Fish were collected once during the study to evaluate endpoints indicative of endocrine disruption. The most commonly detected APCs were 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol and the most commonly detected hormones were estrone and androstenedione. Chemical concentrations were greatest for nonylphenol ethoxycarboxylates (NPECs) (5,000-140,000 ng/l), followed by 4-nonlylphenol and 4-nonylphenolethoxylates (50-880 ng/l), 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenolethoxylates with concentrations as great as 130 ng/l, and hormones (0.1-54 ng/l). Patterns in chemicals and estrogen equivalency indicated that wastewater effluent is a pathway of APCs and hormones to downstream locations in this study. However, upstream contributions can be equally or more important indicating alternative sources. This study indicates that aquatic organisms experience both spatially and temporally variable exposures in the number of compounds, total concentrations, and estrogenicity. This variability was evident in fish collected from the three rivers as no clear upstream to downstream pattern of endocrine disruption endpoints emerged.

  10. Thyroid endocrine system disruption by pentachlorophenol: an in vitro and in vivo assay.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2013-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the disruption caused to the thyroid endocrine system by pentachlorophenol (PCP) using in vitro and in vivo assays. In the in vitro assay, rat pituitary GH3 cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μM PCP. PCP exposure significantly downregulated basal and triiodothyronine (T3)-induced Dio 1 transcription, indicating the antagonistic activity of PCP in vitro. In the in vivo assay, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 1, 3, and 10 μg/L of PCP until 14 days post-fertilization. PCP exposure resulted in decreased thyroxine (T4) levels, but elevated contents of whole-body T3. PCP exposure significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of genes along hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including those encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone, sodium/iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, Dio 1 and Dio 2, alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptor, and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase. PCP exposure did not influence the transcription of the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The results indicate that PCP potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24001430

  11. Occurrence and analysis of endocrine-disrupting compounds in a water supply system.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A R M; Cardoso, V V; Rodrigues, A; Ferreira, E; Benoliel, M J; Duarte, E A

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the study of the occurrence of 10 endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in 60 water samples using a method for simultaneous quantification and confirmation of the presence of these emerging compounds, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS). All samples were previously extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Several natural and synthetic hormones (17-β-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, estriol, estrone, progesterone, mestranol, and diethylstilbestrol) and some industrial products (4-n-nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol, and bisphenol A) were chosen for this survey. The analytical limits were calculated for each compound and were used in the identification and quantification of these target compounds in EPAL's water supply system. In this study, several samples were taken from the main intakes of water (surface and groundwater) used for production of water for human consumption and from different sampling points of the drinking water distribution system (piping, nets, and reservoirs). Some target compounds, such as estriol, 4-tert-octylphenol, mestranol, and nonylphenol, were found in trace amounts in several water samples. However, the studied endocrine-disrupting appeared in very low concentrations when compared with the assessed analytical limits.

  12. Microbial endocrinology: the interplay between the microbiota and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Hadar; Debelius, Justine W; Knight, Rob; Koren, Omry

    2015-07-01

    The new field of microbiome research studies the microbes within multicellular hosts and the many effects of these microbes on the host's health and well-being. We now know that microbes influence metabolism, immunity and even behavior. Essential questions, which are just starting to be answered, are what are the mechanisms by which these bacteria affect specific host characteristics. One important but understudied mechanism appears to involve hormones. Although the precise pathways of microbiota-hormonal signaling have not yet been deciphered, specific changes in hormone levels correlate with the presence of the gut microbiota. The microbiota produces and secretes hormones, responds to host hormones and regulates expression levels of host hormones. Here, we summarize the links between the endocrine system and the gut microbiota. We categorize these interactions by the different functions of the hormones, including those affecting behavior, sexual attraction, appetite and metabolism, gender and immunity. Future research in this area will reveal additional connections, and elucidate the pathways and consequences of bacterial interactions with the host endocrine system.

  13. Thyroid endocrine system disruption by pentachlorophenol: an in vitro and in vivo assay.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2013-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the disruption caused to the thyroid endocrine system by pentachlorophenol (PCP) using in vitro and in vivo assays. In the in vitro assay, rat pituitary GH3 cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μM PCP. PCP exposure significantly downregulated basal and triiodothyronine (T3)-induced Dio 1 transcription, indicating the antagonistic activity of PCP in vitro. In the in vivo assay, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 1, 3, and 10 μg/L of PCP until 14 days post-fertilization. PCP exposure resulted in decreased thyroxine (T4) levels, but elevated contents of whole-body T3. PCP exposure significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of genes along hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including those encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone, sodium/iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, Dio 1 and Dio 2, alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptor, and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase. PCP exposure did not influence the transcription of the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The results indicate that PCP potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P < 0.05). Decreases in parathyroid hormone did not reach significance. Calcitonin showed modest decreases postflight (P < 0.02). Overall, effects of spaceflight on the calcium endocrine system were similar to the effects of chairing on the ground, but were more pronounced. Reduced intestinal calcium absorption, losses in body weight, increases in cortisol, and higher postflight blood urea nitrogen were the changes in flight monkeys that distinguished them from the flight simulation study animals.

  15. The endocrine system controlling sexual reproduction in animals: Part of the evolutionary ancient but well conserved immune system?

    PubMed

    De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-01-15

    Drastic changes in hormone titers, in particular of steroid hormones, are intuitively interpreted as necessary and beneficial for optimal functioning of animals. Peaks in progesterone- and estradiol titers that accompany the estrus cycle in female vertebrates as well as in ecdysteroids at each molt and during metamorphosis of holometabolous insects are prominent examples. A recent analysis of insect metamorphosis yielded the view that, in general, a sharp rise in sex steroid hormone titer signals that somewhere in the body some tissue(s) is undergoing programmed cell death/apoptosis. Increased steroid production is part of this process. Typical examples are ovarian follicle cells in female vertebrates and invertebrates and the prothoracic gland cells, the main production site of ecdysteroids in larval insects. A duality emerges: programmed cell death-apoptosis is deleterious at the cellular level, but it may yield beneficial effects at the organismal level. Reconciling both opposites requires reevaluating the probable evolutionary origin and role of peptidic brain hormones that direct steroid hormone synthesis. Do e.g. Luteinizing Hormone in vertebrates and Prothoracicotropic Hormone (PTTH: acting through the Torso receptor) in insects still retain an ancient role as toxins in the early immune system? Does the functional link of some neuropeptides with Ca(2+)-induced apoptosis make sense in endocrine archeology? The endocrine system as a remnant of the ancient immune system is undoubtedly counterintuitive. Yet, we will argue that such paradigm enables the logical framing of many aspects, the endocrine one inclusive of both male and female reproductive physiology.

  16. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  17. Thirty years of the heart as an endocrine organ: physiological role and clinical utility of cardiac natriuretic hormones.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Giannoni, Alberto; Vittorini, Simona; Passino, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    Thirty years ago, De Bold et al. (20) reported that atrial extracts contain some biologically active peptides, which promote a rapid and massive diuresis and natriuresis when injected in rats. It is now clear that the heart also exerts an endocrine function and in this way plays a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal systems. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent insights and still-debated findings regarding the cardiac natriuretic hormones (CNHs) produced and secreted by cardiomyocytes (i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide). The functional status of the CNH system depends not only on the production/secretion of CNHs by cardiomyocytes but also on both the peripheral activation of circulating inactive precursor of natriuretic hormones and the transduction of the hormone signal by specific receptors. In this review, we will discuss the data supporting the hypothesis that the production and secretion of CNHs is the result of a complex integration among mechanical, chemical, hemodynamic, humoral, ischemic, and inflammatory inputs. The cross talk among endocrine function, adipose tissue, and sex steroid hormones will be discussed more in detail, considering the clinically relevant relationships linking together cardiovascular risk, sex, and body fat development and distribution. Finally, we will review the pathophysiological role and the clinical relevance of both peripheral maturation of the precursor of B-type natriuretic peptides and hormone signal transduction.

  18. Adaptation of the human endocrine system to microgravity in the context of integrative physiology and ageing.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F

    2000-01-01

    This review deals with changes occurring in space in different endocrine systems. Sections are dedicated to hormones involved in bone remodelling, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, pancreatic hormones, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-somato-mammotropic system. In space, most systems - especially those regulating bone/muscle metabolism and reproduction - undergo changes resembling those observed during senescence, but recover within weeks or months after return. This suggests space as a possible experimental model for the study of "reversible ageing processes". Studying ageing through space technology might give us the opportunity to combine the holistic view of integrative physiology with the most ambitious goal of the present scientific community, i.e. to yield successful ageing by promoting chronic disease prevention studies and by optimizing safe, anti-ageing therapeutic protocols.

  19. Biodegradation of Endocrine Disruptors in Solid-Liquid Two-Phase Partitioning Systems by Enrichment Cultures

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Silvia Cristina Cunha; Ouellette, Julianne; Juteau, Pierre; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring and synthetic estrogens and other molecules from industrial sources strongly contribute to the endocrine disruption of urban wastewater. Because of the presence of these molecules in low but effective concentrations in wastewaters, these endocrine disruptors (EDs) are only partially removed after most wastewater treatments, reflecting the presence of these molecules in rivers in urban areas. The development of a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) might be an effective strategy for the removal of EDs from wastewater plant effluents. Here, we describe the establishment of three ED-degrading microbial enrichment cultures adapted to a solid-liquid two-phase partitioning system using Hytrel as the immiscible water phase and loaded with estrone, estradiol, estriol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, and bisphenol A. All molecules except ethynylestradiol were degraded in the enrichment cultures. The bacterial composition of the three enrichment cultures was determined using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and showed sequences affiliated with bacteria associated with the degradation of these compounds, such as Sphingomonadales. One Rhodococcus isolate capable of degrading estrone, estradiol, and estriol was isolated from one enrichment culture. These results highlight the great potential for the development of TPPB for the degradation of highly diluted EDs in water effluents. PMID:23728808

  20. Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

  1. Social Interactions and Familial Relationships Preservice Science Teachers Describe during Interviews about Their Drawings of the Endocrine and Gastrointestinal Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined preservice science teachers' understandings of the structure and function of the human gastrointestinal and endocrine systems through drawings and interviews. Moreover, the preservice science teachers described where they thought they learned about the systems. The 142 preservice teachers were asked to draw the human…

  2. Life-cycle exposure to microcystin-LR interferes with the reproductive endocrine system of male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Su, Yujing; Li, Li; Hou, Jie; Wu, Ning; Lin, Wang; Li, Guangyu

    2016-06-01

    Recently, MC-LR reproductive toxicity drew great attention. Limited information was available on endocrine-disrupting effects of MC-LR on the reproduction system in fish. In the present study, zebrafish hatchlings (5 d post-fertilization) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30μg/L MC-LR for 90 d until they reached sexual maturity. Male zebrafish were selected, and changes in growth and developmental parameters, testicular histological structure as well as the levels of gonadal steroid hormones were studied along with the related-gene transcriptional responses in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG-axis). The results, for the first time, show a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes growth inhibition, testicular damage and delayed sperm maturation. A significant decrease in T/E2 ratio indicated that MC-LR disrupted sex steroid hormones balance. The changes in transcriptional responses of HPG-axis related genes revealed that MC-LR promoted the conversion of T to E2 in circulating blood. It was also noted that vtg1 mRNA expression in the liver was up-regulated, which implied that MC-LR could induce estrogenic-like effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and long-term exposure. Our findings indicated that a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes endocrine disruption with organic and functional damage of the testis, which might compromise the quality of life for the survivors and pose a potent threat on fish reproduction and thus population dynamics in MCs-contaminated aquatic environments. PMID:27060240

  3. Life-cycle exposure to microcystin-LR interferes with the reproductive endocrine system of male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Su, Yujing; Li, Li; Hou, Jie; Wu, Ning; Lin, Wang; Li, Guangyu

    2016-06-01

    Recently, MC-LR reproductive toxicity drew great attention. Limited information was available on endocrine-disrupting effects of MC-LR on the reproduction system in fish. In the present study, zebrafish hatchlings (5 d post-fertilization) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30μg/L MC-LR for 90 d until they reached sexual maturity. Male zebrafish were selected, and changes in growth and developmental parameters, testicular histological structure as well as the levels of gonadal steroid hormones were studied along with the related-gene transcriptional responses in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG-axis). The results, for the first time, show a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes growth inhibition, testicular damage and delayed sperm maturation. A significant decrease in T/E2 ratio indicated that MC-LR disrupted sex steroid hormones balance. The changes in transcriptional responses of HPG-axis related genes revealed that MC-LR promoted the conversion of T to E2 in circulating blood. It was also noted that vtg1 mRNA expression in the liver was up-regulated, which implied that MC-LR could induce estrogenic-like effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and long-term exposure. Our findings indicated that a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes endocrine disruption with organic and functional damage of the testis, which might compromise the quality of life for the survivors and pose a potent threat on fish reproduction and thus population dynamics in MCs-contaminated aquatic environments.

  4. Some evidence of effects of environmental chemicals on the endocrine system in children.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Walter J; Ragan, N Beth

    2007-10-01

    Pollutant chemicals that are widespread in the environment can affect endocrine function in laboratory experiments and in wildlife. Although human beings are commonly exposed to such pollutant chemicals, the exposures are generally low and clear effects on endocrine function from such exposures have been difficult to demonstrate. Human data including both exposure to the chemical agent and the endocrine outcome are reviewed here, including age at weaning, age at puberty, anogenital distance, and sex ratio at birth, and the strength of the evidence are discussed. Although endocrine disruption in humans by pollutant chemicals remains largely undemonstrated, the underlying science is sound and the potential for such effects is real.

  5. [Pathophysiological and clinical correlations between endocrine and cardiovascular systems. An inter-systemic model of internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Mario

    2006-12-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones affect the regulation of the cardiovascular system and the thermogenic and hemodynamic variation induced by thyroid disfunction. It is also stressed the hormonal role of the cardiac myocytes realising natriuretic peptides, involved in plasma volume homeostasis and cardiovascular remodelling; its rapid measurement is a useful clinical tool, in the diagnostic and prognostic of left ventricular dysfunction, correlating with the degree of the clinical symptoms. The endothelial layer is a receptor-effector endocrine organ that produces substances that maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. Cardiovascular risk factors causes oxidative stress that alter endothelial function and leads to endothelial dysfunction. On the basis of the present body of evidence there is no doubt that endothelial dysfunction contributes to the initiation, and progression, of atherosclerotic disease and that it could be considered an independent vascular risk factor for the micro- and macrovascular damages in the diabetes disease. In several extrathyroidal pathological condition, as well as in heart failure, the main alteration of the thyroid function is referred to as "low T3 syndrome". This syndrome is due to an adaptative reaction of the metabolic pathway of thyroxine, producing an increased amount of rT3, metabolically inactive, thus decreasing the detrimental metabolic effects of T3, in conditions of critically impaired hemodynamic and metabolic efficiency. Preliminary clinical trials, in heart failure, suggest the prognostic value of the level of circulating T3, as well as usefulness of T3, or of thyromimetic derivatives (DITPA), in chronic treatment of the heart ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Effects of chronic sultopride treatment on endocrine systems in psychotic women.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Y; Mizuchi, A; Hamano, H; Sarai, K

    1984-01-01

    The effects of chronic sultopride treatment on endocrine systems were studied using five schizophrenic women. Sultopride, an antipsychotic drug, was administered orally three times daily for 5 weeks in a daily dose of 300-600 mg. The serum prolactin levels increased significantly after 1 day of treatment, reaching a maximum at 1 week and remaining elevated during treatment. The serum GH levels declined temporarily after 1 week of treatment and then returned to normal values after 3-5 weeks of treatment. Sultopride had no significant effects on LH, FSH, TSH, insulin, estradiol-17 beta and cortisol basal levels. Serum sultopride levels measured by radioimmunoassay remained steady during treatment. These results showed that sultopride stimulates prolactin secretion in schizophrenic women, probably by blocking pituitary dopamine receptors.

  7. G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and the EGF network in endocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Minnie; Conti, Marco

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) network is composed of a complex array of growth factors synthesized as precursors and expressed on the cell surface. These latent growth factors are activated by cleavage and shedding from the cell surface and act by binding to various homo- and hetero-dimers of the EGF receptors (ErbBs). Although the exact molecular steps are poorly understood, ligand binding to G-protein-coupled receptors as diverse as the beta-adrenoceptors or the lysophosphatidic acid receptors leads to shedding of EGF growth factors and activation of EGF receptors. Recent observations from the pituitary and in the ovary are providing new insight into the role of this network in endocrine systems.

  8. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  9. Regulation of testicular function in the stallion: an intricate network of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Roser, Janet F

    2008-09-01

    It is well established in many mammalian species, including the horse that normal testicular function is dependent upon a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis, which involves classic feedback mechanisms. The major HPT hormones involved in the stallion are gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone (T), estrogens (Es) and inhibin (INH). Although prolactin (PRL) fluctuates with season in the stallion and both PRL and thyroid hormone (TH) affect reproduction in other male species, their effects on stallion reproduction have not been elucidated. Growth hormone (GH) in the stallion may be involved in sperm motility, production and secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and LH-induced testosterone release. The action of these hormones and the products involved for normal spermatogenesis require cell to cell communication within the testis. The somatic cell types, Leydig, Sertoli and peritubular myoid cells, all support germ cell development, maturation and release into the seminiferous tubule lumen. The cell to cell crosstalk involves an intricate network of paracrine-autocrine systems that support the endocrine input to modulate cell function. In other male species, researchers have demonstrated the reproductive effects of such paracrine-autocrine factors as IGF-1, transferrin, androgens, estrogens, inhibin, insulin like peptide 3 (INSL3), beta-endorphin and oxytocin. The specific nature and relative contribution of these various factors on testicular function in fertile and subfertile stallions are under investigation. This review summarizes current information regarding the nature of the multiple endocrine-paracrine-autocrine systems that may be necessary for normal testicular function in the stallion.

  10. The response of endocrine system to stress loads during space flight in human subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Koška, J.; Kšinantová, L.; Pacak, K.; Hoff, T.; Noskov, V. B.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Vigaš, M.; Kvetňanský, R.

    The responses of endocrine system to the exposure to stress-work load and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance tests were studied in the Slovak astronaut before (three weeks before flight), during (on the 4th and the 6th days of space flight), and after space flight (1-3 days and 15-17 days after space flight) on board of space station MIR. Blood samples during the tests were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transforred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Preflight workload produced an increase of plasma norepinephrine and a moderate elevation of epinephrine levels. Plasma levels of insulin, growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol were not markedly changed immediately or 10 min after the end of work load. The higher increases of plasma growth hormone, prolactin and catecholamine levels were noted after workload during space flight as compared to preflight response. The higher plasma glucose and insulin levels were noted during the oral glucose tolerance test in space flight and also in the post flight period. Plasma epinephrine levels were slightly decreasing during glucose tolerance test; however, plasma norepinephrine levels were not changed. The similar patterns of catecholamine levels during glucose tolerance test were found when compared the preflight, in-flight and post flight values. These data demonstrate the changes of the dynamic responses of endocrine system to stress-work and metabolic loads during space flight in human subject.

  11. The response of endocrine system to stress loads during space flight in human subject.

    PubMed

    Macho, L; Koska, J; Ksinantova, L; Pacak, K; Hoff, T; Noskov, V B; Grigoriev, A I; Vigas, M; Kvetnansky, R

    2003-01-01

    The responses of endocrine system to the exposure to stress-work load and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance tests were studied in the Slovak astronaut before (three weeks before flight), during (on the 4th and the 6th days of space flight), and after space flight (1-3 days and 15-17 days after space flight) on board of space station MIR. Blood samples during the tests were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Preflight workload produced an increase of plasma norepinephrine and a moderate elevation of epinephrine levels. Plasma levels of insulin, growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol were not markedly changed immediately or 10 min after the end of work load. The higher increases of plasma growth hormone, prolactin and catecholamine levels were noted after workload during space flight as compared to preflight response. The higher plasma glucose and insulin levels were noted during the oral glucose tolerance test in space flight and also in the post flight period. Plasma epinephrine levels were slightly decreasing during glucose tolerance test; however, plasma norepinephrine levels were not changed. The similar patterns of catecholamine levels during glucose tolerance test were found when compared the preflight, in-flight and post flight values. These data demonstrate the changes of the dynamic responses of endocrine system to stress-work and metabolic loads during space flight in human subject. PMID:12971416

  12. Organic contaminants in onsite wastewater treatment systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, K.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater from thirty onsite wastewater treatment systems was sampled during a reconnaissance field study to quantify bulk parameters and the occurrence of organic wastewater contaminants including endocrine disrupting compounds in treatment systems representing a variety of wastewater sources and treatment processes and their receiving environments. Bulk parameters ranged in concentrations representative of the wide variety of wastewater sources (residential vs. non-residential). Organic contaminants such as sterols, surfactant metabolites, antimicrobial agents, stimulants, metal-chelating agents, and other consumer product chemicals, measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were detected frequently in onsite system wastewater. Wastewater composition was unique between source type likely due to differences in source water and chemical usage. Removal efficiencies varied by engineered treatment type and physicochemical properties of the contaminant, resulting in discharge to the soil treatment unit at ecotoxicologically-relevant concentrations. Organic wastewater contaminants were detected less frequently and at lower concentrations in onsite system receiving environments. Understanding the occurrence and fate of organic wastewater contaminants in onsite wastewater treatment systems will aid in minimizing risk to ecological and human health.

  13. Continuous removal of endocrine disruptors by versatile peroxidase using a two-stage system.

    PubMed

    Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Lu-Chau, Thelmo A; Eibes, Gemma; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Maria T; Lema, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    The oxidant Mn(3+) -malonate, generated by the ligninolytic enzyme versatile peroxidase in a two-stage system, was used for the continuous removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from synthetic and real wastewaters. One plasticizer (bisphenol-A), one bactericide (triclosan) and three estrogenic compounds (estrone, 17β-estradiol, and 17α-ethinylestradiol) were removed from wastewater at degradation rates in the range of 28-58 µg/L·min, with low enzyme inactivation. First, the optimization of three main parameters affecting the generation of Mn(3+) -malonate (hydraulic retention time as well as Na-malonate and H2 O2 feeding rates) was conducted following a response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, the degradation of the EDCs was proven at high (1.3-8.8 mg/L) and environmental (1.2-6.1 µg/L) concentrations. Finally, when the two-stage system was compared with a conventional enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) using the same enzyme, a 14-fold increase of the removal efficiency was observed. At the same time, operational problems found during EDCs removal in the EMR system (e.g., clogging of the membrane and enzyme inactivation) were avoided by physically separating the stages of complex formation and pollutant oxidation, allowing the system to be operated for a longer period (∼8 h). This study demonstrates the feasibility of the two-stage enzymatic system for removing EDCs both at high and environmental concentrations.

  14. Developmental effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wildlife and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, T; vom Saal, F S; Soto, A M

    1993-01-01

    Large numbers and large quantities of endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been released into the environment since World War II. Many of these chemicals can disturb development of the endocrine system and of the organs that respond to endocrine signals in organisms indirectly exposed during prenatal and/or early postnatal life; effects of exposure during development are permanent and irreversible. The risk to the developing organism can also stem from direct exposure of the offspring after birth or hatching. In addition, transgenerational exposure can result from the exposure of the mother to a chemical at any time throughout her life before producing offspring due to persistence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in body fat, which is mobilized during egg laying or pregnancy and lactation. Mechanisms underlying the disruption of the development of vital systems, such as the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, are discussed with reference to wildlife, laboratory animals, and humans. PMID:8080506

  15. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for early breast cancer: a systematic review of the evidence for the 2014 Cancer Care Ontario systemic therapy guideline

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, O.C.; Fletcher, G.G.; Gandhi, S.; Mates, M.; Dent, S.F.; Trudeau, M.E.; Eisen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) recently created an evidence-based consensus guideline on the systemic treatment of early breast cancer. The evidence for the guideline was compiled using a systematic review to answer the question “What is the optimal systemic therapy for patients with early-stage, operable breast cancer, when patient and disease factors are considered?” The question was addressed in three parts: cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine treatment, and her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)–targeted therapy. Methods For the systematic review, the literature in the medline and embase databases was searched for the period January 2008 to May 2014. The Standards and Guidelines Evidence directory of cancer guidelines and the Web sites of major oncology guideline organizations were also searched. The basic search terms were “breast cancer” and “systemic therapy” (chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, targeted agents, ovarian suppression), and results were limited to randomized controlled trials (rcts), guidelines, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Results Several hundred documents that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved. Meta-analyses from the Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group encompassed many of the rcts found. Several additional studies that met the inclusion criteria were retained, as were other guidelines and systematic reviews. Summary The results of the systematic review constitute a comprehensive compilation of high-level evidence, which was the basis for the 2014 pebc guideline on systemic therapy for early breast cancer. The review of the evidence for systemic endocrine therapy (adjuvant tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, and ovarian ablation and suppression) is presented here; the evidence for chemotherapy and her2-targeted treatment—and the final clinical practice recommendations—are presented separately in this supplement. PMID:25848344

  16. Photodegradation of estrogenic endocrine disrupting steroidal hormones in aqueous systems: Progress and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Sornalingam, Kireesan; McDonagh, Andrew; Zhou, John L

    2016-04-15

    This article reviews different photodegradation technologies used for the removal of four endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). The degradation efficiency is greater under UV than visible light; and increases with light intensity up to when mass transfer becomes the rate limiting step. Substantial rates are observed in the environmentally relevant range of pH7-8, though higher rates are obtained for pH above the pKa (~10.4) of the EDCs. The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on EDC photodegradation are complex with both positive and negative impacts being reported. TiO2 remains the best catalyst due to its superior activity, chemical and photo stability, cheap commercial availability, capacity to function at ambient conditions and low toxicity. The optimum TiO2 loading is 0.05-1gl(-1), while higher loadings have negative impact on EDC removal. The suspended catalysts prove to be more efficient in photocatalysis compared to the immobilised catalysts, while the latter are considered more suitable for commercial scale applications. Photodegradation mostly follows 1st or pseudo 1st order kinetics. Photodegradation typically eradicates or moderates estrogenic activity, though some intermediates are found to exhibit higher estrogenicity than the parent EDCs; the persistence of estrogenic activity is mainly attributed to the presence of the phenolic moiety in intermediates. PMID:26815298

  17. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  18. The KiSS-1/GPR54 system: putative target for endocrine disruption of reproduction at hypothalamic-pituitary unit?

    PubMed

    Navarro, Victor M; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) unit, key element in the control of development and function of the reproductive axis, is highly sensitive to the organizing and activational effects of endogenous and exogenous compounds with sex steroid activity. Thus, inappropriate sex steroid input during early critical periods of their maturation can induce immediate or delayed defects in the neuroendocrine systems governing reproduction, which might eventually lead to alterations in the timing of puberty onset and/or infertility. Similarly, later inadequate exposures can cause dysfunctions of the gonadotropic axis. In recent years, kisspeptins (the products of KiSS-1 gene that operate through the G protein-coupled receptor 54) have emerged as fundamental regulators of puberty onset and gonadotropin secretion, and neurons in the hypothalamus expressing KiSS-1 have been demonstrated as essential conduits for the dynamic control of the gonadotropic axis by a number of hormonal factors. In this context, the hypothalamic KiSS-1 system has been proven sensitive to the early organizing effects, as well as to the acute regulatory actions, of gonadal steroids: phenomena which are likely to play fundamental roles in the sexual differentiation of gonadotropin secretion, and its feedback regulation by androgen and oestrogen. These observations raise the question on whether the hypothalamic KiSS-1 system might constitute a potential target for endocrine disruption of puberty onset and reproductive function at the HP unit by compounds with oestrogenic, androgenic or anti-androgenic activity. We review herein the physiological basis and initial, albeit so far scarce, experimental evidence supporting such possibility.

  19. Nonruminant Nutrition Symposium: Involvement of gut neural and endocrine systems in pathological disorders of the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Furness, J B; Poole, D P

    2012-04-01

    The functioning of the gastrointestinal tract is under the control of the most extensive system of peripheral neurons in the body, the enteric nervous system, and the largest endocrine system of the body, the GEP endocrine system. The enteric nervous system in large mammals contains 500 million neurons, and the GEP endocrine system produces more than 30 hormones. Numerous enteric neuropathies affecting both humans and animals have been described and digestive disorders affect commercially important species, such as horses and cattle. The most severe enteric neuropathies (e.g., lethal white syndrome in horses or Hirschsprung's disease in humans) can be fatal. Also, horses with ileus or other digestive disorders are commonly euthanized. In this review we discuss examples of enteric neuropathies that affect agricultural animals and humans: prion disease, postoperative ileus, distal enteric aganglionosis, and infective diarrhea. Enteric neurons and glia are a location of prion proteins and are involved in transmission of the infection from gut to brain and brain to gut. Postoperative ileus is a complex disorder involving the local inhibitory effects of sympathetic nervous system activation and the release of opioids, presumably from enteric neurons. Intestinal inflammation, especially of the external muscle that includes enteric ganglia, also occurs in ileus. Congenital distal bowel aganglionosis, responsible for lethal white syndrome in horses, Hirschsprung's disease in humans, and similar conditions in mice and rats, is a fatal condition if untreated. Mutations of the same genes can cause the condition in each of these species. The only effective current treatment is surgical removal of the aganglionic bowel. Infectious diarrheas involve activation of enteric secretomotor neurons by pathogens and the toxins they produce, which causes substantial fluid loss. Strategies to target enteric neurons in the treatment of secretory diarrheas have not been developed. Disorders

  20. Behaviour of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting chemicals in simplified sewage treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Emanuel M F; de Queiroz, Fernanda B; Afonso, Robson J C F; Aquino, Sérgio F; Chernicharo, Carlos A L

    2013-10-15

    This work assessed the behaviour of nine pharmaceuticals and/or endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB reactors) coupled to distinct simplified post-treatment units (submerged bed, polishing ponds, and trickling filters) fed on raw sewage taken from a municipality in Brazil. The dissolved concentration of the studied micropollutants in the raw and treated sewage was obtained using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by analysis in a liquid chromatography system coupled to a hybrid high resolution mass spectrometer consisting of an ion-trap and time of flight (LC-MS-IT-TOF). The UASB reactors demonstrated that they were not appropriate for efficiently removing the assessed compounds from the sewage. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was an important parameter for the removal of the hydrophilic and less biodegradable compounds, such as trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole. The post-treatment units substantially increased the removal of most target micropollutants present in the anaerobic effluents, with a greater removal of micropollutants in simplified systems that require a large construction area, such as the submerged bed and polishing ponds, probably because of the higher HRT employed. Alternatively, compact post-treatment systems, such as trickling filters, tended to be less effective at removing most of the micropollutants studied, and the type of packing proved to be crucial for determining the fate of such compounds using trickling filters. PMID:23850766

  1. Evidence of effects of environmental chemicals on the endocrine system in children.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Walter J; Ragan, N Beth

    2003-07-01

    Pollutant chemicals that are widespread in the environment can affect endocrine signaling, as evidenced in laboratory experiments and in wildlife with relatively high exposures. Although humans are commonly exposed to such pollutant chemicals, the exposures are generally low, and clear effects on endocrine function from such exposures have been difficult to demonstrate. Several instances in which there are data from humans on exposure to the chemical agent and the endocrine outcome are reviewed, including age at weaning, age at puberty, and sex ratio at birth, and the strength of the evidence is discussed. Although endocrine disruption in humans by pollutant chemicals remains largely undemonstrated, the underlying science is sound and the potential for such effects is real.

  2. Skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ: Role of [Na+]i/[K+]i-mediated excitation-transcription coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Zaharova, Anna N.; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V.; Dulin, Nickolai O.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the last two decades numerous research teams demonstrated that skeletal muscles function as an exercise-dependent endocrine organ secreting dozens of myokines. Variety of physiological and pathophysiological implications of skeletal muscle myokines secretion has been described; however, upstream signals and sensing mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly understood. It is well documented that in skeletal muscles intensive exercise triggers dissipation of transmembrane gradient of monovalent cations caused by permanent activation of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels. Recently, we demonstrated that sustained elevation of the [Na+]i/[K+]i ratio triggers expression of dozens ubiquitous genes including several canonical myokines, such as interleukin 6 and cyclooxygenase 2, in the presence of intra- and extracellular Ca2+ chelators. These data allowed us to suggest a novel [Na+]i/[K+]i-sensitive, Ca2+i-independent mechanism of excitation-transcription coupling which triggers myokine production. This pathway exists in parallel with canonical signaling mediated by Ca2+i, AMP-activated protein kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). In our mini-review we briefly summarize data supporting this hypothesis as well as unresolved issues aiming to forthcoming studies. PMID:27610402

  3. Influence of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter, colloids, and cations on nanofiltration of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Sadmani, A H M Anwar; Andrews, Robert C; Bagley, David M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the rejection of selected pharmaceutically active (PhAC) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) when using nanofiltration as a function of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM), colloidal particles, cations and their interactions. Lake Ontario water served as a source of natural DOM and colloidal particles. PhAC/EDC rejection experiments were conducted using raw Lake Ontario water and Lake Ontario water that was pre-treated with either ultrafiltration to remove colloidal particles, or fluidized ion exchange resins to remove DOM. Additionally, the concentration of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+)) in the raw and pre-treated water matrices was varied. While ionic PhACs and EDCs exhibited high rejections from all the water matrices examined, neutral compounds were most effectively rejected in water containing DOM and no colloids, and least effectively rejected from colloid-containing water with increased cations but no DOM. The presence of DOM significantly improved compound rejection and the increase in cation concentration significantly decreased rejection. The presence of colloids had comparatively little effect except to mitigate the impact of increased cation concentration, apparently providing some cation-buffering capacity. The sequence in which constituents are removed from waters during treatment may significantly impact PhAC and EDC removal, especially of neutral compounds.

  4. Method of identification and isolation of organs of endocrine secretion in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kashirina, N.K.

    1987-10-01

    The authors describe a procedure based on electron autoradiography for isolating and determining the morphology of the adrenal, pituitary, and thyroid glands in albino mice, and use the procedure to give a description, in this paper, of the configuration, location, and physiological interaction of these glands relative to the other organs in these laboratory animals. The procedure overcomes the difficulties encountered in such determinations owing to factors such as smallness.

  5. Circumventricular organs: definition and role in the regulation of endocrine and autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    2000-01-01

    1. The circumventricular organs (CVO) are structures that permit polypeptide hypothalamic hormones to leave the brain without disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and permit substances that do not cross the BBB to trigger changes in brain function. 2. In mammals, CVO include only the median eminence and adjacent neurohypophysis, organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, subfornical organ and the area postrema. 3. The CVO are characterized by their small size, high permeability and fenestrated capillaries. The subcommissural organ is not highly permeable and does not have fenestrated capillaries, but new evidence indicates that it may be involved in the hypertension produced by aldosterone acting on the brain. 4. Feedback control of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) secretion is exerted by free steroids diffusing into the brain, but substances such as cytokines and angiotensin II act on CVO to produce increases in CRH secretion. Gonadal steroids also diffuse into the brain to regulate gonadotrophin-releasing hormone secretion. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone secretion is regulated by thyroid hormones transported across cerebral capillaries. However, CVO may be involved in the negative feedback control of growth hormone and prolactin secretion.

  6. Deviations in the endocrine system and brain of patients with fibromyalgia: cause or consequence of pain and associated features?

    PubMed

    Geenen, Rinie; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-04-01

    The brain and endocrine system are crucial interfaces responding to pathological and psychological processes. This review discusses whether endocrine deviations and structural and functional changes in the brain are a cause or consequence of fibromyalgia. Studies in patients with fibromyalgia virtually uniformly observed subtle alterations in hypothalamic pituitary adrenal functioning, hyporeactive autonomic nervous system responsiveness to stressors, and structural and functional changes in the brain. Our model proposes that predisposing factors, such as genetic vulnerability and trauma, have led to an alteration of the nociceptive system including several neuroendocrine changes. The resulting pain and associated symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, low fitness, fatigue, stress, and distress, are a cause of new neuroendocrine changes. The model predicts that favorable neuroendocrine changes are to be expected after successful pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions that target pain and associated symptoms.

  7. Endocrine activities and cellular stress responses in the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus exposed to cobalt, zinc and their organic nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Falfushynska, Halina; Gnatyshyna, Lesya; Fedoruk, Olga; Sokolova, Inna M; Stoliar, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing materials are extensively used in industry, personal care products and medicine, and their release in the environment causes concern for the potential impacts on aquatic organisms. We assessed endocrine disrupting potential of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone-based nanoparticles (Me-PSs) containing cobalt (Co(2+)) or zinc (Zn(2+)), using the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus as a model. Adult males were exposed for 14 days to waterborne Co(2+) (50μg/L), Zn(2+) (100μg/L) or corresponding concentrations of Co-PS, Zn-PS, or parental polymeric compound (PS). The indices of thyroid activity, vitellogenesis, cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases activity (EROD) and cytotoxicity markers were evaluated. Exposure to Co(2+) led to the elevation of serum thyrotropin (TSH) and hepatic deiodinase activities accompanied by the up-regulation of EROD activity. In contrast, the action of the polymer-containing substances (Co-PS, Zn-PS and PS) as well as free Zn(2+) caused a prominent decrease of EROD activity and a decrease in serum cortisol and TSH concentrations. Exposures to Zn(2+), Zn-PS and PS upregulated vitellogenesis in males. All exposures except Co(2+) caused neurotoxicity as indicated by the depletion of cholinesterase. These results demonstrate toxicity of Co- and Zn-containing Me-PSs and their parental compounds (Zn(2+) and PS) in frogs and indicate distinct mechanisms of Co(2+) action. Broad disruption of the hormonal pathways and reduced capacity for organic xenobiotic detoxification may have deleterious impacts on amphibian populations from habitats exposed to metallorganic pollution. PMID:26624501

  8. Endocrine activities and cellular stress responses in the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus exposed to cobalt, zinc and their organic nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Falfushynska, Halina; Gnatyshyna, Lesya; Fedoruk, Olga; Sokolova, Inna M; Stoliar, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing materials are extensively used in industry, personal care products and medicine, and their release in the environment causes concern for the potential impacts on aquatic organisms. We assessed endocrine disrupting potential of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone-based nanoparticles (Me-PSs) containing cobalt (Co(2+)) or zinc (Zn(2+)), using the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus as a model. Adult males were exposed for 14 days to waterborne Co(2+) (50μg/L), Zn(2+) (100μg/L) or corresponding concentrations of Co-PS, Zn-PS, or parental polymeric compound (PS). The indices of thyroid activity, vitellogenesis, cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases activity (EROD) and cytotoxicity markers were evaluated. Exposure to Co(2+) led to the elevation of serum thyrotropin (TSH) and hepatic deiodinase activities accompanied by the up-regulation of EROD activity. In contrast, the action of the polymer-containing substances (Co-PS, Zn-PS and PS) as well as free Zn(2+) caused a prominent decrease of EROD activity and a decrease in serum cortisol and TSH concentrations. Exposures to Zn(2+), Zn-PS and PS upregulated vitellogenesis in males. All exposures except Co(2+) caused neurotoxicity as indicated by the depletion of cholinesterase. These results demonstrate toxicity of Co- and Zn-containing Me-PSs and their parental compounds (Zn(2+) and PS) in frogs and indicate distinct mechanisms of Co(2+) action. Broad disruption of the hormonal pathways and reduced capacity for organic xenobiotic detoxification may have deleterious impacts on amphibian populations from habitats exposed to metallorganic pollution.

  9. Effects of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate exposure on endocrine systems and reproduction of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bareum; Shin, Hyejin; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Ji, Kyunghee; Kim, Ki-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEOP), a widely used organophosphate flame retardant, has frequently been detected both in the environment and the biota. However, limited information is available on the effects of TBEOP on the endocrine system and its underlying mechanisms. We exposed adult zebrafish pairs to TBEOP at concentrations of 0, 2.1, 11, and 118 μg/L for 21 d, and investigated the effects on gene transcription and hormone production related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and on reproduction. The adverse effects on the F1 generation were further examined. In male fish, plasma concentrations of 17β-estradiol were significantly increased along with up-regulation of cyp19a. Exposure to TBEOP at 118 μg/L led to a significant decrease in average egg production. Exposure of the F0 generation to TBEOP delayed hatching and lowered hatching rates in the F1 generation. The results demonstrate that exposure to TBEOP at environmentally relevant concentration levels could affect the sex hormone balance by altering regulatory circuits of the HPG axis, eventually leading to disruption of reproductive performance and the development of offspring. PMID:27131816

  10. Effects of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate exposure on endocrine systems and reproduction of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bareum; Shin, Hyejin; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Ji, Kyunghee; Kim, Ki-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEOP), a widely used organophosphate flame retardant, has frequently been detected both in the environment and the biota. However, limited information is available on the effects of TBEOP on the endocrine system and its underlying mechanisms. We exposed adult zebrafish pairs to TBEOP at concentrations of 0, 2.1, 11, and 118 μg/L for 21 d, and investigated the effects on gene transcription and hormone production related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and on reproduction. The adverse effects on the F1 generation were further examined. In male fish, plasma concentrations of 17β-estradiol were significantly increased along with up-regulation of cyp19a. Exposure to TBEOP at 118 μg/L led to a significant decrease in average egg production. Exposure of the F0 generation to TBEOP delayed hatching and lowered hatching rates in the F1 generation. The results demonstrate that exposure to TBEOP at environmentally relevant concentration levels could affect the sex hormone balance by altering regulatory circuits of the HPG axis, eventually leading to disruption of reproductive performance and the development of offspring.

  11. Chlordimeform-induced alterations in endocrine regulation within the male rat reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J M; Cooper, R L; Laws, S C; Rehnberg, G L; Edwards, T L; McElroy, W K; Hein, J F

    1990-06-01

    The acaricide chlordimeform has been reported to have adverse effects in mammals that may be mediated by an interaction with alpha-adrenergic receptors. Since the hormonal signals involved in the regulation of reproductive function are themselves under hypothalamic adrenergic control, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of acute exposure to this compound on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Male rats given two intraperitoneal injections of chlordimeform-HCl (20 or 50 mg/kg) spaced 12 hr apart showed 24-hr declines in serum gonadotropins at 50 mg/kg that were paralleled by a drop in testosterone. These changes returned to control levels by 96 hr. Thyroid-stimulating hormone exhibited a dose-response decline that was accompanied by a similar decrease in serum thyroid hormone levels. The norepinephrine-stimulated secretion in vitro of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from hypothalamic explants was suppressed at the higher dose, while LH release from pituitary fragments in culture was unaffected. Although measurements of the in vitro release of other pituitary hormones suggest that there could be some direct pituitary effects of the compound, it appears likely that chlordimeform is able to influence endocrine regulation adversely within the reproductive system by interfering with hypothalamic alpha-adrenergic activity.

  12. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Dana K; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew J; Aday, D Derek; Cope, W Gregory; Kullman, Seth; Rice, James A; Kwak, Thomas J; Law, Mac

    2015-02-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships.

  13. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sackett, Dana K.; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew; Aday, D.D.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kullman, Seth W.; Rice, J.A.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Law, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships.

  14. Characterizing field sediments from three European river basins with special emphasis on endocrine effects - A recommendation for Potamopyrgus antipodarum as test organism.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Claudia; Balaam, Jan; Leonards, Pim; Brix, Rikke; Streck, Georg; Tuikka, Anita; Bervoets, Lieven; Brack, Werner; van Hattum, Bert; Meire, Patrick; de Deckere, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The assessment of endocrine disrupting potentials of field sediments has until now been mostly limited to classical chemical analysis, in vitro assays and in vivo bioassays performed with vertebrates. There is an urgent need for easy, cheap and reproducible invertebrate tests which may be applied in certain monitoring activities. Since the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum is known to be tolerant to natural stressors, but also sensitive to endocrine disrupting chemicals, it is very likely that this organism could be suitable for the assessment of endocrine effects of e.g. field sediments. Within this study the endocrine potential of sediments in three European river basins was assessed. The yeast estrogen screen (YES) and a sediment contact test with P. antipodarum were performed. Furthermore, analyses of physico-chemical properties and concentrations of heavy metals, PAHs, organotins, natural steroids and alkylphenols were done. In the sediment contact test, the reproduction of the snail was promoted by a part of the sediments. This phenomenon could not be explained by their physico-chemical properties. However, at some of those sites a high estrogenic activity was detected in the YES, leading to the assumption that endocrine disrupting compounds could be responsible for those effects. This assumption could be confirmed to some extent with partially high concentrations of xeno-estrogens (e.g. nonylphenol) at the certain sites. Our study demonstrates the applicability of the test with P. antipodarum for a variety of sediments and once again points out the need of suitable in vivo biotests for the risk assessment of field sediments.

  15. Thyroid endocrine status of wild European eels (Anguilla anguilla) in the Loire (France). Relationships with organic contaminant body burdens.

    PubMed

    Couderc, M; Marchand, J; Zalouk-Vergnoux, A; Kamari, A; Moreau, B; Blanchet-Letrouvé, I; Le Bizec, B; Mouneyrac, C; Poirier, L

    2016-04-15

    In teleost fish, thyroid function is involved in various critical physiological processes. Given the complexity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, a large number of genes and proteins can be the potential target of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, in yellow and silver European eels (Anguilla anguilla), potential effects of EDCs on thyroid status by analyzing the associations between EDC body burdens and thyroid hormones (THs). In yellow individuals, greater free T3/T4 ratios (FT3/FT4) and lower plasma FT4 levels were associated with greater concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), as highlighted by significant correlations with many congeners. Few positive relationships with alkylphenols were noticed. In contrast, silver eels usually exhibited less significant correlations between THs and contaminant loads. Expression of a series of genes involved in the HPT axis was also investigated in the silver individuals. Concerning mRNA expression in silver females, some main correlations were noticed: thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHβ) gene expression was significantly correlated to numerous PCBs, and hepatic mRNA levels of deiodinase 2 (Deio 2) were negatively correlated to 2-hydroxyfluorene (2-OHF) and 2-naphtol (2-OHNa). Thyroid receptor (TRα and TRβ) mRNA levels exhibited weak negative correlations with some PBDEs in silver females and males. Hepatic vitellogenin (Vtg) mRNA levels were detected in all silver males but at lower levels than in silver females. In males, Vtg mRNA levels were positively associated to FT4/TT4. In silver females, strong positive correlations were found between congeners of PCBs, PBDEs and PFAS suggesting potential estrogenic effects. Overall, the observed results indicate that several organic contaminants, mainly dl-, ndl-PCBs and PBDEs, could be associated with changes in thyroid homeostasis in these fish, via direct or indirect

  16. Endocrine effects of real-life mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in experimental models and wild fish.

    PubMed

    Berg, Vidar; Kraugerud, Marianne; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Olsvik, Pål A; Skåre, Janneche U; Alestrøm, Peter; Ropstad, Erik; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth; Lyche, Jan L

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies have assessed the occurrence, levels, and potential adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in fish from Lake Mjøsa. In this lake, high levels of various POP were detected in biota. Fish from the nearby Lake Losna contain background levels of POP and served as reference (controls) in these studies. Significantly higher prevalence of mycobacteriosis and pathological changes were documented in burbot (Lota lota) from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna. Further, transcriptional profiling identified changes in gene expression in burbot from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna associated with drug metabolism enzymes and oxidative stress. POP extracted from burbot liver oil from the two lakes was used to expose zebrafish (Danio rerio) during two consecutive generations. During both generations, POP mixtures from both lakes increased the rate of mortality, induced earlier onset of puberty, and skewed sex ratio toward males. However, opposite effects on weight gain were found in exposure groups compared to controls during the two generations. Exposure to POP from both lakes was associated with suppression of ovarian follicle development. Analyses of genome-wide transcription profiling identified functional networks of genes associated with weight homeostasis, steroid hormone functions, and insulin signaling. In human cell studies using adrenocortical H295R and primary porcine theca and granulosa cells, exposure to lake extracts from both populations modulated steroid hormone production with significant difference from controls. The results suggest that POP from both lakes may possess the potential to induce endocrine disruption and may adversely affect health in wild fish. PMID:27484136

  17. Effects of Age, Sex and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type-II on Silver Stained Nucleolar Organizer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Lane, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver stained nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were studied in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes from 55 Caucasian control individuals (34 females with average age of 24 years and age range 19 weeks gestation to 87 years; 21 males with average age of 31 years and age range 29 weeks gestation to 72 years) and 13 individuals (7 females, 6 males; average age 38.8 years with age range 25—58 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia-type II (MEN-II), an autosomal dominant malignancy with increased chromosome breakage. For the first time, AgNORs were examined in lymphocytes from normal fetuses and patients with MEN-II in order to determine the effects of age, sex or malignancy on the number of AgNORs. No significant difference in the average number of AgNORs were found in fetal cells (8.2 ± S.D. 0.7/cell) when compared with cells from older individuals including those over 65 years of age (8.0 ± S.D. 0.8/cell). There was a statistically significant negative correlation (P< 0.05) between the modal number of AgNORs on G but not D chromosomes in both males and females. A negative correlation was also found between the mean number of AgNORs and age but was not statistically significant. The average number of AgNORs in the MEN-II individuals was 8.5 ± S.D. 0.7/cell, which was not significantly different than 8.2 ± S.D. 0.7/cell observed in age-matched control subjects. PMID:2471022

  18. A systematic expression analysis implicates Plexin-B2 and its ligand Sema4C in the regulation of the vascular and endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Matthias; Xia, Jingjing; Friedel, Roland H; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2010-09-10

    Plexins serve as receptors for semaphorins and play important roles in the developing nervous system. Plexin-B2 controls decisive developmental programs in the neural tube and cerebellum. However, whether Plexin-B2 also regulates biological functions in adult nonneuronal tissues is unknown. Here we show by two methodologically independent approaches that Plexin-B2 is expressed in discrete cell types of several nonneuronal tissues in the adult mouse. In the vasculature, Plexin-B2 is selectively expressed in functionally specialized endothelial cells. In endocrine organs, Plexin-B2 localizes to the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and to both cortex and medulla of the adrenal gland. Plexin-B2 expression is also detected in certain types of immune and epithelial cells. In addition, we report on a systematic comparison of the expression patterns of Plexin-B2 and its ligand Sema4C, which show complementarity or overlap in some but not all tissues. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Plexin-B2 and its family member Plexin-B1 display largely nonredundant expression patterns. This work establishes Plexin-B2 and Sema4C as potential regulators of the vascular and endocrine system and provides an anatomical basis to understand the biological functions of this ligand-receptor pair.

  19. Microcystin-LR impairs zebrafish reproduction by affecting oogenesis and endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that microcystins (MCs) are able to exert negative effects on the reproductive system of fish. However, few data are actually available on the effects of MC-LR on the reproductive system of female fish. In the present study, female zebrafish were exposed to 2, 10, and 50 μg L(-1) of MC-LR for 21 d, and its effects on oogenesis, sex hormones, transcription of genes on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis, and reproduction were investigated for the first time. It was observed that egg production significantly declined at ⩾ 10 μg L(-1) MC-LR. MC-LR exposure to zebrafish increased the concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (VTG) at 10 μg L(-1) level, whereas concentrations of E2, VTG and testosterone declined at 50 μg L(-1) MC-LR. The transcriptions of steroidogenic pathway gene (cyp19a, cyp19b, 17βhsd, cyp17 and hmgra) changed as well after the exposure and corresponded well with the alterations of hormone levels. A number of intra- and extra-ovarian factors, such as gnrh3, gnrhr1, fshβ, fshr, lhr, bmp15, mrpβ, ptgs2 and vtg1 which regulate oogenesis, were significantly changed with a different dose-related effect. Moreover, MC-LR exposure to female zebrafish resulted in decreased fertilization and hatching rates, and may suggest the possibility of trans-generational effects of MC-LR exposure. The results demonstrate that MC-LR could modulate endocrine function and oogenesis, eventually leading to disruption of reproductive performance in female zebrafish. These data suggest there is a risk for aquatic population living in MC polluted areas.

  20. Does balneotherapy with low radon concentration in water influence the endocrine system? A controlled non-randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Berhés, István; Kovács, Tibor; Kávási, Norbert; Somlai, János; Bender, Tamás

    2009-08-01

    Radon bath is a well-established modality of balneotherapy for the management of degenerative musculoskeletal disorders. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether baths of relatively low (80 Bq/l) radon concentration have any influence on the functioning of the endocrine system. In the study, a non-randomized pilot study, 27 patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders received 30-min radon baths (of 31-32 degrees C temperature and 80 Bq/l average radon concentration) daily, for 15 days. Twenty-five patients with matching pathologies were subjected to balneotherapy according to the same protocol, using thermal water with negligible radon content (6 Bq/l). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and dehydroepiandrosterone levels were measured before and after a balneotherapy course of 15 sessions. Comparison of the accumulated data using the Wilcoxon test did not reveal any significant difference between pre- and post-treatment values or between the two patient groups. It is noted that while the beneficial effects of balneotherapy with radon-containing water on degenerative disorders is widely known, only few data have been published in the literature on its effect on endocrine functions. The present study failed to demonstrate any substantial effect of thermal water with relatively low radon content on the functioning of the endocrine system.

  1. Do endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias?

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Sisir; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine disruptors or environmental agents, disrupt the endocrine system, leading to various adverse effects in humans and animals. Although the phenomenon has been noted historically in the cases of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), the term “endocrine disruptor” is relatively new. Endocrine disruptors can have a variety of hormonal activities such as estrogenicity or anti-androgenicity. The focus of this review concerns on the induction of hypospadias by exogenous estrogenic endocrine disruptors. This has been a particular clinical concern secondary to reported increased incidence of hypospadias. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed as to whether endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias. Methods A literature search was performed for studies involving both humans and animals. Studies within the past 5 years were reviewed and categorized into basic science, clinical science, epidemiologic, or review studies. Results Forty-three scientific articles were identified. Relevant sentinel articles were also reviewed. Additional pertinent studies were extracted from the reference of the articles that obtained from initial search results. Each article was reviewed and results presented. Overall, there were no studies which definitely stated that endocrine disruptors caused hypospadias. However, there were multiple studies which implicated endocrine disruptors as one component of a multifactorial model for hypospadias. Conclusions Endocrine disruption may be one of the many critical steps in aberrant development that manifests as hypospadias. PMID:26816789

  2. Dynamic nature of alterations in the endocrine system of fathead minnows exposed to the fungicide prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Ankley, Gerald T; Bencic, David C; Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Martinovic, Dalma; Mueller, Nathaniel D; Wehmas, Leah C; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2009-12-01

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms that maintain a dynamic homeostasis in the face of changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemicals. We assessed the effects of prochloraz on HPG axis function in adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) at multiple sampling times during 8-day exposure and 8-day depuration/recovery phases. Consistent with one mechanism of action of prochloraz, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19 aromatase activity, the fungicide depressed ex vivo ovarian production and plasma concentrations of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in female fish. At a prochloraz water concentration of 30 microg/l, inhibitory effects on E2 production were transitory and did not persist during the 8-day exposure phase. At 300 microg/l prochloraz, inhibition of E2 production was evident throughout the 8-day exposure but steroid titers recovered within 1 day of cessation of exposure. Compensation or recovery of steroid production in prochloraz-exposed females was accompanied by upregulation of several ovarian genes associated with steroidogenesis, including cyp19a1a, cyp17 (hydroxylase/lyase), cyp11a (cholesterol side-chain cleavage), and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor. In male fathead minnows, the 8-day prochloraz exposure decreased testosterone (T) production, possibly through inhibition of CYP17. However, as for E2 in females, ex vivo testicular production and plasma concentrations of T recovered within 1 day of stopping exposure. Steroidogenic genes upregulated in testis included cyp17 and cyp11a. These studies demonstrate the adaptability of the HPG axis to chemical stress and highlight the need to consider the dynamic nature of the system when developing approaches to assess potential risks of endocrine-active chemicals.

  3. Early weaning PCB 95 exposure alters the neonatal endocrine system: thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that can severely disrupt the endocrine system. In the present study, early-weaned male rats were administered a single dose of 2,3,6-2',5'-pentachlorinated biphenyl (PCB 95; 32 mg/kg per day, by i.p. injection) for two consecutive days (postnatal days (PNDs) 15 and 16) and killed 24 and 48 h after the administration of the last dose. Compared with the control group, administration of PCB 95 induced a reduction (P<0.01) in serum concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and GH and an increase (P<0.01) in the serum concentration of TSH at PNDs 17 and 18. These conspicuous perturbations led to some histopathological deterioration in the thyroid gland characterized by follicular degeneration, edema, fibrosis, hemorrhage, luminal obliteration, and hypertrophy with reduced colloidal contents at PND 18. The dyshormonogenesis and thyroid dysgenesis may be attributed to the elevation of DNA fragmentation at PNDs 17 and 18. Furthermore, this hypothyroid state revealed higher (P<0.01) serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor and lower (P<0.01) serum concentrations of IGF1 and insulin at both PNDs compared with the control group. Interestingly, the body weight of the neonates in the PCB 95 group exhibited severe decreases throughout the experimental period in relation to that of the control group. These results imply that PCB 95 may act as a disruptor of the developmental hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hypothyroidism caused by PCB 95 may impair the adipokine axis, fat metabolism, and in general postnatal development. Thus, further studies need to be carried out to understand this concept. PMID:24167152

  4. Activation of the Maternal Immune System Induces Endocrine Changes in the Placenta via IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Elaine Y.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the maternal immune system in rodent models sets in motion a cascade of molecular pathways that ultimately result in autism- and schizophrenia-related behaviors in offspring. The finding that interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a crucial mediator of these effects led us to examine the mechanism by which this cytokine influences fetal development in vivo. Here we focus on the placenta as the site of direct interaction between mother and fetus and as a principal modulator of fetal development. We find that maternal immune activation (MIA) with a viral mimic, synthetic double-stranded RNA (poly(I:C)), increases IL-6 mRNA as well as maternally-derived IL-6 protein in the placenta. Placentas from MIA mothers exhibit increases in CD69+ decidual macrophages, granulocytes and uterine NK cells, indicating elevated early immune activation. Maternally-derived IL-6 mediates activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway specifically in the spongiotrophoblast layer of the placenta, which results in expression of acute phase genes. Importantly, this parallels an IL-6-dependent disruption of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis that is characterized by decreased GH, IGFI and IGFBP3 levels. In addition, we observe an IL-6-dependent induction in pro-lactin-like protein-K (PLP-K) expression as well as MIA-related alterations in other placental endocrine factors. Together, these IL-6-mediated effects of MIA on the placenta represent an indirect mechanism by which MIA can alter fetal development. PMID:21195166

  5. Early weaning PCB 95 exposure alters the neonatal endocrine system: thyroid adipokine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that can severely disrupt the endocrine system. In the present study, early-weaned male rats were administered a single dose of 2,3,6-2',5'-pentachlorinated biphenyl (PCB 95; 32 mg/kg per day, by i.p. injection) for two consecutive days (postnatal days (PNDs) 15 and 16) and killed 24 and 48 h after the administration of the last dose. Compared with the control group, administration of PCB 95 induced a reduction (P<0.01) in serum concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and GH and an increase (P<0.01) in the serum concentration of TSH at PNDs 17 and 18. These conspicuous perturbations led to some histopathological deterioration in the thyroid gland characterized by follicular degeneration, edema, fibrosis, hemorrhage, luminal obliteration, and hypertrophy with reduced colloidal contents at PND 18. The dyshormonogenesis and thyroid dysgenesis may be attributed to the elevation of DNA fragmentation at PNDs 17 and 18. Furthermore, this hypothyroid state revealed higher (P<0.01) serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor and lower (P<0.01) serum concentrations of IGF1 and insulin at both PNDs compared with the control group. Interestingly, the body weight of the neonates in the PCB 95 group exhibited severe decreases throughout the experimental period in relation to that of the control group. These results imply that PCB 95 may act as a disruptor of the developmental hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hypothyroidism caused by PCB 95 may impair the adipokine axis, fat metabolism, and in general postnatal development. Thus, further studies need to be carried out to understand this concept.

  6. Characterization of the vitamin D endocrine system in human sebocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Christina; Seltmann, Holger; Seifert, Markus; Tilgen, Wolfgang; Zouboulis, Christos C; Reichrath, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Sebocytes are sebum-producing cells that form the sebaceous glands. We investigated the role of sebocytes as target cells for vitamin D metabolites and the existence of an enzymatic machinery for the local synthesis and metabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3), calcitriol], the biologically active vitamin D metabolite, in these cell types. Expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR), vitamin D-25-hydroxylase (25 OHase), 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (1 alphaOHase), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24 OHase) was detected in SZ95 sebocytes in vitro using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Splice variants of 1alphaOHase were identified by nested touchdown polymerase chain reaction. We demonstrated that incubation of SZ95 sebocytes with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) resulted in a cell culture condition-, time-, and dose-dependent modulation of cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, lipid content and interleukin-6/interleukin-8 secretion in vitro. RNA expression of VDR and 24 OHase was upregulated along with vitamin D analogue treatment. Although several other splice variants of 1alphaOHase were detected, our findings indicate that the full length product represents the major 1 alphaOHase gene product in SZ95 cells. In conclusion, SZ95 sebocytes express VDR and the enzymatic machinery to synthesize and metabolize biologically active vitamin D analogues. Sebocytes represent target cells for biologically active metabolites. Our findings indicate that the vitamin D endocrine system is of high importance for sebocyte function and physiology. We conclude that sebaceous glands represent potential targets for therapy with vitamin D analogues or for pharmacological modulation of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) synthesis/metabolism.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A TEST SYSTEM TO EVALUATE ENDOCRINE EFFECTS IN BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of the process and status of the development of one and two generation Japanese quail reproduction studies for regulatory use will be presented from the perspective of members of the subgroup of the OECD Expert Group on Assessment of Endocrine Disrupting Effects in Bi...

  8. Conserved genetic pathways controlling the development of the diffuse endocrine system in vertebrates and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L

    2010-05-01

    The midgut epithelium is formed by absorptive enterocytes, secretory cells and endocrine cells. Each of these lineages is derived from the pluripotent progenitors that constitute the embryonic endoderm; the mature midgut retains pools of self-renewing stem cells that continue to produce all lineages. Recent findings in vertebrates and Drosophila shed light on the genetic mechanism that specifies the fate of the different lineages. A pivotal role is played by the Notch signaling pathway that, in a manner that appears to be very similar to the way in which Notch signaling selects neural progenitors within the neurectoderm, distinguishes the fate of secretory/endocrine cells and enterocytes. Proneural genes encoding bHLH transcription factors are expressed and required in prospective endocrine cells; activation of the Notch pathways restricts the number of these cells and promotes enterocyte development. In this review we compare the development of the intestinal endocrine cells in vertebrates and insects and summarize recent findings dealing with genetic pathways controlling this cell type.

  9. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS: A REVIEW OF SOME SOURCES, EFFECTS, AND MECHANISMS OF ACTIONS ON BEHAVIOR AND NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Frye, C.; Bo, E.; Calamandrei, G.; Calzà, L.; Dessì-Fulgheri, F.; Fernández, M.; Fusani, L.; Kah, O.; Kajta, M.; Le Page, Y.; Patisaul, H.B.; Venerosi, A.; Wojtowicz, A.K.; Panzica, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some environmental contaminants interact with hormones and may exert adverse consequences due to their actions as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Exposure in people is typically due to contamination of the food chain, inhalation of contaminated house dust, or occupational exposure. EDCs include pesticides and herbicides (such as diphenyl-dichloro-trichloroethane, DDT, or its metabolites), methoxychlor, biocides, heat stabilizers and chemical catalysts (such as tributyltin, TBT), plastic contaminants (e.g. bisphenol A, BPA), pharmaceuticals (i.e. diethylstilbestrol, DES; 17alpha-ethynilestradiol, EE2), or dietary components (such as phytoestrogens). The goal of this review is to address sources, effects and actions of EDCs, with an emphasis on topics discussed at the International Congress on Steroids and the Nervous System. EDCs may alter reproductively-relevant or non-reproductive, sexually-dimorphic behaviors. In addition, EDCs may have significant effects on neurodevelopmental processes, influencing morphology of sexually-dimorphic cerebral circuits. Exposure to EDCs is more dangerous if it occurs during specific “critical periods” of life, such as intrauterine, perinatal, juvenile or puberty periods, when organisms are more sensitive to hormonal disruption, than in other periods. However, exposure to EDCs in adulthood also can alter physiology. Several EDCs are xenoestrogens, may alter serum lipid concentrations, or metabolism enzymes that are necessary for converting cholesterol to steroid hormones, ultimately altering production of E2 and/or other steroids. Finally, many EDCs may have actions via, or independent of, classic actions at cognate steroid receptors. EDCs may have effects through numerous other substrates, such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), signal transduction pathways, calcium influx, and/or neurotransmitter receptors. Thus, EDCs, from varied

  10. Thyroid endocrine status of wild European eels (Anguilla anguilla) in the Loire (France). Relationships with organic contaminant body burdens.

    PubMed

    Couderc, M; Marchand, J; Zalouk-Vergnoux, A; Kamari, A; Moreau, B; Blanchet-Letrouvé, I; Le Bizec, B; Mouneyrac, C; Poirier, L

    2016-04-15

    In teleost fish, thyroid function is involved in various critical physiological processes. Given the complexity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, a large number of genes and proteins can be the potential target of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, in yellow and silver European eels (Anguilla anguilla), potential effects of EDCs on thyroid status by analyzing the associations between EDC body burdens and thyroid hormones (THs). In yellow individuals, greater free T3/T4 ratios (FT3/FT4) and lower plasma FT4 levels were associated with greater concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), as highlighted by significant correlations with many congeners. Few positive relationships with alkylphenols were noticed. In contrast, silver eels usually exhibited less significant correlations between THs and contaminant loads. Expression of a series of genes involved in the HPT axis was also investigated in the silver individuals. Concerning mRNA expression in silver females, some main correlations were noticed: thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHβ) gene expression was significantly correlated to numerous PCBs, and hepatic mRNA levels of deiodinase 2 (Deio 2) were negatively correlated to 2-hydroxyfluorene (2-OHF) and 2-naphtol (2-OHNa). Thyroid receptor (TRα and TRβ) mRNA levels exhibited weak negative correlations with some PBDEs in silver females and males. Hepatic vitellogenin (Vtg) mRNA levels were detected in all silver males but at lower levels than in silver females. In males, Vtg mRNA levels were positively associated to FT4/TT4. In silver females, strong positive correlations were found between congeners of PCBs, PBDEs and PFAS suggesting potential estrogenic effects. Overall, the observed results indicate that several organic contaminants, mainly dl-, ndl-PCBs and PBDEs, could be associated with changes in thyroid homeostasis in these fish, via direct or indirect

  11. Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Chappell, V A; Fenton, S E; Flaws, J A; Nadal, A; Prins, G S; Toppari, J; Zoeller, R T

    2015-12-01

    This Executive Summary to the Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) provides a synthesis of the key points of the complete statement. The full Scientific Statement represents a comprehensive review of the literature on seven topics for which there is strong mechanistic, experimental, animal, and epidemiological evidence for endocrine disruption, namely: obesity and diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer, thyroid, and neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. EDCs such as bisphenol A, phthalates, pesticides, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diethyl ethers, and dioxins were emphasized because these chemicals had the greatest depth and breadth of available information. The Statement also included thorough coverage of studies of developmental exposures to EDCs, especially in the fetus and infant, because these are critical life stages during which perturbations of hormones can increase the probability of a disease or dysfunction later in life. A conclusion of the Statement is that publications over the past 5 years have led to a much fuller understanding of the endocrine principles by which EDCs act, including nonmonotonic dose-responses, low-dose effects, and developmental vulnerability. These findings will prove useful to researchers, physicians, and other healthcare providers in translating the science of endocrine disruption to improved public health. PMID:26414233

  12. Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Chappell, V A; Fenton, S E; Flaws, J A; Nadal, A; Prins, G S; Toppari, J; Zoeller, R T

    2015-12-01

    This Executive Summary to the Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) provides a synthesis of the key points of the complete statement. The full Scientific Statement represents a comprehensive review of the literature on seven topics for which there is strong mechanistic, experimental, animal, and epidemiological evidence for endocrine disruption, namely: obesity and diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer, thyroid, and neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. EDCs such as bisphenol A, phthalates, pesticides, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diethyl ethers, and dioxins were emphasized because these chemicals had the greatest depth and breadth of available information. The Statement also included thorough coverage of studies of developmental exposures to EDCs, especially in the fetus and infant, because these are critical life stages during which perturbations of hormones can increase the probability of a disease or dysfunction later in life. A conclusion of the Statement is that publications over the past 5 years have led to a much fuller understanding of the endocrine principles by which EDCs act, including nonmonotonic dose-responses, low-dose effects, and developmental vulnerability. These findings will prove useful to researchers, physicians, and other healthcare providers in translating the science of endocrine disruption to improved public health.

  13. The Endocrine Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillman, David

    1987-01-01

    Promotes a reductionist approach to teaching about the endocrine system in high school biology and anatomy courses. Encourages the study of how hormones travel to the cells and affect them. Provides suggestions for activities and discussion questions, along with sample diagrams and flow charts. (TW)

  14. Developmental effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wildlife and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T. ); vom Saal, F.S. ); Soto, A.M. )

    1993-10-01

    Large numbers and large quantities of endoncrine-disrupting chemicals have been released into the environment since World War II. Many of these chemicals can disturb development of the endocrine system and of the organs that respond to endocrine signals in organisms indirectly exposed during prenatal and/or early postnatal life; effects of exposure during development are permanent and irreversible. The risk to the developing organism can also stem from direct exposure of the offspring after birth or hatching. In addition, trangenerational exposure can result from the exposure of the mother to a chemical at any time throughout her life before producing offspring due to persistent of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in body fat, which is mobilized during egg laying or pregnancy and lactation. Mechanisms underlying the disruption of the development of vital systems, such as the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, are discussed with reference to wildlife, laboratory animals, and humans.

  15. Endocrine Function In Naturally Long-Living Small Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Buffenstein, Rochelle; Pinto, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The complex, highly integrative endocrine system regulates all aspects of somatic maintenance and reproduction and has been widely implicated as an important determinant of longevity in short-lived traditional model organisms of aging research. Genetic or experimental manipulation of hormone profiles in mice has been proven to definitively alter longevity. These hormonally induced lifespan extension mechanisms may not necessarily be relevant to humans and other long-lived organisms that naturally show successful slow aging. Long-lived species may have evolved novel anti-aging defenses germane to naturally retarding the aging process. Here we examine the available endocrine data associated with the vitamin D, insulin, grlucocorticoid and thyroid endocrine systems of naturally long-living small mammals. Generally, long-living rodents and bats maintain tightly regulated lower basal levels of these key pleiotropic hormones than shorter-lived rodents. Similarities with genetically manipulated suggest that evolutionarily wellconserved hormonal mechanisms are integrally involved in lifespan determination. PMID:18674586

  16. Application of Molecular Pathology in Endocrine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Linke, Ebru Serinsoz; Tezel, Gaye Güler

    2015-01-01

    Rapid growth in knowledge of cell and molecular biology led to the increased usage of molecular techniques in anatomical pathology. This is also due to the advances achieved in the techniques introduced in the last few years which are less laborious as compared to the techniques used at the beginning of the "molecular era". The initial assays were also very expensive and were not performed except for selected centers. Moreover, the clinicians were not sure how to make use of the accumulating molecular information. That situation has also changed and molecular techniques are being performed in a wide variety of medical settings which also has a reflection on the endocrine system pathology among other organ systems. This review will provide an update of genetic changes observed in different endocrine system pathologies and their diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic values.

  17. The unique endocrine milieu of the fetus.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, D A

    1986-01-01

    Table II summarizes in tabular form the major features of the fetal endocrine milieu discussed in the foregoing pages. The mammalian fetus develops in an environment where respiration, alimentation, and excretory functions are provided by the placenta. Fetal tissue metabolism is oriented largely to anabolism; body temperature is modulated by maternal metabolism, and fetal tissue thermogenesis is maintained at a basal level. Tissue and organ growth appear to be regulated by growth factors which probably function by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms during most of gestation (72, 146-148). In this milieu conventional endocrine control systems are largely redundant, and other transient systems more appropriate to the intrauterine environment have evolved. We have developed some insights into these systems, but much more information is necessary before we can truly understand this fascinating environment. PMID:3018041

  18. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Axelstad, Marta; Christiansen, Sofie; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Hass, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalates, pesticides, u.v.-filters, bisphenol A, parabens, and the drug paracetamol. The groups received vehicle (control), a mixture of all 13 chemicals at 150-times (TotalMix150) or 450-times (TotalMix450) high-end human exposure, or 450-times a mixture of nine predominantly anti-androgenic chemicals (AAMix450). Onset of puberty and estrous cyclicity at 9 and 12 months of age were assessed. Few female offspring showed significantly regular estrus cyclicity at 12 months of age in the TotalMix450 and AAMix450 groups compared with controls. In 19-month-old male offspring, epididymal sperm counts were lower than controls, and in ventral prostate an overrepresentation of findings related to hyperplasia was observed in exposed groups compared with controls, particularly in the group dosed with anti-androgens. A higher incidence of pituitary adenoma at 19 months of age was found in males and females in the AAMix450 group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence of pituitary tumors. These delayed effects highlight the need for further studies on the role of endocrine disrupters in hormone-related disorders in aging humans.

  19. Aging of the brain-testicular axis: reproductive systems of healthy old male rats with or without endocrine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Bardgett, M; Farr, S; Humphrey, W; Womack, S; Weiss, J

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that endocrine declines in males are incidental to disease, 24 gonadally intact old (22-24 months) rats were selected on the basis of good general health and assigned to one of three groups. One group of aged males was left untreated for comparison with an untreated control group of young adult males. Results from multiple measures of sociosexual behavior and reproductive physiology indicated that endocrine declines in males are not simply a by-product of increased disease incidence with aging. The untreated old animals showed clear decrements on all 13 measures of hypothalamic-pituitary- testicular (HPT) activity. The other two groups of old males were used to compare responsiveness of the aging HPT axis in healthy males to supplements with a typical exogenous (ExT) androgen regimen (300 micrograms testosterone/kg body wt/SC/daily/6 weeks) or to social stimulation (brief daily exposure to an inaccessible estrous female) for additional episodes of endogenous (EnT) hormone. Neither treatment restored our disease-free old male rats to levels approximating those of untreated young adults. Nonetheless, both treatments activated the aging HPT axis. EnT males showed increases in sociosexual behaviors, growth of androgen-sensitive bulbospongiosus muscle, and elevation of epididymal sperm reserves. ExT males, on the other hand, experienced a more foreboding hypertrophy of the ventral prostate gland. Our conclusion is that endocrine aging in males is ubiquitous and inevitable. Still, aged androgen-sensitive systems of healthy old rats retain notable capacity, particularly, for endogenous activation. Evidence points to functional responses by healthy aged males to the presence of sexually receptive females that, although not quantitatively the same, are qualitatively similar to the responses of young adult males.

  20. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Degen, Gisela H; Dekant, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Daniel; Domingo, Jose L; Gori, Gio Batta; Greim, Helmuth; Hengstler, Jan G; Kacew, Sam; Marquardt, Hans; Pelkonen, Olavi; Savolainen, Kai; Vermeulen, Nico P

    2015-07-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can be subjected to the well-evaluated health risk characterization approach used for many years including adverse outcome pathways. Many of the points arguing for a specific approach for risk characterization of chemicals with hormonal activity are based on highly speculative conclusions. These conclusions are not well supported when evaluating the available information.

  1. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish. PMID:26057477

  2. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish.

  3. Effect of endocrine disrupters on photosystem II energy fluxes of green algae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Perron, Marie-Claude; Juneau, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Among the numerous toxics found in the aquatic environment, endocrine disrupters can interfere with the normal functioning of the endocrine system of several organisms, leading to important consequences. Even if algae and cyanobacteria are non-target organisms without endocrine system, our goals were to verify if endocrine disrupters can affect photosynthetic activity and how energy flows through photosystem II (PSII) were altered. To reach these objectives, we exposed, for 15 min, two green algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC125, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata strain CPCC37) and a toxic and a non-toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa (CPCC299 and CPCC632 respectively) to 4-octylphenol, 4-nonylphenol and β-estradiol at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 5 μg/mL. We have shown for the first time that endocrine disrupters may have drastic effects on PSII energy fluxes. Furthermore, we showed that various species have different sensitivity to endocrine disrupters. P. subcapitata was tolerant to each endocrine disrupter tested, while flows of energy through PSII were affected similarly, but at different extent, for the other species. Cyanobacterial PSII energy fluxes were more affected than green algae, suggesting that the prokaryotic characteristics of these organisms are responsible of their high sensitivity.

  4. The development and endocrine functions of adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White adipose tissue is a mesenchymal tissue that begins developing in the fetus. Classically known for storing the body’s fuel reserves, adipose tissue is now recognized as an endocrine organ. As such, the secretions from adipose tissue are known to affect several systems such as the vascular and...

  5. The origins of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) endocrine systems: new insights from lampreys.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Freamat, Mihael; Kavanaugh, Scott I

    2009-03-01

    The acquisition of a hypothalamic-pituitary axis was a seminal event in vertebrate evolution leading to the neuroendocrine control of many complex functions including growth, reproduction, osmoregulation, stress and metabolism. Lampreys as basal vertebrates are the earliest evolved vertebrates for which there are demonstrated functional roles for two gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) that act via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controlling reproductive processes. With the availability of the lamprey genome, we have identified a novel GnRH form (lamprey GnRH-II) and a novel glycoprotein hormone receptor, lGpH-R II (thyroid-stimulating hormone-like receptor). Based on functional studies, in situ hybridization and phylogenetic analysis, we hypothesize that the newly identified lamprey GnRH-II is an ancestral GnRH to the vertebrate GnRHs. This finding opens a new understanding of the GnRH family and can help to delineate the evolution of the complex neuro/endocrine axis of reproduction. A second glycoprotein hormone receptor (lGpH-R II) was also identified in the sea lamprey. The existing data suggest the existence of a primitive, overlapping yet functional HPG and HPT endocrine systems in this organism, involving one possibly two pituitary glycoprotein hormones and two glycoprotein hormone receptors as opposed to three or four glycoprotein hormones interacting specifically with three receptors in gnathostomes. We hypothesize that the glycoprotein hormone/glycoprotein hormone receptor systems emerged as a link between the neuro-hormonal and peripheral control levels during the early stages of gnathostome divergence. The significance of the results obtained by analysis of the HPG/T axes in sea lamprey may transcend the limited scope of the corresponding physiological compartments by providing important clues in respect to the interplay between genome-wide events (duplications), coding sequence (mutation) and expression control level evolutionary mechanisms

  6. Bioconcentration and metabolism of BDE-209 in the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and impact on the thyroid endocrine system and neuronal development in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiangwei; Chen, Qi; Zhou, Peng; Li, Wenwen; Wang, Junxia; Huang, Changjiang; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Kuangfei; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2014-08-01

    Interactions between organic toxicants and nanoparticles (NPs) in the aquatic environment may modify toxicant bioavailability and consequently the toxicant's environmental fate and toxicity. Therefore, we investigated the influence of titanium dioxide NPs (nano-TiO2) on deca-BDE (BDE-209; a polybrominated diphenyl ether congener) bioconcentration, metabolism and its effects on the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to various concentrations of BDE-209 alone or in combination with nano-TiO2 (0.1 mg/L) until 7-day post-fertilization. Nano-TiO2 can adsorb BDE-209 and nano-TiO2 is taken up into developing zebrafish larvae. Chemical measurements showed that BDE-209 was bioconcentrated and metabolized in zebrafish larvae, and BDE-209 uptake was enhanced by nano-TiO2. Furthermore, increased BDE-209 metabolites were detected in larvae co-exposed with nano-TiO2. BDE-209 exposure significantly increased whole-body thyroid hormone contents (T3 and T4); T4 content significantly increased in the larvae co-exposed with nano-TiO2. Nano-TiO2 exposure alone did not induce generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidative oxidation, gene transcription or thyroid hormone levels. Upregulation of several gene transcriptions (tshβ, tg, dio2) in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis was also observed. Furthermore, co-exposure of nano-TiO2 and BDE-209 caused a decrease in locomotion activity and downregulation of specific genes and proteins involved in the central nervous system of developing zebrafish larvae (e.g. myelin basic protein and α1-tubulin). These results indicate nano-TiO2 enhances BDE-209 bioavailability and metabolism, leading to thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

  7. Assessment of the effects of the carbamazepine on the endogenous endocrine system of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, A L; Floro, A M; Palma, P

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the endocrine activity of the antiepileptic pharmaceutical carbamazepine (CBZ) in the crustacean Daphnia magna was assessed. To assess the hormonal activity of the drug, we exposed maternal daphnids and embryos to environmental relevant concentrations of CBZ (ranging from 10 to 200 μg/L) and to mixtures of CBZ with fenoxycarb (FEN; 1 μg/L). Chronic exposure to CBZ significantly decreased the reproductive output and the number of molts of D. magna at 200 μg/L. This compound induced the production of male offspring (12 ± 1.7 %), in a non-concentration-dependent manner, acting as a weak juvenile hormone analog. Results showed that this substance, at tested concentrations, did not antagonize the juvenoid action of FEN. Further, CBZ has shown to be toxic to daphnid embryos through maternal exposure interfering with their normal gastrulation and organogenesis stages but not producing direct embryo toxicity. These findings suggest that CBZ could act as an endocrine disruptor in D. magna as it decreases the reproductive output, interferes with sex determination, and causes development abnormality in offspring. Therefore, CBZ could directly affect the population sustainability. PMID:27225007

  8. Assessment of the effects of the carbamazepine on the endogenous endocrine system of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, A L; Floro, A M; Palma, P

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the endocrine activity of the antiepileptic pharmaceutical carbamazepine (CBZ) in the crustacean Daphnia magna was assessed. To assess the hormonal activity of the drug, we exposed maternal daphnids and embryos to environmental relevant concentrations of CBZ (ranging from 10 to 200 μg/L) and to mixtures of CBZ with fenoxycarb (FEN; 1 μg/L). Chronic exposure to CBZ significantly decreased the reproductive output and the number of molts of D. magna at 200 μg/L. This compound induced the production of male offspring (12 ± 1.7 %), in a non-concentration-dependent manner, acting as a weak juvenile hormone analog. Results showed that this substance, at tested concentrations, did not antagonize the juvenoid action of FEN. Further, CBZ has shown to be toxic to daphnid embryos through maternal exposure interfering with their normal gastrulation and organogenesis stages but not producing direct embryo toxicity. These findings suggest that CBZ could act as an endocrine disruptor in D. magna as it decreases the reproductive output, interferes with sex determination, and causes development abnormality in offspring. Therefore, CBZ could directly affect the population sustainability.

  9. [Endocrine hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takeda, R

    1993-03-01

    Endocrine Hypertension, is, in a narrow sense, defined as adrenal hypertension, including mainly pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, a syndrome of primary aldosteronism and it's related mineralocorticoid excess disorders. In memory of a great contribution to hypertensiology by the late Prof. Murakami, who was the first author to write on pheochromocytoma in Japan, this paper is dedicated to reviewing the current status of adrenal hypertension in Japan from the epidemiological viewpoint, putting emphasis upon the clinical characteristics of aged patients with adrenal hypertension. Secondly, some topics in the research field of each adrenal hypertension are briefly introduced. Thirdly, our recent data are presented, showing 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-HSD) mRNA expression in resistance vessels and decreased 11 beta-HSD activities in vessels in SHR which supports the hypothesis that there might exist a subtype identified as partial impairment of 11 beta-HSD in patients with essential hypertension. PMID:8331819

  10. Endocrine Proxies Can Simplify Endocrine Complexity to Enable Evolutionary Prediction.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Goggy

    2016-08-01

    It is well understood that much of evolutionary change is mediated through the endocrine system with growing interest to identify how this occurs. This however, causes a conflict of sorts. To understand endocrine mechanism, a focus on detail is required. In contrast, to understand evolutionary change, reduction to a few key traits is essential. Endocrine proxies, measurable traits that accurately reflect specific hormonal titers or the timing of specific hormonal events, can reduce endocrine complexity to a few traits that enable predictions of how the endocrine system regulates evolutionary change. In the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta, Sphingidae), three endocrine proxies, measured on 5470 individuals, were used to test explicit predictions of how the endocrine system regulates the response to 10 generations of simultaneous selection on body size and development time. The critical weight (CW) reflects the variation in the cessation of juvenile hormone (JH) secretion in the last larval instar, the interval to cessation of growth (ICG) reflects the variation in prothoracicotropic hormone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Growth rate (GR) reflects the nutrient signaling pathways, primarily the insulin and TOR This is a standard identity similar to DNA signaling pathways. These three endocrine proxies explained 99% and 93% of the variation in body size and development time, respectively, following the 10 generations of simultaneous selection. When the two focal traits, body size and development time, were selected in the same direction, both to either increase or both to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the CW and the ICG, proxies for the developmental hormones JH and 20E, and constrained by GR. In contrast, when the two focal traits were selected in opposite directions, one to increase and the other to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the insulin and TOR signaling pathways as measured by their proxy, GR, and

  11. Endocrine Proxies Can Simplify Endocrine Complexity to Enable Evolutionary Prediction.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Goggy

    2016-08-01

    It is well understood that much of evolutionary change is mediated through the endocrine system with growing interest to identify how this occurs. This however, causes a conflict of sorts. To understand endocrine mechanism, a focus on detail is required. In contrast, to understand evolutionary change, reduction to a few key traits is essential. Endocrine proxies, measurable traits that accurately reflect specific hormonal titers or the timing of specific hormonal events, can reduce endocrine complexity to a few traits that enable predictions of how the endocrine system regulates evolutionary change. In the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta, Sphingidae), three endocrine proxies, measured on 5470 individuals, were used to test explicit predictions of how the endocrine system regulates the response to 10 generations of simultaneous selection on body size and development time. The critical weight (CW) reflects the variation in the cessation of juvenile hormone (JH) secretion in the last larval instar, the interval to cessation of growth (ICG) reflects the variation in prothoracicotropic hormone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Growth rate (GR) reflects the nutrient signaling pathways, primarily the insulin and TOR This is a standard identity similar to DNA signaling pathways. These three endocrine proxies explained 99% and 93% of the variation in body size and development time, respectively, following the 10 generations of simultaneous selection. When the two focal traits, body size and development time, were selected in the same direction, both to either increase or both to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the CW and the ICG, proxies for the developmental hormones JH and 20E, and constrained by GR. In contrast, when the two focal traits were selected in opposite directions, one to increase and the other to decrease, the response to selection was determined primarily by the insulin and TOR signaling pathways as measured by their proxy, GR, and

  12. [Novel methods and their applicability in the evaluation of the genetic background of endocrine system tumours].

    PubMed

    Patócs, Attila; Likó, István; Butz, Henriett; Baghy, Kornélia; Rácz, Károly

    2015-12-20

    The technical developments leading to revolution in clinical genetic testing offer new approaches for patients with cancer. From one mutation or one gene approach the scale of genetic testing moved to whole exome or whole genome scale. It is well known that many tumours are genetically determined and they are part of familial tumour syndromes. In addition, some mutations indicate specific molecular targeted therapies. Although sampling and sample preparation are different for testing germline and somatic mutations, the technical background of the analysis is the same. The aim of clinical genetic testing is to identify patients who are carriers of disease-causing mutations or to test tumour tissue for the presence of genetic alterations which may be targets for therapeutic approaches. In this review the authors summarize novel possibilities offered by next-generation sequencing in clinical genetic testing of patients with endocrine tumours. In addition, the authors review recent guidelines on technical and ethical issues related to these novel methods.

  13. Development of an in vitro Ovary Culture System to Evaluate Endocrine Disruption in Wood Frog Tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Vu, Maria; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan Manuel; Trudeau, Vance L

    2015-01-01

    Gonad-mesonephros complexes from wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles were incubated in vitro for 1 wk to examine direct effects of naphthenic acids (NA) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on ovarian differentiation. Histological images reveal successful preservation of gonadal integrity where cultured oocytes exhibited no significant differences in diameters and areas compared to uncultured conditions. Ovaries exposed to 10 μg/L 17α-EE2 contained oocytes with significantly advanced atresia and diminished areas and diameters, indicating a degree of ovarian regression. A significant reduction in oocyte area was observed in ovaries exposed to 3 mg/L of a commercial extract of petroleum-derived NA. This novel approach has applications for screening direct effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gonadal function in tadpoles. PMID:26383587

  14. Development of SPR Immunosensing System Using Microchannel Cell for Simultaneous Detection of Several Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Norio; K. Vengatajalabathy, Gobi; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Maeda, Hideaki; Kawazumi, Hirofumi; Iwasaka, Hiroyuki

    The endocrine-disrupting chemicals affect the functioning of hormones of animals and are called “environmental hormones". They exist in various environments at very low concentrations in the range of ppt to ppb levels. Thus, highly sensitive determination of environmental hormones with high selectivity is indispensable in regulating the ecosystem, and the instrumentation that allows the on-site analysis of environmental hormones is paid much attention. In this research project, we are aiming at development of new optical immunosensing system for highly sensitive, selective, on-site and simultaneous detection of several environmental hormones at low cost. We report here the results of our research investigations on application of immunosensing technique to highly sensitive detection of environmental hormones, preparation of monoclonal antibodies, fabrication of the microchannel, miniaturization of the surface-plasmon-resonance detector, design of the compact total-sensing-system.

  15. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals from leather industry effluents on male reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Majumdar, Chandrajeetbalo; Roy, Partha

    2008-09-01

    The leather tanning industry is characterized by the production of different kinds of effluents, generated in each step of leather processing. These effluents have various chemical compounds which may cause toxicity and endocrine disruption and are thus known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). This study was aimed to examine the androgenic potential of leather industry effluents collected from northern region of India. Hershberger assay data showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in the weight and structure of sex accessory tissues of castrated rats. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated a significant change (p<0.05) in the expression patterns of the major steroidogenic enzymes in adrenal and testes namely, cytochrome P450scc, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydorgenase in castrated and intact rats. This was further supported by increased enzymatic activities measured in vitro spectrophotometrically. Serum hormone profile demonstrated a dose dependent increase in testicular and adrenal testosterone productions in intact and castrated rats, respectively. This was further supported by decreased level of gonadotrophic hormones (LH and FSH) in treated groups of animals. Further, the effluent treatment resulted in the development of hyperplasia in seminiferous tubules of testes in treated rats as evident from histopathological studies and about two-fold increases in daily sperm production. On analysis of water samples using GC-MS, it was found to contain various aromatic compounds (nonylphenol, hexaclrobenzene and several azo dyes) some of which independently demonstrated similar effects as shown by water samples. Our data suggests that the effluents from leather industry have potential EDC demonstrating androgenic activities.

  16. N-acetyltransferase (nat) Is a Critical Conjunct of Photoperiodism between the Circadian System and Endocrine Axis in Antheraea pernyi

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jadwiga; Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takeda, Makio

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1923, the biology of photoperiodism remains a mystery in many ways. We sought the link connecting the circadian system to an endocrine switch, using Antheraea pernyi. PER-, CLK- and CYC-ir were co-expressed in two pairs of dorsolateral neurons of the protocerebrum, suggesting that these are the circadian neurons that also express melatonin-, NAT- and HIOMT-ir. The results suggest that a melatonin pathway is present in the circadian neurons. Melatonin receptor (MT2 or MEL-1B-R)-ir in PTTH-ir neurons juxtaposing clock neurons suggests that melatonin gates PTTH release. RIA showed a melatonin rhythm with a peak four hours after lights off in adult brain both under LD16∶8 (LD) and LD12∶12 (SD), and both the peak and the baseline levels were higher under LD than SD, suggesting a photoperiodic influence. When pupae in diapause were exposed to 10 cycles of LD, or stored at 4°C for 4 months under constant darkness, an increase of NAT activity was observed when PTTH released ecdysone. DNA sequence upstream of nat contained E-boxes to which CYC/CLK could bind, and nat transcription was turned off by clk or cyc dsRNA. dsRNANAT caused dysfunction of photoperiodism. dsRNAPER upregulated nat transcription as anticipated, based on findings in the Drosophila melanogaster circadian system. Transcription of nat, cyc and clk peaked at ZT12. RIA showed that dsRNANAT decreased melatonin while dsRNAPER increased melatonin. Thus nat, a clock controlled gene, is the critical link between the circadian clock and endocrine switch. MT-binding may release PTTH, resulting in termination of diapause. This study thus examined all of the basic functional units from the clock: a photoperiodic counter as an accumulator of mRNANAT, to endocrine switch for photoperiodism in A. pernyi showing this system is self-complete without additional device especially for photoperiodism. PMID:24667367

  17. Test concentration setting for fish in vivo endocrine screening assays.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Panter, Grace H; Weltje, Lennart; Thorpe, Karen L

    2013-08-01

    Fish in vivo screening methods to detect endocrine active substances, specifically interacting with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, have been developed by both the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA). In application of these methods, i.e. regulatory testing, this paper provides a proposal on the setting of test concentrations using all available acute and chronic data and also discusses the importance of avoiding the confounding effects of systemic toxicity on endocrine endpoints. This guidance is aimed at reducing the number of false positives and subsequently the number of inappropriate definitive vertebrate studies potentially triggered by effects consequent to systemic, rather than endocrine, toxicity. At the same time it provides a pragmatic approach that maximizes the probability of detecting an effect, if it exists, thus limiting the potential for false negative outcomes.

  18. Removal performance of nitrogen and endocrine-disrupting pesticides simultaneously in the enhanced biofilm system for polluted source water pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-Juan; Yang, Guang-Feng; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-10-01

    The removal performances of nitrogen and trace levels of endocrine-disrupting pesticides (cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos) were studied in the enhanced biofilm pretreatment system at various substrates concentrations and dissolve oxygen (DO) niches. No significant change of EDPs removal occurred with the increased feed of ammonia nitrogen in aerobic batch tests or nitrate in anaerobic batch reactors, but significantly enhanced via reed addition both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Simultaneously enhanced denitrification and EDPs removal were achieved in the anoxic niche with reed addition. The results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that new bands appeared, and some bands became more intense with the reed addition. Sequences analysis showed that the dominant species belonged to Methylophilaceae, Hyphomicrobium, Bacillus and Thauera, which were related to the nitrogen or EDPs removals. In addition, the growth of functional heterotrophic microbes may be promoted via reed addition. PMID:25164348

  19. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  20. Opioids and endocrine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine effects of opioids used for the management of persistent pain are poorly understood by clinicians and patients, and hormone levels are rarely measured. It is recognized that opioids exert this effect via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Additional effects on adrenal hormones, weight, blood pressure and bone density may also occur. Symptoms and signs of sex hormone deficiency occur in both men and women but are under-reported and are often clinically unrecognized. The potential effects of long term opioid therapy on the endocrine system should be explained to patients before opioid therapy is commenced. Monitoring of sex hormones is recommended; if there are deficiencies opioids should be tapered and withdrawn, if this is clinically acceptable. If opioid therapy has to continue, hormone replacement therapy should be initiated and monitored by an endocrinologist. PMID:26516462

  1. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens.

    PubMed

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-05-25

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity.

  2. Opioids and endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Oliver; Hester, Joan

    2012-02-01

    The endocrine effects of opioids used for the management of persistent pain are poorly understood by clinicians and patients, and hormone levels are rarely measured. It is recognized that opioids exert this effect via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Additional effects on adrenal hormones, weight, blood pressure and bone density may also occur. Symptoms and signs of sex hormone deficiency occur in both men and women but are under-reported and are often clinically unrecognized. The potential effects of long term opioid therapy on the endocrine system should be explained to patients before opioid therapy is commenced. Monitoring of sex hormones is recommended; if there are deficiencies opioids should be tapered and withdrawn, if this is clinically acceptable. If opioid therapy has to continue, hormone replacement therapy should be initiated and monitored by an endocrinologist.

  3. Endocrine Labomas

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Deep; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory endocrinology forms an integral part of 21st century endocrinology. Perhaps, no other specialty of medicine is as closely associated with laboratory as endocrinology. This review intends to highlight the challenges faced by an endocrinologist before interpreting a hormone assay report. This review by no means is holistic but intends to highlight some of the pitfalls of laboratory endocrinology and arouse further interest in this important but neglected section of endocrinology. Lack of standardization, as well as rigorous implementation is some of the major challenges facing endocrine assays in our country. It is essential to be aware not only of the details of the method of analysis of a hormone, the pre-analytical requisites, but also disease-specific analytical issues to prevent unnecessary concern both for the patient, as well as the treating physician, as well as needless investigations. Problems with interpretation of serum prolactin, thyroglobulin, steroid hormone assays, rennin assay and vitamin-D assay have been highlighted. PMID:23565398

  4. Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Law and science combine in the estimation of risks from endocrine disruptors (EDs) and actions for their regulation. For both, dose–response models are the causal link between exposure and probability (or percentage change) of adverse response. The evidence that leads to either regulations or judicial decrees is affected by uncertainty and limited knowledge, raising difficult policy issues that we enumerate and discuss. In the United States, some courts have dealt with EDs, but causation based on animal studies has been a stumbling block for plaintiffs seeking compensation, principally because those courts opt for epidemiological evidence. The European Union (EU) has several regulatory tools and ongoing research on the risks associated with bisphenol A, under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation and other regulations or directives. The integration of a vast (in kind and in scope) number of research papers into a statement of causation for either policy or to satisfy legal requirements, in both the United States and the EU, relies on experts. We outline the discursive dilemma and issues that may affect consensus-based results and a Bayesian causal approach that accounts for the evolution of information, yielding both value of information and flexibility associated with public choices. PMID:26740809

  5. The gut endocrine system as a coordinator of postprandial nutrient homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Fiona M

    2012-11-01

    Hormones from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are released following food ingestion and trigger a range of physiological responses including the coordination of appetite and glucose homoeostasis. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathways by which food ingestion triggers secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the altered patterns of gut hormone release observed following gastric bypass surgery. Our understanding of how ingested nutrients trigger secretion of these gut hormones has increased dramatically, as a result of physiological studies in human subjects and animal models and in vitro studies on cell lines and primary intestinal cultures. Specialised enteroendocrine cells located within the gut epithelium are capable of directly detecting a range of nutrient stimuli through a range of receptors and transporters. It is concluded that the arrival of nutrients at the apical surface of enteroendocrine cells is a major stimulus for gut hormone release, thereby coupling these endocrine signals to the arrival of absorbed nutrients in the bloodstream.

  6. The role of the endocrine system in feeding-induced tissue-specific circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miho; Murakami, Mariko; Node, Koichi; Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-07-24

    The circadian clock is entrained to environmental cycles by external cue-mediated phase adjustment. Although the light input pathway has been well defined, the mechanism of feeding-induced phase resetting remains unclear. The tissue-specific sensitivity of peripheral entrainment to feeding suggests the involvement of multiple pathways, including humoral and neuronal signals. Previous in vitro studies with cultured cells indicate that endocrine factors may function as entrainment cues for peripheral clocks. However, blood-borne factors that are well characterized in actual feeding-induced resetting have yet to be identified. Here, we report that insulin may be involved in feeding-induced tissue-type-dependent entrainment in vivo. In ex vivo culture experiments, insulin-induced phase shift in peripheral clocks was dependent on tissue type, which was consistent with tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, and peripheral entrainment in insulin-sensitive tissues involved PI3K- and MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. These results suggest that insulin may be an immediate early factor in feeding-mediated tissue-specific entrainment.

  7. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  8. An approach to the identification and regulation of endocrine disrupting pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ewence, Annette; Brescia, Susy; Johnson, Ian; Rumsby, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Recent decades have seen an increasing interest in chemicals that interact with the endocrine system and have the potential to alter the normal function of this system in humans and wildlife. Chemicals that produce adverse effects caused by interaction with endocrine systems are termed Endocrine Disrupters (EDs). This interest has led regulatory authorities around the world (including the European Union) to consider whether potential endocrine disrupters should be identified and assessed for effects on human health and wildlife and what harmonised criteria could be used for such an assessment. This paper reviews the results of a study whereby toxicity data relating to human health effects of 98 pesticides were assessed for endocrine disruption potential using a number of criteria including the Specific Target Organ Toxicity for repeat exposure (STOT-RE) guidance values used in the European Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulation. Of the pesticides assessed, 27% required further information in order to make a more definitive assessment, 14% were considered to be endocrine disrupters, more or less likely to pose a risk, and 59% were considered not to be endocrine disrupters.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and systemic endocrine effects of the phyto-oestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin after single oral doses to postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Rad, M; Hümpel, M; Schaefer, O; Schoemaker, R C; Schleuning, W-D; Cohen, A F; Burggraaf, J

    2006-01-01

    Aims Pre-clinical data suggest that the racemic phyto-oestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) may have beneficial effects in postmenopausal women and may become an alternative to classical hormone replacement therapy (HRT) treatment regimes. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, endocrine effects and tolerability of chemically synthesized 8-PN in postmenopausal women. Methods The study was performed using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation design with three groups of eight healthy postmenopausal women. In each group six subjects received 8-PN and two subjects placebo. 8-PN was given orally in doses of 50, 250 or 750 mg. Drug concentrations in serum, urine and faeces were measured up to 48 h and follicle-stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations up to 24 h. Results All treatments were well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of (drug unrelated) adverse events. Serum concentrations of free 8-PN showed rapid drug absorption and secondary peaks suggestive of marked enterohepatic recirculation. Independent of the treatment group, approximately 30% of the dose was recovered in excreta as free compound or conjugates over the 48-h observation period. The first Cmax and AUC0–48 h showed dose linearity with ratios of 1 : 4.5 : 13.6 (Cmax) and 1 : 5.2 : 17.1 (AUC). The 750- mg dose decreased LH concentrations by 16.7% (95% confidence interval 0.5, 30.2). Conclusion Single oral doses of up to 750 mg 8-PN were well tolerated by postmenopausal women. The pharmacokinetic profile of 8-PN was characterized by rapid and probably complete enteral absorption, high metabolic stability, pronounced enterohepatic recirculation and tight dose linearity. The decrease in LH serum concentrations found after the highest dose demonstrates the ability of 8-PN to exert systemic endocrine effects in postmenopausal women. PMID:16934044

  10. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  11. Enantioselective disruption of the endocrine system by Cis-Bifenthrin in the male mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Pan, Xiuhong; Miao, Wenyu; Lin, Xiaojian; Wang, Linggang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF), as a chiral pyrethroid, is widely used to control field and household pests in China. At present, the commercial BF is a mixed compound containing cis isomers (cis-BF) including two enantiomers of 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. In the present study, the two individual cis-BF enantiomers were separated by a preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. Then, four week-old adolescent male ICR mice were orally administered 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF separately daily for 3 weeks at doses of 0, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively. Results showed that the transcription status of some genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and transport as well as testosterone (T) synthesis in the testes were influenced by cis-BF enantiomers. Especially, we observed that the transcription status of key genes on the pathway of T synthesis including cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P45017α)) were selectively altered in the testis of mice when treated with 1S-cis-BF, suggesting that it is the possible reason to explain why the lower serum T concentration in 1S-cis-BF treated group. Taken together, it concluded that both of the cis-BF enantiomers have the endocrine disruption activities, while 1S-cis-BF was higher than 1R-cis-BF in mice when exposed during the puberty. The data was helpful to understand the toxicity of cis-BF in mammals under enantiomeric level.

  12. 76 FR 60022 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Weight-of-Evidence Guidance Document; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... the endocrine system. The combined results and information will also be used to identify which tests... AGENCY Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Weight-of-Evidence Guidance Document; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA's Endocrine...

  13. Endocrine disruption in aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kloas, Werner; Urbatzka, Ralph; Opitz, Robert; Würtz, Sven; Behrends, Thomas; Hermelink, Björn; Hofmann, Frauke; Jagnytsch, Oana; Kroupova, Hana; Lorenz, Claudia; Neumann, Nadja; Pietsch, Constanze; Trubiroha, Achim; Van Ballegooy, Christoph; Wiedemann, Caterina; Lutz, Ilka

    2009-04-01

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. The main sink of such substances, called endocrine disrupters (ED), are surface waters. Thus, aquatic vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, are most endangered. ED can adversely affect reproductive biology and the thyroid system. ED act by (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic modes of action, resulting in abnormal sexual differentiation and impaired reproduction. These effects are mainly driven by direct interferences of ED with sex steroid receptors rather than indirectly by impacting synthesis and bioavailability of sex steroids, which in turn might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Recent findings reveal that, in addition to the human-produced waste of ED, natural sources, such as parasites and decomposition of leaves, also might act as ED, markedly affecting sexual differentiation and reproduction in fish and amphibians. Although the thyroid system has essential functions in both fish and amphibians, amphibian metamorphosis has been introduced as the most sensitive model to detect thyroidal ED; no suitable fish model exists. Whereas ED may act primarily on only one specific endocrine target, all endocrine systems will eventually be deregulated as they are intimately connected to each other. The recent ecotoxicological issue of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) present in the aquatic environment indicates a high potential for further endocrine modes of action on aquatic vertebrates by ED derived from PhACs, such as glucocorticoids, progestins, and beta-agonists.

  14. Circadian rhythms and endocrine functions in adult insects.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Hazan, Esther; Rafaeli, Ada

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral and physiological processes in adult insects are influenced by both the endocrine and circadian systems, suggesting that these two key physiological systems interact. We reviewed the literature and found that experiments explicitly testing these interactions in adult insects have only been conducted for a few species. There is a shortage of measurements of hormone titers throughout the day under constant conditions even for the juvenile hormones (JHs) and ecdysteroids, the best studied insect hormones. Nevertheless, the available measurements of hormone titers coupled with indirect evidence for circadian modulation of hormone biosynthesis rate, and the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in hormone biosynthesis, binding or degradation are consistent with the hypothesis that the circulating levels of many insect hormones are influenced by the circadian system. Whole genome microarray studies suggest that the modulation of farnesol oxidase levels is important for the circadian regulation of JH biosynthesis in honey bees, mosquitoes, and fruit flies. Several studies have begun to address the functional significance of circadian oscillations in endocrine signaling. The best understood system is the circadian regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) titers which is important for the temporal organization of sexual behavior in female moths. The evidence that the circadian and endocrine systems interact has important implications for studies of insect physiology and behavior. Additional studies on diverse species and physiological processes are needed for identifying basic principles underlying the interactions between the circadian and endocrine systems in insects.

  15. Cancer and developmental exposure to endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2003-04-01

    Developing organisms have increased susceptibility to cancer if they are exposed to environmental toxicants during rapid growth and differentiation. Human studies have demonstrated clear increases in cancer after prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation, and there is suggestive evidence that brain tumors and leukemia are associated with parental exposures to chemicals. Animal experiments have demonstrated increased tumor formation induced by prenatal or neonatal exposure to a variety of chemicals, including direct-acting carcinogens and drugs. Recently, natural estrogens have been classified as known human carcinogens. Prenatal exposure to natural and synthetic estrogens is associated with increases in breast and vaginal tumors in humans as well as uterine tumors in animals. Synthetic halogenated chemicals increase liver tumors after early life-stage exposure. Recently, a prototypical endocrine-disrupting compound, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, has been shown to be a developmental toxicant of the mammary gland in rodents. Dioxin alters multiple endocrine systems, and its effects on the developing breast involve delayed proliferation and differentiation of the mammary gland, as well as an elongation of the window of sensitivity to potential carcinogens. Implications of these new findings suggest that causes of endocrine-related cancers or susceptibility to cancer may be a result of developmental exposures rather than exposures existing at or near the time of tumor detection.

  16. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on lead bioconcentration and toxicity on thyroid endocrine system and neuronal development in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wei; Zhu, Biran; Xiao, Xiaohong; Li, Ying; Dirbaba, Niguse Bekele; Zhou, Bingsheng; Wu, Hongjuan

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Interactions between heavy metals (e.g., Pb) and NPs in aquatic environments may modify the bioavailability and toxicity of heavy metals. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of NPs (e.g., nano-TiO2) on the bioavailability and toxicity of Pb and its effects in the thyroid endocrine and nervous systems of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Zebrafish embryos (2-h post-fertilization) were exposed to five concentrations of Pb alone (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30μg/L) or in combination with nano-TiO2 (0.1mg/L) until 6 days post-fertilization. Results showed that the bioconcentration of Pb was significantly enhanced when combined with nano-TiO2 than when used alone. Zebrafish exposure to Pb alone at 30μg/L significantly decreased the thyroid hormone levels (T4 and T3), whereas nano-TiO2 treatment alone did not produce detectable changes. The levels of T4 and T3 were further decreased when Pb was combined with nano-TiO2 than when used alone. The transcription of the thyroid hormone-related factor tg gene was remarkably down-regulated by Pb treatment alone but up-regulated when Pb was combined with nano-TiO2. The significant up-regulation of tshβ gene and the down-regulation of TTR gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid were observed in Pb with or without nano-TiO2 treatment groups. In addition, the transcription of genes involved in central nervous system (CNS) development (α-tubulin, mbp, gfap and shha) were significantly down-regulated by Pb and nano-TiO2 co-exposure as compared with Pb exposure alone. The locomotion activity analyzes confirmed that nano-TiO2 might enhance the toxicity of Pb to CNS development. These results suggest that nano-TiO2 increase bioconcentration of lead, which lead to the disruption of thyroid endocrine and neuronal system in zebrafish larvae.

  17. Dual Positive Regulation of Embryo Implantation by Endocrine and Immune Systems--Step-by-Step Maternal Recognition of the Developing Embryo.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeru; Daikoku, Takiko; Shigeta, Minoru; Kanzaki, Hideharu; Mori, Takahide

    2016-03-01

    In humans, HCG secreted from the implanting embryo stimulates progesterone production of the corpus luteum to maintain embryo implantation. Along with this endocrine system, current evidence suggests that the maternal immune system positively contributes to the embryo implantation. In mice, immune cells that have been sensitized with seminal fluid and then the developing embryo induce endometrial differentiation and promote embryo implantation. After hatching, HCG activates regulatory T and B cells through LH/HCG receptors and then stimulates uterine NK cells and monocytes through sugar chain receptors, to promote and maintain pregnancy. In accordance with the above, the intrauterine administration of HCG-treated PBMC was demonstrated to improve implantation rates in women with repeated implantation failures. These findings suggest that the maternal immune system undergoes functional changes by recognizing the developing embryos in a stepwise manner even from a pre-fertilization stage and facilitates embryo implantation in cooperation with the endocrine system. PMID:26755274

  18. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancerous (malignant) tumors or grow excessively without forming tumors. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are caused by ... This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names corticotropin H.P. ACTHAR GEL epinephrine ADRENALIN Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia ...

  19. Endocrine-Active Pharmaceuticals: An Environmental Concern?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, there has been growing interest in pharmaceuticals that are specifically designed to have endocrine activity, such as the estrogens used in birth control pills, exerting unintended effects on fish and other aquatic organisms. These pharmaceuticals may not be persistent...

  20. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Although these studies indicate that wastewater-treatment plant effluent is a conduit for endocrine active chemicals to surface waters, endocrine active chemicals also were present in surface waters with no obvious wastewater-treatment plant effluent sources. Endocrine active chemicals were detected and indicators of endocrine disruption in fish were measured at numerous sites upstream from discharge of wastewater-treatment plant effluent. These observations indicate that other unidentified sources of endocrine active chemicals exist, such as runoff from land surfaces, atmospheric deposition, inputs from onsite septic systems, or other groundwater sources. Alternatively, some endocrine active chemicals may not yet have been identified or measured. The presence of biological indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish indicates that the fish are exposed to endocrine active chemicals. However indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish does not indicate an effect on fish reproduction or changes in fish populations.

  1. Hypothesis: Musculin is a hormone secreted by skeletal muscle, the body's largest endocrine organ. Evidence for actions on the endocrine pancreas to restrain the beta-cell mass and to inhibit insulin secretion and on the hypothalamus to co-ordinate the neuroendocrine and appetite responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Engler, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that skeletal muscle may act as an endocrine organ by secreting interleukin-6 (IL-6) into the systemic circulation. From an analysis of the actions of IL-6 and of additional literature, we postulate that skeletal muscle also secretes an unidentified hormone, which we have named Musculin (Latin: musculus = muscle), which acts on the pancreatic beta-cell to restrain the size of the (beta-cell mass and to tonically inhibit insulin secretion and biosynthesis. It is suggested that the amount of Musculin secreted is determined by, and is positively correlated with, the prevailing insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle, thereby accounting for the hyperinsulinemia that occurs in insulin resistant disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and the polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition, it is postulated that Musculin acts on the hypothalamus (arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus) to co-ordinate the neuroendocrine and appetite responses to exercise. However, the possibilities that Musculin may act on additional central nervous system sites and that an additional hormone(s) may be responsible for these actions are not excluded. It is suggested that a search be made for Musculin, since analogues of such a substance may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of the current global diabetes and obesity epidemic.

  2. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a negative endocrine regulator of the renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Chun; Kong, Juan; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Liu, Shu Q.; Cao, Li-Ping

    2002-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin system, which plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte, and volume homeostasis, may represent a major risk factor for hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. Mounting evidence from clinical studies has demonstrated an inverse relationship between circulating vitamin D levels and the blood pressure and/or plasma renin activity, but the mechanism is not understood. We show here that renin expression and plasma angiotensin II production were increased severalfold in vitamin D receptor–null (VDR-null) mice, leading to hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and increased water intake. However, the salt- and volume-sensing mechanisms that control renin synthesis are still intact in the mutant mice. In wild-type mice, inhibition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] synthesis also led to an increase in renin expression, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 injection led to renin suppression. We found that vitamin D regulation of renin expression was independent of calcium metabolism and that 1,25(OH)2D3 markedly suppressed renin transcription by a VDR-mediated mechanism in cell cultures. Hence, 1,25(OH)2D3 is a novel negative endocrine regulator of the renin-angiotensin system. Its apparent critical role in electrolytes, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis suggests that vitamin D analogues could help prevent or ameliorate hypertension. PMID:12122115

  3. [Endocrine disorders and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuka

    2015-10-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass that predisposes fractures due to underlying disorders or medication. Disorders of the endocrine system, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency, Cushing's syndrome, and anorexia nervosa frequently cause secondary osteoporosis. In those diseases, hormone excess or deficiency affects functions of osteoblasts, osteocyte, and osteoclasts, leading to aberrant bone remodeling. Bisphosphonates are the first-choice pharmacological agents for fracture prevention in most patients with secondary osteoporosis along with treatment of the underlying disease. PMID:26529938

  4. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  5. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  6. Musculoskeletal manifestations of endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Stephanie B; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; Masih, Sulabha; Matcuk, George R

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disorders can lead to disturbances in numerous systems within the body, including the musculoskeletal system. Radiological evaluation of these conditions can demonstrate typical appearances of the bones and soft tissues. Knowledge of these patterns can allow the radiologist to suggest a diagnosis that may not be clinically apparent. This review will highlight the typical musculoskeletal findings of acromegaly, hypercortisolism, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pseudo- and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, and diabetes mellitus. The radiological manifestations of each of these endocrine disorders, along with a brief discussion of the pathophysiology and clinical implications, will be discussed. PMID:24642251

  7. Designing Endocrine Disruption Out of the Next Generation of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Schug, T.T; Abagyan, R.; Blumberg, B.; Collins, T.J.; Crews, D.; DeFur, P.L.; Dickerson, S.M.; Edwards, T.M.; Gore, A.C.; Guillette, L.J.; Hayes, T.; Heindel, J.J.; Moores, A.; Patisaul, H.B.; Tal, T.L.; Thayer, K.A.; Vandenberg, L.N.; Warner, J.; Watson, C.S.; Saal, F.S. vom; Zoeller, R.T.; O’Brien, K.P.; Myers, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of green chemistry is to avoid hazard in the design of new chemicals. This objective is best achieved when information about a chemical’s potential hazardous effects is obtained as early in the design process as feasible. Endocrine disruption is a type of hazard that to date has been inadequately addressed by both industrial and regulatory science. To aid chemists in avoiding this hazard, we propose an endocrine disruption testing protocol for use by chemists in the design of new chemicals. The Tiered Protocol for Endocrine Disruption (TiPED) has been created under the oversight of a scientific advisory committee composed of leading representatives from both green chemistry and the environmental health sciences. TiPED is conceived as a tool for new chemical design, thus it starts with a chemist theoretically at “the drawing board.” It consists of five testing tiers ranging from broad in silico evaluation up through specific cell- and whole organism-based assays. To be effective at detecting endocrine disruption, a testing protocol must be able to measure potential hormone-like or hormone-inhibiting effects of chemicals, as well as the many possible interactions and signaling sequellae such chemicals may have with cell-based receptors. Accordingly, we have designed this protocol to broadly interrogate the endocrine system. The proposed protocol will not detect all possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption, because scientific understanding of these phenomena is advancing rapidly. To ensure that the protocol remains current, we have established a plan for incorporating new assays into the protocol as the science advances. In this paper we present the principles that should guide the science of testing new chemicals for endocrine disruption, as well as principles by which to evaluate individual assays for applicability, and laboratories for reliability. In a ‘proof-of-principle’ test, we ran 6 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that act

  8. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors.

  9. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors. PMID:24685768

  10. A data storage, retrieval and analysis system for endocrine research. [for Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, L. E.; Johnston, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    This retrieval system builds, updates, retrieves, and performs basic statistical analyses on blood, urine, and diet parameters for the M071 and M073 Skylab and Apollo experiments. This system permits data entry from cards to build an indexed sequential file. Programs are easily modified for specialized analyses.

  11. Amphibians as model to study endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka

    2006-10-13

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupters (ED) are known to affect reproductive biology and thyroid system. The classical model species for these endocrine systems are amphibians and therefore they can serve as sentinels for detection of the modes of action (MOAs) of ED. Recently, amphibians are being reviewed as suitable models to assess (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic MOAs influencing reproductive biology as well as (anti)thyroidal MOAs interfering with the thyroid system. The development of targeted bioassays in combination with adequate chemical analyses is the prerequisite for a concise risk assessment of ED.

  12. Endocrine FGFs: Evolution, Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Konishi, Morichika

    2015-01-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family comprises 22 structurally related polypeptides that play crucial roles in neuronal functions, development, and metabolism. FGFs are classified as intracrine, paracrine, and endocrine FGFs based on their action mechanisms. Paracrine and endocrine FGFs are secreted signaling molecules by acting via cell-surface FGF receptors (FGFRs). Paracrine FGFs require heparan sulfate as a cofactor for FGFRs. In contrast, endocrine FGFs, comprising FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23, require α-Klotho or β-Klotho as a cofactor for FGFRs. Endocrine FGFs, which are specific to vertebrates, lost heparan sulfate-binding affinity and acquired a systemic signaling system with α-Klotho or β-Klotho during early vertebrate evolution. The phenotypes of endocrine FGF knockout mice indicate that they play roles in metabolism including bile acid, energy, and phosphate/active vitamin D metabolism. Accumulated evidence for the involvement of endocrine FGFs in human genetic and metabolic diseases also indicates their pathophysiological roles in metabolic diseases, potential risk factors for metabolic diseases, and useful biomarkers for metabolic diseases. The therapeutic utility of endocrine FGFs is currently being developed. These findings provide new insights into the physiological and pathophysiological roles of endocrine FGFs and potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for metabolic diseases. PMID:26483756

  13. Role of beta2 agonists in respiratory medicine with particular attention to novel patents and effects on endocrine system and immune response.

    PubMed

    Larocca, Nancy E; Moreno, Dolores; Garmendia, Jenny V; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2011-09-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors are very important in respiratory medicine. Traditionally, the stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors by beta2-agonists is commonly used for giving bronchodilation in chronic airflow obstruction However; the wide distribution of these receptors in cells and tissues other than airway smooth muscle suggests that beta agonists should offer other beneficial effects in respiratory disease. Recent studies have shown the importance of these receptors in the modulation of endocrine and immune system that affect respiratory function and may decrease therapy effectiveness in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New patented compound and uses have provided new insights in future therapeutics of respiratory diseases in which genetic, endocrine and immune response should be considered.

  14. Endocrine scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Kit; Fig, Lorraine M; Youssef, Ehab; Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging of endocrine disorders takes advantage of unique cellular properties of endocrine organs and tissues that can be depicted by targeted radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed functional maps of biodistributions of radiopharmaceutical uptake can be displayed in three-dimensional tomographic formats, using single photon emission computed tomography (CT) that can now be directly combined with simultaneously acquired cross-sectional anatomic maps derived from CT. The integration of function depicted by scintigraphy and anatomy with CT has synergistically improved the efficacy of nuclear medicine imaging across a broad spectrum of clinical applications, which include some of the oldest imaging studies of endocrine dysfunction.

  15. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  16. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  17. GATA factors in endocrine neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Färkkilä, Anniina; Soini, Tea; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B

    2016-02-01

    GATA transcription factors are structurally-related zinc finger proteins that recognize the consensus DNA sequence WGATAA (the GATA motif), an essential cis-acting element in the promoters and enhancers of many genes. These transcription factors regulate cell fate specification and differentiation in a wide array of tissues. As demonstrated by genetic analyses of mice and humans, GATA factors play pivotal roles in the development, homeostasis, and function of several endocrine organs including the adrenal cortex, ovary, pancreas, parathyroid, pituitary, and testis. Additionally, GATA factors have been shown to be mutated, overexpressed, or underexpressed in a variety of endocrine tumors (e.g., adrenocortical neoplasms, parathyroid tumors, pituitary adenomas, and sex cord stromal tumors). Emerging evidence suggests that GATA factors play a direct role in the initiation, proliferation, or propagation of certain endocrine tumors via modulation of key developmental signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis, such as the WNT/β-catenin and TGFβ pathways. Altered expression or function of GATA factors can also affect the metabolism, ploidy, and invasiveness of tumor cells. This article provides an overview of the role of GATA factors in endocrine neoplasms. Relevant animal models are highlighted.

  18. Plasticity of renal endocrine function.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Birgül; Kurtz, Armin

    2015-03-15

    The kidneys are important endocrine organs. They secrete humoral factors, such as calcitriol, erythropoietin, klotho, and renin into the circulation, and therefore, they are essentially involved in the regulation of a variety of processes ranging from bone formation to erythropoiesis. The endocrine functions are established by cells, such as proximal or distal tubular cells, renocortical interstitial cells, or mural cells of afferent arterioles. These endocrine cells are either fixed in number, such as tubular cells, which individually and gradually upregulate or downregulate hormone production, or they belong to a pool of cells, which display a recruitment behavior, such as erythropoietin- and renin-producing cells. In the latter case, regulation of humoral function occurs via (de)recruitment of active endocrine cells. As a consequence renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells in the kidney show a high degree of plasticity by reversibly switching between distinct cell states. In this review, we will focus on the characteristics of renin- and of erythropoietin-producing cells, especially on their origin and localization, their reversible transformations, and the mediators, which are responsible for transformation. Finally, we will discuss a possible interconversion of renin and erythropoietin expression. PMID:25608752

  19. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders. PMID:21419278

  20. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders.

  1. Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q 25-32). Clinical and endocrine features with a long term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Maggio, M C; Iachininoto, R; Arena, V; Liotta, A

    2003-02-01

    Deletion of long arm of chromosome 1 (1q-) is a rare condition with malformations of many organs (central nervous system, heart, kidney, etc.). Authors describe a young girl characterised by 1q 25-32 deletion, with severe intra- and extrauterine growth retardation, facial dismorphisms, multiple organ malformations. The patient is followed for a long-term clinical and endocrine evaluation, with evidence of hypoplastic hypophysis and multiple endocrine deficiency.

  2. Neuro-Endocrine Networks Controlling Immune System in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Procaccini, Claudio; Pucino, Valentina; De Rosa, Veronica; Marone, Gianni; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems have long been considered as compartments that perform separate and different functions. However, recent clinical, epidemiological, and experimental data have suggested that the pathogenesis of several immune-mediated disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), might involve factors, hormones, and neural mediators that link the immune and nervous system. These molecules are members of the same superfamily, which allow the mutual and bi-directional neural–immune interaction. More recently, the discovery of leptin, one of the most abundant adipocyte-derived hormones that control food intake and metabolism, has suggested that nutritional/metabolic status, acting at central level, can control immune self-tolerance, since it promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS. Here, we summarize the most recent advances and the key players linking the central nervous system, immune tolerance, and the metabolic status. Understanding this coordinated interaction may pave the way for novel therapeutic approaches to increase host defense and suppress immune-mediated disorders. PMID:24778633

  3. Biological Significance of GPCR Heteromerization in the Neuro-Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Maud; Jockers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Clustering of proteins in higher order complexes is a common theme in biology and profoundly influences protein function. The idea that seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) might form dimers or higher order oligomeric complexes has been formulated more than 20 years ago. Since then, this phenomenon has been investigated with many different biochemical and biophysical techniques. The more recent notion of GPCR heteromerization describes the specific association of two different GPCRs. GPCR heteromerization may be of primary importance in neuroendocrinology, as this may explain at least some of the functional crosstalks described between different hormonal systems. Importantly, many GPCR heteromers have distinct functional properties compared to their corresponding homomers. Heteromer-specific pharmacological profiles might be exploited for drug design and open new therapeutic options. GPCR heteromerization has been first studied in heterologous expression systems. Today, increasing evidence for the existence of GPCR heteromers in endogenous systems is emerging providing crucial evidence for the physiological function of GPCR heteromerization. PMID:22649357

  4. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies: thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Richard; Matfin, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is a common endocrine condition that may be secondary to a number of underlying processes. Thyroid storm (also known as thyroid or thyrotoxic crisis) represents the severe end of the spectrum of thyrotoxicosis and is characterized by compromised organ function. Whilst rare in the modern era, the mortality rate remains high, and prompt consideration of this endocrine emergency, with specific treatments, can improve outcomes. PMID:23148158

  5. Endocrine effects of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd T; Dobs, Adrian S

    2002-11-01

    In the 35 years since the active compound of marijuana, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated, the psychological and physiological impact of marijuana use has been actively investigated. Animal models have demonstrated that cannabinoid administration acutely alters multiple hormonal systems, including the suppression of the gonadal steroids, growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid hormone and the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These effects are mediated by binding to the endogenous cannabinoid receptor in or near the hypothalamus. Despite these findings in animals, the effects in humans have been inconsistent, and discrepancies are likely due in part to the development of tolerance. The long-term consequences of marijuana use in humans on endocrine systems remain unclear.

  6. Endocrine activation in tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Lukac, P; Lukacova, S; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the complex character of neuroendocrine response to paroxysmal tachycardia. While the endocrine influences in arrhythmogenesis are well perceived by the cardiologists, less attention has been paid to influence of tachycardia on neuroendocrine activation. However, this may significantly alter the clinical course of tachycardias and its responses to pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Main characteristics of hormones with direct relationship to cardiovascular system (ANP, AVP, catecholamines, angiotensin and others) are listed with description of regulation of their secretion and main biological effects, especially with regard to regulation of circulation. Changes in hemodynamics during tachycardia with accompanying changes in ANP, AVP renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympatho-neural and sympatho-adrenal activation are reviewed. Further research and understanding require more complex approach and concentration on interrelationship of different regulatory hormones in tachycardia. (Fig. 2, Ref. 96.) PMID:11763674

  7. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed.

  8. [Endocrine functions of the brain in adult and developing mammals].

    PubMed

    Ugriumov, M V

    2009-01-01

    The main prerequisite for organism's viability is the maintenance of the internal environment despite changes in the external environment, which is provided by the neuroendocrine control system. The key unit in this system is hypothalamus exerting endocrine effects on certain peripheral organs and anterior pituitary. Physiologically active substances of neuronal origin enter blood vessels in the neurohemal parts of hypothalamus where no blood-brain barrier exists. In other parts of the adult brain, the arrival of physiologically active substances is blocked by the blood-brain barrier. According to the generally accepted concept, the neuroendocrine system formation in ontogeny starts with the maturation of peripheral endocrine glands, which initially function autonomously and then are controlled by the anterior pituitary. The brain is engaged in neuroendocrine control after its maturation completes, which results in a closed control system typical of adult mammals. Since neurons start to secrete physiologically active substances soon after their formation and long before interneuronal connections are formed, these cells are thought to have an effect on brain development as inducers. Considering that there is no blood-brain barrier during this period, we proposed the hypothesis that the developing brain functions as a multipotent endocrine organ. This means that tens of physiologically active substances arrive from the brain to the systemic circulation and have an endocrine effect on the whole body development. Dopamine, serotonin, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone were selected as marker physiologically active substances of cerebral origin to test this hypothesis. In adult animals, they act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators transmitting information from neuron to neuron as well as neurohormones arriving from the hypothalamus with portal blood to the anterior pituitary. Perinatal rats--before the blood-brain barrier is formed--proved to have equally high

  9. Review of the biological effects of weightlessness on the human endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Fulford, M

    1993-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that there are basic physiological changes in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalad fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known but the general approach has been to investigate systemic and hormonal changes. However, data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs, Spacelab 3 (SL-3), Spacelab D-I (SL-DI), and now the new SLS-1 missions support a more basic biological response to microgravity that may occur at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level. This report summarizes ground-based and SLS-1 experiments that examined the mechanism of loss of red blood cell mass in humans, the loss of bone mass and lowered osteoblast growth under space flight conditions, and loss of immune function in microgravity.

  10. Review of the biological effects of weightlessness on the human endocrine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1993-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that there are basic physiological changes in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalad fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known but the general approach has been to investigate systemic and hormonal changes. However, data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs, Spacelab 3 (SL-3), Spacelab D-I (SL-DI), and now the new SLS-1 missions support a more basic biological response to microgravity that may occur at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level. This report summarizes ground-based and SLS-1 experiments that examined the mechanism of loss of red blood cell mass in humans, the loss of bone mass and lowered osteoblast growth under space flight conditions, and loss of immune function in microgravity.

  11. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal has been neglected in endocrine disruption regulatory testing strategy. The adrenal is a vital organ, adrenocortical insufficiency is recognised in life threatening "adrenal crises" and Addison's disease, and the consequences of off-target toxicological inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenesis is well recognised in clinical medicine, where drugs such as aminoglutethimide and etomidate killed patients via unrecognised inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP11B1) along the cortisol and aldosterone pathways. The consequences of adrenocortical dysfunction during early development are also recognised in the congenital salt wasting and adrenogenital syndromes presenting neonatally, yet despite a remit to focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity mechanisms of endocrine disruption by many regulatory agencies (USEPA EDSTAC; REACH) the assessment of adrenocortical function has largely been ignored. Further, every step in the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathway (ACTH receptor, StAR, CYP's 11A1, 17, 21, 11B1, 11B2, and 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Δ4,5 isomerase) is known to be a potential target with multiple examples of chemicals inhibiting these targets. Many of these chemicals have been detected in human and wildlife tissues. This raises the question of whether exposure to low level environmental chemicals may be affecting adrenocortical function. This review examines the omission of adrenocortical testing in the current regulatory frameworks; the characteristics that make the adrenal cortex particularly vulnerable to toxic insult; chemicals and their toxicological targets within the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathways; the typical manifestations of adrenocortical toxicity (e.g. human iatrogenically induced pharmacotoxicological adrenal insufficiency, manifestations in typical mammalian regulatory general toxicology studies, manifestations in wildlife) and models of adrenocortical functional assessment. The utility of the

  12. Ecological risk assessment of endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, T H; Brown, R; Brugger, K E; Campbell, P M; Holt, M; Länge, R; McCahon, P; Tattersfield, L J; van Egmond, R

    2000-01-01

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals proposes a tiered approach for the ecological risk assessment of endocrine disruptors, integrating exposure and hazard (effects) characterization. Exposure assessment for endocrine disruptors should direct specific tests for wildlife species, placing hazard data into a risk assessment context. Supplementing the suite of mammalian screens now under Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) validation, high priority should be given to developing a fish screening assay for detecting endocrine activity in oviparous species. Taking into account both exposure characterization and alerts from endocrine screening, higher tier tests are also a priority for defining adverse effects. We propose that in vivo mammalian and fish assays provide a comprehensive screening battery for diverse hormonal functions (including androgen, estrogen, and thyroid hormone), whereas Amphibia should be considered at higher tiers if there are exposure concerns. Higher tier endocrine-disruptor testing should include fish development and fish reproduction tests, whereas a full life-cycle test could be subsequently used to refine aquatic risk assessments when necessary. For avian risk assessment, the new OECD Japanese quail reproduction test guideline provides a valuable basis for developing a test to detecting endocrine-mediated reproductive effects; this species could be used, where necessary, for an avian life-cycle test. For aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, data from existing developmental and reproductive tests remain of high value for ecological risk assessment. High priority should be given to research into comparative endocrine physiology of invertebrates to support data extrapolation to this diverse fauna. PMID:11102288

  13. Expression of RYamide in the nervous and endocrine system of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Roller, Ladislav; Čižmár, Daniel; Bednár, Branislav; Žitňan, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    RYamides are neuropeptides encoded by a gene whose precise expression and function have not yet been determined. We identified the RYamide gene transcript (fmgV1g15f, SilkBase database) and predicted two candidates for G-protein coupled RYamide receptors (A19-BAG68418 and A22-BAG68421) in the silkworm Bombyx mori. We cloned the RYamide transcript and described its spatial expression using in situ hybridisation. In the larval central nervous system (CNS) expression of RYamide was restricted to 12-14 small neurons in the brain and two posterior neurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion. During metamorphosis their number decreased to eight protocerebral neurons in the adults. Multiple staining, using various insect neuropeptide antibodies, revealed that neurons expressing RYamide are different from other peptidergic cells in the CNS. We also found RYamide expression in the enteroendocrine cells (EC) of the anterior midgut of larvae, pupae and adults. Two minor subpopulations of these EC were also immunoreactive to antibodies against tachykinin and myosupressin. This expression pattern suggests RYamides may play a role in the regulation of feeding and digestion.

  14. Performance of metal-organic framework MIL-101 after surfactant modification in the extraction of endocrine disrupting chemicals from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-10-01

    The research presented in this paper explored the modification and application of a metal-organic framework, MIL-101, with nonionic surfactant-Triton X-114 in dispersive solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of four endocrine disrupting chemicals (estrone, 17α-ethynylestradiol, estriol and diethylstilbestrol) from environmental water samples. Triton X-114 molecules could be adsorbed by the hydrophobic surface of the MIL-101 crystals, and thus improved the dispersibility of MIL-101 in aqueous solution by serving as a hydrophilic coating. Cloud point phase separation from Triton X-114 accelerated the separation of extracts from the aqueous matrix. The proposed method combines the favorable attributes of strong adsorption capacity resulting from the porous structure of MIL-101 and self-assembly of Triton X-114 molecules. Post-extraction derivatization using N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide was employed to facilitate the quantitative determination of the extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main factors affecting the preparation of modified MIL-101, and extraction of the analytes, such as the amount of surfactant, the ultrasonic and vortex durations, solution pH and desorption conditions, were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the present method yielded low limits of detection (0.006-0.023 ng/mL), good linearity from 0.09 to 45 ng/mL (coefficients of determination higher than 0.9980) and acceptable precision (relative standard deviations of 2.2-13%). The surface modified MIL-101 was demonstrated to be effective for the extraction of the selected estrogens from aqueous samples, giving rise to markedly improved extraction performance compared to the unmodified MIL-101. PMID:26078172

  15. Performance of metal-organic framework MIL-101 after surfactant modification in the extraction of endocrine disrupting chemicals from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-10-01

    The research presented in this paper explored the modification and application of a metal-organic framework, MIL-101, with nonionic surfactant-Triton X-114 in dispersive solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of four endocrine disrupting chemicals (estrone, 17α-ethynylestradiol, estriol and diethylstilbestrol) from environmental water samples. Triton X-114 molecules could be adsorbed by the hydrophobic surface of the MIL-101 crystals, and thus improved the dispersibility of MIL-101 in aqueous solution by serving as a hydrophilic coating. Cloud point phase separation from Triton X-114 accelerated the separation of extracts from the aqueous matrix. The proposed method combines the favorable attributes of strong adsorption capacity resulting from the porous structure of MIL-101 and self-assembly of Triton X-114 molecules. Post-extraction derivatization using N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide was employed to facilitate the quantitative determination of the extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main factors affecting the preparation of modified MIL-101, and extraction of the analytes, such as the amount of surfactant, the ultrasonic and vortex durations, solution pH and desorption conditions, were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the present method yielded low limits of detection (0.006-0.023 ng/mL), good linearity from 0.09 to 45 ng/mL (coefficients of determination higher than 0.9980) and acceptable precision (relative standard deviations of 2.2-13%). The surface modified MIL-101 was demonstrated to be effective for the extraction of the selected estrogens from aqueous samples, giving rise to markedly improved extraction performance compared to the unmodified MIL-101.

  16. Bone: a new endocrine organ at the heart of chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, Marc G; Massy, Ziad A; Brandenburg, Vincent M; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Cozzolino, Mario; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Bover, Jordi; Goldsmith, David

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports of several bone-derived substances, some of which have hormonal properties, have shed new light on the bone-cardiovascular axis. Deranged concentrations of humoral factors are not only epidemiologically connected to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but can also be causally implicated, especially in chronic kidney disease. FGF23 rises exponentially with advancing chronic kidney disease, seems to reach maladaptive concentrations, and then induces left ventricular hypertrophy, and is possibly implicated in the process of vessel calcification. Sclerostin and DKK1, both secreted mainly by osteocytes, are important Wnt inhibitors and as such can interfere with systems for biological signalling that operate in the vessel wall. Osteocalcin, produced by osteoblasts or released from mineralised bone, interferes with insulin concentrations and sensitivity, and its metabolism is disturbed in kidney disease. These bone-derived humoral factors might place the bone at the centre of cardiovascular disease associated with chronic kidney disease. Most importantly, factors that dictate the regulation of these substances in bone and subsequent secretion into the circulation have not been researched, and could provide entirely new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds in Aquatic Ecosystems.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a ubiquitous issue of concern in our aquatic systems. Commonly detected EDCs include natural and synthetic hormones, surfactants, plasticizers, disinfectants, herbicides and metals. The potency of these chemicals varies substantially, as ...

  18. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  19. Endocrine complications following pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Josephine; Lewis, Victor; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Stephure, David K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for various diseases can lead to endocrine system dysfunction owing to preparative regimens involving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We assessed the prevalence of post-BMT endocrine complications in children treated at the Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH) from 1991 to 2001. Time of onset of endocrine dysfunction, underlying disease processes, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and age at BMT were characterized. Subjects of <18 years of age at the time of allogeneic or autologous BMT for whom 1-year follow-up through the ACH and a chart were available for review were included in the study. Subjects with a pre-existing endocrine condition were excluded. Of the 194 pediatric BMT procedures performed at the ACH between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2001, 150 complete charts were available for review. Sixty five subjects received follow-up care at other centers and were excluded. Therefore, a total of 85 subjects were included in the review. The prevalence of endocrine complications identified was: primary hypothyroidism 1.2%, compensated hypothyroidism 7.0%, hyperthyroidism 2.4%, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism 22.4%, abnormal bone density 2.4%, and secondary diabetes mellitus 1.2%. These findings emphasize the need to screen for endocrine system dysfunction, particularly hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, in children who have undergone BMT. Children need long-term follow-up so that endocrine complications can be diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:21823531

  20. The endocrine quiz

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Nagesh, V. Sri

    2014-01-01

    With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject. PMID:24944922

  1. Endocrine System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid gland through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is when the levels of thyroid hormones in ... hormone production, is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in kids. Infants can also be born with ...

  2. Endocrine System (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? ... en español El sistema endocrino Ever dozed through chemistry class and wondered what chemistry had to do ...

  3. A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION, WITH COMMENTS ON THE US EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last two decades have witnessed a growing concern for chemicals that have the potential to adversely affect the normal functioning of the endocrine system. The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) of the World Health Organization has recently reviewed the curren...

  4. Endocrine diseases of rodents.

    PubMed

    Collins, Bobby R

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of documented endocrine diseases in rodents and other small mammals varies considerably among the species maintained as pets, biomedical research animals, or display animals in zoos. The clinical diagnosis of endocrine diseases almost never occurs in free-ranging animals in their native habitat. Feral animals that have clinical endocrine disease, such as neoplasia, adrenal cortical hyperplasia, or diabetes, would exhibit clinical signs of altered behavior that would result in their removal by predators. The diagnosis of endocrine disease thus takes place in the relatively protective environment of captivity. This observation should forewarn pet owners and clinicians caring for these animals that the environment contributes to the development of endocrine diseases in these animals.

  5. Students' Understandings of Human Organs and Organ Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-01-01

    Discusses students' understandings of their own internal structure. Analysis shows the extent to which student understanding increases with age and the degree to which students know more about some organs and organ systems than others. Gender differences in the drawings were generally not large and there were some intriguing differences in the…

  6. [Endocrine emergencies during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Harbeck, B; Schütt, M; Sayk, F

    2012-03-01

    Endocrine emergencies during pregnancy can become life-threatening for both mother and fetus. In addition to some pregnancy-linked endocrine disorders, several pre-existing forms of endocrinopathy, such as Grave's disease, type 1 diabetes and adrenal insufficiency might deteriorate acutely during pregnancy. Early diagnosis and management are challenging because the classical symptoms are often modified by pregnancy. Laboratory tests are subject to altered physiological ranges and pharmacological options are limited while therapeutic goals are stricter than in the non-pregnant patient. This article focuses on endocrine emergencies complicating pregnancy. PMID:22349529

  7. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases. PMID:26497928

  8. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases.

  9. Socioeconomic conditions across life related to multiple measures of the endocrine system in older adults: Longitudinal findings from a British birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bann, David; Hardy, Rebecca; Cooper, Rachel; Lashen, Hany; Keevil, Brian; Wu, Frederick C.W.; Holly, Jeff M.P.; Ong, Ken K.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Kuh, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about how socioeconomic position (SEP) across life impacts on different axes of the endocrine system which are thought to underlie the ageing process and its adverse consequences. We examined how indicators of SEP across life related to multiple markers of the endocrine system in late midlife, and hypothesized that lower SEP across life would be associated with an adverse hormone profile across multiple axes. Methods Data were from a British cohort study of 875 men and 905 women followed since their birth in March 1946 with circulating free testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) measured at both 53 and 60–64 years, and evening cortisol at 60–64 years. Indicators of SEP were ascertained prospectively across life—paternal occupational class at 4, highest educational attainment at 26, household occupational class at 53, and household income at 60–64 years. Associations between SEP and hormones were investigated using multiple regression and logistic regression models. Results Lower SEP was associated with lower free testosterone among men, higher free testosterone among women, and lower IGF-I and higher evening cortisol in both sexes. For example, the mean standardised difference in IGF-I comparing the lowest with the highest educational attainment at 26 years (slope index of inequality) was −0.4 in men (95% CI -0.7 to −0.2) and −0.4 in women (−0.6 to −0.2). Associations with each hormone differed by SEP indicator used and sex, and were particularly pronounced when using a composite adverse hormone score. For example, the odds of having 1 additional adverse hormone concentration in the lowest compared with highest education level were 3.7 (95% CI: 2.1, 6.3) among men, and 1.6 (1.0, 2.7) among women (P (sex interaction) = 0.02). We found no evidence that SEP was related to apparent age-related declines in free testosterone or IGF-I. Conclusions Lower SEP was associated with an adverse hormone profile

  10. Review of endocrine syndromes associated with tumours of non-endocrine origin

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, C. B.; Miller, A. L.

    1966-01-01

    During the past 10 years there has been particular interest in the occurrence of a number of endocrine syndromes in association with tumours of organs other than the endocrines. Evidence is increasing to suggest that these result from the formation of hormone-like substances by the tumours. The clinical importance and theoretical implications of these syndromes constitute the justification for reviewing them here. PMID:5325646

  11. Temporal changes of the adrenal endocrine system in a restraint stressed mouse and possibility of postmortem indicators of prolonged psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Abe, Yuki; Ihama, Yoko; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuji; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-07-01

    We investigated temporal changes of adrenal endocrine systems through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenomedullary (SA) axis in restraint stressed mice. Restraint stress for 1 day to 3 weeks caused a significant increase in serum levels of ACTH and glucocorticoids accompanied with an increase in adrenal weights, indicating activation of the HPA axis. Reflecting the overproduction of glucocorticoids, adrenal cholesterol content decreased. Moreover, adrenal gene expression involved in cholesterol supply, including scavenger receptor-class B type I, HMG-CoA reductase, and hormone-sensitive lipase, was increased over the same period. After 4 weeks stress, all of these changes returned to control levels. In contrast, adrenal gene expression of chromogranin A, which is cosecreted with catecholamine via the SA axis, was increased with 1 day to 2 weeks of stress, and decreased with 3-4 weeks of stress. Our results suggest that analyses of adrenal endocrine systems based on the combination of several markers examined here would be useful for not only proving prolonged psychological stress experience but also determining its duration.

  12. Investigations of the Effects of Synthetic Chemicals on the Endocrine System of Common Carp in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.; Goodbred, Steven L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Leiker, Thomas A.; Orsak, Erik

    2006-01-01

    in Las Vegas Wash and Bay environments include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (including DDT and DDE), and 'emerging contaminants' such as fragrances/musks, flame retardants, triclosan and its breakdown products, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals (Bevans and others, 1996; Boyd and Furlong, 2002; Leiker and others, in press). Many of these compounds are able to interact with the endocrine system of animals and potentially cause reproductive impacts. The National Park Service (NPS) manages Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA) with about 8 million yearly visitors including 500,000 anglers drawn to its world-class recreational fishery. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) provides management for the federally designated, endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) and for more than 180 species of migratory birds that utilize LMNRA surface waters. These multiple uses of surface water in the area demonstrate their vital importance to the LMNRA as well as the need to maintain the quality of water at levels that are adequate for these uses.

  13. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  14. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Giudice, Linda C.; Hauser, Russ; Prins, Gail S.; Soto, Ana M.; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in the possible health threat posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are substances in our environment, food, and consumer products that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. In this first Scientific Statement of The Endocrine Society, we present the evidence that endocrine disruptors have effects on male and female reproduction, breast development and cancer, prostate cancer, neuroendocrinology, thyroid, metabolism and obesity, and cardiovascular endocrinology. Results from animal models, human clinical observations, and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant concern to public health. The mechanisms of EDCs involve divergent pathways including (but not limited to) estrogenic, antiandrogenic, thyroid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, retinoid, and actions through other nuclear receptors; steroidogenic enzymes; neurotransmitter receptors and systems; and many other pathways that are highly conserved in wildlife and humans, and which can be modeled in laboratory in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, EDCs represent a broad class of molecules such as organochlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals, plastics and plasticizers, fuels, and many other chemicals that are present in the environment or are in widespread use. We make a number of recommendations to increase understanding of effects of EDCs, including enhancing increased basic and clinical research, invoking the precautionary principle, and advocating involvement of individual and scientific society stakeholders in communicating and implementing changes in public policy and awareness. PMID:19502515

  15. Organ system heterogeneity DB: a database for the visualization of phenotypes at the organ system level

    PubMed Central

    Mannil, Deepthi; Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Campillos, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of mammalian organisms including diseases, drug treatments and gene perturbations in mice affect organ systems differently. Some perturbations impair relatively few organ systems while others lead to highly heterogeneous or systemic effects. Organ System Heterogeneity DB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/Organ_System_Heterogeneity/) provides information on the phenotypic effects of 4865 human diseases, 1667 drugs and 5361 genetically modified mouse models on 26 different organ systems. Disease symptoms, drug side effects and mouse phenotypes are mapped to the System Organ Class (SOC) level of the Medical Dictionary of Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Then, the organ system heterogeneity value, a measurement of the systemic impact of a perturbation, is calculated from the relative frequency of phenotypic features across all SOCs. For perturbations of interest, the database displays the distribution of phenotypic effects across organ systems along with the heterogeneity value and the distance between organ system distributions. In this way, it allows, in an easy and comprehensible fashion, the comparison of the phenotypic organ system distributions of diseases, drugs and their corresponding genetically modified mouse models of associated disease genes and drug targets. The Organ System Heterogeneity DB is thus a platform for the visualization and comparison of organ system level phenotypic effects of drugs, diseases and genes. PMID:25313158

  16. Endocrine alterations in the equine athlete: an update.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Kenneth Harrington

    2011-04-01

    Horses spend most of their day eating, standing, and occasionally exercising. Exercise can range from running in a pasture to athletic training. Under resting conditions, horses easily maintain the internal environment. The performance of work or exercise is a major physiologic challenge, a disturbance to homeostasis that invokes an integrative response from multiple organ systems. The response to exercise involves endocrine and neuroendocrine signaling associated with the short-term and adaptive control of many systems. The coordinated control of multiple physiologic variables is essential for achieving regulation to maintain the integrity of the internal environment of the body.

  17. Pesticide- and sex steroid analogue-induced endocrine disruption differentially targets hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal system during gametogenesis in teleosts - A review.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide-induced endocrine disruption often mimics sex steroidal action resulting in physiological functional disarray of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) system at multiple levels. Among various group of pesticides, organochlorine and organophosphate family of pesticides are known to impart sex steroidal mimicking activity with slightly higher resemblance to estrogens when compared to androgenic action. This review will highlight the effects of organochlorine (for e.g. endosulfan) and organophosphate (for e.g. malathion) pesticides in comparison with sex-steroid analogue-induced changes on HHG axis during gametogenesis in few teleost fish models. Interestingly, the effects of these compounds have produced differential effects in juveniles and adults which also vary based on exposure dosage and duration. Further, the treatments had caused at times sexually dimorphic effects indicating that the action of these compounds bring out serious implications in sexual development. A comprehensive overview has been provided by considering all these aspects to recognize the adverse impacts of pesticide-induced endocrine disruption with special reference to endosulfan and malathion as those had been applied even today or used before for controlling agricultural pests in several Asian countries including India. This review also compares the effects of sex-steroid analogues where in sex reversal to reproductive dysfunction is evident, which may imply the extent of sexual plasticity in teleosts compared to other vertebrates. PMID:25637674

  18. Pesticide- and sex steroid analogue-induced endocrine disruption differentially targets hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal system during gametogenesis in teleosts - A review.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide-induced endocrine disruption often mimics sex steroidal action resulting in physiological functional disarray of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) system at multiple levels. Among various group of pesticides, organochlorine and organophosphate family of pesticides are known to impart sex steroidal mimicking activity with slightly higher resemblance to estrogens when compared to androgenic action. This review will highlight the effects of organochlorine (for e.g. endosulfan) and organophosphate (for e.g. malathion) pesticides in comparison with sex-steroid analogue-induced changes on HHG axis during gametogenesis in few teleost fish models. Interestingly, the effects of these compounds have produced differential effects in juveniles and adults which also vary based on exposure dosage and duration. Further, the treatments had caused at times sexually dimorphic effects indicating that the action of these compounds bring out serious implications in sexual development. A comprehensive overview has been provided by considering all these aspects to recognize the adverse impacts of pesticide-induced endocrine disruption with special reference to endosulfan and malathion as those had been applied even today or used before for controlling agricultural pests in several Asian countries including India. This review also compares the effects of sex-steroid analogues where in sex reversal to reproductive dysfunction is evident, which may imply the extent of sexual plasticity in teleosts compared to other vertebrates.

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Klotho: Physiology and Pathophysiology of an Endocrine Network of Mineral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolically active and perpetually remodeling calcium phosphate–based endoskeleton in terrestrial vertebrates sets the demands on whole-organism calcium and phosphate homeostasis that involves multiple organs in terms of mineral flux and endocrine cross talk. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-Klotho endocrine networks epitomize the complexity of systems biology, and specifically, the FGF23-αKlotho axis highlights the concept of the skeleton holding the master switch of homeostasis rather than a passive target organ as hitherto conceived. Other than serving as a coreceptor for FGF23, αKlotho circulates as an endocrine substance with a multitude of effects. This review covers recent data on the physiological regulation and function of the complex FGF23-αKlotho network. Chronic kidney disease is a common pathophysiological state in which FGF23-αKlotho, a multiorgan endocrine network, is deranged in a self-amplifying vortex resulting in organ dysfunction of the utmost severity that contributes to its morbidity and mortality. PMID:23398153

  20. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors. PMID:26382024

  1. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Contents The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors. PMID:26382024

  2. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors.

  3. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  4. Evolution of self-organized systems.

    PubMed

    Cole, Blaine J

    2002-06-01

    In this paper I ask questions about the evolution of self-organized activity cycles that are found in some ant colonies. I use a computer model that generates periodic activity patterns in interacting subunits and explore the parameters of this model using a genetic algorithm in which selecting on one aspect of the system produces the distinctive self-organized pattern. The general point that I explore, using the example of activity cycles, is that the observation of a self-organized pattern does not mean that the pattern is an adaptation. Self-organized patterns can represent nonadaptive correlated responses to selection, exaptations or even selectively disadvantageous traits. Evolution of self-organized patterns requires genetic feedback between the self-organized output and the subunits that produce the pattern. Without this necessary feedback, a self-organized system does not evolve.

  5. Involvement of endocrine system in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease 1b: speculation on the role of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Melis, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Balivo, Francesca; Minopoli, Giorgia; Rossi, Alessandro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2014-03-19

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is an inherited metabolic defect of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis due to mutations of the SLC37A4 gene and to defective transport of glucose-6-phosphate. The clinical presentation of GSD1b is characterized by hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, fasting hypoglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Patients affected by GSD1b also show neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction that cause increased susceptibility to recurrent bacterial infections. GSD1b patients are also at risk for inflammatory bowel disease. Occasional reports suggesting an increased risk of autoimmune disorders in GSD1b patients, have been published. These complications affect the clinical outcome of the patients. Here we describe the occurrence of autoimmune endocrine disorders including thyroiditis and growth hormone deficiency, in a patient affected by GSD1b. This case further supports the association between GSD1b and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Relative functions of Gαs and its extra-large variant XLαs in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Bastepe, M

    2012-09-01

    Gαs is a ubiquitous signaling protein necessary for the actions of many neurotransmitters, hormones, and autocrine/paracrine factors. Loss-of-function mutations within the gene encoding Gαs, GNAS, are responsible for multiple human diseases, including Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy, progressive osseous heteroplasia, and pseudohypoparathyroidism. Gain-of-function mutations in the same gene are found in various endocrine and nonendocrine tumors and in patients with McCune-Albright Syndrome and fibrous dysplasia of bone. In addition to Gαs, GNAS gives rise to multiple additional coding and noncoding transcripts. Among those, XLαs is a paternally expressed product that is partially identical to Gαs. This article reviews the cellular actions of Gαs and XLαs, focusing on the significance of XLαs relative to Gαs in mammalian physiology and human disease.

  7. Cross talk between the extracellular matrix and the immune system in the context of endocrine pancreatic islet transplantation. A review article.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, C; Vermette, P; Fülöp, T

    2014-04-01

    This review aims to highlight the importance of the bidirectional influence of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and immune cells in the context of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and endocrine pancreatic islet transplantation. We introduced the main classes of molecules and proteins constituting the ECM as well as cells and cytokines of the immune system with the aim to further examine their roles in T1DM and islet transplantation. Integrins expressed by immune cells and their functions are detailed. Finally, this article reviews the roles of the ECM and the immune system in islet transplantation as well as ECM-related cytokines and their influence on the ECM and immune cells. PMID:24679589

  8. Fate of steroid hormones and endocrine activities in swine manure disposal and treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Combalbert, Sarah; Bellet, Virginie; Dabert, Patrick; Bernet, Nicolas; Balaguer, Patrick; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2012-03-01

    Manure may contain high concern endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as steroid hormones, naturally produced by pigs, which are present at μgL(-1) levels. Manure may also contain other EDCs such as nonylphenols (NP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins. Thus, once manure is applied to the land as soil fertilizer these compounds may reach aquifers and consequently living organisms, inducing abnormal endocrine responses. In France, manure is generally stored in anaerobic tanks prior spreading on land; when nitrogen removal is requested, manure is treated by aerobic processes before spreading. However, little is known about the fate of hormones and multiple endocrine-disrupting activities in such manure disposal and treatment systems. Here, we determined the fate of hormones and diverse endocrine activities during manure storage and treatment by combining chemical analysis and in vitro quantification of estrogen (ER), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), androgen (AR), pregnane-X (PXR) and peroxysome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ) receptor-mediated activities. Our results show that manure contains large quantities of hormones and activates ER and AhR, two of the nuclear receptors studied. Most of these endocrine activities were found in the solid fraction of manure and appeared to be induced mainly by hormones and other unidentified pollutants. Hormones, ER and AhR activities found in manure were poorly removed during manure storage but were efficiently removed by aerobic treatment of manure.

  9. 78 FR 35909 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Final Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination of whether a chemical has the potential to interact with the endocrine system will be made on a weight of... endocrine system necessarily meets the standard for information that must be reported in accordance...

  10. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination that a chemical does or is not likely to have the potential to interact with the endocrine system will be... determine ] that a particular chemical has the potential to interact with the endocrine system and...

  11. Update on the Mammalian Tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Protocols

    EPA Science Inventory

    The endocrine system provides a number of target sites that may be susceptible to disruption by environmental agents. In response to emerging concerns that environmental chemicals may have adverse effects on human health by altering the function of the endocrine system (http://w...

  12. Environmental endocrine disruptors: A proposed classification scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Fur, P.L. de; Roberts, J.

    1995-12-31

    A number of chemicals known to act on animal systems through the endocrine system have been termed environmental endocrine disruptors. This group includes some of the PCBs and TCDDs, as well as lead, mercury and a large number of pesticides. The common feature is that the chemicals interact with endogenous endocrine systems at the cellular and/or molecular level to alter normal processes that are controlled or regulated by hormones. Although the existence of artificial or environmental estrogens (e.g. chlordecone and DES) has been known for some time, recent data indicate that this phenomenon is widespread. Indeed, anti-androgens have been held responsible for reproductive dysfunction in alligator populations in Florida. But the significance of endocrine disruption was recognized by pesticide manufacturers when insect growth regulators were developed to interfere with hormonal control of growth. Controlling, regulating or managing these chemicals depends in no small part on the ability to identify, screen or otherwise know that a chemical is an endocrine disrupter. Two possible classifications schemes are: using the effects caused in an animal, or animals as an exposure indicator; and using a known screen for the point of contact with the animal. The former would require extensive knowledge of cause and effect relationships in dozens of animal groups; the latter would require a screening tool comparable to an estrogen binding assay. The authors present a possible classification based on chemicals known to disrupt estrogenic, androgenic and ecdysone regulated hormonal systems.

  13. Exercise and the Regulation of Endocrine Hormones.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony C; Lane, Amy R

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system has profound regulatory effects within the human body and thus the ability to control and maintain appropriate function within many physiological systems (i.e., homeostasis). The hormones associated with the endocrine system utilize autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine actions on the cells of their target tissues within these physiologic systems to adjust homeostasis. The introduction of exercise as a stressor to disrupt homeostasis can greatly amplify and impact the actions of these hormones. To that end, the endocrine response to an acute exercise session occurs in a progression of phases with the magnitude of the response being relative to the exercise work intensity or volume. Various physiologic mechanisms are considered responsible for these responses, although not all are completely understood or elucidated. Chronic exercise training does not eliminate the acute exercise response but may attenuate the overall effect of the responsiveness as the body adapts in a positive fashion to the training stimulus. Regrettably, an excessive intensity and/or volume of training may lead to maladaptation and is associated with inappropriate endocrine hormonal responses. The mechanisms leading to a deleterious maladaptive state are not well understood and require additional research for elucidation. PMID:26477919

  14. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. PMID:27207564

  15. Neonatal endocrine emergencies: a primer for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Pearson, Nadia M; Pillow, M Tyson; Toledo, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The resuscitation principles of securing the airway and stabilizing hemodynamics remain the same in any neonatal emergency. However, stabilizing endocrine disorders may prove especially challenging. Several organ systems are affected simultaneously and the clinical presentation can be subtle. Although not all-inclusive, the implementation of newborn screening tests has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in neonates. Implementing routine screening tests worldwide and improving the accuracy of present tests remains the challenge for healthcare providers. With further study of these disorders and best treatment practices we can provide neonates presenting to the emergency department with the best possible outcomes.

  16. What Is Women's Endocrine Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy lifestyle and harness the power to prevent endocrine disorders, the Power of Prevention. Childhood Childhood is a ... frequent at this time. Learning how to prevent endocrine disorders during this age is pivotal. Young Women At ...

  17. Students' Understandings of Human Organs and Organ Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Michael J.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-06-01

    How do people develop their understanding of what is inside them? This study looks at students' understandings of their internal structure. A cross-sectional approach was used involving a total of 158 students in England from six different age groups (ranging from four year old students to first year undergraduates). Students were given a blank piece of A4-sized paper and asked to draw what they thought was inside themselves. Repeated inspections of the completed drawings allowed us to construct a seven point scale of these representations. Our analysis shows the extent to which student understanding increases with age and the degree to which students know more about some organs and organ systems than others. While gender differences in the drawings were generally not large there were some intriguing differences in the ways males and females drew reproductive organs.

  18. Heart failure: not a single organ disease but a multisystem syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warriner, David; Sheridan, Paul; Lawford, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    Heart failure is not simply a single organ disease; rather it is a complex multi-system clinical syndrome, with impairment of endocrine, haematological, musculoskeletal, renal, respiratory and vascular systems, which influence morbidity and mortality.

  19. Susceptible periods during embryogenesis of the heart and endocrine glands.

    PubMed

    Sadler, T W

    2000-06-01

    One of the original principles of teratology states that, "Susceptibility to teratogenesis varies with the developmental stage at the time of exposure to an adverse influence" [Wilson JG. Environment and Birth Defects. New York:Academic Press, 1973]. The time of greatest sensitivity encompasses the period of organ formation during weeks 3-8 following fertilization in human gestation. At this time, stem cell populations for each organ's morphogenesis are established and inductive events for the initiation of differentiation occur. Structural defects of the heart and endocrine system are no exception to this axiom and have their origins during this time frame. Although the function and maturation of these organs may be affected at later stages, structural defects and loss of cell types usually occur during these early phases of development. Thus, to determine critical windows for studying mechanisms of teratogenesis, it is essential to understand the developmental processes that establish these organs.

  20. Microchannel systems for fine organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarshin, L. L.; Pai, Z. P.; Parmon, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    Characteristic features of application of microchannel systems in organic synthesis are analyzed. The advantages of such systems over conventional chemical engineering equipment, especially for small-scale processes that require fast implementation in industry to obtain small quantities of the product, are shown. Particular examples of successful use of microchannel reactors for various types of organic synthesis are given, primary attention being devoted to the design features of microchannel reactors. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  1. 75 FR 70248 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Second List of Chemicals for Tier 1 Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... more specific chemical effects on the endocrine system, and are currently in the process of being... substance interferes with the endocrine systems of humans or other species simply because it has been listed... AGENCY Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Second List of Chemicals for Tier 1 Screening...

  2. Molecular mechanism of endocrine system impairment by 17α-methyltestosterone in gynogenic Pengze crucian carp offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jiancao; Yang, Yanping; Zhang, Yingying; Bing, Xuwen; Gao, Zexia; Liang, Hongwei; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-06-01

    The effects of synthetic androgen 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) on endocrine impairment were examined in crucian carp. Immature 7-month old mono-female Pengze crucian carp (Pcc) F2 offspring were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/L of MT (week 2, 4, and 8). Gonadosomatic index, hepatosomatic index and intestine weight altered considerably and oocyte development was repressed. In the treatment groups, ovarian 11-ketotestosterone decreased, whereas 17β-estradiol and testosterone increased, and ovarian aromatase activities increased at week 4. However, in the brain tissue, those values significantly decreased. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated changes in steroid receptor genes and upregulation of steroidogenic genes (Pcc-3bhsd, Pcc-11bhsd2 Pcc-cyp11a1), while the other three steroidogenic genes (Pcc-cyp17a1, Pcc-cyp19a1a and Pcc-star) decreased from week 4 to week 8. Ovarian, hepatic Pcc-vtg B and vitellogenin concentration increased in both 50 and 100 μg/L of MT exposure groups. This study adds further information regarding the effects of androgens on the development of previtellogenic oocytes, which suggests that MT could directly target estrogen signaling pathway, or indirectly affect steroidogenesis and vitellogenesis. PMID:26938152

  3. Molecular mechanism of endocrine system impairment by 17α-methyltestosterone in gynogenic Pengze crucian carp offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jiancao; Yang, Yanping; Zhang, Yingying; Bing, Xuwen; Gao, Zexia; Liang, Hongwei; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-06-01

    The effects of synthetic androgen 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) on endocrine impairment were examined in crucian carp. Immature 7-month old mono-female Pengze crucian carp (Pcc) F2 offspring were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/L of MT (week 2, 4, and 8). Gonadosomatic index, hepatosomatic index and intestine weight altered considerably and oocyte development was repressed. In the treatment groups, ovarian 11-ketotestosterone decreased, whereas 17β-estradiol and testosterone increased, and ovarian aromatase activities increased at week 4. However, in the brain tissue, those values significantly decreased. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated changes in steroid receptor genes and upregulation of steroidogenic genes (Pcc-3bhsd, Pcc-11bhsd2 Pcc-cyp11a1), while the other three steroidogenic genes (Pcc-cyp17a1, Pcc-cyp19a1a and Pcc-star) decreased from week 4 to week 8. Ovarian, hepatic Pcc-vtg B and vitellogenin concentration increased in both 50 and 100 μg/L of MT exposure groups. This study adds further information regarding the effects of androgens on the development of previtellogenic oocytes, which suggests that MT could directly target estrogen signaling pathway, or indirectly affect steroidogenesis and vitellogenesis.

  4. Ecotoxicological assessment of cimetidine and determination of its potential for endocrine disruption using three test organisms: Daphnia magna, Moina macrocopa, and Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeram; Jung, Dawoon; Kho, Younglim; Ji, Kyunghee; Kim, Pilje; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-09-01

    Cimetidine is a histamine H2-receptor antagonist used for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. It is often detected in aquatic environments, but its ecotoxicological effects have not been well studied. Thus, ecotoxicity of cimetidine was evaluated using Daphnia magna and Moina macrocopa, and zebrafish (Danio rerio), and a predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) was derived. In D. magna, 48 h immobilization EC50 was determined at 394.9 mg L(-1). However, reproduction damages in D. magna were not found even at the maximum exposure level (30 mg L(-1)). For M. macrocopa, 48 h EC50 was found at 175.8 mg L(-1) and the 7 d reproduction no observed effect concentration (NOEC) was 1.1 mg L(-1). For D. rerio, 40 d growth NOEC was determined at 100 mg L(-1), the highest experimental concentration. The PNEC of cimetidine was estimated at 0.1 mg L(-1) based on M. macrocopa 7d reproduction NOEC. In 14 d adult zebrafish exposure, endocrine disruption potentials of cimetidine were observed. In male, decrease in plasma 17β-estradiol and testosterone levels, up-regulation of gonadal cyp17, and down-regulation of hepatic erα were observed at 300 mg L(-1). In female, increase in plasma E2 level and down-regulation of hepatic cyp1a were noted at 3 mg L(-1). Endocrine disruption effects were also observed in early life stage exposure. Up-regulation of erβ at 17d, and cyp19a and vtg at 40 d post fertilization were detected at 100 mg L(-1), and co-occurrence of ovary and putative testis was observed at as low as 1.1 mg L(-1). The results indicate that there is little evidence for cimetidine to cause direct ecological impact at the current ambient levels in the aquatic environment. However potential consequences of endocrine disruption following long-term exposure in aquatic environment deserves further investigation. PMID:25957140

  5. Photochemistry of Model Organic Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Nizkorodov, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Up to 90 percent of urban aerosol particles have been shown to contain organic molecules. Reactions of these particles with atmospheric oxidants and/or sunlight result in large changes in their composition, toxicity, and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei. For this reason, chemistry of model organic aerosol particles initiated by oxidation and direct photolysis is of great interest to atmospheric, climate, and health scientists. Most studies in this area have focused on identifying the products of oxidation of the organic aerosols, while the products of direct photolysis of the resulting molecules remaining in the aerosol particle have been left mostly unexplored. We have explored direct photolytic processes occurring in selected organic aerosol systems using infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy to identify small gas phase products of photolysis, and mass-spectrometric and photometric techniques to study the condensed phase products. The first model system was secondary organic aerosol formed from the oxidation of several monoterpenes by ozone in the presence and absence of NOx, under different humidities. The second system modeled after oxidatively aged primary organic aerosol particles was a thin film of either alkanes or saturated fatty acids oxidized in several different ways, with the oxidation initiated by ozone, chlorine atom, or OH. In every case, the general conclusion was that the photochemical processing of model organic aerosols is significant. Such direct photolysis processes are believed to age organic aerosol particles on time scales that are short compared to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes.

  6. [Endocrine disease in adrenoleukodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Girard, S; Bruckert, E; Turpin, G

    2001-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodysrophy is the most frequent genetic disorder affecting central and peripheral nervous system myelin. One of the biochemical abnormalities is the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in tissues and body fluids subsequent to defective catabolism in the peroxysomes. The principal characteristic of the disease is an association between a neurological disorder and an endocrine disorder: primary adrenal insufficiency and testicular failure. Clinical manifestations are variable. There are two main forms, one affecting boys between the age of 5 and 10 years with severe rapidly fatal cerebral involvement, and the other affecting young adults between the age of 20 and 30 years with degeneration of the anterior and posterior long spinal cord tracts, similar to the disorders observed in multiple sclerosis. About 20% of the heterozygous women may develop a syndrome which resembles adrenomyeloneuropathy, rarely adrenal insufficiency. Adrenal insufficiency is present in 85% of the childhood cerebral forms and in about 70% of the adult forms. It may occur before, after or at the same time as the neurological disease but is not correlated with the severity of the neurological disorder. Careful screening is required to avoid missing subclinical forms. Adrenoleukodystrophy should be envisaged in young boys with primary adrenal insufficiency, accounting for about 30% of the cases of primary adrenal insufficiency in children under 3 years of age and about 13% of those in adults. Experience with dietary therapy (low-VLCFA diet and supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids such as glyceryl trioleate (GTO) and glyceryl trierucate (GTE), commonly called Lorenzo's oil) has not demonstrated any clinical improvement in the cerebral forms. Bone marrow transplantation is recommended for children who show early evidence of cerebral involvement. Gene therapy is a promising perspective. Lovastatin and 4-phenlbutyrate have recently been shown to normalize

  7. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties. PMID:27308672

  8. Endocrine investigation and therapy.

    PubMed

    McClure, R D

    1987-08-01

    The most commonly investigated testicular disorder is male infertility. Although endocrine causes are uncommon, they are potentially curable. A careful history and examination for subtle features of hypogonadism are important initiating steps. Understanding the appropriate use of both baseline and dynamic testing of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (and, in certain instances, the adrenal and thyroid glands) is extremely important.

  9. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; its occurrence in the real world; and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. Mu...

  10. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways.

  11. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways. PMID:23294635

  12. The evaluation and treatment of endocrine forms of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Alejandro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2014-09-01

    Endocrine hypertension is an important secondary form of hypertension, identified in between 5% and 10% of general hypertensive population. Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of endocrine hypertension, accounting for 1%-10% in uncomplicated hypertension and 7%-20% in resistant hypertension. Other less common causes of endocrine hypertension include Cushing syndrome, pheochromocytoma, thyroid disorders, and hyperparathyroidism. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and the use of appropriate screening tests based on clinical presentation. Failure to make proper diagnosis may lead to catastrophic complications or irreversible hypertensive target organ damage. Accordingly, patients who are suspected to have endocrine hypertension should be referred to endocrinologists or hypertension specialists who are familiar with management of the specific endocrine disorders. PMID:25119722

  13. REMOVAL OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS USING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A growing body of scientific information has shown that man-made industrial chemicals and pesticides may interfere with the normal functioning of human and wildlife endocrine systems. These agents are referred to collectively as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and they are ...

  14. Endocrine Profiling and Prioritization Using ToxCast Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is charged with screening pesticide chemicals and environmental contaminants for their potential to affect the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife (http://www.epa.gov/endo/). The prioritization of chemicals for test...

  15. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  16. Organization of Communication in Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datsenko, V. P.; Zaytsev, N. G.

    Organization of communication between the center of an automated system of information exchange and the subscribers to the system is described. The three requirements are: (1) those technical communication means must be chosen which will provide effective and convenient avenues for calls from the subscribers to the center, (2) the required…

  17. Environmental endocrine disruption: an effects assessment and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, T M; Clegg, E D; Cooper, R L; Wood, W P; Anderson, D G; Baetcke, K P; Hoffmann, J L; Morrow, M S; Rodier, D J; Schaeffer, J E; Touart, L W; Zeeman, M G; Patel, Y M

    1998-01-01

    This report is an overview of the current state of the science relative to environmental endocrine disruption in humans, laboratory testing, and wildlife species. Background information is presented on the field of endocrinology, the nature of hormones, and potential sites for endocrine disruption, with specific examples of chemicals affecting these sites. An attempt is made to present objectively the issue of endocrine disruption, consider working hypotheses, offer opposing viewpoints, analyze the available information, and provide a reasonable assessment of the problem. Emphasis is placed on disruption of central nervous system--pituitary integration of hormonal and sexual behavioral activity, female and male reproductive system development and function, and thyroid function. In addition, the potential role of environmental endocrine disruption in the induction of breast, testicular, and prostate cancers, as well as endometriosis, is evaluated. The interrelationship of the endocrine and immune system is documented. With respect to endocrine-related ecological effects, specific case examples from the peer-reviewed literature of marine invertebrates and representatives of the five classes of vertebrates are presented and discussed. The report identifies some data gaps in our understanding of the environmental endocrine disruption issue and recommends a few research needs. Finally, the report states the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Policy Council's interim position on endocrine disruption and lists some of the ongoing activities to deal with this matter. PMID:9539004

  18. Physical Foundations of Self-organizing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-03-01

    The appearance of coherent global pattern due to local interactions is known as self-organization. Self-organization is a spontaneous process in highly non-equilibrium dissipative systems that form structures which tend to maximize energy dissipation by leveling off energy gradients. This follows as a direct consequence of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Also, a local interaction embodies in the above definition a mechanistic dimension to self-organization. The link between mechanics and the Second Law of Thermodynamics lie in the Principle of Least Action, a strong law of nature that is obeyed in every spontaneous process. Thus, self-organization rests on two basic foundational principles of nature namely, the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the Principle of Least Action. We attempt to develop a formal definition of self-organization based on those principles.

  19. Systems chemistry approach in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Würthner, Frank; Meerholz, Klaus

    2010-08-16

    The common approach in organic materials science is dominated by the perception that the properties of the bulk materials are virtually determined by the properties of the molecular building blocks. In this Concept Article, we advocate for taking into account supramolecular organization principles for all kinds of organic solid-state materials, irrespective of them being crystalline, liquid crystalline, or amorphous, and discuss a showcase example, that is, the utilization of merocyanine dyes as p-type organic semiconductors in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Despite their extraordinarily large dipole moments, which are considered to be detrimental for efficient charge carrier transport, BHJ organic photovoltaic materials of these dyes with fullerenes have reached remarkable power conversion efficiencies of meanwhile nearly 5%. These at the first glance contradictory properties are, however, well-understandable on the systems chemistry level.

  20. 77 FR 15101 - Results From Inert Ingredient Test Orders Issued Under EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... systems. Extensive background on the Agency's endocrine program is available at http://www.epa.gov/endo..., ``Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Policies and Procedures for Initial Screening,'' (74 FR 17560), http... AGENCY Results From Inert Ingredient Test Orders Issued Under EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening...

  1. 75 FR 67963 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP); Announcing the Availability of a Draft for Weight...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... screening and testing chemicals with the potential to interact with the endocrine system. Tier 1 screening... AGENCY Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP); Announcing the Availability of a Draft for Weight-of... submitted as part of EPA's two-tiered paradigm for screening and testing chemicals for endocrine activity...

  2. 77 FR 12297 - Petition To Demonstrate Paperwork Reduction Act Compliance of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... endocrine system or not; (2) has practical utility before proceeding with more Tier 1 screening orders for... AGENCY Petition To Demonstrate Paperwork Reduction Act Compliance of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening... Request (ICR) of the first list of 67 chemicals to receive orders under the Endocrine Disruptor...

  3. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  4. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  5. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sipes, S L; Malee, M P

    1992-12-01

    Disorders of the pituitary gland such as diabetes insipidus, pituitary adenomas, and hyperprolactinemia, disorders of the thyroid gland such as Graves' disease and hypothyroidism, and diseases of the adrenal gland such as adrenocortical insufficiency and Cushing's syndrome can complicate pregnancy. The goals of this article were to provide a basic scientific understanding of the normal function of these endocrine glands, their pregnancy-related changes, and suggestions for diagnosis and treatment of maternal and fetal endocrine disorders during pregnancy. Antenatal recognition and appropriate management of the disorders that especially affect the fetus (i.e., maternal Graves' disease, fetal hypothyroidism, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia) is essential in order to prevent fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.

  6. Endocrine disruptors and obesity.

    PubMed

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Newbold, Retha; Schug, Thaddeus T

    2015-11-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity is a serious global public health challenge. Although the obesity epidemic is largely fueled by poor nutrition and lack of exercise, certain chemicals have been shown to potentially have a role in its aetiology. A substantial body of evidence suggests that a subclass of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which interfere with endocrine signalling, can disrupt hormonally regulated metabolic processes, especially if exposure occurs during early development. These chemicals, so-called 'obesogens' might predispose some individuals to gain weight despite their efforts to limit caloric intake and increase levels of physical activity. This Review discusses the role of EDCs in the obesity epidemic, the latest research on the obesogen concept, epidemiological and experimental findings on obesogens, and their modes of action. The research reviewed here provides knowledge that health scientists can use to inform their research and decision-making processes. PMID:26391979

  7. The organization of an autonomous learning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1988-01-01

    The organization of systems that learn from experience is examined, human beings and animals being prime examples of such systems. How is their information processing organized. They build an internal model of the world and base their actions on the model. The model is dynamic and predictive, and it includes the systems' own actions and their effects. In modeling such systems, a large pattern of features represents a moment of the system's experience. Some of the features are provided by the system's senses, some control the system's motors, and the rest have no immediate external significance. A sequence of such patterns then represents the system's experience over time. By storing such sequences appropriately in memory, the system builds a world model based on experience. In addition to the essential function of memory, fundamental roles are played by a sensory system that makes raw information about the world suitable for memory storage and by a motor system that affects the world. The relation of sensory and motor systems to the memory is discussed, together with how favorable actions can be learned and unfavorable actions can be avoided. Results in classical learning theory are explained in terms of the model, more advanced forms of learning are discussed, and the relevance of the model to the frame problem of robotics is examined.

  8. Supramolecular organization of the mammalian translation system.

    PubMed Central

    Negrutskii, B S; Stapulionis, R; Deutscher, M P

    1994-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that the protein synthetic machinery is organized within cells, this point has been difficult to prove because any organization that might exist is lost upon preparation of the cell-free systems usually used to study translation in vitro. To examine this process under conditions more representative of the intact cell, we have developed an active protein-synthesizing system using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells permeabilized with the plant glycoside saponin. This procedure renders cells permeable to trypan blue and exogenous tRNA, but there is little release of endogenous macromolecules. Protein synthesis in this system proceeds at the same rate as that in intact cells and is about 40-fold faster than that in a cell-free system prepared from the same cells. Active protein synthesis in this system requires the addition of only Mg2+, K+, and creatine phosphate, with a small further stimulation by ATP and an amino acid mixture; no exogenous macromolecules are necessary. The proteins synthesized in this system are indistinguishable from those made by the intact cell, and the channeling of aminoacyl-tRNA observed in vivo is maintained. Our data suggest that the permeabilized cell system retains the protein-synthesizing capabilities of the intact cell and presumably its internal structure as well. Studies with this system demonstrate that the protein-synthesizing apparatus is highly organized and that its macromolecular components are not freely diffusible in mammalian cells. Images PMID:8302874

  9. CONTAMINANT-ASSOCIATED ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN REPTILES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data presented suggest that contaminants can alter the endocrine and reproductive system of reptiles by mimicking hormones and by various mechanisms other than direct hormonal mimicry. However, these data indicate, as do many other studies using various vertebrates, that a fo...

  10. [Endocrine problems during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mann, Klaus; Hintze, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine disorders may have an important influence on fertility, the course of a pregnancy and fetal development. For example, fertility is decreased and the risk of miscarriage is increased in women with autoimmune disorders, such as Addison's disease or autoimmune thyroiditis. Treatment of endocrine diseases in many cases has to be adapted during the course of a pregnancy. In patients with Addison's disease the dosage of hydrocortisone necessarily has to be increased. This is also valid for the time of delivery. Disorders of the thyroid gland are of great importance during pregnancy. If hypothyroidism is diagnosed in early pregnancy, immediate treatment with levothyroxine should be initiated. Iodine supplementation is strongly recommended in all pregnant and breast-feeding women. Treatment of Graves's disease will be performed during the first trimenon with propylthiouracile, afterwards with methimazole (thiamazole). In contrast, thyrotoxicosis due to hCG should not be treated with methimazole. In this paper, we present an overview on the most important endocrine disorders during pregnancy. PMID:27598917

  11. Endocrine taste cells.

    PubMed

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Yee, Karen K; Ilegems, Erwin; Iwatsuki, Ken; Li, Yan; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    In taste cells, taste receptors, their coupled G proteins and downstream signalling elements mediate the detection and transduction of sweet, bitter and umami compounds. In some intestinal endocrine cells, taste receptors and gustducin contribute to the release of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and other gut hormones in response to glucose and non-energetic sweeteners. Conversely, taste cells have been found to express multiple hormones typically found in intestinal endocrine cells, e.g. GLP-1, glucagon, somatostatin and ghrelin. In the present study, by immunohistochemistry, multiple subsets of taste cells were found to express GLP-1. The release of GLP-1 from 'endocrine taste cells' into the bloodstream was examined. In wild-type mice, even after oesophagectomy and vagotomy, oral stimulation with glucose induced an elevation of GLP-1 levels in the bloodstream within 10 min. Stimulation of taste cell explants from wild-type mice with glucose led to the release of GLP-1 into the medium. Knocking out of the Tas1r3 gene did not eliminate glucose-stimulated GLP-1 release from taste cells in vivo. The present results indicate that a portion of the cephalic-phase rise in circulating GLP-1 levels is mediated by the direct release of GLP-1 from taste cells into the bloodstream.

  12. Endocrine response to brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chioléro, R; Berger, M

    1994-11-01

    The neuroendocrine response (NER) is an essential component of the adaptive process to trauma, brain injury, and major surgery. While receiving additive humoral and neural afferent inputs, the brain nuclei responsible for the NER act mainly by efferent pathways to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathoadrenal system, the activations of which induce subsequent circulatory and metabolic responses. The NER to brain injury is similar to the response observed in patients with extracerebral injury, even if the response after brain injury is extremely variable. Generally, there is a biphasic pattern, with a sympathoadrenal storm associated with variable and altered stimulation of the HPA during the ebb phase. The first phase is followed by a decrease in both responses while other endocrine changes develop, involving mainly the counter-regulatory, gonadal, and thyroid hormones. The outcome after brain injury is closely correlated with the intensity of these changes, particularly with catecholamine plasma levels and the severity of the low triiodothyronine syndrome. Alterations of the thyroid hormones are largely related to a reduction in peripheral deiodination of thyroxin. Recent research shows that increased free-radical production and decreased selenium (an antioxidant) serum levels play an important role in thyroid metabolism. Two major issues remain unsolved: a) the precise definition of cerebral death, since endocrine brain function is not abolished in the state currently defined as brain death; and b) the question of whether substitutive hormone therapy should be applied in severe brain injury.

  13. OECD test strategies and methods for endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Gelbke, H P; Kayser, M; Poole, A

    2004-12-01

    The question whether (man-made or natural) chemical substances may have an adverse effect on the endocrine system has gained high visibility in the public as well as in the scientific community. This relates to possible effects on the environment as well as on human health for chemicals with (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic or (anti)thyroid activity. Taking into account the broad universe of chemicals to which humans or the environment may be exposed, a sound testing strategy and robust test methods are urgently needed. Both subjects have been addressed by a specific OECD working group (EDTA-Endocrine Disruptor Testing and Assessment Task Force) involving regulatory agencies, the scientific community, chemical industry and NGOs. Like other organizations the OECD has adopted a tiered-testing strategy with the first tier using screening assays as quick and inexpensive tools, providing a way of generating alerts to potential endocrine activity that can be used to prioritize substances for definitive tests that then can determine the toxicological consequences of endocrine toxicity. The efforts of the OECD have therefore concentrated on the validation of specific screening and testing guidelines, like the uterotrophic, the Hershberger, and the "enhanced TG 407" test. The experimental testing necessary for this validation procedure is completed for the uterotrophic and the "enhanced TG 407" tests and near completion for the Hershberger assay. The data obtained so far have been published (for the uterotrophic assay) or will be submitted to the EDTA working group for final evaluation. Overall, the validation program has been very successful and should be sufficient for setting up OECD test guidelines for these experimental procedures. This will add substantially to the "tool-box" of OECD test methods that is available internationally to regulatory agencies and chemical industry for the identification and assessment of possible endocrine disruptors. Despite this success

  14. Endocrine Aspects of Environmental "Obesogen" Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Francesca; Barrea, Luigi; Di Somma, Carolina; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Orio, Francesco; Savastano, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests the causal link between the endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and the global obesity epidemics, in the context in the so-called "obesogenic environment". Dietary intake of contaminated foods and water, especially in association with unhealthy eating pattern, and inhalation of airborne pollutants represent the major sources of human exposure to EDCs. This is of particular concern in view of the potential impact of obesity on chronic non-transmissible diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hormone-sensitive cancers. The key concept is the identification of adipose tissue not only as a preferential site of storage of EDCs, but also as an endocrine organ and, as such, susceptible to endocrine disruption. The timing of exposure to EDCs is critical to the outcome of that exposure, with early lifetime exposures (e.g., fetal or early postnatal) particularly detrimental because of their permanent effects on obesity later in life. Despite that the mechanisms operating in EDCs effects might vary enormously, this minireview is aimed to provide a general overview on the possible association between the pandemics of obesity and EDCs, briefly describing the endocrine mechanisms linking EDCs exposure and latent onset of obesity. PMID:27483295

  15. Self-organization in social tagging systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuang; Yeung, Chi Ho; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2011-06-01

    Individuals often imitate each other to fall into the typical group, leading to a self-organized state of typical behaviors in a community. In this paper, we model self-organization in social tagging systems and illustrate the underlying interaction and dynamics. Specifically, we introduce a model in which individuals adjust their own tagging tendency to imitate the average tagging tendency. We found that when users are of low confidence, they tend to imitate others and lead to a self-organized state with active tagging. On the other hand, when users are of high confidence and are stubborn to change, tagging becomes inactive. We observe a phase transition at a critical level of user confidence when the system changes from one regime to the other. The distributions of post length obtained from the model are compared to real data, which show good agreement. PMID:21797438

  16. Possible effects of endocrine disruptors on male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Mori, C

    2001-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors act to alter blood hormone levels or the subsequent action of hormones, including effects on hormone production, release, transport, metabolism and/or elimination together with effects on cognate receptor binding and/or subsequent intracellular receptor actions. Confirmed alterations in reproductive development in wildlife species together with reports touting an increase in the incidence of human male reproductive tract abnormalities and decreased adult sperm counts in some parts of the world have increased public concern with endocrine disruptors. A biological plausible hypothesis has suggested that man-made chemicals act as endocrine disruptors resulting in altered development of the reproductive tract causing the observed effects. Based on current knowledge, the impact of endocrine disruptors on the male reproductive function remains to be appreciated. Epidemiological human studies are necessary to fill in the gap in our knowledge. Disturbances of hormonal regulation during fetal or postnatal development in humans may induce adverse effects on the male reproductive system, but these adverse effects of endocrine disruptors on humans are subtle, and difficult to research and detect. We have investigated fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors in Japan by analyzing umbilical cords, and changes of testis-weight in Japanese men by using analytical data of necropsy. This mini-review summarizes current endocrine disruptor issues on possible effects of endocrine disruptors on male reproductive function and the results of our recent research.

  17. Possible effects of endocrine disruptors on male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Mori, C

    2001-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors act to alter blood hormone levels or the subsequent action of hormones, including effects on hormone production, release, transport, metabolism and/or elimination together with effects on cognate receptor binding and/or subsequent intracellular receptor actions. Confirmed alterations in reproductive development in wildlife species together with reports touting an increase in the incidence of human male reproductive tract abnormalities and decreased adult sperm counts in some parts of the world have increased public concern with endocrine disruptors. A biological plausible hypothesis has suggested that man-made chemicals act as endocrine disruptors resulting in altered development of the reproductive tract causing the observed effects. Based on current knowledge, the impact of endocrine disruptors on the male reproductive function remains to be appreciated. Epidemiological human studies are necessary to fill in the gap in our knowledge. Disturbances of hormonal regulation during fetal or postnatal development in humans may induce adverse effects on the male reproductive system, but these adverse effects of endocrine disruptors on humans are subtle, and difficult to research and detect. We have investigated fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors in Japan by analyzing umbilical cords, and changes of testis-weight in Japanese men by using analytical data of necropsy. This mini-review summarizes current endocrine disruptor issues on possible effects of endocrine disruptors on male reproductive function and the results of our recent research. PMID:11577437

  18. Project ATHENA Creates Surrogate Human Organ Systems

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Luke; Knospel, Fanny; Sherrod, Stacy; Iyer, Rashi

    2015-06-15

    The development of miniature surrogate human organs, coupled with highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, could one day revolutionize the way new drugs and toxic agents are studied. “By developing this ‘homo minutus,’ we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs,” said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is nearing the full integration of four human organ constructs — liver, heart, lung and kidney — each organ component is about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA “body” of interconnected organs will fit neatly on a desk. A new video available on the Los Alamos National Laboratory YouTube channel updates the ATHENA project as it begins to integrate the various organ systems into a single system (link to video here). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success. ATHENA is funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and is a collaboration of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Harvard University, Vanderbilt University, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany, CFD Research Corporation, and the University of California San Francisco.

  19. Toward Self-Organizing Search Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Stanislav; Dohnal, Vlastislav; Sedmidubsky, Jan; Zezula, Pavel

    The huge amount of images, videos, and music clips produced everyday by various digital devices must be processed. Firstly, this kind of data calls for content-based search or similarity search rather than keyword-based or text-based search. Secondly, new scalable and efficient methods capable of storing and querying such data must be developed. Although many distributed approaches exist, one of the most suitable and flexible is provided by self-organizing systems. These systems exhibit high resistance to failures in dynamically changing environments. In this chapter, we propose a general three-layer model for designing and implementing a self-organizing system that aims at searching in multimedia data. This model gives a developer guidelines about what component must be implemented, and how they should behave. The usability of this model is illustrated on a system called Metric Social Network. The architecture of this system is based on the social network theory that is utilized for establishing links between nodes. The system's properties are verified by organizing and searching in 10 million images.

  20. Genomic organization and transcriptional modulation in response to endocrine disrupting chemicals of three vitellogenin genes in the self-fertilizing fish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Min Chul; Kang, Hye-Min; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-04-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is the precursor of egg yolk proteins, and its expression has been used as a reliable biomarker for estrogenic contamination in the aquatic environment. To examine the biomarker potential of the self-fertilizing killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus Vtgs (Km-Vtgs), full genomic DNAs of Km-Vtgs-Aa, Km-Vtgs-Ab, and Km-Vtgs-C were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. Three Vtg genes in K. marmoratus are tandemly placed in a 550 kb section of the same chromosome. In silico analysis of promoter regions revealed that both the Km-Vtgs-Aa and Km-Vtgs-Ab genes had an estrogen response element (ERE), but the Km-Vtgs-C gene did not. However, all three Km-Vtgs genes had several ERE-half sites in their promoter regions. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the three deduced amino acid residues were highly conserved with conventional Vtgs protein, forming distinctive clades within teleost Vtgs. Liver tissue showed the highest expression of Km-Vtg transcripts in all tested tissues (brain/pituitary, eye, gonad, intestine, skin, and muscle) in response to endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC)-exposed conditions. Km-Vtg transcripts were significantly increased in response to 17β-estradiol (E2), tamoxifen (TMX), 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), and octylphenol (OP) over 24hr exposure. The Km-Vtg-A gene was highly expressed compared to the control in response to NP and OP. EDC-induced modulatory patterns of Km-Vtg gene expression were different depending on tissue, gender, and isoforms. PMID:27090710

  1. Three months of regular aerobic exercise in patients with obesity improve systemic subclinical inflammation without major influence on blood pressure and endocrine production of subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Trachta, P; Drápalová, J; Kaválková, P; Toušková, V; Cinkajzlová, A; Lacinová, Z; Matoulek, M; Zelinka, T; Widimský, J; Mráz, M; Haluzík, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to explore the effects of regular aerobic exercise on anthropometric, biochemical and hormonal parameters and mRNA expression of selected factors involved in metabolic regulations in subcutaneous adipose tissue of patients with obesity. Fifteen obese women with arterial hypertension underwent a three-month exercise program consisting of 30 min of aerobic exercise 3 times a week. Fifteen healthy lean women with no intervention served as a control group. Obese group underwent anthropometric measurements, blood sampling, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) biopsy and 24-h blood pressure monitoring at baseline and after three months of exercise, while control group was examined only once. At baseline, obese group had increased SCAT expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines relative to control group. Three months of regular exercise improved anthropometric parameters, decreased CRP, blood glucose and HOMA-IR, while having no significant effect on lipid profile and blood pressure. Gene expressions in SCAT were not affected by physical activity with the exception of increased aquaporin-3 mRNA expression. We conclude that three months of regular exercise decrease systemic subclinical inflammation with only minor influence on the blood pressure and the endocrine function of subcutaneous fat.

  2. Evaluation of a Screening System for Obesogenic Compounds: Screening of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds and Evaluation of the PPAR Dependency of the Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Fernandes, Anna; Demaegdt, Heidi; Vandermeiren, Karine; Hectors, Tine L. M.; Jorens, Philippe G.; Blust, Ronny; Vanparys, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Recently the environmental obesogen hypothesis has been formulated, proposing a role for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the development of obesity. To evaluate this hypothesis, a screening system for obesogenic compounds is urgently needed. In this study, we suggest a standardised protocol for obesogen screening based on the 3T3-L1 cell line, a well-characterised adipogenesis model, and direct fluorescent measurement using Nile red lipid staining technique. In a first phase, we characterised the assay using the acknowledged obesogens rosiglitazone and tributyltin. Based on the obtained dose-response curves for these model compounds, a lipid accumulation threshold value was calculated to ensure the biological relevance and reliability of statistically significant effects. This threshold based method was combined with the well described strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) method for classification of non-, weak- or strong obesogenic compounds. In the next step, a range of EDCs, used in personal and household care products (parabens, musks, phthalates and alkylphenol compounds), were tested to further evaluate the obesogenicity screening assay for its discriminative power and sensitivity. Additionally, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) dependency of the positive compounds was evaluated using PPARγ activation and antagonist experiments. Our results showed the adipogenic potential of all tested parabens, several musks and phthalate compounds and bisphenol A (BPA). PPARγ activation was associated with adipogenesis for parabens, phthalates and BPA, however not required for obesogenic effects induced by Tonalide, indicating the role of other obesogenic mechanisms for this compound. PMID:24155963

  3. Organic Carbon Dynamics in Glacier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J.; Sharp, M.; Klassen, J.; Foght, J.; Turner, R.

    2004-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon (OC) has important implications for aquatic system ecology because the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC influence contaminant transport and bioavailability, and determine its suitability as a substrate for microbial metabolism. There have been few studies of OC cycling in glacier systems, and questions remain regarding the abundance, provenance, and biogeochemical transformations of OC in these environments. To address these questions, the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC is investigated in three glacier systems. These systems are characterized by different thermal and hydrological regimes and have different potential OC sources. John Evans Glacier is a polythermal glacier in arctic Canada. Outre Glacier is a temperate glacier in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. Victoria Upper Glacier is a cold-based glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. To provide an indication of the extent to which glacier system OC dynamics are microbially mediated, microbial culturing and identification is performed and organic acid abundance and speciation is determined. Where possible, samples of supraglacial runoff, glacier ice and basal ice and subglacial meltwater were collected. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in each sample was measured by combustion/non-dispersive infrared gas analysis. Emission and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the molecular properties of the DOC from each environment. When possible, microbial culturing and identification was performed and organic acid identification and quantification was measured by ion chromatography. DOC exists in detectable quantities (0.06-46.6 ppm) in all of the glacier systems that were investigated. The molecular characteristics of DOC vary between glaciers, between environments at the same glacier, and over time within a single environment. Viable microbes are recoverable in significant (ca

  4. An overview of estrogen-associated endocrine disruption in fishes: evidence of effects on reproductive and immune physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    Simply and perhaps intuitively defined, endocrine disruption is the abnormal modulation of normal hormonal physiology by exogenous chemicals. In fish, endocrine disruption of the reproductive system has been observed worldwide in numerous species and is known to affect both males and females. Observations of biologically relevant endocrine disruption most commonly occurs near waste water treatment plant outfalls, pulp and paper mills, and areas of high organic loading sometimes associated with agricultural practices. Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) have received an overwhelmingly disproportionate amount of scientific attention compared to other EDCs in recent years. In male fishes, exposure to EEDCs can lead to the induction of testicular oocytes (intersex), measurable plasma vitellogenin protein, altered sex steroid profiles, abnormal spawning behavior, skewed population sex ratios, and lessened reproductive success. Interestingly, contemporary research purports that EDCs modulate aspects of non-reproductive physiology including immune function. Here we present an overview of endocrine disruption in fishes associated with estrogenic compounds, implications of this phenomenon, and examples of EDC related research findings by our group in the Potomac River Watershed, USA.

  5. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  6. Diabetic and endocrine emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, T; Dang, C

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine emergencies constitute only a small percentage of the emergency workload of general doctors, comprising about 1.5% of all hospital admission in England in 2004–5. Most of these are diabetes related with the remaining conditions totalling a few hundred cases at most. Hence any individual doctor might not have sufficient exposure to be confident in their management. This review discusses the management of diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, hypoglycaemia, hypercalcaemia, thyroid storm, myxoedema coma, acute adrenal insufficiency, phaeochromocytoma hypertensive crisis and pituitary apoplexy in the adult population. PMID:17308209

  7. Exposure to a Complex Cocktail of Environmental Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Disturbs the Kisspeptin/GPR54 System in Ovine Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, Michelle; Fowler, Paul A.; Amezaga, Maria R.; Rhind, Stewart M.; Cotinot, Corinne; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice; Sharpe, Richard M.; Evans, Neil P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous environmental chemicals, including endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), are associated with declining human reproductive health, as well as an increasing incidence of cancers of the reproductive system. Verifying such links requires animal models exposed to “real-life,” environmentally relevant concentrations/mixtures of EDC, particularly in utero, when sensitivity to EDC exposure is maximal. Objectives We evaluated the effects of maternal exposure to a pollutant cocktail (sewage sludge) on the ovine fetal reproductive neuroendocrine axes, particularly the kisspeptin (KiSS-1)/GPR54 (G-protein–coupled receptor 54) system. Methods KiSS-1, GPR54, and ERα (estrogen receptor α) mRNA expression was quantified in control (C) and treated (T) maternal and fetal (110-day) hypothalami and pituitary glands using semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and colocalization of kisspeptin with LHβ (luteinizing hormone β) and ERα in C and T fetal pituitary glands quantified using dual-labeling immunohistochemistry. Results Fetuses exposed in utero to the EDC mixture showed reduced KiSS-1 mRNA expression across three hypothalamic regions examined (rostral, mid, and caudal) and had fewer kisspetin immunopositive cells colocalized with both LHβ and ERα in the pituitary gland. In contrast, treatment had no effect on parameters measured in the adult ewe hypothalamus or pituitary. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the developing fetus is sensitive to real-world mixtures of environmental chemicals, which cause significant neuroendocrine alterations. The important role of kisspeptin/GPR54 in regulating puberty and adult reproduction means that in utero disruption of this system is likely to have long-term consequences in adulthood and represents a novel, additional pathway through which environmental chemicals perturb human reproduction. PMID:20019906

  8. Organic Matter in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruiskshank, Dale P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many solid bodies in the outer Solar System are covered with ices of various compositions, including water, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and other molecules that are solid at the low temperatures that prevail there. These ices have all been detected by remote sensing observations made with telescopes on Earth, or more recently, spacecraft in orbit (notably Galileo at Jupiter). The data also reveal other solid materials that could be minerals or complex carbon-bearing organic molecules. A study in progress using large ground-based telescopes to acquire infrared spectroscopic data, and laboratory results on the optical properties of complex organic matter, seeks to identify the non-icy materials on several satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The work on the satellites of Saturn is in part preparatory to the Cassini spacecraft investigation of the Saturn system, which will begin in 2004 and extend for four years.

  9. [Cardiac failure in endocrine diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K

    1993-05-01

    Several endocrine diseases show the symptoms of cardiac failure. Among them, patients with acromegaly show a specific cardiomyopathy which results in a severe left-sided cardiac failure. Hypoparathyroidism also induces cardiac failure, which is resulted from hypocalcemia and low levels of serum parathyroid hormone. In the cases of hypothyroidism, the patients with myxedemal coma show a severe cardiac failure, which is characterized by disturbance of central nervous system, renal function, and cardiac function. In the patients with thyroid crisis (storm), the cardiac failure comes from the great reduction of cardiac output with dehydration. The reduction of circulation volume, observed in the patients with pheochromocytoma easily induces cardiac failure (shock) just after the removal of adrenal tumor. In patients with malignant carcinoid syndrome, right-sided ventricular failure which may be occurred through the actions of biogenic amines is observed. PMID:8331806

  10. Endocrine-related reproductive effects in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Ketata, Imen; Denier, Xavier; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Minier, Christophe

    2008-04-01

    Research on endocrine disruption has been a major topic of the past decade. Although most studies concentrated on vertebrate species, invertebrates are now gaining more attention. In particular, data on molluscs is increasing. One of the best-documented and more relevant examples of endocrine disruption is the imposex phenomenon affecting some gastropod species. But the increasing interest is also due to the fact that molluscs, especially bivalves, are good bioindicators used for decades in environmental studies and that progress have been made in the understanding of the physiology and endocrinology of some mollusc species. Recent results suggest that molluscs can be adversely affected by compounds that alter their reproduction and that vertebrate-type sex-steroids metabolism or mechanism of action could be involved in these effects. Nevertheless, the endocrine system of molluscs appears to be dissimilar in many aspects to those of vertebrates and sex-steroids might not have the same importance in all mollusc species. This diversity constitutes an important opportunity to examine and understand new and alternative mechanisms for endocrine disruption.

  11. Effect of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the transcription of genes related to the innate immune system in the early developmental stage of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Chen, Rujia; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2010-01-01

    Health concerns regarding the potential interference of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the immune system of wildlife and humans have increased in recent years. However, the effects of EDCs in aquatic systems on the immune system of fish species has only received limited attention. In the present study, we found that the mRNA levels of TNFalpha, IFN, IL-1beta, IL-8, CXCL-Clc, and CC-chemokine, which are closely related to the innate immune system, were affected in newly hatched zebrafish when exposed to EDCs, such as 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethynyestradiol, permethrin, atrazine and nonylphenol at various concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 12.5 microg/l) for three days during the embryo stage. However, the different EDCs displayed different potentials to change innate immune-related gene transcription. Among the selected chemicals, permethrin (PM) and 17beta-estradiol (E2) (12.5 microg/l) significantly increased the mRNA levels of many cytokines, exhibiting their most prominent impacts on the innate immune system of zebrafish. In addition, it was found that the mixture of the above five chemicals (2.5 microg/l each) had a greater effect on innate immune system-related gene transcription in zebrafish than equal amounts of the single compound. Moreover, the genes (such as Bcl2, Ucp2 and iNOS) relating to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive free radical production were also influenced by some EDCs and their mixture. We suggest that heavy oxidative stress and the balance of nitric oxide (NO) production lead to death of immune cells. These results may provide an explanation of the possible mode how EDCs influence the innate immune system in zebrafish. Taken together, the results obtained in the present study clearly demonstrate that EDCs and their mixtures in aquatic systems will greatly influence the immune system in fish, suggesting that the effects of EDCs on fish should be associated with immune toxicity. PMID:20153439

  12. Dynamic Nature of Alterations in the Endocrine System of Fathead Minnows Exposed to the Fungicide Prochloraz, Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms that ideally serve to maintain a dynamic homeostasis of the system in the face of changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. In these stud...

  13. Fungal laccases degradation of endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Macellaro, Gemma; Pezzella, Cinzia; Cicatiello, Paola; Sannia, Giovanni; Piscitelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L) has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads. PMID:24829908

  14. Fungal Laccases Degradation of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Macellaro, Gemma; Cicatiello, Paola; Sannia, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L) has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads. PMID:24829908

  15. Targeted toxicological testing to investigate the role of endocrine disrupters in puberty disorders.

    PubMed

    Maranghi, Francesca; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Puberty is a process regulated by the endocrine system which physiological onset is poorly understood. Factors potentially leading to the disruption of this system may seriously affect the reproductive function development. Altered puberty onset can be an unspecific consequence of general toxicity in juvenile rodents; however, several toxicological studies indicate potential effects of specific substances on puberty development. In particular, the exposure to endocrine disrupters (ED) showing (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic activity or interaction with hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is considered biologically plausible and deserving attention. Risk assessment agencies call for data on children effects for their specific vulnerability or specific exposure situations. On the other hand, no international effort is foreseen to develop robust tools for characterizing chemical hazards in the immature organisms. For some chemicals the available data might be sufficient to trigger precautionary measures but a sound risk analysis needs an interdisciplinary integration between human medicine and experimental toxicology.

  16. Male infertility. 3. Endocrine causes.

    PubMed

    McNally, M R

    1987-02-01

    Endocrine causes of male infertility range from easily manageable disorders such as hypothyroidism to complex problems such as pituitary tumors. Proper management requires a thorough understanding of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Hormonal evaluation is performed only when the patient's history and results of physical examination indicate an endocrine problem. With proper identification and treatment, most of these problems can be successfully managed.

  17. Oxidative removal of selected endocrine-disruptors and pharmaceuticals in drinking water treatment systems, and identification of degradation products of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihua; Shi, Honglan; Adams, Craig D; Timmons, Terry; Ma, Yinfa

    2012-11-15

    The potential occurrences of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), as well as pharmaceuticals, are considered to be emerging environmental problems due to their persistence and continuous input into the aquatic ecosystem, even at only trace concentrations. This study systematically investigated the oxidative removal of eight specially selected ECDs and pharmaceuticals by comparing their relative reactivity as a function of different oxidative treatment processes (i.e., free chlorine, ozone, monochloramine, and permanganate) under various pH conditions. For the oxidative removal study, EDC and pharmaceutical standards were spiked into both deionized water and natural water, followed by treatment using common oxidants at typical water treatment concentrations. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used for identification and quantification. The removal efficiency of the EDCs and pharmaceuticals varied significantly between oxidation processes. Free chlorine, permanganate, and ozone treatments were all highly effective at the elimination of triclosan and estrone, while they were not effective for removing ibuprofen, iopromide, and clofibric acid. Monochloramine (at a dose of 3mg/L) was mostly ineffective in eliminating any of the selected EDCs and pharmaceuticals under the tested conditions. pH also played an important role in the removal efficiency of the EDCs and pharmaceuticals during free chlorine, permanganate, and ozone treatments. Additionally, the study identified the oxidation products of triclosan by permanganate, and 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the major oxidation product of triclosan by permanganate in drinking water system treatment. Furthermore, 2,4-dichlorophenol was further degradated to 4,5-dichloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol and/or 5,6-dichloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol. The kinetics for this reaction indicated that the reaction was first order in the drinking water system.

  18. SCREENING CALIFORNIA SURFACE WATERS FOR ESTROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS (EEDC) WITH A JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT LIVER VITELLOGENIN MRNA PROCEDURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern regarding the occurrence of chemicals that disrupt endocrine system functions in aquatic species has heightened over the last 15 years. However, little attention has been given to monitoring for estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) in California's freshwater ...

  19. Synthetic organisms and self-designing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the need for complex, adaptive solutions to certain types of complex problems typified by the Strategic Defense System and NASA's Space Station and Mars Rover. Since natural systems have evolved with capabilities of intelligent behavior in complex, dynamic situations, it is proposed that biological principles be identified and abstracted for application to certain problems now facing industry defense, and space exploration. Two classes of artificial neural networks are presented/endash/a non-adaptive network used as a genetically determined ''retina,'' and a frequency-coded network as an adaptive ''brain.'' The role of a specific environment coupled with a system of artificial neural networks having simulated sensors and effectors is seen as an ecosystem. Evolution of synthetic organisms within this ecosystem provides a powerful optimization methodology for creating intelligent systems able to function successfully in any desired environment. A complex software system involving a simulation of an environment and a program designed to cope with that environment are presented. Reliance on adaptive systems, as found in nature, is only part of the proposed answer, though an essential one. The second part of the proposed method makes use of an additional biological metaphor/endash/that of natural selection/endash/to solve the dynamic optimization problems that every intelligent system eventually faces. A third area of concern in developing an adaptive, intelligent system is that of real-time computing. It is recognized that many of the problems now being explored in this area have their parallels in biological organisms, and many of the performance issues facing artificial neural networks may find resolution in the methodology of real-time computing. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  20. The endocrine effects of nicotine and cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Tweed, Jesse Oliver; Hsia, Stanley H.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2012-01-01

    With a current prevalence of approximately 20%, smoking continues to impact negatively upon health. Tobacco or nicotine use influences the endocrine system, with important clinical implications. In this review we critically evaluate the literature concerning the impact of nicotine as well as tobacco use on several parameters of the endocrine system and on glucose and lipid homeostasis. Emphasis is on the effect of smoking on diabetes mellitus and obesity and the consequences of smoking cessation on these disorders. Understanding the effects of nicotine and cigarettes on the endocrine system and how these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of various endocrine diseases will allow for targeted therapies and more effective approaches for smoking cessation. PMID:22561025

  1. Role of the GATA family of transcription factors in endocrine development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Viger, Robert S; Guittot, Séverine Mazaud; Anttonen, Mikko; Wilson, David B; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2008-04-01

    The WGATAR motif is a common nucleotide sequence found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of numerous genes. In vertebrates, these motifs are bound by one of six factors (GATA1 to GATA6) that constitute the GATA family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Although originally considered for their roles in hematopoietic cells and the heart, GATA factors are now known to be expressed in a wide variety of tissues where they act as critical regulators of cell-specific gene expression. This includes multiple endocrine organs such as the pituitary, pancreas, adrenals, and especially the gonads. Insights into the functional roles played by GATA factors in adult organ systems have been hampered by the early embryonic lethality associated with the different Gata-null mice. This is now being overcome with the generation of tissue-specific knockout models and other knockdown strategies. These approaches, together with the increasing number of human GATA-related pathologies have greatly broadened the scope of GATA-dependent genes and, importantly, have shown that GATA action is not necessarily limited to early development. This has been particularly evident in endocrine organs where GATA factors appear to contribute to the transcription of multiple hormone-encoding genes. This review provides an overview of the GATA family of transcription factors as they relate to endocrine function and disease.

  2. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Lumen, Annie; McNally, Kevin; George, Nysia; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Loizou, George D

    2015-01-01

    A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local sensitivity analysis.

  3. Plant disease management in organic farming systems.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, Ariena H C; Gamliel, Abraham; Finckh, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Organic farming (OF) has significantly increased in importance in recent decades. Disease management in OF is largely based on the maintenance of biological diversity and soil health by balanced crop rotations, including nitrogen-fixing and cover crops, intercrops, additions of manure and compost and reductions in soil tillage. Most soil-borne diseases are naturally suppressed, while foliar diseases can sometimes be problematic. Only when a severe disease outbreak is expected are pesticides used that are approved for OF. A detailed overview is given of cultural and biological control measures. Attention is also given to regulated pesticides. We conclude that a systems approach to disease management is required, and that interdisciplinary research is needed to solve lingering disease problems, especially for OF in the tropics. Some of the organic regulations are in need of revision in close collaboration with various stakeholders.

  4. Organic matter in the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.; Lewis, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental predictions of the formation (and outgassing) of organic molecules in the outer solar system are compared with Voyager IRIS spectral data for the Titan atmosphere. The organic molecules of Titan are of interest because the species and processes within the atmosphere of that moon may have had analogs in the early earth atmosphere 4 Gyr ago. The spacecraft data confirmed the presence of alkanes, ethane, propane, ethylene, alkynes, acetylene, butadiene, methylacetylene, nitriles, hydrogen cyanide, cyanoacetylene, and cyanogen, all heavier than the dominant CH4. Experimental simulation of the effects of UV photolysis, alpha and gamma ray irradiation, electrical discharges and proton and electron bombardment of similar gas mixtures has shown the best promise for modeling the reactions producing the Titan atmosphere chemicals.

  5. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Climate Change: A Worst-Case Combination for Arctic Marine Mammals and Seabirds?

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2006-01-01

    The effects of global change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning encompass multiple complex dynamic processes. Climate change and exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are currently regarded as two of the most serious anthropogenic threats to biodiversity and ecosystems. We should, therefore, be especially concerned about the possible effects of EDCs on the ability of Arctic marine mammals and seabirds to adapt to environmental alterations caused by climate change. Relationships between various organochlorine compounds, necessary such as polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorophenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, and oxychlordane, and hormones in Arctic mammals and seabirds imply that these chemicals pose a threat to endocrine systems of these animals. The most pronounced relationships have been reported with the thyroid hormone system, but effects are also seen in sex steroid hormones and cortisol. Even though behavioral and morphological effects of persistent organic pollutants are consistent with endocrine disruption, no direct evidence exists for such relationships. Because different endocrine systems are important for enabling animals to respond adequately to environmental stress, EDCs may interfere with adaptations to increased stress situations. Such interacting effects are likely related to adaptive responses regulated by the thyroid, sex steroid, and glucocorticosteroid systems. PMID:16818250

  6. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and climate change: A worst-case combination for arctic marine mammals and seabirds?

    PubMed

    Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2006-04-01

    The effects of global change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning encompass multiple complex dynamic processes. Climate change and exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are currently regarded as two of the most serious anthropogenic threats to biodiversity and ecosystems. We should, therefore, be especially concerned about the possible effects of EDCs on the ability of Arctic marine mammals and seabirds to adapt to environmental alterations caused by climate change. Relationships between various organochlorine compounds, necessary such as polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorophenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, and oxychlordane, and hormones in Arctic mammals and seabirds imply that these chemicals pose a threat to endocrine systems of these animals. The most pronounced relationships have been reported with the thyroid hormone system, but effects are also seen in sex steroid hormones and cortisol. Even though behavioral and morphological effects of persistent organic pollutants are consistent with endocrine disruption, no direct evidence exists for such relationships. Because different endocrine systems are important for enabling animals to respond adequately to environmental stress, EDCs may interfere with adaptations to increased stress situations. Such interacting effects are likely related to adaptive responses regulated by the thyroid, sex steroid, and glucocorticosteroid systems.

  7. Preparation of Single-cohort Colonies and Hormone Treatment of Worker Honeybees to Analyze Physiology Associated with Role and/or Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee workers are engaged in various tasks related to maintaining colony activity. The tasks of the workers change according to their age (age-related division of labor). Young workers are engaged in nursing the brood (nurse bees), while older workers are engaged in foraging for nectar and pollen (foragers). The physiology of the workers changes in association with this role shift. For example, the main function of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) changes from the secretion of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) to the secretion of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes. Because worker tasks change as the workers age in typical colonies, it is difficult to discriminate the physiological changes that occur with aging from those that occur with the role shift. To study the physiological changes in worker tissues, including the HPGs, in association with the role shift, it would be useful to manipulate the honeybee colony population by preparing single-cohort colonies in which workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Here we describe a detailed protocol for preparing single-cohort colonies for this analysis. Six to eight days after single-cohort colony preparation, precocious foragers that perform foraging tasks earlier than usual appear in the colony. Representative results indicated role-associated changes in HPG gene expression, suggesting role-associated HPG function. In addition to manipulating the colony population, analysis of the endocrine system is important for investigating role-associated physiology. Here, we also describe a detailed protocol for treating workers with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), an active form of ecdysone, and methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue. The survival rate of treated bees was sufficient to examine gene expression in the HPGs. Gene expression changes were observed in response to 20E- and/or methoprene-treatment, suggesting that hormone treatments induce physiological changes of the HPGs. The protocol for hormone

  8. Preparation of Single-cohort Colonies and Hormone Treatment of Worker Honeybees to Analyze Physiology Associated with Role and/or Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2016-09-06

    Honeybee workers are engaged in various tasks related to maintaining colony activity. The tasks of the workers change according to their age (age-related division of labor). Young workers are engaged in nursing the brood (nurse bees), while older workers are engaged in foraging for nectar and pollen (foragers). The physiology of the workers changes in association with this role shift. For example, the main function of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) changes from the secretion of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) to the secretion of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes. Because worker tasks change as the workers age in typical colonies, it is difficult to discriminate the physiological changes that occur with aging from those that occur with the role shift. To study the physiological changes in worker tissues, including the HPGs, in association with the role shift, it would be useful to manipulate the honeybee colony population by preparing single-cohort colonies in which workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Here we describe a detailed protocol for preparing single-cohort colonies for this analysis. Six to eight days after single-cohort colony preparation, precocious foragers that perform foraging tasks earlier than usual appear in the colony. Representative results indicated role-associated changes in HPG gene expression, suggesting role-associated HPG function. In addition to manipulating the colony population, analysis of the endocrine system is important for investigating role-associated physiology. Here, we also describe a detailed protocol for treating workers with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), an active form of ecdysone, and methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue. The survival rate of treated bees was sufficient to examine gene expression in the HPGs. Gene expression changes were observed in response to 20E- and/or methoprene-treatment, suggesting that hormone treatments induce physiological changes of the HPGs. The protocol for hormone

  9. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  10. Regulation of synaptic functions in central nervous system by endocrine hormones and the maintenance of energy homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhiping P; Han, Weiping

    2012-10-01

    Energy homoeostasis, a co-ordinated balance of food intake and energy expenditure, is regulated by the CNS (central nervous system). The past decade has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of metabolic processes and brain circuitry which responds to a broad range of neural, nutrient and hormonal signals. Accumulating evidence demonstrates altered synaptic plasticity in the CNS in response to hormone signals. Moreover, emerging observations suggest that synaptic plasticity underlies all brain functions, including the physiological regulation of energy homoeostasis, and that impaired synaptic constellation and plasticity may lead to pathological development and conditions. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of postsynaptic receptors such as AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid), NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors, and the presynaptic components by hormone signals. A detailed understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which hormones regulate energy homoeostasis may lead to novel strategies in treating metabolic disorders.

  11. [Stress-induced changes in functional activity of the neuro-endocrine system: modulatory action of derinat].

    PubMed

    Fomicheva, E E; Filatenkova, T A; Shanin, S N; Rybakina, E G

    2009-03-01

    Changes in functional activity of HPA and HPG axes under stress influences of different intensity, and possible ways for their correction by native DNA preparation: derinat, possessing immune modulator effects, were studied. It was shown that the vector of changes in hormone's reactions of both axes did not depend on the intensity of stress influences: different models of stress increased corticosterone level and decreased testosterone level in rats' blood. Intraperitoneal injection of 10 and 50 mg/kg BW doses of Derinat to rats enhanced HPA and HPG axes activity, reversed stress-induced decrease of testosterone concentration in blood, that may indicate a stress-protective effect of derinat. Injection of derinat caused normalizing of stress-induced changes in immunomodulatory cytokines production within Lymphocyte Activating Factors, which regulate not only the immune system functions but also the functions of HPA and HPG axes.

  12. Effects of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals on the Ovary.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Zhou, Changqing; Rattan, Saniya; Flaws, Jodi A

    2015-07-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are found abundantly in the environment, resulting in daily human exposure. This is of concern because many EDCs are known to target the female reproductive system and, more specifically, the ovary. In the female, the ovary is the key organ responsible for reproductive and endocrine functions. Exposure to EDCs is known to cause many reproductive health problems such as infertility, premature ovarian failure, and abnormal sex steroid hormone levels. Some EDCs and their effects on adult ovarian function have been studied extensively over the years, whereas the effects of others remain unclear. This review covers what is currently known about the effects of selected EDCs (bisphenol A, methoxychlor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, phthalates, and genistein) on the adult ovary and the mechanisms by which they act upon the ovary, focusing primarily on their effects on folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis. Furthermore, this review discusses future directions needed to better understand the effects of EDCs, including the need to examine the effects of multiple and more consistent doses and to study different mechanisms of action. PMID:26063868

  13. [Endocrine-metabolic adjustments during Ramadan fasting in young athletes].

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Morilla, Raúl; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Ruiz-Villaverde, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Caravaca, Ma Angeles; Pérez-Moreno, Barbara Alejandra; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2013-03-01

    The Islamic precept of R implies important physiological modifications due to the hydric and dietetic restrictions along a whole month plus a day, all of which have a crucial repercussion over the physical and intellectual performance of Muslims, particularly in occidental societies, in which there is no hour readjustments for daily activities. Among the imposed modifications by Ramadan in daily habits, intermittent fasting along day and night causes adaptation mechanisms to optimize the energy consumption. The objective of this study was to analyze the metabolic-endocrine changes that happen during daily working hours, along the month of fasting in young subjects who have to continue their usual activities and sport training. Ten young muslim subjects, male, healthy, set to sport training, ages in between 18 and 25 who completed Ramadan. Plasma biochemical and hormonal parameters were analyzed in plasma, a week before Ramadan, in the first and fourth of the fasting month and a week after conclusion. During Ramadan, have been observed a drop of biochemical parameters along daytime, especially those related to glycemia, being these changes stronger in the first week. The concentration of cortisol found to be significantly high during the whole month as a consequence of adaptation to the change of circadian secretion rhythms. Ramadan obliges subject's organisms to readjust their endocrine and metabolic system in order to preserve the energetic efficiency during daytime. This auto control becomes more efficient as long as the month advances due to physiological adaptations. PMID:24171224

  14. Endocrine immune interactions in human parturition.

    PubMed

    Golightly, E; Jabbour, H N; Norman, J E

    2011-03-15

    Human parturition is an inflammatory event, modulated and influenced by a host of other environmental and physiological processes, including the endocrine hormones. Complex bidirectional communication occurs between the two systems to bring about some of the changes that are seen in labour, an event that is not yet fully understood. Preterm birth is a major problem in obstetrics and neonatology, with dysfunctional labour or prolonged pregnancy also making increasingly significant contributions to maternal morbidity. With better understanding of normal and abnormal parturition we may be able to develop novel ways of treating these complications of pregnancy and reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the crucial role that endocrine-immune interaction plays in the process of labour and in the processes of abnormal and preterm labour. We propose that amongst these complex interactions it is the immune system that is the driving force behind human parturition.

  15. Groundwater from infiltration galleries used for small public water supply systems: contamination with pesticides and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Mansilha, C; Melo, A; Ferreira, I M P L V O; Pinho, O; Domingues, V; Pinho, C; Gameiro, P

    2011-09-01

    Infiltration galleries are among the oldest known means used for small public water fountains. Owing to its ancestral origin they are usually associated with high quality water. Thirty-one compounds, including pesticides and estrogens from different chemical families, were analysed in waters from infiltration galleries collected in Alto Douro Demarcated Wine region (North of Portugal). A total of twelve compounds were detected in the water samples. Nine of these compounds are described as presenting evidence or potential evidence of interfering with the hormone system of humans and wildlife. Although concentrations of the target analytes were relatively low, many of them below their limit of quantification, four compounds were above quantification limit and two of them even above the legal limit of 0.1 μg/L: dimethoate (30.38 ng/L), folpet (64.35 ng/L), terbuthylazine-desethyl (22.28 to 292.36 ng/L) and terbuthylazine (22.49 to 369.33 ng/L).

  16. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  17. Regions of the Digestive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  18. Components of the Urinary System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  19. Real-time detection of acetylcholine release from the human endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Huang, Y Anthony; Berggren, Per-Olof; Roper, Stephen D; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2012-05-03

    Neurons, sensory cells and endocrine cells secrete neurotransmitters and hormones to communicate with other cells and to coordinate organ and system function. Validation that a substance is used as an extracellular signaling molecule by a given cell requires a direct demonstration of its secretion. In this protocol we describe the use of biosensor cells to detect neurotransmitter release from endocrine cells in real-time. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor M3 were used as ACh biosensors to record ACh release from human pancreatic islets. We show how ACh biosensors loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2 and pressed against isolated human pancreatic islets allow the detection of ACh release. The biosensor approach is simple; the Ca(2+) signal generated in the biosensor cell reflects the presence (release) of a neurotransmitter. The technique is versatile because biosensor cells expressing a variety of receptors can be used in many applications. The protocol takes ∼3 h.

  20. Real-time detection of acetylcholine release from the human endocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Huang, Y Anthony; Berggren, Per-Olof; Roper, Stephen D; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons, sensory cells and endocrine cells secrete neurotransmitters and hormones to communicate with other cells and to coordinate organ and system function. Validation that a substance is used as an extracellular signaling molecule by a given cell requires a direct demonstration of its secretion. In this protocol we describe the use of biosensor cells to detect neurotransmitter release from endocrine cells in real-time. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor M3 were used as ACh biosensors to record ACh release from human pancreatic islets. We show how ACh biosensors loaded with the Ca2+ indicator Fura-2 and pressed against isolated human pancreatic islets allow the detection of ACh release. The biosensor approach is simple; the Ca2+ signal generated in the biosensor cell reflects the presence (release) of a neurotransmitter. The technique is versatile because biosensor cells expressing a variety of receptors can be used in many applications. The protocol takes ~3 h. PMID:22555241

  1. Psychological aspects of endocrine disease.

    PubMed

    Sonino, N; Guidi, J; Fava, G A

    2015-03-01

    This review illustrates how an innovative psychoneuroendocrine approach to endocrine patients may improve their management. Important psychological issues pertain to all the different phases of an endocrine disorder. Before disease onset, stressful life events may play a pathogenetic role and, together with chronic stress, may contribute to a cumulative burden also called allostatic load; psychological and psychiatric symptoms are common both in the prodromal and in the active phase of illness; after cure or remission, there could be residual symptoms and impaired quality of life that deserve attention. All these aspects should be taken into consideration and introduced in current endocrine care and practice.

  2. Endocrine causes of calcium disorders.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2012-11-01

    Endocrine diseases that may cause hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia include hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, thyroid disorders, hyperadrenocorticism, hypoadrenocorticism, and less commonly pheochromocytoma and multiple endocrine neoplasias. The differential diagnosis of hypercalcemia may include malignancy (lymphoma, anal sac carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma), hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D intoxication, chronic renal disease, hypoadrenocorticism, granulomatous disorders, osteolysis, or spurious causes. Hypocalcemia may be caused by puerperal tetany, pancreatitis, intestinal malabsorption, ethlyene glycol intoxication, acute renal failure, hypopararthyroidism, hypovitaminosis D, hypomagnesemia, and low albumin. This article focuses on the endocrine causes of calcium imbalance and provides diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for identifying the cause of hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia in veterinary patients.

  3. Energy pooling upconversion in organic molecular systems.

    PubMed

    LaCount, Michael D; Weingarten, Daniel; Hu, Nan; Shaheen, Sean E; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Walba, David M; Lusk, Mark T

    2015-04-30

    A combination of molecular quantum electrodynamics, perturbation theory, and ab initio calculations was used to create a computational methodology capable of estimating the rate of three-body singlet upconversion in organic molecular assemblies. The approach was applied to quantify the conditions under which such relaxation rates, known as energy pooling, become meaningful for two test systems, stilbene-fluorescein and hexabenzocoronene-oligothiophene. Both exhibit low intramolecular conversion, but intermolecular configurations exist in which pooling efficiency is at least 90% when placed in competition with more conventional relaxation pathways. For stilbene-fluorescein, the results are consistent with data generated in an earlier experimental investigation. Exercising these model systems facilitated the development of a set of design rules for the optimization of energy pooling. PMID:25793313

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Melissa M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2016-09-15

    Endometriosis is an estrogen dependent gynecologic disease with lasting implications for many women's fertility, somatic health, and overall quality of life. Growing evidence suggests that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may be etiologically involved in the development and severity of disease. We weigh the available human evidence focusing on EDCs and endometriosis, restricting to research that has individually quantified chemical concentrations for women, included a comparison group of unaffected women, and used multivariable analytic techniques. Evidence supporting an environmental etiology for endometriosis includes metals/trace elements, dioxins, and other persistent organic pollutants, as well as nonpersistent chemicals, such as benzophenones and phthalates. To address the equivocal findings for various EDCs, future research directions for filling data gaps include [1] use of integrated clinical and population sampling frameworks allowing for incorporation of new diagnostic modalities; [2] the collection of various biologic media, including target tissues for quantifying exposures; [3] study designs that offer various comparison groups to assess potentially shared etiologies with other gynecologic disorders; and [4] novel laboratory and statistical approaches that fully explore all measured EDCs for the assessment of mixtures and low dose effects and the use of directed acyclic graphs and supporting causal analysis for empirically delineating relationships between EDCs and endometriosis. PMID:27424048

  5. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit Kumar; Bhasin, Rohit; Bisht, Y. S.; Kumar, K. V. S. Hari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18–70 years, any duration) in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40) and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20) and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females) had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4), sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3), growth hormone (GH) deficiency (n = 2), primary hypogonadism (n = 2) and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism) and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006). Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study. PMID:25932392

  6. Organizational Awareness: Using Natural Systems To Understand Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popowits, Michael; Reeve, Kevin

    Organizations are self-organizing living systems and therefore capable of doing for themselves much of what managers have always tried to do for them. The role of the leader in organizations should be one of helping the organization develop a clear sense of its own identity, since that is the reference point around which self-organizing takes…

  7. Endocrine-like Signaling in Cnidarians: Current Understanding and Implications for Ecophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Ann M

    2005-01-01

    The vertebrate endocrine system is well-characterized, with many reports of disruption by environmental chemicals. In contrast, cnidarians are less compartmentalized, physiological regulation is poorly understood, and the potential for disruption is unknown. Endocrine-like activity has not been systematically studied in cnidarians, but several classical vertebrate hormones (e.g., steroids, iodinated organic compounds, neuropeptides, and indoleamines) have been identified in cnidarian tissues. Investigators have made progress in identifying putative bioregulatory molecules in cnidarians, and testing the effects of these individual compounds. Less progress has been made in elucidating signaling pathways. For example, putative gonadotropin-releasing hormone and sex steroids have been identified in cnidarian tissues, but it is unknown whether these compounds are components of a larger signal cascade comparable to the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, while sex steroids and iodinated organic compounds may help to regulate cnidarian physiology, the mechanisms of action are unknown. Homologs to the vertebrate steroid and thyroid receptors have not been identified in cnidarians, so more research is needed to understand the mechanisms of endocrine-like signaling in cnidarians. Elucidation of cnidarian regulatory pathways will provide insight into evolution of hormonal signaling. These studies will also improve understanding of how cnidarians respond to environmental cues and will provide a basis to investigate disruption of physiological processes by physical and chemical stressors.

  8. Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kadakia, Kunal C.; Henry, N. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in premenopausal women. Multiple advances in local and systemic therapies have dramatically improved outcomes in women with HR+ early stage breast cancer. Despite these advances, early and late relapses occur. Therefore multiple adjuvant endocrine therapy trials have been conducted with the goal of decreasing breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Recently, large international trials evaluating extended endocrine therapy as well as ovarian suppression with and without tamoxifen or exemestane have been reported. These studies add to the large body of existing data related to adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer and provide additional therapeutic options in those at high risk of disease recurrence. This review will synthesize the most recent data and provide an evidenced based approach, highlighting quality-of-life concerns, when considering adjuvant endocrine therapies in premenopausal women. PMID:27058571

  9. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  10. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases. PMID:27442377

  11. EPIGENETIC TRANSGENERATIONAL ACTIONS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Environmental factors have a significant impact on biology. Therefore, environmental toxicants through similar mechanisms can modulate biological systems to influence physiology and promote disease states. The majority of environmental toxicants do not have the capacity to modulate DNA sequence, but can alter the epigenome. In the event an environmental toxicant such as an endocrine disruptor modifies the epigenome of a somatic cell, this may promote disease in the individual exposed, but not be transmitted to the next generation. In the event a toxicant modifies the epigenome of the germ line permanently, then the disease promoted can become transgenerationaly transmitted to subsequent progeny. The current review focuses on the ability of environmental factors such as endocrine disruptors to promote transgenerational phenotypes. PMID:21055462

  12. Wilson's disease: An endocrine revelation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Nitin; Shetty, Sahana; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism. The affected patients, who otherwise have a near normal life span, may often suffer from some potentially treatable and under recognized endocrine disorders that may hinder their quality of life. We explored previously published literature on the various endocrine aspects of this disease with their probable underlying mechanisms, highlighting the universal need of research in this area. PMID:25364683

  13. Wilson's disease: An endocrine revelation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Nitin; Shetty, Sahana; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-11-01

    Wilson's disease is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism. The affected patients, who otherwise have a near normal life span, may often suffer from some potentially treatable and under recognized endocrine disorders that may hinder their quality of life. We explored previously published literature on the various endocrine aspects of this disease with their probable underlying mechanisms, highlighting the universal need of research in this area. PMID:25364683

  14. Prediction of the endocrine disruption profile of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Devillers, J; Bro, E; Millot, F

    2015-01-01

    Numerous manmade chemicals released into the environment can interfere with normal, hormonally regulated biological processes to adversely affect the development and reproductive functions of living species. Various in vivo and in vitro tests have been designed for detecting endocrine disruptors, but the number of chemicals to test is so high that to save time and money, (quantitative) structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) models are increasingly used as a surrogate for these laboratory assays. However, most of them focus only on a specific target (e.g. estrogenic or androgenic receptor) while, to be more efficient, endocrine disruption modelling should preferentially consider profiles of activities to better gauge this complex phenomenon. In this context, an attempt was made to evaluate the endocrine disruption profile of 220 structurally diverse pesticides using the Endocrine Disruptome simulation (EDS) tool, which simultaneously predicts the probability of binding of chemicals on 12 nuclear receptors. In a first step, the EDS web-based system was successfully applied to 16 pharmaceutical compounds known to target at least one of the studied receptors. About 13% of the studied pesticides were estimated to be potential disruptors of the endocrine system due to their high predicted affinity for at least one receptor. In contrast, about 55% of them were unlikely to be endocrine disruptors. The simulation results are discussed and some comments on the use of the EDS tool are made.

  15. Prediction of the endocrine disruption profile of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Devillers, J; Bro, E; Millot, F

    2015-01-01

    Numerous manmade chemicals released into the environment can interfere with normal, hormonally regulated biological processes to adversely affect the development and reproductive functions of living species. Various in vivo and in vitro tests have been designed for detecting endocrine disruptors, but the number of chemicals to test is so high that to save time and money, (quantitative) structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) models are increasingly used as a surrogate for these laboratory assays. However, most of them focus only on a specific target (e.g. estrogenic or androgenic receptor) while, to be more efficient, endocrine disruption modelling should preferentially consider profiles of activities to better gauge this complex phenomenon. In this context, an attempt was made to evaluate the endocrine disruption profile of 220 structurally diverse pesticides using the Endocrine Disruptome simulation (EDS) tool, which simultaneously predicts the probability of binding of chemicals on 12 nuclear receptors. In a first step, the EDS web-based system was successfully applied to 16 pharmaceutical compounds known to target at least one of the studied receptors. About 13% of the studied pesticides were estimated to be potential disruptors of the endocrine system due to their high predicted affinity for at least one receptor. In contrast, about 55% of them were unlikely to be endocrine disruptors. The simulation results are discussed and some comments on the use of the EDS tool are made. PMID:26548639

  16. Overview of the endocrine response to critical illness: how to measure it and when to treat.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki; Cooper, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    The assessment and manipulation of the endocrine system in patients with critical illness is one of the most complex and controversial areas in endocrinology. Severe acute illness causes dramatic changes in most endocrine systems. This can lead to considerable difficulty in recognising pre-existing endocrine disorders in severely ill patients. Critical care itself might also induce types of endocrine dysfunction not seen outside the critical care unit. It is important to clarify whether or not such endocrine dysfunction occurs. Where it does occur it is also important to determine whether endocrine intervention is useful in improving outcome. There is also the issue of whether endocrine manipulation in critically ill patients without endocrine dysfunction could benefit from endocrine intervention, e.g. to improve haemodynamics or reverse a catabolic state. This review will discuss some of these contentious issues. It will highlight how endocrine assessment of a patient with critical illness differs from that in other types of patient. It will emphasise the added need to place the biochemical assessment and its interpretation in the context of the patients underlying condition.

  17. [Endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic renal failure - part II].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kędzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kędzierska, Joanna; Kowalska, Beata; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of fluids and electrolytes, acid-base balance, and volume regulation. In subjects with chronic renal failure, particularly at its later stages, these adaptive responses are impaired and some of these alterations are of clinical relevance. The ways in which chronic renal failure affects function of endocrine organs include impaired secretion of kidney-derived hormones, altered peripheral hormone metabolism, disturbed binding to carrier proteins, accumulation of hormone inhibitors, as well as abnormal target organ responsiveness. Apart from secondary hyperparathyroidism, thyroid dysfunction and impaired growth, reviewed in our previous study, endocrine disturbances that most frequently affect this group of patients include: abnormal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamicpituitary- gonadal axes, bone loss and gynecomastia. The clinical picture and laboratory findings of these endocrine disturbances depend on the treatment strategy.

  18. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Wu, Shenggan; Lu, Liping; Xu, Yiwen; Zhu, Yanye; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives. PMID:27527194

  19. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Wu, Shenggan; Lu, Liping; Xu, Yiwen; Zhu, Yanye; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives. PMID:27527194

  20. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Wu, Shenggan; Lu, Liping; Xu, Yiwen; Zhu, Yanye; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2016-08-03

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  1. Hormones in the city: endocrine ecology of urban birds.

    PubMed

    Bonier, Frances

    2012-05-01

    Urbanization dramatically changes the landscape, presenting organisms with novel challenges and often leading to reduced species diversity. Urban ecologists have documented numerous biotic and abiotic consequences of urbanization, such as altered climate, species interactions, and community composition, but we lack an understanding of the mechanisms underlying organisms' responses to urbanization. Here, I review findings from the nascent field of study of the endocrine ecology of urban birds. Thus far, no clear or consistent patterns have been revealed, but we do have evidence that urban habitat can shape endocrine traits, and that those traits might contribute to adaptation to the urban environment. I suggest strong approaches for future work addressing exciting questions about the role of endocrine traits in mediating responses to urbanization within species across the globe.

  2. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  3. ScienceOrganizer System and Interface Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    ScienceOrganizer is a specialized knowledge management tool designed to enhance the information storage, organization, and access capabilities of distributed NASA science teams. Users access ScienceOrganizer through an intuitive Web-based interface that enables them to upload, download, and organize project information - including data, documents, images, and scientific records associated with laboratory and field experiments. Information in ScienceOrganizer is "threaded", or interlinked, to enable users to locate, track, and organize interrelated pieces of scientific data. Linkages capture important semantic relationships among information resources in the repository, and these assist users in navigating through the information related to their projects.

  4. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  5. [Endocrine effects of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs may induce disturbances in hormonal system. Regarding endocrine effects of anticonvulsants, an interaction of these drugs with gonadal, thyroid, and adrenal axis deserves attention. Since majority of antiepileptic drugs block voltage dependent sodium and calcium channels, enhance GABAergic transmission and/or antagonize glutamate receptors, one may expect that similar neurochemical mechanisms are engaged in the interaction of these drugs with synthesis of hypothalamic neurohormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). Moreover some antiepileptic drugs may affect hormone metabolism via inhibiting or stimulating cytochrome P-450 iso-enzymes. An influence of antiepileptic drugs on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appears to be sex-dependent. In males, valproate decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) but elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations. Carbamazepine decreased testosterone/sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) ratio, whereas its active metabolite--oxcarbazepine--had no effect on androgens. In females, valproate decreased FSH-stimulated estradiol release and enhanced testosterone level. On the other hand, carbamazepine decreased testosterone level but enhanced SHBG concentration. It has been reported that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or joined administration of carbamazepine and valproate decrease thyroxine (T4) level in patients with no effect on thyrotropin (TSH). While valproate itself has no effect on T4, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone, as metabolic enzyme inducers, can decrease the level of free and bound thyroxine. On the other hand, new antiepileptics such as levetiracetam, tiagabine, vigabatrine or lamotrigine had no effect on thyroid hormones. With respect to hormonal regulation of metabolic processes, valproate was

  6. α-Galactosidase A expressed in the salivary glands partially corrects organ biochemical deficits in the fabry mouse through endocrine trafficking.

    PubMed

    Passineau, Michael J; Fahrenholz, Timothy; Machen, Laurie; Zourelias, Lee; Nega, Katherine; Paul, Rachel; MacDougall, Mary J; Mamaeva, Olga; Steet, Richard; Barnes, Jarrod; Kingston, H M; Benza, Raymond L

    2011-03-01

    Fabry disease is caused by an X-linked deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A (GLA) and has been treated successfully with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Gene therapy has been proposed as an alternative to ERT due to the presumed advantages of continuous, endogenous production of the therapeutic enzyme. GLA production in the liver and its therapeutic efficacy in the Fabry mouse have been demonstrated previously with various viral vector systems. In consideration of the potential advantages of using the salivary glands as endogenous GLA biosynthesis sites, we explored the feasibility of this approach in the Fabry mouse. GLA -/0 or -/- mice received an adenoviral vector (2 × 10(10) or 1 × 10(9) viral particles) expressing GLA to the right submandibular gland via oral cannulation of the submandibular duct. Four days later, animals were sacrificed; saliva, plasma, kidney, liver, and brain were collected and assayed using ELISA, Western blot, and a GLA enzymatic activity assay using both traditional fluorescence methods and isotope dilution mass spectrometry by following the U.S. EPA Method 6800. GLA activity was significantly elevated in the serum and liver of both treatment groups, and improvement in the kidney was marginally significant (P < 0.069) in the high-dose group. Notably, we found that liver and salivary gland produce different glycoforms of the GLA transgene. Only small numbers of adenoviral genomes were observed in the livers of treated animals, but in four of 14 in the high-dose groups, liver levels of adenovirus exceeded 20 copies/μg, indicating that the sequestration in the salivary gland was imperfect at high doses. Taken together, these results indicate that the salivary gland-based gene therapy for Fabry disease is promising, and further studies with advanced viral vector gene delivery systems (e.g., adeno-associated virus) for long-term treatment appear to be warranted. PMID:20858137

  7. Endocrine disrupters: a human risk?

    PubMed

    Waring, R H; Harris, R M

    2005-12-01

    Endocrine disrupters (EDs) alter normal hormonal regulation and may be naturally occurring or environmental contaminants. Classically, EDs act genomically, with agonistic or antagonistic effects on steroid receptors and may alter reproductive function and/or cause feminisation by binding to oestrogen or androgen receptors; their binding to the thyroid receptor may dysregulate the neuroendocrine system. Recently, it has been shown that EDs can also act by non-genomic mechanisms, altering steroid synthesis (inhibition of cytochrome P450 isoforms) or steroid metabolism. The alkylphenol and phthalate plasticisers inhibit the inactivation of oestrogens by sulphation (via SULT 1A1 and 1E1 isoforms) and so cause a rise in levels of the free active endogenous oestrogens. A range of ED effects have been shown in mammals, fish, birds, reptiles, amphibia and aquatic invertebrates but it is not yet clear whether these processes also occur in human beings. It is evident that EDs, as well as altering reproduction, can cause changes in neurosteroid levels and so have the potential to affect immune function, behaviour and memory. This may be of long-term concern since traces of EDs such as plasticisers, brominated fire retardants, sunscreen agents and cosmetic ingredients are widely distributed in the environment and in human biofluids. PMID:16271281

  8. Comparative effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on the aquatic larvae of Chironomus riparius based on gene expression assays related to the endocrine system, the stress response and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Herrero, Oscar; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), two of the most extensively used phthalates, were studied in Chironomus riparius under acute short-term treatments, to compare their relative toxicities and identify genes sensitive to exposure. The ecotoxicity of these phthalates was assessed by analysis of the alterations in gene expression profiles of selected inducible and constitutive genes related to the endocrine system, the cellular stress response and the ribosomal machinery. Fourth instar larvae, a model system in aquatic toxicology, were experimentally exposed to five increasing concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100mg/L) of DEHP and BBP for 24h. Gene expression was analysed by the changes in levels of transcripts, using RT-PCR techniques with specific gene probes. The exposures to DEHP or BBP were able to rapidly induce the hsp70 gene in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the cognate form hsc70 was not altered by either of these chemicals. Transcription of ribosomal RNA as a measure of cell viability, quantified by the levels of ITS2, was not affected by DEHP, but was slightly, yet significantly, downregulated by BBP at the highest concentrations tested. Finally, as these phthalates are classified as endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), their potential effect on the ecdysone endocrine system was studied by analysing the two genes, EcR and usp, of the heterodimeric ecdysone receptor complex. It was found that BBP provoked the overexpression of the EcR gene, with significant increases from exposures of 0.1mg/L and above, while DEHP significantly decreased the activity of this gene at the highest concentration. These data are relevant as they show for the first time the ability of phthalates to interfere with endocrine marker genes in invertebrates, demonstrating their potential capacity to alter the ecdysone signalling pathway. Overall, the study clearly shows a differential gene-toxin interaction

  9. Integrated Neural and Endocrine Control of Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Furness, John B

    2016-01-01

    The activity of the digestive system is dynamically regulated by external factors, including body nutritional and activity states, emotions and the contents of the digestive tube. The gut must adjust its activity to assimilate a hugely variable mixture that is ingested, particularly in an omnivore such as human for which a wide range of food choices exist. It must also guard against toxins and pathogens. These nutritive and non-nutritive components of the gut contents interact with the largest and most vulnerable surface in the body, the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. This requires a gut sensory system that can detect many classes of nutrients, non-nutrient components of food, physicochemical conditions, toxins, pathogens and symbionts (Furness et al., Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 10:729-740, 2013). The gut sensors are in turn coupled to effector systems that can respond to the sensory information. The responses are exerted through enteroendocrine cells (EEC), the enteric nervous system (ENS), the central nervous system (CNS) and the gut immune and tissue defence systems. It is apparent that the control of the digestive organs is an integrated function of these effectors. The peripheral components of the EEC, ENS and CNS triumvirate are extensive. EEC cells have traditionally been classified into about 12 types (disputed in this review), releasing about 20 hormones, together making the gut endocrine system the largest endocrine organ in the body. Likewise, in human the ENS contains about 500 million neurons, far more than the number of neurons in the remainder of the peripheral autonomic nervous system. Together gut hormones, the ENS and the CNS control or influence functions including satiety, mixing and propulsive activity, release of digestive enzymes, induction of nutrient transporters, fluid transport, local blood flow, gastric acid secretion, evacuation and immune responses. Gut content receptors, including taste, free fatty acid, peptide and

  10. Organizations and Social Systems: Organization Theory's Neglected Mandate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Robert N.; Barley, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    The social-systems perspective in organizational theory faded because the increasing complexity of social relations hindered determination of an appropriate unit of analysis. Also, the business-school environment in which organizational research occurred discouraged examination of broad social questions, promoted a particular approach to science,…

  11. Susceptible periods during embryogenesis of the heart and endocrine glands.

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, T W

    2000-01-01

    One of the original principles of teratology states that, "Susceptibility to teratogenesis varies with the developmental stage at the time of exposure to an adverse influence" [Wilson JG. Environment and Birth Defects. New York:Academic Press, 1973]. The time of greatest sensitivity encompasses the period of organ formation during weeks 3-8 following fertilization in human gestation. At this time, stem cell populations for each organ's morphogenesis are established and inductive events for the initiation of differentiation occur. Structural defects of the heart and endocrine system are no exception to this axiom and have their origins during this time frame. Although the function and maturation of these organs may be affected at later stages, structural defects and loss of cell types usually occur during these early phases of development. Thus, to determine critical windows for studying mechanisms of teratogenesis, it is essential to understand the developmental processes that establish these organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:10852854

  12. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  13. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  14. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romãozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda.

  15. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romãozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda. PMID:24160936

  16. Analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticides by capillary GC with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana

    2012-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS) has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP) residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important.

  17. Bone health in adults treated with endocrine therapy for early breast or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a hormonally responsive organ. Sex hormones and calcium regulating hormones, including parathyroid hormone, 1-25 dihydroxy vitamin D, and calcitonin, have effects on bone resorption and bone deposition. These hormones affect both bone quality and bone quantity. The sex hormone estrogen inhibits bone resorption, and estrogen therapy has been developed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Androgens are an important source of estrogen through the action of the enzyme aromatase and may themselves stimulate bone formation. Hence, the sex steroids play a role in bone metabolism. Breast cancer and prostate cancer are frequently hormonally responsive and may be treated with antiestrogens or antiandrogens respectfully. In addition, chemotherapy and supportive medications may alter the patient's endocrine system. In general, the suppression of sex hormones has a predictable affect on bone health, as seen by loss of bone mineral density and increased risk of fragility fractures. The bone toxicity of cancer-directed endocrine therapy can be mitigated through screening, counseling on optimization of calcium and vitamin D intake, exercise, and other lifestyle/behavioral actions, as well as the use of medications when the fracture risk is high. Maintaining bone health in patients who are treated with endocrine therapy for breast and prostate cancer is the focus of this review.

  18. Bone health in adults treated with endocrine therapy for early breast or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a hormonally responsive organ. Sex hormones and calcium regulating hormones, including parathyroid hormone, 1-25 dihydroxy vitamin D, and calcitonin, have effects on bone resorption and bone deposition. These hormones affect both bone quality and bone quantity. The sex hormone estrogen inhibits bone resorption, and estrogen therapy has been developed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Androgens are an important source of estrogen through the action of the enzyme aromatase and may themselves stimulate bone formation. Hence, the sex steroids play a role in bone metabolism. Breast cancer and prostate cancer are frequently hormonally responsive and may be treated with antiestrogens or antiandrogens respectfully. In addition, chemotherapy and supportive medications may alter the patient's endocrine system. In general, the suppression of sex hormones has a predictable affect on bone health, as seen by loss of bone mineral density and increased risk of fragility fractures. The bone toxicity of cancer-directed endocrine therapy can be mitigated through screening, counseling on optimization of calcium and vitamin D intake, exercise, and other lifestyle/behavioral actions, as well as the use of medications when the fracture risk is high. Maintaining bone health in patients who are treated with endocrine therapy for breast and prostate cancer is the focus of this review. PMID:25993224

  19. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    PubMed Central

    Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS) has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP) residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important. PMID:23202677

  20. [Endocrine tumors of the testis].

    PubMed

    Loy, V; Linke, J

    2003-07-01

    The most characteristic endocrine tumours of the testis are germ cell tumours and sex cord/gonadal stromal tumours. They include the primary carcinoid, the relation of which to teratomas is still unclear. In general, gonadal stromal tumours are rare, however, endocrine activity occurs in at least 10%-20%. Among gonadal stromal tumours, only Leydig cell tumours and Sertoli cell tumours are of practical importance. Endocrine disorders are mostly related to Leydig cell tumours (gynaecomastia, pubertas praecox). Although less frequent than the other gonadal stromal tumours, they can, in principle, occur. The large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumour occurs in association with other complex disorders (i.e. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome). Valuable markers are: inhibin, calretinin, cytokeratin, melan-A, CD-99, Ki-67, androgen receptor and p53. As the conventional morphology and immunohistological markers frequently overlap, unclear cases should be referred to specialised centres. PMID:14513279

  1. Endocrine hypertension in small animals.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Claudia E; Schellenberg, Stefan; Wenger, Monique

    2010-03-01

    Hypertension is classified as idiopathic or secondary. In animals with idiopathic hypertension, persistently elevated blood pressure is not caused by an identifiable underlying or predisposing disease. Until recently, more than 95% of cases of hypertension in humans were diagnosed as idiopathic. New studies have shown, however, a much higher prevalence of secondary causes, such as primary hyperaldosteronism. In dogs and cats, secondary hypertension is the most prevalent form and is subclassified into renal and endocrine hypertension. This review focuses on the most common causes of endocrine hypertension in dogs and cats.

  2. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  3. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery A Patient’s Guide Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is a treatment ... This guide for patients is based on The Endocrine Society’s practice guidelines for physicians that focus on ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors are a class of chemicals of growing interest to the environmental community. USEPA's Risk Assessment Forum defined an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) as "an exogenous agent that interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elim...

  5. ANALYTICAL CHALLENGES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported increases in the incidence of endocrine-related conditions have led to speculation about environmental causes. Environmental scientists are focusing increased research effort into understanding the mechanisms by which endocrine disruptors affect human and ecological h...

  6. The Organic Foods System: Its Discursive Achievements and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowacek, David M.; Nowacek, Rebecca S.

    2008-01-01

    Taking the emergence of the organic foods system as a case study, the authors aim to demonstrate both how the discursive richness of the organic foods system offers a challenge to the traditional operations of the market and how activity systems theory as understood in English studies can productively be tied to and enriched by theories of social…

  7. Thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae after exposure to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP).

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wenhui; Huang, Zhigang; Chen, Li; Feng, Cong; Li, Bei; Li, Tanshi

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are extensively used as plasticizers in a variety of daily-life products, resulting in widespread distribution in aquatic environments. However, limited information is available on the endocrine disrupting effects of phthalates in aquatic organisms. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exposure to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), the hydrolytic metabolite of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) disrupts thyroid endocrine system in fish. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to different concentrations of MEHP (1.6, 8, 40, and 200 μg/L) from 2 h post-fertilization (hpf) to 168 hpf. The whole-body content of thyroid hormone and transcription of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were examined. Treatment with MEHP significantly decreased whole-body T4 contents and increased whole-body T3 contents, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. The upregulation of genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism (Dio2 and UGT1ab) might be responsible for decreased T4 contents. Elevated gene transcription of Dio1 was also observed in this study, which might assist to degrade increased T3 contents. Exposure to MEHP also significantly induced transcription of genes involved in thyroid development (Nkx2.1 and Pax8) and thyroid hormone synthesis (TSHβ, NIS and TG). However, the genes encoding proteins involved in TH transport (transthyretin, TTR) was transcriptionally significantly down-regulated after exposure to MEHP. Overall, these results demonstrate that acute exposure to MEHP alters whole-body contents of thyroid hormones in zebrafish embryos/larvae and changes the transcription of genes involved in the HPT axis, thus exerting thyroid endocrine toxicity. PMID:24658602

  8. Biological and enzymatic treatment of bisphenol A and other endocrine disrupting compounds: a review.

    PubMed

    Husain, Qayyum; Qayyum, Shariq

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A is predominantly used as an intermediate in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Traces of bisphenol A released into the environment can reach into the wastewater and soil via application of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment systems that receive water containing bisphenol A, or from leachate from uncontrolled landfills. In this study we have made an effort to review the work on the presence of bisphenol A and other related endocrine disrupting compounds in the environment and their impact on the life of living organisms including human beings. Bisphenol A has several implications on the health of human beings as well it can also affect the growth of plants and animals. Number of physicochemical methods such as adsorption, membrane based filtration, ozonation, fenton, electrochemical and photochemical degradation has been used for the removal of bisphenol A. However, these methods have some inherent limitations and therefore cannot be used for large scale treatment of such pollutants. The alternative procedures have attracted the attention of environmental scientists. Biological methods are looking quite promising and these procedures are helpful in the complete degradation of bisphenol A and related compounds. Several bacterial, fungal, and algal strains and mixed cultures have successfully been employed for the degradation of bisphenol A. Recently, enzymatic methods have attracted the attention of the environmentalists for the treatment of bisphenol A and other endocrine disrupting compounds. Numerous types of oxidoreductases; laccases, tyrosinases, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, polyphenol oxidases, horseradish peroxidase and bitter gourd peroxidase have exhibited their potential for the remediation of such types of compounds. The cytochrome P 450 monooxygenases and hemoglobin have also participated in the degradation of bisphenol A and other related endocrine disrupting compounds. Various redox mediators

  9. Graphic Representation of Organs and Organ Systems: Psychological View and Developmental Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartoszeck, Amauri Betini; Machado, Danielle Zagonel; Amann-Gainotti, Merete

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study is to characterize by means of drawings if the developmental patterns in the graphic representation of organ and organ systems progresses related to age of participants. Secondly, whether there is an integration of sex organs into the internal body image. The drawings representing the inside of the body in…

  10. Prosobranch snails as test organisms for the assessment of endocrine active chemicals--an overview and a guideline proposal for a reproduction test with the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Duft, Martina; Schmitt, Claudia; Bachmann, Jean; Brandelik, Cornelius; Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2007-02-01

    Recently, prosobranch snails have been recommended as promising candidates for test organisms for the assessment of endocrine active chemicals. Three prosobranch snail species, the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, the freshwater ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis, and the marine netted whelk Nassarius reticulatus are portrayed and their respective biotests are presented together with results of laboratory experiments and biological effect monitoring surveys in the field. All characterized species are highly sensitive toward xeno-androgens [triphenyltin (TPT), tributyltin (TBT), methyltestosterone (MT) and fenarimol (FEN)], and xeno-estrogens [bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP), ethinylestradiol], and show effects at environmentally relevant, rather low concentrations in laboratory experiments. For exposure to the xeno-androgen TPT, EC(10) values range between 15.9 and 29.0 ng as Sn/L (sediment 0.03 mug as Sn/kg), for TBT, EC(10) values are found between 3.42 and 37.8 ng as Sn/L (sediment 2.98 microg as Sn/kg) and effect concentrations for FEN are calculated as 18.6 ng/L (EC(10)) and 0.19 microg/kg (EC(50) sediment; EC(10) not calculable). Exposure to xeno-estrogens yielded EC(10 )values of 13.9 ng/L (0.19 microg/kg) for BPA, a NOEC of <1 microg/L (EC(10) of 0.004 microg/kg) for OP and a NOEC of 1 ng/l (EC(10) sediment of 2.2 microg/kg) for ethinylestradiol. Responses to androgens comprised the development of imposex and the reduction of fertility or embryo production, effects of estrogens included the stimulation of egg production and embryo production, and the increased weight of glands. Also, biological effect monitoring studies with P. antipodarum and N. reticulatus in several rivers or estuarine areas revealed the capacity of the biotests to detect an androgenic or estrogenic potential of sediment samples. A comparison of the three test species with regard to sensitivity and practical aspects in routine application favors the freshwater mudsnail P

  11. Endocrine vasculatures are preferable targets of an antitumor ineffective low dose of anti-VEGF therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Hosaka, Kayoko; Huang, Guichun; Zang, Jingwu; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yun; Samani, Nilesh J.; Cao, Yihai

    2016-01-01

    Anti-VEGF–based antiangiogenic drugs are designed to block tumor angiogenesis for treatment of cancer patients. However, anti-VEGF drugs produce off-tumor target effects on multiple tissues and organs and cause broad adverse effects. Here, we show that vasculatures in endocrine organs were more sensitive to anti-VEGF treatment than tumor vasculatures. In thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreatic islets, systemic treatment with low doses of an anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody caused marked vascular regression, whereas tumor vessels remained unaffected. Additionally, a low dose of VEGF blockade significantly inhibited the formation of thyroid vascular fenestrae, leaving tumor vascular structures unchanged. Along with vascular structural changes, the low dose of VEGF blockade inhibited vascular perfusion and permeability in thyroid, but not in tumors. Prolonged treatment with the low-dose VEGF blockade caused hypertension and significantly decreased circulating levels of thyroid hormone free-T3 and -T4, leading to functional impairment of thyroid. These findings show that the fenestrated microvasculatures in endocrine organs are more sensitive than tumor vasculatures in response to systemic anti-VEGF drugs. Thus, our data support the notion that clinically nonbeneficial treatments with anti-VEGF drugs could potentially cause adverse effects. PMID:27035988

  12. Endocrine vasculatures are preferable targets of an antitumor ineffective low dose of anti-VEGF therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Hosaka, Kayoko; Huang, Guichun; Zang, Jingwu; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yun; Samani, Nilesh J; Cao, Yihai

    2016-04-12

    Anti-VEGF-based antiangiogenic drugs are designed to block tumor angiogenesis for treatment of cancer patients. However, anti-VEGF drugs produce off-tumor target effects on multiple tissues and organs and cause broad adverse effects. Here, we show that vasculatures in endocrine organs were more sensitive to anti-VEGF treatment than tumor vasculatures. In thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreatic islets, systemic treatment with low doses of an anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody caused marked vascular regression, whereas tumor vessels remained unaffected. Additionally, a low dose of VEGF blockade significantly inhibited the formation of thyroid vascular fenestrae, leaving tumor vascular structures unchanged. Along with vascular structural changes, the low dose of VEGF blockade inhibited vascular perfusion and permeability in thyroid, but not in tumors. Prolonged treatment with the low-dose VEGF blockade caused hypertension and significantly decreased circulating levels of thyroid hormone free-T3 and -T4, leading to functional impairment of thyroid. These findings show that the fenestrated microvasculatures in endocrine organs are more sensitive than tumor vasculatures in response to systemic anti-VEGF drugs. Thus, our data support the notion that clinically nonbeneficial treatments with anti-VEGF drugs could potentially cause adverse effects.

  13. The concept of self-organizing systems. Why bother?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elverfeldt, Kirsten v.; Embleton-Hamann, Christine; Slaymaker, Olav

    2016-04-01

    Complexity theory and the concept of self-organizing systems provide a rather challenging conceptual framework for explaining earth systems change. Self-organization - understood as the aggregate processes internal to an environmental system that lead to a distinctive spatial or temporal organization - reduces the possibility of implicating a specific process as being causal, and it poses some restrictions on the idea that external drivers cause a system to change. The concept of self-organizing systems suggests that many phenomena result from an orchestration of different mechanisms, so that no causal role can be assigned to an individual factor or process. The idea that system change can be due to system-internal processes of self-organization thus proves a huge challenge to earth system research, especially in the context of global environmental change. In order to understand the concept's implications for the Earth Sciences, we need to know the characteristics of self-organizing systems and how to discern self-organizing systems. Within the talk, we aim firstly at characterizing self-organizing systems, and secondly at highlighting the advantages and difficulties of the concept within earth system sciences. The presentation concludes that: - The concept of self-organizing systems proves especially fruitful for small-scale earth surface systems. Beach cusps and patterned ground are only two of several other prime examples of self-organizing earth surface systems. They display characteristics of self-organization like (i) system-wide order from local interactions, (ii) symmetry breaking, (iii) distributed control, (iv) robustness and resilience, (v) nonlinearity and feedbacks, (vi) organizational closure, (vii) adaptation, and (viii) variation and selection. - It is comparatively easy to discern self-organization in small-scale systems, but to adapt the concept to larger scale systems relevant to global environmental change research is more difficult: Self-organizing

  14. CURRENT CHALLENGES ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For over ten years, major international efforts have been aimed at understanding the mechanism and extent of endocrine disruption in experimental models, wildlife, and people; the occurrence of this in the real world and in developing tools for screening and prediction of risk. ...

  15. Characterisation and quantification of organic phosphorus and organic nitrogen components in aquatic systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Paul J; Monbet, Philippe; Tappin, Alan D; Fitzsimons, Mark F; Stiles, David A; McKelvie, Ian D

    2008-08-22

    This review provides a critical assessment of knowledge regarding the determination of organic phosphorus (OP) and organic nitrogen (ON) in aquatic systems, with an emphasis on biogeochemical considerations and analytical challenges. A general background on organic phosphorus and organic nitrogen precedes a discussion of sample collection, extraction, treatment/conditioning and preconcentration of organic phosphorus/nitrogen from sediments, including suspended particulate matter, and waters, including sediment porewaters. This is followed by sections on the determination of organic phosphorus/nitrogen components. Key techniques covered for organic phosphorus components are molecular spectrometry, atomic spectrometry and enzymatic methods. For nitrogen the focus is on the measurement of total organic nitrogen concentrations by carbon hydrogen nitrogen analysis and high temperature combustion, and organic nitrogen components by gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, X-ray techniques and enzymatic methods. Finally future trends and needs are discussed and recommendations made. PMID:18706309

  16. Space research on organs and tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on various physiological systems are reviewed focusing on muscle, bone, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurovestibular, liver, and endocrine systems. It is noted that certain alterations of organs and tissues caused by microgravity are not reproducible in earth-bound animal or human models. Thus space research on organs and tissues is essential for both validating the earth-bound models used in laboratories and studying the adaptations to weightlessness which cannot be mimicked on earth.

  17. 76 FR 49473 - Petition to Maximize Practical Utility of List 1 Chemicals Screened Through EPA's Endocrine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... AGENCY Petition to Maximize Practical Utility of List 1 Chemicals Screened Through EPA's Endocrine... decisions on data received in response to the test orders issued under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening...'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in...

  18. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS FROM COMBUSTION AND VEHICULAR EMISSIONS: IDENTIFICATION AND SOURCE NOMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the last decade, concerns have been raised regarding the possible harmful effects of exposure to certain chemicals that are capable of modulating or disrupting the function of the endocrine system. These chemicals, which are referred to as endocrine disrupting chemicals (E...

  19. DETERMINING INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS (EDCS): AN OVERVIEW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors are characterized by their influence on animal endocrine systems resulting in reproductive, developmental, neurological, and immune dysfunction. The purpose of this overview is to provide the reader with a sense of the activities within the U.S. Environmental...

  20. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2013-01-08

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  1. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  2. Functional self-organization in complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, W. Santa Fe Inst., NM )

    1990-01-01

    A novel approach to functional self-organization is presented. It consists of a universe generated by a formal language that defines objects (=programs), their meaning (=functions), and their interactions (=composition). Results obtained so far are briefly discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Aligning Performance: Improving People, Systems, and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, Danny

    Performance is the actual work that is done to assure that an organization achieves its mission, and aligning that performance assures that the path to the mission is harmonious. Alignment exists when all people involved understand the dimensions of the work and want to achieve and improve alignment. This book presents the "Language of Work" model…

  4. Improving the current system for supplying organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horton, R L; Horton, P J

    1993-01-01

    The United States currently relies on a voluntary, altruistic system for supplying organs for transplantation. It is now generally recognized that this system, as currently operated, produces a seriously inadequate supply of organs. A number of scholars have argued that some type of (generally unspecified) market system is necessary. Two articles appearing in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law have proposed relatively specific market systems for increasing the supply of organs. In this paper we argue that market systems are at best premature. In particular, there is little to suggest that any type of market system for organs will be permitted in the United States in the foreseeable future. We present data that strongly suggest that the current voluntary, altruistic system has not been developed to its full potential and offer a number of specific suggestions for improving the system.

  5. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND CYCLODEXTRIN-CLAY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational and experimental techniques are combined in order to better understand interactions involving organic compounds and cyclodextrin (CD)-clay systems. CD-clay systems may have great potential in the containment of organic contaminants in the environment. This study w...

  6. The Theoretical Principles of the Organization of Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulikowski, Juliusz Lech

    A survey of the theoretical problems connected with the organization and design of systems for processing and transmitting information is presented in this article. It gives a definition of Information Systems (IS) and classifies them from various points of view. It discusses briefly the most important aspects of the organization of IS, such as…

  7. Organic dairy production systems in Pennsylvania: a case study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Kamphuis, G H; Karsten, H D; Weaver, R D

    2007-08-01

    The current market demand and price for organic milk is encouraging dairy producers, particularly those on smaller farms, to consider organic production as a means for improving the economic viability of their operations. Organic production systems vary widely in scale, in practices, and across agroclimatic settings. Within this context, case studies of 4 actual organic dairy farms were used to characterize existing systems in Pennsylvania. Based on data from these farms, a whole-farm simulation model (Integrated Farm System Model) was used to compare 4 production systems representing organic grass, organic crop, conventional crop with grazing, and conventional confinement production. The performance of each of these systems was simulated over each year of 25 yr of central Pennsylvania weather data. Simulation results indicated that farm level accumulation of soil P and K may be a concern on organic farms that use poultry manure as a primary crop nutrient source, and that erosion and runoff loss of P may be of concern on organic farms producing annual crops because more tillage is required for weed control. Whole-farm budgets with prices that reflect recent conditions showed an economic advantage for organic over conventional production. A sensitivity analysis showed that this economic advantage depended on a higher milk price for producers of organic milk and was influenced by the difference in milk production maintained by herds using organic and conventional systems. Factors found to have little effect on the relative profitability of organic over conventional production included the differences between organic and conventional prices for seed, chemicals, forage, and animals and the overall costs or prices assumed for organic certification, machinery, pasture fencing, fuel, and labor. Thus, at the current organic milk price, relative to other prices, the case study organic production systems seem to provide an option for improving the economic viability of dairy

  8. Bone endocrine regulation of energy metabolism and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Karsenty, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    Usually vertebrate physiology is studied within the confined limits of a given organ, if not cell type. This approach has progressively changed with the emergence of mouse genetics that has rejuvenated the concept of a whole body study of physiology. A vivid example of how mouse genetics has profoundly affected our understanding of physiology is skeleton physiology. A genetic approach to bone physiology revealed that bone via osteocalcin, an osteoblast-secreted molecule, is a true endocrine organ regulating energy metabolism and male reproduction. This ongoing body of work that takes bone out of its traditional roles is connecting it to a growing number of peripheral organs. These novel important hormonal connections between bone, energy metabolism and reproduction underscore the concept of functional dependence in physiology and the importance of genetic approaches to identify novel endocrine regulations.

  9. Carcinogenetic mechanisms of endocrine disruptors in female cancers (Review).

    PubMed

    Del Pup, Lino; Mantovani, Alberto; Cavaliere, Carla; Facchini, Gaetano; Luce, Amalia; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Caraglia, Michele; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2016-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are pollutants that alter the endocrine system and are involved in carcinogenesis. EDs have multiple and complex levels of action. They can affect the synthesis, release and transport of natural hormones. In target tissues, EDs can reduce or increase the effects of natural hormones on their receptors and change signaling cascades. When ED exposure happens at critical periods of life, from embryo to puberty, they can act at doses considered safe for an adult. Furthermore, their epigenetic effects can also influence the cancer risk of future generations. The cancer mechanisms of known EDs are hereby reviewed, There are thousands of newly introduced substances whose potential endocrine-disrupting and cancer effects are completely unknown. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge, these data support the urgent need for health and environmental policies aimed at protecting the public and in particular, the developing fetus and women of reproductive age. PMID:27349723

  10. Carcinogenetic mechanisms of endocrine disruptors in female cancers (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Del Pup, Lino; Mantovani, Alberto; Cavaliere, Carla; Facchini, Gaetano; Luce, Amalia; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Caraglia, Michele; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are pollutants that alter the endocrine system and are involved in carcinogenesis. EDs have multiple and complex levels of action. They can affect the synthesis, release and transport of natural hormones. In target tissues, EDs can reduce or increase the effects of natural hormones on their receptors and change signaling cascades. When ED exposure happens at critical periods of life, from embryo to puberty, they can act at doses considered safe for an adult. Furthermore, their epigenetic effects can also influence the cancer risk of future generations. The cancer mechanisms of known EDs are hereby reviewed, There are thousands of newly introduced substances whose potential endocrine-disrupting and cancer effects are completely unknown. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge, these data support the urgent need for health and environmental policies aimed at protecting the public and in particular, the developing fetus and women of reproductive age. PMID:27349723

  11. DIPS organic rankine cycle heat rejection system

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an optimization study performed on the heat rejection system for a space based ORC power system using an isotope heat source. The radiator sizing depends on the heat rejection temperature, radiator configuration, and radiator properties such as the fin effectiveness, emissivity, and absorptivity. The optimization analysis to evaluate the effect of each of these parameters on the system weight and area is presented.

  12. Hypothalamic-endocrine aspects in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and fatal disorder caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat in the HD gene, resulting in a mutant form of the protein huntingtin. Wild-type and mutant huntingtin are expressed in most tissues of the body but the normal function of huntingtin is not fully known. In HD, the neuropathology is characterized by intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions of huntingtin aggregates, and cell death primarily in striatum and cerebral cortex. However, hypothalamic atrophy occurs at early stages of HD with loss of orexin- and somatostatin-containing cell populations. Several symptoms of HD such as sleep disturbances, alterations in circadian rhythm, and weight loss may be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Endocrine changes including increased cortisol levels, reduced testosterone levels and increased prevalence of diabetes are found in HD patients. In HD mice, alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs as well as pancreatic beta-cell and adipocyte dysfunction. Increasing evidence points towards important pathology of the hypothalamus and the endocrine system in HD. As many neuroendocrine factors are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, it is possible that their levels may reflect the disease state in the central nervous system. Investigating neuroendocrine changes in HD opens up the possibility of finding biomarkers to evaluate future therapies for HD, as well as of identifying novel targets for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Impact of Physical Exercise on Endocrine Aging.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Joseph A M J L

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise may be vital to the maintenance of the endocrine system with aging and its helps to restore loss of activity of the endocrine system with aging. There is evidence that physical exercise induces activity of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis and so produces anabolic effects in skeletal muscles. Mechano growth factor (MGF), a locally produced isoform of IGF-1, has been hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of skeletal muscles with aging. Short-term high-resistance exercise results in an increase of MGF mRNA in young but not in elderly subjects. Reported changes in levels of circulating sex steroid hormones in men after different types of (acute and chronic) physical exercise are mixed and not consistent. In addition, physical exercise may increase local effects of sex steroid hormones, and this may be more important than levels of circulating sex steroids for the maintenance and function of skeletal muscles. In elderly women, both increased physical exercise and reduced body fat may decrease levels of circulating sex hormones. Aging is further associated with changes in the dynamic functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, but these changes may be attenuated/modified by aerobic training. Chronic exercise does not alter circulating cortisol levels in elderly subjects. PMID:27348867

  14. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects. PMID:26994811

  15. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects.

  16. Estrogenic environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical effects on reproductive neuroendocrine function and dysfunction across the life cycle.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Sarah M; Gore, Andrea C

    2007-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the normal function of an organism's endocrine system. Many EDCs are resistant to biodegradation, due to their structural stability, and persist in the environment. The focus of this review is on natural and artificial EDCs that act through estrogenic mechanisms to affect reproductive neuroendocrine systems. This endocrine axis comprises the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary gonadotropins, and gonadal steroid hormones, including estrogens. Although it is not surprising that EDCs that mimic or antagonize estrogen receptors may exert actions upon reproductive targets, the mechanisms for these effects are complex and involve all three levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) system. Nevertheless, considerable evidence links exposure to estrogenic environmental EDCs with neuroendocrine reproductive deficits in wildlife and in humans. The effects of an EDC are variable across the life cycle of an animal, and are particularly potent when exposure occurs during fetal and early postnatal development. As a consequence, abnormal sexual differentiation, disrupted reproductive function, or inappropriate sexual behavior may be detected later in life. This review will cover the effects of two representative classes of estrogenic EDCs, phytoestrogens and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on neuroendocrine reproductive function, from molecules to behavior, across the vertebrate life cycle. Finally, we identify the gaps of knowledge in this field and suggest future directions for study.

  17. U.S. system for organ procurement and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, M J; Alexander, D C

    1992-07-01

    The establishment and responsibilities of the organ procurement and transplantation network in the United States are discussed, and the process of receiving an organ transplant through the system is described. The National Organ Transplant Act of 1984 provided for a federally funded network for organ procurement and transplantation, which would function as a private, non-profit organization. This organization is the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). UNOS monitors the activities of and provides service to transplant centers and organ procurement organizations (OPOs). The names of all candidates awaiting cadaveric organ transplants are placed on a central waiting list maintained by UNOS; UNOS also is responsible for maintaining a scientific registry to collect relevant data from transplant centers on the recipients of organ transplants. Although there is a national list of more than 25,000 persons waiting at any given time for a cadaveric organ, there are far fewer actual organ donors (less than 5000 in 1991). The hospital's best resource with respect to the donation process is the local OPO, which provides services related to organ donor referral, evaluation, and surgical recovery. The organ donation process consists of eight components: donor identification, referral, evaluation, consent, management, recovery of organs, allocation, and follow-up. An organ recovery coordinator from the local OPO helps the hospital staff in determining donation potential, seeking consent from the next of kin, and managing the donor after consent has been obtained. The OPO--never the donor's family or their insurer--is billed for charges relating to the donation. The OPO then bills the costs associated with the donation to the transplant centers receiving each organ for implantation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized by variable penetrance of medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC), pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). MEN2 consists of two clinical subtypes, MEN2A and MEN2B. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is now viewed as a phenotypic variant of MEN2A with decreased penetrance for PHEO and PHPT rather than a distinct entity. All subtypes are caused by gain-of-function mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. Recognition of the clinical entity in individuals and families at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation is crucial for the management and prevention of associated malignancies. Recent guidelines released by the American Thyroid Association regarding the management of MTC will be summarized in this chapter.

  19. Classical endocrine diseases causing obesity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jolanta U

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with several endocrine diseases, including common ones such as hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome to rare ones such as Cushing's syndrome, central hypothyroidism and hypothalamic disorders. The mechanisms for the development of obesity vary in according to the endocrine condition. Hypothyroidism is associated with accumulation of hyaluronic acid within various tissues, additional fluid retention due to reduced cardiac output and reduced thermogenesis. The pathophysiology of obesity associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome remains complex as obesity itself may simultaneously be the cause and the effect of the syndrome. Net excess of androgen appears to be pivotal in the development of central obesity. In Cushing's syndrome, an interaction with thyroid and growth hormones plays an important role in addition to an increased adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. This review also describes remaining rare cases: hypothalamic obesity due to central hypothyroidism and combined hormone deficiencies. PMID:18230905

  20. Male reprotoxicity and endocrine disruption

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Catlin, Natasha; Heger, Nicholas; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Pacheco, Sara E.; Saffarini, Camelia; Sandrof, Moses A.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive tract development is a tightly regulated process that can be disrupted following exposure to drugs, toxicants, endocrine disrupting chemicals or other compounds via alterations to gene and protein expression or epigenetic regulation. Indeed, the impacts of developmental exposure to certain toxicants may not be fully realized until puberty or adulthood when the reproductive tract becomes sexually mature and altered functionality is manifested. Exposures that occur later in life, once development is complete, can also disrupt the intricate hormonal and paracrine interactions responsible for adult functions, such as spermatogenesis. In this chapter, the biology and toxicology of the male reproductive tract is explored, proceeding through the various life stages including in utero development, puberty, adulthood and senescence. Special attention is given to the discussion of endocrine disrupting chemicals, chemical mixtures, low dose effects, transgenerational effects, and potential exposure-related causes of male reproductive tract cancers. PMID:22945574