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Sample records for endogenous brain nop

  1. Post-blast treatment with Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor antagonist reduces brain injury-induced hypoxia and signaling proteins in vestibulomotor-related brain regions.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Durand, Cindy D; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Zhang, Yong; Lerner, Megan R; Brackett, Daniel J; Sherry, David M; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2016-10-25

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) diagnoses have increased due to aggressive sports and blast-related injuries, but the cellular mechanisms and pathology underlying mTBI are not completely understood. Previous reports indicate that Nociceptin Orphanin/FQ (N/OFQ), an endogenous neuropeptide, contributes to post-injury ischemia following mechanical brain injury, yet its specific role in cerebral hypoxia, vestibulomotor function and injury marker expression following blast-induced TBI is not known. This study is the first to identify a direct association of N/OFQ and its N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor with TBI-induced changes following a single 80psi head blast exposure in male rats. N/OFQ and NOP receptor expression increased in brain tissue and plasma following TBI, concurrent with vestibular dysfunction but preceding hypoxia and appearance of injury markers compared to sham rats. A single post-blast treatment with the NOP receptor antagonist, SB-612111, transiently improved acute vestibulomotor performance. It also prevented increases in markers of TBI-induced hypoxia, pro-apoptotic proteins and injury seen 8-10days post-blast. This study reveals an apparent role for the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system in blast TBI and suggests potential therapeutic utility of NOP receptor antagonists for mTBI.

  2. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Kosi, Nina; Alić, Ivan; Kolačević, Matea; Vrsaljko, Nina; Jovanov Milošević, Nataša; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland; Mitrečić, Dinko

    2015-02-09

    The nucleolar protein 2 gene encodes a protein specific for the nucleolus. It is assumed that it plays a role in the synthesis of ribosomes and regulation of the cell cycle. Due to its link to cell proliferation, higher expression of Nop2 indicates a worse tumor prognosis. In this work we used Nop2(gt1gaj) gene trap mouse strain. While lethality of homozygous animals suggested a vital role of this gene, heterozygous animals allowed the detection of expression of Nop2 in various tissues, including mouse brain. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy techniques, applied to a mature mouse brain, human brain and on mouse neural stem cells revealed expression of Nop2 in differentiating cells, including astrocytes, as well as in mature neurons. Nop2 was detected in various regions of mouse and human brain, mostly in large pyramidal neurons. In the human, Nop2 was strongly expressed in supragranular and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex and in layer III of the cingulate cortex. Also, Nop2 was detected in CA1 and the subiculum of the hippocampus. Subcellular analyses revealed predominant location of Nop2 within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. To test if Nop2 expression correlates to cell proliferation occurring during tissue regeneration, we induced strokes in mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two weeks after stroke, the number of Nop2/nestin double positive cells in the region affected by ischemia and the periventricular zone substantially increased. Our findings suggest a newly discovered role of Nop2 in both mature neurons and in cells possibly involved in the regeneration of nervous tissue.

  3. Comparative biochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel, NOP receptor selective hexapeptide, Ac-RYYRIR-ol.

    PubMed

    Bojnik, Engin; Babos, Fruzsina; Fischetti, Carmela; Magyar, Anna; Camarda, Valeria; Borsodi, Anna; Bajusz, Sándor; Calo', Girolamo; Benyhe, Sándor

    2010-03-16

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) is an endogenous neuropeptide, which is widely distributed in central and peripheral nervous system. Some N/OFQ sequence unrelated hexapeptides can effectively bind to the N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor and they were used as template for structure-activity studies that lead to discovery of the new NOP selective ligands. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of the novel hexapeptide Ac-RYYRIR-ol was investigated using various in vitro assays including receptor binding and G-protein activation in rat brain membranes, mouse and rat vas deferens, guinea pig ileum, mouse colon and Ca(2+) mobilization assay in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells co-expressing the human recombinant NOP receptor and the C-terminally modified Galpha(qi5) protein. In rat brain membranes Ac-RYYRIR-ol displaced both [(3)H]nociceptin/OFQ and [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol with high affinity (pK(i) 9.35 and 8.81, respectively) and stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding showing however lower maximal effects than N/OFQ (alpha=0.28). The stimulatory effect of Ac-RYYRIR-ol was antagonized by the selective NOP receptor antagonist UFP-101. In the electrically stimulated mouse vas deferens Ac-RYYRIR-ol displayed negligible agonist activity while antagonizing in a competitive manner (pA(2) 7.99) the inhibitory effects of N/OFQ. Similar results were obtained in the rat vas deferens. In the mouse colon Ac-RYYRIR-ol produced concentration dependent contractile effects with similar potency and maximal effects as N/OFQ. Finally, in the Ca(2+) mobilization assay performed with CHO-hNOP-Galpha(qi5) cells Ac-RYYRIR-ol displayed lower potency and maximal effects (alpha=0.87) compared with N/OFQ. In conclusion, the novel NOP receptor selective hexapeptide Ac-RYYRIR-ol has been shown to have fine selectivity, high potency, furthermore agonist and antagonist effects toward the NOP receptors were measured in various assays; this is likely due to its partial agonist pharmacological activity.

  4. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  5. Association of endogenous substrate with solubilized bovine brain sialidase.

    PubMed

    Schengrund, C L; Repman, M A

    1986-01-01

    Nonidet P40 solubilized up to 90% of the sialidase, active towards added ganglioside substrate, that was associated with the total membrane fraction prepared from gray matter of bovine brains. Solubilized sialidase acted upon endogenous substrate (sialic acid containing compounds solubilized with the enzyme), hydrolyzing approximately 50% of the readily available sialosyl residues within 20 min. During a 2-hr reaction time 80% of the polysialylated gangliosides solubilized with the enzyme were acted upon. A 20-min lag was observed before sialidase acted upon added ganglioside substrate. The lag could be reduced to less than 2 min when the enzyme was allowed to act on endogenous substrate prior to exposure to exogenous substrate, suggesting that the solubilized enzyme acted preferentially on endogenous substrate. A protease inhibitor prevented much of the 86% loss of activity towards added substrate that was seen when the enzyme was stored at 4 degrees C for 6 days; activity towards endogenous substrate decreased only 34%.

  6. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy. There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  7. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin (Simon); Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native

  8. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ-NOP receptor system in inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Gavioli, Elaine C; de Medeiros, Iris Ucella; Monteiro, Marta C; Calo, Girolamo; Romão, Pedro R T

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) is the endogenous ligand of the G-protein-coupled receptor NOP. Cells from the immune system express the precursor preproN/OFQ and the NOP receptor, as well as secrete N/OFQ. The activation of the N/OFQ-NOP pathway can regulate inflammatory and immune responses. Several immune activities, including leukocyte migration, cytokine and chemokine production, and lymphocytes proliferation are influenced by NOP activation. It was demonstrated that cytokines and other stimuli such as Toll-like receptor agonist (e.g., lipopolysaccharide) induce N/OFQ production by cells from innate and adaptive immune response. In this context, N/OFQ could modulate the outcome of inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis and immune-mediated pathologies by mechanisms not clearly elucidated. In fact, clinical studies revealed increased levels of N/OFQ under sepsis, arthritis, and Parkinson's disease. Preclinical and clinical studies pointed to the blockade of NOP receptor signaling as successful strategy for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. This review is focused on experimental and clinical data that suggest the participation of N/OFQ-NOP receptor activation in the modulation of the immune response, highlighting the immunomodulatory potential of NOP antagonists in the inflammatory and immunological disturbances.

  9. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP. PMID:26097618

  10. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP.

  11. Acute and subchronic treatments with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor density in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus; interactions between nociceptin/NOP system and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Le Maître, Erwan; Dourmap, Nathalie; Vilpoux, Catherine; Leborgne, Romain; Janin, François; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Costentin, Jean; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle

    2013-07-03

    Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ is the endogenous ligand of NOP receptor, formerly referred to as the Opioid Receptor-Like 1 receptor. We have previously shown that NOP receptors were located on serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, suggesting possible direct interactions between nociceptin and serotonin in this region, which is a target for antidepressant action. In the present study, we investigated further the link between Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant treatments and the nociceptin/NOP receptor system. Intraperitoneal administration of the SSRI citalopram induced an increase in NOP-receptor density, measured by autoradiographic [(3)H] nociceptin binding, in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, from the first to the 21st day of treatment. This effect was also observed with other SSRIs (sertraline, fluoxetine), but not with two tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine, clomipramine) and was abolished by pre-treatment with para-chlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis. Using microdialysis experiments, we demonstrated that NOP-receptor activation by infusion of nociceptin 10(-6) M or 10(-5) M increased the level of extracellular serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus. This effect was abolished by co-infusion of the NOP-receptor antagonist UFP 101. These results confirm the existence of reciprocal interactions between serotonin and nociceptin/NOP transmissions in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

  12. ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol decreases NOP receptor density and mRNA levels in human SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Cannarsa, Rosalia; Carretta, Donatella; Lattanzio, Francesca; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2012-02-01

    Several studies demonstrated a cross-talk between the opioid and cannabinoid system. The NOP receptor and its endogenous ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ represent an opioid-related functional entity that mediates some non-classical opioid effects. The relationship between cannabinoid and nociceptin/NOP system is yet poorly explored. In this study, we used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line to investigate the effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9)-THC) on nociceptin/NOP system. Results revealed that the exposure to ∆(9)-THC (100, 150, and 200 nM) for 24 h produces a dose-dependent NOP receptor B (max) down-regulation. Moreover, ∆(9)-THC caused a dose-dependent decrease in NOP mRNA levels. The selective cannabinoid receptor CB1 antagonist AM251 (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide) reduces both effects, suggesting that ∆(9)-THC activation of CB1 receptor is involved in the observed effects. These data show evidence of a cross-talk between NOP and CB1 receptors, thus suggesting a possible interplay between cannabinoid and nociceptin/NOP system.

  13. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established.

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of small peptides as NOP and opioid receptors' ligands: view on current developments.

    PubMed

    Naydenova, Emilia; Todorov, Petar; Zamfirova, Rositza

    2015-01-01

    The heptadecapeptide nociceptin, also called orphanin FQ (N/OFQ), is the endogenous agonist of the N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP receptor) and is involved in several central nervous system pathways, such as nociception, reward, tolerance, and feeding. The discovery of small molecule ligands for NOP is being actively pursued for several therapeutic applications. This review presents overview of the several recently reported NOP ligands (agonists and antagonists), with an emphasis of the structural features that may be important for modulating the intrinsic activity of these ligands. In addition, a brief account on the characterization of newly synthesized ligands of NOP receptor with aminophosphonate moiety and β-tryptophan analogues will be presented.

  15. Characterisation of the Novel Mixed Mu-NOP Peptide Ligand Dermorphin-N/OFQ (DeNo)

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Mark F.; Malfacini, Davide; Vezzi, Vanessa; Molinari, Paola; Micheli, Laura; Mannelli, Lorenzo Di Cesare; Ghelardini, Carla; Guerrini, Remo; Calò, Girolamo; Lambert, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Opioid receptors are currently classified as Mu (μ), Delta (δ), Kappa (κ) plus the opioid related nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP). Despite compelling evidence for interactions and benefits of targeting more than one receptor type in producing analgesia, clinical ligands are Mu agonists. In this study we have designed a Mu-NOP agonist named DeNo. The Mu agonist component is provided by dermorphin, a peptide isolated from the skin of Phyllomedusa frogs and the NOP component by the endogenous agonist N/OFQ. Methods We have assessed receptor binding profile of DeNo and compared with dermorphin and N/OFQ. In a series of functional screens we have assessed the ability to (i) increase Ca2+ in cells coexpressing recombinant receptors and a the chimeric protein Gαqi5, (ii) stimulate the binding of GTPγ[35S], (iii) inhibit cAMP formation, (iv) activate MAPKinase, (v) stimulate receptor-G protein and arrestin interaction using BRET, (vi) electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (gpI) assay and (vii) ability to produce analgesia via the intrathecal route in rats. Results DeNo bound to Mu (pKi; 9.55) and NOP (pKi; 10.22) and with reasonable selectivity. This translated to increased Ca2+ in Gαqi5 expressing cells (pEC50 Mu 7.17; NOP 9.69), increased binding of GTPγ[35S] (pEC50 Mu 7.70; NOP 9.50) and receptor-G protein interaction in BRET (pEC50 Mu 8.01; NOP 9.02). cAMP formation was inhibited and arrestin was activated (pEC50 Mu 6.36; NOP 8.19). For MAPK DeNo activated p38 and ERK1/2 at Mu but only ERK1/2 at NOP. In the gpI DeNO inhibited electrically-evoked contractions (pEC50 8.63) that was sensitive to both Mu and NOP antagonists. DeNo was antinociceptive in rats. Conclusion Collectively these data validate the strategy used to create a novel bivalent Mu-NOP peptide agonist by combining dermorphin (Mu) and N/OFQ (NOP). This molecule behaves essentially as the parent compounds in vitro. In the antonocicoeptive assays employed in this

  16. Endogenous Opioid Peptides and Epilepsy: Quieting the Seizing Brain?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    neurons ments using low doses of highly ebral metabolism targeted the are mixed, exhibiting predominant selective 1-opioid ligands have limbic forebrain...1981 demonstrating with low doses of antagonists in be critically important to the initia- that enkephalin or P-enclorphin various models of...turned tance for endogenous K systems in jections of low (pharmacological) our attention towards determining seizure mechanisms. Indeed, the doses of

  17. Seizures, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block as endogenous brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Houssaini, Kenza; Ivanov, Anton I.; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block are pathological brain activities whose mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a generic mathematical model of seizure activity, we show that these activities coexist under certain conditions spanning the range of possible brain activities. We perform a detailed bifurcation analysis and predict strategies to escape from some of the pathological states. Experimental results using rodent data provide support of the model, highlighting the concept that these pathological activities belong to the endogenous repertoire of brain activities.

  18. Differences between endogenous and exogenous emotion inhibition in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of emotions is an integral part of our mental health. It has only recently been investigated using brain imaging techniques. In most studies, participants are instructed by a cue to inhibit a specific emotional reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alternative situation where a person decides to inhibit an emotion as an act of endogenous self-control. Healthy participants viewed highly arousing pictures with negative valence. In the endogenous condition, participants could freely choose on each trial to inhibit or feel the emotions elicited by the picture. In an exogenous condition, a visual cue instructed them to either feel or inhibit the emotion elicited by the picture. Participants' subjective ratings of intensity of experienced emotion showed an interaction effect between source of control (endogenous/exogenous) and feel/inhibit based on a stronger modulation between feel and inhibition for the endogenous compared to the exogenous condition. Endogenous inhibition of emotions was associated with dorso-medial prefrontal cortex activation, whereas exogenous inhibition was found associated with lateral prefrontal cortex activation. Thus, the brain regions for both endogenous and exogenous inhibition of emotion are highly similar to those for inhibition of motor actions in Brass and Haggard (J Neurosci 27:9141-9145, 2007), Kühn et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 30:2834-2843, 2009). Functional connectivity analyses showed that dorsofrontomedial cortex exerts greater control onto pre-supplementary motor area during endogenous inhibition compared to endogenous feel. This functional dissociation between an endogenous, fronto-medial and an exogenous, fronto-lateral inhibition centre has important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation in health and psychopathology.

  19. Environment and brain plasticity: towards an endogenous pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sale, Alessandro; Berardi, Nicoletta; Maffei, Lamberto

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity refers to the remarkable property of cerebral neurons to change their structure and function in response to experience, a fundamental theoretical theme in the field of basic research and a major focus for neural rehabilitation following brain disease. While much of the early work on this topic was based on deprivation approaches relying on sensory experience reduction procedures, major advances have been recently obtained using the conceptually opposite paradigm of environmental enrichment, whereby an enhanced stimulation is provided at multiple cognitive, sensory, social, and motor levels. In this survey, we aim to review past and recent work concerning the influence exerted by the environment on brain plasticity processes, with special emphasis on the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms and starting from experimental work on animal models to move to highly relevant work performed in humans. We will initiate introducing the concept of brain plasticity and describing classic paradigmatic examples to illustrate how changes at the level of neuronal properties can ultimately affect and direct key perceptual and behavioral outputs. Then, we describe the remarkable effects elicited by early stressful conditions, maternal care, and preweaning enrichment on central nervous system development, with a separate section focusing on neurodevelopmental disorders. A specific section is dedicated to the striking ability of environmental enrichment and physical exercise to empower adult brain plasticity. Finally, we analyze in the last section the ever-increasing available knowledge on the effects elicited by enriched living conditions on physiological and pathological aging brain processes.

  20. Central N/OFQ-NOP Receptor System in Pain Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ding, Huiping; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    It has been two decades since the peptide, nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ), and its cognate (NOP) receptor were discovered. Although NOP receptor activation causes a similar pattern of intracellular actions as mu opioid (MOP) receptors, NOP receptor-mediated pain modulation in rodents are more complicated than MOP receptor activation. In this review, we highlight the functional evidence of spinal, supraspinal, and systemic actions of NOP receptor agonists for regulating pain. In rodents, effects of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system in spinal and supraspinal sites for modulating pain are bidirectional depending on the doses, assays, and pain modalities. The net effect of systemically administered NOP receptor agonists may depend on relative contribution of spinal and supraspinal actions of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor signaling in rodents under different pain states. In stark contrast, NOP receptor agonists produce only antinociception and antihypersensitivity in spinal and supraspinal regions of nonhuman primates regardless of doses and assays. More importantly, NOP receptor agonists and a few bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists do not exhibit reinforcing effects (abuse liability), respiratory depression, itch pruritus, nor do they delay the gastrointestinal transit function (constipation) in nonhuman primates. Depending upon their intrinsic efficacies for activating NOP and MOP receptors, bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists warrant additional investigation in primates regarding their side effect profiles. Nevertheless, NOP receptor-related agonists display a much wider therapeutic window as compared to that of MOP receptor agonists in primates. Both selective NOP receptor agonists and bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists hold a great potential as effective and safe analgesics without typical opioid-associated side effects in humans. PMID:26920014

  1. Central N/OFQ-NOP Receptor System in Pain Modulation.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ding, Huiping; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Two decades have passed since the peptide, nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ), and its cognate (NOP) receptor were discovered. Although NOP receptor activation causes a similar pattern of intracellular actions as mu-opioid (MOP) receptors, NOP receptor-mediated pain modulation in rodents are more complicated than MOP receptor activation. This review highlights the functional evidence of spinal, supraspinal, and systemic actions of NOP receptor agonists for regulating pain. In rodents, effects of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system in spinal and supraspinal sites for modulating pain are bidirectional depending on the doses, assays, and pain modalities. The net effect of systemically administered NOP receptor agonists may depend on relative contribution of spinal and supraspinal actions of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor signaling in rodents under different pain states. In stark contrast, NOP receptor agonists produce only antinociception and antihypersensitivity in spinal and supraspinal regions of nonhuman primates regardless of doses and assays. More importantly, NOP receptor agonists and a few bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists do not exhibit reinforcing effects (abuse liability), respiratory depression, itch pruritus, nor do they delay the gastrointestinal transit function (constipation) in nonhuman primates. Depending upon their intrinsic efficacies for activating NOP and MOP receptors, bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists warrant additional investigation in primates regarding their side effect profiles. Nevertheless, NOP receptor-related agonists display a much wider therapeutic window as compared to that of MOP receptor agonists in primates. Both selective NOP receptor agonists and bifunctional NOP/MOP receptor agonists hold great potential as effective and safe analgesics without typical opioid-associated side effects in humans.

  2. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  3. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  4. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  5. Trafficking of Endogenous Immunoglobulins by Endothelial Cells at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Ozmen, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Grüninger, Fiona; Loetscher, Hansruedi; Keller, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Collin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) restricts access of large molecules to the brain. The low endocytic activity of brain endothelial cells (BECs) is believed to limit delivery of immunoglobulins (IgG) to the brain parenchyma. Here, we report that endogenous mouse IgG are localized within intracellular vesicles at steady state in BECs in vivo. Using high-resolution quantitative microscopy, we found a fraction of endocytosed IgG in lysosomes. We observed that loss of pericytes (key components of the BBB) in pdgf-bret/ret mice affects the intracellular distribution of endogenous mouse IgG in BECs. In these mice, endogenous IgG was not detected within lysosomes but instead accumulate at the basement membrane and brain parenchyma. Such IgG accumulation could be due to reduced lysosomal clearance and increased sorting to the abluminal membrane of BECs. Our results suggest that, in addition to low uptake from circulation, IgG lysosomal degradation may be a downstream mechanism by which BECs further restrict IgG access to the brain. PMID:27149947

  6. Brain response to injury and neurodegeneration: endogenous neuroprotective signaling.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Nicolas G; Marcheselli, Victor L; Cole-Edwards, Kasie

    2005-08-01

    Synaptic activity and ischemia/injury promote lipid messenger formation through phospholipase-mediated cleavage of specific phospholipids from membrane reservoirs. Lipid messengers modulate signaling cascades, contributing to development, differentiation, function (e.g., memory), protection, regeneration, and repair of neurons and overall regulation of neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell functional integrity. Oxidative stress disrupts lipid signaling and promotes lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration. Lipid signaling at the neurovascular unit (neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and cells of the microvasculature) is altered in early cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease. We discuss how lipid signaling regulates critical events in neuronal survival. Aberrant synaptic plasticity (e.g., epileptogenesis) is highlighted to show how gene expression may drive synaptic circuitry formation in the "wrong" direction. Docosahexaenoic acid has been implicated in memory, photoreceptor cell biogenesis and function, and neuroprotection. Free docosahexaenoic acid released in the brain during experimental stroke leads to the synthesis of stereospecific messengers through oxygenation pathways. One messenger, 10,17S-docosatriene (neuroprotectin D1; NPD1), counteracts leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression in brain ischemia-reperfusion. In retina, photoreceptor survival depends on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell integrity. NPD1 is synthesized in RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress, potently counteracts oxidative stress-triggered apoptotic DNA damage in RPE, upregulates antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L), and decreases proapoptotic Bax and Bad expression. These findings expand our understanding of how the nervous system counteracts redox disturbances, mitochondrial dysfunction, and proinflammatory conditions. The specificity and potency of NPD1 indicate a potential target for therapeutic intervention for stroke, age

  7. [An endogenous inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (tribulin A) from brain: purification and structure identification].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Kamyshanskaia, N S; Halket, J; Glover, V; Sandler, A

    1995-05-01

    The endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor, tribulin, contains several components which selectively (or nonselectively) inhibit monoamine oxidases A and B. The pig brain tribulin component selectively inhibiting monoamine oxidase A was purified and identified as 4-hydroxyphenylethanol using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This compound was also found in the rabbit brain tribulin fraction which selectively inhibits monoamine oxidase A but has no influence on monoamine oxidase B. 4-Hydroxyphenylethanol inhibits monoamine oxidase A in an incompetitive manner with respect to the substrate, serotonin (Ki = 1.4 mM). Possible pathways of 4-hydroxyphenylethanol synthesis and its biological importance as the monoamine oxidase A inhibiting component of tribulin are discussed.

  8. Brain self-protection: the role of endogenous neural progenitor cells in adult brain after cerebral cortical ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Liu, Xiao-Yun; Guo, Wen-Ping; Xue, Yue-Qiang; Duan, Wei-Ming; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2010-04-23

    Convincing evidence has shown that brain ischemia causes the proliferation of neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) in both the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult brain. The role of brain ischemia-induced NSC/NPC proliferation, however, has remained unclear. Here we have determined whether brain ischemia-induced amplification of the NSCs/NPCs in adult brain is required for brain self-protection. The approach of intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), an inhibitor for cell proliferation, for the first 7days after brain ischemia was used to block ischemia-induced NSC/NPC proliferation. We observed that ICV infusion of Ara-C caused a complete blockade of NSC/NPC proliferation in the SVZ and a dramatic reduction of NSC/NPC proliferation in the SGZ. Additionally, as a result of the inhibition of ischemia-induced NSC/NPC pool amplification, the number of neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 was significantly reduced, the infarction size was significantly enlarged, and neurological deficits were significantly worsened after focal brain ischemia. We also found that an NSC/NPC-conditioned medium showed neuroprotective effects in vitro and that adult NSC/NPC-released brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are required for NSC/NPC-conditioned medium-induced neuroprotection. These data suggest that NSC/NPC-generated trophic factors are neuroprotective and that brain ischemia-triggered NSC/NPC proliferation is crucial for brain protection. This study provides insights into the contribution of endogenous NSCs/NPCs to brain self-protection in adult brain after ischemia injury.

  9. Endogenous Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Stabilize the Cortical Microenvironment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Kirsty J.; Theus, Michelle H.; Nelersa, Claudiu M.; Mier, Jose; Travieso, Lissette G.; Yu, Tzong-Shiue; Kernie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although a myriad of pathological responses contribute to traumatic brain injury (TBI), cerebral dysfunction has been closely linked to cell death mechanisms. A number of therapeutic strategies have been studied in an attempt to minimize or ameliorate tissue damage; however, few studies have evaluated the inherent protective capacity of the brain. Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) reside in distinct brain regions and have been shown to respond to tissue damage by migrating to regions of injury. Until now, it remained unknown whether these cells have the capacity to promote endogenous repair. We ablated NSPCs in the subventricular zone to examine their contribution to the injury microenvironment after controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Studies were performed in transgenic mice expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene under the control of the nestinδ promoter exposed to CCI injury. Two weeks after CCI injury, mice deficient in NSPCs had reduced neuronal survival in the perilesional cortex and fewer Iba-1-positive and glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive glial cells but increased glial hypertrophy at the injury site. These findings suggest that the presence of NSPCs play a supportive role in the cortex to promote neuronal survival and glial cell expansion after TBI injury, which corresponds with improvements in motor function. We conclude that enhancing this endogenous response may have acute protective roles after TBI. PMID:25290253

  10. Prion diseases and adult neurogenesis: how do prions counteract the brain's endogenous repair machinery?

    PubMed

    Relaño-Ginés, Aroa; Lehmann, Sylvain; Crozet, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Scientific advances in stem cell biology and adult neurogenesis have raised the hope that neurodegenerative disorders could benefit from stem cell-based therapy. Adult neurogenesis might be part of the physiological regenerative process, however it might become impaired by the disease's mechanism and therefore contribute to neurodegeneration. In prion disorders this endogenous repair system has rarely been studied. Whether adult neurogenesis plays a role or not in brain repair or in the propagation of prion pathology remains unclear. We have recently investigated the status of adult neural stem cells isolated from prion-infected mice. We were able to show that neural stem cells accumulate and replicate prions thus resulting in an alteration of their neuronal destiny. We also reproduced these results in adult neural stem cells, which were infected in vitro. The fact that endogenous adult neurogenesis could be altered by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein represents another great challenge. Inhibiting prion propagation in these cells would thus help the endogenous neurogenesis to compensate for the injured neuronal system. Moreover, understanding the endogenous modulation of the neurogenesis system would help develop effective neural stem cell-based therapies.

  11. Prion diseases and adult neurogenesis: How do prions counteract the brain's endogenous repair machinery?

    PubMed Central

    Relaño-Ginés, Aroa; Lehmann, Sylvain; Crozet, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Scientific advances in stem cell biology and adult neurogenesis have raised the hope that neurodegenerative disorders could benefit from stem cell-based therapy. Adult neurogenesis might be part of the physiological regenerative process; however, it might become impaired by the disease's mechanism and therefore contribute to neurodegeneration. In prion disorders this endogenous repair system has rarely been studied. Whether adult neurogenesis plays a role or not in brain repair or in the propagation of prion pathology remains unclear. We have recently investigated the status of adult neural stem cells isolated from prion-infected mice. We were able to show that neural stem cells accumulate and replicate prions thus resulting in an alteration of their neuronal destiny. We also reproduced these results in adult neural stem cells, which were infected in vitro. The fact that endogenous adult neurogenesis could be altered by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein represents another great challenge. Inhibiting prion propagation in these cells would thus help the endogenous neurogenesis to compensate for the injured neuronal system. Moreover, understanding the endogenous modulation of the neurogenesis system would help develop effective neural stem cell-based therapies. PMID:24831876

  12. Determination of endogenous corticosterone in rodent's blood, brain and hair with LC-APCI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Xu, Hang; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Shifei; Chen, Zheng; Deng, Huihua

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous corticosterone in rodent's hair would be a potential biomarker to assess the response of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to chronic stress. However, currently unknown is whether hair corticosterone is associated with endogenous corticosterone in blood and brain. The present study aimed to develop an enhanced assay for determination of endogenous corticosterone in blood, brain and hair, and to examine associations of hair corticosterone with blood and brain corticosterone under basal condition and association with blood corticosterone under chronic stressful condition. Hair at the back and blood samples were collected from non-stressed and stressed rodents, and prefrontal lobe and thalamus from non-stressed rodents. Chronic stress exerted on mice was 30-day repeated social defeat. The analyses were done using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in positive mode. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5ng/ml for rat's blood, and 0.5 and 1.0pg/mg for rat's hair and brain, and 1.25 and 2.50ng/ml (or pg/mg) for mouse's blood (or hair). Recovery ranged from 84.2 to 108.0%. The intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%. Additionally, correlation of hair corticosterone with blood corticosterone was significant in both mice and rats, but correlations with corticosterone in prefrontal lobe and thalamus were not significant in rats. Both hair and blood corticosterone were significantly higher in stressed mice compared with controls.

  13. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death.

  14. Clonidine-specific antisera recognize an endogenous clonidine-displacing substance in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Meeley, M.P.; Towle, A.C.; Ernsberger, P.; Char, L.K.; McCauley, P.M.; Reis, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    An endogenous substance in brain, clonidine-displacing substance, binds to the same receptor populations as clonidine and is biologically active. Since receptor binding sites can be modeled by using specific antiligand antibodies, we tested the hypothesis that polyclonal antibodies raised in rat and rabbit against the clonidine analog p-aminoclonidine coupled to hemocyanin would recognize compounds structurally related to clonidine, including clonidine-displacing substance. Binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies was examined by using a competitive radioimmunoassay with tritiated p-aminoclonidine as the radioligand. Central vasodepressor agents that, like clonidine, are known to bind with high affinity to both imidazole sites and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in brain inhibited radioligand binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies. All of these agents contain imidazol(in)e and phenyl ring moieties as part of their chemical structures (e.g., oxymetazoline); a number of other compounds without one or both of these rings failed to cross-react with the antisera. Clonidine-displacing substance, partially purified from bovine brain, also inhibited specific radioligand binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies. The inhibition was dose dependent and high affinity (IC50, 4 Units). The endogenous substance had no effect on the apparent affinity of the antibodies for the radioligand, but blocked a specific number of binding sites. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that authentic clonidine-displacing substance, that which displaces tritiated p-aminoclonidine binding to membrane receptors, is recognized by anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies.

  15. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E.; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D.; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, alpha-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by re-exposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are currently no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA provides a novel pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse. PMID:24121737

  16. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E; Redhi, Godfrey H; Panlilio, Leigh V; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana's main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by reexposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA offers a pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse.

  17. Bacopa monnieri modulates endogenous cytoplasmic and mitochondrial oxidative markers in prepubertal mice brain.

    PubMed

    Shinomol, George K; Muralidhara

    2011-02-15

    Bacopa monnieri (BM) an herb, found throughout the Indian subcontinent in wet, damp and marshy areas is used in Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving intellect/memory, treatment of anxiety and neuropharmacological disorders. Although extensively given to children as a memory enhancer, no data exists on its ability to modulate neuronal oxidative stress in prepubertal animal models. Hence in this study, we examined if dietary intake of BM leaf powder has the propensity to modulate endogenous markers of oxidative stress, redox status (reduced GSH, thiol status), response of antioxidant defenses (enzymic), protein oxidation and cholinergic function in various brain regions of prepubertal (PP) mice. PP mice maintained on a BM-enriched diet (0.5 and 1%) for 4 weeks showed a significant diminution of basal oxidative markers (malondialdehyde levels, reactive species generation, hydroperoxide levels and protein carbonyls) in both cytoplasm and mitochondria of all brain regions. This was accompanied with enhanced reduced glutathione, thiol levels and elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase). Significant reduction in the activity of acetyl cholinesterase enzyme in all brain regions suggested the potential of BM leaf powder to modulate cholinergic function. Further evidence that dietary intake of BM leaf powder confers the prepubertal brain with additional capacity to cope up with neurotoxic prooxidants was obtained by exposing cortical/cerebellar synaptosomes of normal and BM fed mice to 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA). While synaptosomes from control mice exhibited a concentration related lipid peroxidation and ROS generation, synaptosomes obtained from BM fed mice showed only a marginal induction at the highest concentration clearly suggesting their increased resistance to 3-NPA-induced oxidative stress. Collectively these data clearly indicate the potential of Bacopa monnieri to modulate endogenous markers of

  18. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  19. Endosulfine, an endogenous peptidic ligand for the sulfonylurea receptor: purification and partial characterization from ovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy-Vergine, A; Leray, H; Kuroki, S; Lupo, B; Dufour, M; Bataille, D

    1992-01-01

    Antidiabetic sulfonylureas act through receptors coupled to ATP-dependent potassium channels. Using the binding of [3H]glibenclamide, a highly potent sulfonylurea, to rat brain membranes to follow the purification procedure, we extracted from ovine brain, purified, and partially characterized two peptides that are endogenous ligands for the central nervous system sulfonylurea receptors. These peptides, referred to as alpha and beta endosulfine, differ by their isoelectric points, the beta form being more basic. Each form of endosulfine is recognized equally by the sulfonylurea receptors from the central nervous system and from insulin-secreting beta cells. In the same concentration range that is active on the receptors, beta endosulfine releases insulin from a beta-cell line. Endosulfine is a good candidate for being implicated in the physiology of beta cells and their disorders (e.g., type II diabetes) and in certain pathologies related to modifications of ion fluxes. Images PMID:1631165

  20. Endogenous reward mechanisms and their importance in stress reduction, exercise and the brain

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, George B.

    2010-01-01

    Stress can facilitate disease processes and causes strain on the health care budgets. It is responsible or involved in many human ailments of our time, such as cardiovascular illnesses, particularly related to the psychosocial stressors of daily life, including work. Besides pharmacological or clinical medical treatment options, behavioral stress reduction is much-needed. These latter approaches rely on an endogenous healing potential via life-style modification. Hence, research has suggested different ways and approaches to self-treat stress or buffer against stressors and their impacts. These self-care-centred approaches are sometimes referred to as mind-body medicine or multi-factorial stress management strategies. They consist of various cognitive behavioral techniques, as well as relaxation exercises and nutritional counselling. However, a critical and consistent element of modern effective stress reduction strategies are exercise practices. With regard to underlying neurobiological mechanisms of stress relief, reward and motivation circuitries that are imbedded in the limbic regions of the brain are responsible for the autoregulatory and endogenous processing of stress. Exercise techniques clearly have an impact upon these systems. Thereby, physical activities have a potential to increase mood, i.e., decrease psychological distress by pleasure induction. For doing so, neurobiological signalling molecules such as endogenous morphine and coupled nitric oxide pathways get activated and finely tuned. Evolutionarily, the various activities and autoregulatory pathways are linked together, which can also be demonstrated by the fact that dopamine is endogenously converted into morphine which itself leads to enhanced nitric oxide release by activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase enzymes. These molecules and mechanisms are clearly stress-reducing. PMID:22371784

  1. Endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, provide antioxidant defense in the brain against free radical-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Yang, Ding-Jian; Cai, Wen-Qing; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Gao, Yan-Feng; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2003-11-20

    Oxidative stress has been considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. The brain appears to be more susceptible to oxidative damage than other organs. Therefore, the existence of antioxidants may be essential in brain protective systems. The antioxidative and free radical scavenging effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, have been investigated in vitro. The oxidative damage was initiated by a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrocholoride) (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The linoleic acid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides, by plasmid pBR 322 DNA nicking assay and single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Endomorphins can inhibit lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation induced by free radical. Endomorphins also reacted with galvinoxyl radicals in homogeneous solution, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were determined spectrophotometrically by following the disappearance of galvinoxyl radicals. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and GSH, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins are one of the protective systems against free radical-induced damage in the brain.

  2. Deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray releases endogenous opioids in humans.

    PubMed

    Sims-Williams, Hugh; Matthews, Julian C; Talbot, Peter S; Love-Jones, Sarah; Brooks, Jonathan Cw; Patel, Nikunj K; Pickering, Anthony E

    2017-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) is used in the treatment of severe refractory neuropathic pain. We tested the hypothesis that DBS releases endogenous opioids to exert its analgesic effect using [(11)C]diprenorphine (DPN) positron emission tomography (PET). Patients with de-afferentation pain (phantom limb pain or Anaesthesia Dolorosa (n=5)) who obtained long-lasting analgesic benefit from DBS were recruited. [(11)C]DPN and [(15)O]water PET scanning was performed in consecutive sessions; first without, and then with PAG stimulation. The regional cerebral tracer distribution and kinetics were quantified for the whole brain and brainstem. Analysis was performed on a voxel-wise basis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and also within brainstem regions of interest and correlated to the DBS-induced improvement in pain score and mood. Brain-wide analysis identified a single cluster of reduced [(11)C]DPN binding (15.5% reduction) in the caudal, dorsal PAG following DBS from effective electrodes located in rostral dorsal/lateral PAG. There was no evidence for an accompanying focal change in blood flow within the PAG. No correlation was found between the change in PAG [(11)C]DPN binding and the analgesic effect or the effect on mood (POMSSV) of DBS. The analgesic effect of DBS in these subjects was not altered by systemic administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (400ug). These findings indicate that DBS of the PAG does indeed release endogenous opioid peptides focally within the midbrain of these neuropathic pain patients but we are unable to further resolve the question of whether this release is responsible for the observed analgesic benefit.

  3. Increased synaptic inhibition in dentate gyrus of mice with reduced levels of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Olofsdotter, K; Lindvall, O; Asztély, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of endogenous neurotrophins for inhibitory synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus of adult mice. Heterozygous knockout (+/-) mice or neurotrophin scavenging proteins were used to reduce the levels of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3. Patch-clamp recordings from dentate granule cells in brain slices showed that the frequency, but not the kinetics or amplitude, of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents was modulated in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. Furthermore, paired-pulse depression of evoked inhibitory synaptic responses was increased in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- mice. Similar results were obtained in brain slices from brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/+ mice incubated with tyrosine receptor kinase B-immunoglobulin G, which scavenges endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The increased inhibitory synaptic activity in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- mice was accompanied by decreased excitability of the granule cells. No differences in the frequency, amplitude or kinetics of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents were seen between neurotrophin-3 +/- and +/+ mice. From these results we suggest that endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, has acute modulatory effects on synaptic inhibition onto dentate granule cells. The site of action seems to be located presynaptically, i.e. brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates the properties of inhibitory interneurons, leading to increased excitability of dentate granule cells. We propose that through this mechanism, brain-derived neurotrophic factor can change the gating/filtering properties of the dentate gyrus for incoming information from the entorhinal cortex to hippocampus. This will have consequences for the recruitment of hippocampal neural circuitries both under physiological and pathological conditions, such as epileptogenesis.

  4. Characterization of Nops, nodulation outer proteins, secreted via the type III secretion system of NGR234.

    PubMed

    Marie, Corinne; Deakin, William J; Viprey, Virginie; Kopciñska, Joanna; Golinowski, Wladyslaw; Krishnan, Hari B; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J

    2003-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Rhizobium species NGR234 secretes, via a type III secretion system (TTSS), proteins called Nops (nodulation outer proteins). Abolition of TTSS-dependent protein secretion has either no effect or leads to a change in the number of nodules on selected plants. More dramatically, Nops impair nodule development on Crotalaria juncea roots, resulting in the formation of nonfixing pseudonodules. A double mutation of nopX and nopL, which code for two previously identified secreted proteins, leads to a phenotype on Pachyrhizus tuberosus differing from that of a mutant in which the TTSS is not functional. Use of antibodies and a modification of the purification protocol revealed that NGR234 secretes additional proteins in a TTSS-dependent manner. One of them was identified as NopA, a small 7-kDa protein. Single mutations in nopX and nopL were also generated to assess the involvement of each Nop in protein secretion and nodule formation. Mutation of nopX had little effect on NopL and NopA secretion but greatly affected the interaction of NGR234 with many plant hosts tested. NopL was not necessary for the secretion of any Nops but was required for efficient nodulation of some plant species. NopL may thus act as an effector protein whose recognition is dependent upon the hosts' genetic background.

  5. Adolescent brain maturation, the endogenous cannabinoid system and the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2010-11-01

    Cannabis use during adolescence increases the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life. However, the neurobiological processes underlying this relationship are unknown. This review reports the results of a literature search comprising various neurobiological disciplines, ultimately converging into a model that might explain the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia. The article briefly reviews current insights into brain development during adolescence. In particular, the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in experience-dependent maturation of specific cortical circuitries is examined. The review also covers recent hypotheses regarding disturbances in strengthening and pruning of synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex, and the link with latent psychotic disorders. In the present model, cannabis-induced schizophrenia is considered to be a distortion of normal late postnatal brain maturation. Distortion of glutamatergic transmission during critical periods may disturb prefrontal neurocircuitry in specific brain areas. Our model postulates that adolescent exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive substance in cannabis, transiently disturbs physiological control of the endogenous cannabinoid system over glutamate and GABA release. As a result, THC may adversely affect adolescent experience-dependent maturation of neural circuitries within prefrontal cortical areas. Depending on dose, exact time window and duration of exposure, this may ultimately lead to the development of psychosis or schizophrenia. The proposed model provides testable hypotheses which can be addressed in future studies, including animal experiments, reanalysis of existing epidemiological data, and prospective epidemiological studies in which the role of the dose-time-effect relationship should be central.

  6. Protective effects of endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Xue, Li-Ying; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Chen, Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with oxidative stress. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) exists in the brain and is especially sensitive to oxidative damage. Oxidative modification of LDL has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protecting LDL from oxidation may be essential in the brain. The antioxidative effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on LDL oxidation has been investigated in vitro. The peroxidation was initiated by either copper ions or a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH). Oxidation of the LDL lipid moiety was monitored by measuring conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and the relative electrophoretic mobility. Low density lipoprotein oxidative modifications were assessed by evaluating apoB carbonylation and fragmentation. Endomorphins markedly and in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited Cu2+ and AAPH induced the oxidation of LDL, due to the free radical scavenging effects of endomorphins. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and l-glutathione, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins provide protection against free radical-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Endogenous Repair Signaling after Brain Injury and Complementary Bioengineering Approaches to Enhance Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Caroline P; Roussas, Adam; Dutta, Dipankar; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 5.3 million Americans annually. Despite the many long-term deficits associated with TBI, there currently are no clinically available therapies that directly address the underlying pathologies contributing to these deficits. Preclinical studies have investigated various therapeutic approaches for TBI: two such approaches are stem cell transplantation and delivery of bioactive factors to mitigate the biochemical insult affiliated with TBI. However, success with either of these approaches has been limited largely due to the complexity of the injury microenvironment. As such, this review outlines the many factors of the injury microenvironment that mediate endogenous neural regeneration after TBI and the corresponding bioengineering approaches that harness these inherent signaling mechanisms to further amplify regenerative efforts. PMID:25983552

  8. It still hurts: altered endogenous opioid activity in the brain during social rejection and acceptance in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, D T; Sanford, B J; Meyers, K K; Love, T M; Hazlett, K E; Walker, S J; Mickey, B J; Koeppe, R A; Langenecker, S A; Zubieta, J-K

    2015-02-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, well known for dampening physical pain, is also hypothesized to dampen 'social pain.' We used positron emission tomography scanning with the selective MOR radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil to test the hypothesis that MOR system activation (reflecting endogenous opioid release) in response to social rejection and acceptance is altered in medication-free patients diagnosed with current major depressive disorder (MDD, n=17) compared with healthy controls (HCs, n=18). During rejection, MDD patients showed reduced endogenous opioid release in brain regions regulating stress, mood and motivation, and slower emotional recovery compared with HCs. During acceptance, only HCs showed increased social motivation, which was positively correlated with endogenous opioid release in the nucleus accumbens, a reward structure. Altered endogenous opioid activity in MDD may hinder emotional recovery from negative social interactions and decrease pleasure derived from positive interactions. Both effects may reinforce depression, trigger relapse and contribute to poor treatment outcomes.

  9. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage.

    PubMed

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section.

  10. Design, synthesis and evaluation of [(3)H]PF-7191, a highly specific nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptor radiotracer for in vivo receptor occupancy (RO) studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Drummond, Elena; Brodney, Michael A; Cianfrogna, Julie; Drozda, Susan E; Grimwood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; Villalobos, Anabella

    2014-11-15

    Herein we report the identification of (+)-N-(2-((1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl)-3-((1R,3r,5S)-6'-fluoro-8-azaspiro[bicyclo[3.2.1]octane-3,1'-isochroman]-8-yl)propyl)-N-[(3)H]-methylacetamide {[(3)H]PF-7191 [(+)-11]} as a promising radiotracer for the nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptor. (+)-11 demonstrated high NOP binding affinity (Ki = 0.1 nM), excellent selectivity over other opioid receptors (>1000×) and good brain permeability in rats (C(b,u)/C(p,u) = 0.29). Subsequent characterization of [(3)H](+)-11 showed a high level of specific binding and a brain bio-distribution pattern consistent with known NOP receptor expression. Furthermore, the in vivo brain binding of [(3)H](+)-11 in rats was inhibited by a selective NOP receptor antagonist in a dose-responsive manner. This overall favorable profile indicated that [(3)H](+)-11 is a robust radiotracer for pre-clinical in vivo receptor occupancy (RO) measurements and a possible substrate for carbon-11 labeling for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in higher species.

  11. The origins of the brain's endogenous electromagnetic field and its relationship to provision of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Hales, C G

    2014-06-01

    As a potential source of consciousness, the brain's endogenous electromagnetic (EM) field has much to commend it. Difficulties connecting EM phenomena and consciousness have been exacerbated by the lack of a specific conclusive biophysically realistic mechanism originating the EM field, its form and dynamics. This work explores a potential mechanism: the spatial and temporal coherent action of transmembrane ion channel currents which simultaneously produce electric and magnetic fields that dominate all other field sources. Ion channels, as tiny current filaments, express, at a distance, the electric and magnetic fields akin to those of a short (transmembrane) copper wire. Following assembly of appropriate formalisms from EM field theory, the paper computationally explores the scalar electric potential produced by the current filaments responsible for an action potential (AP) in a realistic hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neuron. It reveals that AP signaling can impress a highly structured, focused and directed "sweeping-lighthouse beam" that "illuminates" neighbors at mm scales. Ion channel currents thereby provide a possible explanation for both EEG/MEG origins and recently confirmed functional EM coupling effects. Finally, a physically plausible EM field decomposition is posited. It reveals objective and subjective perspectives intrinsic to the membrane-centric field dynamics. Perceptual "fields" can be seen to operate as the collective action of virtual EM-boson composites (called qualeons) visible only by "being" the fields, yet objectively appear as the familiar EM field activity. This explains the problematic evidence presentation and offers a physically plausible route to a solution to the "hard problem".

  12. Identifying endogenous neural stem cells in the adult brain in vitro and in vivo: novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Rueger, Maria Adele; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, Joseph Altman reported that the adult mammalian brain is capable of generating new neurons. Today it is understood that some of these neurons are derived from uncommitted cells in the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The first area generates new neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas hippocampal neurogenesis seems to play roles in particular types of learning and memory. A part of these uncommitted (immature) cells is able to divide and their progeny can generate all three major cell types of the nervous system: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes; these properties define such cells as neural stem cells. Although the roles of these cells are not yet clear, it is accepted that they affect functions including olfaction and learning/memory. Experiments with insults to the central nervous system also show that neural stem cells are quickly mobilized due to injury and in various disorders by proliferating, and migrating to injury sites. This suggests a role of endogenous neural stem cells in disease. New pools of stem cells are being discovered, suggesting an even more important role for these cells. To understand these cells and to coax them to contribute to tissue repair it would be very useful to be able to image them in the living organism. Here we discuss advances in imaging approaches as well as new concepts that emerge from stem cell biology with emphasis on the interface between imaging and stem cells.

  13. Evaluation of endogenous species involved in brain tumors using multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that using non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), excised brain tumor (grade III astrocytoma) and healthy tissue can be differentiated from each other, even in neighboring biopsy samples[1, 2]. Because of this, this powerful technique offers a great deal of potential for use as a surgical guidance technique for tumor margining with up to cellular level spatial resolution[3]. NMPPAS spectra are obtained by monitoring the non-radiative relaxation pathways via ultrasonic detection, following two-photon excitation with light in the optical diagnostic window (740nm-1100nm). Based upon significant differences in the ratiometric absorption of the tissues following 970nm and 1100nm excitation, a clear classification of the tissue can be made. These differences are the result of variations in composition and oxidation state of certain endogenous biochemical species between healthy and malignant tissues. In this work, NADH, NAD+ and ATP were measured using NMPPAS in model gelatin tissue phantoms to begin to understand which species might be responsible for the observed spectral differences in the tissue. Each species was placed in specific pH environments to provide control over the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the species. Ratiometric analyses were then conducted to account for variability caused due to instrumental parameters. This paper will discuss the potential roles of each of the species for tumor determination and their contribution to the spectral signature.

  14. Ischemic conditioning-induced endogenous brain protection: Applications Pre-, Per- or Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuechun; Reis, Cesar; Applegate, Richard; Stier, Gary; Martin, Robert; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    In the area of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, a plethora of experimental and clinical evidence strongly indicates the promise of therapeutically exploiting the endogenous adaptive system at various levels like triggers, mediators and the end-effectors to stimulate and mobilize intrinsic protective capacities against brain injuries. It is believed that ischemic pre- or post-conditioning are actually the strongest known interventions to stimulate the innate neuroprotective mechanism to prevent or reverse neurodegenerative diseases including stoke and traumatic brain injury. Recently, studies showed the effectiveness of ischemic per-conditioning in some organs. Therefore the term ischemic conditioning, including all interventions applied pre-, per- and post- ischemia, which spans therapeutic windows in 3 time periods, has recently been broadly accepted by scientific communities. In addition, it is extensively acknowledged that ischemia-mediated protection not only affects the neurons but also all the components of the neurovascular network (consisting of neurons, glial cells, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and venule/veins). The concept of cerebroprotection has been widely used in place of neuroprotection. Intensive studies on the cellular signaling pathways involved in ischemic conditioning have improved the mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. This has added impetus to exploration for potential pharmacologic mimetics, which could possibly induce and maximize inherent protective capacities. However, most of these studies were performed in rodents, and the efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Several classical signaling pathways involving apoptosis, inflammation, or oxidation have been elaborated in the past decades. Newly characterized mechanisms are emerging with the advances in biotechnology and conceptual renewal. In this review we are going to focus on those

  15. Four new caponiids species (Araneae, Caponiidae) from the West Indies and redescription of Nops blandus (Bryant).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ruiz, Alexander; Brescovit, Antonio D; Alayón, Giraldo

    2015-06-10

    We update the knowledge of the unusual Caponiidae spiders from the West Indies with the description of four new species, and the redescription of Nops blandus (Bryant) including the first description of the female. Specimens previously assigned to N. blandus from Hispaniola and Puerto Rico represents two new species: Nops hispaniola n. sp. and Nops agnarssoni n. sp. respectively; while the distribution of the former is limited to British and U. S. Virgin Islands. The others two new species are Nops finisfurvus n. sp. from British Virgin Islands and Cubanops luquillo n. sp. from Puerto Rico. Female internal genitalia of Nops species are described, photographed and illustrated for the first time.

  16. Effects of the immunostimulant, levamisole, on opiate withdrawal and levels of endogenous opiate alkaloids and monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spector, S; Munjal, I; Schmidt, D E

    1998-11-01

    This report present evidence that the immunostimulant drug levamisole, (-)-(S)-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenylimidazo[2,1-b] thiazole monohydrochloride, produced a significant elevation of endogeneous morphine and codeine levels in brain regions and peripheral organs and attenuated the effects of naltrexone-induced withdrawal in morphine-addicted rats. Levamisole also significantly altered the metabolism of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in specific brain regions. These results suggest that levamisole's attenuation of opiate withdrawal may be related to its ability to increase endogeneous opiate alkaloid levels and/or to alter central monoaminergic function. Levamisole does not have significant affinity for opiate receptors. These results raise the intriguing possibility that agents such as levamisole, which elevate the levels of the endogenous opiate alkaloids, might be useful for treating narcotic withdrawal. The mechanism for the immunostimulatory properties of agents such as levamisole and muramyl dipeptide (MDP) have not been established. We suggest that the ability of MDP and levamisole to increase endogenous opiate alkaloids may be related to their immunostimulatory properties.

  17. NOP14 suppresses breast cancer progression by inhibiting NRIP1/Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jin-Ju; Peng, Rou-Jun; Kuang, Bo-Hua; Yuan, Zhong-Yu; Qin, Tao; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Guo, Yun-Miao; Han, Hui-Qiong; Lian, Yi-Fan; Deng, Cheng-Cheng; Zhang, Hao-Jiong; Chen, Li-Zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Xu, Miao; Feng, Lin; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2015-09-22

    NOP14, which is functionally conserved among eukaryotes, has been implicated in cancer development. Here, we show that NOP14 is poorly expressed in breast cancer cells and invasive breast cancer tissues. In vivo and in vitro studies indicated that NOP14 suppressed the tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Further investigations revealed that NOP14 enhanced ERα expression and inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by up-regulating NRIP1 expression. Survival analysis indicated that low NOP14 expression was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0006) and disease-free survival (P = 0.0007), suggesting that NOP14 is a potential prognostic factor in breast cancer. Taken together, our findings reveal that NOP14 may suppress breast cancer progression and provide new insights into the development of targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

  18. Pharmacological Studies of NOP Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    strongly implicated in the integration and transduction of a variety of pain signaling including tissue-injury induced thermal hyperalgesia, diabetic ...have shown that activation of peripheral and spinal NOP receptors produces antinociceptive effects in a variety of pain models in rodents (Erb et al...Spinal and local peripheral antiallodynic activity of Ro 64-6198 in neuropathic pain in the rat. Pain 116: 17–25. Park KM, Max MB, Robinovitz E, Gracely

  19. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke.

  20. Protective Role of Endogenous Ovarian Hormones Against Learning and Memory Impairments and Brain Tissues Oxidative Damage Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Pourganji, Masoume; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Zabihi, Hoda; Hadjzadeh, Mosa Al-reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The contribution of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been widely reported. The effects of female gonadal hormones in both neuroinflammation and brain cognitive functions have also been well considered. Objectives: In the present study, the possible protective role for endogenous ovarian hormones against learning and memory impairment as well as brain tissues oxidative damage induced by lipopolysachride (LPS) was investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into four groups: Sham-LPS, Ovariectomized (OVX)-LPS, Sham, and OVX. The animals of sham group were in proestrous phase in which the serum concentration of estradiol is high. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 µg/kg) before acquisition. The animals were examined using passive avoidance (PA) test. The brains were then removed and malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiol groups concentrations were measured. Results: The time latency to enter the dark compartment by OVX-LPS group was shorter than that of OVX at both first and 24th hours after the shock (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001). In Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups, total thiol concentration in hippocampal and cortical tissues were significantly lower while MDA concentrations were higher than that of Sham and OVX groups (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001). ). The hippocampal MDA concentration in OVX-LPS group was higher than Sham- LPS group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Brain tissue oxidative damage contributed in deleterious effects of LPS on learning and memory. Some protective effects for the endogenous ovarian hormones against damaging effects of LPS on learning and memory function, as well as brain tissues oxidative damage could be postulated; however, it needs more investigation. PMID:24829769

  1. Endogenous and exogenous electric fields as modifiers of brain activity: rational design of noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-03-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity in the cortex generates weak electric fields that are routinely measured in humans and animal models by electroencephalography and local field potential recordings. Traditionally, these endogenous electric fields have been considered to be an epiphenomenon of brain activity. Recent work has demonstrated that active cortical networks are surprisingly susceptible to weak perturbations of the membrane voltage of a large number of neurons by electric fields. Simultaneously, noninvasive brain stimulation with weak, exogenous electric fields (transcranial current stimulation, TCS) has undergone a renaissance due to the broad scope of its possible applications in modulating brain activity for cognitive enhancement and treatment of brain disorders. This review aims to interface the recent developments in the study of both endogenous and exogenous electric fields, with a particular focus on rhythmic stimulation for the modulation of cortical oscillations. The main goal is to provide a starting point for the use of rational design for the development of novel mechanism-based TCS therapeutics based on transcranial alternating current stimulation, for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

  2. Endogenous and exogenous electric fields as modifiers of brain activity: rational design of noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial alternating current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity in the cortex generates weak electric fields that are routinely measured in humans and animal models by electroencephalography and local field potential recordings. Traditionally, these endogenous electric fields have been considered to be an epiphenomenon of brain activity. Recent work has demonstrated that active cortical networks are surprisingly susceptible to weak perturbations of the membrane voltage of a large number of neurons by electric fields. Simultaneously, noninvasive brain stimulation with weak, exogenous electric fields (transcranial current stimulation, TCS) has undergone a renaissance due to the broad scope of its possible applications in modulating brain activity for cognitive enhancement and treatment of brain disorders. This review aims to interface the recent developments in the study of both endogenous and exogenous electric fields, with a particular focus on rhythmic stimulation for the modulation of cortical oscillations. The main goal is to provide a starting point for the use of rational design for the development of novel mechanism-based TCS therapeutics based on transcranial alternating current stimulation, for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses. PMID:24733974

  3. Neuroprotective effect of endogenous cannabinoids on ischemic brain injury induced by the excess microglia-mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuyun; Liu, Yanwu; Ma, Rui; Li, Jun; Su, Binxiao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated the role of endogenous cannabinoids system (ECS) on protecting brain injury caused by ischemia (IMI). Papers reported that microglia-mediated inflammation has become one of the most pivotal mechanisms for IMI. This study was aimed to investigate the potential roles of ECS on neuron protection under microglia-mediated inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines level both in vitro (BV-2 cells) and in vivo (brain tissue from constructed IMI model and brain-isolated microglia) was detected. ECS levels were detected, and its effects on inflammations was also analyzed. Influence of microglia-mediated inflammation on neuron injury was analyzed. Moreover, the effects of ECS on protecting neuron injury were also analyzed. Our results showed that the levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNFα and IL-1β were higher while IKBα was lower in IMI model brain tissue, brain-isolated microglia and BV-2 cells compared to the control. Inflammation was activated in microglia, as well as the activation of ECS characterized by the increasing level of AEA and 2-AG. Furthermore, the activated microglia-mediated self-inflammation performed harmful influence on neurons via suppressing cell viability and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, ECS functioned as a protector on neuron injury though promoting cell proliferation and suppressing cell apoptosis which were caused by the activated BV-2 cells (LPS induced for 3 h). Our data suggested that ECS may play certain neuroprotective effects on microglia-mediated inflammations-induced IMI through anti-inflammatory function. PMID:27398146

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhance endogenous neurogenesis in an ischemic stroke model.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Muk; Lim, Jung Yeon; Ryu, Chung Heon; Jun, Jin Ae; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can ameliorate neurological deficits in ischemic stroke models. Among the various hypotheses that have been suggested to explain the therapeutic mechanism underlying these observations, neurogenesis is thought to be critical. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs), we efficiently modified hBM-MSCs by introduction of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene via adenoviral transduction mediated by cell-permeable peptides and investigated whether BDNF-modified hBM-MSCs (MSCs-BDNF) contributed to functional recovery and endogenous neurogenesis in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Transplantation of MSCs induced the proliferation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU-) positive cells in the subventricular zone. Transplantation of MSCs-BDNF enhanced the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells more significantly, while suppressing cell death. Newborn cells differentiated into doublecortin (DCX-) positive neuroblasts and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN-) positive mature neurons in the subventricular zone and ischemic boundary at higher rates in animals with MSCs-BDNF compared with treatment using solely phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or MSCs. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and behavioral analysis revealed greater functional recovery in animals with MSCs-BDNF compared with the other groups. MSCs-BDNF exhibited effective therapeutic potential by protecting cell from apoptotic death and enhancing endogenous neurogenesis.

  5. Evidence for neuroprotective effects of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor after global forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, Z; Lindvall, O

    1999-11-01

    The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) vary between different forebrain areas and show region-specific changes after cerebral ischemia. The present study explores the possibility that the levels of endogenous BDNF determine the susceptibility to ischemic neuronal death. To block BDNF activity the authors used the TrkB-Fc fusion protein, which was infused intraventricularly in rats during 1 week before and 1 week after 5 or 30 minutes of global forebrain ischemia. Ischemic damage was quantified in the striatum and hippocampal formation after 1 week of reperfusion using immunocytochemistry and stereological procedures. After the 30-minute insult, there was a significantly lower number of surviving CA4 pyramidal neurons, neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive dentate hilar neurons, and choline acetyltransferase- and TrkA-positive, cholinergic striatal interneurons in the TrkB-Fc-infused rats as compared to controls. In contrast, the TrkB-Fc treatment did not influence survival of CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neurons or striatal projection neurons. Also, after the mild ischemic insult (5 minutes), neuronal death in the CA1 region was similar in the TrkB-Fc-treated and control groups. These results indicate that endogenous BDNF can protect certain neuronal populations against ischemic damage. It is conceivable, though, that efficient neuroprotection after brain insults is dependent not only on this factor but on the concerted action of a large number of neurotrophic molecules.

  6. Transplantation of neural progenitors enhances production of endogenous cells in the impaired brain.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shaanan, T L; Ben-Hur, T; Yanai, J

    2008-02-01

    Grafting of neural progenitors has been shown to reverse a wide variety of neurobehavioral defects. While their role of replacing injured cells and restoring damaged circuitries has been shown, it is widely accepted that this cannot be the only mechanism, as therapy can occur even when an insufficient number of transplanted cells are found. We hypothesized that one major mechanism by which transplanted neural progenitors exert their therapeutic effect is by enhancing endogenous cells production. Consequently, in an allographic model of transplantation, prenatally heroin-exposed genetically heterogeneous (HS) mice were made defective in their hippocampal neurobehavioral function by exposing their mothers to heroin (10 mg kg(-1) heroin on gestation days 9-18). Hippocampal damage was confirmed by deficient performance in the Morris maze (P<0.009), and decreased production of endogenous cells in the dentate gyrus by 39% was observed. On postnatal day 35, they received an HS-derived neural progenitors transplant followed by repeated bromodeoxyuridine injections. The transplant returned endogenous cells production to normal levels (P<0.006) and reversed the behavioral defects (P<0.03), despite the fact that only 0.0334% of the transplanted neural progenitors survived and that they differentiated mainly to astrocytes. An immunological study demonstrated the presence of macrophages and T cells as a possible explanation for the paucity of the transplanted cells. This study suggests one mechanism for the therapeutic action of neural progenitors, the enhancement of the production of endogenous cells, pointing to future clinical applications in this direction by use of neural progenitors or by analogous cell-inducing techniques.

  7. Mapping a nucleolar targeting sequence of an RNA binding nucleolar protein, Nop25

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Suzuki, Shunji . E-mail: suzukis@yamanashi.ac.jp; Kanno, Motoko; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Tanaka, Junya

    2006-06-10

    Nop25 is a putative RNA binding nucleolar protein associated with rRNA transcription. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism of Nop25 localization in the nucleolus. Deletion experiments of Nop25 amino acid sequence showed Nop25 to contain a nuclear targeting sequence in the N-terminal and a nucleolar targeting sequence in the C-terminal. By expressing derivative peptides from the C-terminal as GFP-fusion proteins in the cells, a lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide (KRKHPRRAQDSTKKPPSATRTSKTQRRRR) allowed a GFP-fusion protein to be transported and fully retained in the nucleolus. When the peptide was fused with cMyc epitope and expressed in the cells, a cMyc epitope was then detected in the nucleolus. Nop25 did not localize in the nucleolus by deletion of the peptide from Nop25. Furthermore, deletion of a subdomain (KRKHPRRAQ) in the peptide or amino acid substitution of lysine and arginine residues in the subdomain resulted in the loss of Nop25 nucleolar localization. These results suggest that the lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide is the most prominent nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25 and that the long stretch of basic residues might play an important role in the nucleolar localization of Nop25. Although Nop25 contained putative SUMOylation, phosphorylation and glycosylation sites, the amino acid substitution in these sites had no effect on the nucleolar localization, thus suggesting that these post-translational modifications did not contribute to the localization of Nop25 in the nucleolus. The treatment of the cells, which expressed a GFP-fusion protein with a nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25, with RNase A resulted in a complete dislocation of the protein from the nucleolus. These data suggested that the nucleolar targeting sequence might therefore play an important role in the binding of Nop25 to RNA molecules and that the RNA binding of Nop25 might be essential for the nucleolar localization of Nop25.

  8. Anxiolytic-like effect of central administration of NOP receptor antagonist UFP-101 in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Duzzioni, Marcelo; Duarte, Filipe S; Leme, Leandro R; Gavioli, Elaine C; De Lima, Thereza C M

    2011-09-12

    Depression and anxiety disorders present several genetic and neurobiological similarities. Drugs with antidepressant activity are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of anxiety disorders. Preclinical results showed that acute and chronic treatment with the NOP antagonist [Nphe(1),Arg(14),Lys(15)]N/OFQ-NH(2) (UFP-101) produced antidepressant-like effects in rodents. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of central administration of UFP-101 on the anxiety-related behavior in rats as evaluated in the elevated T-maze (ETM) test. Our results showed that UFP-101 reduced the latency of inhibitory avoidance in the ETM, indicating an anxiolytic-like effect. The endogenous peptide N/OFQ prevented this anxiolytic-like action of UFP-101, demonstrating its modulation via central NOP receptors. However, UFP-101 failed to interfere with the latency to escape. No change was observed in locomotor activity after UFP-101 treatment, ruling out any nonspecific motor effect. In conclusion, our results showed that the central administration of UFP-101 presents an anxiolytic-like effect in rats evaluated in the ETM test, providing new insights for drug development to treat anxiety disorders targeting the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system.

  9. 77 FR 59287 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012) for Nutrient Vitamins and Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... CFR Part 205 [Document Number AMS-NOP-10-0083; NOP-10-09IR] RIN 0581-AD17 National Organic Program... recommendation submitted to the Secretary of Agriculture (Secretary) by the National Organic Standards Board...) of nutrient vitamins and minerals in organic handling on U.S. Department of Agriculture's...

  10. Endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end-products inhibits amyloid-β1-42 uptake into mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Takahiro; Munesue, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Shigeru; Akhter, Nasima; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Yonekura, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The cell-surface receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complications and Alzheimer's disease. RAGE has been considered to be involved in amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42) uptake into brain. In the present study, we demonstrate that endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), a decoy form of RAGE generated by alternative RNA processing, is able to inhibit Aβ1-42 influx into mouse brain. Surface plasmon resonance and competitive binding assays revealed that human Aβ1-42 interacted with human esRAGE within the immunoglobulin V type region. We next examined the uptake and distribution of 125I-labeled human Aβ1-42 in various organs and body fluids of newly created mice overexpressing human esRAGE as well as RAGE-null and wild-type (WT) mice. The transition of the 125I-labeled Aβ1-42 from circulation to brain parenchyma peaked at 30 min after the injection into WT mice, but this was significantly blunted in esRAGE-overexpressing and RAGE-null mice. Significant reduction in 125I-labeled Aβ1-42-derived photo-stimulated luminescence were marked in ventricles, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, especially CA1 and CA3 regions, putamen, and thalamus. The results thus suggest the potential of esRAGE in protection against the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Changes in endogenous prostacyclin in the rat brain during clinical death and after resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kapuściński, A

    1992-01-01

    By means of the radioimmunologic method changes of concentration of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha)--the stable metabolite of prostacyclin in the rat brain have been evaluated during 5-min clinical death and up to 2 hrs after resuscitation. Ischemia did not produce significant changes of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha concentration in the brain. In the early postresuscitation period the concentration of 6-keto-PGF1 in the and 7-fold control values. Later the concentration of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the brain decreased reaching in 30 min a 3-fold the control level, and in 60 and 120 min after resuscitation control values. The reasons of unsuccessful therapy of ischemic stroke with prostacyclin are discussed.

  12. Endogenous glycosphingolipid acceptor specificity of sialosyltransferase systems in intact golgi membranes, synaptosomes, and synaptic plasma membranes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Durrie, R.; Saito, M.; Rosenberg, A.

    1988-05-17

    Preparations highly enriched in Golgi complex membranes, synaptosomes, and synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) by marker enzyme analysis and electron microscopic morphology were made from the brains of 28-day-old rats. These were incubated with cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-acetyl(/sup 14/C)neuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) in a physiologic buffer, without detergents. Glycolipid sialosyltransferase activities (SATs) were measured by analyzing incorporation of radiolabeled NeuAc into endogenous membrane gangliosides. Golgi SAT was diversified in producing all the various molecular species of labeled gangliosides. Synaptosomal SAT exhibited a lower activity, but it was highly specific in its labeling pattern, with a marked preference for labeling NeuAc..cap alpha..2 ..-->.. 8NeuAc..cap alpha..2 ..-->.. 3Gal..beta..1 ..-->.. 4Glc..beta..1 ..-->.. 1Cer (GD3 ganglioside). SPM prepared from the synaptosomes retained the GD3-related SAT (or SAT-2), and the total specific activity increased, which suggests that the location of the synaptosomal activity is in the SPM. These results indicate that SAT activity in Golgi membranes differs from that in synaptosomes with regard to endogenous acceptor substrate specificity and SAT activity of synaptosomes should be located in the synaptosomal plasma membrane. This SAT could function as an ectoenzyme in concert with ecto-sialidase to modulate the GD3 and other ganglioside population in situ at the SPM of the central nervous system.

  13. Evidence against an essential role of endogenous brain dopamine in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Callahan, B T; McCann, U D; Ricaurte, G A

    2001-06-01

    The present studies examined the role of endogenous dopamine (DA) in methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity while controlling for temperature-related neuroprotective effects of the test compounds, reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). To determine if the vesicular pool of DA was essential for the expression of METH-induced DA neurotoxicity, reserpine (3 mg/kg, given iintraperitoneally 24-26 h prior to METH) was given prior to a toxic dose regimen of METH. Despite severe striatal DA deficits during the period of METH exposure, mice treated with reserpine prior to METH developed long-term reductions in striatal DA axonal markers, suggesting that vesicular DA stores were not crucial for the development of METH neurotoxicity, but leaving open the possibility that cytoplasmic DA might be involved. To evaluate this possibility, cytoplasmic DA stores were depleted with AMPT prior to METH administration. When this study was carried out at 28 degrees C, complete neuroprotection was observed, likely due to lingering effects on core temperature because when the same study was repeated at 33 degrees C (to eliminate AMPT's hypothermic effect in METH-treated animals), the previously observed neuroprotection was no longer evident. In the third and final set of experiments, mice were pretreated with a combination of reserpine and AMPT, to deplete both vesicular and cytoplasmic DA pools, and to reduce striatal DA levels to negligible values during the period of METH administration (< 0.05%). When core temperature differences were eliminated by raising ambient temperature, METH-induced DA neurotoxic changes were evident in mice pretreated with reserpine and AMPT. Collectively, these findings bring into question the view that endogenous DA plays an essential role in METH-induced DA neurotoxicity.

  14. Endogenous Nutritive Support after Traumatic Brain Injury: Peripheral Lactate Production for Glucose Supply via Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Johnson, Matthew L.; Horning, Michael A.; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that nutritive needs of injured brains are supported by large and coordinated increases in lactate shuttling throughout the body. To that end, we used dual isotope tracer ([6,6-2H2]glucose, i.e., D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate) techniques involving central venous tracer infusion along with cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who had nonpenetrating head injuries (n=12, all male) were entered into the study after consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from healthy controls (n=6, including one female). As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) for glucose was suppressed after TBI. Near normal arterial glucose and lactate levels in patients studied 5.7±2.2 days (range of days 2–10) post-injury, however, belied a 71% increase in systemic lactate production, compared with control, that was largely cleared by greater (hepatic+renal) glucose production. After TBI, gluconeogenesis from lactate clearance accounted for 67.1% of glucose rate of appearance (Ra), which was compared with 15.2% in healthy controls. We conclude that elevations in blood glucose concentration after TBI result from a massive mobilization of lactate from corporeal glycogen reserves. This previously unrecognized mobilization of lactate subserves hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis. As such, a lactate shuttle mechanism indirectly makes substrate available for the body and its essential organs, including the brain, after trauma. In addition, when elevations in arterial lactate concentration occur after TBI, lactate shuttling may provide substrate directly to vital organs of the body, including the injured brain. PMID:25279664

  15. Polyphenols and the human brain: plant “secondary metabolite” ecologic roles and endogenous signaling functions drive benefits.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O

    2014-09-01

    Flavonoids and other polyphenols are ubiquitous plant chemicals that fulfill a range of ecologic roles for their home plant, including protection from a range of biotic and abiotic stressors and a pivotal role in the management of pathogenic and symbiotic soil bacteria and fungi. They form a natural part of the human diet, and evidence suggests that their consumption is associated with the beneficial modulation of a number of health-related variables, including those related to cardiovascular and brain function. Over recent years, the consensus as to the mechanisms responsible for these effects in humans has shifted away from polyphenols having direct antioxidant effects and toward their modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways. To date, little consideration has been given to the question of why, rather than how, these plant-derived chemicals might exert these effects. Therefore, this review summarizes the evidence suggesting that polyphenols beneficially affect human brain function and describes the current mechanistic hypotheses explaining these effects. It then goes on to describe the ecologic roles and potential endogenous signaling functions that these ubiquitous phytochemicals play within their home plant and discusses whether these functions drive their beneficial effects in humans via a process of “cross-kingdom” signaling predicated on the many conserved similarities in plant, microbial, and human cellular signal transduction pathways.

  16. Polyphenols and the Human Brain: Plant “Secondary Metabolite” Ecologic Roles and Endogenous Signaling Functions Drive Benefits12

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and other polyphenols are ubiquitous plant chemicals that fulfill a range of ecologic roles for their home plant, including protection from a range of biotic and abiotic stressors and a pivotal role in the management of pathogenic and symbiotic soil bacteria and fungi. They form a natural part of the human diet, and evidence suggests that their consumption is associated with the beneficial modulation of a number of health-related variables, including those related to cardiovascular and brain function. Over recent years, the consensus as to the mechanisms responsible for these effects in humans has shifted away from polyphenols having direct antioxidant effects and toward their modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways. To date, little consideration has been given to the question of why, rather than how, these plant-derived chemicals might exert these effects. Therefore, this review summarizes the evidence suggesting that polyphenols beneficially affect human brain function and describes the current mechanistic hypotheses explaining these effects. It then goes on to describe the ecologic roles and potential endogenous signaling functions that these ubiquitous phytochemicals play within their home plant and discusses whether these functions drive their beneficial effects in humans via a process of “cross-kingdom” signaling predicated on the many conserved similarities in plant, microbial, and human cellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:25469384

  17. Lipidomic analyses of the mouse brain after antidepressant treatment: evidence for endogenous release of long-chain fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Lee, Lynette Hui-Wen; Shui, Guanghou; Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Wenk, Markus R; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2009-08-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in a possible link between changes in brain polyunsaturated fatty acids, neural membrane phospholipid degradation, serotonergic neurotransmission, and depression. The present study aims to examine effects of antidepressants on lipids in different regions of the brain at individual molecular species level, using the novel technique of lipidomics. Balb/C mice received daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 10 mg/kg of the antidepressants maprotiline, fluoxetine and paroxetine for 4 wk. The prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum were harvested, and lipid profiles compared to those of saline-injected mice. Treatment with maprotiline and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine, resulted in significant decreases in phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, PC36:1, PC38:3, PC40:2p, PC40:6, PC40:5, PC42:7p, PC42:6p and PC42:5p in the prefrontal neocortex. The decreases in phospholipids were accompanied by increases in lysophospholipid species, lysoPC16:0, lysoPC18:2 and lysoPC18:0 in the prefrontal cortex, indicating increase in phospholipase A2 activity and possible release of long-chain fatty acids. Maprotiline and paroxetine treatment also resulted in decreases in sphingomyelin and increases in several ceramide species in the prefrontal cortex. It is postulated that endogenous release of long-chain fatty acids may be related to the mechanism of action of maprotiline and paroxetine.

  18. Endogenous cannabinoids in amygdala and hippocampus in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, Olli K; Lehtonen, Marko; Laukkanen, Virpi; Tupala, Erkki; Hyytiä, Petri; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Callaway, J C; Storvik, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Accumulating evidence continues to link certain aspects of the endogenous cannabinoid (EC) system with alcohol dependence, negative-reinforcement learning, and the modulation of stress responses. Specific alterations in brain regions that are related to stress and negative-reinforcement learning have been reported to exist in Cloninger type 1 and type 2 alcoholics. To study possible differences in profiles of EC systems between Cloninger type 1 (n = 9) and type 2 (n = 8) alcoholics and non-alcoholic control subjects (n = 10), we analyzed post-mortem amygdala and hippocampus brain samples for several ECs by quantitative liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass-spectrometric detection. A significant difference was found between these 3 groups in terms of EC profiles in the amygdala (p = 0.037). In particular, this difference was prominent for variations in docosahexaenoylethanolamide levels, which were significantly higher in type 1 alcoholics (p = 0.022) when compared to controls. There was also a large negative correlation between anandamide concentration and mGlu1/5 receptor density in the hippocampi of Cloninger type 1 alcoholics (R = -0.88, p = 0.002), which was not seen in Cloninger type 2 alcoholics or in controls. Although preliminary, and from relatively small diagnostic groups, these results suggest that the EC system profile may be altered in the hippocampus and amygdala of Cloninger type 1 alcoholics.

  19. Endogenous level of TIGAR in brain is associated with vulnerability of neurons to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijuan; Chen, Jieyu; Li, Mei; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Meiling; Sheng, Rui; Han, Feng; Wang, Guanghui; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-10-01

    In previous studies, we showed that TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) protects neurons against ischemic brain injury. In the present study, we investigated the developmental changes of TIGAR level in mouse brain and the correlation of TIGAR expression with the vulnerability of neurons to ischemic injury. We found that the TIGAR level was high in the embryonic stage, dropped at birth, partially recovered in the early postnatal period, and then continued to decline to a lower level in early adult and aged mice. The TIGAR expression was higher after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse brain 8 and 12 weeks after birth. Four-week-old mice had smaller infarct volumes, lower neurological scores, and lower mortality rates after ischemia than 8- and 12-week-old mice. TIGAR expression also increased in response to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation insult or H2O2 treatment in cultured primary neurons from different embryonic stages (E16 and E20). The neurons cultured from the early embryonic period had a greater resistance to OGD and oxidative insult. Higher TIGAR levels correlated with higher pentose phosphate pathway activity and less oxidative stress. Older mice and more mature neurons had more severe DNA and mitochondrial damage than younger mice and less mature neurons in response to ischemia/reperfusion or OGD/reoxygenation insult. Supplementation of cultured neurons with nicotinamide adenine dinuclectide phosphate (NADPH) significantly reduced ischemic injury. These results suggest that TIGAR expression changes during development and its expression level may be correlated with the vulnerability of neurons to ischemic injury.

  20. Physiological relevance of endogenous free D-serine in the mammalian brain: are scientists on a royal road for the treatment of glutamatergic-related brain disorders?

    PubMed

    Mothet, J P

    2001-10-01

    Over the last century, it has been considered that amino acids in mammalian tissues and body fluids occur solely in the L-configuration whether free or as components of peptides and proteins. However, the recent discovery that high levels of D-serine and D-aspartate are present in Mammals overturns this long-cherished theory. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding the physiological relevance of D-serine, a new neurotransmitter formed in glial cells, that serves as the endogenous ligand for the accessory strychnine-insensitive glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors. This unusual molecule not only questions our basic ideas about how nerve cells converse but also offers a novel way to treat some brain disorders as both over-stimulation and down regulation of NMDA receptors has been implicated in a large number of acute and chronic degenerative conditions.

  1. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is an endogenous neuroprotectant after traumatic brain injury in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Sinz, E H; Kochanek, P M; Dixon, C E; Clark, R S; Carcillo, J A; Schiding, J K; Chen, M; Wisniewski, S R; Carlos, T M; Williams, D; DeKosky, S T; Watkins, S C; Marion, D W; Billiar, T R

    1999-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) derived from the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) is an inflammatory product implicated both in secondary damage and in recovery from brain injury. To address the role of iNOS in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), we used 2 paradigms in 2 species. In a model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with secondary hypoxemia, rats were treated with vehicle or with 1 of 2 iNOS inhibitors (aminoguanidine and L-N-iminoethyl-lysine), administered by Alzet pump for 5 days and 1. 5 days after injury, respectively. In a model of CCI, knockout mice lacking the iNOS gene (iNOS(-/-)) were compared with wild-type (iNOS(+/+)) mice. Functional outcome (motor and cognitive) during the first 20 days after injury, and histopathology at 21 days, were assessed in both studies. Treatment of rats with either of the iNOS inhibitors after TBI significantly exacerbated deficits in cognitive performance, as assessed by Morris water maze (MWM) and increased neuron loss in vulnerable regions (CA3 and CA1) of hippocampus. Uninjured iNOS(+/+) and iNOS(-/-) mice performed equally well in both motor and cognitive tasks. However, after TBI, iNOS(-/-) mice showed markedly worse performance in the MWM task than iNOS(+/+) mice. A beneficial role for iNOS in TBI is supported.

  2. Abnormal endogenous amino acid release in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R

    1991-01-02

    The basal and potassium-evoked efflux of glutamate, glycine, taurine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was measured in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted and sufficient 14-day-old rats. The results indicate a reduced level of basal glutamate, taurine, and GABA efflux in hippocampal slices and taurine and GABA in cortical slices from vitamin B-6 restricted animals. In the presence of depolarizing potassium concentrations, there was a reduced level of GABA efflux in hippocampal and cortical slices, and a marked reduction in the release of glutamate in cortical slices from B-6 restricted rats. The abnormalities in the secretion process of these neuroactive amino acids may be related to the neurological sequelae associated with neonatal vitamin B-6 restriction.

  3. EphrinB3 restricts endogenous neural stem cell migration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kirsty J; Mier, Jose; Gajavelli, Shyam; Turbic, Alisa; Bullock, Ross; Turnley, Ann M; Liebl, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a series of pathological events that can have profound influences on motor, sensory and cognitive functions. Conversely, TBI can also stimulate neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation leading to increased numbers of neuroblasts migrating outside their restrictive neurogenic zone to areas of damage in support of tissue integrity. Unfortunately, the factors that regulate migration are poorly understood. Here, we examine whether ephrinB3 functions to restrict neuroblasts from migrating outside the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS). We have previously shown that ephrinB3 is expressed in tissues surrounding these regions, including the overlying corpus callosum (CC), and is reduced after controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Our current study takes advantage of ephrinB3 knockout mice to examine the influences of ephrinB3 on neuroblast migration into CC and cortex tissues after CCI injury. Both injury and/or ephrinB3 deficiency led to increased neuroblast numbers and enhanced migration outside the SVZ/RMS zones. Application of soluble ephrinB3-Fc molecules reduced neuroblast migration into the CC after injury and limited neuroblast chain migration in cultured SVZ explants. Our findings suggest that ephrinB3 expression in tissues surrounding neurogenic regions functions to restrict neuroblast migration outside the RMS by limiting chain migration.

  4. Acupuncture Induces the Proliferation and Differentiation of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in Rats with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuting; Chen, Weihao; Zhang, Yimin; Zhang, Yujuan; Chen, Ailian; Dai, Qiufu; Lin, Shujun; Lin, Hanyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether acupuncture induced the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) in a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods. 104 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal, model, and acupuncture groups. Each group was subdivided into three-day (3 d), seven-day (7 d), and fourteen-day (14 d) groups. The rat TBI model was established using Feeney's freefall epidural impact method. The rats in the acupuncture group were treated at acupoints (Baihui, Shuigou, Fengfu, Yamen, and bilateral Hegu). The normal and model groups did not receive acupuncture. The establishment of the rat TBI model and the therapeutic effect of acupuncture were assessed using neurobehavioral scoring and hematoxylin-eosin staining. The proliferation and differentiation of NSCs in TBI rats were analyzed using immunofluorescence microscopy. Results. The levels of nestin-expressing cells and bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein- (BrdU/GFAP-) and BrdU/S100 calcium-binding protein B-positive and BrdU/microtubule-associated protein 2- and BrdU/galactocerebrosidase-positive cells were more significantly increased at various time points in the acupuncture group than in the model group (P < 0.01), except for a decreased level of BrdU/GFAP-positive cells at 7 d and 14 d. Conclusion. Acupuncture induced the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs, thereby promoting neural repair in the TBI rats. PMID:27313641

  5. Mapping Alterations to the Endogenous Elemental Distribution within the Lateral Ventricles and Choroid Plexus in Brain Disorders Using X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Brittney R.; Pushie, Jake M.; Jones, Michael; Howard, Daryl L.; Howland, John G.; Hackett, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus and cerebral ventricles are critical structures for the production of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and play an important role in regulating ion and metal transport in the brain, however many aspects of its roles in normal physiology and disease states, such as psychiatric illness, remain unknown. The choroid plexus is difficult to examine in vivo, and in situ ex vivo, and as such has typically been examined indirectly with radiolabeled tracers or ex vivo stains, making measurements of the endogenous K+, Cl−, and Ca+ distributions unreliable. In the present study, we directly examined the distribution of endogenous ions and biologically relevant transition metals in the choroid plexus and regions surrounding the ventricles (ventricle wall, cortex, corpus callosum, striatum) using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI). We find that the choroid plexus was rich in Cl− and Fe while K+ levels increase further from the ventricle as Cl− levels decrease, consistent with the known role of ion transporters in the choroid plexus CSF production. A polyI:C offspring displayed enlarged ventricles, elevated Cl− surrounding the ventricles, and intraventricular calcifications. These observations fit with clinical findings in patients with schizophrenia and suggest maternal treatment with polyI:C may lead to dysfunctional ion regulation in offspring. This study demonstrates the power of XFI for examining the endogenous elemental distributions of the ventricular system in healthy brain tissue as well as disease models. PMID:27351594

  6. A nopA deletion mutant of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257, a soybean symbiont, is impaired in nodulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 employs type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cells through filamentous surface appendages, called pili. The NopA protein is the major component of USDA257 pili. The promoter region of USDA257 nopA posses a well conserved tts box. Se...

  7. The Nociceptin Opioid Receptor (NOP) as a Therapeutic Target: Progress in Translation from Preclinical Research to Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2016-01-01

    In the two decades since the discovery of the nociceptin opioid receptor (NOP) and its ligand, nociceptin/orphaninFQ (N/OFQ), steady progress has been achieved in understanding the pharmacology of this fourth opioid receptor/peptide system, aided by genetic and pharmacologic approaches. This research spawned an explosion of small-molecule NOP receptor ligands from discovery programs in major pharmaceutical companies. NOP agonists have been investigated for their efficacy in preclinical models of anxiety, cough, substance abuse, pain (spinal and peripheral) and urinary incontinence, whereas NOP antagonists have been investigated for treatment of pain, depression and motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. Translation of preclinical findings into the clinic is guided by PET and receptor occupancy studies, particularly for NOP antagonists. Recent progress in preclinical NOP research suggests that NOP agonists may have clinical utility for pain treatment and substance abuse pharmacotherapy. This review discusses the progress towards validating the NOP-N/OFQ system as a therapeutic target. PMID:26878436

  8. Occupancy of dopamine D2/3 receptors in rat brain by endogenous dopamine measured with the agonist positron emission tomography radioligand [11C]MNPA.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S; Skinbjerg, Mette; Liow, Jeih-San; Hong, Jinsoo; Sibley, David R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B

    2008-10-01

    Estimates of dopamine D(2/3) receptor occupancy by endogenous dopamine using positron emission tomography (PET) in animals have varied almost threefold. This variability may have been caused by incomplete depletion of dopamine or by the use of antagonist radioligands, which appear less sensitive than agonist radioligands to changes in endogenous dopamine. PET scans were performed in rats with the agonist PET radioligand [(11)C]MNPA ([O-methyl-(11)C]2-methoxy-N-propylnorapomorphine). [(11)C]MNPA was injected as a bolus plus constant infusion to achieve steady-state concentration in the body and equilibrium receptor binding in the brain. Radioligand binding was compared at baseline and after treatment with reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, which cause approximately 95% depletion of endogenous dopamine. Depletion of dopamine increased radioligand binding in striatum but had little effect in cerebellum. Striatal [(11)C]MNPA binding potential was 0.93 +/- 0.12 at baseline and increased to 1.99 +/- 0.25 after dopamine depletion. Occupancy of D(2/3) receptors by endogenous dopamine at baseline was calculated to be approximately 53%. Striatal binding was displaceable with raclopride, but not with BP 897 (a selective D(3) compound), thus confirming the D(2) receptor specificity of [(11)C]MNPA binding. Radioactivity extracted from rat brain contained only 8-10% radiometabolites and was insignificantly altered by administration of reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine. Hence, dopamine depletion did not increase the PET measurements via an effect on radiotracer metabolism. Our in vivo estimate of dopamine's occupancy of D(2/3) receptors at baseline is higher than that previously reported using antagonist radioligands and PET, but is similar to that reported using agonist radioligands and ex vivo measurements.

  9. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Nodulation Outer Protein NopI Is a Determinant for Efficient Nodulation of Soybean and Cowpea Plants.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2017-03-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a specialized secretion apparatus that is commonly used by many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria to deliver proteins, termed effectors, to the interior of the host cells. These effectors suppress host defenses and interfere with signal transduction pathways to promote infection. Some rhizobial strains possess a functional T3SS, which is involved in the suppression of host defense responses, host range determination, and symbiotic efficiency. The analysis of the genome of the broad-host-range rhizobial strain Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 identified eight genes that code for putative T3SS effectors. Three of these effectors, NopL, NopP, and NopI, are Rhizobium specific. In this work, we demonstrate that NopI, whose amino acid sequence shows a certain similarity with NopP, is secreted through the S. fredii HH103 T3SS in response to flavonoids. We also determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is directly secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, the symbiotic phenotype of single, double, and triple nopI, nopL, and nopP mutants in soybean and cowpea was assayed, showing that NopI plays an important role in determining the number of nodules formed in both legumes and that the absence of both NopL and NopP is highly detrimental for symbiosis.IMPORTANCE The paper is focused on three Rhizobium-specific T3SS effectors of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, NopL, NopP, and NopI. We demonstrate that S. fredii HH103 is able to secrete through the T3SS in response to flavonoids the nodulation outer protein NopI. Additionally, we determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, nodulation assays of soybean and cowpea indicated that NopI is important for the determination of the number of nodules formed and that the absence of both NopL and NopP negatively affected

  10. Glutamate-evoked release of endogenous brain dopamine: inhibition by an excitatory amino acid antagonist and an enkephalin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Marien, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADL) on the spontaneous and the L-glutamic acid (L-Glu)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from superfused slices of rat caudate-putamen. The amount of dopamine in slice superfusates was measured by a sensitive method employing high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (h.p.l.c.-e.d.) after a two-step separation procedure. The spontaneous release of endogenous dopamine was partially dependent on Ca2+, enhanced in Mg2+-free superfusion medium, partially reduced by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), partially reduced by the putative excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (DL-APH, 1 mM), and increased 10 fold by the dopamine uptake blocker, nomifensine (10 microM). DADL (5 and 50 nM) did not significantly affect spontaneous dopamine release. L-Glu (0.1-10 mM) produced a concentration-dependent release of endogenous dopamine from slices of caudate-putamen. This effect was Ca2+-dependent, strongly inhibited by 1.2 mM Mg2+, attenuated by DL-APH (1 mM), attenuated by TTX (0.3 microM), and enhanced by nomifensine (10 microM). In the presence of nomifensine DADL (50 nM) reduced significantly the L-Glu-evoked release of endogenous dopamine by 20%. The inhibitory effect of DADL was blocked by 10 microM naloxone. These results indicate that L-Glu stimulates the Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous dopamine in the caudate-putamen by activation of N-methy-D-aspartate-type of excitatory amino acid receptors. This release can be selectively modified by the delta-opioid agonist DADL in a naloxone-sensitive manner. PMID:2884003

  11. Brain imaging reveals that engagement of descending inhibitory pain pathways in healthy women in a low endogenous estradiol state varies with testosterone.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Katy; Warnaby, Catherine; Stagg, Charlotte J; Moore, Jane; Kennedy, Stephen; Tracey, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) has been implicated in the development of a number of chronic pain conditions. Modern COCP formulations produce a low endogenous estradiol, low progesterone environment similar to the early follicular phase of the natural menstrual cycle, with a variable effect on serum androgen levels. We used behavioural measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli in healthy women, in both a natural and COCP-induced low endogenous estradiol state, to investigate whether alterations in central pain processing may underlie these observations in COCP users. Although COCP users overall did not require lower temperatures to obtain a fixed pain intensity, alterations in the brain response to these stimuli were observed. In a subgroup of COCP users with significantly reduced serum testosterone, however, lower temperatures were required. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that within key regions of the descending pain inhibitory system, activity in response to noxious stimulation varied with serum testosterone levels in both groups of women. Of particular interest, in COCP users, activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla increased with increasing testosterone and in those women with low testosterone, was significantly reduced compared to controls. These findings suggest that, in a low endogenous estradiol state, testosterone may be a key factor in modulating pain sensitivity via descending pathways. Specifically, failure to engage descending inhibition at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla may be responsible for the reduction in temperature required by COCP users with low circulating testosterone.

  12. 77 FR 8089 - National Organic Program (NOP); Amendments to the National List of Allowed and Prohibited...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 RIN 0581-AD06 National Organic Program (NOP); Amendments to the National... to the Secretary of Agriculture (Secretary) by the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) on May 22... cheesewax, along with any restrictive annotations, for use in organic mushroom production; and adds...

  13. 77 FR 44429 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 205 RIN 0581-AC96 National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012); Correction... that can be used as ingredients in processed products labeled as ``organic'' if organic forms are not... following correcting amendments: PART 205--NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM 0 1. The authority citation for 7...

  14. 77 FR 38463 - Implementation of National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012) Amendments to Pectin on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ...: The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (OFPA) (7 U.S.C. 6501-6522) authorizes the establishment of... Service 7 CFR Part 205 Implementation of National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2012) Amendments... the organic industry, AMS is informing operations certified to the USDA organic regulations that...

  15. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  16. Fluorescent protein tagging of endogenous protein in brain neurons using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in and in utero electroporation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mori, Takuma; Kurihara, Taiga; Kawase, Shiori; Koike, Rie; Satoga, Michiru; Cao, Xueshan; Li, Xue; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakurai, Takayuki; Shindo, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons. These signals were particularly abundant in the head of dendritic spines, corresponding to the localization of the endogenous β-actin protein. EGFP knock-in neurons showed no detectable changes in spine density and basic electrophysiological properties. In contrast, exogenously overexpressed EGFP-β-actin showed increased spine density and EPSC frequency, and changed resting membrane potential. Thus, our technique provides a potential tool to elucidate the localization of various endogenous proteins in neurons by epitope tagging without altering neuronal and synaptic functions. This technique can be also useful for introducing a specific mutation into genes to study the function of proteins and genomic elements in brain neurons. PMID:27782168

  17. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  18. Symbiosis-promoting and deleterious effects of NopT, a novel type 3 effector of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei-Jun; Zeng, Yong; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2008-07-01

    Establishment of symbiosis between certain host plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria ("rhizobia") depends on type 3 effector proteins secreted via the bacterial type 3 secretion system (T3SS). Here, we report that the open reading frame y4zC of strain NGR234 encodes a novel rhizobial type 3 effector, termed NopT (for nodulation outer protein T). Analysis of secreted proteins from NGR234 and T3SS mutants revealed that NopT is secreted via the T3SS. NopT possessed autoproteolytic activity when expressed in Escherichia coli or human HEK 293T cells. The processed NopT exposed a glycine (G50) to the N terminus, which is predicted to be myristoylated in eukaryotic cells. NopT with a point mutation at position C93, H205, or D220 (catalytic triad) showed strongly reduced autoproteolytic activity, indicating that NopT is a functional protease of the YopT-AvrPphB effector family. When transiently expressed in tobacco plants, proteolytically active NopT elicited a rapid hypersensitive reaction. Arabidopsis plants transformed with nopT showed chlorotic and necrotic symptoms, indicating a cytotoxic effect. Inoculation experiments with mutant derivatives of NGR234 indicated that NopT affected nodulation either positively (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1; Tephrosia vogelii) or negatively (Crotalaria juncea). We suggest that NopT-related polymorphism may be involved in evolutionary adaptation of NGR234 to particular host legumes.

  19. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  20. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  1. Novel endogenous N-acyl amides activate TRPV1-4 receptors, BV-2 microglia, and are regulated in brain in an acute model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raboune, Siham; Stuart, Jordyn M.; Leishman, Emma; Takacs, Sara M.; Rhodes, Brandon; Basnet, Arjun; Jameyfield, Evan; McHugh, Douglas; Widlanski, Theodore; Bradshaw, Heather B.

    2014-01-01

    A family of endogenous lipids, structurally analogous to the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (Anandamide), and called N-acyl amides have emerged as a family of biologically active compounds at TRP receptors. N-acyl amides are constructed from an acyl group and an amine via an amide bond. This same structure can be modified by changing either the fatty acid or the amide to form potentially hundreds of lipids. More than 70 N-acyl amides have been identified in nature. We have ongoing studies aimed at isolating and characterizing additional members of the family of N-acyl amides in both central and peripheral tissues in mammalian systems. Here, using a unique in-house library of over 70 N-acyl amides we tested the following three hypotheses: (1) Additional N-acyl amides will have activity at TRPV1-4, (2) Acute peripheral injury will drive changes in CNS levels of N-acyl amides, and (3) N-acyl amides will regulate calcium in CNS-derived microglia. Through these studies, we have identified 20 novel N-acyl amides that collectively activate (stimulating or inhibiting) TRPV1-4. Using lipid extraction and HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry we showed that levels of at least 10 of these N-acyl amides that activate TRPVs are regulated in brain after intraplantar carrageenan injection. We then screened the BV2 microglial cell line for activity with this N-acyl amide library and found overlap with TRPV receptor activity as well as additional activators of calcium mobilization from these lipids. Together these data provide new insight into the family of N-acyl amides and their roles as signaling molecules at ion channels, in microglia, and in the brain in the context of inflammation. PMID:25136293

  2. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  3. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A.; Bernard, Claude C.; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C.; Coleman, Harold A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Forsythe, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  4. 2-buten-4-olide, an endogenous feeding suppressant, improves spatial performance through brain acidic fibroblast growth factor in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X L; Aou, S; Li, A J; Hori, T; Tooyama, I; Oomura, Y

    2001-12-01

    Endogenous sugar acid 2-buten-4-olide, a satiety substance, has been shown to increase the blood glucose, norepinephrine, and glucocorticoid concentrations that are known to modulate learning and memory processes. The glucose-induced release of acidic fibroblast growth factor facilitated the hippocampus-dependent memory function. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 2-buten-4-olide on the spatial performance of male DDY mice undergoing the water maze task. The intraperitoneal injection of 2-buten-4-olide (5 mg/kg) facilitated the spatial performance, which was indicated by a reduction in the escape latency in which the mouse finds and climbs the goal platform in comparison to the vehicle-injected control mice. In the probe test after removing the platform, the 2-buten-4-olide-treated mice stayed a longer time in the quadrant where the platform was originally located and crossed more frequently at the platform location than did the control mice. The pretreatment of acidic fibroblast growth factor antibody injected into the lateral ventricle eliminated the effect of 2-buten-4-olide both during the training sessions and during the probe test. Therefore, 2-buten-4-olide was found to improve the spatial performance, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by acidic fibroblast growth factor.

  5. Interaction of ARC and Daxx: A Novel Endogenous Target to Preserve Motor Function and Cell Loss after Focal Brain Ischemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Donath, Stefan; An, Junfeng; Lee, Sabrina Lin Lin; Gertz, Karen; Datwyler, Anna Lena; Harms, Ulrike; Müller, Susanne; Farr, Tracy Deanne; Füchtemeier, Martina; Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Lips, Janet; Foddis, Marco; Mosch, Larissa; Bernard, René; Grittner, Ulrike; Balkaya, Mustafa; Kronenberg, Golo; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Endres, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the signaling and neuroprotective effect of transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction of the apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC) in in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia in mice. In mice, transient focal cerebral ischemia reduced endogenous ARC protein in neurons in the ischemic striatum at early reperfusion time points, and in primary neuronal cultures, RNA interference resulted in greater neuronal susceptibility to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). TAT.ARC protein delivery led to a dose-dependent better survival after OGD. Infarct sizes 72 h after 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) were on average 30 ± 8% (mean ± SD; p = 0.005; T2-weighted MRI) smaller in TAT.ARC-treated mice (1 μg intraventricularly during MCAo) compared with controls. TAT.ARC-treated mice showed better performance in the pole test compared with TAT.β-Gal-treated controls. Importantly, post-stroke treatment (3 h after MCAo) was still effective in affording reduced lesion volume by 20 ± 7% (mean ± SD; p < 0.05) and better functional outcome compared with controls. Delayed treatment in mice subjected to 30 min MCAo led to sustained neuroprotection and functional behavior benefits for at least 28 d. Functionally, TAT.ARC treatment inhibited DAXX–ASK1–JNK signaling in the ischemic brain. ARC interacts with DAXX in a CARD-dependent manner to block DAXX trafficking and ASK1–JNK activation. Our work identifies for the first time ARC–DAXX binding to block ASK1–JNK activation as an ARC-specific endogenous mechanism that interferes with neuronal cell death and ischemic brain injury. Delayed delivery of TAT.ARC may present a promising target for stroke therapy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Up to now, the only successful pharmacological target of human ischemic stroke is thrombolysis. Neuroprotective pharmacological strategies are needed to accompany therapies aiming to achieve reperfusion. We describe that apoptosis

  6. NopP, a phosphorylated effector of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, is a major determinant of nodulation of the tropical legumes Flemingia congesta and Tephrosia vogelii.

    PubMed

    Skorpil, Peter; Saad, Maged M; Boukli, Nawal M; Kobayashi, Hajime; Ares-Orpel, Florencia; Broughton, William J; Deakin, William J

    2005-09-01

    Rhizobium sp. NGR234 nodulates many plants, some of which react to proteins secreted via a type three secretion system (T3SS) in a positive- (Flemingia congesta, Tephrosia vogelii) or negative- (Crotalaria juncea, Pachyrhizus tuberosus) manner. T3SSs are devices that Gram-negative bacteria use to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The only two rhizobial T3SS effector proteins characterized to date are NopL and NopP of NGR234. NopL can be phosphorylated by plant kinases and we show this to be true for NopP as well. Mutation of nopP leads to a dramatic reduction in nodule numbers on F. congesta and T. vogelii. Concomitant mutation of nopL and nopP further diminishes nodulation capacity to levels that, on T. vogelii, are lower than those produced by the T3SS null mutant NGR(Omega)rhcN. We also show that the T3SS of NGR234 secretes at least one additional effector, which remains to be identified. In other words, NGR234 secretes a cocktail of effectors, some of which have positive effects on nodulation of certain plants while others are perceived negatively and block nodulation. NopL and NopP are two components of this mix that extend the ability of NGR234 to nodulate certain legumes.

  7. Pharmacological Studies of NOP Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    the past few decades. However, itch/ pruritus is the most common side effects derived from spinal opioids. Intrathecal administration of morphine...method for pain management, and it is widely used for obstetric analgesia.8,10 However, itch/ pruritus is the most common side effect derived from...Brain Res 455:223-231, 1988 14. Ganesh A, Maxwell LG: Pathophysiology and manage- ment of opioid-induced pruritus . Drugs 67:2323-2333, 2007 15. Inoue M

  8. Scrapie infection in experimental rodents and SMB-S15 cells decreased the brain endogenous levels and activities of Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jin; Shi, Qi; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Chen, Cao; Chen, Li-Na; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Kang; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Prion diseases are composed of a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders resulting from misfolding of cellular prion (PrP(C)) into scrapie prion (PrP(Sc)). Sirt1, a class III histone deacetylase, has been reported to protect neuronal cells against PrP (106-126)-induced cell death. To address the potential role of Sirt1 during prion infection, the levels and enzyme activities of Sirt1 in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents, including hamsters infected with strain 263K, mice infected with strains 139A and ME7, and in prion infected SMB-S15 cells, were analyzed. Western blots revealed that endogenous Sirt1 levels were significantly decreased in all tested scrapie-infected models. Dynamic assays of brain Sirt1 levels in 263K-infected hamsters during incubation period showed a time-dependent decrease. The acetylating forms of Sirt1 target proteins, P53, PGC-1, and STAT3, markedly increased both in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents and in SMB-S15 cells, representing decreased Sirt1 activity. Immunofluorescent assays illustrated that Sirt1 predominately localized in cytosol of SMB-S15 cells but clearly distributed in nucleus of its normal partner cell line, SMB-PS. Moreover, accompanying with increase of Sirt1 level and decrease of acetyl-P53 level, treatments with Sirt1 activators SRT1720 and resveratrol in SMB-S15 cells significantly reduced PrP(Sc); at the same time, the cellular distribution of PrP proteins became normal, and the cell proliferating state was slightly improved. These data indicate that prion infection notably attenuates the Sirt1 activity in host cells. Sensitivity of the PrP(Sc) to Sirt1 activators highlights a potential role of Sirt1 in prion therapeutics.

  9. Altered gravity influences rDNA and NopA100 localization in nucleoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.

    Fundamental discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused increasing attention on an elucidation of the mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the cellular and subcellular levels. The nucleolus is the transcription site of rRNA genes as well as the site of processing and initial packaging of their transcripts with ribosomal and nonribosomal proteins. The mechanisms inducing the changes in the subcomponents of the nucleolus that is morphologically defined yet highly dynamic structure are still unknown in detail. To understand the functional organization of the nucleolus as in the control as under altered gravity conditions it is essential to determine both the precise location of rDNA and the proteins playing the key role in rRNA processing. Lepidium sativum seeds were germinated in 1% agar medium on the slow horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) and in the stationary conditions. We investigated the root meristematic cells dissected from the seedlings grown in darkness for two days. The investigations were carried out with anti-DNA and anti-NopA100 antibodies labeling as well as with TdT procedure, and immunogold electron microscopy. In the stationary growth conditions, the anti-DNA antibody as well TdT procedure were capable of detecting fibrillar centers (FCs) and the dense fibrillar component (DFC) in the nucleolus. In FCs, gold particles were revealed on the condensed chromatin inclusions, internal fibrils of decondensed rDNA and the transition zone FC-DFC. Quantitatively, FCs appeared 1,5 times more densely labeled than DFC. NopA100 was localized in FCs and in DFC. In FCs, the most of protein was revealed in the transition zone FC-DFC. After a quantitative study, FCs and the transition zone FC-DFC appeared to contain NopA100 1,7 times more than DFC. Under the conditions of altered gravity, quantitative data clearly showed a redistribution of nucleolar DNA and NopA100 between FCs and DFC in comparison with the control. In

  10. M2 Phenotype Microglia-derived Cytokine Stimulates Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation of Endogenous Stem Cells in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Yong; Kim, Jong Youl; Kim, Jae Young; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Won Taek

    2017-01-01

    Microglia play a key role in the immune response and inflammatory reaction that occurs in response to ischemic stroke. Activated microglia promote neuronal damage or protection in injured brain tissue. Extracellular signals polarize the microglia towards the M1/M2 phenotype. The M1/M2 phenotype microglia released pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which induce the activation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). In this study, we investigated how the cytokines released by microglia affect the activation of NSPCs. First, we treated BV2 cells with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) for M1 phenotype microglia and interleukin-4 (IL-4; 20 ng/ml) for M2 phenotype microglia in BV2 cells. Mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 1 h. In ex vivo, brain sections containing the subventricular zone (SVZ) were cultured in conditioned media of M1 and M2 phenotype-conditioned media for 3 d. We measured the expression of cytokines in the conditioned media by RT-PCR and ELISA. The M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media led to the proliferation and neural differentiation of NSPCs in the ipsilateral SVZ after ischemic stroke. The RT-PCR and ELISA results showed that the expression of TGF-α mRNA was significantly higher in the M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media. These data support that M2 phenotype microglia-derived TGF-α is one of the key factors to enhance proliferation and neural differntiation of NSPCs after ischemic stroke. PMID:28243165

  11. SPARC/osteonectin, an endogenous mechanism for targeting albumin to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid interface during brain development.

    PubMed

    Liddelow, S A; Dziegielewska, K M; Møllgård, K; Phoenix, T N; Temple, S; Vandeberg, J L; Saunders, N R

    2011-10-01

    Specialized populations of choroid plexus epithelial cells have previously been shown to be responsible for the transfer of individual plasma proteins from blood to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contributing to their characteristically high concentrations in CSF of the developing brain. The mechanism of this protein transfer remains elusive. Using a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, we demonstrate that the albumin-binding protein SPARC (osteonectin/BM-40/culture-shock protein) is present in a subset of choroid plexus epithelial cells from its first appearance, throughout development, and into adulthood. The synthesis of SPARC by the lateral ventricular plexus was confirmed with real-time PCR. The expression level of SPARC was higher in plexuses of younger than older animals. Western blot analysis of the gene product confirmed the quantitative PCR results. The co-localization of SPARC and albumin shown by immunocytochemistry and its cellular location indicate that this glycoprotein may act as a recognition site for albumin. In addition, the numbers of SPARC-immunopositive cells and its expression were responsive to experimental changes of albumin concentration in the blood. It is suggested that SPARC may be one of the molecules that govern the uptake and delivery of proteins from blood to the CSF. The results also confirm that protein transfer across the blood-CSF barrier is developmentally and physiologically regulated.

  12. Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields: cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem.

    PubMed

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Rinzel, John

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing activity of neurons generates a spatially and time-varying field of extracellular voltage (Ve). This Ve field reflects population-level neural activity, but does it modulate neural dynamics and the function of neural circuits? We provide a cable theory framework to study how a bundle of model neurons generates Ve and how this Ve feeds back and influences membrane potential (Vm). We find that these "ephaptic interactions" are small but not negligible. The model neural population can generate Ve with millivolt-scale amplitude, and this Ve perturbs the Vm of "nearby" cables and effectively increases their electrotonic length. After using passive cable theory to systematically study ephaptic coupling, we explore a test case: the medial superior olive (MSO) in the auditory brain stem. The MSO is a possible locus of ephaptic interactions: sounds evoke large (millivolt scale)Vein vivo in this nucleus. The Ve response is thought to be generated by MSO neurons that perform a known neuronal computation with submillisecond temporal precision (coincidence detection to encode sound source location). Using a biophysically based model of MSO neurons, we find millivolt-scale ephaptic interactions consistent with the passive cable theory results. These subtle membrane potential perturbations induce changes in spike initiation threshold, spike time synchrony, and time difference sensitivity. These results suggest that ephaptic coupling may influence MSO function.

  13. Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields: cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Rinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing activity of neurons generates a spatially and time-varying field of extracellular voltage (Ve). This Ve field reflects population-level neural activity, but does it modulate neural dynamics and the function of neural circuits? We provide a cable theory framework to study how a bundle of model neurons generates Ve and how this Ve feeds back and influences membrane potential (Vm). We find that these “ephaptic interactions” are small but not negligible. The model neural population can generate Ve with millivolt-scale amplitude, and this Ve perturbs the Vm of “nearby” cables and effectively increases their electrotonic length. After using passive cable theory to systematically study ephaptic coupling, we explore a test case: the medial superior olive (MSO) in the auditory brain stem. The MSO is a possible locus of ephaptic interactions: sounds evoke large (millivolt scale) Ve in vivo in this nucleus. The Ve response is thought to be generated by MSO neurons that perform a known neuronal computation with submillisecond temporal precision (coincidence detection to encode sound source location). Using a biophysically based model of MSO neurons, we find millivolt-scale ephaptic interactions consistent with the passive cable theory results. These subtle membrane potential perturbations induce changes in spike initiation threshold, spike time synchrony, and time difference sensitivity. These results suggest that ephaptic coupling may influence MSO function. PMID:26823512

  14. Induction of long-term potentiation and depression is reflected by corresponding changes in secretion of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Aicardi, Giorgio; Argilli, Emanuela; Cappello, Silvia; Santi, Spartaco; Riccio, Massimo; Thoenen, Hans; Canossa, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins play an important role in modulating activity-dependent neuronal plasticity. In particular, threshold levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are required to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in acute hippocampal slices. Conversely, the administration of exogenous BDNF prevents the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the visual cortex. A long-standing missing link in the analysis of this modulatory role of BDNF was the determination of the time-course of endogenous BDNF secretion in the same organotypic preparation in which LTP and LTD are elicited. Here, we fulfilled this requirement in slices of perirhinal cortex. Classical theta-burst stimulation patterns evoking LTP lasting >180 min elicited a large increase in BDNF secretion that persisted 5-12 min beyond the stimulation period. Weaker theta-burst stimulation patterns leading only to the initial phase of LTP (≈35 min) were accompanied by a smaller increase in BDNF secretion lasting <1 min. Sequestration of BDNF by TrkB-IgG receptor bodies prevented LTP. Low-frequency stimulations leading to LTD were accompanied by reductions in BDNF secretion that never lasted beyond the duration of the stimulation. PMID:15505222

  15. Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, via endogenous carbon monoxide, promote survival of brain endothelial cells during TNF-α-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Tcheranova, Dilyara; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Leffler, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in promoting cell survival during oxidative stress induced by the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMVEC) from newborn piglets. Nox4 is the major isoform of NADPH oxidase responsible for TNF-α-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in CMVEC. We present novel data that Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived ROS also initiate a cell survival mechanism by increasing production of a gaseous antioxidant mediator carbon monoxide (CO) by constitutive heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2). TNF-α rapidly enhanced endogenous CO production in a superoxide- and NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in CMVEC with innate, but not with small interfering RNA (siRNA)-downregulated Nox4 activity. CORM-A1, a CO-releasing compound, inhibited Nox4-mediated ROS production and enhanced cell survival in TNF-α-challenged CMVEC. The ROS-induced CO-mediated survival mechanism requires functional interactions between the protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)/p38 MAPK signaling pathways activated by TNF-α. In Akt siRNA-transfected CMVEC and in cells with pharmacologically inhibited Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities, CORM-A1 was no longer capable of blocking Nox4 activation and apoptosis caused by TNF-α. Overall, Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived ROS initiate both death and survival pathways in TNF-α-challenged CMVEC. The ROS-dependent cell survival pathway is mediated by an endogenous antioxidant CO, which inhibits Nox4 activation via a mechanism that includes Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. The ability of CO to inhibit TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK activities in an Akt-dependent manner appears to be the key element in ROS-dependent survival of endothelial cells during TNF-α-mediated brain inflammatory disease. PMID:21123734

  16. The Cbf5-Nop10 Complex is a Molecular Bracket that Organizes Box H/ACA RNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Hamma, Tomoko; Reichow, Steve L.; Varani, Gabriele; Ferre-D'Amare, Adrian R.

    2005-12-01

    Box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) catalyze RNA pseudouridylation and direct processing of ribosomal RNA, and are essential architectural components of vertebrate telomerases. H/ACA RNPs comprise four proteins and a multihelical RNA. Two proteins, Cbf5 and Nop10, suffice for basal enzymatic activity in an archaeal in vitro system. We now report their cocrystal structure at 1.95-A resolution. We find that archaeal Cbf5 can assemble with yeast Nop10 and with human telomerase RNA, consistent with the high sequence identity of the RNP componenets between archaea and eukarya. Thus, the Cbf5-Nop10 architecture is phylogenetically conserved. The structure shows how Nop10 buttresses the active site of Cbf5, and it reveals two basic troughs that bidirectionally extend the active site cleft. Mutagenesis results implicate an adjacent basic patch in RNA binding. This tripartite RNA-binding surface may function as a molecular bracket that organizes the multihelical H/ACA and telomerase RNAs.

  17. Fibrillarin and Nop56 interact before being co-assembled in box C/D snoRNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Lechertier, Tanguy; Grob, Alice; Hernandez-Verdun, Daniele

    2009-04-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs play crucial roles in ribosome biogenesis. They guide folding, site-specific nucleotide modifications and participate in cleavage of precursor ribosomal RNAs. To better understand how the biogenesis of the box C/D small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs) occur in a cellular context, we used a new approach based on the possibility of relocalizing a given nuclear complex by adding an affinity tag for B23 to one component of this complex. We selectively delocalized each core box C/D protein, namely 15.5kD, Nop56, Nop58 and fibrillarin, and analyzed the effect of such changes on other components of the box C/D snoRNPs. We show that modifying the localization and the mobility of core box C/D proteins impairs their association with box C/D snoRNPs. In addition, we demonstrate that fibrillarin and Nop56 directly interact in vivo. This interaction, indispensable for the association of both proteins with the box C/D snoRNPs, does not involve the glycine- and arginine-rich domain or the RNA-binding domain but the alpha-helix domain of fibrillarin. In addition, no RNA seems required to maintain fibrillarin-Nop56 interaction.

  18. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C'-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins. PMID:27725644

  19. Nop9 is a PUF-like protein that prevents premature cleavage to correctly process pre-18S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; McCann, Kathleen L.; Qiu, Chen; Gonzalez, Lauren E.; Baserga, Susan J.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2016-10-11

    Numerous factors direct eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, and defects in a single ribosome assembly factor may be lethal or produce tissue-specific human ribosomopathies. Pre-ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) must be processed stepwise and at the correct subcellular locations to produce the mature rRNAs. Nop9 is a conserved small ribosomal subunit biogenesis factor, essential in yeast. Here we report a 2.1-Å crystal structure of Nop9 and a small-angle X-ray-scattering model of a Nop9:RNA complex that reveals a ‘C’-shaped fold formed from 11 Pumilio repeats. We show that Nop9 recognizes sequence and structural features of the 20S pre-rRNA near the cleavage site of the nuclease, Nob1. We further demonstrate that Nop9 inhibits Nob1 cleavage, the final processing step to produce mature small ribosomal subunit 18S rRNA. Together, our results suggest that Nop9 is critical for timely cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA. Moreover, the Nop9 structure exemplifies a new class of Pumilio repeat proteins.

  20. PREFACE: International Workshop on Neutron Optics and Detectors (NOP&D 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Every two-three years scientists involved in developments of neutron optics gather together for the International Workshop on Neutron Optics (NOP). Neutron optics has always been considered very important for the development of new neutron instrumentation. The limited brilliance of existing or future neutron sources requires the more effective usage of emitted neutrons. Indeed, improvements of the neutron optical system or an optimization of the neutron-optical tracts of instruments can result in a significant enhancement of their performance. This is especially important at present when the neutron scattering community is strongly engaged in developments of new instrumentation around the spallation neutron sources - SNS, ESS, J-PARC and Second Target Station at ISIS. In 2013 the workshop was organized by the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science of the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and was held at the Conference Centre in Ismaning next to Munich on July 2-7, 2013 on the eve of the ICNS-2013 in Edinburg. It carried on the series of Neutron Optics workshops held in Villigen (1999, 2007), Tokyo (2004) and Alpe d'Huez (2010). This time it is also aimed to compliment the International Conference on Neutron Scattering in Edinburgh (ICNS-2013) by providing a platform for detailed discussions on the latest developments in the field of neutron optics. The scope of the workshop was extended to the neutron detectors (in a way similar to the NOP-2004 held in Tokyo) and was labelled as the International Workshop on Neutron Optics and Detectors, NOP&D-2013. However, in contrast to the Tokyo workshop, the focus of discussions was not the detector technologies (which are the subject of many dedicated meetings), rather than the use of detectors for the purpose of the design of modern instrumentation aiming to inform detector developers about real detectors requirements for new advanced instrumental concepts. The three-full-days workshop gathered a record number of participants, more

  1. The fungal opsin gene nop-1 is negatively-regulated by a component of the blue light sensing pathway and influences conidiation-specific gene expression in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Bieszke, Jennifer A; Li, Liande; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2007-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that the nop-1 gene encodes a putative green-light opsin photoreceptor that is highly expressed in cultures that support asexual sporulation (conidiation) in Neurospora crassa. In this study, we demonstrate that nop-1 is a late-stage conidiation gene, through analysis of nop-1 transcript levels in wild-type strains and mutants blocked at various stages of conidiation. nop-1 message amounts are similar with constant illumination or darkness during conidiation, consistent with developmental, but not light, regulation of nop-1 expression. Furthermore, photoinduction experiments using wild type and mutants defective in components of the blue light sensing pathway (wc-1 and wc-2) indicate that nop-1 mRNA levels are not appreciably affected by brief light exposure during conidiation. Surprisingly, nop-1 message amounts are greatly elevated in wc-2 mutants in light or dark, suggesting that the wc-2 gene product regulates nop-1 expression in a light-independent manner. Analysis of expression patterns for al-2, con-10 and con-13, genes regulated by conidiation and/or blue light, showed that nop-1 has significant and reproducible effects on all three genes during various stages of conidiation. The results suggest that NOP-1 directly or indirectly modulates carotenogenesis and repression of conidiation-specific gene expression in N. crassa.

  2. NopB, a type III secreted protein of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, is associated with pilus-like surface appendages.

    PubMed

    Saad, Maged M; Kobayashi, Hajime; Marie, Corinne; Brown, Ian R; Mansfield, John W; Broughton, William J; Deakin, William J

    2005-02-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 possesses a functional type three secretion system (TTSS), through which a number of proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are delivered to the outside of the cell. A major constraint to the identification of Nops is their low abundance in the supernatants of NGR234 strains grown in culture. To overcome this limitation, a more sensitive proteomics-based strategy was developed. Secreted proteins from wild-type NGR234 were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the gel was compared to similar gels containing the proteins from a TTSS mutant (NGROmegarhcN). To identify the proteins, spots unique to the NGR234 gels were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and the data were compared to the sequence of the symbiotic plasmid of NGR234. A nonpolar mutant of one of these proteins was generated called NopB. NopB is required for Nop secretion but inhibits the interaction with Pachyrhizus tuberosus and augments nodulation of Tephrosia vogelii. Flavonoids and a functional TTSS are required for the formation of some surface appendages on NGR234. In situ immunogold labeling and isolation of these pili showed that they contain NopB.

  3. Characterization of the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of a NOP Receptor Agonist Ro 64-6198 in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Zelenock, Kathy A.; Lindsey, Angela M.; Sulima, Agnieszka; Rice, Kenner C.; Prinssen, Eric P.; Wichmann, Jürgen; Woods, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP) agonists have been reported to produce antinociceptive effects in rhesus monkeys with comparable efficacy to μ-opioid receptor (MOP) agonists, but without their limiting side effects. There are also known to be species differences between rodents and nonhuman primates (NHPs) in the behavioral effects of NOP agonists. The aims of this study were the following: 1) to determine if the NOP agonist Ro 64-6198 could be trained as a discriminative stimulus; 2) to evaluate its pharmacological selectivity as a discriminative stimulus; and 3) to establish the order of potency with which Ro 64-6198 produces discriminative stimulus effects compared with analgesic effects in NHPs. Two groups of rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate either fentanyl or Ro 64-6198 from vehicle. Four monkeys were trained in the warm-water tail-withdrawal procedure to measure antinociception. Ro 64-6198 produced discriminative stimulus effects that were blocked by the NOP antagonist J-113397 and not by naltrexone. The discriminative stimulus effects of Ro 64-6198 partially generalized to diazepam, but not to fentanyl, SNC 80, ketocyclazocine, buprenorphine, phencyclidine, or chlorpromazine. Fentanyl produced stimulus effects that were blocked by naltrexone and not by J-113397, and Ro 64-6198 did not produce fentanyl-appropriate responding in fentanyl-trained animals. In measures of antinociception, fentanyl, but not Ro 64-6198, produced dose-dependent increases in tail-withdrawal latency. Together, these results demonstrate that Ro 64-6198 produced stimulus effects in monkeys that are distinct from other opioid receptor agonists, but may be somewhat similar to diazepam. In contrast to previous findings, Ro 64-6198 did not produce antinociception in the majority of animals tested even at doses considerably greater than those that produced discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:26801398

  4. Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4, a homolog of yeast NOP53, regulates cell proliferation rate during organ growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ran; Qin, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xiao; Hu, Yuxin

    2015-10-01

    Cell proliferation is a fundamental event essential for plant organogenesis and contributes greatly to the final organ size. Although the control of cell proliferation in plants has been extensively studied, how the plant sets the cell number required for a single organ is largely elusive. Here, we describe the Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4 (SMO4) that functions in the regulation of cell proliferation rate and thus final organ size. The smo4 mutant exhibits a reduced size of organs due to the decreased cell number, and further analysis reveals that such phenotype results from a retardation of the cell cycle progression during organ development. SMO4 encodes a homolog of NUCLEOLAR PROTEIN 53 (NOP53) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is expressed primarily in tissues undergoing cell proliferation. Nevertheless, further complementation tests show that SMO4 could not rescue the lethal defect of NOP53 mutant of S. cerevisiae. These results define SMO4 as an important regulator of cell proliferation during organ growth and suggest that SMO4 might have been evolutionarily divergent from NOP53.

  5. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ)-evoked bradycardia, hypotension, and diuresis are absent in N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Melissa A; Ansonoff, Michael A; Pintar, John E; Kapusta, Daniel R

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of the opioid-like peptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) produces bradycardia, hypotension, and diuresis in mice. We hypothesized that these responses are solely caused by selective activation of central N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptors. To test this premise, we first examined whether i.c.v. N/OFQ produced dose-dependent diuretic and cardiovascular depressor responses in commercially available C57BL/6 mice. Next, using doses established in these studies, we examined the renal excretory and cardiovascular responses to i.c.v. N/OFQ in conscious transgenic NOP receptor knockout mice (NOP(-/-)). In metabolic studies, i.c.v. N/OFQ, but not saline vehicle, dose-dependently increased urine output (V) in NOP(+/+); this response was significant at 3 nmol (N/OFQ, V = 0.39 +/- 0.10 ml/2 h; saline, 0.08 +/- 0.05 ml/2 h). The N/OFQ-evoked diuresis was absent in littermate NOP(-/-) (N/OFQ, V = 0.06 +/- 0.06 ml/2 h; saline, 0.03 +/- 0.03 ml/2 h). There were no significant changes in urinary sodium or potassium excretion or free water clearance in either group. In telemetry studies, i.c.v. N/OFQ dose dependently lowered heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). At 3 nmol N/OFQ, both HR and MAP were reduced in NOP(+/+) (peak DeltaHR = -217 +/- 31 bpm; peak DeltaMAP =-47 +/- 7 mm Hg) compared with saline (peak DeltaHR =-14 +/- 5 bpm; peak DeltaMAP = 2 +/- 3 mm Hg). These N/OFQ-evoked bradycardic and hypotensive responses were absent in NOP(-/-) (peak DeltaHR =-13 +/- 17 bpm; peak DeltaMAP =-2 +/- 4 mm Hg, respectively). Basal 24-h cardiovascular and renal excretory function were not different between NOP(-/-) and NOP(+/+) mice. These results establish that the bradycardia, hypotension and diuresis produced by centrally administered N/OFQ are mediated by selective activation of NOP receptors.

  6. The central mechanism underlying hypertension: a review of the roles of sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress and endogenous digitalis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hakuo; Yoshika, Masamichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Nishimura, Masato

    2011-11-01

    The central nervous system has a key role in regulating the circulatory system by modulating the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, pituitary hormone release, and the baroreceptor reflex. Digoxin- and ouabain-like immunoreactive materials were found >20 years ago in the hypothalamic nuclei. These factors appeared to localize to the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei and the nerve fibers at the circumventricular organs and supposed to affect electrolyte balance and blood pressure. The turnover rate of these materials increases with increasing sodium intake. As intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain increases blood pressure via sympathetic activation, an endogenous digitalis-like factor (EDLF) was thought to regulate cardiovascular system-related functions in the brain, particularly after sodium loading. Experiments conducted mainly in rats revealed that the mechanism of action of ouabain in the brain involves sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), all of which are affected by sodium loading. Rats fed a high-sodium diet develop elevated sodium levels in their cerebrospinal fluid, which activates ENaCs. Activated ENaCs and/or increased intracellular sodium in neurons activate the RAAS; this releases EDLF in the brain, activating the sympathetic nervous system. The RAAS promotes oxidative stress in the brain, further activating the RAAS and augmenting sympathetic outflow. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin act in the brain to activate this cascade, increasing sympathetic outflow and leading to hypertension. Thus, the brain Na(+)-ENaC-RAAS-EDLF axis activates sympathetic outflow and has a crucial role in essential and secondary hypertension. This report provides an overview of the central mechanism underlying hypertension and discusses the use of antihypertensive agents.

  7. Endogenous IL-33 is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, lymphoid organs, brain, embryos, and inflamed tissues: in situ analysis using a novel Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Pichery, Mélanie; Mirey, Emilie; Mercier, Pascale; Lefrancais, Emma; Dujardin, Arnaud; Ortega, Nathalie; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2012-04-01

    IL-33 (previously known as NF from high endothelial venules) is an IL-1 family cytokine that signals through the ST2 receptor and drives cytokine production in mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, invariant NKT and NK cells, Th2 lymphocytes, and type 2 innate immune cells (natural helper cells, nuocytes, and innate helper 2 cells). Little is known about endogenous IL-33; for instance, the cellular sources of IL-33 in mouse tissues have not yet been defined. In this study, we generated an Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain (Il-33(Gt/Gt)) and used this novel tool to analyze expression of endogenous IL-33 in vivo. We found that the Il-33 promoter exhibits constitutive activity in mouse lymphoid organs, epithelial barrier tissues, brain, and embryos. Immunostaining with anti-IL-33 Abs, using Il-33(Gt/Gt) (Il-33-deficient) mice as control, revealed that endogenous IL-33 protein is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, including stratified squamous epithelia from vagina and skin, as well as cuboidal epithelium from lung, stomach, and salivary gland. Constitutive expression of IL-33 was not detected in blood vessels, revealing the existence of species-specific differences between humans and mice. Importantly, IL-33 protein was always localized in the nucleus of producing cells with no evidence for cytoplasmic localization. Finally, strong expression of the Il-33-LacZ reporter was also observed in inflamed tissues, in the liver during LPS-induced endotoxin shock, and in the lung alveoli during papain-induced allergic airway inflammation. Together, our findings support the possibility that IL-33 may function as a nuclear alarmin to alert the innate immune system after injury or infection in epithelial barrier tissues.

  8. PARATHYROID HORMONE 2 RECEPTOR AND ITS ENDOGENOUS LIGAND TIP39 ARE CONCENTRATED IN ENDOCRINE, VISCEROSENSORY AND AUDITORY BRAIN REGIONS IN MACAQUE AND HUMAN

    PubMed Central

    Bagó, Attila G.; Dimitrov, Eugene; Saunders, Richard; Seress, László; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone receptor 2 (PTH2R) and its ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) constitute a neuromodulator system implicated in endocrine and nociceptive regulations. We now describe the presence and distribution of the PTH2R and TIP39 in the brain of primates using a range of tissues and ages from macaque and human brain. In situ hybridization histochemistry of TIP39 mRNA, studied in young macaque brain, due to its possible decline beyond late postnatal ages, was present only in the thalamic subparafascicular area and the pontine medial paralemniscal nucleus. In contrast in situ hybridization histochemistry in macaque identified high levels of PTH2R expression in the central amygdaloid nucleus, medial preoptic area, hypothalamic paraventricular and periventricular nuclei, medial geniculate, and the pontine tegmentum. PTH2R mRNA was also detected in several human brain areas by RT-PCR. The distribution of PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers in human, determined by immunocytochemistry, was similar to that in rodents including dense fiber networks in the medial preoptic area, hypothalamic paraventricular, periventricular and infundibular (arcuate) nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, median eminence, thalamic paraventricular nucleus, periaqueductal gray, lateral parabrachial nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, sensory trigeminal nuclei, medullary dorsal reticular nucleus, and dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Co-localization suggested that PTH2R fibers are glutamatergic, and that TIP39 may directly influence hypophysiotropic somatostatin containing and indirectly influence corticotropin releasing-hormone containing neurons. The results demonstrate that TIP39 and the PTH2R are expressed in the brain of primates in locations that suggest involvement in regulation of fear, anxiety, reproductive behaviors, release of pituitary hormones, and nociception. PMID:19401215

  9. Therapeutic targeting of polo-like kinase 1 using RNA-interfering nanoparticles (iNOPs) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Joshua A; Dwarte, Tanya; Baigude, Huricha; Dang, Jason; Yang, Lu; Erlich, Rafael B; Kimpton, Kathleen; Teo, Joann; Sagnella, Sharon M; Akerfeldt, Mia C; Liu, Jie; Phillips, Phoebe A; Rana, Tariq M; Kavallaris, Maria

    2015-05-20

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the most common cause of cancer death worldwide due its resistance to chemotherapy and aggressive tumor growth. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine-threonine protein kinase which is overexpressed in cancer cells, and plays a major role in regulating tumor growth. A number of PLK1 inhibitors are in clinical trial; however, poor tumor bioavailability and off-target effects limit their efficacy. Short-interfering-RNA (siRNA) holds promise as a class of therapeutics, which can selectively silence disease-causing genes. However, siRNA cannot enter cells without a delivery vehicle. Herein, we investigated whether RNAi-interfering nanoparticles could deliver siRNA to NSCLC cells and silence PLK1 expression in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7 was non-toxic, and delivered siRNA with high efficiency to NSCLC cells. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA silenced PLK1 expression and reduced NSCLC growth in vitro. Notably, iNOP-7 delivered siRNA to orthotopic lung tumors in mice, and administration of iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA reduced lung tumor burden. These novel data show that iNOP-7 can deliver siRNA against PLK1 to NSCLC cells, and decrease cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC as well as other cancers which aberrantly express this gene.

  10. On-Tissue Derivatization via Electrospray Deposition for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Endogenous Fatty Acids in Rat Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is used for the multiplex detection and characterization of diverse analytes over a wide mass range directly from tissues. However, analyte coverage with MALDI MSI is typically limited to the more abundant compounds, which have m/z values that are distinct from MALDI matrix-related ions. On-tissue analyte derivatization addresses these issues by selectively tagging functional groups specific to a class of analytes, while simultaneously changing their molecular masses and improving their desorption and ionization efficiency. We evaluated electrospray deposition of liquid-phase derivatization agents as a means of on-tissue analyte derivatization using 2-picolylamine; we were able to detect a range of endogenous fatty acids with MALDI MSI. When compared with airbrush application, electrospray led to a 3-fold improvement in detection limits and decreased analyte delocalization. Six fatty acids were detected and visualized from rat cerebrum tissue using a MALDI MSI instrument operating in positive mode. MALDI MSI of the hippocampal area allowed targeted fatty acid analysis of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer and the CA1 pyramidal layer with a 20-μm pixel width, without degrading the localization of other lipids during liquid-phase analyte derivatization. PMID:27181709

  11. Lysine methylation is an endogenous post-translational modification of tau protein in human brain and a modulator of aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Liao, Zhongping; Clark, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau dissociates from the neuronal cytoskeleton and aggregates to form cytoplasmic inclusions. Although hyper-phosphorylation of tau Ser and Thr residues is an established trigger of tau misfunction and aggregation, tau modifications extend to Lys residues as well, raising the possibility that different modification signatures depress or promote aggregation propensity depending on site occupancy. To identify Lys-residue modifications associated with normal tau function, soluble tau proteins isolated from four cognitively normal human brains were characterized by mass spectrometry methods. The major detectable Lys modification was found to be methylation, which appeared in the form of mono- and di-methyl Lys residues distributed among at least eleven sites. Unlike tau phosphorylation sites, the frequency of Lys methylation was highest in the microtubule binding repeat region that mediates both microtubule binding and homotypic interactions. When purified recombinant human tau was modified in vitro through reductive methylation, its ability to promote tubulin polymerization was retained, whereas its aggregation propensity was greatly attenuated at both nucleation and extension steps. These data establish Lys methylation as part of the normal tau post-translational modification signature in human brain, and suggest that it can function in part to protect against pathological tau aggregation. PMID:24869773

  12. Brain stem slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Kale, Ajay; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Siratirakun, Piyaporn; Aquino, Jorge B; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Ernfors, Patrik; Olivius, Petri

    2014-05-30

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve.

  13. Endogenous IL-6 of mesenchymal stem cell improves behavioral outcome of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage neonatal rats by supressing apoptosis in astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; He, Mulan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jinngjing; Hou, Nali; Bin, Tan; Zhang, Yun; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the neurological impairment caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) via immunomodulation. In the current study, we found that MSC transplantation improved learning and memory function and enhanced long-term potentiation in neonatal rats subjected to HIBD and the amount of IL-6 released from MSCs was far greater than that of other cytokines. However, the neuroprotective effect of MSCs infected with siIL-6-transduced recombinant lentivirus (siIL-6 MSCs) was significantly weakened in the behavioural tests and electrophysiological analysis. Meanwhile, the hippocampal IL-6 levels were decreased following siIL-6 MSC transplantation. In vitro, the levels of IL-6 release and the levels of IL-6R and STAT3 expression were increased in both primary neurons and astrocytes subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) following MSCs co-culture. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was upregulated and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was downregulated in OGD-injured astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. However, the siIL-6 MSCs suppressed ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in the injured astrocytes and induced apoptosis number of the injured astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of MSC transplantation in neonatal HIBD rats is partly mediated by IL-6 to enhance anti-apoptosis of injured astrocytes via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:26766745

  14. Endogenous IL-6 of mesenchymal stem cell improves behavioral outcome of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage neonatal rats by supressing apoptosis in astrocyte.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan; He, Mulan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jinngjing; Hou, Nali; Bin, Tan; Zhang, Yun; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-14

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the neurological impairment caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) via immunomodulation. In the current study, we found that MSC transplantation improved learning and memory function and enhanced long-term potentiation in neonatal rats subjected to HIBD and the amount of IL-6 released from MSCs was far greater than that of other cytokines. However, the neuroprotective effect of MSCs infected with siIL-6-transduced recombinant lentivirus (siIL-6 MSCs) was significantly weakened in the behavioural tests and electrophysiological analysis. Meanwhile, the hippocampal IL-6 levels were decreased following siIL-6 MSC transplantation. In vitro, the levels of IL-6 release and the levels of IL-6R and STAT3 expression were increased in both primary neurons and astrocytes subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) following MSCs co-culture. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was upregulated and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was downregulated in OGD-injured astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. However, the siIL-6 MSCs suppressed ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in the injured astrocytes and induced apoptosis number of the injured astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of MSC transplantation in neonatal HIBD rats is partly mediated by IL-6 to enhance anti-apoptosis of injured astrocytes via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway.

  15. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the physiology of endogenous pyrogen (EP), the fever-producing factor of cellular origin. Included are: its hormone-like role, its molecular nature, bioassay procedures, cellular production and mechanisms of EP action. (SA)

  16. Pharmacological studies on the NOP and opioid receptor agonist PWT2-[Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13).

    PubMed

    Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Ding, Huiping; Bird, Mark F; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ferrari, Federica; Malfacini, Davide; Rizzi, Anna; Ruzza, Chiara; Lambert, David G; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Calo, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo

    2017-01-05

    An innovative chemical strategy named peptide welding technology (PWT) has been developed for the facile synthesis of tetrabranched peptides. [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 acts as a universal agonist for nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) and classical opioid receptors. The present study investigated the pharmacological profile of the PWT derivative of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 (PWT2-[Dmt(1)]) in several assays in vitro and in vivo after spinal administration in monkeys subjected to the tail withdrawal assay. PWT2-[Dmt(1)] mimicked the effects of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 displaying full agonist activity, similar affinity/potency and selectivity at human recombinant N/OFQ (NOP) and opioid receptors in receptor binding, stimulation of [(35)S]GTPγS binding, calcium mobilization in cells expressing chimeric G proteins, and BRET studies for measuring receptor/G-protein and receptor/β-arrestin 2 interaction. In vivo in monkeys PWT2-[Dmt(1)] elicited dose-dependent and robust antinociceptive effects being more potent and longer lasting than [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2. The analgesic action of PWT2-[Dmt(1)] was sensitive to the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397, but not naltrexone. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the tetrabranched derivative of [Dmt(1)]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 obtained with the PWT technology maintains the in vitro pharmacological profile of the parent peptide but displays higher potency and longer lasting action in vivo.

  17. Structures and heats of formation of the neutral and ionic PNO, NOP, and NPO systems from electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Kemeny, Andre E; Francisco, Joseph S

    2008-04-28

    High level ab initio electronic structure calculations using the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method with augmented correlation-consistent basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set limit have been performed on the PNO, NOP, and NPO isomers and their corresponding anions and cations. Geometries for all species were optimized up through the aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z level and vibrational frequencies were calculated with the aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z basis set. The most stable of the three isomers is NPO and it is predicted to have a heat of formation of 23.3 kcal/mol. PNO is predicted to be only 1.7 kcal/mol higher in energy. The calculated adiabatic ionization potential of NPO is 12.07 eV and the calculated adiabatic electron affinity is 2.34 eV. The calculated adiabatic ionization potential of PNO is 10.27 eV and the calculated adiabatic electron affinity is only 0.24 eV. NOP is predicted to be much higher in energy by 29.9 kcal/mol. The calculated rotational constants for PNO and NPO should allow for these species to be spectroscopically distinguished. The adiabatic bond dissociation energies for the P[Single Bond]N, P[Single Bond]O, and N[Single Bond]O bonds in NPO and PNO are the same within approximately 10 kcal/mol and fall in the range of 72-83 kcal/mol.

  18. Structures and heats of formation of the neutral and ionic PNO, NOP, and NPO systems from electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Daniel J.; Dixon, David A.; Kemeny, Andre E.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2008-04-01

    High level ab initio electronic structure calculations using the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method with augmented correlation-consistent basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set limit have been performed on the PNO, NOP, and NPO isomers and their corresponding anions and cations. Geometries for all species were optimized up through the aug-cc-pV(Q +d)Z level and vibrational frequencies were calculated with the aug-cc-pV(T +d)Z basis set. The most stable of the three isomers is NPO and it is predicted to have a heat of formation of 23.3kcal/mol. PNO is predicted to be only 1.7kcal/mol higher in energy. The calculated adiabatic ionization potential of NPO is 12.07eV and the calculated adiabatic electron affinity is 2.34eV. The calculated adiabatic ionization potential of PNO is 10.27eV and the calculated adiabatic electron affinity is only 0.24eV. NOP is predicted to be much higher in energy by 29.9kcal/mol. The calculated rotational constants for PNO and NPO should allow for these species to be spectroscopically distinguished. The adiabatic bond dissociation energies for the P N, P O, and N O bonds in NPO and PNO are the same within ˜10kcal/mol and fall in the range of 72-83kcal/mol.

  19. Brain Gαi2-subunit proteins and the prevention of salt sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Casey Y.; Wainford, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    To counter the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, multiple brain G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) systems are activated to facilitate sympathoinhibition, sodium homeostasis, and normotension. Currently there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the role of down-stream GPCR-activated Gα-subunit proteins in these critically important physiological regulatory responses required for long-term blood pressure regulation. We have determined that brain Gαi2-proteins mediate natriuretic and sympathoinhibitory responses produced by acute pharmacological (exogenous central nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP) and α2-adrenoceptor activation) and physiological challenges to sodium homeostasis (intravenous volume expansion and 1 M sodium load) in conscious Sprague–Dawley rats. We have demonstrated that in salt-resistant rat phenotypes, high dietary salt intake evokes site-specific up-regulation of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) Gαi2-proteins. Further, we established that PVN Gαi2 protein up-regulation prevents the development of renal nerve-dependent sympathetically mediated salt-sensitive hypertension in Sprague–Dawley and Dahl salt-resistant rats. Additionally, failure to up-regulate PVN Gαi2 proteins during high salt-intake contributes to the pathophysiology of Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) hypertension. Collectively, our data demonstrate that brain, and likely PVN specific, Gαi2 protein pathways represent a central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal-nerve dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Further, impairment of this endogenous “anti-hypertensive” mechanism contributes to the pathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26347659

  20. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  1. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  2. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of rats: a sensitive directed to the photoreceptor system for phototaxis of the proto- assay method for endogenous...spinal heating and cooling and photobiologists. The remainder of the book is devoted to the eye. intracerebroventricular injections of monoamines and...photobehavior and vision discussed, such as histamine /antihistamines, cough remedies, of invertebrates. h i e nd slep-aids and laxatives. The few citations

  3. Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention on cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Hopfinger, Joseph B; West, Vicki M

    2006-06-01

    Sensory processing is affected by both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of attention, although how these mechanisms interact in the brain has remained unclear. In the present study, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate how multiple stages of information processing in the brain are affected when endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are concurrently engaged. We found that the earliest stage of cortical visual processing, the striate-cortex-generated C1, was immune to attentional modulation, even when endogenous and exogenous attention converged on a common location. The earliest stage of processing to be affected in this experiment was the late phase of the extrastriate-cortex-generated P1 component, which was dominated by exogenous attention. Processing at this stage was enhanced by exogenous attention, regardless of where endogenous attention had been oriented. Endogenous attention, however, dominated a later, higher-order stage of processing indexed by an enhancement of the P300 that was unaffected by exogenous attention. Critically, between these early and late stages, an interaction was found wherein endogenous and exogenous attention produced distinct, and overlapping, effects on information processing. At the same time that exogenous attention was producing an extended enhancement of the late-P1, endogenous attention was enhancing the occipital-parietal N1 component. These results provide neurophysiological support for theories suggesting that endogenous and exogenous mechanisms represent two attention systems that can affect information processing in the brain in distinct ways. Furthermore, these data provide new evidence regarding the precise stages of neural processing that are, and are not, affected when endogenous and exogenous attentions interact.

  4. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood-brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates.

  5. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  6. Novel mixed NOP/MOP agonist BU08070 alleviates pain and inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sobczak, Marta; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sałaga, Maciej; Husbands, Stephen M.; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background The opioid and nociceptin systems play a crucial role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of BU08070, a novel mixed MOP/NOP agonist, on mouse intestinal contractility in vitro and GI motility in vivo in physiological conditions and in animal models mimicking symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), including diarrhea and abdominal pain. Methods The effect of BU08070 on muscle contractility in vitro was characterized in the ileum and colon. To assess the effect of BU08070 in vivo, the following parameters were assessed: whole GI transit, gastric emptying, geometric center, colonic bead expulsion, fecal pellet output and time to castor oil-induced diarrhea. The antinociceptive activity of BU08070 was characterized in the mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test, alone and in the presence of MOP and NOP antagonists. Results In vitro, BU08070 (10−10–10−6 M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, BU08070 prolonged the whole GI transit and inhibited colonic bead expulsion. The antitransit and antidiarrheal effect of BU08070 was observed already at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg (i.p.). BU08070 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Conclusion Our results suggest that BU08070 has a potential of becoming an efficient drug in IBS-D therapy. Here we also validate mixed NOP/MOP receptor targeting as possible future treatment of functional GI diseases. PMID:24815321

  7. Whole genome expression profiling of blood cells in ovarian cancer patients -prognostic impact of the CYP1B1, MTSS1, NCALD, and NOP14.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Helena S; Sorbe, Bengt; Nilsson, Torbjörn K

    2014-06-30

    Ovarian cancer patients with different tumor stages and cell differentiation might be distinguished from each other by gene expression profiles in whole blood cell mRNA by the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Array. We also examined if there is any association with other clinical variables, response to therapy, and residual tumor burden after surgery. Patients were divided into two groups, one with poor prognosis, advanced stage and poorly differentiated tumors (n = 22), and one group with good prognosis, early stage and well- to medium differentiated tumors (n = 11). Six genes were found to be differentially expressed: the PDIA3, LYAR, NOP14, NCALD and MTSS1 genes were down-regulated and the CYP1B1 gene expression was up-regulated in the poor prognosis group, all with p value <0.05, adjusted for mass comparison. In survival analyses, CYP1B1, MTSS1, NCALD and NOP14 remained significantly different (p<0.05). Patient groups did not differ in any transcript related to acute phase or immune responses. This minimal gene expression signature of prognostic ovarian cancer-related genes opens up an avenue for more practicable monitoring of ovarian cancer patients by simple peripheral blood tests, which may evolve into a tool to guide selection of curative and postoperative supportive therapies.

  8. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  9. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network 'purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  10. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network `purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  11. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  12. Endogenous molecules stimulating N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA).

    PubMed

    Tai, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Uyama, Toru; Masuda, Kim; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Houchi, Hitoshi; Ueda, Natsuo

    2012-05-16

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays the central role in the degradation of bioactive N-acylethanolamines such as the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) in brain and peripheral tissues. A lysosomal enzyme referred to as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) catalyzes the same reaction with preference to palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous analgesic and neuroprotective substance, and is therefore expected as a potential target of therapeutic drugs. In the in vitro assays thus far performed, the maximal activity of NAAA was achieved in the presence of both nonionic detergent (Triton X-100 or Nonidet P-40) and the SH reagent dithiothreitol. However, endogenous molecules that might substitute for these synthetic compounds remain poorly understood. Here, we examined stimulatory effects of endogenous phospholipids and thiol compounds on recombinant NAAA. Among different phospholipids tested, choline- or ethanolamine-containing phospholipids showed potent effects, and 1 mM phosphatidylcholine increased NAAA activity by 6.6-fold. Concerning endogenous thiol compounds, dihydrolipoic acid at 0.1-1 mM was the most active, causing 8.5-9.0-fold stimulation. These results suggest that endogenous phospholipids and dihydrolipoic acid may contribute in keeping NAAA active in lysosomes. Even in the presence of phosphatidylcholine and dihydrolipoic acid, however, the preferential hydrolysis of palmitoylethanolamide was unaltered. We also investigated a possible compensatory induction of NAAA mRNA in brain and other tissues of FAAH-deficient mice. However, NAAA expression levels in all the tissues examined were not significantly altered from those in wild-type mice.

  13. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazole derivatives as novel NOP/ORL1 receptor antagonists: exploration and optimization of alternative pyrazole structure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Asai, Masanori; Ohno, Akio; Yamada, Koji; Ozaki, Satoshi; Ohta, Hisashi; Okamoto, Osamu

    2009-08-15

    Nonpeptidic small-molecule NOP/ORL1 receptor antagonists with an imidazole scaffold were designed and synthesized to investigate alternatives to the pyrazole analog. Systematic modification of the original pyrazole lead [Kobayashi et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.2009, 19, 3627; Kobayashi et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., in press] to change the heterocyclic core, substituted side chain, and pendant functional group demonstrated that examining the structure-activity relationship for novel templates allowed the identification of potent, fully substituted 4-aminomethyl-1H-imidazole and 2-aminomethyl-1H-imidazole. These compounds exhibited excellent potency for ORL1 receptor with minimal P-gp efflux and/or reduced hERG affinity.

  15. Revisiting tolerance from the endogenous morphine perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M; Esch, Tobias

    2009-09-01

    Tolerance represents a dynamic mechanism that can be used to temper various regulatory processes regardless of whether they mediate excitation or inhibition. Tolerance operationally directs state-dependent attenuation of the action of endogenous and exogenous morphine. For example, tolerance ensures that immuno-inhibition induced by morphine does not compromise a requisite functional system over an extended period of time. In the nervous system, tolerance to inhibitory action insures that excitatory tone is resumed. Thus, desensitization sets in and allows various essential processes to be operational once again. Clearly, the temporal rebound of diverse immune and nervous processes involved with opiate actions provides a self-contained operational mechanism to ensure survival of the organism. Furthermore, love and/or pleasure, and satiety, are complex neurobiological phenomena linked to limbic brain reward circuitry. These processes are critically dependent on oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine, endogenous morphine and serotoninergic signaling. Naturally rewarding and/or pleasurable activities are usually governed by beneficial biological behaviors like eating, sex, and reproduction. It is our contention that critically important tolerance mechanisms extend to behaviors mediated by CNS reward systems. In other words, we become satisfied with sex, food, pleasure for the moment and disinterest creeps in until the "urges" return.

  16. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination.

  17. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  18. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-05

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses.

  19. Exposure to a Highly Caloric Palatable Diet during the Perinatal Period Affects the Expression of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in the Brain, Liver and Adipose Tissue of Adult Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Arco, Raquel; Decara, Juan; Vázquez, Mariam; Noemí Blanco, Rosario; Alén, Francisco; Suárez, Juan; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked gestational exposure to highly caloric diets with a disrupted endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS). In the present study, we have extended these studies by analyzing the impact of the exposure to a palatable diet during gestation and lactation on a) the adult expression of endocannabinoid-related behaviors, b) the metabolic profile of adult offspring and c) the mRNA expression of the signaling machinery of the ECS in the hypothalamus, the liver and the adipose tissue of adult offspring of both sexes. Exposure to a palatable diet resulted in a) sex-dimorphic and perinatal diet specific feeding behaviors, including the differential response to the inhibitory effects of the cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist AM251, b) features of metabolic syndrome including increased adiposity, hyperleptinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia and c) tissue and sex-specific changes in the expression of both CB1 and CB2 receptors and in that of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MAGL, being the adipose tissue the most affected organ analyzed. Since the effects were observed in adult animals that were weaned while consuming a normal diet, the present results indicate that the ECS is one of the targets of maternal programming of the offspring energy expenditure. These results clearly indicate that the maternal diet has long-term effects on the development of pups through multiple alterations of signaling homeostatic pathways that include the ECS. The potential relevance of these alterations for the current obesity epidemic is discussed.

  20. Exposure to a Highly Caloric Palatable Diet during the Perinatal Period Affects the Expression of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in the Brain, Liver and Adipose Tissue of Adult Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Arco, Raquel; Decara, Juan; Vázquez, Mariam; Noemí Blanco, Rosario; Alén, Francisco; Suárez, Juan; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked gestational exposure to highly caloric diets with a disrupted endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS). In the present study, we have extended these studies by analyzing the impact of the exposure to a palatable diet during gestation and lactation on a) the adult expression of endocannabinoid-related behaviors, b) the metabolic profile of adult offspring and c) the mRNA expression of the signaling machinery of the ECS in the hypothalamus, the liver and the adipose tissue of adult offspring of both sexes. Exposure to a palatable diet resulted in a) sex-dimorphic and perinatal diet specific feeding behaviors, including the differential response to the inhibitory effects of the cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist AM251, b) features of metabolic syndrome including increased adiposity, hyperleptinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia and c) tissue and sex-specific changes in the expression of both CB1 and CB2 receptors and in that of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MAGL, being the adipose tissue the most affected organ analyzed. Since the effects were observed in adult animals that were weaned while consuming a normal diet, the present results indicate that the ECS is one of the targets of maternal programming of the offspring energy expenditure. These results clearly indicate that the maternal diet has long-term effects on the development of pups through multiple alterations of signaling homeostatic pathways that include the ECS. The potential relevance of these alterations for the current obesity epidemic is discussed. PMID:27806128

  1. The endogenous opioid system: a common substrate in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Trigo, José Manuel; Martin-García, Elena; Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits that involve several neurotransmitters. One of the neurochemical systems that plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction is the endogenous opioid system (EOS). Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within these reward circuits. Chronic exposure to the different prototypical drugs of abuse, including opioids, alcohol, nicotine, psychostimulants and cannabinoids has been reported to produce significant alterations within the EOS, which seem to play an important role in the development of the addictive process. In this review, we will describe the adaptive changes produced by different drugs of abuse on the EOS, and the current knowledge about the contribution of each component of this neurobiological system to their addictive properties.

  2. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  3. Endogenous Molecules Stimulating N-Acylethanolamine-Hydrolyzing Acid Amidase (NAAA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays the central role in the degradation of bioactive N-acylethanolamines such as the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) in brain and peripheral tissues. A lysosomal enzyme referred to as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) catalyzes the same reaction with preference to palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous analgesic and neuroprotective substance, and is therefore expected as a potential target of therapeutic drugs. In the in vitro assays thus far performed, the maximal activity of NAAA was achieved in the presence of both nonionic detergent (Triton X-100 or Nonidet P-40) and the SH reagent dithiothreitol. However, endogenous molecules that might substitute for these synthetic compounds remain poorly understood. Here, we examined stimulatory effects of endogenous phospholipids and thiol compounds on recombinant NAAA. Among different phospholipids tested, choline- or ethanolamine-containing phospholipids showed potent effects, and 1 mM phosphatidylcholine increased NAAA activity by 6.6-fold. Concerning endogenous thiol compounds, dihydrolipoic acid at 0.1–1 mM was the most active, causing 8.5–9.0-fold stimulation. These results suggest that endogenous phospholipids and dihydrolipoic acid may contribute in keeping NAAA active in lysosomes. Even in the presence of phosphatidylcholine and dihydrolipoic acid, however, the preferential hydrolysis of palmitoylethanolamide was unaltered. We also investigated a possible compensatory induction of NAAA mRNA in brain and other tissues of FAAH-deficient mice. However, NAAA expression levels in all the tissues examined were not significantly altered from those in wild-type mice. PMID:22860206

  4. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  5. [Memory processes in endogenous depression].

    PubMed

    Radziwiłłowicz, W; Radziwiłłowicz, P

    1998-01-01

    The thesis aims to answer the questions about the profile of mental ability in endogenous depression and to decide whether self-estimation of depressive symptoms influences the results achieved by patients in memory tests. Fifty six patients suffering from endogenous depression have been examined. The following methods have been applied: Mini Mental State Examination, Benton Visual Retention Test, Beck Depression Inventory, hold tests: Vocabulary, Information, Comprehension and Digit Span of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, DCS Weidlich. General status of cognitive functions correlates with the profile of specific kinds of memory results, particularly with delayed memory. Self-estimation of depressive symptoms intensity is mostly influenced by memory capacity, visuomotorial factor, functions of perception and lingual factor. High correlation between verbal and non verbal learning shows uniform influence of depression on the process of learning.

  6. Where are the new cough treatments: a debriefing of recent clinical proof-of-concept trials with the NOP agonist SCH 486757.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Tulshian, Deen B; Sadeh, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Cough continues to be one of the top reasons why patients seek medical attention from health care providers. The prescription antitussive market is dominated by opioids, such as codeine that produces inconsistent efficacy and is often accompanied by significant side effect liabilities. Consequently, cough represents an unmet medical need and an underserved market. Yet, against the backdrop of increasing cough research, the development of novel treatments has been exceptionally challenging with dextromethorphan being the last US drug approved for cough almost a half century ago. We support the position that an unambiguous and actionable 'road map' that clearly delineates the pathway forward for new cough suppressants from basic research to and beyond clinical proof-of-concept studies will be an important aspect for future success of this pharmacological class of drug. Pivotal to the establishment of such a road map will be the review of lessons learned from antitussive agents that have been recently progressed to proof-of-concept trials. In the present commentary, we briefly discuss observations and challenges pertaining to SCH 486757, a selective orally active NOP agonist that has recently advanced to human antitussive testing.

  7. Molecular chaperone Hsp90 stabilizes Pih1/Nop17 to maintain R2TP complex activity that regulates snoRNA accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongmin; Kakihara, Yoshito; Gribun, Anna; Huen, Jennifer; Yang, Guocheng; Khanna, May; Costanzo, Michael; Brost, Renée L.; Boone, Charles; Hughes, Timothy R.; Yip, Christopher M.; Houry, Walid A.

    2008-01-01

    Hsp90 is a highly conserved molecular chaperone that is involved in modulating a multitude of cellular processes. In this study, we identify a function for the chaperone in RNA processing and maintenance. This functionality of Hsp90 involves two recently identified interactors of the chaperone: Tah1 and Pih1/Nop17. Tah1 is a small protein containing tetratricopeptide repeats, whereas Pih1 is found to be an unstable protein. Tah1 and Pih1 bind to the essential helicases Rvb1 and Rvb2 to form the R2TP complex, which we demonstrate is required for the correct accumulation of box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins. Together with the Tah1 cofactor, Hsp90 functions to stabilize Pih1. As a consequence, the chaperone is shown to affect box C/D accumulation and maintenance, especially under stress conditions. Hsp90 and R2TP proteins are also involved in the proper accumulation of box H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs. PMID:18268103

  8. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Peng, Ming-Yieh; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs when organisms are hematogenously disseminated in to the eye from a distant focus of infection. The most common isolated organisms that cause endogenous endophthalmitis are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Previous reports on endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter species are limited. We present the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri bacteremia and renal abscesses.

  9. Top-down identification of endogenous peptides up to 9 kDa in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue by nanoelectrospray quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Thomas; Kellmann, Markus; Jürgens, Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2005-02-01

    Recent work on protein and peptide biomarker patterns revealed the difficulties in identifying their molecular components, which is indispensable for validation of the biological context. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue are used as sources to discover new biomarkers, e.g. for neurodegenerative diseases. Many of these biomarker candidates are peptides with a molecular mass of <10 kDa. Their identification is favourably achieved with a 'top-down' approach, because this requires less purification and an enzymatic cleavage will often not yield enough specific fragments for successful database searches. Here, we describe an approach using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) as a highly efficient mass spectrometric purification and identification tool after off-line decomplexation of biological samples by liquid chromatography. After initial peptidomic screening with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) TOFMS, the elution behaviour in chromatography and the exact molecular mass were used to locate the same signals in nanoelectrospray measurements. Most of the peaks detected in MALDI-TOFMS could be retrieved in nanoelectrospray quadrupole TOFMS. Suitable collision energies for informative fragment spectra were investigated for different parent ions, charge states and molecular masses. After collision-induced dissociation, the resulting fragmentation data of multiply charged ions can become much more complicated than those derived from tryptic peptide digests. However, the mass accuracy and resolution of quadrupole TOF instruments results in high-quality data suitable for determining peptide sequences. The protein precursor, proteolytic processing and post-translational modifications were identified by automated database searches. This is demonstrated by the exemplary identifications of thymosin beta-4 (5.0 kDa) and NPY (4.3 kDa) from rat hypothalamic tissue and ubiquitin (8.6 kDa) from human cerebrospinal fluid. The high data quality

  10. Endogenous attention and illusory line motion depend on task set.

    PubMed

    Chica, Ana B; Charras, Pom; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2008-09-01

    Task set has been shown to determine some important cognitive operations like conscious perception [Rafal, R. D., Ward, R., & Danziger, S. (2006). Selection for action and selection for awareness: Evidence from hemispatial neglect. Brain Research, 1080(1), 2-8], and the exogenous orienting of spatial attention [Folk, C. L., Remington, R. W., & Johnston, J. C. (1992). Involuntary covert orienting is contingent on attentional control settings. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 18(4), 1030-1044; Lupiáñez, J., Ruz, M., Funes, M. J., & Milliken, B. (2007). The manifestation of attentional capture: Facilitation or IOR depending on task demands. Psychological Research, 71(1), 77-91]. In the present study we investigate whether endogenous attention would also be task-dependent. We use an illusion of movement, the illusory line motion [Hikosaka, O., Miyauchi, S., & Shimojo, S. (1993). Focal visual attention produces illusory temporal order and motion sensation. Vision Research, 33(9), 1219-1240] to explore this question. Our results revealed that endogenously attending to detect the appearance of a target produce different consequences in modulating the illusion of movement than endogenously attending to discriminate one of its features. We suggest that endogenous attention is implemented differently depending on the task at hand, producing different effects on perceptual integration.

  11. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  12. Endogenous fertility, mortality and growth.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, K; Cipriani, G P

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model that illustrates the joint determination of population and development. "Economic and demographic outcomes are determined jointly in a choice-theoretic model of fertility, mortality and capital accumulation.... In addition to choosing savings and births, parents may reduce (infant) deaths by incurring expenditures on health-care which is also provided by the government. A generalised production technology accounts for long-run endogenous growth with short-run transitional dynamics. The analysis yields testable time series and cross-section implications which accord with the empirical evidence on the relationship between demography and development."

  13. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well.

  14. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  15. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cao, María; Iduma, Paola; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Blanco, Julià; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are retroviruses that infected human genome millions of years ago and have persisted throughout human evolution. About 8% of our genome is composed of HERVs, most of which are nonfunctional because of epigenetic control or deactivating mutations. However, a correlation between HERVs and human cancer has been described and many tumors, such as melanoma, breast cancer, germ cell tumors, renal cancer or ovarian cancer, express HERV proteins, mainly HERV-K (HML6) and HERV-K (HML2). Although the causative role of HERVs in cancer is controversial, data from animal models demonstrated that endogenous retroviruses are potentially oncogenic. HERV protein expression in human cells generates an immune response by activating innate and adaptive immunities. Some HERV-derived peptides have antigenic properties. For example, HERV-K (HML-6) encodes the HER-K MEL peptide recognized by CD8+ lymphocytes. In addition, HERVs are two-edged immunomodulators. HERVs show immunosuppressive activity. The presence of genomic retroviral elements in host-cell cytosol may activate an interferon type I response. Therefore, targeting HERVs through cellular vaccines or immunomodulatory drugs combined with checkpoint inhibitors is attracting interest because they could be active in human tumors. PMID:28154780

  16. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  17. HMGB1: Endogenous Danger Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klune, John R; Dhupar, Rajeev; Cardinal, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Tsung, Allan

    2008-01-01

    While foreign pathogens and their products have long been known to activate the innate immune system, the recent recognition of a group of endogenous molecules that serve a similar function has provided a framework for understanding the overlap between the inflammatory responses activated by pathogens and injury. These endogenous molecules, termed alarmins, are normal cell constituents that can be released into the extracellular milieu during states of cellular stress or damage and subsequently activate the immune system. One nuclear protein, High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), has received particular attention as fulfilling the functions of an alarmin by being involved in both infectious and non-infectious inflammatory conditions. Once released, HMGB1 signals through various receptors to activate immune cells involved in the immune process. Although initial studies demonstrated HMGB1 as a late mediator of sepsis, recent findings indicate HMGB1 to have an important role in models of non-infectious inflammation, such as autoimmunity, cancer, trauma, and ischemia reperfusion injury. Furthermore, in contrast to its pro-inflammatory functions, there is evidence that HMGB1 also has restorative effects leading to tissue repair and regeneration. The complex functions of HMGB1 as an archetypical alarmin are outlined here to review our current understanding of a molecule that holds the potential for treatment in many important human conditions. PMID:18431461

  18. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  19. Endogenous retroviruses in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Jugo, Begoña Marina

    2014-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements that are present in a wide range of vertebrates. Although the study of ERVs has been carried out mainly in humans and model organisms, recently, domestic animals have become important, and some species have begun to be analyzed to gain further insight into ERVs. Due to the availability of complete genomes and the development of new computer tools, ERVs can now be analyzed from a genome-wide viewpoint. In addition, more experimental work is being carried out to analyze the distribution, expression and interplay of ERVs within a host genome. Cats, cattle, chicken, dogs, horses, pigs and sheep have been scrutinized in this manner, all of which are interesting species in health and economic terms. Furthermore, several studies have noted differences in the number of endogenous retroviruses and in the variability of these elements among different breeds, as well as their expression in different tissues and the effects of their locations, which, in some cases, are near genes. These findings suggest a complex, intriguing relationship between ERVs and host genomes. In this review, we summarize the most important in silico and experimental findings, discuss their implications and attempt to predict future directions for the study of these genomic elements.

  20. Endocannabinoid signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachel I; Nicoll, Roger A

    2002-04-26

    The primary psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), affects the brain mainly by activating a specific receptor (CB1). CB1 is expressed at high levels in many brain regions, and several endogenous brain lipids have been identified as CB1 ligands. In contrast to classical neurotransmitters, endogenous cannabinoids can function as retrograde synaptic messengers: They are released from postsynaptic neurons and travel backward across synapses, activating CB1 on presynaptic axons and suppressing neurotransmitter release. Cannabinoids may affect memory, cognition, and pain perception by means of this cellular mechanism.

  1. Blood-brain barrier delivery.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-01-01

    Neuropharmaceutics is the largest potential growth sector of the pharmaceutical industry. However, this growth is blocked by the problem of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Essentially 100% of large-molecule drugs and >98% of small-molecule drugs do not cross the BBB. The BBB can be traversed because there are multiple endogenous transporters within this barrier. Therefore, brain drug development programs of the future need to be re-configured so that drugs are formulated to enable transport into the brain via endogenous BBB transporters.

  2. Pharmacological profile of the NOP agonist and cough suppressing agent SCH 486757 (8-[Bis(2-Chlorophenyl)Methyl]-3-(2-Pyrimidinyl)-8-Azabicyclo[3.2.1]Octan-3-Ol) in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Tulshian, Deen B; Bolser, Donald C; Varty, Geoffrey B; Baptista, Marco; Fernandez, Xiomara; Parra, Leonard E; Zimmer, Jennifer C; Erickson, Christine H; Ho, Ginny D; Jia, Yanlin; Ng, Fay W; Korfmacher, Walter; Xu, Xiaoying; Veals, John; Smith-Torhan, April; Wainhaus, Samuel; Fawzi, Ahmad B; Austin, Theodore M; van Heek, Margaret; Hey, John A

    2010-03-25

    We describe the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profiles of SCH 486757, a nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor agonist that has recently entered human clinical trials for cough. SCH 486757 selectively binds human NOP receptor (K(i)=4.6+/-0.61nM) over classical opioid receptors. In a guinea pig capsaicin cough model, SCH 486757 (0.01-1mg/kg) suppressed cough at 2, 4, and 6h post oral administration with a maximum efficacy occurring at 4h equivalent to codeine, hydrocodone, dextromethorphan and baclofen. The antitussive effects of SCH 486757 (3.0mg/kg, p.o.) was blocked by the NOP receptor antagonist J113397 (12mg/kg, i.p.) but not by naltrexone (10mg/kg, p.o.). SCH 486757 does not produce tolerance to its antitussive activity after a 5-day BID dosing regimen. After acute and chronic dosing paradigms, SCH 486757 (1mg/kg) inhibited capsaicin-evoked coughing by 46+/-9% and 40+/-11%, respectively. In a feline mechanically-evoked cough model, SCH 486757 produces a maximum inhibition of cough and expiratory abdominal electromyogram amplitude of 59 and 61%, respectively. SCH 486757 did not significantly affect inspiratory electromyogram amplitude. We examined the abuse potential of SCH 486757 (10mg/kg, p.o.) in a rat conditioned place preference procedure which is sensitive to classical drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine and morphine. SCH 486757 was without effect in this model. Finally, SCH 486757 displays a good oral pharmacokinetic profile in the guinea pig, rat and dog. We conclude that SCH 486757 has a favorable antitussive profile in preclinical animal models.

  3. The Use of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children in Differentiating Between the Endogenous and Exogenous Mental Defective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tava, Edward G.

    This research is, in part, a study of a method of differentiating between two different types of retardation (the exogenous or brain injured and the endogenous or non-brain injured). However, this paper is also an example of the evaluation of a research problem, for it incorporates data and information from three different studies, each of which…

  4. The interactions of multisensory integration with endogenous and exogenous attention.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jinglong; Shen, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli from multiple sensory organs can be integrated into a coherent representation through multiple phases of multisensory processing; this phenomenon is called multisensory integration. Multisensory integration can interact with attention. Here, we propose a framework in which attention modulates multisensory processing in both endogenous (goal-driven) and exogenous (stimulus-driven) ways. Moreover, multisensory integration exerts not only bottom-up but also top-down control over attention. Specifically, we propose the following: (1) endogenous attentional selectivity acts on multiple levels of multisensory processing to determine the extent to which simultaneous stimuli from different modalities can be integrated; (2) integrated multisensory events exert top-down control on attentional capture via multisensory search templates that are stored in the brain; (3) integrated multisensory events can capture attention efficiently, even in quite complex circumstances, due to their increased salience compared to unimodal events and can thus improve search accuracy; and (4) within a multisensory object, endogenous attention can spread from one modality to another in an exogenous manner.

  5. The interactions of multisensory integration with endogenous and exogenous attention

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jinglong; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli from multiple sensory organs can be integrated into a coherent representation through multiple phases of multisensory processing; this phenomenon is called multisensory integration. Multisensory integration can interact with attention. Here, we propose a framework in which attention modulates multisensory processing in both endogenous (goal-driven) and exogenous (stimulus-driven) ways. Moreover, multisensory integration exerts not only bottom-up but also top-down control over attention. Specifically, we propose the following: (1) endogenous attentional selectivity acts on multiple levels of multisensory processing to determine the extent to which simultaneous stimuli from different modalities can be integrated; (2) integrated multisensory events exert top-down control on attentional capture via multisensory search templates that are stored in the brain; (3) integrated multisensory events can capture attention efficiently, even in quite complex circumstances, due to their increased salience compared to unimodal events and can thus improve search accuracy; and (4) within a multisensory object, endogenous attention can spread from one modality to another in an exogenous manner. PMID:26546734

  6. [Endomorphins--endogenous ligands of the mu-opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Two endogenous opioid peptides with extremely high mu-opioid receptor affinity and selectivity, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, were: discovered and isolated from the mammalian brain in 1997. Endomorphins are amidated tetrapeptides, structurally different from so called typical opioids: enkephalins, dynorphins and endorphins. A protein precursor of endomorphins and a gene encoding their sequence remain unknown. Endomorphins are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier because of their low hydrophobicity. In animal models, these peptides turned out to be very potent in relieving neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In comparison with morphine, a prototype opioid receptor ligand, endomorphins produces less undesired side effects. In this article we describe the discovery of endomorphins, their cellular localization and functions in the organism, as well as their structure-activity relationships and biodegradation pathways.

  7. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  8. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  9. Endogenous neurotrophins and plasticity following spinal deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Matt S

    2012-05-01

    Neurons intrinsic to the spinal cord dorsal horn receive input from various classes of long-distance projection systems. Two of the best known of these are primary afferent and descending monoaminergic axons. Together with intrinsic interneurons, activity in these axonal populations shapes the early part of the sensory experience before it is transmitted to supraspinal structures via ascending projection axons. Injury to dorsal roots, which contain the centrally projecting branches of primary afferent axons, results in their permanent disconnection from the spinal cord, as well as sensory dysfunction such as pain. In animals, experimental dorsal root injuries affecting a small number of roots produce dynamic behavioural changes, providing evidence for the now familiar concept that sensory processing at the level of the spinal cord is not hard-wired. Changes in behaviour following rhizotomy suggest changes in spinal sensory circuitry, and we and others have shown that the density of spinal serotonergic axons as well as processes of inhibitory interneurons increases following rhizotomy. Intact primary afferent axons are less apt to sprout into denervated territory. Recent work from our group has asked (1) what is the stimulus that induces sprouting of serotonergic (and other) axons and (2) what prevents spared primary afferent axons from occupying the territory of those lost to injury. This article will review the evidence that a single factor upregulated by dorsal root injury, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), underpins both serotonergic sprouting and a lack of primary afferent plasticity. BDNF also differentially modulates some of the behavioural consequences of dorsal root injury: antagonizing endogenous BDNF improves spontaneous mechanosensory recovery but prevents recovery from rhizotomy-induced hypersensitivity to cold. These findings reinforce the notion that in disease states as complex and variable as spinal cord injury, single pharmacological

  10. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  11. Xenotransplantation and pig endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Magre, Saema; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Bartosch, Birke

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human patients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and virological factors considered with regard to xenotransplantation. Among the issues reviewed are the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology and the immunological hindrances with regard to the various types of rejection and attempts at abrogating rejection. Advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection by creating genetically modified pigs that are more suited to the human microenvironment are also discussed. Finally, with regard to virology, possible zoonotic infections emanating from pigs are reviewed, with special emphasis on the pig endogenous retrovirus (PERV). An in depth account of PERV studies, comprising their discovery as well as recent knowledge of the virus, is given. To date, all retrospective studies on patients with pig xenografts have shown no evidence of PERV transmission, however, many factors make us interpret these results with caution. Although the lack of PERV infection in xenograft recipients up to now is encouraging, more basic research and controlled animal studies that mimic the pig to human xenotransplantation setting more closely are required for safety assessment.

  12. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2016-01-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  13. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  14. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  15. A hormonal role for endogenous opiate alkaloids: vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Zhu, Wei; Cadet, Patrick; Mantione, Kirk; Bilfinger, Thomas V; Bianchi, Enrica; Guarna, Massimo

    2002-02-01

    The distribution of morphine-containing cells in the central nervous system, adrenal gland, and its presence in blood may serve to demonstrate that this signal molecule can act as a hormone besides its role in cell-to-cell signaling within the brain. This speculative review is the result of a literature evaluation with an emphasis on studies from our laboratory. Opioid peptides and opiate alkaloids have been found to influence cardiac and vascular function. They have also been reported to promote ischemic preconditioning protection in the heart. Given the presence of morphine and the novel mu(3) opiate receptor on vascular endothelial cells, including cardiac and vascular endothelial cells in the median eminence, it would appear that endogenous opiate alkaloids are involved in modulating cardiac function, possible at the hormonal level. This peripheral target tissue, via nitric oxide coupling to mu opiate receptors, may serve to down regulate the excitability of this tissue given the heart's high performance state as compared to that of the saphenous vein, a passive resistance conduit. With this in mind, morphine and other endogenous opiate alkaloids may function as a hormone.

  16. Alterations in endogenous opioid functional measures in chronic back pain.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Ilkka K; Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany M; Nuechterlein, Emily B; Cummiford, Chelsea M; Green, Carmen R; Harris, Richard E; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-09-11

    The absence of consistent end organ abnormalities in many chronic pain syndromes has led to a search for maladaptive CNS mechanisms that may explain their clinical presentations and course. Here, we addressed the role of brain regional μ-opioid receptor-mediated neurotransmission, one of the best recognized mechanisms of pain regulation, in chronic back pain in human subjects. We compared μ-opioid receptor availability in vivo at baseline, during pain expectation, and with moderate levels of sustained pain in 16 patients with chronic nonspecific back pain (CNBP) and in 16 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, using the μ-opioid receptor-selective radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil and positron emission tomography. We found that CNBP patients showed baseline increases in thalamic μ-opioid receptor availability, contrary to a previously studied sample of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. During both pain expectation and sustained pain challenges, CNBP patients showed regional reductions in the capacity to activate this neurotransmitter system compared with their control sample, further associated with clinical pain and affective state ratings. Our results demonstrate heterogeneity in endogenous opioid system functional measures across pain conditions, and alterations in both receptor availability and endogenous opioid function in CNBP that are relevant to the clinical presentation of these patients and the effects of opioid analgesics on μ-opioid receptors.

  17. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  18. Endogenous versus Exogenous Origins of Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier

    Are large biological extinctions such as the Cretaceous/Tertiary KT boundary due to a meteorite, extreme volcanic activity or self-organized critical extinction cascades? Are commercial successes due to a progressive reputation cascade or the result of a well orchestrated advertisement? Determining the chain of causality for Xevents in complex systems requires disentangling interwoven exogenous and endogenous contributions with either no clear signature or too many signatures. Here, I review several efforts carried out with collaborators which suggest a general strategy for understanding the organizations of several complex systems under the dual effect of endogenous and exogenous fluctuations. The studied examples are: internet download shocks, book sale shocks, social shocks, financial volatility shocks, and financial crashes. Simple models are offered to quantitatively relate the endogenous organization to the exogenous response of the system. Suggestions for applications of these ideas to many other systems are offered.

  19. Two cognitive and neural systems for endogenous and exogenous spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Chica, Ana B; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Orienting of spatial attention is a family of phylogenetically old mechanisms developed to select information for further processing. Information can be selected via top-down or endogenous mechanisms, depending on the goals of the observers or on the task at hand. Moreover, salient and potentially dangerous events also attract spatial attention via bottom-up or exogenous mechanisms, allowing a rapid and efficient reaction to unexpected but important events. Fronto-parietal brain networks have been demonstrated to play an important role in supporting spatial attentional orienting, although there is no consensus on whether there is a single attentional system supporting both endogenous and exogenous attention, or two anatomical and functionally different attentional systems. In the present paper we review behavioral evidence emphasizing the differential characteristics of both systems, as well as their possible interactions for the control of the final orienting response. Behavioral studies reporting qualitative differences between the effects of both systems as well as double dissociations of the effects of endogenous and exogenous attention on information processing, suggest that they constitute two independent attentional systems, rather than a single one. Recent models of attentional orienting in humans have put forward the hypothesis of a dorsal fronto-parietal network for orienting spatial attention, and a more ventral fronto-parietal network for detecting unexpected but behaviorally relevant events. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques, as well as neuropsychological data, suggest that endogenous and exogenous attention are implemented in overlapping, although partially segregated, brain circuits. Although more research is needed in order to refine our anatomical and functional knowledge of the brain circuits underlying spatial attention, we conclude that endogenous and exogenous spatial orienting constitute two independent attentional systems, with

  20. An endogenous model of the credit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianmin; Sui, Xin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an endogenous credit network model of firm-bank agents is constructed. The model describes the endogenous formation of firm-firm, firm-bank and bank-bank credit relationships. By means of simulations, the model is capable of showing some obvious similarities with empirical evidence found by other scholars: the upper-tail of firm size distribution can be well fitted with a power-law; the bank size distribution can be lognormally distributed with a power-law tail; the bank in-degrees of the interbank credit network as well as the firm-bank credit network fall into two-power-law distributions.

  1. Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yoon; Lim, Hyungsik; Yoon, Young J; Follenzi, Antonia; Nwokafor, Chiso; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Meng, Xiuhua; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The transcription and transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) are critical steps in regulating the spatial and temporal components of gene expression, but it has not been possible to observe the dynamics of endogenous mRNA in primary mammalian tissues. We have developed a transgenic mouse in which all β-actin mRNA is fluorescently labeled. We found that β-actin mRNA in primary fibroblasts localizes predominantly by diffusion and trapping as single mRNAs. In cultured neurons and acute brain slices, we found that multiple β-actin mRNAs can assemble together, travel by active transport, and disassemble upon depolarization by potassium chloride. Imaging of brain slices revealed immediate early induction of β-actin transcription after depolarization. Studying endogenous mRNA in live mouse tissues provides insight into its dynamic regulation within the context of the cellular and tissue microenvironment.

  2. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  3. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  4. [Prediction by means of endogenous and exogenous evoked potentials of the favorable evolution of a prolonged coma].

    PubMed

    Michel, C; Denison, S; Minne, C; Guérit, J M

    1998-09-01

    A neurophysiological follow-up (EEG, exogenous and endogenous evoked potentials--EP) was performed over a 4-month period in a patient who presented a long-lasting coma following a cardiac arrest and an amniotic embolism. A pure anoxic aetiology was ruled out starting from the second day on the basis of a dissociation between mildly altered flash visual EP and markedly altered somatosensory EP, indicating focal brain-stem pathology. Endogenous EP reappeared after 12 days. This patient recovered consciousness after 51 days. Despite the absence of MRI abnormalities, we put forward the hypothesis that a brain-stem embolism had, in fact, worsened the clinical picture of an actually moderate anoxia. This case exemplifies the interest of an integrated neurophysiological approach (EEG, exogenous three-modality EP and endogenous EP) in the early evaluation of coma. It also illustrates the complement between structural imaging and functional assessment of the nervous system.

  5. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  6. Pharmacological Potential of the Endogenous Dipeptide Kyotorphin and Selected Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Juliana; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Sá Santos, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    The endogenous peptide kyotorphin (KTP) has been extensively studied since it was discovered in 1979. The dipeptide is distributed unevenly over the brain but the majority is concentrated in the cerebral cortex. The putative KTP receptor has not been identified yet. As many other neuropeptides, KTP clearance is mediated by extracellular peptidases and peptide transporters. From the wide spectrum of biological activity of KTP, analgesia was by far the most studied. The mechanism of action is still unclear, but researchers agree that KTP induces Met-enkephalins release. More recently, KTP was proposed as biomarker of Alzheimer disease. Despite all that, KTP limited pharmacological value prompted researchers to develop derivatives more lipophilic and therefore more prone to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and also more resistant to enzymatic degradation. Conjugation of KTP with functional molecules, such as ibuprofen, generated a new class of compounds with additional biological properties. Moreover, the safety profile of these derivatives compared to opioids and their efficacy as neuroprotective agents greatly increases their pharmacological value. PMID:28127286

  7. Protective conditioning of the brain: expressway or roadblock?

    PubMed Central

    Mergenthaler, Philipp; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brain responds to noxious stimulation with protective signalling. Over the last decades, a number of experimental strategies have been established to study endogenous brain protection. Pre-, per-, post- and remote ‘conditioning’ are now widely used to unravel the underlying mechanisms of endogenous neuroprotection. Some of these strategies are currently being tested in clinical trials to protect the human brain against anticipated damage or to boost protective responses during or after injury. Here we summarize the principles of ‘conditioning’ research and current efforts to translate this knowledge into effective treatment of patients. Conditioning to induce protected brain states provides an experimental window into endogenous brain protection and can lead to the discovery of drugs mimicking the effects of conditioning. Mechanisms of endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through a wide variety of stimuli that signal ‘danger’ to the brain. These danger signals lead to the induction of regulator and effector mechanisms, which suppress death and induce survival pathways, decrease metabolism, as well as increase substrate delivery. We conclude that preclinical research on endogenous brain protection has greatly benefited from conditioning strategies, but that clinical applications are challenging, and that we should not prematurely rush into ill-designed and underpowered clinical trials. PMID:21708907

  8. The Cannabinoid Acids, Analogs and Endogenous Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid acids are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds some of which are endogenous molecules and others that are metabolites of phytocannabinoids. The prototypic endogenous substance is N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAgly) that is closely related in structure to the cannabinoid agonist anandamide. The most studied phytocannabinoid is Δ9–THC-11-oic acid, the principal metabolite of Δ9–THC. Both types of acids have in common several biological actions such as low affinity for CB1, anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic properties. This suggests that there may be similarities in their mechanism of action, a point that is discussed in this review. Also presented are reports on analogs of the acids that provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic agents, such as ajulemic acid. PMID:24731541

  9. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  10. Endogenous gas gangrene after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zelić, M; Kunisek, L; Mendrila, D; Gudelj, M; Abram, M; Uravić, M

    2011-01-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall is rare, and it is usually associated with organ perforation, immunosuppression or gastrointestinal malignancies. In this paper we present a case of fulminant, endogenous gas gangrene in a 58-year old diabetic female with arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis, following uneventful laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She developed gas gangrene of the abdominal wall 12-hours after cholecystectomy and died 24-hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in spite of treatment.

  11. Endogenous cerebellar neurogenesis in adult mice with progressive ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Srivastava, Rupali; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplanting exogenous neuronal progenitors to replace damaged neurons in the adult brain following injury or neurodegenerative disorders and achieve functional amelioration is a realistic goal. However, studies so far have rarely taken into consideration the preexisting inflammation triggered by the disease process that could hamper the effectiveness of transplanted cells. Here, we examined the fate and long-term consequences of human cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNP) transplanted into the cerebellum of Harlequin mice, an adult model of progressive cerebellar degeneration with early-onset microgliosis. Methods Human embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors expressing Atoh1, a transcription factor key to GNP specification, were generated in vitro and stereotaxically transplanted into the cerebellum of preataxic Harlequin mice. The histological and functional impact of these transplants was followed using immunolabeling and Rotarod analysis. Results Although transplanted GNPs did not survive beyond a few weeks, they triggered the proliferation of endogenous nestin-positive precursors in the leptomeninges that crossed the molecular layer and differentiated into mature neurons. These phenomena were accompanied by the preservation of the granule and Purkinje cell layers and delayed ataxic changes. In vitro neurosphere generation confirmed the enhanced neurogenic potential of the cerebellar leptomeninges of Harlequin mice transplanted with exogenous GNPs. Interpretation The cerebellar leptomeninges of adult mice contain an endogenous neurogenic niche that can be stimulated to yield mature neurons from an as-yet unidentified population of progenitors. The transplantation of human GNPs not only stimulates this neurogenesis, but, despite the potentially hostile environment, leads to neuroprotection and functional amelioration. PMID:25574472

  12. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  13. [Endogenous persistent hypoglicemia of adult: case report].

    PubMed

    Costa, Raquel R; Maia, Frederico F R; Araújo, Levimar R

    2007-02-01

    Persistent Hyperinsulinemic Endogenous hypoglycemia in adults is, in most cases, due to Insulinoma. Nesidioblastosis, a peculiar functional hyperinsulinemia from hypertrophic beta cells, has been described mainly in newborns. This article describes a 34-year-old patient who presented hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglycemia clinical and laboratorial situation (Fasting glycemia: 54 mg/dl / Reference Interval (RI): 60-99 mg/dl; Serum insulin: 70.9 mcU/ml / RI: < 29.1 mcU/ml; e C peptide: 7.1 ng/ml / RI: 1.1-5.0 ng/ml). It was suspected Insulinoma. Because of the lack of typical images in radiologic exams (ultrasonography and computerized tomography) it had been decided to do laparotomy, but it was not found any macroscopic pancreatic tumor. Histological and histochemistry examination of a distal pancreatic segment showed alteration suitable to nesidioblastosis. The patient presented clinical stability during the next two months, however, after that, there was a recurrence of a hypoglycemia crisis, refractory to Octreotide administration. It was done "octreoscan", which showed expanded nesidioblastosis, being done extensive partial pancreatectomy. Octreotide was used again, with a good control of the hypoglycemia crisis. As it is an uncommon diagnosis in an adult, the objective of this article is to describe the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects in cases of hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglicemia.

  14. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  15. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  16. Synthetic neurosteroids on brain protection

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Mariana; Coirini, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids, like allopregnanolone and pregnanolone, are endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Inside the brain, they are highly selective and potent modulators of GABAA receptor activity. Their anticonvulsant, anesthetics and anxiolytic properties are useful for the treatments of several neurological and psychiatric disorders via reducing the risks of side effects obtained with the commercial drugs. The principal disadvantages of endogenous neurosteroids administration are their rapid metabolism and their low oral bioavailability. Synthetic steroids analogues with major stability or endogenous neurosteroids stimulation synthesis might constitute promising novel strategies for the treatment of several disorders. Numerous studies indicate that the 3α-hydroxyl configuration is the key for binding and activity, but modifications in the steroid nucleus may emphasize different pharmacophores. So far, several synthetic steroids have been developed with successful neurosteroid-like effects. In this work, we summarize the properties of various synthetic steroids probed in trials throughout the analysis of several neurosteroids-like actions. PMID:25788907

  17. Measurement in vivo of dopamine receptor density I: Effect of endogenous dopamine on spiroperidol binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, O.T.; Van Moffaert, G.J.C.; Friedman, A.M.; Dinerstein, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Non-invasive localization of brain dopamine (DA) receptors has been achieved by us and others using gamma emitting derivatives of the DA antagonist spiroperidol (SP). To accurately characterize this localization, the authors have previously described an equilibrium binding model involving SP and DA for a single DA receptor. It is the purpose of this study to establish experimentally the significance of endogenous DA on the ability of SP to bind a group of DA receptors. Several mice were administered different doses of SP. To one group of mice L-dopa was given with peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, RO-4-4602, in order to elevate brain DA levels while a separate group served as control. /sup 3/H-SP binding and DA levels were measured in each brain sample. The results reflect a significant competition between DA and SP for caudate DA binding sites.

  18. Independent effects of endogenous and exogenous spatial cueing: inhibition of return at endogenously attended target locations.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez, Juan; Decaix, Caroline; Siéroff, Eric; Chokron, Sylvie; Milliken, Bruce; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is thought to reflect a bias against returning attention to previously attended locations. According to this view, IOR should occur only if attention is withdrawn from the target location prior to target appearance. In the present study, endogenous attention and exogenous cueing were manipulated orthogonally. IOR was observed both when a target appeared at an unexpected location, and when a target appeared at the expected location. A similar pattern of results was obtained in a reanalysis of data from a study with Neglect patients. These results suggest that IOR is independent of endogenous orienting.

  19. Copper and endogenous mediators of estradiol action.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1988-04-29

    Divalent copper increases by severalfold specific estradiol binding in rat uterine cytosol at 37 degrees C. Two endogenous substances have now been isolated from the cytosol one of which sharply inhibits the copper effect while the other sharply promotes it. The inhibitor is thermostable, it is adsorbed by dextran coated charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with water. The promoter is thermolabile at 60 degrees C, it is not readily adsorbed by the charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with KCl. The two substances are thought to be mediators of estradiol action.

  20. Distribution of endogenous retroviruses in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Rodríguez-Zárate, Clara J; Isberg, Sally R; Damayanti, Chandramaya Siska; Miles, Lee G; Chansue, Nantarika; Moran, Chris; Melville, Lorna; Gongora, Jaime

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in crocodilians (Crocodylia) is limited, and their distribution among extant species is unclear. Here we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of these retroelements in 20 species of crocodilians by studying the pro-pol gene. The results showed that crocodilian ERVs (CERVs) cluster into two major clades (CERV 1 and CERV 2). CERV 1 clustered as a sister group of the genus Gammaretrovirus, while CERV 2 clustered distantly with respect to all known ERVs. Interestingly, CERV 1 was found only in crocodiles (Crocodylidae). The data generated here could assist future studies aimed at identifying orthologous and paralogous ERVs among crocodilians.

  1. Diverging patterns with endogenous labor migration.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, P; Rustichini, A

    1998-05-05

    "The standard neoclassical model cannot explain persistent migration flows and lack of cross-country convergence when capital and labor are mobile. Here we present a model where both phenomena may take place.... Our model is based on the Arrow-Romer approach to endogenous growth theory. We single out the importance of a (however weak) scale effect from the size of the workforce.... The main conclusion of this simple model is that lack of convergence, or even divergence, among countries is possible, even with perfect capital mobility and labor mobility."

  2. Approaches to Assess Functional Selectivity in GPCRs: Evaluating G Protein Signaling in an Endogenous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Laura M.; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Jo-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-directed signaling, biased agonism, and functional selectivity are terms that describe the propensity of a ligand to drive signaling toward one GPCR pathway over another. Most of the early examples demonstrated to date examine the divergence between GPCR signaling to G protein coupling and βarrestin2 recruitment. As biased agonists begin to become available based on cell-based screening criteria, a need arises to determine if G protein signaling biases will be maintained in the endogenous setting, wherein receptors are functioning to control relevant biological responses. This report presents our method and offers tips for evaluating G protein signaling in endogenous tissues. Predominately, brain tissues are discussed here; optimization points that can be applied to any tissues are highlighted. PMID:26260601

  3. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  4. Optogenetic elevation of endogenous glucocorticoid level in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Rodrigo J.; Groneberg, Antonia H.; Yeh, Chen-Min; Castillo Ramírez, Luis A.; Ryu, Soojin

    2013-01-01

    The stress response is a suite of physiological and behavioral processes that help to maintain or reestablish homeostasis. Central to the stress response is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as it releases crucial hormones in response to stress. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the final effector hormones of the HPA axis, and exert a variety of actions under both basal and stress conditions. Despite their far-reaching importance for health, specific GC effects have been difficult to pin-down due to a lack of methods for selectively manipulating endogenous GC levels. Hence, in order to study stress-induced GC effects, we developed a novel optogenetic approach to selectively manipulate the rise of GCs triggered by stress. Using this approach, we could induce both transient hypercortisolic states and persistent forms of hypercortisolaemia in freely behaving larval zebrafish. Our results also established that transient hypercortisolism leads to enhanced locomotion shortly after stressor exposure. Altogether, we present a highly specific method for manipulating the gain of the stress axis with high temporal accuracy, altering endocrine and behavioral responses to stress as well as basal GC levels. Our study offers a powerful tool for the analysis of rapid (non-genomic) and delayed (genomic) GC effects on brain function and behavior, feedbacks within the stress axis and developmental programming by GCs. PMID:23653595

  5. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma.

  6. Endogenous 24S-hydroxycholesterol modulates NMDAR-mediated function in hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min-Yu; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Benz, Ann; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a major subtype of glutamate receptors mediating excitatory transmission throughout the central nervous system (CNS), play critical roles in governing brain function and cognition. Because NMDAR dysfunction contributes to the etiology of neurological and psychiatric disorders including stroke and schizophrenia, NMDAR modulators are potential drug candidates. Our group recently demonstrated that the major brain cholesterol metabolite, 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-HC), positively modulates NMDARs when exogenously administered. Here, we studied whether endogenous 24S-HC regulates NMDAR activity in hippocampal slices. In CYP46A1−/− (knockout; KO) slices where endogenous 24S-HC is greatly reduced, NMDAR tone, measured as NMDAR-to-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) ratio, was reduced. This difference translated into more NMDAR-driven spiking in wild-type (WT) slices compared with KO slices. Application of SGE-301, a 24S-HC analog, had comparable potentiating effects on NMDAR EPSCs in both WT and KO slices, suggesting that endogenous 24S-HC does not saturate its NMDAR modulatory site in ex vivo slices. KO slices did not differ from WT slices in either spontaneous neurotransmission or in neuronal intrinsic excitability, and exhibited LTP indistinguishable from WT slices. However, KO slices exhibited higher resistance to persistent NMDAR-dependent depression of synaptic transmission induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an effect restored by SGE-301. Together, our results suggest that loss of positive NMDAR tone does not elicit compensatory changes in excitability or transmission, but it protects transmission against NMDAR-mediated dysfunction. We expect that manipulating this endogenous NMDAR modulator may offer new treatment strategies for neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:26745248

  7. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  8. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid, inhibits Shaker-related voltage-gated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Poling, J S; Rogawski, M A; Salem, N; Vicini, S

    1996-01-01

    Anandamide has been identified in porcine brain as an endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand and is believed to be a counterpart to the psychoactive component of marijuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). Here we report that anandamide directly inhibits (IC50, 2.7 muM) Shaker-related Kv1.2 K+ channels that are found ubiquitously in the mammalian brain. Delta 9-THC also inhibited Kv1.2 channels with comparable potency (IC50, 2.4 muM), as did several N-acyl-ethanolamides with cannabinoid receptor binding activity. Potassium current inhibition occurred through a pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism and was not prevented by the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A. Utilizing excised patches of Kv1.2 channel-rich membrane as a rapid and sensitive bioassay, we found that phospholipase D stimulated the release of an endogenous anandamide-like K+ channel blocker from rat brain slices. Structure-activity studies were consistent with the possibility that the released blocker was either anandamide or another N-acyl-ethanolamide.

  9. Endogenous kynurenate controls the vulnerability of striatal neurons to quinolinate: Implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sapko, Michael T; Guidetti, Paolo; Yu, Ping; Tagle, Danilo A; Pellicciari, Roberto; Schwarcz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Excessive activation of NMDA receptors results in excitotoxic nerve cell loss, which is believed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD) and several other catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases. Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite, has neuroprotective properties and may serve as an endogenous anti-excitotoxic agent. This hypothesis was tested in the striatum, using mice with a targeted deletion of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), a major biosynthetic enzyme of KYNA in the mammalian brain. On post-natal day (PND) 14, the striatum of mkat-2-/- mice showed a reduction in KYNA levels but contained normal concentrations of the metabolically related neurotoxins 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid (QUIN). Intrastriatal injections of QUIN, a NMDA receptor agonist, caused significantly larger lesions in these immature mutant mice than in age-matched wild-type animals. This lesion enlargement was not observed when mkat-2-/- mice were acutely pre-treated with the kynurenine 3-hydroxylase inhibitor UPF 648, which counteracted the striatal KYNA deficit. Moreover, no increased vulnerability to QUIN was observed in 2-month-old mkat-2-/- mice, which present with normal brain KYNA levels. Intrastriatal injections of the non-NMDA receptor agonist kainate caused similar lesion sizes in both genotypes regardless of age. These results indicate that endogenous KYNA preferentially controls the vulnerability of striatal neurons to QUIN. Our data suggest that timely pharmacological interventions resulting in an up-regulation of brain KYNA levels may benefit patients suffering from HD or other neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to investigate endogenous peptides in an animal model of Usher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Dickhut, Clarissa; Mielke, Svenja; Krüger, Jonas; Just, Ingo; Glage, Silke; Meier, Martin; Wedekind, Dirk; Pich, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Imaging MS (MSI) has emerged as a valuable tool to study the spatial distribution of biomolecules in the brain. Herein, MALDI-MSI was used to determine the distribution of endogenous peptides in a rat model of Usher's disease. This rare disease is considered as a leading cause of deaf-blindness in humans worldwide. Cryosections of brain tissue were analyzed by MALDI-MSI to differentiate between healthy and diseased rats. MSI results were highly reproducible. Tissue-specific peptides were identified by MS/MS using LC-Orbitrap and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses. These peptides were proposed for histological classification due to their particular spatial distribution in the brain, for example, substantia nigra, corpus callosum, and hippocampus. Several endogenous peptides showed significantly increased ion densities, particularly in the colliculi superiores and in the substantia nigra of diseased rats, including peptides derived from Fsd1, dystrobrevin-β, and ProSAAS. Furthermore, several proteolytic degradation products of the myelin basic protein were identified, of which one peptide is most likely mediated by calpain-2. Our findings contribute to the characterization of this animal model and include possible peptide markers of disease.

  11. Adult neurogenesis and its role in neuropsychiatric disease, brain repair and normal brain function.

    PubMed

    Braun, S M G; Jessberger, S

    2014-02-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the mammalian brain retain the ability to generate new neurones throughout life in discrete brain regions, through a process called adult neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis, a dramatic form of adult brain circuitry plasticity, has been implicated in physiological brain function and appears to be of pivotal importance for certain forms of learning and memory. In addition, failing or altered neurogenesis has been associated with a variety of brain diseases such as major depression, epilepsy and age-related cognitive decline. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the basic biology underlying the neurogenic process in the adult brain, focusing on mechanisms that regulate quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of NSPCs. In addition, we discuss how neurogenesis influences normal brain function, and in particular its role in memory formation, as well as its contribution to neuropsychiatric diseases. Finally, we evaluate the potential of targeting endogenous NSPCs for brain repair.

  12. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  13. Involvement of Endogenous Retroviruses in Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    For millions of years, vertebrates have been continuously exposed to infection by retroviruses. Ancient retroviral infection of germline cells resulted in the formation and accumulation of inherited retrovirus sequences in host genomes. These inherited retroviruses are referred to as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), and recent estimates have revealed that a significant portion of animal genomes is made up of ERVs. Although various host factors have suppressed ERV activation, both positive and negative functions have been reported for some ERVs in normal and abnormal physiological conditions, such as in disease states. Similar to other complex diseases, ERV activation has been observed in prion diseases, and this review will discuss the potential involvement of ERVs in prion diseases. PMID:25437206

  14. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  15. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  16. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tang, W Joyce; Fernandez, Javier G; Sohn, Joel J; Amemiya, Chris T

    2015-03-30

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi and is an important structural molecule [1, 2]. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin; however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology.

  17. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  18. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  19. Dynamic option pricing with endogenous stochastic arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Mauricio; Montalva, Rodrigo; Pellicer, Rely; Villena, Marcelo

    2010-09-01

    Only few efforts have been made in order to relax one of the key assumptions of the Black-Scholes model: the no-arbitrage assumption. This is despite the fact that arbitrage processes usually exist in the real world, even though they tend to be short-lived. The purpose of this paper is to develop an option pricing model with endogenous stochastic arbitrage, capable of modelling in a general fashion any future and underlying asset that deviate itself from its market equilibrium. Thus, this investigation calibrates empirically the arbitrage on the futures on the S&P 500 index using transaction data from September 1997 to June 2009, from here a specific type of arbitrage called “arbitrage bubble”, based on a t-step function, is identified and hence used in our model. The theoretical results obtained for Binary and European call options, for this kind of arbitrage, show that an investment strategy that takes advantage of the identified arbitrage possibility can be defined, whenever it is possible to anticipate in relative terms the amplitude and timespan of the process. Finally, the new trajectory of the stock price is analytically estimated for a specific case of arbitrage and some numerical illustrations are developed. We find that the consequences of a finite and small endogenous arbitrage not only change the trajectory of the asset price during the period when it started, but also after the arbitrage bubble has already gone. In this context, our model will allow us to calibrate the B-S model to that new trajectory even when the arbitrage already started.

  20. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  1. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  2. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  3. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  4. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  5. When the endogenous hallucinogenic trace amine N,N-dimethyltryptamine meets the sigma-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsung-Ping; Hayashi, Teruo; Vaupel, D Bruce

    2009-03-10

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a hallucinogen found endogenously in human brain that is commonly recognized to target the 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor or the trace amine-associated receptor to exert its psychedelic effect. DMT has been recently shown to bind sigma-1 receptors, which are ligand-regulated molecular chaperones whose function includes inhibiting various voltage-sensitive ion channels. Thus, it is possible that the psychedelic action of DMT might be mediated in part through sigma-1 receptors. Here, we present a hypothetical signaling scheme that might be triggered by the binding of DMT to sigma-1 receptors.

  6. Endogenous Nocardial Endophthalmitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient: A Serious Warning of an Underlying Life Threatening and Blinding Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Hemant; Kaushik, Jaya; Jain, Vaibhav Kumar; Parihar, Jitendra Kumar Singh; Avasthi, Abhijit

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of bilateral endogenous nocardial endophthalmitis with central nervous system involvement in an immunocompromised individual with an extremely poor outcome. Case Report: A 35-year-old man with a history of long-term, prescribed oral steroid use for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis presented with profound bilateral vision loss. Patient's diagnosis of bilateral endogenous nocardial endophthalmitis was delayed. Nocardia was finally isolated from a brain biopsy after a repeat magnetic resonance imaging revealed a brain abscess. With anti-nocardia therapy, patient improved systemically, but the visual outcome was poor, with no light perception in both eyes. Conclusion: Ocular nocardiosis is a serious vision and life threatening disorder, particularly in patients on immunosuppressive therapy. A high index of suspicion is required for successful treatment. PMID:28299015

  7. Characterization of the endogenous GIT1-betaPIX complex, and identification of its association to membranes.

    PubMed

    Botrugno, Oronza A; Paris, Simona; Za, Lorena; Gualdoni, Sara; Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela; de Curtis, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase interactors (GITs) are adaptor proteins with ADP-ribosylating factor--GTPase-activating protein (ARF-GAP) activity that form complexes with the p21-activated kinase-interacting exchange factor (PIX) guanine nucleotide exchanging factors for Rac and Cdc42. In this study we have characterized the endogenous GIT1/p95-APP1/Cat1 (GIT1)- PIX complexes in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In COS7 cells, immunocytochemical analysis shows the localization of endogenous GIT1 in the perinuclear region of the cell, as well as at the cell periphery, where GIT1 co-localizes with filamentous actin. The perinuclear localization of endogenous GIT1 was confirmed in avian fibroblasts. In COS7 cells, immunoprecipitation and microsequencing experiments with either anti-GIT1 or anti-betaPIX antibodies unequivocally show that betaPIX is uniquely associated with GIT1 in lysates from these cells, while GIT2/PKL/p95-APP2/Cat2 (GIT2) is undetectable in the endogenous complexes. Moreover, this analysis demonstrates that betaPIX is the limiting factor for the formation of the endogenous complexes, since a small fraction of GIT1 can be co-immunoprecipitated with most betaPIX from these cells. Saponin treatment of unfixed cells indicates that betaPIX-bound GIT1 is preferentially retained in the saponin-resistant fraction when compared to betaPIX-free GIT1. Moreover, analysis by tissue fractionation shows that a significant fraction of the endogenous GIT1-betaPIX complex is firmly associated to membranes from brain homogenates. Our findings show the specific localization of the complex at intracellular membranes, and indicate a correlation between the association of GIT1 to betaPIX, and the localization of the endogenous complex at membranes.

  8. Two's company, three's a crowd: can H2S be the third endogenous gaseous transmitter?

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui

    2002-11-01

    Bearing the public image of a deadly "gas of rotten eggs," hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be generated in many types of mammalian cells. Functionally, H2S has been implicated in the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation, brain development, and blood pressure regulation. By acting specifically on KATP channels, H2S can hyperpolarize cell membranes, relax smooth muscle cells, or decrease neuronal excitability. The endogenous metabolism and physiological functions of H2S position this gas well in the novel family of endogenous gaseous transmitters, termed "gasotransmitters." It is hypothesized that H2S is the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, besides nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. This positioning of H2S will open an exciting field-H2S physiology-encompassing realization of the interaction of H2S and other gasotransmitters, sulfurating modification of proteins, and the functional role of H2S in multiple systems. It may shed light on the pathogenesis of many diseases related to the abnormal metabolism of H2S.

  9. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Endogenous Neural Oscillations in Young Children: Implications for Hearing Speech In Noise

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elaine C.; Woodruff Carr, Kali; White-Schwoch, Travis; Tierney, Adam; Nicol, Trent; Kraus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Speech signals contain information in hierarchical time scales, ranging from short-duration (e.g., phonemes) to long-duration cues (e.g., syllables, prosody). A theoretical framework to understand how the brain processes this hierarchy suggests that hemispheric lateralization enables specialized tracking of acoustic cues at different time scales, with the left and right hemispheres sampling at short (25 ms; 40 Hz) and long (200 ms; 5 Hz) periods, respectively. In adults, both speech-evoked and endogenous cortical rhythms are asymmetrical: low-frequency rhythms predominate in right auditory cortex, and high-frequency rhythms in left auditory cortex. It is unknown, however, whether endogenous resting state oscillations are similarly lateralized in children. We investigated cortical oscillations in children (3–5 years; N = 65) at rest and tested our hypotheses that this temporal asymmetry is evident early in life and facilitates recognition of speech in noise. We found a systematic pattern of increasing leftward asymmetry for higher frequency oscillations; this pattern was more pronounced in children who better perceived words in noise. The observed connection between left-biased cortical oscillations in phoneme-relevant frequencies and speech-in-noise perception suggests hemispheric specialization of endogenous oscillatory activity may support speech processing in challenging listening environments, and that this infrastructure is present during early childhood. PMID:26804355

  10. Endogenous CNS expression of neurotensin and neurotensin receptors is altered during the postpartum period in outbred mice.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Terri M; Zhao, Changjiu; Whittlinger, Anna; Williams, Horecia; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neuropeptide identical in mice and humans that is produced and released in many CNS regions associated with maternal behavior. NT has been linked to aspects of maternal care and previous studies have indirectly suggested that endogenous NT signaling is altered in the postpartum period. In the present study, we directly examine whether NT and its receptors exhibit altered gene expression in maternal relative to virgin outbred mice using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) across multiple brain regions. We also examine NT protein levels using anti-NT antibodies and immunohistochemistry in specific brain regions. In the medial preoptic area (MPOA), which is critical for maternal behaviors, mRNA of NT and NT receptor 3 (Sort1) were significantly up-regulated in postpartum mice compared to virgins. NT mRNA was also elevated in postpartum females in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis dorsal. However, in the lateral septum, NT mRNA was down-regulated in postpartum females. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), Ntsr1 expression was down-regulated in postpartum females. Neurotensin receptor 2 (Ntsr2) expression was not altered in any brain region tested. In terms of protein expression, NT immunohistochemistry results indicated that NT labeling was elevated in the postpartum brain in the MPOA, lateral hypothalamus, and two subregions of PVN. Together, these findings indicate that endogenous changes occur in NT and its receptors across multiple brain regions, and these likely support the emergence of some maternal behaviors.

  11. The Historical Foundation of Learning Disabilities: A Quantitative Synthesis Assessing the Validity of Strauss and Werner's Exogenous versus Endogenous Distinction of Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Forness, Steven R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews research of A. Strauss and H. Werner on behavioral differences between exogeneous (brain injured) and endogeneous (familial-cultural) mental retardation using quantitative methods of research synthesis. Findings offer little empirical support for the presumed behavioral differences and reveal considerable overlap among the…

  12. A case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae causing bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Elvy, J; Hanspal, I; Simcock, P

    2008-11-01

    This report describes a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, an occupational zoonotic pathogen, which was successfully treated with intravenous penicillin G followed by oral linezolid. This is believed to be the first report of E rhusiopathiae causing endogenous endophthalmitis.

  13. Endogenous opioid peptides in regulation of innate immunity cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A

    2011-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides comprise a group of bioregulatory factors involved in regulation of functional activity of various physiological systems of an organism. One of most important functions of endogenous opioids is their involvement in the interaction between cells of the nervous and immune systems. Summary data on the effects of opioid peptides on regulation of functions of innate immunity cells are presented.

  14. Lunularic acid, a common endogenous growth inhibitor of liverworts.

    PubMed

    Pryce, R J

    1971-12-01

    By gas-liquid chromotography and thin layer chromatography, an endogenous growth inhibitor of Lunularia cruciata has been detected in seven other representatives of the class of liverworts. All liverworts so far examined have been found to contain lunularic acid. Evidence for the identity of the previously isolated, but unidentified, endogenous growth inhibitor of Marchantia polymorpha and lunularic acid is presented.

  15. Estimating endogenous changes in task performance from EEG

    PubMed Central

    Touryan, Jon; Apker, Gregory; Lance, Brent J.; Kerick, Scott E.; Ries, Anthony J.; McDowell, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Brain wave activity is known to correlate with decrements in behavioral performance as individuals enter states of fatigue, boredom, or low alertness.Many BCI technologies are adversely affected by these changes in user state, limiting their application and constraining their use to relatively short temporal epochs where behavioral performance is likely to be stable. Incorporating a passive BCI that detects when the user is performing poorly at a primary task, and adapts accordingly may prove to increase overall user performance. Here, we explore the potential for extending an established method to generate continuous estimates of behavioral performance from ongoing neural activity; evaluating the extended method by applying it to the original task domain, simulated driving; and generalizing the method by applying it to a BCI-relevant perceptual discrimination task. Specifically, we used EEG log power spectra and sequential forward floating selection (SFFS) to estimate endogenous changes in behavior in both a simulated driving task and a perceptual discrimination task. For the driving task the average correlation coefficient between the actual and estimated lane deviation was 0.37 ± 0.22 (μ ± σ). For the perceptual discrimination task we generated estimates of accuracy, reaction time, and button press duration for each participant. The correlation coefficients between the actual and estimated behavior were similar for these three metrics (accuracy = 0.25 ± 0.37, reaction time = 0.33 ± 0.23, button press duration = 0.36 ± 0.30). These findings illustrate the potential for modeling time-on-task decrements in performance from concurrent measures of neural activity. PMID:24994968

  16. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α Promotes Endogenous Adaptive Response in Rat Model of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ju, Jieyang; Deng, Min; Wang, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Li; Zhang, Junjian

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a pivotal regulator of gene expression in response to hypoxia and ischemia, is now considered to regulate both pro-survival and pro-death responses depending on the duration and severity of the stress. We previously showed that chronic global cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) triggered long-lasting accumulation of HIF-1α protein in the hippocampus of rats. However, the role of the stabilized HIF-1α in CCH is obscure. Here, we knock down endogenous HIF-1α to determine whether and how HIF-1α affects the disease processes and phenotypes of CCH. Lentivirus expressing HIF-1α small hairpin RNA was injected into the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ventricles to knock down HIF-1α gene expression in the hippocampus and other brain areas. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusions, known as 2-vessel occlusions (2VOs), were used to induce CCH in rats. Angiogenesis, oxidative stress, histopathological changes of the brain, and cognitive function were tested. Knockdown of HIF-1α prior to 2VO significantly exacerbates the impairment of learning and memory after four weeks of CCH. Mechanically, reduced cerebral angiogenesis, increased oxidative damage, and increased density of astrocytes and microglia in the cortex and some subregions of hippocampus are also shown after four weeks of CCH. Furthermore, HIF-1α knockdown also disrupts upregulation of regulated downstream genes. Our findings suggest that HIF-1α-protects the brain from oxidative stress and inflammation response in the disease process of CCH. Accumulated HIF-1α during CCH mediates endogenous adaptive processes to defend against more severe hypoperfusion injury of the brain, which may provide a therapeutic benefit. PMID:28106731

  17. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  18. Stem Cell Stimulation of Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Brian R.; Canty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodeling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted during the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone marrow- and peripheral blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the preclinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair, and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischemic heart disease patients. PMID:23577634

  19. Stem cell stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration.

    PubMed

    Weil, Brian R; Canty, John M

    2013-08-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodelling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted over the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone-marrow- and peripheral-blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischaemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the pre-clinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  20. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  1. Endogenous prion protein attenuates experimentally induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary R; Keenan, Catherine M; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2011-11-01

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is expressed in the enteric nervous system and lamina propria, its function(s) in the gut is unknown. Because PrP(C) may exert a cytoprotective effect in response to various physiologic stressors, we hypothesized that PrP(C) expression levels might modulate the severity of experimental colitis. We evaluated the course of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in hemizygous Tga20 transgenic mice (approximately sevenfold overexpression of PrP(C)), Prnp(-/-) mice, and wild-type mice. On day 7, colon length, disease severity, and histologic activity indices were determined. Unlike DSS-treated wild-type and Prnp(-/-) animals, PrP(C) overexpressing mice were resistant to colitis induction, exhibited much milder histopathologic features, and did not exhibit weight loss or colonic shortening. In keeping with these results, pro-survival molecule expression and/or phosphorylation levels were elevated in DSS-treated Tga20 mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine production and pSTAT3 levels were reduced. In contrast, DSS-treated Prnp(-/-) mice exhibited increased BAD protein expression and a cytokine expression profile predicted to favor inflammation and differentiation. PrP(C) expression from both the endogenous Prnp locus or the Tga20 transgene was increased in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Considered together, these findings demonstrate that PrP(C) has a previously unrecognized cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory function within the murine colon.

  2. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C.; Meik, J. M.; Dashevsky, D.; Card, D. C.; Castoe, T. A.; Schaack, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. PMID:25080342

  3. Identification of receptors for pig endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Thomas A; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Templin, Christian; Quinn, Gary; Farhadian, Shelli F; Wood, James C; Oldmixon, Beth A; Suling, Kristen M; Ishii, Jennifer K; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Salomon, Daniel R; Weiss, Robin A; Patience, Clive

    2003-05-27

    Xenotransplantation of porcine tissues has the potential to treat a wide variety of major health problems including organ failure and diabetes. Balanced against the potential benefits of xenotransplantation, however, is the risk of human infection with a porcine microorganism. In particular, the transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is a major concern [Chapman, L. E. & Bloom, E. T. (2001) J. Am. Med. Assoc. 285, 2304-2306]. Here we report the identification of two, sequence-related, human proteins that act as receptors for PERV-A, encoded by genes located on chromosomes 8 and 17. We also describe homologs from baboon and porcine cells that also are active as receptors. Conversely, activity could not be demonstrated with a syntenic murine receptor homolog. Sequence analysis indicates that PERV-A receptors [human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR)-1, HuPAR-2, baboon PERV-A receptor 2, and porcine PERV-A receptor] are multiple membrane-spanning proteins similar to receptors for other gammaretroviruses. Expression is widespread in human tissues including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but their biological functions are unknown. The identification of the PERV-A receptors opens avenues of research necessary for a more complete assessment of the retroviral risks of pig to human xenotransplantation.

  4. Role of endogenous thiols in protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, O.

    Aminothiols represent the most important group of radioprotective compounds. The most effective compounds administered at an optimal dose and time before irradiation are able to provide a protection in mice with a dose reduction factor (DRF) of about 2-2.5. The working mechanism can partly be explained as a scavenging process of radicals induced in water and partly as a chemical repair process of injured DNA. The endogenous aminothiol which has far-out the highest intracellular concentration is glutathione (GSH). The importance of intracellular GSH in determining cellular radiosensitivity has been shown by irradiating cells that had very low GSH levels. Such cells appear to have a high radiosensitivity, especially in hypoxic conditions. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that induction of a high GSH level (100-200% above the normal level) provides only a small protection. In vitro experiments with DNA indicate that thiols with a high positive charge condense in the vicinity of DNA and are effective protectors, whereas thiols with a negative charge are kep away from it and are poor protectors. In comparison with the most effective exogenous aminothiols like cysteamine and WR1065, GSH is not an effective radioprotector. Putative explanations for this relatively poor protective ability of GSH are presented.

  5. Endogenic modification of impact craters on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of internally modified impact craters on Mercury's surface may be used to evaluate the possibility of Mercurian volcanism. Such craters are similar to the floor-fractured and mare-filled craters observed on the moon. Mariner-10 images show that most such craters occur, as on the moon, near plains-filled basins. Color-ratio images have indicated that some Mercurian craters manifest red plains materials on their floors. These features may be associated with lava analogous to mare basalts in some lunar craters, or with compositionally distinct subsurface material preserved within the impact crater. Several basins manifest photometric contrasts between basin exteriors and basin-filling plains. Dark haloes are observed around some impact craters superimposed on the interior plains. This suggests the excavation of compositionally distinct material. Some possible endogenic features are discerned, despite the poor surface resolution, such as irregular rimless depressions. It is felt that volcanism may have occurred on Mercury, and that in some areas it may be similar to that of the lunar Mare Australe region.

  6. Endogenous ethanol--its metabolic, behavioral and biomedical significance.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky YuM

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is constantly formed endogenously from acetaldehyde, and level of the former can be measured in both human beings and animals. Acetaldehyde can be generated in situ from the metabolism of pyruvate, threonine, deoxyribose-5-phosphate, phosphoethanolamine, alanine and presumably from other substrates. The levels of blood and tissue endogenous ethanol change as a function of various physiologic and experimental conditions such as starvation, aging, stress, cooling, adrenalectomy, etc. and are regulated by many exogenous compounds such as antimetabolites, derivatives of amino acids, lithium salts, disulfiram, cyanamide, etc. Under free choice alcohol selection situations, the levels of endogenous ethanol in rat blood and alcohol preference by the animals are negatively correlated. Similar negative correlations have been found between the levels of blood endogenous ethanol and the frequency of delirium in alcoholic patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal. Endogenous ethanol and acetaldehyde can therefore be regarded as compounds which fulfil substrate, regulatory and modulator functions.

  7. Endogenous Electric Fields May Guide Neocortical Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Local field potentials and the underlying endogenous electric fields (EFs) are traditionally considered to be epiphenomena of structured neuronal network activity. Recently, however, externally applied EFs have been shown to modulate pharmacologically evoked network activity in rodent hippocampus. In contrast, very little is known about the role of endogenous EFs during physiological activity states in neocortex. Here we used the neocortical slow oscillation in vitro as a model system to show that weak sinusoidal and naturalistic EFs enhance and entrain physiological neocortical network activity with an amplitude threshold within the range of in vivo endogenous field strengths. Modulation of network activity by positive and negative feedback fields based on the network activity in real-time provide direct evidence for a feedback loop between neuronal activity and endogenous EF. This significant susceptibility of active networks to EFs that only cause small changes in membrane potential in individual neurons suggests that endogenous EFs could guide neocortical network activity. PMID:20624597

  8. Neurabin scaffolding of adenosine receptor and RGS4 regulates anti-seizure effect of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Yin; Cottingham, Christopher; McMahon, Lori; Jiao, Kai; Greengard, Paul; Wang, Qin

    2012-02-22

    Endogenous adenosine is an essential protective agent against neural damage by various insults to the brain. However, the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor-directed ligands for neuroprotection is offset by side effects in peripheral tissues and organs. An increase in adenosine receptor responsiveness to endogenous adenosine would enhance neuroprotection while avoiding the confounding effects of exogenous ligands. Here we report novel regulation of adenosine-evoked responses by a neural tissue-specific protein, neurabin. Neurabin attenuated adenosine A(1) receptor (A1R) signaling by assembling a complex between the A1R and the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4), a protein known to turn off G-protein signaling. Inactivation of the neurabin gene enhanced A1R signaling and promoted the protective effect of adenosine against excitotoxic seizure and neuronal death in mice. Furthermore, administration of a small molecule inhibitor of RGS4 significantly attenuated seizure severity in mice. Notably, the dose of kainate capable of inducing an ∼50% rate of death in wild-type (WT) mice did not affect neurabin-null mice or WT mice cotreated with an RGS4 inhibitor. The enhanced anti-seizure and neuroprotective effect achieved by disruption of the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex is elicited by the on-site and on-demand release of endogenous adenosine, and does not require administration of A1R ligands. These data identify neurabin-RGS4 as a novel tissue-selective regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning adenosine receptor function in the nervous system. Moreover, these findings implicate the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex as a valid therapeutic target for specifically manipulating the neuroprotective effects of endogenous adenosine.

  9. Mindfulness-Meditation-Based Pain Relief Is Not Mediated by Endogenous Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Adler-Neal, Adrienne L.; Wells, Rebecca E.; Stagnaro, Emily; May, Lisa M.; Eisenach, James C.; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation, a cognitive practice premised on sustaining nonjudgmental awareness of arising sensory events, reliably attenuates pain. Mindfulness meditation activates multiple brain regions that contain a high expression of opioid receptors. However, it is unknown whether mindfulness-meditation-based analgesia is mediated by endogenous opioids. The present double-blind, randomized study examined behavioral pain responses in healthy human volunteers during mindfulness meditation and a nonmanipulation control condition in response to noxious heat and intravenous administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (0.15 mg/kg bolus + 0.1 mg/kg/h infusion) or saline placebo. Meditation during saline infusion significantly reduced pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to the control + saline group. However, naloxone infusion failed to reverse meditation-induced analgesia. There were no significant differences in pain intensity or pain unpleasantness reductions between the meditation + naloxone and the meditation + saline groups. Furthermore, mindfulness meditation during naloxone produced significantly greater reductions in pain intensity and unpleasantness than the control groups. These findings demonstrate that mindfulness meditation does not rely on endogenous opioidergic mechanisms to reduce pain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Endogenous opioids have been repeatedly shown to be involved in the cognitive inhibition of pain. Mindfulness meditation, a practice premised on directing nonjudgmental attention to arising sensory events, reduces pain by engaging mechanisms supporting the cognitive control of pain. However, it remains unknown if mindfulness-meditation-based analgesia is mediated by opioids, an important consideration for using meditation to treat chronic pain. To address this question, the present study examined pain reports during meditation in response to noxious heat and administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone and placebo saline

  10. Safety and Efficacy Evaluation of Carnosine, An Endogenous Neuroprotective Agent for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Serfozo, Kelsey; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Ki Yong; Dorrance, Anne; Rumbeiha, Wilson; Fitzgerald, Scott D.; Farooq, Muhammad U; Naravelta, Bharath; Bhatt, Archit; Majid, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose An urgent need exists to develop therapies for stroke which have high efficacy, long therapeutic time windows and acceptable toxicity. We undertook preclinical investigations of a novel therapeutic approach involving supplementation with carnosine, an endogenous pleiotropic dipeptide. Methods Efficacy and safety of carnosine treatment was evaluated in rat models of permanent or transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Mechanistic studies used primary neuronal/astrocytic cultures and ex vivo brain homogenates. Results Intravenous treatment with carnosine exhibited robust cerebroprotection in a dose-dependent manner, with long clinically-relevant therapeutic time windows of 6 h and 9 h in transient and permanent models, respectively. Histological outcomes and functional improvements including motor and sensory deficits were sustained at 14 d post-stroke onset. In safety and tolerability assessments, carnosine did not exhibit any evidence of adverse effects or toxicity. Moreover, histological evaluation of organs, complete blood count, coagulation tests and the serum chemistry did not reveal any abnormalities. In primary neuronal cell cultures and ex vivo brain homogenates, carnosine exhibited robust anti-excitotoxic, antioxidant, and mitochondria protecting activity. Conclusion In both permanent and transient ischemic models, carnosine treatment exhibited significant cerebroprotection against histological and functional damage, with wide therapeutic and clinically relevant time windows. Carnosine was well tolerated and exhibited no toxicity. Mechanistic data show that it influences multiple deleterious processes. Taken together, our data suggest that this endogenous pleiotropic dipeptide is a strong candidate for further development as a stroke treatment. PMID:23250994

  11. Reduction of brain kynurenic acid improves cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Rouba; Campbell, Brian M; Strick, Christine A; Horner, Weldon; Hoffmann, William E; Kiss, Tamas; Chapin, Douglas S; McGinnis, Dina; Abbott, Amanda L; Roberts, Brooke M; Fonseca, Kari; Guanowsky, Victor; Young, Damon A; Seymour, Patricia A; Dounay, Amy; Hajos, Mihaly; Williams, Graham V; Castner, Stacy A

    2014-08-06

    The elevation of kynurenic acid (KYNA) observed in schizophrenic patients may contribute to core symptoms arising from glutamate hypofunction, including cognitive impairments. Although increased KYNA levels reduce excitatory neurotransmission, KYNA has been proposed to act as an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and as a negative allosteric modulator at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Levels of KYNA are elevated in CSF and the postmortem brain of schizophrenia patients, and these elevated levels of KYNA could contribute to NMDAR hypofunction and the cognitive deficits and negative symptoms associated with this disease. However, the impact of endogenously produced KYNA on brain function and behavior is less well understood due to a paucity of pharmacological tools. To address this issue, we identified PF-04859989, a brain-penetrable inhibitor of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the enzyme responsible for most brain KYNA synthesis. In rats, systemic administration of PF-04859989 dose-dependently reduced brain KYNA to as little as 28% of basal levels, and prevented amphetamine- and ketamine-induced disruption of auditory gating and improved performance in a sustained attention task. It also prevented ketamine-induced disruption of performance in a working memory task and a spatial memory task in rodents and nonhuman primates, respectively. Together, these findings support the hypotheses that endogenous KYNA impacts cognitive function and that inhibition of KAT II, and consequent lowering of endogenous brain KYNA levels, improves cognitive performance under conditions considered relevant for schizophrenia.

  12. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  13. Strategies for the photo-control of endogenous protein activity.

    PubMed

    Brechun, Katherine E; Arndt, Katja M; Woolley, G Andrew

    2016-11-28

    Photo-controlled or 'optogenetic' effectors interfacing with endogenous protein machinery allow the roles of endogenous proteins to be probed. There are two main approaches being used to develop optogenetic effectors: (i) caging strategies using photo-controlled conformational changes, and (ii) protein relocalization strategies using photo-controlled protein-protein interactions. Numerous specific examples of these approaches have been reported and efforts to develop general methods for photo-control of endogenous proteins are a current focus. The development of improved screening and selection methods for photo-switchable proteins would advance the field.

  14. tirant, a Newly Discovered Active Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Akkouche, Abdou; Rebollo, Rita; Burlet, Nelly; Esnault, Caroline; Martinez, Sonia; Viginier, Barbara; Terzian, Christophe; Vieira, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have the ability to become permanently integrated into the genomes of their host, and they are generally transmitted vertically from parent to progeny. With the exception of gypsy, few endogenous retroviruses have been identified in insects. In this study, we describe the tirant endogenous retrovirus in a subset of Drosophila simulans natural populations. By focusing on the envelope gene, we show that the entire retroviral cycle (transcription, translation, and retrotransposition) can be completed for tirant within one population of this species. PMID:22278247

  15. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  16. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  17. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests don't provide enough information. Screening for brain aneurysms The use of imaging tests to screen ... and occupational therapy to relearn skills. Treating unruptured brain aneurysms Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling can be ...

  18. Brain Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed the f… Series Healthy Minds: Nurturing Your Child's Development Each of these age-based handouts are based ... report from the National Academy of Sciences on child and brain development. Podcast Nurturing Brain Development From Birth to Three ...

  19. Brain Fog

    MedlinePlus

    ... friendships and relationships. • Take your body to the gym and don’t forget to visit the “BRAIN SPA” – both will improve brain function. • Recent scientific data show that longevity ...

  20. Brain Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  1. Endogenous Polysialic Acid Based Micelles for Calmodulin Antagonist Delivery against Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gao, Yin-Ping; Lu, Nan-Nan; Li, Wei-Shuo; Xu, Ji-Fang; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Wu, Gang; Liao, Mei-Hua; Tan, Chao; Shao, Ling-Xiao; Lu, Ying-Mei; Zhang, Chen; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han, Feng; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2016-12-28

    Clinical treatment for vascular dementia still remains a challenge mainly due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a micelle based on polysialic acid (PSA), which is a hydrophilic and endogenous carbohydrate polymer, was designed to deliver calmodulin antagonist for therapy of vascular dementia. PSA was first chemically conjugated with octadecylamine (ODA), and the obtained PSA-ODA copolymer could self-assemble into micelle in aqueous solution with a 120.0 μg/mL critical micelle concentration. The calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle, featuring sustained drug release behavior over a period of 72 h with a 3.6% (w/w) drug content and a 107.0 ± 4.0 nm size was then fabricated. The PSA-ODA micelle could cross the BBB mainly via active endocytosis by brain endothelial cells followed by transcytosis. In a water maze test for spatial learning, calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle significantly reduced the escape latencies of right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO) mice with dosage significantly reduced versus free drug. The decrease of hippocampal phospho-CaMKII (Thr286/287) and phospho-synapsin I (Ser603) was partially restored in rUCCAO mice following calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle treatment. Consistent with the restored CaMKII phosphorylation, the elevation of BrdU/NeuN double-positive cells in the same context was also observed. Overall, the PSA-ODA micelle developed from the endogenous material might promote the development of therapeutic approaches for improving the efficacy of brain-targeted drug delivery and have great potential for vascular dementia treatment.

  2. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  3. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  4. The Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  5. Isolating Exogenous and Endogenous Modes of Temporal Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Michael A.; Klein, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The differential allocation of information processing resources over time, here termed "temporal attention," may be achieved by relatively automatic "exogenous" or controlled "endogenous" mechanisms. Over 100 years of research has confounded these theoretically distinct dimensions of temporal attention. The current…

  6. Missing piece of the puzzle in the science of consciousness: Resting state and endogenous correlates of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Havlík, Marek

    2017-03-01

    Consciousness still stands as one of the most interesting and the most elusive problems of neuroscience. Finding its correlates is the first step toward its satisfactory explanation. Several theories have proposed its correlates but none of them seem to be generally accepted even though most of them share some very similar elements. These elements are the activity of the thalamus, which is considered by some as the central region for consciousness, and gamma synchronization, which should be the general principal for the emergence of conscious experience. However, all of these proposed theories share one characteristic and that is that they do not take into consideration the recently discovered endogenous activity of the brain, which is generally associated with the default mode network. Although the activity of this large scale brain network is in correlation with various levels of consciousness it is still missing in discussions of consciousness. This review recognizes the importance of endogenous activity and points out the important discoveries of endogenous activity that could be an important step toward a satisfactory explanation of consciousness.

  7. Presence of a low molecular weight endogenous inhibitor on 3H-muscimol binding in synaptic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yukio; Kuriyama, Kinya

    1980-06-01

    The specific binding of 3H-muscimol to synaptic membrane preparations obtained from the rat brain has been thought to reflect the association of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potential candidate as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), with its synaptic receptors1,2. Treatment of synaptic membranes with Triton X-100 significantly increases the specific binding of 3H-muscimol2. Several reports also indicate the presence of endogenous substances, such as GABA3, acidic protein4 and phosphatidylethanolamine5, which inhibit Na-independent binding of 3H-GABA in the synaptic membranous fractions from the rat brain. We report here that in the supernatant obtained from Triton-treated synaptic membranes there exists a new type of endogenous inhibitor of 3H-muscimol binding which is apparently different from the inhibitory substances described previously3-5. The new inhibitor has a low molecular weight (MW) and probably originated from neurones rather than glial cells. We have termed this endogenous inhibitor the GABA receptor binding inhibitory factor (GRIF).

  8. Endomorphins: novel endogenous mu-opiate receptor agonists in regions of high mu-opiate receptor density.

    PubMed

    Zadina, J E; Martin-Schild, S; Gerall, A A; Kastin, A J; Hackler, L; Ge, L J; Zhang, X

    1999-01-01

    Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2, EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2, EM-2) are peptides recently isolated from brain that show the highest affinity and selectivity for the mu (morphine) opiate receptor of all the known endogenous opioids. The endomorphins have potent analgesic and gastrointestinal effects. At the cellular level, they activate G-proteins (35S-GTP gamma-S binding) and inhibit calcium currents. Support for their role as endogenous ligands for the mu-opiate receptor includes their localization by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry in central nervous system regions of high mu receptor density. Intense EM-2 immunoreactivity is present in the terminal regions of primary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the medulla near high densities of mu receptors. Chemical (capsaicin) and surgical (rhizotomy) disruption of nociceptive primary afferent neurons depletes the immunoreactivity, implicating the primary afferents as the source of EM-2. Thus, EM-2 is well-positioned to serve as an endogenous modulator of pain in its earliest stages of perception. In contrast to EM-2, which is more prevalent in the spinal cord and lower brainstem, EM-1 is more widely and densely distributed throughout the brain than EM-2. The distribution is consistent with a role for the peptides in the modulation of diverse functions, including autonomic, neuroendocrine, and reward functions as well as modulation of responses to pain and stress.

  9. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  10. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  11. Remarkable diversity of endogenous viruses in a crustacean genome.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa.

  12. Remarkable Diversity of Endogenous Viruses in a Crustacean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  13. The Perception and Endogenous Modulation of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Pain is often perceived an unpleasant experience that includes sensory and emotional/motivational responses. Accordingly, pain serves as a powerful teaching signal enabling an organism to avoid injury, and is critical to survival. However, maladaptive pain, such as neuropathic or idiopathic pain, serves no survival function. Genomic studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain or paroxysmal pain syndromes considerable increased our understanding of the function of peripheral nociceptors, and especially of the roles of voltage-gated sodium channels and of nerve growth factor (NGF)/TrkA receptors in nociceptive transduction and transmission. Brain imaging studies revealed a “pain matrix,” consisting of cortical and subcortical regions that respond to noxious inputs and can positively or negatively modulate pain through activation of descending pain modulatory systems. Projections from the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM) to the trigeminal and spinal dorsal horns can inhibit or promote further nociceptive inputs. The “pain matrix” can explain such varied phenomena as stress-induced analgesia, placebo effect and the role of expectation on pain perception. Disruptions in these systems may account for the existence idiopathic pan states such as fibromyalgia. Increased understanding of pain modulatory systems will lead to development of more effective therapeutics for chronic pain. PMID:24278716

  14. Consciousness, endogenous generation of goals and homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitolovsky, Lev E.

    2015-08-01

    Behaviour can be both unpredictable and goal directed, as animals act in correspondence with their motivation. Motivation arises when neurons in specific brain areas leave the state of homeostatic equilibrium and are injured. The basic goal of organisms and living cells is to maintain their life and their functional state is optimal if it does not lead to physiological damage. This can somehow be sensed by neurons and the occurrence of damage elicits homeostatic protection to recover excitability and the ability to produces spikes. It can be argued that the neuron's activity is guided on the scale of "damage-protection" and it behaves as an object possessing minimum awareness. The approach of death increases cellular efforts to operate. Thus, homeostasis may evidently produce both maintenance of life and will. The question is - how does homeostasis reach the optimum? We have no possibility of determining how the cell evaluates its own states, e.g. as "too little free energy" or in terms of "threat" to life. In any case, the approach of death increases cellular efforts to operate. For the outside observer, this is reminiscent of intentional action and a manifestation of will.

  15. Brain to music to brain!

    PubMed

    Azizi, S Ausim

    2009-07-31

    It has been implicitly understood that culture and music as collective products of human brain in turn influence the brain itself. Now, imaging and anatomical data add substance to this notion. The impact of playing piano on the brain of musicians and its possible effects on cultural and neurological evolution are briefly discussed.

  16. Tectonic conditionality endogenic geoecological processes on a shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kholmianskaia, Galina

    2014-05-01

    Influence on a sea ecosystem of deep tectonic structures and processes is considered. From the point of view of studying endogenic geoecological processes and the phenomena ensuring origin of «endogenic» ecological dangers, us the following interests, first of all: a structurally-tectonic structure, a lithologic-stratigraphic section, hydro- and lithodynamic, a hydrology, seismic activity, endogenic ingress of heavy metals, a structure cryolithozone The map of endogenic dangers to water area Barents and Karasky seas is made. In the list of the endogenic dangers which have been taken out on the map, have entered: - Areas of heavy metals endogenic origins; - Zones of hyperactivity of corrosion processes; - Zones of the raised seismological activity; - Areas active roiling at seismological influences; - Zones of negative influence on biogene communities, - Characteristics of influence of natural electric field on lithodynamic processes. The most part flooded at the bottom of technogenic objects is located within the tectonic zones characterised by raised intensity of corrosion processes. The tectonic reasons, in the big degree, cause dynamics of the deep hydro-geological processes providing receipt in hydrosphere of the sea highly mineralized waters, negatively influencing on a biogenic component of an ecosystem. The most vulnerable are the biogenic forms living in deeper sites of the sea. On the map are allocated and ranked some zones endogenic hydro-geological dangers to biogenic communities. At displays of seismological activity endogenic tectonic nature process roiling the ground deposits, menacing to normal dwelling biota, leading to death ground invertebral organisms, to sharp pauperisation of a forage reserve benthos feeder will have fishes, to sharp reduction of population nectobentofages and predators. At last, infringement of a hydrochemical mode in aggregate with endogenic receipts can strengthen aforementioned negative processes. The geoecological map of

  17. Endogenous ligands of imidazoline receptors: classic and immunoreactive clonidine-displacing substance and agmatine.

    PubMed

    Reis, D J; Li, G; Regunathan, S

    1995-07-12

    1. There are several endogenous ligands that bind to I-receptors of both the I1 and I2 subclass. These include: (a) classic CDS, a partially purified entity isolated by the criteria that it displaces binding ligands to alpha 2- and I-receptors; (b) immunoreactive (ir)-CDS, a moiety that binds to antibodies raised against clonidine, para-amino-clonidine, or idazoxan; and (c) agmatine. 2. Classic-CDS, not yet defined structurally, binds to I1, I2, and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, is neither a peptide nor a catecholamine, and has purportedly a molecular weight of 588 Da. By ligand binding assays, it was found in brain, serum, CSF, and placenta and in a neural-glial cell line. Partially purified classic CDS is bioactive. Like clonidine, it contracts aorta and vas deferens and inhibits platelet aggregation, effects largely attributable to agonism at alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. Unlike clonidine, it contracts rat gastric fundus and releases catecholamines from chromaffin cells, effects attributable to actions at I-receptors. Injected into the RVL, classic CDS alters arterial pressure, but the direction of change of pressure has differed between groups of investigators. However, in the absence of structure, it is possible that ligand binding and bioactivity may be attributable to different molecules. 3. Ir-CDS, also of unknown structure, is a material(s) that binds to antibodies raised against clonidine, PAC, or idazoxan. Ir-CDS, measured by radioimmunoassay, is unevenly distributed in brain with highest concentrations in the hypothalamus, midbrain, and dorsal medulla. It is contained in the gastric fundus, adrenal gland, heart, kidney, and serum in amounts substantially higher than found in brain. Ir-CDS may be elevated in the serum of some patients with hypertension and in the CSF of patients with structural brain disease. The concentration of ir-CDS and bioactivity on gastric fundus directly correlates, suggesting that it may share similarities with classic

  18. Reduction of Endogenous Melatonin Accelerates Cognitive Decline in Mice in a Simulated Occupational Formaldehyde Exposure Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yufei; Duan, Chunli; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Yun; Cao, Fenghua; Shang, Shuai; Ding, Shumao; Yue, Xiangpei; Gao, Ge; Yang, Hui; Shen, Luxi; Feng, Xueyan; Jia, Jianping; Tong, Zhiqian; Yang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Individuals afflicted with occupational formaldehyde (FA) exposure often suffer from abnormal behaviors such as aggression, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and in particular, cognitive impairments. Coincidentally, clinical patients with melatonin (MT) deficiency also complain of cognitive problems associated with the above mental disorders. Whether and how FA affects endogenous MT metabolism and induces cognitive decline need to be elucidated. To mimic occupational FA exposure environment, 16 healthy adult male mice were exposed to gaseous FA (3 mg/m3) for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that FA exposure impaired spatial memory associated with hippocampal neuronal death. Biochemical analysis revealed that FA exposure elicited an intensive oxidative stress by reducing systemic glutathione levels, in particular, decreasing brain MT concentrations. Inversely, intraperitoneal injection of MT markedly attenuated FA-induced hippocampal neuronal death, restored brain MT levels, and reversed memory decline. At tissue levels, injection of FA into the hippocampus distinctly reduced brain MT concentrations. Furthermore, at cellular and molecular levels, we found that FA directly inactivated MT in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that MT supplementation contributes to the rescue of cognitive decline, and may alleviate mental disorders in the occupational FA-exposed human populations. PMID:26938543

  19. Do inhalation general anesthetic drugs induce the neuronal release of endogenous opioid peptides?

    PubMed

    Quock, Raymond M; Vaughn, Linda K

    2005-10-07

    The antagonism of some effects of inhalation general anesthetic agents by naloxone suggests that there may be an opioid component to anesthetic action. There is evidence that this opioid action component is due to neuronal release of endogenous opioid peptides. The strongest evidence is provided by studies that monitor changes in the concentration of opioid peptides in the perfused brain following inhalation of the anesthetic. Indirect or circumstantial evidence also comes from studies of anesthetic effects on regional brain levels of opioid peptides, antagonism of selected anesthetic effects by antisera to opioid peptides and anesthetic-induced changes radioligand binding to opioid receptors. It is likely that some inhalation general anesthetics (e.g., nitrous oxide) can induce neuronal release of opioid peptides and that this may contribute to certain components of general anesthesia (e.g., analgesia). More definitive studies utilizing in vivo microdialysis or autoradiography in selected areas of the brain during induction and successive states of general anesthesia have yet to be conducted.

  20. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  1. Blunted Endogenous Opioid Release Following an Oral Amphetamine Challenge in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Inge; Myers, Jim; Ramos, Anna C; Stokes, Paul R A; Erritzoe, David; Colasanti, Alessandro; Gunn, Roger N; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Searle, Graham E; Waldman, Adam D; Parkin, Mark C; Brailsford, Alan D; Galduróz, José C F; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Clark, Luke; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2016-01-01

    Pathological gambling is a psychiatric disorder and the first recognized behavioral addiction, with similarities to substance use disorders but without the confounding effects of drug-related brain changes. Pathophysiology within the opioid receptor system is increasingly recognized in substance dependence, with higher mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability reported in alcohol, cocaine and opiate addiction. Impulsivity, a risk factor across the addictions, has also been found to be associated with higher MOR availability. The aim of this study was to characterize baseline MOR availability and endogenous opioid release in pathological gamblers (PG) using [11C]carfentanil PET with an oral amphetamine challenge. Fourteen PG and 15 healthy volunteers (HV) underwent two [11C]carfentanil PET scans, before and after an oral administration of 0.5 mg/kg of d-amphetamine. The change in [11C]carfentanil binding between baseline and post-amphetamine scans (ΔBPND) was assessed in 10 regions of interest (ROI). MOR availability did not differ between PG and HV groups. As seen previously, oral amphetamine challenge led to significant reductions in [11C]carfentanil BPND in 8/10 ROI in HV. PG demonstrated significant blunting of opioid release compared with HV. PG also showed blunted amphetamine-induced euphoria and alertness compared with HV. Exploratory analysis revealed that impulsivity positively correlated with caudate baseline BPND in PG only. This study provides the first evidence of blunted endogenous opioid release in PG. Our findings are consistent with growing evidence that dysregulation of endogenous opioids may have an important role in the pathophysiology of addictions. PMID:26552847

  2. Brain surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... to take these medicines. If you had a brain aneurysm , you may also have other symptoms or problems. ... chap 28. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain abscess Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Brain tumor - children Brain tumor - ...

  3. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Thomas Arn; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Guldberg Frøslev, Tobias; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J.

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads are derived. First, we showed by simulations that we can robustly infer the level of genetic diversity from short sequence reads. Second, we find that the measures of nucleotide diversity inferred from our retroviral sequences significantly exceed the level observed from Human Immunodeficiency Virus infections, prompting us to conclude that the novel retroviruses are both of endogenous origin. Through further simulations, we rule out the possibility that the observed elevated levels of nucleotide diversity are the result of co-infection with two closely related exogenous retroviruses. PMID:26493184

  4. Regulation of body temperature and neuroprotection by endogenous interleukin-6 in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Oliver; Tarabin, Victoria; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Attigah, Nicolas; Coserea, Irinel; Schneider, Armin; Vogel, Johannes; Prinz, Simone; Schwab, Stefan; Monyer, Hannah; Brombacher, Frank; Schwaninger, Markus

    2003-04-01

    Although the function of fever is still unclear, it is now beyond doubt that body temperature influences the outcome of brain damage. An elevated body temperature is often found in stroke patients and denotes a bad prognosis. However, the pathophysiologic basis and treatment options of elevated body temperature after stroke are still unknown. Cerebral ischemia rapidly induced neuronal interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in mice. In IL-6-deficient mice, body temperature was markedly decreased after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), but infarct size was comparable to that in control mice. If body temperature was controlled by external warming after MCAO, IL-6-deficient mice had a reduced survival, worse neurologic status, and larger infarcts than control animals. In cell culture, IL-6 exerted an antiapoptotic and neuroprotective effect. These data suggest that IL-6 is a key regulator of body temperature and an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia. Neuroprotective properties apparently compensate for its pyretic action after MCAO and enhance the safety of this endogenous pyrogen.

  5. The Effect of Endogenous Adenosine on Neuronal Activity in Rats: An FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Soumen; Zhang, Dali; Mzengeza, Shadreck; Ko, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 2–18F‐fluorodeoxy‐D‐glucose (FDG) is a glucose analog that is taken up by cells and phosphorylated. The amount of FDG accumulated by cells is a measure of the rate of glycolysis, which reflects cellular activity. As the levels and actions of the neuromodulator adenosine are dynamically regulated by neuronal activity, this study was designed to test whether endogenous adenosine affects tissue accumulation of FDG as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) or by postmortem analysis of tissue radioactivity. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8‐cyclopentyl‐1,3‐dipropyl‐xanthine (DPCPX, 3 mg/kg), the adenosine kinase inhibitor ABT‐702 (3 mg/kg), or vehicle 10 minutes prior to an intravenous injection of FDG (15.4 ± 0.7 MBq per rat). Rats were then subjected to a 15 minute static PET scan. Reconstructed images were normalized to FDG PET template for rats and standard uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. To examine the regional effect of active treatment compared to vehicle, statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed. Whole‐brain FDG uptake was not affected by drug treatment. Significant regional hypometabolism was detected, particularly in cerebellum, of DPCPX‐ and ABT‐702 treated rats, relative to vehicle‐treated rats. Thus, endogenous adenosine can affect FDG accumulation although this effect is modest in quiescent rats. PMID:27082948

  6. Functional roles of endogenous D-serine in pain-induced ultrasonic vocalization.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Hitomi; Maekawa, Masao; Konno, Ryuichi; Hori, Yuuichi

    2012-11-14

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is crucial for pain-related behaviors. D-Serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SR) and modulates NMDAR functions by acting as an agonist at the glycine-binding site. We analyzed noxious stimulus-induced ultrasonic vocalization and locomotor activity in the open-field test using SR knockout (SR-KO) mice to examine the role of endogenous D-serine in mammalian behaviors. SR-KO mice emitted less ultrasonic vocalization after noxious stimulation (VAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. The locomotor activity of WT mice decreased with repeated daily exposures to the open field, whereas that of SR-KO mice remained unchanged. VAS was significantly enhanced during arthritis in WT mice, whereas it was not enhanced during arthritis in SR-KO mice. These results indicate that mice lacking the ability to produce D-serine endogenously in the brain differ from normal mice with respect to the chronic pain-induced behavioral changes.

  7. D-serine, an endogenous synaptic modulator: localization to astrocytes and glutamate-stimulated release.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, M J; Molliver, M E; Snyder, S H

    1995-01-01

    Using an antibody highly specific for D-serine conjugated to glutaraldehyde, we have localized endogenous D-serine in rat brain. Highest levels of D-serine immunoreactivity occur in the gray matter of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, anterior olfactory nucleus, olfactory tubercle, and amygdala. Localizations of D-serine immunoreactivity correlate closely with those of D-serine binding to the glycine modulatory site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor as visualized by autoradiography and are inversely correlated to the presence of D-amino acid oxidase. D-Serine is enriched in process-bearing glial cells in neuropil with the morphology of protoplasmic astrocytes. In glial cultures of rat cerebral cortex, D-serine is enriched in type 2 astrocytes. The release of D-serine from these cultures is stimulated by agonists of non-NMDA glutamate receptors, suggesting a mechanism by which astrocyte-derived D-serine could modulate neurotransmission. D-Serine appears to be the endogenous ligand for the glycine site of NMDA receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7732010

  8. Taking Advantage of Nature’s Gift: Can Endogenous Neural Stem Cells Improve Myelin Regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Akkermann, Rainer; Jadasz, Janusz Joachim; Azim, Kasum; Küry, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible functional deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS) are directly correlated to axonal damage and loss. Neurodegeneration results from immune-mediated destruction of myelin sheaths and subsequent axonal demyelination. Importantly, oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cells of the central nervous system, can be replaced to some extent to generate new myelin sheaths. This endogenous regeneration capacity has so far mainly been attributed to the activation and recruitment of resident oligodendroglial precursor cells. As this self-repair process is limited and increasingly fails while MS progresses, much interest has evolved regarding the development of remyelination-promoting strategies and the presence of alternative cell types, which can also contribute to the restoration of myelin sheaths. The adult brain comprises at least two neurogenic niches harboring life-long adult neural stem cells (NSCs). An increasing number of investigations are beginning to shed light on these cells under pathological conditions and revealed a significant potential of NSCs to contribute to myelin repair activities. In this review, these emerging investigations are discussed with respect to the importance of stimulating endogenous repair mechanisms from germinal sources. Moreover, we present key findings of NSC-derived oligodendroglial progeny, including a comprehensive overview of factors and mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:27854261

  9. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  10. Effects of endogenous histamine on seizure development of pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-San; Chen, Zhong; Huang, Yu-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wei; Wei, Er-Qing; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether or not endogenous histamine can protect seizure development of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling in rats. An intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with clobenpropit (5 and 10 microg), a representative H(3)-antagonist, significantly prolonged the onset of kindling and inhibited the seizure stages in a dose-dependent manner. Its action was significantly reversed by both immepip (2 microg, i.c.v.), an H(3)-agonist, and alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 10 microg, i.c.v.), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor. alpha-FMH (20 microg, i.c.v.) and pyrilamine (1 and 5 mg/kg i.p.), a classical H(1)-antagonist, markedly augmented the severity of seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling. Therefore, these results indicate that brain endogenous histamine plays a certain protective role on seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling in rats, and that its protective roles are mediated by H(1)-receptors.

  11. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  12. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  13. Involvement of endogenous opiates in regulation of gastric emptying of fat test meals in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fioramonti, J.; Fargeas, M.J.; Bueno, L.

    1988-08-01

    The role of endogenous opioids and cholecystokinin (CCK) in gastric emptying was investigated in mice killed 30 min after gavage with /sup 51/Cr-radiolabeled liquid meals. The meals consisted of 0.5 ml of milk or one of five synthetic meals containing arabic gum, glucose and/or arachis oil and/or casein. Naloxone (0.1 mg/kg sc) significantly (P less than 0.01) accelerated gastric emptying of milk and meals containing fat but did not modify gastric emptying of nonfat meals. The CCK antagonist asperlicin (0.1 mg/kg ip) increased by 25% gastric emptying of milk. The gastric emptying of meals containing glucose and casein but not fat was reduced after administration of the COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8, 4 micrograms/kg ip). This decrease was antagonized by both asperlicin (10 mg/kg ip) and naloxone (0.1 mg/kg sc). Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of an opiate antagonist that poorly crosses the blood-brain barrier, methyl levallorphan (10 micrograms/kg), did not modify gastric emptying of milk but accelerated it when peripherally administered (0.1 mg/kg sc). Similarly, asperlicin (icv) administered at a dose of 1 mg/kg did not affect milk emptying. These results indicate that endogenous opiates are involved at peripheral levels in the regulation of gastric emptying of fat meals only and that such regulation involves release of CCK.

  14. Possible role of a dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system in antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Wedekind, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Around half the inmates in prison institutions have antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). A recent theory has proposed that a dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) underlies the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). In the present theoretical paper, based on a comprehensive database and hand search of the relevant literature, this hypothesis is extended to ASPD, which may be the predominant expression of EOS dysfunction in men, while the same pathology underlies BPD in women. According to evidence from human and animal studies, the problematic behaviours of persons with antisocial, callous, or psychopathic traits may be seen as desperate, unconscious attempts to stimulate their deficient EOS, which plays a key role in brain reward circuits. If the needs of this system are not being met, the affected persons experience dysphoric mood, discomfort, or irritability, and strive to increase binding of endogenous opioids to receptors by using the rewarding effects of aggression by exertion of physical or manipulative power on others, by abusing alcohol or substances that have the reward system as target, by creating an "endorphin rush" by self-harm, by increasing the frequency of their sexual contacts, or by impulsive actions and sensation seeking. Symptoms associated with ASPD can be treated with opioid antagonists like naltrexone, naloxone, or nalmefene.

  15. Staphylococcal endogenous endophthalmitis in association with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Steeples, L R; Jones, N P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis as a rare infection associated with endogenous endophthalmitis.METHODS A retrospective review of three patients with endogenous endophthalmitis and sepsis due to underlying Staphylococcal vertebral osteomyelitis presenting during a 21-month time period. The ophthalmic and systemic features and management and outcomes are presented.RESULTS One patient developed unilateral endophthalmitis with cervical spine osteomyelitis, Staphylococcus aureus being isolated from blood cultures. The second presented with bilateral endophthalmitis with disseminated Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection, with thoracic and lumbar discitis and para-spinal abscesses. MRSA was cultured from vitreous, blood, and synovial fluid. Both patients received prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Intravitreal antibiotic therapy was used in the second patient. Excellent visual and systemic outcomes were achieved in both cases with no ocular complications. The third patient developed lumbar osteomyelitis following spinal surgery and presented with disseminated S. aureus sepsis including unilateral endogenous endophthalmitis. Despite systemic antibiotics and intensive care the patient died.CONCLUSIONS Endogenous endophthalmitis should be suspected in septic patients developing eye symptoms. Endogenous endophthalmitis with staphylococcal bone infection is a rare but serious condition. Osteomyelitis should be considered as an infective source in any such patient reporting bone pain or reduced spinal mobility. Prompt investigation and treatment can achieve favourable visual and systemic outcomes.

  16. Endomorphins 1 and 2, endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists, impair passive avoidance learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Ukai, M; Watanabe, Y; Kameyama, T

    2001-06-08

    The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists, on passive avoidance learning associated with long-term memory were investigated in mice. Endomorphin-1 (10 and 17.5 microg) and endomorphin-2 (17.5 microg) produced a significant decrease in step-down latency in a passive avoidance learning task. beta-Funaltrexamine (5 microg) almost completely reversed the endomorphin-1 (17.5 microg)- and endomorphin-2 (17.5 microg)-induced shortening of step-down latency, although neither naltrindole (4 ng) nor nor-binaltorphimine (4 microg) produced any significant effects on the effects of endomorphins 1 and 2. These results suggest that endomorphins 1 and 2 impair long-term memory through the mediation of mu-opioid receptors in the brain.

  17. DHA Effects in Brain Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Brambilla, Paolo; Mazzocchi, Alessandra; Harsløf, Laurine B S; Ciappolino, Valentina; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-01-04

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a structural constituent of membranes specifically in the central nervous system. Its accumulation in the fetal brain takes place mainly during the last trimester of pregnancy and continues at very high rates up to the end of the second year of life. Since the endogenous formation of DHA seems to be relatively low, DHA intake may contribute to optimal conditions for brain development. We performed a narrative review on research on the associations between DHA levels and brain development and function throughout the lifespan. Data from cell and animal studies justify the indication of DHA in relation to brain function for neuronal cell growth and differentiation as well as in relation to neuronal signaling. Most data from human studies concern the contribution of DHA to optimal visual acuity development. Accumulating data indicate that DHA may have effects on the brain in infancy, and recent studies indicate that the effect of DHA may depend on gender and genotype of genes involved in the endogenous synthesis of DHA. While DHA levels may affect early development, potential effects are also increasingly recognized during childhood and adult life, suggesting a role of DHA in cognitive decline and in relation to major psychiatric disorders.

  18. DHA Effects in Brain Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Brambilla, Paolo; Mazzocchi, Alessandra; Harsløf, Laurine B. S.; Ciappolino, Valentina; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a structural constituent of membranes specifically in the central nervous system. Its accumulation in the fetal brain takes place mainly during the last trimester of pregnancy and continues at very high rates up to the end of the second year of life. Since the endogenous formation of DHA seems to be relatively low, DHA intake may contribute to optimal conditions for brain development. We performed a narrative review on research on the associations between DHA levels and brain development and function throughout the lifespan. Data from cell and animal studies justify the indication of DHA in relation to brain function for neuronal cell growth and differentiation as well as in relation to neuronal signaling. Most data from human studies concern the contribution of DHA to optimal visual acuity development. Accumulating data indicate that DHA may have effects on the brain in infancy, and recent studies indicate that the effect of DHA may depend on gender and genotype of genes involved in the endogenous synthesis of DHA. While DHA levels may affect early development, potential effects are also increasingly recognized during childhood and adult life, suggesting a role of DHA in cognitive decline and in relation to major psychiatric disorders. PMID:26742060

  19. Neurorestorative Treatments for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major cause of death and permanent disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. A total of 1.5 million people experience head trauma each year in the United States, with an annual economic cost exceeding $56 billion. Unfortunately, almost all Phase III TBI clinical trials have yet to yield a safe and effective neuroprotective treatment, raising questions regarding the use of neuroprotective strategies as the primary therapy for acute brain injuries. Recent preclinical data suggest that neurorestorative strategies that promote angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing endothelial cells), axonal remodeling (axonal sprouting and pruning), neurogenesis (generation of new neurons) and synaptogenesis (formation of new synapses) provide promising opportunities for the treatment of TBI. This review discusses select cell-based and pharmacological therapies that activate and amplify these endogenous restorative brain plasticity processes to promote both repair and regeneration of injured brain tissue and functional recovery after TBI. PMID:21122475

  20. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia.

  1. The Search for Endogenous Activators of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest aspect, this review is an attempt to describe the major ligand classes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A grander objective is to provide models that may help define the physiological activator or “endogenous ligand” of the AHR. We begin by presenting evidence that supports a developmental function for the AHR. This is followed by proposing mechanisms by which an endogenous ligand and consequent AHR activation might be important during normal physiology and development. With this background, we then present a survey of the known xenobiotic, endogenous, dietary and “un-conventional” activators of the AHR. When possible, this includes information about their induction potency, receptor binding affinity and potential for exposure. Because of the essential function of the AHR in embryonic development, we discuss the candidacy of each of these compounds as physiologically important activators. PMID:18076143

  2. Residential water demand with endogenous pricing: The Canadian Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Arnaud; Renzetti, Steven; Villeneuve, Michel

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we show that the rate structure endogeneity may result in a misspecification of the residential water demand function. We propose to solve this endogeneity problem by estimating a probabilistic model describing how water rates are chosen by local communities. This model is estimated on a sample of Canadian local communities. We first show that the pricing structure choice reflects efficiency considerations, equity concerns, and, in some cases, a strategy of price discrimination across consumers by Canadian communities. Hence estimating the residential water demand without taking into account the pricing structures' endogeneity leads to a biased estimation of price and income elasticities. We also demonstrate that the pricing structure per se plays a significant role in influencing price responsiveness of Canadian residential consumers.

  3. Endogenous lentiviral elements in the weasel family (Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Endogenous retroviruses provide molecular fossils for studying the ancient evolutionary history of retroviruses. Here, we report our independent discovery and analysis of endogenous lentiviral insertions (Mustelidae endogenous lentivirus [MELV]) within the genomes of weasel family (Mustelidae). Genome-scale screening identified MELV elements in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) genome (MELVmpf). MELVmpf exhibits a typical lentiviral genomic organization. Phylogenetic analyses position MELVmpf basal to either primate lentiviruses or feline immunodeficiency virus. Moreover, we verified the presence of MELV insertions in the genomes of several species of the Lutrinae and Mustelinae subfamilies but not the Martinae subfamily, suggesting that the invasion of MELV into the Mustelidae genomes likely took place between 8.8 and 11.8 Ma. The discovery of MELV in weasel genomes extends the host range of lentiviruses to the Caniformia (order Carnivora) and provides important insights into the prehistoric diversity of lentiviruses.

  4. Ethanol acceptance as a function of genotype amounts of brain [Met]enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, K; Elston, S F; DeLallo, L; Briggs, A H; Wallace, J E

    1983-01-01

    Our results indicate a negative correlation between the amount of ethanol (10%) consumed and endogenous levels of brain [Met]enkephalin in C57BL/6J (alcohol-preferring) and DBA/2J (alcohol-nonpreferring) inbred mice strains. Additionally, it was found that 8 wk after 1-day starved groups of both C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice were challenged with ethanol (10%) for 1-day acceptance, they had significantly lower levels of brain [Met]enkephalin compared with their nonalcohol-treated controls. These results suggest that the brain endogenous peptidyl opiates may play a crucial role in alcohol-seeking behavior. PMID:6579537

  5. Assessing the bioequivalence of analogues of endogenous substances (‘endogenous drugs’): considerations to optimize study design

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Sanjeeva

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assessment of the bioequivalence of generic versions of certain reference drugs is complicated by the presence of endogenous levels of said compounds which cannot be distinguished from externally derived compound levels following drug administration. If unaccounted for, the presence of endogenous compound biases towards equivalence in bioequivalence studies of these drugs. Bioequivalence assessments may be complicated further as disposition of the exogenous analogue can be subject to various endogenous processes resulting in nonlinear pharmacokinetics. To overcome these inherent biases a number of different strategies have been employed. AIMS To critically review methods used to overcome confounding biases in bioequivalence studies of ‘endogenous’ drugs. METHODS A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases was performed. RESULTS The following strategies were identified: ablation/modulation of baseline endogenous substance levels; recruitment of ‘substance-deficient’ populations; restriction of dietary intake of the relevant substance; standardization of conditions with the potential to affect relevant homeostatic mechanisms; correction for baseline substance levels; and administration of supra-therapeutic drug doses. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of this review key study design concepts, intended to optimize the design of future bioequivalence studies of these so-called ‘endogenous drugs’, are described. The dual stable isotope method, which could be used in a specific context, is also discussed. PMID:20233194

  6. The Regulation of GluN2A by Endogenous and Exogenous Regulators in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongjun; Zhan, Liying; Cheng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Linan; Hu, Jie; Gao, Zibin

    2017-04-01

    The NMDA receptor is the most widely studied ionotropic glutamate receptor, and it is central to many physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system. GluN2A is one of the two main types of GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the forebrain. The proper activity of GluN2A is important to brain function, as the abnormal regulation of GluN2A may induce some neuropsychiatric disorders. This review will examine the regulation of GluN2A by endogenous and exogenous regulators in the central nervous system.

  7. Endogenous endophthalmitis as a septic complication postureteroscope candiduria

    PubMed Central

    Inn, Fam Xeng; Md. Noh, Umi Kalthum; Jasman, Mohd. Hafidzul

    2017-01-01

    Ureteroscopy (URS) is commonly used by urologists to treat ureteral stones. It is a relatively low-risk procedure. Both urinary tract obstruction and contamination of instrument can cause candiduria post-URS, and this infection can be treated with an antifungal medication. Candidemia is known as hematogenous dissemination, and ocular tissue is a common invasion. However, endogenous endophthalmitis, due to postureteroscope candiduria, has not been reported up to date. This is a devastating complication that may lead to visual loss. Here, we describe a case of endogenous endophthalmitis as a consequence of candiduria after URS. PMID:28216938

  8. SNIPER peptide-mediated degradation of endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuelai; Wang, Yu Tian

    2015-03-02

    Rapid and reversible methods for altering the function of endogenous proteins are not only indispensable tools for probing complex biological systems, but may potentially drive the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases. Genetic approaches have provided insights into protein function, but are limited in speed, reversibility and spatiotemporal control. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a peptide-based method (SNIPER: Selective Native Protein Eradication) to degrade any given endogenous protein at the post-translational level by harnessing chaperone-mediated autophagy, a major intracellular protein degradation pathway. This unit presents a typical strategy in the design and validation of a protein-knockdown peptide.

  9. Protection from experimental asthma by an endogenous bronchodilator.

    PubMed

    Que, Loretta G; Liu, Limin; Yan, Yun; Whitehead, Gregory S; Gavett, Stephen H; Schwartz, David A; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2005-06-10

    Mechanisms that protect against asthma remain poorly understood. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an endogenous bronchodilator, is depleted from asthmatic airways, suggesting a protective role. We report that, following allergen challenge, wild-type mice exhibiting airway hyperresponsivity have increased airway levels of the enzyme GSNO reductase (GSNOR) and are depleted of lung S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). In contrast, mice with genetic deletion of GSNOR exhibit increases in lung SNOs and are protected from airway hyperresponsivity. Our results indicate that endogenous SNOs, governed by GSNOR, are critical regulators of airway responsivity and may provide new therapeutic approaches to asthma.

  10. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  11. A population of endogenous pararetrovirus genomes in carrizo citrange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomes of three related endogenous pararetroviruses (EPRVs) were obtained by 454 sequencing of nucleic acid extracts from ‘Carrizo’citrange, used as a citrus rootstock. Numerous homologous sequences have been found in the sweet orange genome. The new EPRVs are most closely related to...

  12. Improving access to endogenous DNA in ancient bones and teeth

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Peter B.; Margaryan, Ashot; Schroeder, Hannes; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske; Allentoft, Morten E.

    2015-01-01

    Poor DNA preservation is the most limiting factor in ancient genomic research. In the majority of ancient bones and teeth, endogenous DNA molecules represent a minor fraction of the whole DNA extract, rendering shot-gun sequencing inefficient for obtaining genomic data. Based on ancient human bone samples from temperate and tropical environments, we show that an EDTA-based enzymatic ‘pre-digestion’ of powdered bone increases the proportion of endogenous DNA several fold. By performing the pre-digestion step between 30 min and 6 hours on five bones, we observe an asymptotic increase in endogenous DNA content, with a 2.7-fold average increase reached at 1 hour. We repeat the experiment using a brief pre-digestion (15 or 30 mins) on 21 ancient bones and teeth from a variety of archaeological contexts and observe an improvement in 16 of these. We here advocate the implementation of a brief pre-digestion step as a standard procedure in ancient DNA extractions. Finally, we demonstrate on 14 ancient teeth that by targeting the outer layer of the roots we obtain up to 14 times more endogenous DNA than when using the inner dentine. Our presented methods are likely to increase the proportion of ancient samples that are suitable for genome-scale characterization. PMID:26081994

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  14. [Effectiveness of ultrasmall doses of endogenous bioregulators and immunoactive compounds].

    PubMed

    Ashmarin, I P; Karazeeva, E P; Lelekova, T V

    2005-01-01

    The data and hypotheses on the mechanisms of action of ultrasmall doses (USD) and ultralow concentrations (ULC) of endogenous bioregulators and immunoactive compounds (regulatory peptides, cytokines, etc.) are presented. The reliability of the published data on the effectiveness of USD and ULC within the concentration limits 10(-13) - 10(-24) M and lower is considered.

  15. Evolutionary Systems Theory, Universities, and Endogenous Regional Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Universities today are increasingly being viewed in terms of serving the purpose of economic development. This paper postulates that their chief purpose is to advance knowledge and that in doing so they effectuate regional economic growth and development through processes specified in the endogenous economic growth model. To achieve this purpose…

  16. Conceptual Understanding of Multiplicative Properties through Endogenous Digital Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Andre

    2012-01-01

    This study purposed to determine the effect of an endogenously designed instructional game on conceptual understanding of the associative and distributive properties of multiplication. Additional this study sought to investigate if performance on measures of conceptual understanding taken prior to and after game play could serve as predictors of…

  17. Apparent posttranscriptional block to anaerobic induction of endogenous leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker-Dowling, P A; Marotti, K R; Anderson, G R

    1979-01-01

    Uninfected Fischer rat cells were induced by anaerobic stress to transcribe high levels of endogenous type C leukemia virus RNA. Complete 35S virus RNA with attached polyadenylic acid sequences was found associated with polysomes, indicating functional mRNA. Since no mature virus was released under these conditions, the presence of a posttranscriptional block to complete virus synthesis is strongly indicated. PMID:232174

  18. Proteomics investigation of endogenous S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Fares, Abasse; Rossignol, Michel; Peltier, Jean-Benoit

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and quantification of nitrosothiols. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A first dataset of endogenously nitrosylated cysteines in Arabidopsis cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrosothiols display apolar motifs not located in close vicinity of cysteines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt stress alters the endogenous nitrosylation of specific cysteines in Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: S-Nitrosylation emerges as an important protein modification in many processes. However, most data were obtained at the protein level after addition of a NO donor, particularly in plants where information about the cysteines nitrosylated in these proteins is scarce. An adapted work-flow, combining the classical biotin switch method and labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), is proposed. Without addition of NO donor, a total of 53 endogenous nitrosocysteines was identified in Arabidopsis cells, in proteins belonging to all cell territories, including membranes, and covering a large panel of functions. This first repertoire of nitrosothiols in plants enabled also preliminary structural description. Three apolar motifs, not located in close vicinity of cysteines and accounting for half the dataset, were detected and are proposed to complement nitrosylation prediction algorithms, poorly trained with plant data to date. Analysis of changes induced by a brief salt stress showed that NaCl modified the nitrosylation level of a small proportion of endogenously nitrosylated proteins and did not concern all nitrosothiols in these proteins. The possible role of some NO targets in the response to salt stress was discussed.

  19. School system evaluation by value added analysis under endogeneity.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Jorge; San Martín, Ernesto; Van Bellegem, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Value added is a common tool in educational research on effectiveness. It is often modeled as a (prediction of a) random effect in a specific hierarchical linear model. This paper shows that this modeling strategy is not valid when endogeneity is present. Endogeneity stems, for instance, from a correlation between the random effect in the hierarchical model and some of its covariates. This paper shows that this phenomenon is far from exceptional and can even be a generic problem when the covariates contain the prior score attainments, a typical situation in value added modeling. Starting from a general, model-free definition of value added, the paper derives an explicit expression of the value added in an endogeneous hierarchical linear Gaussian model. Inference on value added is proposed using an instrumental variable approach. The impact of endogeneity on the value added and the estimated value added is calculated accurately. This is also illustrated on a large data set of individual scores of about 200,000 students in Chile.

  20. Health and Wages: Panel Data Estimates Considering Selection and Endogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackle, Robert; Himmler, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper complements previous studies on the effects of health on wages by addressing the problems of unobserved heterogeneity, sample selection, and endogeneity in one comprehensive framework. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), we find the health variable to suffer from measurement error and a number of tests provide…

  1. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  2. RELIABLE ASSAYS FOR DETERMINING ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy women from 18-38 years old (N=25) fasted for several hours and twice donated blood and milk (postpartum 2-7 weeks and 3-4 months) for the EPA's Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis study, a pilot for the National Children's Study (NCS). Endogenous components were chosen...

  3. Inhibition of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J.M.; Agee, K.; Sidow, S.; McNally, K.; Lindsey, K.; Borke, J.; Elsalanty, M.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to extracellular collagen matrix degradation in hybrid layers following adhesive dentin bonding procedures. Endodontic irrigants, including chlorhexidine (CHX) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) may help protect the hybrid layer from this process. The objective of the present study was to determine the exposure time necessary for EDTA to inactivate endogenous MMP activity in human dentin. Methods Dentin beams (2×1×3 mm) were prepared from mid-coronal dentin of extracted third molars. The beams were demineralized in 10 wt% phosphoric acid which also activated endogenous MMPs, and were divided into four experimental groups based on exposure time to 17% EDTA (0, 1, 2 or 5 min). A generic colorimetric MMP assay measured MMP activity via absorbance at 412 nm. Data were evaluated by Kruskal Wallis ANOVA, followed by Dunn’s pair-wise comparisons at α = 0.05. Results All exposure times resulted in significant inhibition (P<0.001) compared to unexposed controls. Specifically, percent inhibition for 1-, 2-, and 5-minute exposure times were 55.1±21.5%, 72.8±11.7%, and 74.7±19.7%, respectively. Conclusions 17% EDTA significantly inhibits endogenous MMP activity of human dentin within 1–2 min. This may minimize hybrid layer degradation following resin bonding procedures in the root canal space. PMID:22152622

  4. Endogenous psychoactive tryptamines reconsidered: an anxiolytic role for dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Michael S; Presti, David E

    2005-01-01

    The presence of the potent hallucinogenic psychoactive chemical N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) in the human body has puzzled scientists for decades. Endogenous DMT was investigated in the 1960s and 1970s and it was proposed that DMT was involved in psychosis and schizophrenia. This hypothesis developed from comparisons of the blood and urine of schizophrenic and control subjects. However, much of this research proved inconclusive and conventional thinking has since held that trace levels of DMT, and other endogenous psychoactive tryptamines, are insignificant metabolic byproducts. The recent discovery of a G-protein-coupled, human trace amine receptor has triggered a reappraisal of the role of compounds present in limited concentrations in biological systems. Interestingly enough, DMT and other psychoactive tryptamine hallucinogens elicit a robust response at the trace amine receptor. While it is currently accepted that serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors play a pivotal role in the activity of hallucinogenic/psychedelic compounds, we propose that the effects induced by exogenous DMT administration, especially at low doses, are due in part to activity at the trace amine receptor. Furthermore, we suggest that endogenous DMT interacts with the TA receptor to produce a calm and relaxed mental state, which may suppress, rather than promote, symptoms of psychosis. This hypothesis may help explain the inconsistency in the early analysis of endogenous DMT in humans. Finally, we propose that amphetamine action at the TA receptor may contribute to the calming effects of amphetamine and related drugs, especially at low doses.

  5. PROTECTION FROM EXPERIMENTAL ASTHMA BY AN ENDOGENOUS BRONCHODILATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms that serve to protect against asthma remain poorly understood. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an endogenous bronchodilator, is depleted from the airways of asthmatic patients. We show here that mice with targeted deletion of the enzyme GSNO reductase (GSNOR-/-) sustain i...

  6. Endogenous mitigation of H2S inside of the landfills.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhong, Zhong; Shen, Dongsheng; Du, Yao; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang

    2016-02-01

    Vast quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emitted from landfill sites require urgent disposal. The current study focused on source control and examined the migration and conversion behavior of sulfur compounds in two lab-scale simulated landfills with different operation modes. It aimed to explore the possible strategies and mechanisms for H2S endogenous mitigation inside of landfills during decomposition. It was found that the strength of H2S emissions from the landfill sites was dependent on the municipal solid waste (MSW) degradation speed and vertical distribution of sulfide. Leachate recirculation can shorten both the H2S influence period and pollution risk to the surrounding environment. H2S endogenous mitigation may be achieved by chemical oxidation, biological oxidation, adsorption, and/or precipitation in different stages. Migration and conversion mainly affected H2S release behavior during the initial stabilization phase in the landfill. Microbial activities related to sulfur, nitrogen, and iron can further promote H2S endogenous mitigation during the high reducing phase. Thus, H2S endogenous mitigation can be effectively enhanced via control of the aforementioned processes.

  7. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA

    PubMed Central

    Harata, N. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background An in-frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE-torsinA) results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown. Methods We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA. Results Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild-type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A) into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non-neuronal cells, exogenous wild-type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE-torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate. Discussion As patients’ cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non-overexpressed) vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed) proteins. PMID:25279252

  8. [Brain concussion].

    PubMed

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  9. The Regenerative Response of Endogenous Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells to Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-09

    caused by underlying pathology such as neurodegeneration, demyelination. and inflammation. Even though within the adult central nervous system (CNS...animal MRI system (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA) equipped with Magnex/Agilent HD imaging gradient coil (Magnex/ Agilent, Oxford, UK) with pulse...surgery. Images were acquired at each time point using a 7T/20 cm BioSpec@ system (Bruker NMR Inc., Billerica, MA). Accelerated T2-weighted images

  10. Inhibition of cellular respiration by endogenously produced carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Lam, Francis; Hagen, Thilo; Moncada, Salvador

    2006-06-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) interacts with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. This interaction has been shown to have important physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is also known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase in vitro; however, it is not clear whether endogenously produced CO can inhibit cellular respiration and, if so, what the significance of this might be. In this study, we show that exogenous CO inhibits respiration in a moderate but persistent manner in HEK293 cells under ambient (21%) oxygen concentrations (K(i) = 1.44 microM). This effect of CO was increased (K(i) = 0.35 microM) by incubation in hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen). Endogenous CO, generated by HEK293 cells transfected with the inducible isoform of haem oxygenase (haem oxygenase-1; HO-1), also inhibited cellular respiration moderately (by 12%) and this was accompanied by inhibition (23%) of cytochrome c oxidase activity. When the cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions during HO-1 induction, the inhibitory effect of CO on cell respiration was markedly increased to 70%. Furthermore, endogenously produced CO was found to be responsible for the respiratory inhibition that occurs in RAW264.7 cells activated in hypoxic conditions with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, in the presence of N-(iminoethyl)-L-ornithine to prevent the synthesis of NO. Our results indicate that CO contributes significantly to the respiratory inhibition in activated cells, particularly under hypoxic conditions. Inhibition of cell respiration by endogenous CO through its interaction with cytochrome c oxidase might have an important role in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.

  11. Chronic Cocaine Use Causes Changes in the Striatal Proteome Depending on the Endogenous Expression of Pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Herradón, Gonzalo; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Pérez-García, Carmen

    2015-07-20

    The neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) is upregulated in different brain areas after the administration of different drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants. PTN has been shown to prevent cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in NG108-15 and PC12 cells. We previously demonstrated that specific phosphoproteins related to neurodegeneration processes are differentially regulated in the mouse striatum by a single cocaine (15 mg/kg) administration depending on the endogenous expression of PTN. Since neurodegenerative processes are usually observed in patients exposed to toxicants for longer duration, we have now performed a striatal proteomic study using samples enriched in phosphorylated proteins from PTN knockout (PTN-/-) mice, from mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain, and from wild type (WT) mice after a chronic treatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg/day for 7 days). We have successfully identified 23 proteins significantly affected by chronic cocaine exposure, genotype, or both. Most of these proteins, including peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), and annexins A5 (ANXA5) and A7 (ANXA7), may be of significant importance because they were previously identified in proteomic studies in animals treated with psychostimulants and/or because they are related to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The data support a protective role of PTN against chronic cocaine-induced neural alterations.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiang Jun; Yu, Shan Ping; Zhang, Like; Wei, Ling

    2010-07-01

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  13. Cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript is involved in the orexigenic effect of endogenous anandamide.

    PubMed

    Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Depetrillo, Michael; Harvey-White, Judith; Bannon, Anthony W; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Kuhar, Michael J; Mackie, Ken; Palkovits, Miklós; Kunos, George

    2005-01-01

    Endocannabinoids acting at CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) increase appetite. In view of the predominant presynaptic localization of CB1 in the brain, we tested the hypothesis that the orexigenic effect of endocannabinoids involves inhibition of the release of a tonically active anorexigenic mediator, such as the peptide product of the cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART). The CB1 antagonist rimonabant inhibited food intake in food-restricted wild-type mice, but not in their CART-deficient littermates. Mice deficient in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for the in vivo metabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide, have reduced levels of CART-immunoreactive nerve fibers and terminals in several brain regions implicated in appetite control, including the arcuate, dorsomedial and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus accumbens, and treatment of FAAH(-/-) mice with rimonabant, 3 mg/kg/day for 7 days, increased CART levels toward those seen in FAAH(+/+) wild-type controls. In contrast, no difference in the density of CART-immunoreactive fibers was observed in the median eminence and the paraventricular nucleus of FAAH(+/+) and FAAH(-/-) mice. Acute treatment of wild-type mice with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 resulted in elevated CART levels in the dorsomedial nucleus and the shell portion of the nucleus accumbens. These observations are compatible with CART being a downstream mediator of the CB1-mediated orexigenic effect of endogenous anandamide.

  14. Physical activity and brain plasticity in late adulthood.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Gildengers, Ariel G; Butters, Meryl A

    2013-03-01

    The human brain shrinks with advancing age, but recent research suggests that it is also capable of remarkable plasticity, even in late life. In this review we summarize the research linking greater amounts of physical activity to less cortical atrophy, better brain function, and enhanced cognitive function, and argue that physical activity takes advantage of the brain's natural capacity for plasticity. Further, although the effects of physical activity on the brain are relatively widespread, there is also some specificity, such that prefrontal and hippocampal areas appear to be more influenced than other areas of the brain. The specificity of these effects, we argue, provides a biological basis for understanding the capacity for physical activity to influence neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. We conclude that physical activity is a promising intervention that can influence the endogenous pharmacology of the brain to enhance cognitive and emotional function in late adulthood.

  15. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  16. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  17. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  18. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  19. Anatomy of the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of ...

  20. Fragile Brains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes three types of brain disorders: the sluggish, the oppositional, and the depressed. Explains how to identify these disorders and offers educators strategies for dealing with each. (Contains 11 references.) (PKP)

  1. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... small abscess (less than 2 cm) An abscess deep in the brain An abscess and meningitis Several ... or MRI scan may be needed for a deep abscess. During this procedure, medicines may be injected ...

  2. Brain Basics

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  3. Brain Autopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monthly Donation Named Funds Planned Giving Gifts of Stock Business Partnerships Host an Event AFTD-Team Races ... family members to reach a closure after a long struggle. Brain autopsy is often done in conjunction ...

  4. Neuroprotective Effect of the Endogenous Amine 1MeTIQ in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wąsik, Agnieszka; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Nalepa, Irena; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is hallmarked by pathological changes associated with the death of dopaminergic neurons, particularly in the extrapyramidal system (substantia nigra pars compacta, striatum) of the brain. Although the causes of slow neuronal death in PD are unknown, both genetic and environmental factors are likely involved. Endogenous isoquinolines, such as 1-benzyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1BnTIQ), present in the human brain have been previously reported to participate in the pathogenesis of PD. The chronic administration of 1BnTIQ induced parkinsonism in primates, and this effect might be associated with idiopathic PD. However, another endogenous derivative of tetrahydroisoquinoline, 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1MeTIQ), displays clear neuroprotective properties in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of 1MeTIQ (25 and 50 mg/kg) in an animal model of PD after the chronic administration of 1BnTIQ (25 mg/kg). Behavioral analyses demonstrate that both acute and repeated treatment with 1MeTIQ completely antagonized 1BnTIQ-induced changes in rat locomotor activity. Neurochemical experiments indicate that 1MeTIQ co-administered with 1BnTIQ completely antagonized 1BnTIQ-induced reduction in the dopamine (DA) concentration in rat brain structures. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that 1MeTIQ possesses important neuroprotective properties in the animal model of PD and that the rats did not develop tolerance after its chronic administration.

  5. The effect of dietary methionine levels on endogenous nitrogen and endogenous amino acids flows in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C S; Tan, Z L; Tang, S X; Sun, Z H; Han, X F; Wang, M; Tayo, G O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of dietary methionine (Met) levels on endogenous N and amino acids (AA) flows at different part of the digestive tract of growing goats was determined using a (15)N isotope dilution technique. Three goats (25 ± 2.5 kg) were fitted with the ruminal, duodenal and ileal cannulae and allocated to three dietary treatments in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. The dietary treatments consisted of a total mixed ration containing three levels of Met (0.15%, 0.25% and 0.35%) respectively. It was found that at 0.15% Met level, the lowest flow in endogenous N and total AA at the duodenum and ileum occurred. The endogenous N secretion contributed to 26% and 23% of the duodenal and ileal total N flows, respectively, and the proportions were not affected by the dietary Met levels. The duodenal and ileal flows of endogenous total AA were 11.1, 11.8, 11.3 g/d and 2.9, 3.9, 4.1 g/d respectively. The average real digestibility of N was 65%, 87% and 95% in the forestomach, intestine and whole digestive tract respectively.

  6. Do metals that translocate to the brain exacerbate traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Kalinich, John F; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-05-01

    Metal translocation to the brain is strictly controlled and often prevented by the blood-brain barrier. For the most part, only those metals required to maintain normal function are transported into the brain where they are under tight metabolic control. From the literature, there are reports that traumatic brain injury disrupts the blood-brain barrier. This could allow the influx of metals that would normally have been excluded from the brain. We also have preliminary data showing that metal pellets, surgically-implanted into the leg muscle of a rat to simulate a shrapnel wound, solubilize and the metals comprising the pellet can enter the brain. Surprisingly, rats implanted with a military-grade tungsten alloy composed of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt also showed significantly elevated uranium levels in their brains as early as 1 month after pellet implantation. The only source of uranium was low levels that are naturally found in food and water. Conversely, rats implanted with depleted uranium pellets demonstrated elevated uranium levels in brain resulting from degradation of the implanted pellets. However, when cobalt levels were measured, there were no significant increases in the brain until the rats had reached old age. The only source of cobalt for these rats was the low levels found in their food and water. These data suggest that some metals or metal mixtures (i.e., tungsten alloy), when embedded into muscle, can enhance the translocation of other, endogenous metals (e.g., uranium) across the blood-brain barrier. For other embedded metals (i.e., depleted uranium), this effect is not observed until the animal is of advanced age. This raises the possibility that metal body-burdens can affect blood-brain barrier permeability in a metal-specific and age-dependent manner. This possibility is disconcerting when traumatic brain injury is considered. Traumatic brain injury has been called the "signature" wound of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, often, an

  7. Brain imaging and brain function

    SciTech Connect

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage.

  8. Towards a roadmap in brain protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Muresanu, Dafin F; Buzoianu, Anca; Florian, Stefan I; von Wild, Tobias; Muresanu, DF

    2012-01-01

    This article briefly reviews some of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, i.e. damage mechanisms (DM), and their interactions and overlap with protection and reparatory processes (i.e. endogenous defence activities). A relationship between DM and endogenous defence activity (EDA) regarding therapy principles will also be described. Currently, it is difficult to find the correct therapeutic approach for brain protection and recovery, especially because we do not fully understand all of the endogenous neurobiological processes, the complete nature of the pathophysiological mechanisms and the links between these two categories. Moreover, we continue to use a simplistic and reductionist approach in this respect. Endogenous neurobiological processes, such as neurotrophicity, neuroprotection, neuroplasticity and neurogenesis, are central to protection and recovery and represent the background of EDA. The biological reality of the nervous system is far more complex. In fact, there is an endogenous holistic process of neuroprotection and neurorecovery that should be approached therapeutically in an integrated way. The current tendency to exclusively frame drug activity in terms of single mechanisms and single focus effect might distract from other paradigms with greater explanatory power and hinder the development of more effective treatment strategies. A change of concept is required in pharmacological brain protection and recovery. Prospective considerations include an integrated pharmacological approach, focusing on drugs with multimodal activity and pleiotropic neuroprotective effect which are biological drugs, rather than single mechanism drugs, which usually are chemical drugs. PMID:22863521

  9. Involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the antinociception induced by the novel dermorphin tetrapeptide analog amidino-TAPA.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Moriyama, Kaori; Sato, Bunsei; Ohwada, Keiko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2007-04-10

    The antinociceptive effect of i.t. administered N(alpha)-amidino-Tyr-d-Arg-Phe-beta-Ala (amidino-TAPA), an N-terminal tetrapeptide analog of dermorphin, was characterized in ddY mice. In the opioid receptor ligand-binding assays using mouse brain membranes, amidino-TAPA showed a very high affinity for mu-opioid receptors, a low affinity to delta-opioid receptors and no affinity for kappa-opioid receptors. In the mouse tail-flick test, i.t. treatment with amidino-TAPA produced a potent antinociception. The antinociception induced by amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with the mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine, the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine and the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. Moreover, the antinociception induced by amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with antisera against the endogenous kappa-opioid peptides dynorphin A, dynorphin B and alpha-neo-endorphin; and the endogenous delta-opioid peptide [Leu(5)]enkephalin. In mice lacking prodynorphin, the precursor of the endogenous kappa-opioid peptides, the antinociceptive effect of amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated compared to that in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. However, there was no difference in G-protein activation by amidino-TAPA in the spinal cord membranes from prodynorphin knockout mice and C57BL/6J mice. The present results suggest that the spinal antinociception induced by the mu-opioid receptor selective peptide amidino-TAPA is mediated in part by the release of endogenous opioid peptides in the spinal cord, which is caused by the direct stimulation of mu-opioid receptors.

  10. Identification of the convulsant opiate thebaine in mammalian brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kodaira, H; Lisek, C A; Jardine, I; Arimura, A; Spector, S

    1989-01-01

    The convulsant opiate thebaine, an intermediate of morphine biosynthesis, was purified from bovine brain to homogeneity by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) monitored by a radioimmunoassay. The immunoreactive material behaved identically to standard thebaine in two HPLC systems and was confirmed to be thebaine by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, the presence of thebaine in mammalian tissue has not been demonstrated previously. Codeine and morphine were also found to exist in ovine brain. The presence of thebaine in ovine brain provides strong evidence that morphine and codeine, in various mammalian tissues, are of endogenous origin and actually biosynthesized from a precursor. Images PMID:2911601

  11. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids control synaptic transmission in mice nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Robbe, David; Alonso, Gerard; Manzoni, Oliver J

    2003-11-01

    Addictive drugs are thought to alter normal brain function and cause the remodeling of synaptic functions in areas important to memory and reward. Excitatory transmission to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is involved in the actions of most drugs of abuse, including cannabis. We have explored the functions of the endocannabinoid system at the prefrontal cortex-NAc synapses. Immunocytochemistry showed cannabinoid receptor (CB1) expression on axonal terminals making contacts with NAc neurons. In NAc slices, synthetic cannabinoids inhibit spontaneous and evoked glutamate-mediated transmission through presynaptic activation of presynaptic K+ channels and GABA-mediated transmission most likely via a direct presynaptic action on the vesicular release machinery. How does synaptic activity lead to the production of endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) in the NAc? More generally, do eCBs participate in long-term synaptic plasticity in the brain? We found that tetanic stimulation (mimicking naturally occurring frequencies) of prelimbic glutamatergic afferents induced a presynaptic LTD dependent on eCB and CB1 receptors (eCB-LTD). Induction of eCB-LTD required postsynaptic activation of mGlu5 receptors and a rise in postsynaptic Ca2+ from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores. This retrograde signaling cascade involved postsynaptic eCB release and activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors. In the NAc, eCB-LTD might be part of a negative feedback loop, reducing glutamatergic synaptic strength during sustained cortical activity. The fact that this new form of LTD was occluded by an exogenous cannabinoid suggested that cannabis derivatives, such as marijuana, may alter normal eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity. These data suggest a major role of the eCB system in long-term synaptic plasticity and give insights into how cannabis derivatives, such as marijuana, alter normal eCB functions in the brain reward system.

  12. Broad characterization of endogenous peptides in the tree shrew visual system.

    PubMed

    Ranc, Vaclav; Petruzziello, Filomena; Kretz, Robert; Argandoña, Enrike G; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-05-17

    Endogenous neuropeptides, acting as neurotransmitters or hormones in the brain, carry out important functions including neural plasticity, metabolism and angiogenesis. Previous neuropeptide studies have focused on peptide-rich brain regions such as the striatum or hypothalamus. Here we present an investigation of peptides in the visual system, composed of brain regions that are generally less rich in peptides, with the aim of providing the first broad overview of peptides involved in mammalian visual functions. We target three important parts of the visual system: the primary visual cortex (V1), lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC). Our study is performed in the tree shrew, a close relative of primates. Using a combination of data dependent acquisition and targeted LC-MS/MS based neuropeptidomics; we identified a total of 52 peptides from the tree shrew visual system. A total of 26 peptides, for example GAV and neuropeptide K were identified in the visual system for the first time. Out of the total 52 peptides, 27 peptides with high signal-to-noise-ratio (>10) in extracted ion chromatograms (EIC) were subjected to label-free quantitation. We observed generally lower abundance of peptides in the LGN compared to V1 and SC. Consistently, a number of individual peptides showed high abundance in V1 (such as neuropeptide Y or somatostatin 28) and in SC (such as somatostatin 28 AA1-12). This study provides the first in-depth characterization of peptides in the mammalian visual system. These findings now permit the investigation of neuropeptide-regulated mechanisms of visual perception.

  13. Endogenous neurogenesis in adult mammals after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Song, Wei; Zhao, Wen; Gao, Yudan; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-12-01

    During the whole life cycle of mammals, new neurons are constantly regenerated in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Thanks to emerging methodologies, great progress has been made in the characterization of spinal cord endogenous neural stem cells (ependymal cells) and identification of their role in adult spinal cord development. As recently evidenced, both the intrinsic and extrinsic molecular mechanisms of ependymal cells control the sequential steps of the adult spinal cord neurogenesis. This review introduces the concept of adult endogenous neurogenesis, the reaction of ependymal cells after adult spinal cord injury (SCI), the heterogeneity and markers of ependymal cells, the factors that regulate ependymal cells, and the niches that impact the activation or differentiation of ependymal cells.

  14. Endogenous RNAi and adaptation to environment in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grishok, Alla

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of short RNAs to the control of repetitive elements are well documented in animals and plants. Here, the role of endogenous RNAi and AF10 homolog ZFP-1 in the adaptation of C. elegans to the environment is discussed. First, modulation of insulin signaling through regulation of transcription of the PDK-1 kinase (Mansisidor et al., PLoS Genetics, 2011) is reviewed. Second, an siRNA-based natural selection model is proposed in which variation in endogenous siRNA pools between individuals is subject to natural selection similarly to DNA-based genetic variation. The value of C. elegans for the research of siRNA-based epigenetic variation and adaptation is highlighted. PMID:24058837

  15. Endogenous Auxin and Ethylene in Pellia (Bryophyta) 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.; Harrison, Marcia A.; Taylor, Jane; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid and ethylene in bryophyte tissue was tentatively demonstrated using gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and double-standard isotope dilution techniques. Rapidly elongating stalks (or setae) of Pellia epiphylla (L.) Corda sporophytes contain approximately 2.5 to 2.9 micrograms per gram fresh weight of putative free IAA. Ethylene released by setae increases during growth from 0.027 to 0.035 nanoliter per seta per hour. Application of 5 microliters per liter ethylene inhibits auxin-stimulated elongation growth of this tissue, a result which suggests that both endogenously produced compounds act in tandem as natural growth modulators. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663227

  16. Salusin-β as a powerful endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Tani, Yuji; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Salusin-β is an endogenous parasympathomimetic peptide, predominantly localized to the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary. Subcutaneously administered salusin-β (50 nmol/mouse) significantly increased water intake but did not affect locomotor activity or food intake. The salusin-β-induced increase in water intake was completely abrogated by pretreatment with muscarinic antagonist, atropine sulphate. In contrast, intracerebroventricular injection of salusin-β, at lower doses (10–100 fmol/mouse) caused a long-lasting decrease in water intake and locomotor activity throughout the entire dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Pre-injection of intracerebroventricular anti-salusin-β IgG completely abrogated the central salusin-β mediated suppression of water intake and locomotor activity. These results demonstrate contrasting actions of salusin-β in the control of water intake via the central and peripheral systems and highlight it as a potent endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide. PMID:26869388

  17. Proteomics analysis of the endogenous, constitutive, leaf SUMOylome.

    PubMed

    Colignon, Bertrand; Delaive, Edouard; Dieu, Marc; Demazy, Catherine; Muhovski, Yordan; Wallon, Cindy; Raes, Martine; Mauro, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    SUMOylation is a post-translational modification which regulates a number of critical biological processes in, for example mammals, yeast and plants. In order to fully understand the functional effects of SUMOylation an essential first step is the identification of endogenous targets for SUMOylation. Here we report the results of using a recently developed proteomic approach based on the use of 3D gels to identify the endogenous SUMO targets in leaves of Solanum tuberosum. By using 3D gels we avoid the problem of co-migration of proteins, which is a major limitation of 2D gels, and we enable the use of the highly sensitive CyDye DIGE fluor saturation dyes. Using this new method we have identified 39 individual proteins as probable SUMO targets in leaves of Solanum tuberosum. The advantages of this method compared with other approaches are discussed, and possible future developments are outlined.

  18. Biology and evolution of the endogenous koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Tarlinton, R; Meers, J; Young, P

    2008-11-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are ubiquitous features of all mammalian genomes, the process of initial germ line invasion and subsequent inactivation from a pathogenic element has not yet been observed in a wild species. Koala retrovirus (KoRV) provides a unique opportunity to study this process of endogenisation in action as it still appears to be spreading through the koala population. Ongoing expression of the endogenous sequence and consequent high levels of viraemia have been linked to neoplasia and immunosuppression in koalas. This apparently recent invader of the koala genome shares a remarkably close sequence relationship with the pathogenic exogenous Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV), and comparative analyses of KoRV and GALVare helping to shed light on how retroviruses in general adapt to a relatively benign or at least less pathogenic existence within a new host genome. (Part of a multi-author review).

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  20. Endogenous epinephrine protects against obesity induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Michael G; Milic, Milos; Sun, Ping; Tang, Chih-Min; Elayan, Hamzeh; Bao, Xuping; Cheung, Wai Wilson; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2011-07-05

    Epinephrine (E) is a hormone released from the adrenal medulla in response to low blood sugar and other stresses. E and related β2-adrenergic agonists are used to treat asthma, but a side effect is high blood sugar. C57BL/6 mice prone to overfeeding induced type II diabetes had the PNMT gene knocked out to prevent E synthesis. These E deficient mice were very similar to control animals on a 14% fat diet. On a 40.6% fat diet they gained 20 to 33% more weight than control animals and increased their blood glucose response to a glucose tolerance test because they became resistant to insulin. Although the short term effect of β2-agonists such as E is to raise blood glucose, some long acting β2-agonists improve muscle glucose uptake. Endogenous E protects against overfeeding induced diabetes. Since adrenal E release can be impaired with aging and diabetes, endogenous E may help prevent adult onset diabetes.

  1. Role of endogenous cat retrovirus in cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, S

    1982-01-01

    Several long-term cultures were established from a spontaneous melanoma of a cat. Cells were rounded or spindle shaped and exhibited black/brown pigmentation in the cytoplasm. No virus was released from these cells spontaneously or after treatment with chemicals. However, exogenous infection of the cat melanoma cells with the endogenous cat virus RD114 resulted in remarkable morphological and functional changes. Most of the RD114 virus-infected cells exhibited multiple neuritic extensions and about 1-2% of the population showed characteristics of neuronal cells. Because human, mouse, and hamster melanoma cultures infected with various mammalian retroviruses, including the RD114 virus, did not display any morphological alteration, it is concluded that the neuronal cell differentiation in the cat melanoma cells is a consequence of its specific interaction with the endogenous cat retrovirus. Images PMID:6961415

  2. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  3. Achievement of high nitrite accumulation via endogenous partial denitrification (EPD).

    PubMed

    Ji, Jiantao; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2017-01-01

    This study proposed a novel strategy for achievement of partial denitrification driven by endogenous carbon sources in an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system. Results showed that in the steady-stage, the nitrate-to-nitrite transformation ratio (NTR) was kept at around 87% without nitrate in the effluent. During the anaerobic period, exogenous carbon sources was completely taken up, accompanied by the consumption of glycogen and production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). During the anoxic period, nitrate was reduced to nitrite by using PHAs as carbon sources, followed by the replenishment of glycogen. Thus, the phenotype of denitrifying GAOs was clearly observed and endogenous partial denitrification (EPD) occurred. Furthermore, results showed the nitrate reduction was prior to the nitrite reduction in the presence of nitrate, which led to the high nitrite accumulation.

  4. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  5. Complex links between dietary lipids, endogenous endotoxins and metabolic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Laugerette, Fabienne; Vors, Cécile; Peretti, Noël; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity are characterized by a subclinical inflammatory state that contributes to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Recent reports also indicate that (i) there are alterations of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases and (ii) absorption of endogenous endotoxins (namely lipopolysaccharides, LPS) can occur, particularly during the digestion of lipids. The aim of the present review is to highlight recently gained knowledge regarding the links between high fat diets, lipid digestion, intestinal microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia & inflammation.

  6. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  7. Carlactone is an endogenous biosynthetic precursor for strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yoshiya; Sado, Aika; Asami, Kei; Hanada, Atsushi; Umehara, Mikihisa; Akiyama, Kohki; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2014-01-28

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a class of terpenoid plant hormones that regulate shoot branching as well as being known as root-derived signals for symbiosis and parasitism. SL has tricyclic-lactone (ABC-ring) and methyl butenolide (D-ring), and they are connected through an enol ether bridge. Recently, a putative biosynthetic intermediate called carlactone (CL), of which carbon skeleton is in part similar to those of SLs, was identified by biochemical analysis of three biosynthetic enzymes, DWARF27, CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 7 (CCD7), and CCD8 in vitro. However, CL has never been identified from plant tissues, and the conversion of CL to SLs has not been proven in vivo. To address these questions, we chemically synthesized (13)C-labeled CL. We show that (13)C-labeled CL is converted to (-)-[(13)C]-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol ((-)-2'-epi-5DS) and [(13)C]-orobanchol, endogenous SLs in rice, in the dwarf10 mutant, which is defective in CCD8. In addition, we successfully identified endogenous CL by using liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry in rice and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we determined the absolute stereochemistry of endogenous CL to be (11R)-configuration, which is the same as that of (-)-2'-epi-5DS at the corresponding position. Feeding experiments showed that only the (11R)-isomer of CL, but not the (11S)-isomer, was converted to (-)-2'-epi-5DS in vivo. Taken together, our data provide conclusive evidence that CL is an endogenous SL precursor that is stereospecifically recognized in the biosynthesis pathway.

  8. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  9. [Endorphines--the endogenous ligands of opiate receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teschemacher, H

    1978-01-01

    The demonstration of opiate receptors in the nervous tissue of vertebrates in 1973 was the starting point of an intensive search for the endogenous ligands of these receptors. During the following years, several of such "edogenous opiates", called "endorphines", were isolated from various tissues of the mammalian organism. These are peptides which are able to elicit the same effects as do opiates. Possibly, they play a role in the reaction of the organism to stress.

  10. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Daito, Takuji; Oshida, Tatsuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Jern, Patric; Gojobori, Takashi; Coffin, John M; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2010-01-07

    Retroviruses are the only group of viruses known to have left a fossil record, in the form of endogenous proviruses, and approximately 8% of the human genome is made up of these elements. Although many other viruses, including non-retroviral RNA viruses, are known to generate DNA forms of their own genomes during replication, none has been found as DNA in the germline of animals. Bornaviruses, a genus of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA virus, are unique among RNA viruses in that they establish persistent infection in the cell nucleus. Here we show that elements homologous to the nucleoprotein (N) gene of bornavirus exist in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents and elephants. These sequences have been designated endogenous Borna-like N (EBLN) elements. Some of the primate EBLNs contain an intact open reading frame (ORF) and are expressed as mRNA. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EBLNs seem to have been generated by different insertional events in each specific animal family. Furthermore, the EBLN of a ground squirrel was formed by a recent integration event, whereas those in primates must have been formed more than 40 million years ago. We also show that the N mRNA of a current mammalian bornavirus, Borna disease virus (BDV), can form EBLN-like elements in the genomes of persistently infected cultured cells. Our results provide the first evidence for endogenization of non-retroviral virus-derived elements in mammalian genomes and give novel insights not only into generation of endogenous elements, but also into a role of bornavirus as a source of genetic novelty in its host.

  11. Brain death.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  12. Anandamide and 2-AG Are Endogenously Present within the Laterodorsal Tegmental Nucleus: Functional Implications for a role of eCBs in arousal.

    PubMed

    Soni, Neeraj; Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Mehta, Ved; Mirza, Osman; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2017-04-09

    Previously, we presented electrophysiological evidence for presence in mice brain slices of functional cannabinoid type I receptors (CB1Rs) within the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT), a brain stem nucleus critical in control of arousal and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Further, using pharmacological agents, we provided data suggestive of the endogenous presence of cannabinoids (CBs) acting at LDT CB1Rs. However, in those studies, we were unable to identify the type(s) of CB ligands endogenously present in the LDT, and this information has not been provided elsewhere. Accordingly, we used the highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method to determine whether N-arachidonoylethanolamide (Anandamide or AEA) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), which are both endogenous CB ligands acting at CB1Rs, are present in the LDT. Mice brain tissue samples of the LDT were assayed using ion trap LC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. Chromatographic analysis and product-ion MS scans identified presence of the CBs, AEA and 2-AG, from LDT mouse tissue. Data using the LC-MS method show that AEA and 2-AG are endogenously present within the LDT and when coupled with our electrophysiological findings, lead to the suggestion that AEA and 2-AG act at electropharmacologically-demonstrated CB1Rs in this nucleus. Accordingly, AEA and 2-AG likely play a role in processes governed by the LDT, including control of states of cortical gamma band activity seen in alert, aroused states, as well as cortical and motor activity characteristic of REM sleep.

  13. The aliens inside human DNA: HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1 endogenous retroviruses and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Dolei, Antonina; Uleri, Elena; Ibba, Gabriele; Caocci, Maurizio; Piu, Claudia; Serra, Caterina

    2015-07-04

    The human genome contains remnants of ancestral retroviruses now endogenously transmitted, called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). HERVs can be variably expressed, and both beneficial and detrimental effects have described. This review focuses on the MSRV and syncytin-1 HERV-W elements in relationship to neurodegeneration in view of their neuro-pathogenic and immune-pathogenic properties. Multiple sclerosis (MS) and a neurodegenerative disease (neuroAIDS) are reported in this review. In vivo studies in patients and controls for molecular epidemiology and follow-up studies are reviewed, along with in vitro cellular studies of the effects of treatments and of molecular mechanisms. HERV-W/MSRV has been repeatedly found in MS patients (in blood, spinal fluid, and brain samples), and MRSV presence/load strikingly parallels MS stages and active/remission phases, as well as therapy outcome. The DNA of MS patients has increased MSRVenv copies, while syncytin-1 copies are unchanged in controls. Presence of MSRV in the spinal fluid predicted the worst MS progression, ten years in advance. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates HERV-W/MSRV both in vitro and in vivo. With respect to neuroAIDS, the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein activates HERV-W/MSRV in monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes indirectly by interaction with TLR4 and induction of TNFa. HERV-W/MSRV can be considered a biomarker for MS behavior and therapy outcome. Regarding MS pathogenesis, we postulate the possibility for EBV of an initial trigger of future MS, years later, and for MSRV of a direct role of effector of neuropathogenesis during MS. Additionally, HERV-W/MSR/syncytin-1 activation by HIV Tat could contribute to the HIV-related neurodegeneration.

  14. Stimulation by surangin B of endogenous amino acid release from synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanshen; Nicholson, Russell A

    2003-09-15

    The effect of surangin B, an insecticidal natural product coumarin, on presynaptic release of endogenous amino acids was investigated using a purified synaptosomal fraction isolated from mouse brain. Surangin B stimulated the release of glutamic acid (GLU), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serine, alanine and the aminosulfonic acid taurine from synaptosomes at micromolar concentrations. In all cases, these responses were reduced by removing calcium from the saline and surangin B-evoked release of GLU, GABA, aspartic acid (ASP) and alanine was significantly inhibited by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin. Rotenone (a complex I inhibitor) and carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP; an uncoupler), were more potent releasers of amino acids from synaptosomes than surangin B, however, carboxin (a complex II-selective inhibitor), was extremely weak to ineffective in this regard. The stimulatory effect of surangin B and complex III-selective inhibitors on release of GLU, GABA, ASP and alanine by synaptosomes was significantly reduced by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, suggesting that blockade of complex III in intraterminal mitochondria is an important effect of this coumarin. Our results demonstrate that surangin B, in common with CCCP and inhibitors of complex I and III, cause release of both neurotransmitter and non-neurotransmitter amino acids from nerve endings in vitro. However, in contrast to most classical agents which interfere selectively with mitochondrial function, the release of endogenous amino acids from synaptosomes by surangin B also involves a moderate extracellular calcium ion-dependent component and relies partially on sodium ion entry into the nerve ending.

  15. Endogenous cannabinoid release within prefrontal-limbic pathways affects memory consolidation of emotional training.

    PubMed

    Morena, Maria; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Ratano, Patrizia; Peloso, Andrea; Hauer, Daniela; Atsak, Piray; Trabace, Luigia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; McGaugh, James L; Schelling, Gustav; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2014-12-23

    Previous studies have provided extensive evidence that administration of cannabinoid drugs after training modulates the consolidation of memory for an aversive experience. The present experiments investigated whether the memory consolidation is regulated by endogenously released cannabinoids. The experiments first examined whether the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are released by aversive training. Inhibitory avoidance training with higher footshock intensity produced increased levels of AEA in the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) shortly after training in comparison with levels assessed in rats trained with lower footshock intensity or unshocked controls exposed only to the training apparatus. In contrast, 2-AG levels were not significantly elevated. The additional finding that posttraining infusions of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which selectively increases AEA levels at active synapses, administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), hippocampus, or mPFC enhanced memory strongly suggests that the endogenously released AEA modulates memory consolidation. Moreover, in support of the view that this emotional training-associated increase in endocannabinoid neurotransmission, and its effects on memory enhancement, depends on the integrity of functional interactions between these different brain regions, we found that disruption of BLA activity blocked the training-induced increases in AEA levels as well as the memory enhancement produced by URB597 administered into the hippocampus or mPFC. Thus, the findings provide evidence that emotionally arousing training increases AEA levels within prefrontal-limbic circuits and strongly suggest that this cannabinoid activation regulates emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation.

  16. Endogenous Inhibition of the Trigeminally Evoked Neurotransmission to Cardiac Vagal Neurons by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Philbin, K.; Bateman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs. PMID:20719927

  17. Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry (FSCV) Detection of Endogenous Octopamine in Drosophila melanogaster Ventral Nerve Cord.

    PubMed

    Pyakurel, Poojan; Privman Champaloux, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2016-08-17

    Octopamine is an endogenous biogenic amine neurotransmitter, neurohormone, and neuromodulator in invertebrates and has functional analogy with norepinephrine in vertebrates. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) can detect rapid changes in neurotransmitters, but FSCV has not been optimized for octopamine detection in situ. The goal of this study was to characterize octopamine release in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila larvae for the first time. A FSCV waveform was optimized so that the potential for octopamine oxidation would not be near the switching potential where interferences can occur. Endogenous octopamine release was stimulated by genetically inserting either the ATP sensitive channel, P2X2, or the red-light sensitive channelrhodopsin, CsChrimson, into cells expressing tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), an octopamine synthesis enzyme. To ensure that release is due to octopamine and not the precursor tyramine, the octopamine synthesis inhibitor disulfiram was applied, and the signal decreased by 80%. Stimulated release was vesicular, and a 2 s continuous light stimulation of CsChrimson evoked 0.22 ± 0.03 μM of octopamine release in the larval ventral nerve cord. Repeated stimulations were stable with 2 or 5 min interstimulation times. With pulsed stimulations, the release was dependent on the frequency of applied light pulse. An octopamine transporter has not been identified, and blockers of the dopamine transporter and serotonin transporter had no significant effect on the clearance time of octopamine, suggesting that they do not take up octopamine. This study shows that octopamine can be monitored in Drosophila, facilitating future studies of how octopamine release functions in the insect brain.

  18. Aberrant seasonal variations of platelet serotonin uptake in endogenous depression.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R; Aberg-Wistedt, A; Mårtensson, B

    1989-02-15

    The serotonin uptake in platelets of 120 healthy volunteers and 64 endogenously depressed patients was investigated over a 2-year period. In healthy individuals, Km exhibited a significant seasonal rhythm during the bright half of the year. The seasonal rhythm of Vmax assumes the form of a sine curve, with nadir values at the vernal and autumn equinoxes and peak values at the winter and summer solstices. Km in patients was higher than in controls in February and October, and the seasonal variation of Km differed between patients and controls. The monthly mean values of Vmax in patients were, as a rule, lower than corresponding values in controls, but significantly so only in December. Patients had higher Vmax than controls in October and November, and the seasonal variation of Vmax in patients differed from that of controls. The results suggest that Km, a measure of the affinity of the serotonin uptake site, may be subject to photoperiodic regulation in healthy individuals. The annual variation in uptake site densities, as judged by the changes in Vmax, are probably generated by an endogenous superior oscillator. The aberrant uptake kinetics found in the endogenously depressed patients may reflect seasonal susceptibility to the disorder and/or altered serotonergic rhythmicity.

  19. Analgesic strategies aimed at stimulating the endogenous production of allopregnanolone

    PubMed Central

    Poisbeau, Pierrick; Keller, Anne Florence; Aouad, Maya; Kamoun, Nisrine; Groyer, Ghislaine; Schumacher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies indicate that 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids are remarkable analgesics in various pain states. This is the case for allopregnanolone (AP), one of the most potent endogenous positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptor function. From the pioneering work of Hans Selye, who described the sedative properties of steroids, synthetic compounds resembling the progesterone metabolite AP have been developed. If some of them have been used as anesthetics, it seems difficult to propose them as a therapeutic option for pain since they display several adverse side effects such as sedation, amnesia and functional tolerance. An alternative strategy, chosen by few laboratories around the world, is aimed at stimulating the local production of 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids in order to limit these well-known side effects. This pharmacological approach has the advantage of targeting specific structures, fully equipped with the necessary biosynthetic enzymatic machinery, where neurosteroids already act as endogenous pain modulators. The various pharmacological trials which attempted to treat pain symptoms by stimulating the production of 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids are reviewed here, as well as novel neurotransmitter systems possibly regulating their endogenous production. PMID:24987335

  20. Circulating Hepcidin-25 Is Reduced by Endogenous Estrogen in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lehtihet, Mikael; Bonde, Ylva; Beckman, Lena; Berinder, Katarina; Hoybye, Charlotte; Rudling, Mats; Sloan, John H.; Konrad, Robert J.; Angelin, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepcidin reduces iron absorption by binding to the intestinal iron transporter ferroportin, thereby causing its degradation. Although short-term administration of testosterone or growth hormone (GH) has been reported to decrease circulating hepcidin levels, little is known about how hepcidin is influenced in human endocrine conditions associated with anemia. Research design and methods We used a sensitive and specific dual–monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay to measure hepcidin-25 in patients (a) during initiation of in vitro fertilization when endogenous estrogens were elevated vs. suppressed, (b) with GH deficiency before and after 12 months substitution treatment, (c) with hyperthyroidism before and after normalization, and (d) with hyperprolactinemia before and after six months of treatment with a dopamine agonist. Results In response to a marked stimulation of endogenous estrogen production, median hepcidin levels decreased from 4.85 to 1.43 ng/mL (p < 0.01). Hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia, or GH substitution to GH-deficient patients did not influence serum hepcidin-25 levels. Conclusions In humans, gonadotropin-stimulated endogenous estrogen markedly decreases circulating hepcidin-25 levels. No clear and stable correlation between iron biomarkers and hepcidin-25 was seen before or after treatment of hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia or growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26866603

  1. Determination of endogenous faecal phosphorus loss in goats.

    PubMed

    Tayo, Grace Oluwatoyin; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang; Sun, Zhi Hong; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuan She; Han, Xue Feng

    2009-04-01

    Four black Liuyang wether goats were fed with corn stover and concentrate formulated to contain four levels of dietary phosphorus (P), including 0.129, 0.140, 0.162 and 0.180% of P. In a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment the endogenous faecal P loss was determined by the regression technique and the substitution method. Treatment effects on faecal and urinary P output, apparent P digestibility and P retention, and saliva P secretion were not significant. A linear relationship was observed between apparent faecal digestible P (Y, g/kg DMI) and P intake (X, g/kg DMI), which was described by the equation: Y = 0.4799 X -0.9209, r2 = 0.9869, (p < 0.05). The true P digestibility determined by the regression technique and the substitution method amounted to 48.0 and 48.9%, respectively; the recorded endogenous faecal P losses were 0.92 and 0.93 g/kg DMI, respectively. The study demonstrated the potential of the regression method as well as the substitution method for estimation of true P digestibility and endogenous faecal P losses in goats.

  2. Endogenous galactose formation in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, Peter; Kamalanathan, Loganathan; Hammen, Hans-Werner; Kotzka, Jorg; Wendel, Udo

    2014-12-01

    Patients with classical galactosaemia (galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency) manifest clinical complications despite strict dietary galactose restriction. Therefore the significance of endogenous galactose production has been assessed. Previous in vivo studies primarily focused on patients homozygous for the most common genetic variant Q188R but little is known about other genetic variants. In the present study the endogenous galactose release in a group of non-Q188R homozygous galactosaemic patients (n = 17; 4-34 years) exhibiting comparably low residual GALT activity in red blood cells was investigated. Primed continuous infusion studies with D-[1-(13)C]galactose as substrate were conducted under post-absorptive conditions and in good metabolic control. The results demonstrate that all patients exhibiting residual GALT activity of <1.5% of control showed a comparable pathological pattern of increased endogenous galactose release irrespective of the underlying genetic variations. Possible implications of the findings towards a more differentiated dietary regimen in galactosaemia are discussed.

  3. [Endogenous heparin-like syndrome: analysis of clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Bulanov, A Iu; Iatskov, K V; Shulutko, E M; Glukhova, T E; Andreĭchenko, S A

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons for non-surgical bleeding is heparin-like syndrome (HLS), under which is understanded presence of heparin effect in the absence of it's exogenous application. The role of endogenous heparins perform glycosaminoglycans -- biologically active substances. HLS is accompanied by endothelium damage and discussed in the network of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). HLS is described in liver future, sepsis, pregnancy and a number of hemoblastosis. Hypocoagulation effect of endogenous heparin localizates in X coagulation factor. The main method of diagnosis - thromboelastography. The use of a specific heparin antidote - Protamine sulfate has not confirmed clinical efficacy. Priority direction in the therapy of - methods of "shunt hemostasis". In this paper, we present the analysis of observations of 4 patients with developed endogenous HLS. In 2 cases (combination of sepsis with hepatic failure in one patient and initial thrombophilia in other) HLS has been accompanied by massive bleeding (massive hemothoraxc with haemorrhagic shock, a massive intraoperative blood loss). For HLS relief in these cases was used prothrombine complex concentrate (PCC) (in the 1st case), recombinant VIIa factor (in the 2nd case). In other cases, HLS (in a patient with multiple myeloma and childbirth in the postpartum period), haemorrhagic syndrome was not so expressed, the treatment was carried out with FFP transfusion.

  4. Drawing a fine line on endogenous retroelement activity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Diaz, Nathaly; Friedli, Marc; Trono, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroelements (EREs) are essential motors of evolution yet require careful control to prevent genomic catastrophes, notably during the vulnerable phases of epigenetic reprogramming that occur immediately after fertilization and in germ cells. Accordingly, a variety of mechanisms restrict these mobile genetic units. Previous studies have revealed the importance of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) and their cofactor, KAP1, in the early embryonic silencing of endogenous retroviruses and so-called SVAs, but the implication of this transcriptional repression system in the control of LINE-1, the only known active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome, was thought to be marginal. Two recent studies straighten the record by revealing that the KRAB/KAP system is key to the control of L1 in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and go further in demonstrating that DNA methylation and KRAB/KAP1-induced repression contribute to this process in an evolutionally dynamic fashion. These results shed light on the delicate equilibrium between higher vertebrates and endogenous retroelements, which are not just genetic invaders calling for strict control but rather a constantly renewed and nicely exploitable source of evolutionary potential. PMID:26442176

  5. Endogenous small RNAs and antibacterial immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hailing

    2008-08-06

    Small RNAs are non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that control gene expression by mediating mRNA degradation, translational inhibition, or chromatin modification. Virus-derived small RNAs induce silencing of viral RNAs and are essential for antiviral defense in both animal and plant systems. The role of host endogenous small RNAs on antibacterial immunity has only recently been recognized. Host disease resistance and defense responses are achieved by activation and repression of a large array of genes. Certain endogenous small RNAs in plants, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are induced or repressed in response to pathogen attack and subsequently regulate the expression of genes involved in disease resistance and defense responses by mediating transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene silencing. Thus, these small RNAs play an important role in gene expression reprogramming in plant disease resistance and defense responses. This review focuses on the recent findings of plant endogenous small RNAs in antibacterial immunity.

  6. The Drosophila hairpin RNA pathway generates endogenous short interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Katsutomo; Chung, Wei-Jen; Ruby, J. Graham; Guo, Huili; Bartel, David P.; Lai, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to microRNAs and Piwi-associated RNAs, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are seemingly dispensable for host-directed gene regulation in Drosophila. This notion is based on the fact that mutants lacking the core siRNA-generating enzyme Dicer-2 or the predominant siRNA effector Argonaute 2 are viable, fertile and of relatively normal morphology1,2. Moreover, endogenous Drosophila siRNAs have not yet been identified. Here we report that siRNAs derived from long hairpin RNA genes (hpRNAs) programme Slicer complexes that can repress endogenous target transcripts. The Drosophila hpRNA pathway is a hybrid mechanism that combines canonical RNA interference factors (Dicer-2, Hen1 (known as CG12367) and Argonaute 2) with a canonical microRNA factor (Loquacious) to generate ~21-nucleotide siRNAs. These novel regulatory RNAs reveal unexpected complexity in the sorting of small RNAs, and open a window onto the biological usage of endogenous RNA interference in Drosophila. PMID:18463630

  7. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  8. Endogenous Hepadnaviruses in the Genome of the Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and the Evolution of Avian Hepadnaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses [HBVs]) were recently discovered in the genomes of passerine birds. We mined six additional avian genomes and discovered multiple copies of endogenous HBVs in the budgerigar (order Psittaciformes), designated eBHBV. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that the endogenous hepadnaviruses are more diverse than their exogenous counterparts and that the endogenous and exogenous hepadnaviruses form distinct lineages even when sampled from the same avian order, indicative of multiple genomic integration events. PMID:22553337

  9. [Rapid isolation of 4-hydroxyphenylethanol from the bovine brain using Water Sep-Pak Plus cartridges with lipophilic sorbent (Florisil)].

    PubMed

    Panova, N G; Veselovskaia, N V; Medvedev, A E

    1996-01-01

    4-Hydroxypherlylethanol, MAO-A Inhibitory component of endogenous MAO Inhibitory activity, tribulin, was isolated from a small quantity of bovine brain using Maters Sep-Pak Florisil cartridges. Procedure included isolation of crude tribulin fraction, which was passed through the cartridge. Preliminary data revealed that this substance is not absorbed on Florisil. The employment of this type of cartridges essentially accelerates isolation of 4-hydroxyphenyethanol from brain samples for quantitative determination. Pilot experiments also revealed that Sep-Pak Folrisil cartridges could be used for the rapid isolation of isatin, another endogenous MAO (B) inhibitor, from brain tissue.

  10. Brain heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Modarresifar, Homayoun; Ho, Linh

    2009-03-01

    We present a case with intractable partial complex seizures in a 14-year-old girl who was found to have brain heterotopia on MRI and PET-CT. The patient presented with intractable partial complex seizures and a normal electroencephalogram. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging showed heterotopic gray matter lining the ventricular margin of the right occipital horn. Subsequent PET-CT demonstrated moderate tracer localization in the heterotopic gray matter surrounding the ventricular margin of the right occipital horn. Heterotopia may demonstrate normal or increased FDG uptake on PET, therefore its appearance may be deceiving when other pathologies are being considered.

  11. Endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in isolated bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Madhura; Njie-Mbye, Ya Fatou; Okpobiri, Ikechukwu; Zhao, Min; Opere, Catherine A; Ohia, Sunny E

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a novel gasotransmitter with physiological and pathological functions in vascular homeostasis, cardiovascular system and central nervous system. In the present study, we determined the endogenous levels of H(2)S in various tissues of the bovine eye. We also examined the basal levels of H(2)S in response to donors (sodium hydrosulfide, NaHS and sodium sulfide, Na(2)S), substrate (L: -cysteine), inhibitors (propargylglycine, PAG and aminooxyacetic acid, AOA) and activator (S-adenosyl-L: -methionine, SAM) of this gas in the bovine retina. H(2)S was measured using a well established spectrophotometric method. The highest concentration of endogenous H(2)S was detected in cornea (19 ± 2.85 nmoles/mg protein, n = 6) and retina (17 ± 2.1 nmoles/mg protein, n = 6). Interestingly, H(2)S was not present in vitreous humor. The inhibitors of CSE and CBS; PAG (1 mM) and AOA (1 mM), significantly attenuated the production of H(2)S in the bovine retina by 56.8 and 42%, respectively. On the other hand the activator of CBS; SAM (100 μM), H(2)S donors; NaHS (1 μM) and Na(2)S (100 μM), significantly increased endogenous levels of H(2)S in bovine retina. L: -cysteine (10-300 μM) produced a significant (P < 0.05) concentration-dependent increase in H(2)S levels reaching a maximal at 300 μM. We conclude that H(2)S is endogenously produced in various tissues of the isolated bovine eye. Moreover, endogenous levels of H(2)S are enhanced in the presence of substrate (L: -cysteine), an activator of CBS (SAM) and H(2)S donors but are blocked by inhibitors of enzymes that synthesize this gas in neural retina.

  12. Enkephalinase inhibition and hippocampal excitatory effects of exogenous and endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Sagratella, S

    1994-10-01

    1. The relationships between the in vivo and in vitro epileptogenic effects of opioids or enkephalins and the electrophysiological activity of inhibitors of endogenous enkephalinase were analyzed. 2. The functional effects of the inhibition of the endogenous enkephalinase has been compared with the role of the endogenous opioid peptidergic system in the control of neuronal excitability.

  13. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-11-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  14. Endogenous technological and demographic change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Ertsen, Maurits; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-05-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  15. Reducing Endogenous α-Synuclein Mitigates the Degeneration of Selective Neuronal Populations in an Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Brian; Desplats, Paula A.; Overk, Cassia R.; Valera-Martin, Elvira; Rissman, Robert A.; Wu, Chengbiao; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Florio, Jazmin; Rockenstein, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the progressive accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and microtubule associate protein tau, leading to the selective degeneration of neurons in the neocortex, limbic system, and nucleus basalis, among others. Recent studies have shown that α-synuclein (α-syn) also accumulates in the brains of patients with AD and interacts with Aβ and tau, forming toxic hetero-oligomers. Although the involvement of α-syn has been investigated extensively in Lewy body disease, less is known about the role of this synaptic protein in AD. Here, we found that reducing endogenous α-syn in an APP transgenic mouse model of AD prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Together, these results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Reducing endogenous α-synuclein (α-syn) in an APP transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of amyloid β. PMID:27466341

  16. The role of endogenous serotonin in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Angoa Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Shah, Mrudang M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species. The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by reactive oxygen species to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5-hydroxytryptophan do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that p-chlorophenylalanine largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum.

  17. Characterization of a family of endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors GPR7 and GPR8

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Norimasa; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Kurosu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kenji; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Williams, S. Clay; Richardson, James A.; Tsujino, Natsuko; Garry, Mary G.; Lerner, Michael R.; King, David S.; O'Dowd, Brian F.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    GPR7 and GPR8 are orphan G protein-coupled receptors that are highly similar to each other. These receptors are expressed predominantly in brain, suggesting roles in central nervous system function. We have purified an endogenous peptide ligand for GPR7 from bovine hypothalamus extracts. This peptide, termed neuropeptide B (NPB), has a C-6-brominated tryptophan residue at the N terminus. It binds and activates human GPR7 or GPR8 with median effective concentrations (EC50) of 0.23 nM and 15.8 nM, respectively. In situ hybridization shows distinct localizations of the prepro-NPB mRNA in mouse brain, i.e., in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and several nuclei in midbrain and brainstem. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPB in mice induces hyperphagia during the first 2 h, followed by hypophagia. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPB produces analgesia to s.c. formalin injection in rats. Through EST database searches, we identified a putative paralogous peptide. This peptide, termed neuropeptide W (NPW), also has an N-terminal tryptophan residue. Synthetic human NPW binds and activates human GPR7 or GPR8 with EC50 values of 0.56 nM and 0.51 nM, respectively. The expression of NPW mRNA in mouse brain is confined to specific nuclei in midbrain and brainstem. These findings suggest diverse physiological functions of NPB and NPW in the central nervous system, acting as endogenous ligands on GPR7 and/or GPR8. PMID:12719537

  18. Endogenous glucocorticoids protect against TNF-alpha-induced increases in anxiety-like behavior in virally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, MN; Macdougall, MG; Hu, F; Pace, TWW; Raison, CL; Miller, AH

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to immune challenges such as viral infection. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines induce behavioral alterations including changes in locomotor/exploratory activity. Accordingly, we examined proinflammatory cytokines and open-field behavior in virally infected mice rendered glucocorticoid deficient by adrenalectomy (ADX). Mice were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and open-field behavior (36 h post-infection) and plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 (42 h post-infection) were assessed. Compared to sham-ADX-MCMV-infected animals, ADX-MCMV-infected mice exhibited significant reductions in total distance moved, number of center entries, and time spent in center. These behavioral alterations were accompanied by significantly higher plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6, both of which were correlated with degree of behavioral change. To examine the role of TNF-alpha in these behavioral alterations, open-field behavior was compared in wild-type (WT) and TNF-R1-knockout (KO), ADX-MCMV-infected mice. TNF-R1-KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated decreases in number of rearings, number of center entries and time spent in center, but not distance moved, which correlated with plasma IL-6. Given the potential role of brain cytokines in these findings, mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 was assessed in various brain regions. Although MCMV induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine mRNA throughout the brain (especially in ADX animals), no remarkable differences were found between WT and TNF-R1-KO mice. These results demonstrate that endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to viral infection and their impact on locomotor/exploratory activity. Moreover, TNF-alpha appears to mediate cytokine-induced changes in open-field behaviors, especially those believed to reflect anxiety. PMID:17389906

  19. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system.

  20. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Barbara A.; Ahmed, Imad A. M.; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A.; Foulds, Penelope G.; Allsop, David; Mann, David M. A.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-01

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <˜200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health.

  1. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Barbara A.; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A.; Foulds, Penelope G.; Allsop, David; Mann, David M. A.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683–7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health. PMID:27601646

  2. Peptides and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25805003

  3. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Maher, Barbara A; Ahmed, Imad A M; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A; Foulds, Penelope G; Allsop, David; Mann, David M A; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-27

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health.

  4. Smart Brains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    New techniques have opened windows to the brain. Although the biochemistry of learning remains largely a mystery, the following findings seem to have clear implications for education: (1) the importance of early-learning opportunities for the very young; (2) the connection between music and abstract reasoning; and (3) the importance of good…

  5. Animating Brains.

    PubMed

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title 'Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience'. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of 'soul catching', the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain's electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains?

  6. Promoting brain remodeling to aid in stroke recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous brain repair after stroke involves a set of highly interactive processes, such as angiogenesis, neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis and axonal outgrowth, which together orchestrate neurological recovery. During the past several years, there have been advances in our understanding of miRNAs and histone deacetylases (HDACs) in brain repair processes after stroke. Emerging data indicate the important role of exosomes for intercellular communication in promoting coupled brain remodeling processes. These advances will likely have a major impact on development of restorative therapies for ischemic brain repair, consequently leading to improvement of neurological function. In this review, we provide an update on our current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of miRNAs, exosomes, and HDACs in brain restorative processes after stroke. PMID:26278490

  7. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony KP

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. PMID:27660488

  8. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain.

  9. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  10. [Development of physical dependence on nicotine and endogenous opioid system--participation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor].

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro; Yamamoto, Chizuko

    2014-10-01

    Nicotine (NIC) regulates various cellular functions acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). And nAChR consists of ligand-gated cation channels with pentameric structure and composed of α and β subunits. In the central nervous system, α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChRs are the most abundantly expressed as nAChR subtypes. There are several lines of evidence indicating that systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids, such as, endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, in the brain. NIC exerts numerous acute effects, for example, antinociceptive effects and the activating effects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In these effects, NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation, was inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (NLX), and was also suppressed in morphine tolerated mice, indicating the participation of the endogenous opioid system in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception was antagonized by both α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChR antagonists, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation was antagonized by α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist, but not by α 7 nAChR antagonist. These results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may not be located on the downstream of α 4 β 2 nAChR. On the other hand, NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. NLX elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration evaluated by corticosterone increase as a withdrawal sign, and NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of other opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, indicating the participation of endogenous opioid system in the development of physical dependence on NIC. NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal was also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α 7 nAChR antagonist, but not an α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that the endogenous opioid system may be located on the downstream of α 7

  11. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  12. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  13. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  14. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors A A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  15. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  16. Brain injury associated with widely abused amphetamines: neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2010-12-01

    Over the course of the 20(th) century, it became increasingly clear that amphetamine-like psychostimulants carried serious abuse liability that has resulted in sociological use patterns that have been described as epidemics. In fact, drug addiction is a brain disease with a high worldwide prevalence, and is considered the most expensive of the neuropsychiatric disorders. This review goes beyond the previously well-documented evidence demonstrating that amphetamines cause neuronal injury. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of psychostimulants drugs have been extensively described giving particular attention to the role of oxidative stress and metabolic compromise. Recently, it was shown that the amphetamine class of drugs of abuse triggers an inflammatory process, emerging as a critical concept to understand the toxic effects of these drugs. Moreover, it has been suggested that psychostimulants compromise the capacity of the brain to generate new neurons (neurogenesis), and can also lead to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Together, these effects may contribute to brain damage, allowing the entry of pathogens into the brain parenchyma and thus decreasing the endogenous brain repair resources. The overall objective of this review is to highlight experimental evidence in an attempt to clarify the role of neuroinflammation in amphetamines-induced brain dysfunction and the effect of these drugs on both neurogenesis and BBB integrity.

  17. Endogenous technological and demographic change under increasing water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many ancient civilizations such as the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions. Even contemporary societies such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin, Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Skeptics of hydroclimatic determinism have often cautioned against the use of hydroclimatic change as the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions by suggesting that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity. We here develop a simple overlapping generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. It models technological change not as an exogenous random sequence of events but as an endogenous process (as is widely accepted in contemporary literature) that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the endogenous diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, individuals' patience in terms of its present consumption versus future consumption, the production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of these factors. The population growth rate is modeled to decline once consumption per capita crosses a ';survival' threshold. The model demonstrates that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but only to a certain extent in many cases. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water society, leading to an exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require that the rate of success of investment in technological advancement is high. In other more realistic cases of technological success, we find that endogenous technology change has an effect delaying the peak of population before it starts to decline. While the model is a rather simple model of societal growth, it is capable of replicating (not to scale) patterns of technological

  18. Pediatric endogenous Haemophilus influenzae endophthalmitis with presumed hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Yumiko; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Background Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis is a rare but potentially devastating intraocular infection that can have severe sight-threatening complications. Most patients with endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis have underlying infectious conditions, such as diabetes or malignancy, which predispose them to infection. Case report A 1-year-old girl presented with cloudiness of the right eye. Ocular examination showed a cloudy cornea in the right eye with conjunctival injection and hypopyon. The intraocular pressure was 43 mmHg, and the fundus could not be visualized. She had an 8-day history of fever, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed typical findings of bacterial meningitis. She was clinically diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and endophthalmitis in the right eye and was treated with intravenous, topical, and intravitreal antibiotics and vitrectomy. Haemophilus influenzae was isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, but not from the aqueous and vitreous cultures. Four months later, her pediatrician diagnosed Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, but she had no clinical signs of endophthalmitis. Seven years after the initial presentation, the best-corrected visual acuity was 20/40 in the right eye. Discussion Endophthalmitis caused by H. influenzae is generally associated with poor visual outcomes; however, the patient in the current case responded well to the treatment. The patient had recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae within a 4-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to search for underlying infectious causes and revealed that the patient had an extremely small spleen for her age. Because the spleen is critical for clearing encapsulated bacteria such as H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae, we speculated that hyposplenism led to the bloodstream infection of H. influenza and then endogenous endophthalmitis in the right eye. PMID:28115875

  19. Visualization of an endogenous retinoic acid gradient across embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2013-04-18

    In vertebrate development, the body plan is determined by primordial morphogen gradients that suffuse the embryo. Retinoic acid (RA) is an important morphogen involved in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of structures, including the hindbrain and paraxial mesoderm. RA diffuses over long distances, and its activity is spatially restricted by synthesizing and degrading enzymes. However, gradients of endogenous morphogens in live embryos have not been directly observed; indeed, their existence, distribution and requirement for correct patterning remain controversial. Here we report a family of genetically encoded indicators for RA that we have termed GEPRAs (genetically encoded probes for RA). Using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer we engineered the ligand-binding domains of RA receptors to incorporate cyan-emitting and yellow-emitting fluorescent proteins as fluorescence resonance energy transfer donor and acceptor, respectively, for the reliable detection of ambient free RA. We created three GEPRAs with different affinities for RA, enabling the quantitative measurement of physiological RA concentrations. Live imaging of zebrafish embryos at the gastrula and somitogenesis stages revealed a linear concentration gradient of endogenous RA in a two-tailed source-sink arrangement across the embryo. Modelling of the observed linear RA gradient suggests that the rate of RA diffusion exceeds the spatiotemporal dynamics of embryogenesis, resulting in stability to perturbation. Furthermore, we used GEPRAs in combination with genetic and pharmacological perturbations to resolve competing hypotheses on the structure of the RA gradient during hindbrain formation and somitogenesis. Live imaging of endogenous concentration gradients across embryonic development will allow the precise assignment of molecular mechanisms to developmental dynamics and will accelerate the application of approaches based on morphogen gradients to tissue engineering and

  20. Trafficking of an endogenous potassium channel in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Cheng, Yvonne; Dou, Ying; Goonesekara, Charitha; David, Jens-Peter; Steele, David F.; Huang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The roles of several small GTPases in the expression of an endogenous potassium current, Ito,f, in adult rat ventricular myocytes have been investigated. The results indicate that forward trafficking of newly synthesized Kv4.2, which underlies Ito,f in these cells, requires both Rab1 and Sar1 function. Expression of a Rab1 dominant negative (DN) reduced Ito,f current density by roughly one-half relative to control, mCherry-transfected myocytes. Similarly, expression of a Sar1DN nearly halved Ito,f current density. Rab11 is not essential to trafficking of Kv4.2, as expression of a Rab11DN had no effect on Ito,f over the time frames investigated here. In a process dependent on intact endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport, however, overexpression of wild-type Rab11 resulted in a doubling of Ito,f density; block of ER-to-Golgi traffic by Brefeldin A completely abrogated the effect. Also implicated in the trafficking of Kv4.2 are Rab5 and Rab4. Rab5DN expression increased endogenous Ito,f by two- to threefold, nonadditively with inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis. And, in a phenomenon similar to that previously reported for myoblast-expressed Kv1.5, Rab4DN expression roughly doubled endogenous peak transient currents. Colocalization experiments confirmed the involvement of Rab4 in postinternalization trafficking of Kv4.2. There was little role evident for the lysosome in the degradation of internalized Kv4.2, as overexpression of neither wild-type nor DN isoforms of Rab7 had any effect on Ito,f. Instead, degradation may depend largely on the proteasome; the proteasome inhibitor MG132 significantly increased Ito,f density. PMID:22914645

  1. A comparative assessment of endogenous water institutional change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Ersten, Maurits

    2013-04-01

    This paper builds the theory of endogenous institutional change, first proposed by Greif and Laitin (2004), for water scarce regions in context of water institutions. The current emphasis on environmental change, including hydrological change, largely ignores the adaptation of human societies to change. Humans have mostly been considered as boundary conditions or parameters of the dynamics of hydrological change and are not considered as conduits of feedbacks. Nonetheless, the dynamical representation of hydrological change with feedbacks between various components of a system is assuring since it is reminiscent of processual ecological anthropology(Orlove, 1980), except that individual decision making is absent. This paper proposes to consider selected dryland basins of the world, to conceptualize proxies of water relevant socio-economic organisation, such as spatial scales of upstream-downstream cooperation in water use, synthesized over time and then proposes a comparative assessment to test regularities predicted by an extension of river game theory (Ambec and Ehlers, 2008; van der Brink et al, 2012) to endogenous institutional change. References: Orlove, B. S. (1980). Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 9 (1980), pp. 235-273. Greif. A. and D. D. Laitin (2004). A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change. American Political Science Review, Vol. 98, No. 4 November 2004. Ambec, S. and L. Ehlers (2008). Sharing a river amongst satiable agents. Games and Economic Behavior, 64, 35-50. Van der Brink, G. van der Laan and N. Moes (2012). Fair agreements for sharing international rivers with multiple springs and externalities. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 63, 388-403.

  2. Role for endogenous estrogen in prepubertal Sertoli cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Eddy; Villalon, Rosalina; Ribeiro, Salustiano; Berger, Trish

    2012-11-01

    Reducing prepubertal endogenous estrogens led to increased numbers of Sertoli cells and the associated increased testicular size and testicular sperm production capacity in boars. The increased number of Sertoli cells might be due to a longer time for proliferation; delayed differentiation of Sertoli cells during suppressed endogenous estrogens would be consistent with this hypothesized, prolonged proliferation interval. This study used immunohistochemical detection of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a marker of immature Sertoli cells, and of CDKN1B, a cell cycle inhibitor associated with more mature Sertoli cells, to determine if suppressing endogenous estrogens detectably delayed "differentiation" of porcine Sertoli cells. Testes were from littermate pairs of boars previously treated with Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, or vehicle, from the first week of age until tissue collection at 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 months of age. Four animals were examined at each age following Letrozole treatment and their corresponding littermates evaluated following treatment with vehicle. Amount of AMH protein in Sertoli cells decreased with age of boar and could not be detected at 6 months of age. The AMH labeling was greater in the Letrozole-treated boars compared with littermate vehicle controls at 4 months of age (P=0.03). The percentage of CDKN1B-labeled Sertoli cells apparently increased with age through 5 months of age. At 4 and 5 months of age, the mean percentage of CDKN1B-labeled Sertoli cells was less in the Letrozole-treated animals than in the vehicle control animals (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that continual inhibition of aromatase (and concomitatant reduced estrogen synthesis) causes a delay in Sertoli cell maturation in boars.

  3. Blood–Retinal Barrier Compromise and Endogenous Staphylococcus aureus Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Astley, Roger A.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that blood–retinal barrier compromise is associated with the development of endogenous Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis. Methods To compromise the blood–retinal barrier in vivo, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice for 1, 3, or 5 months. Diabetic and age-matched nondiabetic mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. aureus, a common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis in diabetics. After 4 days post infection, electroretinography, histology, and bacterial counts were performed. Staphylococcus aureus–induced alterations in in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell barrier structure and function were assessed by anti–ZO-1 immunohistochemistry, FITC-dextran conjugate diffusion, and bacterial transmigration assays. Results We observed one bilateral infection in a control, nondiabetic animal (mean = 1.54 × 103 ± 1.78 × 102 cfu/eye, 7% incidence). Among the 1-month diabetic mice, we observed culture-confirmed unilateral infections in two animals (mean = 5.54 × 102 ± 7.09 × 102 cfu/eye, 12% incidence). Among the 3-month diabetic mice, infections were observed in 11 animals, three with bilateral infections (mean = 2.67 × 102 ± 2.49 × 102 cfu/eye, 58% incidence). Among the 5-month diabetic mice, we observed infections in five animals (mean = 7.88 × 102 ± 1.08 × 103 cfu/eye, 33% incidence). In vitro, S. aureus infection reduced ZO-1 immunostaining and disrupted the barrier function of cultured RPE cells, resulting in diffusion of fluorophore-conjugated dextrans and transmigration of live bacteria across a permeabilized RPE barrier. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicated that S. aureus is capable of inducing blood–retinal barrier permeability and causing endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis in normal and diabetic animals. PMID:26559476

  4. Endogenous Epoxygenases Are Modulators of Monocyte/Macrophage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Mary C.; Holness, Mark J.; Swales, Karen E.; Warner, Timothy D.; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid is metabolized through three major metabolic pathways, the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and CYP450 enzyme systems. Unlike cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases, the role of CYP450 epoxygenases in monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings When transfected in vitro, CYP2J2 is an efficient activator of anti-inflammatory pathways through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α. Human monocytes and macrophages contain PPARα and here we show they express the epoxygenases CYP2J2 and CYP2C8. Inhibition of constitutive monocyte epoxygenases using the epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A induces cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and activity, and the release of TNFα, and can be reversed by either add back of the endogenous epoxygenase products and PPARα ligand 11,12- epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) or the addition of the selective synthetic PPARα ligand GW7647. In alternatively activated (IL-4-treated) monocytes, in contrast to classically activated cells, epoxygenase inhibition decreased TNFα release. Epoxygenases can be pro-inflammatory via superoxide anion production. The suppression of TNFα by SKF525A in the presence of IL-4 was associated with a reduction in superoxide anion generation and reproduced by the superoxide dismutase MnCl2. Similar to these acute activation studies, in monocyte derived macrophages, epoxygenase inhibition elevates M1 macrophage TNFα mRNA and further decreases M2 macrophage TNFα. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, epoxygenase activity represents an important endogenous pathway which limits monocyte activation. Moreover endogenous epoxygenases are immuno-modulators regulating monocyte/macrophage activation depending on the underlying activation state. PMID:22028915

  5. Endogenous RNA viruses of plants in insect genomes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Holmes, Edward C

    2012-06-05

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from RNA viruses with no DNA stage are rare, especially those where the parental viruses possess single-strand positive-sense (ssRNA+) genomes. Here we provide evidence that EVEs that share a sequence similarity to ssRNA+viruses of plants are integrated into the genomes of a number of insects, including mosquito, fruit flies, bees, ant, silkworm, pea aphid, Monarch butterfly, and wasps. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis places these EVEs as divergent relatives of the Virgaviridae and three currently unclassified plant viral species.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of keratin endogenous signal for skin multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Strupler, M.; Boulesteix, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2005-08-01

    We recorded one-photon excited fluorescence (1PEF) and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) spectra of purified keratin from human epidermis, and determined the action cross section of this endogenous chromophore. We used this spectroscopic analysis to analyse multiphoton images of skin biopsies and assign the intrinsic fluorescence signals in the epidermis. We observed a good agreement between in situ and in vitro 2PEF spectra of keratin. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the 2PEF signal of the keratins from the epidermis, and will be of practical interest for multiphoton imaging of the skin.

  7. Actinomyces endogenous endophthalmitis in a cat following multiple dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Westermeyer, Hans D; Ward, Daniel A; Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Lyons, Jeremiah A

    2013-11-01

    An 8-year-old, brachycephalic, mixed breed cat underwent full mouth tooth extractions for the treatment of tooth root abscessation. Subsequently, the cat developed anterior uveitis refractory to topical therapy that eventually necessitated enucleation. Actinomyces species were isolated from both the tooth root abscesses and the anterior chamber after enucleation. Histopathology of the enucleated eye revealed panophthalmitis with abundant intralesional bacteria morphologically consistent with Actinomyces. Between the time of tooth root extraction and enucleation (20 weeks), the cat was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and treated with oral steroids for inflammatory bowel syndrome. We believe this report represents a rare case of endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to dental disease, possibly precipitated by concurrent immunosuppression.

  8. Evaluation of the endogenous glucocorticoid hypothesis of denervation atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Max, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects are studied of the oral administration of RU38486, a potent selective glucocorticoid antagonist, on muscle weight, non-collagen protein content, and selected enzyme activities (choline acetyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamine synthetase) following denervation of rat skeletal muscle. Neither decreases in muscle weight, protein content, and choline acetyltransferase activity, nor increases in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogernase and glutamine synthetase were affected by RU38486. These data do not support the hypothesis that denervation atrophy results from enhanced sensitivity of muscle to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  9. Food cravings, endogenous opioid peptides, and food intake: a review.

    PubMed

    Mercer, M E; Holder, M D

    1997-12-01

    Extensive research indicates a strong relationship between endogenous opioid peptides (EOPs) and food intake. In the present paper, we propose that food cravings act as an intervening variable in this opioid-ingestion link. Specifically, we argue that altered EOP activity may elicit food cravings which in turn may influence food consumption. Correlational support for this opioidergic theory of food cravings is provided by examining various clinical conditions (e.g. pregnancy, menstruation, bulimia, stress, depression) which are associated with altered EOP levels, intensified food cravings, and increased food intake.

  10. Capital accumulation, endogenous population growth, and Easterlin cycles.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, G; Dockner, E J

    1990-01-01

    "In this paper we attempt to explain the occurrence of population cycles in industrialised economies where the birth rate depends on the difference between the actual and the expected consumption rate. This model of an endogenously growing population brings together Easterlin's idea of an adapting aspiration level with the neoclassical optimal growth paradigm. It is shown that in this highly aggregated demo-economic system (i.e., without inclusion of the age structure of a population) swings both in the economic and demographic variables may exist. The reason behind this 'strange' optimal behaviour is identified to be an intertemporal substitution effect between current and future levels of consumption."

  11. The Creative Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  12. Martian 'Brain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 May 2004 Most middle-latitude craters on Mars have strange landforms on their floors. Often, the floors have pitted and convoluted features that lack simple explanation. In this case, the central part of the crater floor shown in this 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image bears some resemblance to the folded nature of a brain. Or not. It depends upon the 'eye of the beholder,' perhaps. The light-toned 'ring' around the 'brain' feature is more easily explained--windblown ripples and dunes. The crater occurs near 33.1oS, 91.2oW, and is illuminated from the upper left. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  13. Silicon Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation <1 kW. For a balanced view on intelligence, we references Hawkins' view to first perceive the task and then design an intelligent technical response.

  14. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  15. Ionic homeostasis in brain conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Ornella; Vinciguerra, Antonio; Cerullo, Pierpaolo; Anzilotti, Serenella; Brancaccio, Paola; Bilo, Leonilda; Scorziello, Antonella; Molinaro, Pasquale; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Pignataro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Most of the current focus on developing neuroprotective therapies is aimed at preventing neuronal death. However, these approaches have not been successful despite many years of clinical trials mainly because the numerous side effects observed in humans and absent in animals used at preclinical level. Recently, the research in this field aims to overcome this problem by developing strategies which induce, mimic, or boost endogenous protective responses and thus do not interfere with physiological neurotransmission. Preconditioning is a protective strategy in which a subliminal stimulus is applied before a subsequent harmful stimulus, thus inducing a state of tolerance in which the injury inflicted by the challenge is mitigated. Tolerance may be observed in ischemia, seizure, and infection. Since it requires protein synthesis, it confers delayed and temporary neuroprotection, taking hours to develop, with a pick at 1–3 days. A new promising approach for neuroprotection derives from post-conditioning, in which neuroprotection is achieved by a modified reperfusion subsequent to a prolonged ischemic episode. Many pathways have been proposed as plausible mechanisms to explain the neuroprotection offered by preconditioning and post-conditioning. Although the mechanisms through which these two endogenous protective strategies exert their effects are not yet fully understood, recent evidence highlights that the maintenance of ionic homeostasis plays a key role in propagating these neuroprotective phenomena. The present article will review the role of protein transporters and ionic channels involved in the control of ionic homeostasis in the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning and post-conditioning in adult brain, with particular regards to the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), the Na+/H+ exchange (NHE), the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransport (NKCC) and the acid-sensing cation channels (ASIC). Ischemic stroke is the third leading

  16. Cannabinoids: Well-Suited Candidates for the Treatment of Perinatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, David; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, Maria Ángeles; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury can be induced by a number of different damaging events occurring during or shortly after birth, including neonatal asphyxia, neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke-induced focal ischemia. Typical manifestations of these conditions are the presence of glutamate excitoxicity, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, the combination of which can potentially result in apoptotic-necrotic cell death, generation of brain lesions and long-lasting functional impairment. In spite of the high incidence of perinatal brain injury, the number of clinical interventions available for the treatment of the affected newborn babies is extremely limited. Hence, there is a dramatic need to develop new effective therapies aimed to prevent acute brain damage and enhance the endogenous mechanisms of long-term brain repair. The endocannabinoid system is an endogenous neuromodulatory system involved in the control of multiple central and peripheral functions. An early responder to neuronal injury, the endocannabinoid system has been described as an endogenous neuroprotective system that once activated can prevent glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium accumulation, activation of cell death pathways, microglia activation, neurovascular reactivity and infiltration of circulating leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier. The modulation of the endocannabinoid system has proven to be an effective neuroprotective strategy to prevent and reduce neonatal brain injury in different animal models and species. Also, the beneficial role of the endocannabinoid system on the control of the endogenous repairing responses (neurogenesis and white matter restoration) to neonatal brain injury has been described in independent studies. This review addresses the particular effects of several drugs that modulate the activity of the endocannabinoid system on the progression of different manifestations of perinatal brain injury during both the acute and chronic recovery phases using

  17. Cognitive Improvement Induced by Environment Enrichment in Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rats: a Result of Upregulated Endogenous Neuroprotection?

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Junjian; Xiong, Li; Deng, Min; Wang, Jing; Xin, Jiawei; Liu, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Environment enrichment (EE) has been demonstrated to improve the cognitive impairment that is induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH), but the underlying mechanism has not yet been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the role of endogenous neuroprotection in EE-induced cognitive improvement in rats with CCH. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusions (2-vessel occlusions (2VOs)) were performed to induce CCH in male adult Wistar rats. Four weeks after the surgeries, the rats were exposed to enriched environments for 4 weeks (6 h/day). Subsequently, we assessed the effects of EE on cognitive function, brain histone acetylation levels, neuroprotection-related transcription factors (i.e., cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phospho-CREB (p-CREB), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) α, and nuclear regulatory factor 2 (Nrf2)), and oxidative stress and histological changes in the brain. After 2VO, the rats exposed to the EE treatment exhibited increased acetylation of histone 4 and increased p-CREB and Nrf2 protein levels in the brain. HIF-1α levels were increased after 2VO and reduced after EE treatment. The oxidative damage, histopathological changes in the brain, and spatial learning and memory impairments induced by 2VO were subsequently restored after EE treatment. These data indicate that EE promotes the acetylation of histone 4, regulates some neuroprotection-related transcription factors, attenuates oxidative damage, and protects against the histopathological damage to the brain induced by CCH. Together, the effects of EE in CCH rats might contribute to the recovery of spatial learning and memory.

  18. Animating Brains

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  19. Enriched Endogenous Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Protect Cortical Neurons from Experimental Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe; Ren, Huixia; Luo, Chuanming; Yao, Xiaoli; Li, Peng; He, Chengwei; Kang, Jing-X; Wan, Jian-Bo; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Su, Huanxing

    2016-11-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms still lack investigation. Here, we report that cultured cortical neurons isolated from fat-1 mice with high endogenous n-3 PUFAs were tolerant to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) injury. Fat-1 neurons exhibited significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) activation induced by OGD/R injury, upregulated antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and reduced cleaved caspase-3. Exogenous administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major component of the n-3 PUFA family, resulted in similar protective effects on cultured cortex neurons. We further verified the protective effects of n-3 PUFAs in vivo, using a mini ischemic model with a reproducible cortical infarct and manifest function deficits by occlusion of the distal branch of the middle cerebral artery with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The Fat-1 animals showed decreased ROS expression and higher level of glutathione in the injured brain, associated with improved functional recovery. We therefore provide evidence that n-3 PUFAs exert their protective effects against ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo, partly through inhibiting ROS activation.

  20. Endogenous activation of kainate receptors regulates glutamate release and network activity in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lauri, Sari E; Segerstråle, Mikael; Vesikansa, Aino; Maingret, Francois; Mulle, Christophe; Collingridge, Graham L; Isaac, John T R; Taira, Tomi

    2005-05-04

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are highly expressed throughout the neonatal brain, but their function during development is unclear. Here, we show that the maturation of the hippocampus is associated with a switch in the functional role of presynaptic KARs. In a developmental period restricted to the first postnatal week, endogenous L-glutamate tonically activates KARs at CA3 glutamatergic synapses to regulate release in an action potential-independent manner. At synapses onto pyramidal cells, KARs inhibit glutamate release via a G-protein and PKC-dependent mechanism. In contrast, at glutamatergic terminals onto CA3 interneurons, presynaptic KARs can facilitate release in a G-protein-independent mechanism. In both cell types, however, KAR activation strongly upregulates inhibitory transmission. We show that, through the interplay of these novel diverse mechanisms, KARs strongly regulate the characteristic synchronous network activity observed in the neonatal hippocampus. By virtue of this, KARs are likely to play a central role in the development of hippocampal synaptic circuits.

  1. Quinolinic Acid, an endogenous molecule combining excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and other toxic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity.

  2. Quinolinic Acid, an Endogenous Molecule Combining Excitotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Other Toxic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity. PMID:22408367

  3. Physiological and behavioural effects of the endogenous cannabinoid, arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, E. A.; Fuller, S. A.; Edgemond, W. S.; Campbell, W. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. Arachidonylethanolamide (AEA; anandamide) has been isolated from mammalian brain and found to bind to, and is thought to be, an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor. In order to understand better its behavioural and physiological properties, we have examined its acute effects in unanaesthetized freely behaving rats. 2. Intravenous AEA caused dose-related decreases in locomotor behaviour, a pronounced hyperreflexia, and a moderate antinociceptive state. At doses between 3 and 30 mg kg-1, a dose-dependent hypothermia and profound, time-dependent cardiovascular changes were also observed. 3. An immediate bradycardia exceeding 50% was seen within 10-15 s of administration and lasted up to 11 min following the highest dose of the drug. In contrast, the change in mean arterial pressure was biphasic: an immediate 20% decrease in mean arterial pressure followed by a significant increase in blood pressure that lasted about 13 min after the highest dose. 4. These data demonstrate that AEA in the unanaesthetized rat exerts behavioural and physiological effects generally similar to those seen following natural cannabinoids and synthetic cannabimimetic agents and suggests a role for AEA in regulation of various physiological processes. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8872363

  4. Hyperpolarized 13C dehydroascorbate as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M

    2011-11-15

    Reduction and oxidation (redox) chemistry is involved in both normal and abnormal cellular function, in processes as diverse as circadian rhythms and neurotransmission. Intracellular redox is maintained by coupled reactions involving NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and vitamin C, as well as their corresponding oxidized counterparts. In addition to functioning as enzyme cofactors, these reducing agents have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the toxic products of oxidative metabolism seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Despite this strong relationship between redox and human disease, methods to interrogate a redox pair in vivo are limited. Here we report the development of [1-(13)C] dehydroascorbate [DHA], the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy. In murine models, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-(13)C] vitamin C within the liver, kidneys, and brain, as well as within tumor in a transgenic prostate cancer mouse. This result is consistent with what has been previously described for the DHA/Vitamin C redox pair, and points to a role for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA in characterizing the concentrations of key intracellular reducing agents, including GSH. More broadly, these findings suggest a prognostic role for this new redox sensor in determining vulnerability of both normal and abnormal tissues to ROS.

  5. Cryogenic role of central endogenous hydrogen sulfide in the rat model of endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rodrigo A R; Soriano, Renato N; Francescato, Heloísa D C; Sabino, João P; Coimbra, Terezila M; Branco, Luiz G S

    2016-11-01

    Thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are affected by modulators that increase (propyretic) or decrease (cryogenic) body temperature (Tb). We tested the hypothesis that central hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a thermoregulatory modulator and that H2S production in the anteroventral preoptic region of the hypothalamus (AVPO) is increased during hypothermia and decreased during fever induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2.5mg/kg i.p.) in rats kept at an ambient temperature of 25°C. Deep Tb was recorded before and after pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme cystathionine β-synthase (CBS - responsible for H2S endogenous production in the brain) combined or not with LPS administration. To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these thermoregulatory adjustments, we also measured prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) production in the AVPO. LPS caused typical hypothermia followed by fever. Levels of AVPO H2S were significantly increased during hypothermia when compared to both euthermic and febrile rats. Intracerebroventricular (icv) microinjection of aminooxyacetate (AOA, a CBS inhibitor; 100 pmol) neither affected Tb nor basal PGD2 production during euthermia. In LPS-treated rats, AOA caused increased Tb values during hypothermia, along with enhanced PGD2 production. We conclude that the gaseous messenger H2S modulates hypothermia during endotoxic shock, acting as a cryogenic molecule.

  6. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  7. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  8. Downregulation of the endogenous opioid peptides in the dorsal striatum of human alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Daniil; Hussain, Muhammad Z.; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kononenko, Olga; Bazov, Igor; Zhou, Xingwu; Yamskova, Olga; Krishtal, Oleg; Karpyak, Victor M.; Yakovleva, Tatiana; Bakalkin, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides dynorphins and enkephalins may be involved in brain-area specific synaptic adaptations relevant for different stages of an addiction cycle. We compared the levels of prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin (PENK) mRNAs (by qRT-PCR), and dynorphins and enkephalins (by radioimmunoassay) in the caudate nucleus and putamen between alcoholics and control subjects. We also evaluated whether PDYN promoter variant rs1997794 associated with alcoholism affects PDYN expression. Postmortem specimens obtained from 24 alcoholics and 26 controls were included in final statistical analysis. PDYN mRNA and Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, a marker of PENK were downregulated in the caudate of alcoholics, while PDYN mRNA and Leu-enkephalin-Arg, a marker of PDYN were decreased in the putamen of alcoholics carrying high risk rs1997794 C allele. Downregulation of opioid peptides in the dorsal striatum may contribute to development of alcoholism including changes in goal directed behavior and formation of a compulsive habit in alcoholics. PMID:26029055

  9. Interactions between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Katherine A; Aichele, Stephen R; Bridwell, David A; Mangun, George R; Wojciulik, Ewa; Saron, Clifford D

    2009-07-01

    The ability to remain vigilant over long periods of time is critical for many everyday tasks, but controlled studies of visual sustained attention show that performance declines over time when observers are required to respond to rare stimulus events (targets) occurring in a sequence of standard stimulus events (nontargets). When target discrimination is perceptually difficult, this vigilance decrement manifests as a decline in perceptual sensitivity. We examined whether sudden-onset stimuli could act as exogenous attentional cues to improve sensitivity during a traditional sustained attention task. Sudden-onset cues presented immediately before each stimulus attenuated the sensitivity decrement, but only when stimulus timing (the interstimulus interval [ISI]) was constant. When stimulus timing was variable, exogenous cues increased overall sensitivity but did not prevent performance decline. Finally, independent of the effects of sudden onsets, a constant ISI improved vigilance performance. Our results demonstrate that exogenous attention enhances perceptual sensitivity during vigilance performance, but that this effect is dependent on observers' being able to predict the timing of stimulus events. Such a result indicates a strong interaction between endogenous and exogenous attention during vigilance. We relate our findings to a resource model of vigilance, as well as to theories of endogenous and exogenous attention over short time periods.

  10. Pyrintegrin Induces Soft Tissue Formation by Transplanted or Endogenous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhranti S.; Chen, Mo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Embree, Mildred; Kong, Kimi; Lee, Chang H.; He, Ling; Xiang, Lusai; Ahn, Jeffrey A.; Ding, Sheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adipose deficiency, such as lipoatrophy, lumpectomy or facial trauma, is a formidable challenge in reconstructive medicine, and yet scarcely investigated in experimental studies. Here, we report that Pyrintegrin (Ptn), a 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine known to promote embryonic stem cells survival, is robustly adipogenic and induces postnatal adipose tissue formation in vivo of transplanted adipose stem/progenitor cells (ASCs) and recruited endogenous cells. In vitro, Ptn stimulated human adipose tissue derived ASCs to differentiate into lipid-laden adipocytes by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), with differentiated cells increasingly secreting adiponectin, leptin, glycerol and total triglycerides. Ptn-primed human ASCs seeded in 3D-bioprinted biomaterial scaffolds yielded newly formed adipose tissue that expressed human PPARγ, when transplanted into the dorsum of athymic mice. Remarkably, Ptn-adsorbed 3D scaffolds implanted in the inguinal fat pad had enhanced adipose tissue formation, suggesting Ptn’s ability to induce in situ adipogenesis of endogenous cells. Ptn promoted adipogenesis by upregulating PPARγ and C/EBPα not only in adipogenesis induction medium, but also in chemically defined medium specifically for osteogenesis, and concurrently attenuated Runx2 and Osx via BMP-mediated SMAD1/5 phosphorylation. These findings suggest Ptn’s novel role as an adipogenesis inducer with a therapeutic potential in soft tissue reconstruction and augmentation. PMID:28128224

  11. Silent no more: Endogenous small RNA pathways promote gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wedeles, Christopher J; Wu, Monica Z; Claycomb, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous small RNA pathways related to RNA interference (RNAi) play a well-documented role in protecting host genomes from the invasion of foreign nucleic acids. In C. elegans, the PIWI type Argonaute, PRG-1, through an association with 21U-RNAs, mediates a genome surveillance process by constantly scanning the genome for potentially deleterious invading elements. Upon recognition of foreign nucleic acids, PRG-1 initiates a cascade of cytoplasmic and nuclear events that results in heritable epigenetic silencing of these transcripts and their coding genomic loci. If the PRG-1/21U-RNA genome surveillance pathway has the capacity to target most of the C. elegans transcriptome, what mechanisms exist to protect endogenous transcripts from being silenced by this pathway? In this commentary, we discuss three recent publications that implicate the CSR-1 small RNA pathway in the heritable activation of germline transcripts, propose a model as to why not all epialleles behave similarly, and touch on the practical implications of these findings.

  12. Endogenous retroviruses regulate periimplantation placental growth and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Kathrin A.; Palmarini, Massimo; Varela, Mariana; Burghardt, Robert C.; Hayashi, Kanako; Farmer, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are fixed and abundant in the genomes of vertebrates. Circumstantial evidence suggests that ERVs play a role in mammalian reproduction, particularly placental morphogenesis, because intact ERV envelope genes were found to be expressed in the syncytiotrophoblasts of human and mouse placenta and to elicit fusion of cells in vitro. We report here in vivo and in vitro experiments finding that the envelope of a particular class of ERVs of sheep, endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retroviruses (enJSRVs), regulates trophectoderm growth and differentiation in the periimplantation conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated extraembryonic membranes). The enJSRV envelope gene is expressed in the trophectoderm of the elongating ovine conceptus after day 12 of pregnancy. Loss-of-function experiments were conducted in utero by injecting morpholino antisense oligonucleotides on day 8 of pregnancy that blocked enJSRV envelope protein production in the conceptus trophectoderm. This approach retarded trophectoderm outgrowth during conceptus elongation and inhibited trophoblast giant binucleate cell differentiation as observed on day 16. Pregnancy loss was observed by day 20 in sheep receiving morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. In vitro inhibition of the enJSRV envelope reduced the proliferation of mononuclear trophectoderm cells isolated from day 15 conceptuses. Consequently, these results demonstrate that the enJSRV envelope regulates trophectoderm growth and differentiation in the periimplantation ovine conceptus. This work supports the hypothesis that ERVs play fundamental roles in placental morphogenesis and mammalian reproduction. PMID:16980413

  13. Effects of endogenous antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on macrophage phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Repollet, E.; Opava-Stitzer, S.; Tiffany, S.; Schwartz, A.

    1983-07-01

    Although several studies have indicated that antidiuretic hormone (ADH) enhances the phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in shock syndromes, it remains unknown what influence ADH exerts upon the individual phagocytic components of this system. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of endogenous ADH on the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage cells. As a phagocytic stimuli, fluorescent methacrylate microbeads were injected intraperitoneally into Brattleboro (ADH deficient) and normal Long Evans rats in the presence and absence of exogenous ADH. Peritoneal cells were harvested 19-22 hr after the administration of the microbeads and the percent phagocytosis was determined in macrophage cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Our results indicate that the percentage of peritoneal macrophages ingesting the fluorescent methacrylate microbeads was significantly reduced in the absence of ADH (Brattleboro rats: 5.4 +/- 0.6% versus Long Evans rats: 16.8 +/- 2.3%; p less than 0.001). In addition, our data demonstrate that exogenous administration of ADH significantly enhanced macrophage phagocytosis in Brattleboro (14.7 +/- 2.2%) and normal Long Evans (49.6 +/- 4.5%) rats. These data suggest, for the first time, that endogenous ADH might play a modulatory role in the phagocytic activity of a specific component of the RES, namely, the macrophage cell.

  14. Borderline personality disorder: a dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system?

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids constitute part of the underlying pathophysiology of BPD. The alarming symptoms and self-destructive behaviors of the affected patients may be explained by uncontrollable and unconscious attempts to stimulate their endogenous opioid system (EOS) and the dopaminergic reward system, regardless of the possible harmful consequences. Neurobiological findings that support this hypothesis are reviewed: Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, frequent and risky sexual contacts, and attention-seeking behavior may be explained by attempts to make use of the rewarding effects of human attachment mediated by the EOS. Anhedonia and feelings of emptiness may be an expression of reduced activity of the EOS. Patients with BPD tend to abuse substances that target mu-opioid receptors. Self-injury, food restriction, aggressive behavior, and sensation seeking may be interpreted as desperate attempts to artificially set the body to survival mode in order to mobilize the last reserves of the EOS. BPD-associated symptoms, such as substance abuse, anorexia, self-injury, depersonalization, and sexual overstimulation, can be treated successfully with opioid receptor antagonists. An understanding of the neurobiology of BPD may help in developing new treatments for patients with this severe disorder.

  15. Endogenous change: on cooperation and water in ancient history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.

    2013-04-01

    We propose and test the theory of endogenous change based on historical reconstructions of two ancient civilizations, Indus and Hohokam, in two water scarce basins, the Indus basin in the Indian subcontinent and the Lower Colorado basin in Southwestern United States. The endogenous institutional change sees changes in institutions as a sequence of equilibria brought about by changes in "quasi-parameters" such as rainfall, population density, soil and land use induced water resource availability. In the historical reconstructions of ancient civilizations, institutions are proximated by the scale of cooperation be it in the form of the extent of trade, sophisticated irrigation network, a centrally planned state or a loosely held state with a common cultural identity. The "quasi-parameters" either change naturally or are changed by humans and the changes affect the stability of cooperative structures over time. However, human influenced changes in the quasi-parameters itself are conditioned on the scale of existing cooperative structures. We thus provide insights into the quantitative dimensions of water access by ancient populations and its co-evolution with the socioeconomic and sociopolitical organization of the human past. We however do not suggest that water manipulation was the single most significant factor in stimulating social development and complexity - clearly this has been shown as highly reductionist, even misleading. The paper cautiously contributes to proximate prediction of hydrological change by attempting to understand the complexity of coupled human-hydrological systems.

  16. Endogenous digitalis-like factors: an overview of the history.

    PubMed

    Buckalew, Vardaman M

    2015-01-01

    The sodium pump is a ubiquitous cell surface enzyme, a Na, K ATPase, which maintains ion gradients between cells and the extracellular fluid (ECF). The extracellular domain of this enzyme contains a highly conserved binding site, a receptor for a plant derived family of compounds, the digitalis glycosides. These compounds inhibit the enzyme and are used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and certain cardiac arrhythmias. The highly conserved nature of this enzyme and its digitalis receptor led to early suggestions that endogenous regulators might exist. Recent examination of this hypothesis emerged from research in two separate areas: the regulation of ECF volume by a natriuretic hormone (NH), and the regulation of peripheral vascular resistance by a circulating inhibitor of vascular Na, K ATPase. These two areas merged with the hypothesis that NH and the vascular Na, K ATPase inhibitor were in fact the same entity, and that it played a causative role in the pathophysiology of certain types of hypertension. The possibility that multiple endogenous digitalis-like factors (EDLFs) exist emerged from efforts to characterize the circulating enzyme inhibitory activity. In this review, the development of this field from its beginnings is traced, the current status of the structure of EDLFs is briefly discussed, and areas for future development are suggested.

  17. Presynaptic Control of Corticostriatal Synapses by Endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABAB receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABAA, and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABAB receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABAB receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  18. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-07-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time.

  19. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0–1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time. PMID:23486249

  20. GPR56 Plays Varying Roles in Endogenous Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Begum, Shahinoor; Barry, Marc; Crowley, Denise; Yang, Liquan; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2011-01-01

    GPR56, a non-classical adhesion receptor, was previously reported to suppress tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models using human melanoma cell lines. To understand whether GPR56 plays similar roles in the development of endogenous tumors, we analyzed cancer progression in Gpr56−/− mice using a variety of transgenic cancer models. Our results showed that GPR56 suppressed prostate cancer progression in the TRAMP model on a mixed genetic background, similar to its roles in progression of melanoma xenografts. However, its roles in other cancer types appeared to be complex. It had marginal effects on tumor onset of mammary tumors in the MMTV-PyMT model, but had no effects on subsequent tumor progression in either the MMTV-PyMT mice or the melanoma model, Ink4a/Arf−/− tyr-Hras. These results indicate diverse roles of GPR56 in cancer progression and provide the first genetic evidence for the involvement of an adhesion GPCR in endogenous cancer development. PMID:20333450

  1. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: (1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, (2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and (3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: (1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, (2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and (3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  2. HIV infection en route to endogenization: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Colson, P; Ravaux, I; Tamalet, C; Glazunova, O; Baptiste, E; Chabriere, E; Wiedemann, A; Lacabaratz, C; Chefrour, M; Picard, C; Stein, A; Levy, Y; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    The long-term spontaneous evolution of humans and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well characterized; many vertebrate species, including humans, exhibit remnants of other retroviruses in their genomes that question such possible endogenization of HIV. We investigated two HIV-infected patients with no HIV-related disease and no detection with routine tests of plasma HIV RNA or cell-associated HIV DNA. We used Sanger and deep sequencing to retrieve HIV DNA sequences integrated in the human genome and tested the host humoral and cellular immune responses. We noticed that viruses from both patients were inactivated by the high prevalence of the transformation of tryptophan codons into stop codons (25% overall (3–100% per gene) and 24% overall (0–50% per gene)). In contrast, the humoral and/or cellular responses were strong for one patient and moderate for the other, indicating that a productive infection occurred at one stage of the infection. We speculate that the stimulation of APOBEC, the enzyme group that exchanges G for A in viral nucleic acids and is usually inhibited by the HIV protein Vif, has been amplified and made effective from the initial stage of the infection. Furthermore, we propose that a cure for HIV may occur through HIV endogenization in humans, as observed for many other retroviruses in mammals, rather than clearance of all traces of HIV from human cells, which defines viral eradication. PMID:25366539

  3. Cellular localization and tissue distribution of endogenous DFCP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Nanao, Tomohisa; Koike, Masato; Yamaguchi, Junji; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the maintenance of cellular metabolism. Once autophagy is induced in cells, the isolation membrane forms a so-called phagophore. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is one of several candidates for the membrane source for phagophores. Recently, LC3-positive isolation membranes were found to emerge from a DFCP1 (double FYVE domain-containing protein)-positive, ER-associated compartment called the omegasome. Although the GFP-tagged DFCP1 protein has been examined in cultured cells, little is known about the precise cellular and tissue distribution of this endogenous protein. To determine the expression of the endogenous DFCP1 protein, we produced antibodies specific to mouse DFCP1 protein. The antibody recognized both human and mouse DFCP1 proteins, both of which have molecular masses of approximately 87 kDa. In HeLa cells under normal conditions, immunoreactivity for DFCP1 was found dotted or tubular along Tom20-positive filamentous mitochondria and was only partially co-localized in the ER or Golgi apparatus. Moreover, under starved conditions, distinct DFCP1-positive structures became more dotted and scattered in the cytoplasm, while one part of the LC3-positive autophagosomes were immunopositive for DFCP1. These results indicate that an antibody raised against DFCP1 could be a useful tool in explaining the mechanism of phagophore formation from omegasome compartments.

  4. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  5. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  6. Hypoxia-Mimicking Nanofibrous Scaffolds Promote Endogenous Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqing; Liu, Yangxi; Tao, Jianning; Baumgarten, Keith M; Sun, Hongli

    2016-11-30

    Utilizing biomimetic materials to potentiate endogenous cell growth or signaling is superior to relying on exogenous cells or signals for bone formation. Desferoxamine (DFO), which is a hypoxia-mimetic agent that chelates iron (Fe(3+)), mimics hypoxia to encourage bone healing. However, high cytotoxicity, off-target effects, and the short half-life of DFO have significantly impeded its further applications. We mitigated these side effects by locally immobilizing DFO onto a gelatin nanofibrous (GF) scaffold that retained DFO's ability to chelate Fe(3+). Moreover, DFO-functionalized GF (GF-DFO) scaffolds, which have similar micro/macrostructures to GF scaffolds, not only demonstrated decreased cytotoxicity on both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human mesenchymal stem cells but also significantly increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vitro. Most importantly, in our in vivo experiments on a critical-sized cranial bone defect mouse model, a significant amount of bone was formed in most of the GF-DFO scaffolds after six weeks, while very little new bone was observed in the GF scaffolds. These data suggest that use of a hypoxia-mimicking nanofibrous scaffold is a promising strategy for promoting endogenous bone formation.

  7. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  8. Endogenous cortisol levels influence exposure therapy in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Michael, Tanja

    2014-09-01

    Previous research in patients with phobia showed that the administration of glucocorticoids reduces fear in phobic situations and enhances exposure therapy. Glucocorticoids underlie a daily cycle with a peak in the morning and low levels during the evening and night. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure is more effective when conducted in the morning when endogenous cortisol levels are high. Sixty patients meeting DSM IV criteria for specific phobia (animal type) were randomly assigned to one-session exposure treatment either at 08.00 a.m. (high cortisol group) or at 06.00 p.m. (low cortisol group). Participants returned for a posttreatment assessment one week after therapy and a follow-up assessment three months after therapy. Both groups showed good outcome, but patients treated in the morning exhibited significantly less fear of spiders in the behavioral approach test (BAT) and a trend for lower scores on the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) than patients treated in the evening. This effect was present at posttreatment and follow-up. Our findings indicate that exposure therapy is more effective in the morning than in the evening. We suggest that this may be due to higher endogenous cortisol levels in the morning group that enhance extinction memory.

  9. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  10. Physical activity behavior predicts endogenous pain modulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Keith E; Riley, Zachary A; Keith, NiCole R

    2017-03-01

    Older adults compared with younger adults are characterized by greater endogenous pain facilitation and a reduced capacity to endogenously inhibit pain, potentially placing them at a greater risk for chronic pain. Previous research suggests that higher levels of self-reported physical activity are associated with more effective pain inhibition and less pain facilitation on quantitative sensory tests in healthy adults. However, no studies have directly tested the relationship between physical activity behavior and pain modulatory function in older adults. This study examined whether objective measures of physical activity behavior cross-sectionally predicted pain inhibitory function on the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) test and pain facilitation on the temporal summation (TS) test in healthy older adults. Fifty-one older adults wore an accelerometer on the hip for 7 days and completed the CPM and TS tests. Measures of sedentary time, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were obtained from the accelerometer. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to determine the relationship of TS and CPM with levels of physical activity, while controlling for demographic, psychological, and test variables. The results indicated that sedentary time and LPA significantly predicted pain inhibitory function on the CPM test, with less sedentary time and greater LPA per day associated with greater pain inhibitory capacity. Additionally, MVPA predicted pain facilitation on the TS test, with greater MVPA associated with less TS of pain. These results suggest that different types of physical activity behavior may differentially impact pain inhibitory and facilitatory processes in older adults.

  11. Endogenous allergens in the regulatory assessment of genetically engineered crops.

    PubMed

    Graf, Lynda; Hayder, Hikmat; Mueller, Utz

    2014-11-01

    A scientific approach to the assessment of foods derived from genetically engineered (GE) crops is critical to maintaining objectivity and public confidence in regulatory decisions. Principles developed at the international level support regulators and enable robust and transparent safety assessments. A comparison of key constituents in the GE crop with a suitable comparator is an important element of an assessment. In Europe, endogenous allergens would be included in the comparative analysis, however this approach has been hindered by technical limitations on the ability to accurately measure identified allergenic proteins. Over recent years, improved proteomic methods have enabled researchers to focus on major allergenic proteins in conventional food crops, as information on natural variability is largely lacking. Emerging data for soybean indicate that variability in levels of major allergens already in the food supply is broad. This raises questions about the biological interpretation of differences between a GE plant and its conventional counterpart, in particular, whether any conclusions about altered allergenicity could be inferred. This paper discusses the scientific justification for requiring proteomic analysis of endogenous allergens as part of the evaluation. Ongoing scientific review and corresponding international discussion are integral to ensuring that data requirements address legitimate risk assessment questions.

  12. Endogenous 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and dopaquinone modifications on protein tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H; Heibeck, Tyler H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O; Camp, David G; Pounds, Joel G; Jacobs, Jon M; Smith, Desmond J; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e. DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 50 and 14 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, whereas only a few nitrotyrosine-containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 20 and 12 dopaquinone-modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly one-fourth of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal binding properties, consistent with metal-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondrially associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially derived oxidative stress and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  13. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-10-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release.

  14. Functional interactions between endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems: focus on alcohol, genetics and drug-addicted behaviors.

    PubMed

    López-Moreno, J A; López-Jiménez, A; Gorriti, M A; de Fonseca, F Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Although the first studies regarding the endogenous opioid system and addiction were published during the 1940s, addiction and cannabinoids were not addressed until the 1970s. Currently, the number of opioid addiction studies indexed in PubMed-Medline is 16 times greater than the number of cannabinoid addiction reports. More recently, functional interactions have been demonstrated between the endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems. For example, the cannabinoid brain receptor type 1 (CB1) and mu opioid receptor type 1 (MOR1) co-localize in the same presynaptic nerve terminals and signal through a common receptor-mediated G-protein pathway. Here, we review a great variety of behavioral models of drug addiction and alcohol-related behaviors. We also include data providing clear evidence that activation of the cannabinoid and opioid endogenous systems via WIN 55,512-2 (0.4-10 mg/kg) and morphine (1.0-10 mg/kg), respectively, produces similar levels of relapse to alcohol in operant alcohol self-administration tasks. Finally, we discuss genetic studies that reveal significant associations between polymorphisms in MOR1 and CB1 receptors and drug addiction. For example, the SNP A118G, which changes the amino acid aspartate to asparagine in the MOR1 gene, is highly associated with altered opioid system function. The presence of a microsatellite polymorphism of an (AAT)n triplet near the CB1 gene is associated with drug addiction phenotypes. But, studies exploring haplotypes with regard to both systems, however, are lacking.

  15. The human endogenous retrovirus link between genes and environment in multiple sclerosis and in multifactorial diseases associating neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Perron, Hervé; Lang, Alois

    2010-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses represent about 8% of the human genome and belong to the superfamily of transposable and retrotransposable genetic elements. Altogether, these mobile genetic elements and their numerous inactivated "junk" sequences represent nearly one half of the human DNA. Nonetheless, a significant part of this "non-conventional" genome has retained potential activity. Epigenetic control is notably involved in silencing most of these genetic elements but certain environmental factors such as viruses are known to dysregulate their expression in susceptible cells. More particularly, embryonal cells with limited gene methylation are most susceptible to uncontrolled activation of these mobile genetic elements by, e.g., viral infections. In particular, certain viruses transactivate promoters from endogenous retroviral family type W (HERV-W). HERV-W RNA was first isolated in circulating viral particles (Multiple Sclerosis-associated RetroViral element, MSRV) that have been associated with the evolution and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. HERV-W elements encode a powerful immunopathogenic envelope protein (ENV) that activates a pro-inflammatory and autoimmune cascade through interaction with Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. This ENV protein has repeatedly been detected in MS brain lesions and may be involved in other diseases. Epigenetic factors controlling HERV-W ENV protein expression then reveal critical. This review addresses the gene-environment epigenetic interface of such HERV-W elements and its potential involvement in disease.

  16. Endogenous intracellular calcium buffering and the activation/inactivation of HVA calcium currents in rat dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Granule cells acutely dissociated from the dentate gyrus of adult rat brains displayed a single class of high-threshold, voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channels. The kinetics of whole-cell Ca2+ currents recorded with pipette solutions containing an intracellular ATP regenerating system but devoid of exogenous Ca2+ buffers, were fit best by Hodgkin- Huxley kinetics (m2h), and were indistinguishable from those recorded with the nystatin perforated patch method. In the absence of exogenous Ca2+ buffers, inactivation of HVA Ca2+ channels was a predominantly Ca(2+)-dependent process. The contribution of endogenous Ca2+ buffers to the kinetics of inactivation was investigated by comparing currents recorded from control cells to currents recorded from neurons that have lost a specific Ca(2+)-binding protein, Calbindin-D28K (CaBP), after kindling-induced epilepsy. Kindled neurons devoid of CaBP showed faster rates of both activation and inactivation. Adding an exogenous Ca2+ chelator, 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), to the intracellular solution largely eliminated inactivation in both control and kindled neurons. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that endogenous intraneuronal CaBP contributes significantly to submembrane Ca2+ sequestration at a concentration range and time domain that regulate Ca2+ channel inactivation. PMID:1662686

  17. Epigenetic regulation of HDAC1 SUMOylation as an endogenous neuroprotection against Aβ toxicity in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chih Chieh; Hsu, Wei Lun; Ma, Yun Li; Cheng, Sin Jhong; Lee, Eminy Hy

    2017-02-10

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) produces neurotoxicity in the brain and causes neuronal death, but the endogenous defense mechanism that is activated on Aβ insult is less well known. Here we found that acute Aβ increases the expression of PIAS1 and Mcl-1 via activation of MAPK/ERK, and Aβ induction of PIAS1 enhances HDAC1 SUMOylation in rat hippocampus. Knockdown of PIAS1 decreases endogenous HDAC1 SUMOylation and blocks Aβ induction of Mcl-1. Sumoylated HDAC1 reduces it association with CREB, increases CREB binding to the Mcl-1 promoter and mediates Aβ induction of Mcl-1 expression. Transduction of SUMO-modified lenti-HDAC1 vector to the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice rescues spatial learning and memory deficit and long-term potentiation impairment in APP/PS1 mice. It also reduces the amount of amyloid plaque and the number of apoptotic cells in CA1 area of APP/PS1 mice. Meanwhile, HDAC1 SUMOylation decreases HDAC1 binding to the neprilysin promoter. These results together reveal an important role of HDAC1 SUMOylation as a naturally occurring defense mechanism protecting against Aβ toxicity and provide an alternative therapeutic strategy against AD.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cdd.2016.161.

  18. LC/MS/MS analysis of the endogenous dimethyltryptamine hallucinogens, their precursors, and major metabolites in rat pineal gland microdialysate.

    PubMed

    Barker, Steven A; Borjigin, Jimo; Lomnicka, Izabela; Strassman, Rick

    2013-12-01

    We report a qualitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous analysis of the three known N,N-dimethyltryptamine endogenous hallucinogens, their precursors and metabolites, as well as melatonin and its metabolic precursors. The method was characterized using artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) as the matrix and was subsequently applied to the analysis of rat brain pineal gland-aCSF microdialysate. The method describes the simultaneous analysis of 23 chemically diverse compounds plus a deuterated internal standard by direct injection, requiring no dilution or extraction of the samples. The results demonstrate that this is a simple, sensitive, specific and direct approach to the qualitative analysis of these compounds in this matrix. The protocol also employs stringent MS confirmatory criteria for the detection and confirmation of the compounds examined, including exact mass measurements. The excellent limits of detection and broad scope make it a valuable research tool for examining the endogenous hallucinogen pathways in the central nervous system. We report here, for the first time, the presence of N,N-dimethyltryptamine in pineal gland microdialysate obtained from the rat.

  19. Analytical and Biological Methods for Probing the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnline, Sloan; Courtney, D.; Nandi, Pradyot; Linz, Thomas H.; Aldrich, Jane V.; Audus, Kenneth L.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2012-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important interface between the peripheral and central nervous systems. It protects the brain against the infiltration of harmful substances and regulates the permeation of beneficial endogenous substances from the blood into the extracellular fluid of the brain. It can also present a major obstacle in the development of drugs that are targeted for the central nervous system. Several methods have been developed to investigate the transport and metabolism of drugs, peptides, and endogenous compounds at the BBB. In vivo methods include intravenous injection, brain perfusion, positron emission tomography, and microdialysis sampling. Researchers have also developed in vitro cell-culture models that can be employed to investigate transport and metabolism at the BBB without the complication of systemic involvement. All these methods require sensitive and selective analytical methods to monitor the transport and metabolism of the compounds of interest at the BBB.

  20. Classification effects of real and imaginary movement selective attention tasks on a P300-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaris, Mathew; Sepulveda, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) rely on various electroencephalography methodologies that allow the user to convey their desired control to the machine. Common approaches include the use of event-related potentials (ERPs) such as the P300 and modulation of the beta and mu rhythms. All of these methods have their benefits and drawbacks. In this paper, three different selective attention tasks were tested in conjunction with a P300-based protocol (i.e. the standard counting of target stimuli as well as the conduction of real and imaginary movements in sync with the target stimuli). The three tasks were performed by a total of 10 participants, with the majority (7 out of 10) of the participants having never before participated in imaginary movement BCI experiments. Channels and methods used were optimized for the P300 ERP and no sensory-motor rhythms were explicitly used. The classifier used was a simple Fisher's linear discriminant. Results were encouraging, showing that on average the imaginary movement achieved a P300 versus No-P300 classification accuracy of 84.53%. In comparison, mental counting, the standard selective attention task used in previous studies, achieved 78.9% and real movement 90.3%. Furthermore, multiple trial classification results were recorded and compared, with real movement reaching 99.5% accuracy after four trials (12.8 s), imaginary movement reaching 99.5% accuracy after five trials (16 s) and counting reaching 98.2% accuracy after ten trials (32 s).