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Sample records for endogenous circadian period

  1. An endogenous circadian rhythm of respiratory control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Christina M; Czeisler, Charles A; Shea, Steven A

    2000-01-01

    Many physiological and behavioural functions have circadian rhythms – endogenous oscillations with a period of approximately 24 h that can occur even in the absence of sleep. We determined whether there is an endogenous circadian rhythm in breathing, metabolism and ventilatory chemosensitivity in humans. Ten healthy, adult males were studied throughout 4 days in a stable laboratory environment. After two initial baseline days (16 h wakefulness plus 8 h sleep) that served to achieve a steady state, subjects were studied under constant behavioural and environmental conditions throughout 41 h of wakefulness. Ventilation, metabolism and the magnitude of the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were measured every 2 h. Individuals’ data were aligned according to circadian phase (core body temperature minimum; CBTmin) and averaged. In the group average data, there was a significant and large amplitude circadian variation in HCVR slope (average of ±0.4 l min−1 mmHg−1; corresponding to ±12.1 % of 24 h mean), and a smaller amplitude rhythm in the HCVR x-axis intercept (average of ±1.1 mmHg; ±2.1 % of 24 h mean). Despite a significant circadian variation in metabolism (±3.2 % of 24 h mean), there were no detectable rhythms in tidal volume, respiratory frequency or ventilation. This small discrepancy between metabolism and ventilation led to a small but significant circadian variation in end-tidal PCO2(PET,CO2; ±0.6 mmHg; ±1.5 % of 24 h mean). The circadian minima of the group-averaged respiratory variables occurred 6-8 h earlier than CBTmin, suggesting that endogenous changes in CBT across the circadian cycle have less of an effect on respiration than equivalent experimentally induced changes in CBT. Throughout these circadian changes, there were no correlations between HCVR parameters (slope or x-axis intercept) and either resting ventilation or resting PET,CO2. This suggests that ventilation and PET,CO2 are little influenced by central chemosensory

  2. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-12-26

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at approximately 10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to approximately 10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5-9 p.m. ( approximately 9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at approximately 10 a.m.

  3. Ethanol consumption in mice: relationships with circadian period and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Jennifer L.; Do, David T.; Grahame, Nicholas J.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional connection between the circadian timing system and alcohol consumption is suggested by multiple lines of converging evidence. Ethanol consumption perturbs physiological rhythms in hormone secretion, sleep and body temperature, and conversely, genetic and environmental perturbations of the circadian system can alter alcohol intake. A fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker, the endogenous period of its cycle under free-running conditions, was previously shown to differ between selectively bred High- (HAP) and Low- (LAP) Alcohol Preferring replicate 1 mice. To test whether there is a causal relationship between circadian period and ethanol intake, we induced experimental, rather than genetic, variations in free-running period. Male inbred C57Bl/6J mice and replicate 2 male and female HAP2 and LAP2 mice were entrained to light:dark cycles of 26 h or 22 h or remained in a standard 24 h cycle. Upon discontinuation of the light:dark cycle, experimental animals exhibited longer and shorter free-running periods, respectively. Despite robust effects on circadian period and clear circadian rhythms in drinking, these manipulations failed to alter the daily ethanol intake of the inbred strain or selected lines. Likewise, driving the circadian system at long and short periods produced no change in alcohol intake. In contrast with replicate 1 HAP and LAP lines, there was no difference in free-running period between ethanol naïve HAP2 and LAP2 mice. HAP2 mice, however, were significantly more active than LAP2 mice as measured by general home-cage movement and wheel running, a motivated behavior implicating a selection effect on reward systems. Despite a marked circadian regulation of drinking behavior, the free-running and entrained period of the circadian clock does not determine daily ethanol intake. PMID:20880659

  4. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  5. Simulations of light effects on the human circadian pacemaker: implications for assessment of intrinsic period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of the human circadian system to light has been the subject of considerable debate. Using computer simulations of a recent quantitative model for the effects of light on the human circadian system, we investigated these effects of light during different experimental protocols. The results of the simulations indicate that the nonuniform distribution over the circadian cycle of exposure to ordinary room light seen in classical free-run studies, in which subjects select their exposure to light and darkness, can result in an observed period of approximately 25 h, even when the intrinsic period of the subject's endogenous circadian pacemaker is much closer to 24 h. Other simulation results suggest that accurate assessment of the true intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker requires low ambient light intensities (approximately 10-15 lx) during scheduled wake episodes, desynchrony of the imposed light-dark cycle from the endogenous circadian oscillator, and a study length of at least 20 days. Although these simulations await further experimental substantiation, they highlight the sensitivity to light of the human circadian system and the potential confounding influence of light on the assessment of the intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker.

  6. Stability, precision, and near-24-hour period of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Duffy, J. F.; Shanahan, T. L.; Brown, E. N.; Mitchell, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Ronda, J. M.; Silva, E. J.; Allan, J. S.; Emens, J. S.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of circadian period in humans was thought to differ from that of other species, with the period of the activity rhythm reported to range from 13 to 65 hours (median 25.2 hours) and the period of the body temperature rhythm reported to average 25 hours in adulthood, and to shorten with age. However, those observations were based on studies of humans exposed to light levels sufficient to confound circadian period estimation. Precise estimation of the periods of the endogenous circadian rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, and cortisol in healthy young and older individuals living in carefully controlled lighting conditions has now revealed that the intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker averages 24.18 hours in both age groups, with a tight distribution consistent with other species. These findings have important implications for understanding the pathophysiology of disrupted sleep in older people.

  7. In vitro circadian period is associated with circadian/sleep preference

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Ohsawa, Yosuke; Enomoto, Minori; Katayose, Yasuko; Motomura, Yuki; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Nozaki, Kentaro; Watanabe, Makiko; Aritake, Sayaka; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Kato, Mie; Kamei, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Shin; Goto, Yu-ichi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases associated with disturbed biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). We measured clock gene expression in fibroblasts from individual subjects and observed circadian rhythms in the cells (in vitro rhythms). Period length of the in vitro rhythm (in vitro period) was compared with the intrinsic circadian period, τ, measured under a forced desynchrony protocol (in vivo period) and circadian/sleep parameters evaluated by questionnaires, sleep log, and actigraphy. Although no significant correlation was observed between the in vitro and in vivo periods, the in vitro period was correlated with chronotype, habitual sleep time, and preferred sleep time. Our data demonstrate that the in vitro period is significantly correlated with circadian/sleep preference. The findings suggest that fibroblasts from individual patients can be utilized for in vitro screening of therapeutic agents to provide personalized therapeutic regimens for CRSD patients. PMID:23797865

  8. Circadian rhythms and period expression in the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Daniel J; Shaw, Kerry L

    2013-05-01

    Daily activity times and circadian rhythms of crickets have been a subject of behavioral and physiological study for decades. However, recent studies suggest that the underlying molecular mechanism of cricket endogenous clocks differ from the model of circadian rhythm generation in Drosophila. Here we examine the circadian free-running periods of walking and singing in two Hawaiian swordtail cricket species, Laupala cerasina and Laupala paranigra, that differ in the daily timing of mating related activities. Additionally, we examine variation in sequence and daily cycling of the period (per) gene transcript between these species. The species differed significantly in free-running period of singing, but did not differ significantly in the free-running period of locomotion. Like in Drosophila, per transcript abundance showed cycling consistent with a role in circadian rhythm generation. The amino acid differences identified between these species suggest a potential of the per gene in interspecific behavioral variation in Laupala.

  9. Circadian rhythms and period expression in the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala

    PubMed Central

    Fergus, Daniel J.; Shaw, Kerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Daily activity times and circadian rhythms of crickets have been a subject of behavioral and physiological study for decades. However, recent studies suggest that the underlying molecular mechanism of cricket endogenous clocks differ from the model of circadian rhythm generation in Drosophila. Here we examine the circadian free-running periods of walking and singing in two Hawaiian swordtail cricket species, Laupala cerasina and Laupala paranigra, that differ in the daily timing of mating related activities. Additionally, we examine variation in sequence and daily cycling of the period (per) gene transcript between these species. The species differed significantly in free-running period of singing, but did not differ significantly in the free-running period of locomotion. Like in Drosophila, per transcript abundance showed cycling consistent with a role in circadian rhythm generation. The amino acid differences identified between these species suggest a potential of the per gene in interspecific behavioral variation in Laupala. PMID:23436058

  10. A circadian clock in Antarctic krill: an endogenous timing system governs metabolic output rhythms in the euphausid species Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Mathias; Wendt, Sabrina; Kawaguchi, So; Kramer, Achim; Meyer, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, shapes the structure of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Its central position in the food web, the ongoing environmental changes due to climatic warming, and increasing commercial interest on this species emphasize the urgency of understanding the adaptability of krill to its environment. Krill has evolved rhythmic physiological and behavioral functions which are synchronized with the daily and seasonal cycles of the complex Southern Ocean ecosystem. The mechanisms, however, leading to these rhythms are essentially unknown. Here, we show that krill possesses an endogenous circadian clock that governs metabolic and physiological output rhythms. We found that expression of the canonical clock gene cry2 was highly rhythmic both in a light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. We detected a remarkable short circadian period, which we interpret as a special feature of the krill's circadian clock that helps to entrain the circadian system to the extreme range of photoperiods krill is exposed to throughout the year. Furthermore, we found that important key metabolic enzymes of krill showed bimodal circadian oscillations (∼9-12 h period) in transcript abundance and enzymatic activity. Oxygen consumption of krill showed ∼9-12 h oscillations that correlated with the temporal activity profile of key enzymes of aerobic energy metabolism. Our results demonstrate the first report of an endogenous circadian timing system in Antarctic krill and its likely link to metabolic key processes. Krill's circadian clock may not only be critical for synchronization to the solar day but also for the control of seasonal events. This study provides a powerful basis for the investigation into the mechanisms of temporal synchronization in this marine key species and will also lead to the first comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock of a polar marine organism through the entire photoperiodic cycle.

  11. A Circadian Clock in Antarctic Krill: An Endogenous Timing System Governs Metabolic Output Rhythms in the Euphausid Species Euphausia superba

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, Mathias; Wendt, Sabrina; Kawaguchi, So; Kramer, Achim; Meyer, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, shapes the structure of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Its central position in the food web, the ongoing environmental changes due to climatic warming, and increasing commercial interest on this species emphasize the urgency of understanding the adaptability of krill to its environment. Krill has evolved rhythmic physiological and behavioral functions which are synchronized with the daily and seasonal cycles of the complex Southern Ocean ecosystem. The mechanisms, however, leading to these rhythms are essentially unknown. Here, we show that krill possesses an endogenous circadian clock that governs metabolic and physiological output rhythms. We found that expression of the canonical clock gene cry2 was highly rhythmic both in a light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. We detected a remarkable short circadian period, which we interpret as a special feature of the krill's circadian clock that helps to entrain the circadian system to the extreme range of photoperiods krill is exposed to throughout the year. Furthermore, we found that important key metabolic enzymes of krill showed bimodal circadian oscillations (∼9–12 h period) in transcript abundance and enzymatic activity. Oxygen consumption of krill showed ∼9–12 h oscillations that correlated with the temporal activity profile of key enzymes of aerobic energy metabolism. Our results demonstrate the first report of an endogenous circadian timing system in Antarctic krill and its likely link to metabolic key processes. Krill's circadian clock may not only be critical for synchronization to the solar day but also for the control of seasonal events. This study provides a powerful basis for the investigation into the mechanisms of temporal synchronization in this marine key species and will also lead to the first comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock of a polar marine organism through the entire photoperiodic cycle. PMID:22022521

  12. Alterations in endogenous circadian rhythm of core temperature in senescent Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, R. B.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Ruhe, R. C.; Fuller, C. A.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed whether alterations in endogenous circadian rhythm of core temperature (CRT) in aging rats are associated with chronological time or with a biological marker of senescence, i.e., spontaneous rapid body weight loss. CRT was measured in male Fischer 344 (F344) rats beginning at age 689 days and then continuously until death. Young rats were also monitored. The rats were housed under constant dim red light at 24-26 degrees C, and core temperature was recorded every 10 min via biotelemetry. The CRT amplitude of the body weight-stable (presenescent) old rats was significantly less than that of young rats at all analysis periods. At the onset of spontaneous rapid weight loss (senescence), all measures of endogenous CRT differed significantly from those in the presenescent period. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (a circadian pacemaker) of the senescent rats maintained its light responsiveness as determined by an increase in c-fos expression after a brief light exposure. These data demonstrate that some characteristics of the CRT are altered slowly with chronological aging, whereas others occur rapidly with the onset of senescence.

  13. Association of intrinsic circadian period with morningness-eveningness, usual wake time, and circadian phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The biological basis of preferences for morning or evening activity patterns ("early birds" and "night owls") has been hypothesized but has remained elusive. The authors reported that, compared with evening types, the circadian pacemaker of morning types was entrained to an earlier hour with respect to both clock time and wake time. The present study explores a chronobiological mechanism by which the biological clock of morning types may be set to an earlier hour. Intrinsic period, a fundamental property of the circadian system, was measured in a month-long inpatient study. A subset of participants also had their circadian phase assessed. Participants completed a morningness-eveningness questionnaire before study. Circadian period was correlated with morningness-eveningness, circadian phase, and wake time, demonstrating that a fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker is correlated with the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness.

  14. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  15. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Yang, Jessica N.; Garcia, Joanna I.; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Shea, Steven A.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers. PMID:25870289

  16. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Yang, Jessica N; Garcia, Joanna I; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M; Shea, Steven A; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2015-04-28

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show--by using two 8-d laboratory protocols--in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers.

  17. Counting circadian cycles to determine the period of a circasemilunar rhythm in a marine insect.

    PubMed

    Soong, Keryea; Chang, Yin-Hao

    2012-12-01

    Semilunar and lunar rhythms are often controlled endogenously, but the mechanisms of their respective free-run periods, when external factors are absent, are mostly unclear. In this investigation, the authors studied the mechanism controlling the period of the circasemilunar emergence rhythm of a marine midge, Pontomyia oceana, in southern Taiwan. Experimental approaches were adopted with various artificial light-dark (LD) periods, or T, from 22 to 28 h per cycle in the first experiment, and 18 to 30 h per cycle in the second experiment, as treatments on the same cohorts of midge larvae. The responses in emergence days were directly proportional to the magnitude of the treatments, just as that predicted by the frequency demultiplication hypothesis. A counting mechanism is thus the only hypothesis supported by this finding. To further test whether it is endogenous oscillations that are counted, submultiples as well as multiples of 24 h, i.e., 6, 12, 24, and 48 h per cycle, were used as T. The midges under all these treatments emerged at similar days. This result supports the hypothesis that endogenous circadian oscillations, not external LD cycles, are counted in this circasemilunar emergence rhythm of the marine midge. This paper reports a first case supporting the frequency demultiplication hypothesis in a circasemilunar rhythm that is based on counting the cycles of endogenous circadian rhythms.

  18. Neurospora circadian rhythms in space - A reexamination of the endogenous-exogenous question

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Ellman, D.; Wassmer, G.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M.

    1984-01-01

    To test the functioning of circadian rhythms removed from periodicities of the earth's 24-hour rotation, the conidiation rhythm of the fungus Neurospora crassa was monitored in constant darkness during spaceflight. The free-running period of the rhythm was the same in space as on the earth, but there was a marked reduction in the clarity of the rhythm, and apparent arrhythmicity in some tubes. At the current stage of analysis of the results there is insufficient evidence to determine whether the effect seen in space was related to removal from 24-hour periodicities and whether the circadian timekeeping mechanism, or merely its expression, was affected.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of circadian periodic pattern in plant transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    Background Circadian rhythm is a crucial factor in orchestration of plant physiology, keeping it in synchrony with the daylight cycle. Previous studies have reported that up to 16% of plant transcriptome are circadially expressed. Results Our studies of mammalian gene expression revealed circadian baseline oscillation in nearly 100% of genes. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of periodicity in two independent data sets. Application of the advanced algorithms and analytic approached already tested on animal data reveals oscillation in almost every gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusion This study indicates an even more pervasive role of oscillation in molecular physiology of plants than previously believed. Earlier studies have dramatically underestimated the prevalence of circadian oscillation in plant gene expression. PMID:18793463

  20. Circadian corticosteroid periodicity: critical period for abolition by neonatal injection of corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Krieger, D T

    1972-12-15

    Circadian variation of corticosteroid concentrations in rat plasma is suppressed if corticosteroids are administered between days 2 to 4 of neonatal life, but not if they are given between days 12 to 14 of neonatal life. This indicates a critical period for the effect of corticosteroid administration on the central nervous system pathways regulating such periodicity. Circadian periodicity of corticosteroids is not affected by neonatal administration of testosterone or reserpine.

  1. Intrinsic near-24-h pacemaker period determines limits of circadian entrainment to a weak synchronizer in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Hughes, R. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are robust regulators of physiology and behavior. Synchronization or entrainment of biological clocks to environmental time is adaptive and important for physiological homeostasis and for the proper timing of species-specific behaviors. We studied subjects in the laboratory for up to 55 days each to determine the ability to entrain the human clock to a weak circadian synchronizing stimulus [scheduled activity-rest cycle in very dim (approximately 1.5 lux in the angle of gaze) light-dark cycle] at three approximately 24-h periods: 23.5, 24.0, and 24.6 h. These studies allowed us to test two competing hypotheses as to whether the period of the human circadian pacemaker is near to or much longer than 24 h. We report here that imposition of a sleep-wake schedule with exposure to the equivalent of candle light during wakefulness and darkness during sleep is usually sufficient to maintain circadian entrainment to the 24-h day but not to a 23.5- or 24.6-h day. Our results demonstrate functionally that, in normally entrained sighted adults, the average intrinsic circadian period of the human biological clock is very close to 24 h. Either exposure to very dim light and/or the scheduled sleep-wake cycle itself can entrain this near-24-h intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker to the 24-h day.

  2. Impact of dispersed coupling strength on the free running periods of circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Rohling, Jos H. T.; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie

    2016-03-01

    The dominant endogenous clock, named the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), regulates circadian rhythms of behavioral and physiological activity in mammals. One of the main characteristics of the SCN is that the animal maintains a circadian rhythm with a period close to 24 h in the absence of a daily light-dark cycle (called the free running period). The free running period varies among species due to heterogeneity of the SCN network. Previous studies have shown that the heterogeneity in cellular coupling as well as in intrinsic neuronal periods shortens the free running period. Furthermore, as derived from experiments, one neuron's coupling strength is negatively associated with its period. It is unknown what the effects of this association between coupling strength and period are on the free running period and how the heterogeneity in coupling strength influences this free running period. In the present study we found that in the presence of a negative relationship between one neuron's coupling strength and its period, surprisingly, the dispersion of coupling strengths increases the free running period. Our present finding may shed new light on the understanding of the heterogeneous SCN network and provides an alternative explanation for the diversity of free running periods between species.

  3. Functional analysis of the circadian clock gene period by RNA interference in nymphal crickets Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiyuki; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Akira, Matsumoto; Sumihare, Noji; Tomioka, Kenji

    2009-05-01

    The circadian clock gene period (Gryllus bimaculatus period, Gb'per) plays a core role in circadian rhythm generation in adults of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. We examined the role of Gb'per in nymphal crickets that show a diurnal rhythm rather than the nocturnal rhythm of the adults. As in the adult optic lobes, Gb'per mRNA levels in the head of the third instar nymphs showed daily cycling in light-dark cycles with a peak at mid night, and the rhythm persisted in constant darkness. Injection of Gb'per double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the abdomen of third instar nymphs knocked-down the mRNA levels to 25% of that in control animals. Most Gb'per dsRNA injected nymphs lost their circadian locomotor activity rhythm, while those injected with DsRed2 dsRNA as a negative control clearly maintained the rhythm. These results suggest that nymphs and adults share a common endogenous clock mechanism involving the clock gene Gb'per.

  4. Functional analysis of the circadian clock gene period by RNA interference in nymphal crickets Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiyuki; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Matsumoto, Akira; Noji, Sumihare; Tomioka, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    The circadian clock gene period (Gryllus bimaculatus period, Gb'per) plays a core role in circadian rhythm generation in adults of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. We examined the role of Gb'per in nymphal crickets that show a diurnal rhythm rather than the nocturnal rhythm of the adults. As in the adult optic lobes, Gb'per mRNA levels in the head of the third instar nymphs showed daily cycling in light-dark cycles with a peak at mid night, and the rhythm persisted in constant darkness. Injection of Gb'per double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the abdomen of third instar nymphs knocked-down the mRNA levels to 25% of that in control animals. Most Gb'per dsRNA injected nymphs lost their circadian locomotor activity rhythm, while those injected with DsRed2 dsRNA as a negative control clearly maintained the rhythm. These results suggest that nymphs and adults share a common endogenous clock mechanism involving the clock gene Gb'per.

  5. Stretch, Shrink, and Shatter the Rhythms: The Intrinsic Circadian Period in Mania and Depression.

    PubMed

    Martynhak, Bruno Jacson; Pereira, Marcela; de Souza, Camila Pasquini; Andreatini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in the circadian rhythms have long been associated with depression and mania. Animal models of mania and depression exhibit differential effects upon the intrinsic circadian period and the same occurs with antidepressants and mood stabilizers treatment. The intrinsic circadian period is expressed when there are no time clues or when the light/dark cycle length is beyond the capacity of synchronization. In summary, while there is no clear association between the circadian period and mania, depressive-like behaviour is generally associated either with lengthening of the circadian period or with arrythmicity, and the improvement of depressive-like behaviour is associated with shortening of the circadian period. Thus, this review is an attempt to summarize data regarding these correlations and find a putative role of the circadian intrinsic period in mood regulation, particularly concerning the switch from depression to mania.

  6. Propylthiouracil, but not other antithyroid treatments, lengthens hamster circadian period

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, L.P. )

    1988-07-01

    Two experiments were performed to evaluate the role of the thyroid gland as a mediator of circadian rhythms in the hamster. In experiment 1, the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil (PTU) lengthened the circadian period ({tau}), increased thyroid weight, and eliminated detectable thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) from blood. A low-iodine diet greatly reduced T{sub 4} levels but had no effect on T{sub 3} or {tau}. Treatment with 500 {mu}Ci of {sup 131}I failed to alter any parameter of physiology or thythmicity measured. In this experiment, some animals in the low-iodine and PTU groups had greatly reduced testes sizes, and testses size was inversely correlated with change in {tau}. In experiment 2, T{sub 4} and T{sub 3} levels detected 11 wk after surgical thyroidectomy were significantly less than those found in sham-operated ammals, but concentrations of the two hormones varied widely across the thyroidectomized group. Thyroidectomy did not increase {tau} either 4 or 11 wk after surgery, nor was there evidence from individuals that level of thyroid function was associated with change in {tau}. The results from these experiments suggest that diminished thyroid function is not causal of lengthened circadian period.

  7. Effects of gravity on the circadian period in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Dean M.; Demaria, Victor H.; Fuller, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increased gravity force on the circadian period of body temperature and activity of rats was investigated using rats implanted with a small radio telemetry device and, after a 2-week recovery and a 3-week control period at 1G, rotated at for 4 weeks at a constant 2G field in a 18-ft-diam centrifuge. Measurements of the mean freerunning period of the temperature and activity rhythms after 10 days showed that the exposure to 2G led to a functional separation of the pacemakers that regulate the activity and the temperature in the animals. Each pacemaker reacted differently: the activity period increased and the temperature period decreased. By the third or the fourth week, the activity and the temperature periods have returned to 1G control levels.

  8. microRNA modulation of circadian clock period and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hai-Ying M.; Papp, Joseph W.; Varlamova, Olga; Dziema, Heather; Russell, Brandon; Curfman, John P.; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Shimizu, Kimiko; Okamura, Hitoshi; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding, RNAs that regulate the stability or translation of mRNA transcripts. Although recent work has implicated miRNAs in development and in disease, the expression and function of miRNAs in the adult mammalian nervous system has not been extensively characterized. Here, we examine the role of two brain-specific miRNAs, miR-219 and miR-132, in modulating the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. miR-219 is a target of the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex, exhibits robust circadian rhythms of expression and the in vivo knockdown of miR-219 lengthens the circadian period. miR-132 is induced by photic entrainment cues via a MAPK/CREB-dependent mechanism, modulates clock gene expression, and attenuates the entraining effects of light. Collectively, these data reveal miRNAs as clock- and light-regulated genes and provide a mechanistic examination of their roles as effectors of pacemaker activity and entrainment. PMID:17553428

  9. The mammalian circadian clock protein period counteracts cryptochrome in phosphorylation dynamics of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Tokuda, Isao; Matsuo, Takahiro; Sato, Miho; Node, Koichi; Nishida, Eisuke; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-11-14

    The circadian transcription factor CLOCK exhibits a circadian oscillation in its phosphorylation levels. Although it remains unclear whether this phosphorylation contributes to circadian rhythm generation, it has been suggested to be involved in transcriptional activity, intracellular localization, and degradative turnover of CLOCK. Here, we obtained direct evidence that CLOCK phosphorylation may be essential for autonomous circadian oscillation in clock gene expression. Importantly, we found that the circadian transcriptional repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER) showed an opposite effect on CLOCK phosphorylation; CRY impaired BMAL1-dependent CLOCK phosphorylation, whereas PER protected the phosphorylation against CRY. Interestingly, unlike PER1 and PER2, PER3 did not exert a protective action, which correlates with the phenotypic differences among mice lacking the Per genes. Further studies on the regulatory mechanism of CLOCK phosphorylation would thus lead to elucidation of the mechanism of CRY-mediated transcriptional repression and an understanding of the true role of PER in the negative feedback system.

  10. Multiple circadian-regulated elements contribute to cycling period gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Stanewsky, R; Jamison, C F; Plautz, J D; Kay, S A; Hall, J C

    1997-01-01

    A new regulatory element necessary for the correct temporal expression of the period (per) gene was identified by monitoring real-time per expression in living individual flies carrying two different period-luciferase transgenes. luciferase RNA driven from only the per promoter was not sufficient to replicate the normal pattern of per RNA cycling; however, a per-luc fusion RNA driven from a transgene containing additional per sequences cycled identically to endogenous per. The results indicate the existence of at least two circadian-regulated elements--one within the promoter and one within the transcribed portion of the per gene. Phase and amplitude analysis of both per-luc transgenes revealed that normal per expression requires the regulation of these elements at distinct phases and suggests a mechanism by which biological clocks sustain high-amplitude feedback oscillations. PMID:9305642

  11. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-08-23

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in the circadian and circatidal rhythms of A. asahinai using RNAi. After injection of double-stranded RNA of per, most crickets did not show the circadian modulation of activity but the circatidal rhythm persisted without a significant difference in the period from controls. Thus, per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm but plays no role, or a less important role, in the circatidal rhythm. We conclude that the circatidal rhythm in A. asahinai is controlled by a circatidal clock whose molecular mechanism is different from that of the circadian clock.

  12. Sex difference in the near-24-hour intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Cain, Sean W.; Chang, Anne-Marie; Phillips, Andrew J. K.; Münch, Mirjam Y.; Gronfier, Claude; Wyatt, James K.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature are set to an earlier hour in women than in men, even when the women and men maintain nearly identical and consistent bedtimes and wake times. Moreover, women tend to wake up earlier than men and exhibit a greater preference for morning activities than men. Although the neurobiological mechanism underlying this sex difference in circadian alignment is unknown, multiple studies in nonhuman animals have demonstrated a sex difference in circadian period that could account for such a difference in circadian alignment between women and men. Whether a sex difference in intrinsic circadian period in humans underlies the difference in circadian alignment between men and women is unknown. We analyzed precise estimates of intrinsic circadian period collected from 157 individuals (52 women, 105 men; aged 18–74 y) studied in a month-long inpatient protocol designed to minimize confounding influences on circadian period estimation. Overall, the average intrinsic period of the melatonin and temperature rhythms in this population was very close to 24 h [24.15 ± 0.2 h (24 h 9 min ± 12 min)]. We further found that the intrinsic circadian period was significantly shorter in women [24.09 ± 0.2 h (24 h 5 min ± 12 min)] than in men [24.19 ± 0.2 h (24 h 11 min ± 12 min); P < 0.01] and that a significantly greater proportion of women have intrinsic circadian periods shorter than 24.0 h (35% vs. 14%; P < 0.01). The shorter average intrinsic circadian period observed in women may have implications for understanding sex differences in habitual sleep duration and insomnia prevalence. PMID:21536890

  13. Skylab SO71/SO72 circadian periodicity experiment. [experimental design and checkout of hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairchild, M. K.; Hartmann, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The circadian rhythm hardware activities from 1965 through 1973 are considered. A brief history of the programs leading to the development of the combined Skylab SO71/SO72 Circadian Periodicity Experiment (CPE) is given. SO71 is the Skylab experiment number designating the pocket mouse circadian experiment, and SO72 designates the vinegar gnat circadian experiment. Final design modifications and checkout of the CPE, integration testing with the Apollo service module CSM 117 and the launch preparation and support tasks at Kennedy Space Center are reported.

  14. The parathyroid hormone circadian rhythm is truly endogenous--a general clinical research center study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    el-Hajj Fuleihan, G.; Klerman, E. B.; Brown, E. N.; Choe, Y.; Brown, E. M.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    While circulating levels of PTH follow a diurnal pattern, it has been unclear whether these changes are truly endogenous or are dictated by external factors that themselves follow a diurnal pattern, such as sleep-wake cycles, light-dark cycles, meals, or posture. We evaluated the diurnal rhythm of PTH in 11 normal healthy male volunteers in our Intensive Physiologic Monitoring Unit. The first 36 h spent under baseline conditions were followed by 28-40 h of constant routine conditions (CR; enforced wakefulness in the strict semirecumbent position, with the consumption of hourly snacks). During baseline conditions, PTH levels followed a bimodal diurnal rhythm with an average amplitude of 4.2 pg/mL. A primary peak (t1max) occurred at 0314 h, and the secondary peak (t2max) occurred at 1726 h, whereas the primary and secondary nadirs (t1min and t2min) took place, on the average, at 1041 and 2103 h, respectively. This rhythm was preserved under CR conditions, albeit with different characteristics, thus confirming its endogenous nature. The serum ionized calcium (Cai) demonstrated a rhythm in 3 of the 5 subjects studied that varied widely between individuals and did not have any apparent relation to PTH. Urinary calcium/creatinine (UCa/Cr), phosphate/Cr (UPO4/Cr), and sodium/Cr (UNa/Cr) ratios all followed a diurnal rhythm during the baseline day. These rhythms persisted during the CR, although with different characteristics for the first two parameters, whereas that of UNa/Cr was unchanged. In general, the temporal pattern for the UCa/Cr curve was a mirror image of the PTH curve, whereas the UPO4/Cr pattern moved in parallel with the PTH curve. In conclusion, PTH levels exhibit a diurnal rhythm that persists during a CR, thereby confirming that a large component of this rhythm is an endogenous circadian rhythm. The clinical relevance of this rhythm is reflected in the associated rhythms of biological markers of PTH effect at the kidney, namely UCa/Cr and UPO4/Cr.

  15. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  16. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    PubMed Central

    Zantke, Juliane; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Arboleda, Enrique; Lohs, Claudia; Schipany, Katharina; Hallay, Natalia; Straw, Andrew D.; Todo, Takeshi; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian) clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly) clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function. PMID:24075994

  17. The circadian clock has transient plasticity of period and is required for timing of nocturnal processes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Antony N; Dalchau, Neil; Gardner, Michael J; Baek, Seong-Jin; Webb, Alex A R

    2014-01-01

    A circadian rhythm matched to the phase and period of the day-night cycle has measurable benefits for land plants. We assessed the contribution of circadian period to the phasing of cellular events with the light : dark cycle. We also investigated the plasticity of circadian period within the Arabidopsis circadian oscillator. We monitored the circadian oscillator in wild-type and circadian period mutants under light : dark cycles of varying total duration. We also investigated changes in oscillator dynamics during and after the transition from light : dark cycles to free running conditions. Under light : dark cycles, dawn and dusk were anticipated differently when the circadian period was not resonant with the environmental period ('T cycle'). Entrainment to T cycles differing from the free-running period caused a short-term alteration in oscillator period. The transient plasticity of period was described by existing mathematical models of the Arabidopsis circadian network. We conclude that a circadian period resonant with the period of the environment is particularly important for anticipation of dawn and the timing of nocturnal events; and there is short-term and transient plasticity of period of the Arabidopsis circadian network.

  18. Human Gut Bacteria Are Sensitive to Melatonin and Express Endogenous Circadian Rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jiffin K.; Wright, John M.; Patel, Akruti G; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are fundamental properties of most eukaryotes, but evidence of biological clocks that drive these rhythms in prokaryotes has been restricted to Cyanobacteria. In vertebrates, the gastrointestinal system expresses circadian patterns of gene expression, motility and secretion in vivo and in vitro, and recent studies suggest that the enteric microbiome is regulated by the host’s circadian clock. However, it is not clear how the host’s clock regulates the microbiome. Here, we demonstrate at least one species of commensal bacterium from the human gastrointestinal system, Enterobacter aerogenes, is sensitive to the neurohormone melatonin, which is secreted into the gastrointestinal lumen, and expresses circadian patterns of swarming and motility. Melatonin specifically increases the magnitude of swarming in cultures of E. aerogenes, but not in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The swarming appears to occur daily, and transformation of E. aerogenes with a flagellar motor-protein driven lux plasmid confirms a temperature-compensated circadian rhythm of luciferase activity, which is synchronized in the presence of melatonin. Altogether, these data demonstrate a circadian clock in a non-cyanobacterial prokaryote and suggest the human circadian system may regulate its microbiome through the entrainment of bacterial clocks. PMID:26751389

  19. Translational Regulation of the DOUBLETIME/CKIδ/ε Kinase by LARK Contributes to Circadian Period Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmei; McNeil, Gerard P.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila homolog of Casein Kinase I δ/ε, DOUBLETIME (DBT), is required for Wnt, Hedgehog, Fat and Hippo signaling as well as circadian clock function. Extensive studies have established a critical role of DBT in circadian period determination. However, how DBT expression is regulated remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that translation of dbt transcripts are directly regulated by a rhythmic RNA-binding protein (RBP) called LARK (known as RBM4 in mammals). LARK promotes translation of specific alternative dbt transcripts in clock cells, in particular the dbt-RC transcript. Translation of dbt-RC exhibits circadian changes under free-running conditions, indicative of clock regulation. Translation of a newly identified transcript, dbt-RE, is induced by light in a LARK-dependent manner and oscillates under light/dark conditions. Altered LARK abundance affects circadian period length, and this phenotype can be modified by different dbt alleles. Increased LARK delays nuclear degradation of the PERIOD (PER) clock protein at the beginning of subjective day, consistent with the known role of DBT in PER dynamics. Taken together, these data support the idea that LARK influences circadian period and perhaps responses of the clock to light via the regulated translation of DBT. Our study is the first to investigate translational control of the DBT kinase, revealing its regulation by LARK and a novel role of this RBP in Drosophila circadian period modulation. PMID:25211129

  20. Deviation of innate circadian period from 24 hours reduces longevity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Libert, Sergiy; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Pointer, Kelli; Pletcher, Scott D.; Guarente, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Summary The variation of individual lifespans, even in highly inbred cohorts of animals and under strictly controlled environmental conditions, is substantial and not well understood. This variation in part could be due to epigenetic variation, which later affects the animal’s physiology and ultimately longevity. Identification of the physiological properties that impact health and lifespan is crucial for longevity research and the development of anti-aging therapies. Here we measured individual circadian and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of inbred F1 hybrid mice and correlated these parameters to their lifespans. We found that mice with innate circadian periods close to 24 hours (revealed during 30 days of housing in total darkness) enjoyed nearly 20% longer lifespans than their littermates, which had shorter or longer innate circadian periods. These findings show that maintenance of a 24 hour intrinsic circadian period is a positive predictor of longevity. Our data suggest that circadian period may be used to predict individual longevity and that processes that control innate circadian period affect aging. PMID:22702406

  1. Robust circadian rhythms in organoid cultures from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean R; Pruszka, Jill; Vallance, Jefferson; Aihara, Eitaro; Matsuura, Toru; Montrose, Marshall H; Shroyer, Noah F; Hong, Christian I

    2014-09-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for several human gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, ranging from diarrhea to ulcers to cancer. Four-dimensional tissue culture models that faithfully mimic the circadian clock of the GI epithelium would provide an invaluable tool to understand circadian regulation of GI health and disease. We hypothesized that rhythmicity of a key circadian component, PERIOD2 (PER2), would diminish along a continuum from ex vivo intestinal organoids (epithelial 'miniguts'), nontransformed mouse small intestinal epithelial (MSIE) cells and transformed human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Here, we show that bioluminescent jejunal explants from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice displayed robust circadian rhythms for >72 hours post-excision. Circadian rhythms in primary or passaged PER2::LUC jejunal organoids were similarly robust; they also synchronized upon serum shock and persisted beyond 2 weeks in culture. Remarkably, unshocked organoids autonomously synchronized rhythms within 12 hours of recording. The onset of this autonomous synchronization was slowed by >2 hours in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 (20 μM). Doubling standard concentrations of the organoid growth factors EGF, Noggin and R-spondin enhanced PER2 oscillations, whereas subtraction of these factors individually at 24 hours following serum shock produced no detectable effects on PER2 oscillations. Growth factor pulses induced modest phase delays in unshocked, but not serum-shocked, organoids. Circadian oscillations of PER2::LUC bioluminescence aligned with Per2 mRNA expression upon analysis using quantitative PCR. Concordant findings of robust circadian rhythms in bioluminescent jejunal explants and organoids provide further evidence for a peripheral clock that is intrinsic to the intestinal epithelium. The rhythmic and organotypic features of organoids should offer unprecedented advantages as a resource for elucidating the role

  2. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  3. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-07-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm.

  4. Glucocorticoid-mediated Period2 induction delays the phase of circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Solmi; Park, Noheon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) signaling synchronizes the circadian rhythm of individual peripheral cells and induces the expression of circadian genes, including Period1 (Per1) and Period2 (Per2). However, no GC response element (GRE) has been reported in the Per2 promoter region. Here we report the molecular mechanisms of Per2 induction by GC signaling and its relevance to the regulation of circadian timing. We found that GC prominently induced Per2 expression and delayed the circadian phase. The overlapping GRE and E-box (GE2) region in the proximal Per2 promoter was responsible for GC-mediated Per2 induction. The GRE in the Per2 promoter was unique in that brain and muscle ARNT-like protein-1 (BMAL1) was essential for GC-induced Per2 expression, whereas other GRE-containing promoters, such as Per1 and mouse mammary tumor virus, responded to dexamethasone in the absence of BMAL1. This specialized regulatory mechanism was mediated by BMAL1-dependent binding of the GC receptor to GRE in Per2 promoter. When Per2 induction was abrogated by the mutation of the GRE or E-box, the circadian oscillation phase failed to be delayed compared with that of the wild-type. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that the rapid Per2 induction mediated by GC is crucial for delaying the circadian rhythm. PMID:23620290

  5. Drosophila peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 modulates circadian rhythms via regulating levels of PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Kang, So Who; Lee, Euna; Cho, Eunjoo; Seo, Ji Hye; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Kim, Eun Young

    2015-07-31

    In animal circadian clock machinery, the phosphorylation program of PERIOD (PER) leads to the spatio-temporal regulation of diverse PER functions, which are crucial for the maintenance of ~24-hr circadian rhythmicity. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PIN1 modulates the diverse functions of its substrates by inducing conformational changes upon recognizing specific phosphorylated residues. Here, we show that overexpression of Drosophila pin1, dodo (dod), lengthens the locomotor behavioral period. Using Drosophila S2 cells, we demonstrate that Dod associates preferentially with phosphorylated species of PER, which delays the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of PER. Consistent with this, PER protein levels are higher in flies overexpressing dod. Taken together, we suggest that Dod plays a role in the maintenance of circadian period by regulating PER metabolism.

  6. Mutations in the circadian gene period alter behavioral and biochemical responses to ethanol in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jennifer; Seggio, Joseph A; Ahmad, S Tariq

    2016-04-01

    Clock genes, such as period, which maintain an organism's circadian rhythm, can have profound effects on metabolic activity, including ethanol metabolism. In turn, ethanol exposure has been shown in Drosophila and mammals to cause disruptions of the circadian rhythm. Previous studies from our labs have shown that larval ethanol exposure disrupted the free-running period and period expression of Drosophila. In addition, a recent study has shown that arrhythmic flies show no tolerance to ethanol exposure. As such, Drosophila period mutants, which have either a shorter than wild-type free-running period (perS) or a longer one (perL), may also exhibit altered responses to ethanol due to their intrinsic circadian differences. In this study, we tested the initial sensitivity and tolerance of ethanol exposure on Canton-S, perS, and perL, and then measured their Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) and body ethanol levels. We showed that perL flies had slower sedation rate, longer recovery from ethanol sedation, and generated higher tolerance for sedation upon repeated ethanol exposure compared to Canton-S wild-type flies. Furthermore, perL flies had lower ADH activity and had a slower ethanol clearance compared to wild-type flies. The findings of this study suggest that period mutations influence ethanol induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in Drosophila and that flies with longer circadian periods are more sensitive to ethanol exposure.

  7. RNA interference of the clock gene period disrupts circadian rhythms in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiyuki; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Karpova, Svetlana G; Matsumoto, Akira; Noji, Sumihare; Tomioka, Kenji

    2008-08-01

    Periodic expression of so-called clock genes is an essential part of the circadian clock. In Drosophila melanogaster the cyclic expression of per and tim through an autoregulatory feedback loop is believed to play a central role in circadian rhythm generation. However, it is still elusive whether this hypothesis is applicable to other insect species. Here it is shown that per gene plays a key role in the rhythm generation in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Measurement of per mRNA levels in the optic lobe revealed the rhythmic expression of per in light cycles with a peak in the late day to early night, persisting in constant darkness. A single injection of per double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the abdomen of the final instar nymphs effectively knocked down the mRNA levels as adult to about 50% of control animals. Most of the per dsRNA-injected crickets completely lost the circadian locomotor activity rhythm in constant darkness up to 50 days after the injection, whereas those injected with DsRed2 dsRNA as a negative control clearly maintained it. The electrical activity of optic lobe efferents also became arrhythmic in the per dsRNA-injected crickets. These results not only suggest that per plays an important role in the circadian rhythm generation also in the cricket but also show that RNA interference is a powerful tool to dissect the molecular machinery of the cricket circadian clock.

  8. Codon usage affects the structure and function of the Drosophila circadian clock protein PERIOD

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingjing; Murphy, Katherine A.; Zhou, Mian; Li, Ying H.; Lam, Vu H.; Tabuloc, Christine A.; Chiu, Joanna C.; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of all genomes, but its in vivo biological functions in animal systems are not clear. To investigate the in vivo role of codon usage in animals, we took advantage of the sensitivity and robustness of the Drosophila circadian system. By codon-optimizing parts of Drosophila period (dper), a core clock gene that encodes a critical component of the circadian oscillator, we showed that dper codon usage is important for circadian clock function. Codon optimization of dper resulted in conformational changes of the dPER protein, altered dPER phosphorylation profile and stability, and impaired dPER function in the circadian negative feedback loop, which manifests into changes in molecular rhythmicity and abnormal circadian behavioral output. This study provides an in vivo example that demonstrates the role of codon usage in determining protein structure and function in an animal system. These results suggest a universal mechanism in eukaryotes that uses a codon usage “code” within genetic codons to regulate cotranslational protein folding. PMID:27542830

  9. The circadian clock component PERIOD2: from molecular to cerebral functions.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is based on a molecular oscillator, which simulates the external day within nearly all of a body's cells. This "internalized" day then defines activity and rest phases for the cells and the organism by generating precise rhythms in the metabolism, physiology, and behavior. In its perfect state, this timing system allows for the synchronization of an organism to its environment and this may optimize energy handling and responses to daily recurring challenges. However, nowadays, we believe that desynchronization of an organism due to its lifestyle or problems with its circadian clock not only causes discomfort but also may aggravate conditions such as depression, metabolic syndrome, addiction, or cancer. In this review, we focus on one simple cogwheel of the mammalian circadian clock, the PERIOD2 (PER2) protein. Originally identified as an integral part of the molecular mechanism that yields overt rhythms of about 24h, more recently multiple other functions have been identified. In essence, the PER proteins, in addition to their important function within the molecular oscillator, can be seen not only as integrators on the input side of the circadian clock but also as mediators of clock output. This diversity in their function is possible, because the PER proteins can interact with a multitude of other proteins transferring oscillator timing information to the latter. In this fashion, the circadian clock synchronizes many rhythmic processes.

  10. Recovery from Age-Related Infertility under Environmental Light-Dark Cycles Adjusted to the Intrinsic Circadian Period.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Tokuda, Isao T; Todo, Takeshi; Block, Gene D; Nakamura, Wataru

    2015-09-01

    Female reproductive function changes during aging with the estrous cycle becoming more irregular during the transition to menopause. We found that intermittent shifts of the light-dark cycle disrupted regularity of estrous cycles in middle-aged female mice, whose estrous cycles were regular under unperturbed 24-hr light-dark cycles. Although female mice deficient in Cry1 or Cry2, the core components of the molecular circadian clock, exhibited regular estrous cycles during youth, they showed accelerated senescence characterized by irregular and unstable estrous cycles and resultant infertility in middle age. Notably, tuning the period length of the environmental light-dark cycles closely to the endogenous one inherent in the Cry-deficient females restored the regularity of the estrous cycles and, consequently, improved fertility in middle age. These results suggest that reproductive potential can be strongly influenced by age-related changes in the circadian system and normal reproductive functioning can be rescued by the manipulation of environmental timing signals.

  11. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  12. Endogenous circadian rhythms in pigment composition induce changes in photochemical efficiency in plant canopies.

    PubMed

    García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G; Hoch, Günter; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Tissue, David T; Voltas, Jordi; Gessler, Arthur; Roy, Jacques; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2017-01-18

    There is increasing evidence that the circadian clock is a significant driver of photosynthesis that becomes apparent when environmental cues are experimentally held constant. We studied whether the composition of photosynthetic pigments is under circadian regulation, and whether pigment oscillations lead to rhythmic changes in photochemical efficiency. To address these questions, canopies of bean and cotton were maintained, after an entrainment phase, under constant (light or darkness) conditions for 30-48 h. Photosynthesis and quantum yield peaked at subjective noon and non-photochemical quenching peaked at night. These oscillations were not associated to parallel changes in carbohydrate content or xanthophyll cycle activity. We observed robust oscillations of Chla/b during constant light in both species, and also under constant darkness in bean, peaking when it would have been night during the entrainment (subjective nights). These oscillations could be attributed to the synthesis and/or degradation of trimeric light-harvesting complex II (reflected by the rhythmic changes in Chla/b), with the antenna size minimal at night and maximal around subjective noon. Considering together the oscillations of pigments and photochemistry, the observed pattern of changes is counterintuitive if we assume that the plant strategy is to avoid photo-damage, but consistent with a strategy where non-stressed plants maximize photosynthesis.

  13. Allelic polymorphism of GIGANTEA is responsible for naturally occurring variation in circadian period in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiguang; Lou, Ping; Hermand, Victor; Aman, Rashid; Park, Hee Jin; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe Yeon; Salmela, Matti Juhani; Ewers, Brent E; Weinig, Cynthia; Khan, Sarah L; Schaible, D Loring P; McClung, C Robertson

    2015-03-24

    GIGANTEA (GI) was originally identified by a late-flowering mutant in Arabidopsis, but subsequently has been shown to act in circadian period determination, light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and responses to multiple abiotic stresses, including tolerance to high salt and cold (freezing) temperature. Genetic mapping and analysis of families of heterogeneous inbred lines showed that natural variation in GI is responsible for a major quantitative trait locus in circadian period in Brassica rapa. We confirmed this conclusion by transgenic rescue of an Arabidopsis gi-201 loss of function mutant. The two B. rapa GI alleles each fully rescued the delayed flowering of Arabidopsis gi-201 but showed differential rescue of perturbations in red light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and altered cold and salt tolerance. The B. rapa R500 GI allele, which failed to rescue the hypocotyl and abiotic stress phenotypes, disrupted circadian period determination in Arabidopsis. Analysis of chimeric B. rapa GI alleles identified the causal nucleotide polymorphism, which results in an amino acid substitution (S264A) between the two GI proteins. This polymorphism underlies variation in circadian period, cold and salt tolerance, and red light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Loss-of-function mutations of B. rapa GI confer delayed flowering, perturbed circadian rhythms in leaf movement, and increased freezing and increased salt tolerance, consistent with effects of similar mutations in Arabidopsis. Collectively, these data suggest that allelic variation of GI-and possibly of clock genes in general-offers an attractive target for molecular breeding for enhanced stress tolerance and potentially for improved crop yield.

  14. Chronic Ethanol Intake Alters Circadian Phase Shifting and Free-Running Period in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Fixaris, Michael C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker—including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli—in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  15. The mammalian clock component PERIOD2 coordinates circadian output by interaction with nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Baeriswyl-Aebischer, Stéphanie; Albrecht, Urs

    2010-02-15

    Mammalian circadian clocks provide a temporal framework to synchronize biological functions. To obtain robust rhythms with a periodicity of about a day, these clocks use molecular oscillators consisting of two interlocked feedback loops. The core loop generates rhythms by transcriptional repression via the Period (PER) and Cryptochrome (CRY) proteins, whereas the stabilizing loop establishes roughly antiphasic rhythms via nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptors also govern many pathways that affect metabolism and physiology. Here we show that the core loop component PER2 can coordinate circadian output with the circadian oscillator. PER2 interacts with nuclear receptors including PPARalpha and REV-ERBalpha and serves as a coregulator of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Consequently, PER2 is rhythmically bound at the promoters of nuclear receptor target genes in vivo. In this way, the circadian oscillator can modulate the expression of nuclear receptor target genes like Bmal1, Hnf1alpha, and Glucose-6-phosphatase. The concept that PER2 may propagate clock information to metabolic pathways via nuclear receptors adds an important facet to the clock-dependent regulation of biological networks.

  16. The hypersensitive glucocorticoid response specifically regulates period 1 and expression of circadian genes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Crawford, Gregory E; Garabedian, Michael J; Myers, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate gene expression by binding and activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While ligand affinity determines the global sensitivity of the response, additional proteins act on the genome to tune sensitivity of some genes. However, the genomic extent and specificity of dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are unknown. We show that dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are extraordinarily specific at the genomic scale, able to distinctly express a single gene, the circadian rhythm gene for Period 1 (PER1), at concentrations consistent with the nighttime nadir of human cortisol. We mapped the PER1 response to a single GR binding site. The specific GR binding sequence did not impact sensitivity, and we instead attributed the response to a combination of additional transcription factors and chromatin accessibility acting in the same locus. The PER1 hypersensitive response element is conserved in the mouse, where we found similar upregulation of Per1 in pituitary cells. Targeted and transient overexpression of PER1 led to regulation of additional circadian rhythm genes hours later, suggesting that hypersensitive expression of PER1 impacts circadian gene expression. These findings show that hypersensitive GR binding occurs throughout the genome, drives targeted gene expression, and may be important to endocrine mediation of peripheral circadian rhythms.

  17. An approximation to the temporal order in endogenous circadian rhythms of genes implicated in human adipose tissue metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is well established that human adipose tissue (AT) shows circadian rhythmicity, published studies have been discussed as if tissues or systems showed only one or few circadian rhythms at a time. To provide an overall view of the internal temporal order of circadian rhythms in human AT in...

  18. A PERIOD3 variant causes a circadian phenotype and is associated with a seasonal mood trait

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Hirano, Arisa; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Jones, Christopher R.; Sakai, Noriaki; Okuro, Masashi; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Xu, Ying; Saigoh, Noriko; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Lin, Shu-Ting; Kaasik, Krista; Nishino, Seiji; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the connection between sleep and mood has long been recognized, although direct molecular evidence is lacking. We identified two rare variants in the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3-P415A/H417R) in humans with familial advanced sleep phase accompanied by higher Beck Depression Inventory and seasonality scores. hPER3-P415A/H417R transgenic mice showed an altered circadian period under constant light and exhibited phase shifts of the sleep-wake cycle in a short light period (photoperiod) paradigm. Molecular characterization revealed that the rare variants destabilized PER3 and failed to stabilize PERIOD1/2 proteins, which play critical roles in circadian timing. Although hPER3-P415A/H417R-Tg mice showed a mild depression-like phenotype, Per3 knockout mice demonstrated consistent depression-like behavior, particularly when studied under a short photoperiod, supporting a possible role for PER3 in mood regulation. These findings suggest that PER3 may be a nexus for sleep and mood regulation while fine-tuning these processes to adapt to seasonal changes. PMID:26903630

  19. Genetic basis of incidence and period length of circadian rhythm for locomotor activity in populations of a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Harano, T; Miyatake, T

    2010-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in a wide variety of organisms, although their genetic variation has been analyzed in only a few species. We found genetic differences in the circadian rhythm of adult locomotor activity among strains of the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis, which differed in origin and have been maintained in isolation. All beetles in some strains clearly had free-running rhythms in constant darkness whereas most beetles in other strains were arrhythmic. The period of free-running rhythm varied from approximately 19 to 23 h between the strains. F(1) males from reciprocal crosses among strains with different periods of circadian rhythms had circadian periods that were intermediate between their parental strains. Segregation of the circadian rhythm appeared in the F(2) generation. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that variation in the period length of circadian rhythm is explained by a major autosomal gene with additive effects and no dominance. This hypothesis was supported by the joint scaling test for the free-running period in the F(1) and F(2) generations. We discuss possible causes for genetic variation in circadian rhythm in the C. chinensis strains in terms of random factors and selection.

  20. Relationship of endogenous circadian melatonin and temperature rhythms to self-reported preference for morning or evening activity in young and older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Hall, E. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morningness-eveningness refers to interindividual differences in preferred timing of behavior (i.e., bed and wake times). Older people have earlier wake times and rate themselves as more morning-like than young adults. It has been reported that the phase of circadian rhythms is earlier in morning-types than in evening types, and that older people have earlier phases than young adults. These changes in phase have been considered to be the chronobiological basis of differences in preferred bed and wake times and age-related changes therein. Whether such differences in phase are associated with changes in the phase relationship between endogenous circadian rhythms and the sleep-wake cycle has not been investigated previously. METHODS: We investigated the association between circadian phase, the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms, and morningness-eveningness, and their interaction with aging. In this circadian rhythm study, 68 young and 40 older subjects participated. RESULTS: Among the young subjects, the phase of the melatonin and core temperature rhythms occurred earlier in morning than in evening types and the interval between circadian phase and usual wake time was longer in morning types. Thus, while evening types woke at a later clock hour than morning types, morning types actually woke at a later circadian phase. Comparing young and older morning types we found that older morning types had an earlier circadian phase and a shorter phase-wake time interval. The shorter phase-waketime interval in older "morning types" is opposite to the change associated with morningness in young people, and is more similar to young evening types. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate an association between circadian phase, the relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian phase, and morningness-eveningness in young adults. Furthermore, they demonstrate that age-related changes in phase angle cannot be attributed fully to

  1. Bidirectional Interactions between Circadian Entrainment and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritton, Howard J.; Kantorowski, Ana; Sarter, Martin; Lee, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms influence a variety of physiological and behavioral processes; however, little is known about how circadian rhythms interact with the organisms' ability to acquire and retain information about their environment. These experiments tested whether rats trained outside their endogenous active period demonstrate the same rate of…

  2. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-22

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  3. Ecological measurements of light exposure, activity, and circadian disruption.

    PubMed

    Miller, D; Bierman, A; Figueiro, Mg; Schernhammer, Es; Rea, Ms

    2010-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that repeat at approximately 24 hours. In humans, circadian rhythms have an average period of 24.2 hours. The 24-hour patterns of light and dark on the retina synchronize circadian rhythms to the local time on earth. Lighting characteristics affecting circadian rhythms are very different than those affecting visual responses. Lack of synchronization between the endogenous clock and the local time has been associated with a host of maladies. Therefore, it is important to measure circadian light exposures over the course of the 24-hour day and to be able to assess circadian entrainment and disruption in actual living environments. Presented is an overview of the recently developed Daysimeter, a personal measurement device for recording activity and circadian light-exposure. When the Daysimeter is worn on the head, two light sensors near the eye are used to estimate circadian light (CLA) exposures over extended periods of time. Phasor analysis combines the measured periodic activity-rest patterns with the measured periodic light-dark patterns to assess behavioural circadian entrainment/disruption. As shown, day-shift and rotating-shift nurses exhibit remarkably different levels of behavioural circadian entrainment/disruption. These new ecological measurement and analysis techniques may provide important insights into the relationship between circadian disruption and well-being.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  5. Circadian periodicity of resistance to ionizing radiation in the pocket mouse.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Hayden, P.; Gambino, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the response of pocket mice to Co 60 irradiation delivered at two times of day - namely, the predicted high and low points of the metabolic rate. The validity of torpor as an assay of the circadian period of body temperature in pocket mice and as a basis for selecting irradiation times is examined. A study is made of the mitotic activity in the pocket mouse intestinal epithelium as an example of a physiological rhythm which might influence radiation sensitivity. The results of tests in which pocket mice were exposed to ionizing radiation at two different times of day are cited. It is found that under the investigated conditions pocket mice irradiated during their metabolically active period (2330 hr) live significantly longer than those irradiated while their metabolic rate is low (0900 hr).

  6. Heme Binding to the Mammalian Circadian Clock Protein Period 2 is Non-Specific†

    PubMed Central

    Airola, Michael V.; Du, Jing; Dawson, John H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock synchronizes physical and metabolic activity with the diurnal cycle through a transcriptional-posttranslational feedback loop. An additional feedback mechanism regulating clock timing has been proposed to involve oscillation in heme availability. Period 2 (PER2), an integral component in the negative feedback loop that establishes circadian rhythms in mammals, has been identified as a heme binding protein. However, the majority of evidence for heme binding is based upon in vitro heme binding assays. We sought to ascertain if these largely spectral assays could distinguish between specific and non-specific heme interactions. Heme binding properties by a number of other well-characterized proteins, all with no known biological role involving heme interaction, corresponded to those displayed by PER2. Site-directed mutants of putative heme-binding residues identified by MCD were unable to locate a specific heme-binding site on PER2. Protein film electrochemistry also indicates that heme binds PER2 non-specifically on the protein surface. Our results establish the inability of typical in vitro assays to easily distinguish between specific and non-specific heme binding. We conclude that heme binding to PER2 is likely to be non-specific and does not involve the hydrophobic pocket within the PER2 PAS domains that in other PAS proteins commonly recognizes cofactors. These findings also question the significance of in vivo studies that implicate heme interactions with the clock proteins PER2 and nPAS2 in biological function. PMID:20411915

  7. The frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm is modulated on a circadian period and is entrained by food availability

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Robert G. K.; Tyree, Susan M.; McNaughton, Neil; Bilkey, David K.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in the generation of episodic memory. While the encoding of the spatial and contextual components of memory have been extensively studied, how the hippocampus encodes temporal information, especially at long time intervals, is less well understood. The activity of place cells in hippocampus has previously been shown to be modulated at a circadian time-scale, entrained by a behavioral stimulus, but not entrained by light. The experimental procedures used in the previous study of this phenomenon, however, necessarily conflated two alternative entraining stimuli, the exposure to the recording environment and the availability of food, making it impossible to distinguish between these possibilities. Here we demonstrate that the frequency of theta-band hippocampal EEG varies with a circadian period in freely moving animals and that this periodicity mirrors changes in the firing rate of hippocampal neurons. Theta activity serves, therefore, as a proxy of circadian-modulated hippocampal neuronal activity. We then demonstrate that the frequency of hippocampal theta driven by stimulation of the reticular formation also varies with a circadian period. Because this effect can be observed without having to feed the animal to encourage movement we were able to identify what stimulus entrains the circadian oscillation. We show that with reticular-activated recordings started at various times of the day the frequency of theta varies quasi-sinusoidally with a 25 h period and phase-aligned when referenced to the animal’s regular feeding time, but not the recording start time. Furthermore, we show that theta frequency consistently varied with a circadian period when the data obtained from repeated recordings started at various times of the day were referenced to the start of food availability in the recording chamber. This pattern did not occur when data were referenced to the start of the recording session or to the actual time of

  8. [Multilayered control of the Mammalian circadian system].

    PubMed

    Ode, Koji L; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2014-06-01

    All mammals show daily rhythms in their physiological activity, for example, sleep-wake cycles. This rhythmicity is endogenously generated by a system called the circadian clock, and is composed of reactions occurring in several neural/cellular layers of multicellular organisms. Inter-cellular and inter-organ communication is important for the synchronous action of circadian rhythmicity across the whole body. The heart of the circadian system lies in the rhythmic neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. The oscillation emerges as cell-autonomous rhythmic gene expression observed in individual SCN neurons. Inter-neuronal communication synchronizes the circadian phase of each neuron within the SCN. The integrated rhythmic SCN activity works as a pacemaker for the circadian clocks of non-SCN cells, each of which also rhythmically express clock genes. The -24-h period length of the circadian rhythm is predominantly determined by reactions at the molecular level. Cell-autonomous circadian oscillation is driven by a negative feedback loop of transcription regulation, where CRY/PER heterodimers act as the transcriptional repressors of their own genes. One of the rate limiting steps of circadian cycling is a phosphorylation of CRY and PER proteins followed by proteasome-mediated degradation of those proteins. Pharmacological and genetic perturbation of the phosphorylation or degradation pathways alters the circadian period length. This review provides a hierarchical view of the circadian system, which is important to uncover the different effects of medical or social perturbations on circadian regulation of inter-cellular synchronization, or cell-autonomous oscillation.

  9. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Sandate, Colby R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Parsons, Michael J.; Vibert, Jennifer L.; Joynson, Greg M.; Partch, Carrie L.; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1–CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER–CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2Edo/Edo mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2Edo complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2Edo/Edo; Csnk1eTau/Tau mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2Edo reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  10. Effect of photoreceptor degeneration on circadian photoreception and free-running period in the Royal College of Surgeons rat.

    PubMed

    Tosini, Gianluca; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Bullock, Nicole M; Liu, Cuimei; Kasamatsu, Manami

    2007-05-07

    The study of how the retina processes the photic information required for the entrainment of the circadian system is an exciting new topic in retinal neurobiology. We have recently shown that in RCS/N-rdy rats melanopsin mRNA levels are dramatically reduced (about 90%) and melanopsin immunoreactivity cannot be detected in the retina of these rats at 60 days of age. Although RCS/N-rdy rats are a widely used model to investigate mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration, no study has investigated circadian photoreception in these animals. The aim of this study was to examine circadian photoreception in RCS/N-rdy(+) (rdy(+)) rats homozygous for the normal rdy allele and age-matched RCS/N-rdy (rdy) homozygotes with retinal dystrophy. No differences between RCS/N-rdy and rdy(+) were observed in light-induced phase shift of locomotor activity at the three light intensities used (1 x 10(-3), 1 x 10(-1), and 1 x 10(1) microW cm(-2)). Surprisingly, we observed that in RCS/N-rdy the free-running period of the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity was shorter (P<0.01) than in rdy(+), thus suggesting that photoreceptor degeneration may affect the free-running period of the locomotor activity rhythm.

  11. Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Allen, Charles N; Derkach, Victor A; Phillips, Tamara J; Belknap, John K; Raber, Jacob

    2013-11-01

    Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (τ) when only water was available. During a 25 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

  12. Expression of the circadian clock gene Period2 in the hippocampus: possible implications for synaptic plasticity and learned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louisa M-C; Dragich, Joanna M; Kudo, Takashi; Odom, Irene H; Welsh, David K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Genes responsible for generating circadian oscillations are expressed in a variety of brain regions not typically associated with circadian timing. The functions of this clock gene expression are largely unknown, and in the present study we sought to explore the role of the Per2 (Period 2) gene in hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. We found that PER2 protein is highly expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cell layers and that the expression of both protein and mRNA varies with a circadian rhythm. The peaks of these rhythms occur in the late night or early morning and are almost 180° out-of-phase with the expression rhythms measured from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the same animals. The rhythms in Per2 expression are autonomous as they are present in isolated hippocampal slices maintained in culture. Physiologically, Per2-mutant mice exhibit abnormal long-term potentiation. The underlying mechanism is suggested by the finding that levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response-element-binding protein, but not phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, are reduced in hippocampal tissue from mutant mice. Finally, Per2-mutant mice exhibit deficits in the recall of trace, but not cued, fear conditioning. Taken together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal cells contain an autonomous circadian clock. Furthermore, the clock gene Per2 may play a role in the regulation of long-term potentiation and in the recall of some forms of learned behaviour. PMID:19570032

  13. Endogenous insulin fluctuations during glucose-induced paralysis in patients with familial periodic hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, T

    1977-11-01

    Endogenous insulin production in patients with familial periodic hypokalemia has not previously been studied during induced attacks. The serum insulin, serum potassium, and blood glucose concentrations were measured in six patients with familial periodic hypokalemia during six attacks of paralysis induced by long-lasting glucose stimulation. The same parameters were measured in four normal subjects under the same conditions. There was no difference in insulin response or in blood glucose between the two groups. Basal insulin levels showed no difference. There was no correlation between the occurrence of the attack and the serum insulin level in the patients. All the patients responded by severe paralysis and hypokalemia.

  14. Circadian Period Modulation and Masking Effects Induced by Repetitive Light Pulses in Locomotor Rhythms of the Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Germ, M; Tomioka, K

    1998-06-01

    Effects of 15 min light pulses given at various intervals (every 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 hr) under constant darkness on the locomotor rhythm were investigated in the adult male cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. A single pulse per 24 hr induced period modulation in a circadian phase dependent manner, yielding a period modulation curve (PMC): the 15 min light pulse lengthened the period in the early subjective night (CT11-16) and shortened it during the late subjective night to the early subjective day (CT20-5). Frequent light pulses modulated the freerunning period of the rhythm dependent on the interval of the pulses: when compared with the freerunning period in DD (23.74 +/- 0.03 hr) the period was significantly shorter in intervals of 2 and 4 hr, but lengthened when the interval was 1 and 12 hr. Frequent light pulses also resulted in entrainment of the rhythm to run with the period of 24 hr and the ratio of the entrained animals varied from 12% to 72% depending on the interval of the light pulses. The period modulation and the entrainment by the repetitive light pulses could be interpreted according to the PMC. In about 15% of animals, the light pulses induced a rhythm dissociation, suggesting that the bilaterally paired circadian pacemakers have their own sensitivity to the entraining photic information. The light pulse caused a masking effect, i.e., an intense burst of activity. The magnitude of the light induced responses was dependent on the circadian phase. The strongest masking effect was observed in the subjective night. The phase of the prominent period modulation and of the marked masking effects well coincides with the previously reported sensitive phase of the photoreceptive system.

  15. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption.

  16. CKIepsilon/delta-dependent phosphorylation is a temperature-insensitive, period-determining process in the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Isojima, Yasushi; Nakajima, Masato; Ukai, Hideki; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Masumoto, Koh-hei; Kiuchi, Reiko; Ishida, Mayumi; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Minami, Yoichi; Kito, Ryotaku; Nakao, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Wataru; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Takano, Atsuko; Kojima, Toshio; Nagai, Katsuya; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Joseph S; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2009-09-15

    A striking feature of the circadian clock is its flexible yet robust response to various environmental conditions. To analyze the biochemical processes underlying this flexible-yet-robust characteristic, we examined the effects of 1,260 pharmacologically active compounds in mouse and human clock cell lines. Compounds that markedly (>10 s.d.) lengthened the period in both cell lines, also lengthened it in central clock tissues and peripheral clock cells. Most compounds inhibited casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon) or CKIdelta phosphorylation of the PER2 protein. Manipulation of CKIepsilon/delta-dependent phosphorylation by these compounds lengthened the period of the mammalian clock from circadian (24 h) to circabidian (48 h), revealing its high sensitivity to chemical perturbation. The degradation rate of PER2, which is regulated by CKIepsilon/delta-dependent phosphorylation, was temperature-insensitive in living clock cells, yet sensitive to chemical perturbations. This temperature-insensitivity was preserved in the CKIepsilon/delta-dependent phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide in vitro. Thus, CKIepsilon/delta-dependent phosphorylation is likely a temperature-insensitive period-determining process in the mammalian circadian clock.

  17. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostas...

  18. Genetic determinism of parasitic circadian periodicity and subperiodicity in human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Gaston; Treuil, Jean-Pierre

    2004-12-01

    The larval parasites of the pantropical lymphatic filariasis exhibit two types of circadian behaviour. Typically, they only appear in the human bloodstream at nighttime, synchronised with their mosquito vectors. In Polynesia and parts of Southeast Asia, free of nocturnal vectors, they are found at all hours, and each population biorhythm differs. Through a geometrical approach, we explain this circadian diversity by a single, dominant mutation: the clocks of individual parasites are set at midnight (ubiquitous) or at 2 p.m. Compared to other circadian genes, this mutation must be very old, as it is shared by four biologically remote genera of parasites. This seniority sheds new light on several theoretical and practical aspects of vector-parasite temporal relations.

  19. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gene D.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca2+]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated channel is one of the targets. PMID:26553726

  20. Circadian clock and cardiac vulnerability: A time stamp on multi-scale neuroautonomic regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2005-03-01

    Cardiovascular vulnerability displays a 24-hour pattern with a peak between 9AM and 11AM. This daily pattern in cardiac risk is traditionally attributed to external factors including activity levels and sleep-wake cycles. However,influences from the endogenous circadian pacemaker independent from behaviors may also affect cardiac control. We investigate heartbeat dynamics in healthy subjects recorded throughout a 10-day protocol wherein the sleep/wake and behavior cycles are desynchronized from the endogenous circadian cycle,enabling assessment of circadian factors while controlling for behavior-related factors. We demonstrate that the scaling exponent characterizing temporal correlations in heartbeat dynamics over multiple time scales does exhibit a significant circadian rhythm with a sharp peak at the circadian phase corresponding to the period 9-11AM, and that this rhythm is independent from scheduled behaviors and mean heart rate. Our findings of strong circadian rhythms in the multi-scale heartbeat dynamics of healthy young subjects indicate that the underlying mechanism of cardiac regulation is strongly influenced by the endogenous circadian pacemaker. A similar circadian effect in vulnerable individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease would contribute to the morning peak of adverse cardiac events observed in epidemiological studies.

  1. Comparative analysis of the circadian rhythm genes period and timeless in Culex pipiens Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaikevich, Elena V.; Karan, Ludmila S.; Fyodorova, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nucleotide sequences of the circadian rhythm genes, period and timeless, were studied for the first time in mosquitoes Culex pipiens Linnaeus, 1758. In this work we evaluated variations of the studied genome fragments for the two forms of Culex pipiens (forma “pipiens” – mosquitoes common for aboveground habitats, forma “molestus” – underground mosquitoes). We compared Culex pipiens from Russia with transatlantic Culex pipiens and subtropical Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823. Our results show that intraspecies variability is higher for the gene period than for the gene timeless. The revealed substitutions in nucleotide sequences and especially in amino acid sequences grouped the individuals of the two forms into distinct clusters with high significance. The detected fixed amino acid substitutions may appear essential for functioning of the circadian rhythm proteins in Culex pipiens, and may be correlated with adaptations of the taxa within the group Culex pipiens. Our results suggest that natural selection favors fixed mutations and the decrease in diversity of the genes period and timeless in mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens f. “molestus” compared with the Culex pipiens f. “pipiens”, is probably correlated with adaptive features of Culex pipiens f. “molestus”. The studied genome regions may be considered as promising molecular-genetic markers for identification, population and phylogenetic analysis of similar species and forms of the Culex pipiens complex. PMID:28123673

  2. Getting through to circadian oscillators: why use constant routines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2002-01-01

    Overt 24-h rhythmicity is composed of both exogenous and endogenous components, reflecting the product of multiple (periodic) feedback loops with a core pacemaker at their center. Researchers attempting to reveal the endogenous circadian (near 24-h) component of rhythms commonly conduct their experiments under constant environmental conditions. However, even under constant environmental conditions, rhythmic changes in behavior, such as food intake or the sleep-wake cycle, can contribute to observed rhythmicity in many physiological and endocrine variables. Assessment of characteristics of the core circadian pacemaker and its direct contribution to rhythmicity in different variables, including rhythmicity in gene expression, may be more reliable when such periodic behaviors are eliminated or kept constant across all circadian phases. This is relevant for the assessment of the status of the circadian pacemaker in situations in which the sleep-wake cycle or food intake regimes are altered because of external conditions, such as in shift work or jet lag. It is also relevant for situations in which differences in overt rhythmicity could be due to changes in either sleep oscillatory processes or circadian rhythmicity, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndromes, in aging, or in particular clinical conditions. Researchers studying human circadian rhythms have developed constant routine protocols to assess the status of the circadian pacemaker in constant behavioral and environmental conditions, whereas this technique is often thought to be unnecessary in the study of animal rhythms. In this short review, the authors summarize constant routine methodology and what has been learned from constant routines and argue that animal and human circadian rhythm researchers should (continue to) use constant routines as a step on the road to getting through to central and peripheral circadian oscillators in the intact organism.

  3. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jinmi; Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Chun, Sung Kook; Son, Gi Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions. Methods We examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2) gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC) knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system. Results Administration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms. Conclusion These findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock. PMID:25491783

  4. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  5. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-06-15

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research.

  6. Synchronised expressions of LPXRFamide peptide and its receptor genes: seasonal, diurnal and circadian changes during spawning period in grass puffer.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, M; Ikegami, T; Osugi, T; Ukena, K; Doi, H; Hattori, A; Tsutsui, K; Ando, H

    2011-01-01

    Among the RFamide peptide family, the LPXRFamide peptide (LPXRFa) group regulates the release of various pituitary hormones and, recently, LPXRFa genes were found to be regulated by photoperiod via melatonin. As a first step towards investigating the role of LPXRFa on reproductive function in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles), which spawns in semilunar cycles, genes encoding LPXRFa and its receptor (LPXRFa-R) were cloned, and seasonal, diurnal and circadian changes in their absolute amounts of mRNAs in the brain and pituitary were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The grass puffer LPXRFa precursor contains two putative RFamide peptides and one possible RYamide peptide. LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R genes were extensively expressed in the diencephalon and pituitary. The expression levels of both genes were significantly elevated during the spawning periods in both sexes in the brain and pituitary, although they were low in the spawning fish just after releasing eggs and sperm. The treatment of primary pituitary cultures with goldfish LPXRFa increased the amounts of follicle-stimulating hormone β- and luteinising hormone β-subunit mRNAs. In the diencephalon, LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R genes showed synchronised diurnal and circadian variations with one peak at zeitgeber time 3 and circadian time 15, respectively. The correlated expression patterns of LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R genes in the diencephalon and pituitary and the possible stimulatory effects of LPXRFa on gonadotrophin subunit gene expression suggest the functional significance of the LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R system in the regulation of lunar-synchronised spawning of grass puffer.

  7. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  8. Association of the circadian factor Period 2 to p53 influences p53's function in DNA-damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Liu, Jingjing; Schiffhauer, Samuel; Finkielstein, Carla V.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian period proteins influence cell division and death by associating with checkpoint components, although their mode of regulation has not been firmly established. hPer2 forms a trimeric complex with hp53 and its negative regulator Mdm2. In unstressed cells, this association leads to increased hp53 stability by blocking Mdm2-dependent ubiquitination and transcription of hp53 target genes. Because of the relevance of hp53 in checkpoint signaling, we hypothesize that hPer2 association with hp53 acts as a regulatory module that influences hp53's downstream response to genotoxic stress. Unlike the trimeric complex, whose distribution was confined to the nuclear compartment, hPer2/hp53 was identified in both cytosol and nucleus. At the transcriptional level, a reporter containing the hp21WAF1/CIP1 promoter, a target of hp53, remained inactive in cells expressing a stable form of the hPer2/hp53 complex even when treated with γ-radiation. Finally, we established that hPer2 directly acts on the hp53 node, as checkpoint components upstream of hp53 remained active in response to DNA damage. Quantitative transcriptional analyses of hp53 target genes demonstrated that unbound hp53 was absolutely required for activation of the DNA-damage response. Our results provide evidence of the mode by which the circadian tumor suppressor hPer2 modulates hp53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:25411341

  9. Inhibition of expression of the circadian clock gene Period causes metabolic abnormalities including repression of glycometabolism in Bombyx mori cells

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Li, Xue; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Cui, Wen-Zhao; Sima, Yang-Hu; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities in the circadian clock system are known to affect the body’s metabolic functions, though the molecular mechanisms responsible remain uncertain. In this study, we achieved continuous knockdown of B. mori Period (BmPer) gene expression in the B. mori ovary cell line (BmN), and generated a Per-KD B. mori model with developmental disorders including small individual cells and slow growth. We conducted cell metabolomics assays by gas chromatography/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and showed that knockdown of BmPer gene expression resulted in significant inhibition of glycometabolism. Amino acids that used glucose metabolites as a source were also down-regulated, while lipid metabolism and nucleotide metabolism were significantly up-regulated. Metabolite correlation analysis showed that pyruvate and lactate were closely related to glycometabolism, as well as to metabolites such as aspartate, alanine, and xanthine in other pathways. Further validation experiments showed that the activities of the key enzymes of glucose metabolism, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, and citrate synthase, were significantly decreased and transcription of their encoding genes, as well as that of pyruvate kinase, were also significantly down-regulated. We concluded that inhibition of the circadian clock gene BmPer repressed glycometabolism, and may be associated with changes in cellular amino acid metabolism, and in cell growth and development. PMID:28393918

  10. [Circadian rhythm and stroke].

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the relationship between stroke incidence and alterations of circadian rhythm are scarce, while pathologically reduced or abolished circadian variation has been described to cause stroke since a long time ago. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulation balance including platelet function, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, autonomic function, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important.

  11. Electrical Hyperexcitation of Lateral Ventral Pacemaker Neurons Desynchronizes Downstream Circadian Oscillators in the Fly Circadian Circuit and Induces Multiple Behavioral Periods

    PubMed Central

    Nitabach, Michael N.; Wu, Ying; Sheeba, Vasu; Lemon, William C.; Strumbos, John; Zelensky, Paul K.; White, Benjamin H.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2008-01-01

    Coupling of autonomous cellular oscillators is an essential aspect of circadian clock function but little is known about its circuit requirements. Functional ablation of the pigment-dispersing factor-expressing lateral ventral subset (LNV ) of Drosophila clock neurons abolishes circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. The hypothesis that LNVs synchronize oscillations in downstream clock neurons was tested by rendering the LNVs hyperexcitable via transgenic expression of a low activation threshold voltage-gated sodium channel. When the LNVs are made hyperexcitable, free-running behavioral rhythms decompose into multiple independent superimposed oscillations and the clock protein oscillations in the dorsal neuron 1 and 2 subgroups of clock neurons are phase-shifted. Thus, regulated electrical activity of the LNVs synchronize multiple oscillators in the fly circadian pacemaker circuit. PMID:16407545

  12. Circadian period and the timing of melatonin onset in men and women: predictors of sleep during the weekend and in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Alpar S; Santhi, Nayantara; Hasan, Sibah; Lo, June C-Y; Johnston, Jonathan D; Von Schantz, Malcolm; Archer, Simon N; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-04-01

    Sleep complaints and irregular sleep patterns, such as curtailed sleep during workdays and longer and later sleep during weekends, are common. It is often implied that differences in circadian period and in entrained phase contribute to these patterns, but few data are available. We assessed parameters of the circadian rhythm of melatonin at baseline and in a forced desynchrony protocol in 35 participants (18 women) with no sleep disorders. Circadian period varied between 23 h 50 min and 24 h 31 min, and correlated positively (n = 31, rs  = 0.43, P = 0.017) with the timing of the melatonin rhythm relative to habitual bedtime. The phase of the melatonin rhythm correlated with the Insomnia Severity Index (n = 35, rs  = 0.47, P = 0.004). Self-reported time in bed during free days also correlated with the timing of the melatonin rhythm (n = 35, rs  = 0.43, P = 0.01) as well as with the circadian period (n = 31, rs  = 0.47, P = 0.007), such that individuals with a more delayed melatonin rhythm or a longer circadian period reported longer sleep during the weekend. The increase in time in bed during the free days correlated positively with circadian period (n = 31, rs  = 0.54, P = 0.002). Polysomnographically assessed latency to persistent sleep (n = 34, rs  = 0.48, P = 0.004) correlated with the timing of the melatonin rhythm when participants were sleeping at their habitual bedtimes in the laboratory. This correlation was significantly stronger in women than in men (Z = 2.38, P = 0.017). The findings show that individual differences in circadian period and phase of the melatonin rhythm associate with differences in sleep, and suggest that individuals with a long circadian period may be at risk of developing sleep problems.

  13. Feedback Loops of the Mammalian Circadian Clock Constitute Repressilator

    PubMed Central

    Pett, J. Patrick; Korenčič, Anja; Wesener, Felix; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Mammals evolved an endogenous timing system to coordinate their physiology and behaviour to the 24h period of the solar day. While it is well accepted that circadian rhythms are generated by intracellular transcriptional feedback loops, it is still debated which network motifs are necessary and sufficient for generating self-sustained oscillations. Here, we systematically explore a data-based circadian oscillator model with multiple negative and positive feedback loops and identify a series of three subsequent inhibitions known as “repressilator” as a core element of the mammalian circadian oscillator. The central role of the repressilator motif is consistent with time-resolved ChIP-seq experiments of circadian clock transcription factors and loss of rhythmicity in core clock gene knockouts. PMID:27942033

  14. Cell type-specific functions of period genes revealed by novel adipocyte and hepatocyte circadian clock models.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Xu, Haiyan; Khan, Sanjoy K; Shen, Yang; Gitis, Paula J; Welsh, David K; Hogenesch, John B; Liu, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    In animals, circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior result from coherent rhythmic interactions between clocks in the brain and those throughout the body. Despite the many tissue specific clocks, most understanding of the molecular core clock mechanism comes from studies of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus and a few other cell types. Here we report establishment and genetic characterization of three cell-autonomous mouse clock models: 3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and MMH-D3 hepatocytes. Each model is genetically tractable and has an integrated luciferase reporter that allows for longitudinal luminescence recording of rhythmic clock gene expression using an inexpensive off-the-shelf microplate reader. To test these cellular models, we generated a library of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against a panel of known clock genes and evaluated their impact on circadian rhythms. Knockdown of Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, and Cry2 each resulted in similar phenotypes in all three models, consistent with previous studies. However, we observed cell type-specific knockdown phenotypes for the Period and Rev-Erb families of clock genes. In particular, Per1 and Per2, which have strong behavioral effects in knockout mice, appear to play different roles in regulating period length and amplitude in these peripheral systems. Per3, which has relatively modest behavioral effects in knockout mice, substantially affects period length in the three cellular models and in dissociated SCN neurons. In summary, this study establishes new cell-autonomous clock models that are of particular relevance to metabolism and suitable for screening for clock modifiers, and reveals previously under-appreciated cell type-specific functions of clock genes.

  15. A period-extender gene, pex, that extends the period of the circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, S; Kondo, T; Aoki, S; Ishiura, M

    1998-04-01

    We cloned the pS1K1 plasmid in the process of apparently "complementing" a circadian clock mutant of cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942, SP22, which has a 22-h period (T. Kondo, N. F. Tsinoremas, S. S. Golden, C. H. Johnson, S. Kutsuna, and M. Ishiura, Science 266:1233-1236, 1994). Sequence analysis revealed that SP22 did not have a mutation in the genomic DNA segment carried on pS1K1, and the sp22 mutation was later found in a recently cloned new clock gene, kaiC. Therefore, the period-extender gene pex that was carried on pS1K1 was a suppressor gene for the sp22 mutation. The pex gene encoded a protein of 148 amino acid residues. No meaningful homologs were found in DNA or protein databases including the Synechocystis genome database. The pex gene was transcribed from 129 and 164 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon as 0.6-kb transcripts. The Pex protein was detected as a fusion protein with a molecular mass of 15 kDa by the epitope tag fusion method using a c-Myc epitope tag. Disruption of the pex gene in wild-type cells shortened the period of the rhythms by 1 h, although it did not affect other properties of the rhythms, whereas its overexpression extended the period by 3 h with a concomitant reduction in the amplitude of the rhythms. In various clock mutants examined, overexpression caused arrhythmicity. Thus, Pex is likely to function as a modifier of the circadian clock in Synechococcus.

  16. The mood stabilizer valproic acid opposes the effects of dopamine on circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Joiner, William J; McCarthy, Michael J; Kiessling, Silke; Barandas, Rita; Young, Jared W; Cermakian, Nicolas; Welsh, David K

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous circadian (∼24 h) clocks regulate key physiological and cognitive processes via rhythmic expression of clock genes. The main circadian pacemaker is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mood disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD), are commonly associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. Dopamine (DA) contributes to mania in BD and has direct impact on clock gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that high levels of DA during episodes of mania contribute to disturbed circadian rhythms in BD. The mood stabilizer valproic acid (VPA) also affects circadian rhythms. Thus, we further hypothesized that VPA normalizes circadian disturbances caused by elevated levels of DA. To test these hypotheses, we examined locomotor rhythms and circadian gene cycling in mice with reduced expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT-KD mice), which results in elevated DA levels and mania-like behavior. We found that elevated DA signaling lengthened the circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants. In contrast, we found that VPA shortened circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants, hippocampal cell lines, and human fibroblasts from BD patients. Thus, DA and VPA have opposing effects on circadian period. To test whether the impact of VPA on circadian rhythms contributes to its behavioral effects, we fed VPA to DAT-deficient Drosophila with and without functioning circadian clocks. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that VPA had potent activity-suppressing effects in hyperactive DAT-deficient flies with intact circadian clocks. However, these effects were attenuated in DAT-deficient flies in which circadian clocks were disrupted, suggesting that VPA functions partly through the circadian clock to suppress activity. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence across species that elevated DA signaling lengthens the circadian

  17. Silencing the circadian clock gene Clock using RNAi reveals dissociation of the circatidal clock from the circadian clock in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Numata, Hideharu; Shiga, Sakiko; Goto, Shin G

    2014-09-01

    Whether a clock that generates a circatidal rhythm shares the same elements as the circadian clock is not fully understood. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows simultaneously two endogenous rhythms in its locomotor activity; the circatidal rhythm generates active and inactive phases, and the circadian rhythm modifies activity levels by suppressing the activity during subjective day. In the present study, we silenced Clock (Clk), a master gene of the circadian clock, in A. asahinai using RNAi to investigate the link between the circatidal and circadian clocks. The abundance of Clk mRNA in the crickets injected with double-stranded RNA of Clk (dsClk) was reduced to a half of that in control crickets. dsClk injection also reduced mRNA abundance of another circadian clock gene period (per) and weakened diel oscillation in per mRNA expression. Examination of the locomotor rhythms under constant conditions revealed that the circadian modification was disrupted after silencing Clk expression, but the circatidal rhythm remained unaffected. There were no significant changes in the free-running period of the circatidal rhythm between the controls and the crickets injected with dsClk. Our results reveal that Clk is essential for the circadian clock, but is not required for the circatidal clock. From these results we propose that the circatidal rhythm of A. asahinai is driven by a clock, the molecular components of which are distinct from that of the circadian clock.

  18. The circadian protein period 1 contributes to blood pressure control and coordinately regulates renal sodium transport genes.

    PubMed

    Stow, Lisa R; Richards, Jacob; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Lynch, I Jeanette; Jeffers, Lauren A; Greenlee, Megan M; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S; Gumz, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock protein period 1 (Per1) contributes to the regulation of expression of the α subunit of the renal epithelial sodium channel at the basal level and in response to the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone. The goals of the present study were to define the role of Per1 in the regulation of additional renal sodium handling genes in cortical collecting duct cells and to evaluate blood pressure (BP) in mice lacking functional Per1. To determine whether Per1 regulates additional genes important in renal sodium handling, a candidate gene approach was used. Immortalized collecting duct cells were transfected with a nontarget small interfering RNA or a Per1-specific small interfering RNA. Expression of the genes for α-epithelial sodium channel and Fxyd5, a positive regulator of Na, K-ATPase activity, decreased in response to Per1 knockdown. Conversely, mRNA expression of caveolin 1, Ube2e3, and ET-1, all negative effectors of epithelial sodium channel, was induced after Per1 knockdown. These results led us to evaluate BP in Per1 KO mice. Mice lacking Per1 exhibit significantly reduced BP and elevated renal ET-1 levels compared with wild-type animals. Given the established role of renal ET-1 in epithelial sodium channel inhibition and BP control, elevated renal ET-1 is one possible explanation for the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice. These data support a role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the coordinate regulation of genes involved in renal sodium reabsorption. Importantly, the lower BP observed in Per1 KO mice compared with wild-type mice suggests a role for Per1 in BP control as well.

  19. Distinct patterns of Period gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus underlie circadian clock photoentrainment by advances or delays.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, William J; Tavakoli-Nezhad, Mahboubeh; Lambert, Christopher M; Weaver, David R; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2011-10-11

    The circadian clock in the mammalian hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is entrained by the ambient light/dark cycle, which differentially acts to cause the clock to advance or delay. Light-induced changes in the rhythmic expression of SCN clock genes are believed to be a critical step in this process, but how the two entrainment modalities--advances vs. delays--engage the molecular clockwork remains incompletely understood. We investigated molecular substrates of photic entrainment of the clock in the SCN by stably entraining hamsters to T cycles (non-24-h light/dark cycles) consisting of a single 1-h light pulse repeated as either a short (23.33-h) or a long (24.67-h) cycle; under these conditions, the light pulse of the short cycle acts as "dawn," whereas that of the long cycle acts as "dusk." Analyses of the expression of the photoinducible and rhythmic clock genes Period 1 and 2 (Per1 and Per2) in the SCN revealed fundamental differences under these two entrainment modes. Light at dawn advanced the clock, advancing the onset of the Per1 mRNA rhythm and acutely increasing mRNA transcription, whereas light at dusk delayed the clock, delaying the offset of the Per2 mRNA rhythm and tonically increasing mRNA stability. The results suggest that the underlying molecular mechanisms of circadian entrainment differ with morning (advancing) or evening (delaying) light exposure, and such differences may reflect how entrainment takes place in nocturnal animals under natural conditions.

  20. Model-driven experimental approach reveals the complex regulatory distribution of p53 by the circadian factor Period 2

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Liu, Jingjing; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Stauffer, Philip E.; Tyson, John J.; Finkielstein, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and cell cycle networks are interlocked on the molecular level, with the core clock loop exerting a multilevel regulatory role over cell cycle components. This is particularly relevant to the circadian factor Period 2 (Per2), which modulates the stability of the tumor suppressor p53 in unstressed cells and transcriptional activity in response to genotoxic stress. Per2 binding prevents Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and, therefore, its degradation, and oscillations in the peaks of Per2 and p53 were expected to correspond. However, our findings showed that Per2 and p53 rhythms were significantly out-of-phase relative to each other in cell lysates and in purified cytoplasmic fractions. These seemingly conflicting experimental data motivated the use of a combined theoretical and experimental approach focusing on the role played by Per2 in dictating the phase of p53 oscillations. Systematic modeling of all possible regulatory scenarios predicted that the observed phase relationship between Per2 and p53 could be simulated if (i) p53 was more stable in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm, (ii) Per2 associates to various ubiquitinated forms of p53, and (iii) Per2 mediated p53 nuclear import. These predictions were supported by a sevenfold increase in p53’s half-life in the nucleus and by in vitro binding of Per2 to the various ubiquitinated forms of p53. Last, p53’s nuclear shuttling was significantly favored by ectopic expression of Per2 and reduced because of Per2 down-regulation. Our combined theoretical/mathematical approach reveals how clock regulatory nodes can be inferred from oscillating time course data. PMID:27834218

  1. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  2. Potent Effects of Flavonoid Nobiletin on Amplitude, Period, and Phase of the Circadian Clock Rhythm in PER2::LUCIFERASE Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Misawa, Kenichiro; Ikeda, Yuko; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kamagata, Mayo; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural polyphenols that are widely found in plants. The effects of flavonoids on obesity and numerous diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s have been well studied. However, little is known about the relationships between flavonoids and the circadian clock. In this study, we show that continuous or transient application of flavonoids to the culture medium of embryonic fibroblasts from PER2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice induced various modifications in the circadian clock amplitude, period, and phase. Transient application of some of the tested flavonoids to cultured cells induced a phase delay of the PER2::LUC rhythm at the down slope phase. In addition, continuous application of the polymethoxy flavonoids nobiletin and tangeretin increased the amplitude and lengthened the period of the PER2::LUC rhythm. The nobiletin-induced phase delay was blocked by co-treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor. In summary, among the tested flavonoids, polymethoxy flavones increased the amplitude, lengthened the period, and delayed the phase of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm. Therefore, foods that contain polymethoxy flavones may have beneficial effects on circadian rhythm disorders and jet lag. PMID:28152057

  3. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light–dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (“circadian resonance hypothesis”). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness. PMID:26715747

  4. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness.

  5. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  6. Free-running circadian rhythms of muscle strength, reaction time, and body temperature in totally blind people.

    PubMed

    Squarcini, Camila Fabiana Rossi; Pires, Maria Laura Nogueira; Lopes, Cleide; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Esteves, Andrea Maculano; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine; Matarazzo, Carolina; Garcia, Danilo; da Silva, Maria Stella Peccin; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2013-01-01

    Light is the major synchronizer of circadian rhythms. In the absence of light, as for totally blind people, some variables, such as body temperature, have an endogenous period that is longer than 24 h and tend to be free running. However, the circadian rhythm of muscle strength and reaction time in totally blind people has not been defined in the literature. The objective of this study was to determine the period of the endogenous circadian rhythm of the isometric and isokinetic contraction strength and simple reaction time of totally blind people. The study included six totally blind people with free-running circadian rhythms and four sighted people (control group). Although the control group required only a single session to determine the circadian rhythm, the blind people required three sessions to determine the endogenous period. In each session, isometric strength, isokinetic strength, reaction time, and body temperature were collected six different times a day with an interval of at least 8 h. The control group had better performance for strength and reaction time in the afternoon. For the blind, this performance became delayed throughout the day. Therefore, we conclude that the circadian rhythms of strength and simple reaction time of totally blind people are within their free-running periods. For some professionals, like the blind paralympic athletes, activities that require large physiological capacities in which the maximum stimulus should match the ideal time of competition may result in the blind athletes falling short of their expected performance under this free-running condition.

  7. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  8. Evidence for the circadian gene period as a proximate mechanism of protandry in a pollinating fig wasp.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Feng; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Dunn, Derek W; Niu, Li-Ming; Wang, Bo; Jia, Ling-Yi; Huang, Da-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Protandry in insects is the tendency for adult males to emerge before females and usually results from intra-sexual selection. However, the genetic basis of this common phenomenon is poorly understood. Pollinating fig wasp (Agaonidae) larvae develop in galled flowers within the enclosed inflorescences ('figs') of fig trees. Upon emergence, males locate and mate with the still galled females. After mating, males release females from their galls to enable dispersal. Females cannot exit galls or disperse from a fig without male assistance. We sampled male and female Ceratosolen solmsi (the pollinator of Ficus hispida) every 3 h over a 24 h emergence period, and then measured the expression of five circadian genes: period (per), clock (clk), cycle (cyc), pigment-dispersing factor (pdf) and clockwork orange (cwo). We found significant male-biased sexual dimorphism in the expression of all five genes. per showed the greatest divergence between the sexes and was the only gene rhythmically expressed. Expression of per correlated closely with emergence rates at specific time intervals in both male and female wasps. We suggest that this rhythmical expression of per may be a proximate mechanism of protandry in this species.

  9. Glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing in peripheral osteoclasts resulting in the circadian expression rhythm of osteoclast-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Kondo, Hisataka; Noguchi, Toshihide; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in bone metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that output signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are transmitted from the master circadian rhythm to peripheral osteoblasts through β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid signaling. In this study, we examined how the master circadian rhythm is transmitted to peripheral osteoclasts and the role of clock gene in osteoclast. Mice were maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods and sacrificed at Zeitgeber times 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. mRNA was extracted from femur (cancellous bone) and analyzed for the expression of osteoclast-related genes and clock genes. Osteoclast-related genes such as cathepsin K (CTSK) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) showed circadian rhythmicity like clock genes such as period 1 (PER1), PER2 and brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1). In an in vitro study, not β-agonist but glucocorticoid treatment remarkably synchronized clock and osteoclast-related genes in cultured osteoclasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed the interaction between BMAL1 proteins and promoter region of CTSK and NFATc1. To examine whether endogenous glucocorticoids influence the osteoclast circadian rhythms, mice were adrenalectomized (ADX) and maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods at least two weeks before glucocorticoid injection. A glucocorticoid injection restarted the circadian expression of CTSK and NFATc1 in ADX mice. These results suggest that glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing to peripheral osteoclasts and osteoclast clock contributes to the circadian expression of osteoclast-related genes such as CTSK and NFATc1.

  10. Metabolic circadian rhythms in embryonic turtles.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Fiona Kay; Spencer, Ricky-John; Strassmeyer, Alana; Harland, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Oviparous species are model organisms for investigating embryonic development of endogenous physiological circadian rhythms without the influence of maternal biorhythms. Recent studies have demonstrated that heart rates and metabolic rates of embryonic turtles are not constant or always maximal and can be altered in response to the presence of embryos at a more advanced stage of development within the nest. A first step in understanding the physiological mechanisms underpinning these responses in embryonic ectothermic organisms is to develop metabolic profiles (e.g., heart rate) at different temperatures throughout incubation. Heart beat and rhythmic patterns or changes in development may represent important signals or cues within a nest and may be vital to coordinate synchronous hatching well in advance of the final stages of incubation. We developed baseline embryonic heart-rate profiles of embryos of the short-necked Murray River turtle (Emydura macquarii) to determine the stage of embryogenesis that metabolic circadian rhythms become established, if at all. Eggs were incubated at constant temperatures (26°C and 30°C) and heart rates were monitored at 6-h intervals over 24 h every 7-11 days until hatching. Circadian heart rate rhythms were detected at the mid-gestation period and were maintained until hatching. Heart rates throughout the day varied by up to 20% over 24 h and were not related to time of day. This study demonstrated that endogenous metabolic circadian rhythms in developing embryos in turtle eggs establish earlier in embryogenesis than those documented in other vertebrate taxa during embryogenesis. Early establishment of circadian rhythms in heart rates may be critical for communication among embryos and synchrony in hatching and emergence from the nest.

  11. Locking and unlocking of running wheel affects circadian period stability differently in three inbred strains of rats.

    PubMed

    Kohler, M; Wollnik, F

    1998-08-01

    Running-wheel access has been shown to shorten the circadian period length (tau) of various mammalian species. Due to the close correlation between tau and the level of activity, running wheel-induced changes of the activity level are thought to be responsible for the observed changes in tau. In the present study, the influence of the running wheel on tau and the activity level was examined in three inbred strains of rats (ACI, BH, LEW). Four animals of each strain had free access to their running wheels, while the wheels of the other 4 animals of each strain were mechanically locked. These conditions were changed twice, so that each animal encountered both kinds of changes, that is, from a locked to an unlocked running wheel and vice versa. During the whole study, overall activity was measured by infrared detectors. Running-wheel access resulted in a significant increase of overall activity in strains LEW and ACI. However, significant changes of tau were observed only in LEW rats. These rats showed a significant shortening of tau after the second change of the housing conditions regardless of whether the wheel was locked or unlocked. Consequently, no causal relationship was found between changes of tau and running wheel-induced changes of overall activity. Instead, the results suggest that subtle environmental influences like locking or unlocking the running wheel affect tau in a strain-dependent manner, whereas changes in the activity level are neither necessary nor sufficient to induce changes of tau.

  12. Disrupting the circadian photo-period alters the release of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, progesterone, and estradiol in maternal and fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    GAO, Qinqin; LV, Juanxiu; LI, Weisheng; ZHANG, Pengjie; TAO, Jianying; XU, Zhice

    2016-01-01

    Although a large number of studies show that photo-period disruption potentially affects hormone secretion in mammals, information about the effects of circadian photo-period disruption during pregnancy on fetal blood reproductive hormone levels is scarce. This study used ewes and their fetuses to determine the effects of circadian photo-period disruption (deprivation of darkness) on follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, and progesterone in maternal and fetal circulation at late gestation. Pregnant ewes (gestational age: 135 ± 3 days) were randomly placed into control and dark deprivation groups. The control (N = 5) and dark deprivation (N = 5) groups were exposed to a fixed 12 h light/12 h dark cycle and a 24 h constant light cycle, respectively, for 2 days. Dark deprivation up-regulated follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol levels and down-regulated progesterone levels in both maternal and fetal circulation, and up-regulated luteinizing hormone levels in fetal but not maternal circulation. These results provide new information about how circadian photo-period disruption during pregnancy could alter the release of certain reproductive hormones into fetal blood, which may influence the development of fetal organs in utero, as well as long-term health. PMID:27319751

  13. Temperature compensation and temperature sensation in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Philip B.; Young, Michael W.; Siggia, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    All known circadian clocks have an endogenous period that is remarkably insensitive to temperature, a property known as temperature compensation, while at the same time being readily entrained by a diurnal temperature oscillation. Although temperature compensation and entrainment are defining features of circadian clocks, their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Most models presume that multiple steps in the circadian cycle are temperature-dependent, thus facilitating temperature entrainment, but then insist that the effect of changes around the cycle sums to zero to enforce temperature compensation. An alternative theory proposes that the circadian oscillator evolved from an adaptive temperature sensor: a gene circuit that responds only to temperature changes. This theory implies that temperature changes should linearly rescale the amplitudes of clock component oscillations but leave phase relationships and shapes unchanged. We show using timeless luciferase reporter measurements and Western blots against TIMELESS protein that this prediction is satisfied by the Drosophila circadian clock. We also review evidence for pathways that couple temperature to the circadian clock, and show previously unidentified evidence for coupling between the Drosophila clock and the heat-shock pathway. PMID:26578788

  14. Temperature cycle amplitude alters the adult eclosion time and expression pattern of the circadian clock gene period in the onion fly.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yosuke; Watari, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Goto, Shin G

    2016-03-01

    Soil temperature cycles are considered to play an important role in the entrainment of circadian clocks of underground insects. However, because of the low conductivity of soil, temperature cycles are gradually dampened and the phase of the temperature cycle is delayed with increasing soil depth. The onion fly, Delia antiqua, pupates at various soil depths, and its eclosion is timed by a circadian clock. This fly is able to compensate for the depth-dependent phase delay of temperature change by advancing the eclosion time with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. Therefore, pupae can eclose at the appropriate time irrespective of their location at any depth. However, the mechanism that regulates eclosion time in response to temperature amplitude is still unknown. To understand whether this mechanism involves the circadian clock or further downstream physiological processes, we examined the expression patterns of period (per), a circadian clock gene, of D. antiqua under temperature cycles that were square wave cycles of 12-h warm phase (W) and 12-h cool phase (C) with the temperature difference of 8 °C (WC 29:21 °C) and 1 °C (WC 25.5:24.5 °C). The phase of oscillation in per expression was found to commence 3.5h earlier under WC 25.5:24.5 °C as compared to WC 29:21 °C. This difference was in close agreement with the eclosion time difference between the two temperature cycles, suggesting that the mechanism that responds to the temperature amplitude involves the circadian clock.

  15. Effects of exercise on circadian rhythms and mobility in aging Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Wambua, Rebecca; Giebultowicz, Tomasz M; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2013-11-01

    Daily life functions such as sleep and feeding oscillate with circa 24 h period due to endogenous circadian rhythms generated by circadian clocks. Genetic or environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with various aging-related phenotypes. Circadian rhythms decay during normal aging, and there is a need to explore strategies that could avert age-related changes in the circadian system. Exercise was reported to delay aging in mammals. Here, we investigated whether daily exercise via stimulation of upward climbing movement could improve circadian rest/activity rhythms in aging Drosophila melanogaster. We found that repeated exercise regimen did not strengthen circadian locomotor activity rhythms in aging flies and had no effect on their lifespan. We also tested the effects of exercise on mobility and determined that regular exercise lowered age-specific climbing ability in both wild type and clock mutant flies. Interestingly, the climbing ability was most significantly reduced in flies carrying a null mutation in the core clock gene period, while rescue of this gene significantly improved climbing to wild type levels. Our work highlights the importance of period in sustaining endurance in aging flies exposed to physical challenge.

  16. Circadian Clock-Regulated Expression of Phytochrome and Cryptochrome Genes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Réka; Kevei, Éva; Hall, Anthony; Millar, Andrew J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Kozma-Bognár, László

    2001-01-01

    Many physiological and biochemical processes in plants exhibit endogenous rhythms with a period of about 24 h. Endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks regulate these rhythms. The circadian clocks are synchronized to the periodic environmental changes (e.g. day/night cycles) by specific stimuli; among these, the most important is the light. Photoreceptors, phytochromes, and cryptochromes are involved in setting the clock by transducing the light signal to the central oscillator. In this work, we analyzed the spatial, temporal, and long-term light-regulated expression patterns of the Arabidopsis phytochrome (PHYA to PHYE) and cryptochrome (CRY1 and CRY2) promoters fused to the luciferase (LUC+) reporter gene. The results revealed new details of the tissue-specific expression and light regulation of the PHYC and CRY1 and 2 promoters. More importantly, the data obtained demonstrate that the activities of the promoter::LUC+ constructs, with the exception of PHYC::LUC+, display circadian oscillations under constant conditions. In addition, it is shown by measuring the mRNA abundance of PHY and CRY genes under constant light conditions that the circadian control is also maintained at the level of mRNA accumulation. These observations indicate that the plant circadian clock controls the expression of these photoreceptors, revealing the formation of a new regulatory loop that could modulate gating and resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:11743105

  17. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S.; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  18. Pigment-dispersing factor affects nocturnal activity rhythms, photic entrainment, and the free-running period of the circadian clock in the cricket gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Hassaneen, Ehab; El-Din Sallam, Alaa; Abo-Ghalia, Ahmad; Moriyama, Yoshiyuki; Karpova, Svetlana G; Abdelsalam, Salah; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2011-02-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a neuropeptide widely distributed in insect brains and plays important roles in the circadian system. In this study, we used RNA interference to study the role of the pigment-dispersing factor (pdf) gene in regulating circadian locomotor rhythms in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Injections of pdf double-stranded RNA (dspdf) effectively knocked down the pdf mRNA and PDF peptide levels. The treated crickets maintained the rhythm both under light-dark cycles (LD) and constant darkness (DD). However, they showed rhythms with reduced nocturnal activity with prominent peaks at lights-on and lights-off. Entrainability of dspdf-injected crickets was higher than control crickets as they required fewer cycles to resynchronize to the LD cycles shifted by 6 h. The free-running periods of the dspdf-injected crickets were shorter than those of control crickets in DD. These results suggest that PDF is not essential for the rhythm generation but involved in control of the nocturnality, photic entrainment, and fine tuning of the free-running period of the circadian clock.

  19. Circadian changes in endogenous concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid, melatonin, serotonin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid in Characeae (Chara australis Brown)

    PubMed Central

    Beilby, Mary J; Turi, Christina E; Baker, Teesha C; Tymm, Fiona JM; Murch, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Giant-celled Characeae (Chara australis Brown), grown for 4 months on 12/12 hr day/night cycle and summer/autumn temperatures, exhibited distinct concentration maxima in auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA), melatonin and serotonin about 4 hr after subjective daybreak. These concentration peaks persisted after 3 day pretreatment in continuous darkness: confirming a circadian rhythm, rather than a response to “light on.” The plants pretreated for 3 d in continuous light exhibited several large IAA concentration maxima throughout the 24 hr. The melatonin and serotonin concentrations decreased and were less synchronized with IAA. Chara plants grown on 9/15 hr day/night cycle for 4 months and winter/spring temperatures contained much smaller concentrations of IAA, melatonin and serotonin. The IAA concentration maxima were observed in subjective dark phase. Serotonin concentration peaks were weakly correlated with those of IAA. Melatonin concentration was low and mostly independent of circadian cycle. The “dark” IAA concentration peaks persisted in plants treated for 3 d in the dark. The plants pretreated for 3 d in the light again developed more IAA concentration peaks. In this case the concentration maxima in melatonin and serotonin became more synchronous with those in IAA. The abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were also measured in plants on winter regime. The ABA concentration did not exhibit circadian pattern, while JA concentration peaks were out of phase with those of IAA. The data are discussed in terms of crosstalk between metabolic pathways. PMID:26382914

  20. Tuning the phase of circadian entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrian; Rose, Pia; Imkeller, Katharina; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock coordinates daily physiological, metabolic and behavioural rhythms. These endogenous oscillations are synchronized with external cues (‘zeitgebers’), such as daily light and temperature cycles. When the circadian clock is entrained by a zeitgeber, the phase difference ψ between the phase of a clock-controlled rhythm and the phase of the zeitgeber is of fundamental importance for the fitness of the organism. The phase of entrainment ψ depends on the mismatch between the intrinsic period τ and the zeitgeber period T and on the ratio of the zeitgeber strength to oscillator amplitude. Motivated by the intriguing complexity of empirical data and by our own experiments on temperature entrainment of mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) slices, we present a theory on how clock and zeitgeber properties determine the phase of entrainment. The wide applicability of the theory is demonstrated using mathematical models of different complexity as well as by experimental data. Predictions of the theory are confirmed by published data on Neurospora crassa strains for different period mismatches τ − T and varying photoperiods. We apply a novel regression technique to analyse entrainment of SCN slices by temperature cycles. We find that mathematical models can explain not only the stable asymptotic phase of entrainment, but also transient phase dynamics. Our theory provides the potential to explore seasonal variations of circadian rhythms, jet lag and shift work in forthcoming studies. PMID:26136227

  1. Tuning the phase of circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrian; Rose, Pia; Imkeller, Katharina; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2015-07-06

    The circadian clock coordinates daily physiological, metabolic and behavioural rhythms. These endogenous oscillations are synchronized with external cues ('zeitgebers'), such as daily light and temperature cycles. When the circadian clock is entrained by a zeitgeber, the phase difference ψ between the phase of a clock-controlled rhythm and the phase of the zeitgeber is of fundamental importance for the fitness of the organism. The phase of entrainment ψ depends on the mismatch between the intrinsic period τ and the zeitgeber period T and on the ratio of the zeitgeber strength to oscillator amplitude. Motivated by the intriguing complexity of empirical data and by our own experiments on temperature entrainment of mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) slices, we present a theory on how clock and zeitgeber properties determine the phase of entrainment. The wide applicability of the theory is demonstrated using mathematical models of different complexity as well as by experimental data. Predictions of the theory are confirmed by published data on Neurospora crassa strains for different period mismatches τ - T and varying photoperiods. We apply a novel regression technique to analyse entrainment of SCN slices by temperature cycles. We find that mathematical models can explain not only the stable asymptotic phase of entrainment, but also transient phase dynamics. Our theory provides the potential to explore seasonal variations of circadian rhythms, jet lag and shift work in forthcoming studies.

  2. Peripheral Circadian Clocks Mediate Dietary Restriction-Dependent Changes in Lifespan and Fat Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katewa, Subhash D; Akagi, Kazutaka; Bose, Neelanjan; Rakshit, Kuntol; Camarella, Timothy; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Hall, David; Davis, Sonnet; Nelson, Christopher S; Brem, Rachel B; Ramanathan, Arvind; Sehgal, Amita; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-12

    Endogenous circadian clocks orchestrate several metabolic and signaling pathways that are known to modulate lifespan, suggesting clocks as potential targets for manipulation of metabolism and lifespan. We report here that the core circadian clock genes, timeless (tim) and period (per), are required for the metabolic and lifespan responses to DR in Drosophila. Consistent with the involvement of a circadian mechanism, DR enhances the amplitude of cycling of most circadian clock genes, including tim, in peripheral tissues. Mass-spectrometry-based lipidomic analysis suggests a role of tim in cycling of specific medium chain triglycerides under DR. Furthermore, overexpression of tim in peripheral tissues improves its oscillatory amplitude and extends lifespan under ad libitum conditions. Importantly, effects of tim on lifespan appear to be mediated through enhanced fat turnover. These findings identify a critical role for specific clock genes in modulating the effects of nutrient manipulation on fat metabolism and aging.

  3. Mitomycin C modulates the circadian oscillation of clock gene period 2 expression through attenuating the glucocorticoid signaling in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kimoto, Kenichi; Akamine, Takahiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2015-11-06

    Clock gene regulates the circadian rhythm of various physiological functions. The expression of clock gene has been shown to be attenuated by certain drugs, resulting in a rhythm disorder. Mitomycin C (MMC) is often used in combination with ophthalmic surgery, especially in trabeculectomy, a glaucoma surgical procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of MMC on clock gene expression in fibroblasts, the target cells of MMC. Following MMC treatment, Bmal1 mRNA levels was significantly decreased, whereas Dbp, Per1, and Rev-erbα mRNA levels were significantly increased in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells. Microarray analysis was performed to explore of the gene(s) responsible for MMC-induced alteration of clock gene expression, and identified Nr3c1 gene encoding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a candidate. MMC suppressed the induction of Per1 mRNA by dexamethasone (DEX), ligand of GR, in NIH3T3 cells. MMC also modulated the DEX-driven circadian oscillations of Per2::Luciferase bioluminescence in mouse-derived ocular fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of MMC in GR signaling and the circadian clock system. The present findings suggest that MMC combined with trabeculectomy could increase the risk for a local circadian rhythm-disorder at the ocular surface.

  4. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  5. Circadian rhythms of PERIOD1 expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus in the absence of entrained food-anticipatory activity rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Lam, Germain Y M; Amir, Shimon

    2009-06-01

    When food availability is restricted to a single time of day, circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology in rodents shift to anticipate the predictable time of food arrival. It has been hypothesized that certain food-anticipatory rhythms are linked to the induction and entrainment of rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a putative food-entrained circadian oscillator. To study this concept further, we made food availability unpredictable by presenting the meal at a random time each day (variable restricted feeding, VRF), either during the day, night or throughout the 24-h cycle. Wheel running activity and the expression of the clock protein, Period1 (PER1), in the DMH and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were assessed. Rats exhibited increased levels of activity during the portion of the day when food was randomly presented but, as expected, failed to entrain anticipatory wheel running activity to a single time of day. PER1 expression in the SCN was unchanged by VRF schedules. In the DMH, PER1 expression became rhythmic, peaking at opposite times of day in rats fed only during the day or during the night. In rats fed randomly throughout the entire 24-h cycle, PER1 expression in the DMH remained arrhythmic, but was elevated. These results demonstrate that VRF schedules confined to the day or night can induce circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the DMH. Such feeding schedules cannot entrain behavioral rhythms, thereby showing that food-entrainment of behavior and circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the DMH are dissociable.

  6. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  7. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D; Levine, Joel D; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the 'group' level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature.

  8. Circadian Behaviour in Neuroglobin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hundahl, Christian A.; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night. PMID:22496809

  9. Impact of the human circadian system, exercise, and their interaction on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Hu, Kun; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; Malhotra, Atul; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A

    2010-11-23

    The risk of adverse cardiovascular events peaks in the morning (≈9:00 AM) with a secondary peak in the evening (≈8:00 PM) and a trough at night. This pattern is generally believed to be caused by the day/night distribution of behavioral triggers, but it is unknown whether the endogenous circadian system contributes to these daily fluctuations. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that the circadian system modulates autonomic, hemodynamic, and hemostatic risk markers at rest, and that behavioral stressors have different effects when they occur at different internal circadian phases. Twelve healthy adults were each studied in a 240-h forced desynchrony protocol in dim light while standardized rest and exercise periods were uniformly distributed across the circadian cycle. At rest, there were large circadian variations in plasma cortisol (peak-to-trough ≈85% of mean, peaking at a circadian phase corresponding to ≈9:00 AM) and in circulating catecholamines (epinephrine, ≈70%; norepinephrine, ≈35%, peaking during the biological day). At ≈8:00 PM, there was a circadian peak in blood pressure and a trough in cardiac vagal modulation. Sympathetic variables were consistently lowest and vagal markers highest during the biological night. We detected no simple circadian effect on hemostasis, although platelet aggregability had two peaks: at ≈noon and ≈11:00 PM. There was circadian modulation of the cardiovascular reactivity to exercise, with greatest vagal withdrawal at ≈9:00 AM and peaks in catecholamine reactivity at ≈9:00 AM and ≈9:00 PM. Thus, the circadian system modulates numerous cardiovascular risk markers at rest as well as their reactivity to exercise, with resultant profiles that could potentially contribute to the day/night pattern of adverse cardiovascular events.

  10. Endogenous CNS expression of neurotensin and neurotensin receptors is altered during the postpartum period in outbred mice.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Terri M; Zhao, Changjiu; Whittlinger, Anna; Williams, Horecia; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neuropeptide identical in mice and humans that is produced and released in many CNS regions associated with maternal behavior. NT has been linked to aspects of maternal care and previous studies have indirectly suggested that endogenous NT signaling is altered in the postpartum period. In the present study, we directly examine whether NT and its receptors exhibit altered gene expression in maternal relative to virgin outbred mice using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) across multiple brain regions. We also examine NT protein levels using anti-NT antibodies and immunohistochemistry in specific brain regions. In the medial preoptic area (MPOA), which is critical for maternal behaviors, mRNA of NT and NT receptor 3 (Sort1) were significantly up-regulated in postpartum mice compared to virgins. NT mRNA was also elevated in postpartum females in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis dorsal. However, in the lateral septum, NT mRNA was down-regulated in postpartum females. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), Ntsr1 expression was down-regulated in postpartum females. Neurotensin receptor 2 (Ntsr2) expression was not altered in any brain region tested. In terms of protein expression, NT immunohistochemistry results indicated that NT labeling was elevated in the postpartum brain in the MPOA, lateral hypothalamus, and two subregions of PVN. Together, these findings indicate that endogenous changes occur in NT and its receptors across multiple brain regions, and these likely support the emergence of some maternal behaviors.

  11. Kernel Architecture of the Genetic Circuitry of the Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of organisms features molecular machines, circadian clocks, which generate endogenous oscillations with ~24 h periodicity and thereby synchronize biological processes to diurnal environmental fluctuations. Recently, it has become clear that plants harbor more complex gene regulatory circuits within the core circadian clocks than other organisms, inspiring a fundamental question: are all these regulatory interactions between clock genes equally crucial for the establishment and maintenance of circadian rhythms? Our mechanistic simulation for Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrates that at least half of the total regulatory interactions must be present to express the circadian molecular profiles observed in wild-type plants. A set of those essential interactions is called herein a kernel of the circadian system. The kernel structure unbiasedly reveals four interlocked negative feedback loops contributing to circadian rhythms, and three feedback loops among them drive the autonomous oscillation itself. Strikingly, the kernel structure, as well as the whole clock circuitry, is overwhelmingly composed of inhibitory, rather than activating, interactions between genes. We found that this tendency underlies plant circadian molecular profiles which often exhibit sharply-shaped, cuspidate waveforms. Through the generation of these cuspidate profiles, inhibitory interactions may facilitate the global coordination of temporally-distant clock events that are markedly peaked at very specific times of day. Our systematic approach resulting in experimentally-testable predictions provides insights into a design principle of biological clockwork, with implications for synthetic biology. PMID:26828650

  12. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-29

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells.

  13. Extent of mismatch between the period of circadian clocks and light/dark cycles determines time-to-emergence in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pankaj; Choudhury, Deepak; Sadanandappa, Madhumala K; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Circadian clocks time developmental stages of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, while light/dark (LD) cycles delimit emergence of adults, conceding only during the "allowed gate." Previous studies have revealed that time-to-emergence can be altered by mutations in the core clock gene period (per), or by altering the length of LD cycles. Since this evidence came from studies on genetically manipulated flies, or on flies maintained under LD cycles with limited range of periods, inferences that can be drawn are limited. Moreover, the extent of shortening or lengthening of time-to-emergence remains yet unknown. In order to pursue this further, we assayed time-to-emergence of D. melanogaster under 12 different LD cycles as well as in constant light (LL) and constant dark conditions (DD). Time-to-emergence in flies occurred earlier under LL than in LD cycles and DD. Among the LD cycles, time-to-emergence occurred earlier under T4-T8, followed by T36-T48, and then T12-T32, suggesting that egg-to-emergence duration in flies becomes shorter when the length of LD cycles deviates from 24 h, bearing a strong positive and a marginally negative correlation with day length, for values shorter and longer than 24 h, respectively. These results suggest that the extent of mismatch between the period of circadian clocks and environmental cycles determines the time-to-emergence in Drosophila.

  14. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8–15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3–29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  15. Molecular targets for small-molecule modulators of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    He, Baokun; Chen, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks are endogenous timing systems that regulate various aspects of mammalian metabolism, physiology and behavior. Traditional chronotherapy refers to the administration of drugs in a defined circadian time window to achieve optimal pharmacokinetic and therapeutic efficacies. In recent years, substantial efforts have been dedicated to developing novel small-molecule modulators of circadian clocks. Methods Here, we review the recent progress in the identification of molecular targets of small-molecule clock modulators and their efficacies in clock-related disorders. Specifically, we examine the clock components and regulatory factors as possible molecular targets of small molecules, and we review several key clock-related disorders as promising venues for testing the preventive/therapeutic efficacies of these small molecules. Finally, we also discuss circadian regulation of drug metabolism. Results Small molecules can modulate the period, phase and/or amplitude of the circadian cycle. Core clock proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, and clock-related kinases and other epigenetic regulators are promising molecular targets for small molecules. Through these targets small molecules exert protective effects against clock-related disorders including the metabolic syndrome, immune disorders, sleep disorders and cancer. Small molecules can also modulate circadian drug metabolism and response to existing therapeutics. Conclusion Small-molecule clock modulators target clock components or diverse cellular pathways that functionally impinge upon the clock. Target identification of new small-molecule modulators will deepen our understanding of key regulatory nodes in the circadian network. Studies of clock modulators will facilitate their therapeutic applications, alone or in combination, for clock-related diseases. PMID:26750111

  16. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-03-08

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show-by using two 8-d laboratory protocols-that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8-15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3-29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk.

  17. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-07-13

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  18. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  19. Genes encoding glycine-rich Arabidopsis thaliana proteins with RNA-binding motifs are influenced by cold treatment and an endogenous circadian rhythm.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, C D; Kreps, J A; Simon, A E

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the expression of two members of a class of Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich, putative RNA-binding proteins that we denote Ccr1 and Ccr2. Southern blot analysis indicates that Ccr1 and Ccr2 are members of a small gene family. Both Ccr1 and Ccr2 mRNA levels were influenced by a circadian rhythm that has an unusual phase for plants, with maximal accumulation at 6:00 PM and minimal accumulation at 10:00 AM. The level of CCR1 protein, however, remained relatively constant throughout the cycle. The transcript accumulation patterns of the Ccr1 and Ccr2 genes differed considerably from conditions that affect the expression of similar genes from maize, sorghum, and carrot. Levels of Ccr1 and Ccr2 mRNAs were unchanged in wounded plants, increased at least 4-fold in cold-stressed plants, and decreased 2- to 3-fold in abscisic acid-treated plants. Ccr1 transcript levels decreased in response to drought, whereas Ccr2 transcript levels increased under the same conditions. Based on the presence of additional Ccr transcripts in dark-grown plants, we propose that Ccr transcripts may be subjected to a light- or dark-mediated regulation. PMID:7513083

  20. Circadian Periods of Sensitivity for Ramelteon on the onset of Running-wheel Activity and the Peak of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuronal Firing Rhythms in C3H/HeN Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Hudson, Randall L.; Stepien, Iwona; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Ramelteon, an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia and circadian sleep disorders. Ramelteon phase shifts circadian rhythms in rodents and humans when given at the end of the subjective day; however, its efficacy at other circadian times is not known. Here, the authors determined in C3H/ HeN mice the maximal circadian sensitivity for ramelteon in vivo on the onset of circadian running-wheel activity rhythms, and in vitro on the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain slices. The phase response curve (PRC) for ramelteon (90 μg/mouse, subcutaneous [sc]) on circadian wheel-activity rhythms shows maximal sensitivity during the late mid to end of the subjective day, between CT8 and CT12 (phase advance), and late subjective night and early subjective day, between CT20 and CT2 (phase delay), using a 3-day-pulse treatment regimen in C3H/HeN mice. The PRC for ramelteon resembles that for melatonin in C3H/ HeN mice, showing the same magnitude of maximal shifts at CT10 and CT2, except that the range of sensitivity for ramelteon (CT8–CT12) during the subjective day is broader. Furthermore, in SCN brain slices in vitro, ramelteon (10 pM) administered at CT10 phase advances (5.6 ± 0.29 h, n = 3) and at CT2 phase delays (−3.2 ± 0.12 h, n = 6) the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing, with the shifts being significantly larger than those induced by melatonin (10 pM) at the same circadian times (CT10: 2.7 ± 0.15 h, n = 4, p < .05; CT2: −1.13 ± 0.08 h, n = 6, p < .001, respectively). The phase shifts induced by both melatonin and ramelteon in the SCN brain slice at either CT10 or CT2 corresponded with the period of sensitivity observed in vivo. In conclusion, melatonin and ramelteon showed identical periods of circadian sensitivity at CT10 (advance) and CT2 (delay) to shift the onset of circadian activity rhythms in vivo and the peak of SCN neuronal firing rhythms in vitro

  1. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  2. Circadian rhythms and treatment implications in depression.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Martiadis, Vassilis; Maj, Mario

    2011-08-15

    In humans almost all physiological and behavioural functions occur on a rhythmic basis. Therefore the possibility that delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythms may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders is an interesting field of research. In particular mood disorders such as seasonal affective disorder and major depression have been linked to circadian rhythms alterations. Furthermore, the antidepressant efficacy of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies affecting endogenous circadian rhythms, such as new antidepressant medications, light-therapy and sleep deprivation, is consistent with the idea that circadian alterations may represent a core component of depression, at least in a subgroup of depressed patients. This paper briefly describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating the endogenous clock system, and reviews the literature supporting the relationships between depression, antidepressant treatments and changes in circadian rhythms.

  3. CUL1 regulates TOC1 protein stability in the Arabidopsis circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Frank; Imaizumi, Takato; Gray, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The circadian clock is the endogenous timer that coordinates physiological processes with daily and seasonal environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, establishment of the circadian period relies on targeted degradation of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) by the 26S proteasome. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) is the F-box protein that associates with the SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase that is responsible for marking TOC1 for turnover. CULLIN1 (CUL1) is a core component of SCF complexes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. To assess the contribution of CUL1-containing SCF complexes to signaling within the plant oscillator, circadian rhythms were examined in the recessive, temperature-sensitive CUL1 allele axr6-3. The activity of CUL1 in this mutant declines progressively with increasing ambient temperature, resulting in more severe defects in CUL1-dependent activities at elevated temperature. Examination of circadian rhythms in axr6-3 revealed circadian phenotypes comparable to those observed in ztl null mutants; namely, lengthened circadian period, altered expression of core oscillator genes, and limited degradation of TOC1. In addition, treatment of seedlings with exogenous auxin did not alter TOC1 stability. These results demonstrate that CUL1 is required for TOC1 degradation and further suggest that this protein is the functional cullin for the SCFZTL complex. PMID:18433436

  4. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings.

  5. Reciprocal interaction of the circadian clock with the iron homeostasis network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunghyun; Kim, Sun A; Guerinot, Mary Lou; McClung, C Robertson

    2013-02-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) uptake and homeostasis are critical for survival, and these processes are tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillating mechanisms that allow an organism to anticipate environmental changes to coordinate biological processes both with one another and with the environmental day/night cycle. The plant circadian clock controls many physiological processes through rhythmic expression of transcripts. In this study, we examined the expression of three Fe homeostasis genes (IRON REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 [IRT1], BASIC HELIX LOOP HELIX39, and FERRITIN1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using promoter:LUCIFERASE transgenic lines. Each of these promoters showed circadian regulation of transcription. The circadian clock monitors a number of clock outputs and uses these outputs as inputs to modulate clock function. We show that this is also true for Fe status. Fe deficiency results in a lengthened circadian period. We interrogated mutants impaired in the Fe homeostasis response, including irt1-1, which lacks the major high-affinity Fe transporter, and fit-2, which lacks Fe deficiency-induced TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor necessary for induction of the Fe deficiency response. Both mutants exhibit symptoms of Fe deficiency, including lengthened circadian period. To determine which components are involved in this cross talk between the circadian and Fe homeostasis networks, we tested clock- or Fe homeostasis-related mutants. Mutants defective in specific clock gene components were resistant to the change in period length under different Fe conditions observed in the wild type, suggesting that these mutants are impaired in cross talk between Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock.

  6. Circadian rhythmicity of synapses in mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Grzegorczyk, Anna; Woznicka, Olga; Jasek, Ewa; Kossut, Malgorzata; Barbacka-Surowiak, Grazyna; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2015-10-01

    The circadian rhythmicity displayed by motor behavior of mice: activity at night and rest during the day; and the associated changes in the sensory input are reflected by cyclic synaptic plasticity in the whisker representations located in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex. It was not clear whether diurnal rhythmic changes in synapse density previously observed in the barrel cortex resulted from changes in the activity of the animals, from daily light/dark (LD) rhythm or are driven by an endogenous clock. These changes were investigated in the barrel cortex of C57BL/6 mouse strain kept under LD 12 : 12 h conditions and in constant darkness (DD). Stereological analysis of serial electron microscopic sections was used to assess numerical density of synapses. In mice kept under LD conditions, the total density of synapses and the density of excitatory synapses located on dendritic spines was higher during the light period (rest phase). In contrast, the density of inhibitory synapses located on dendritic spines increased during the dark period (activity phase). Under DD conditions, the upregulation of the inhibitory synapses during the activity phase was retained, but the cyclic changes in the density of excitatory synapses were not observed. The results show that the circadian plasticity concerns only synapses located on spines (and not those on dendritic shafts), and that excitatory and inhibitory synapses are differently regulated during the 24 h cycle: the excitatory synapses are influenced by light, whilst the inhibitory synapses are driven by the endogenous circadian clock.

  7. Independence of genetic geographical variation between photoperiodic diapause, circadian eclosion rhythm, and Thr-Gly repeat region of the period gene in Drosophila littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lankinen, P; Forsman, P

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila littoralis is a latitudinally widespread European species of the Drosophila virilis group. The species has ample genetic variation in photoperiodism (adult diapause) and circadian rhythmicity (pupal eclosion rhythm), with adaptive latitudinal clines in both of them. The possible common genetic basis between the variability of photoperiodism and circadian rhythms was studied by a long-term crossing experiment. A northern strain (65 degrees N) having long critical day length (CDL = 19.9 h) for diapause, early phase of the entrained rhythm in LD 3:21 (psi(LD3:21) = 12.3 h), and short period (tau= 18.8 h) of the free-running rhythm for the eclosion rhythm was crossed with a southern strain (42 degrees N) having short CDL (12.4 h), late eclosion phase (psi(LD3:21) = 20.2 h), and long period (tau= 22.8 h). After 54 generations, including free recombination, artificial selection, and genetic drift, a novel strain resulted, having even more "southern" diapause and more "northern" eclosion rhythm characteristics than found in any of the geographical strains. The observed complete separation of eclosion rhythm characteristics from photoperiodism is a new finding in D. littoralis; in earlier studies followed for 16 generations, the changes had been mostly parallel. Evidently, the genes controlling the variability of the eclosion rhythm and photoperiodism in D. littoralis are different but closely linked. To test for the possible gene loci underlying the observed geographical variability, the period gene was studied in 10 strains covering all the known clock variability in D. littoralis. The authors sequenced the most suspected Thr-Gly region, which is known to take part in the adaptive clock variability in Drosophila melanogaster. No coding differences were found in the strains, showing that this region is not included in the adaptive clock variability in D. littoralis.

  8. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  9. PPAR{alpha} is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kudo, Takashi; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2007-06-08

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erb{alpha} was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPAR{alpha} is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPAR{alpha} could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS.

  10. Warming Up Your Tick-Tock: Temperature-Dependent Regulation of Circadian Clocks.

    PubMed

    Ki, Yoonhee; Ri, Hwajung; Lee, Hoyeon; Yoo, Eunseok; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2015-10-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping mechanisms to adaptively coordinate animal behaviors and physiology with daily environmental changes. So far many circadian studies in model organisms have identified evolutionarily conserved molecular frames of circadian clock genes in the context of transcription-translation feedback loops. The molecular clockwork drives cell-autonomously cycling gene expression with ~24-hour periodicity, which is fundamental to circadian rhythms. Light and temperature are two of the most potent external time cues to reset the circadian phase of the internal clocks, yet relatively little is known about temperature-relevant clock regulation. In this review, we describe recent findings on temperature-dependent clock mechanisms in homeothermic mammals as compared with poikilothermic Drosophila at molecular, neural, and organismal levels. We propose thermodynamic transitions in RNA secondary structures might have been potent substrates for the molecular evolution of temperature-relevant post-transcriptional mechanisms. Future works should thus validate the potential involvement of specific post-transcriptional steps in temperature-dependent plasticity of circadian clocks.

  11. Daily changes in ultraviolet light levels can synchronize the circadian clock of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Chittka, Lars; Stelzer, Ralph J; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized to the 24-h day by external zeitgebers such as daily light and temperature cycles. Bumblebee foragers show diurnal rhythms under daily light:dark cycles and short-period free-running circadian rhythms in constant light conditions in the laboratory. In contrast, during the continuous light conditions of the arctic summer, they show robust 24-h rhythms in their foraging patterns, meaning that some external zeitgeber must entrain their circadian clocks in the presence of constant light. Although the sun stays above the horizon for weeks during the arctic summer, the light quality, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) range, exhibits pronounced daily changes. Since the photoreceptors and photopigments that synchronize the circadian system of bees are not known, we tested if the circadian clocks of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) can be entrained by daily cycles in UV light levels. Bumblebee colonies were set up in the laboratory and exposed to 12 h:12 h UV + :UV- cycles in otherwise continuous lighting conditions by placing UV filters on their foraging arenas for 12 h each day. The activity patterns of individual bees were recorded using fully automatic radiofrequency identification (RFID). We found that colonies manipulated in such a way showed synchronized 24-h rhythms, whereas simultaneously tested control colonies with no variation in UV light levels showed free-running rhythms instead. The results of our study show that bumblebee circadian rhythms can indeed be synchronized by daily cycles in ambient light spectral composition.

  12. Brain Circadian Oscillators and Redox Regulation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongfei A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional states of organisms vary rhythmically with a period of about a day (i.e., circadian). This endogenous dynamic is shaped by day–night alternations in light and energy. Mammalian circadian rhythms are orchestrated by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a brain region specialized for timekeeping. These autonomous ∼24-h oscillations are cell-based, requiring transcription–translation-based regulation. SCN circadian oscillations include the maintenance of intrinsic rhythms, sensitivities to input signals, and generation of output signals. These change predictably as time proceeds from dawn to day, dusk, and through the night. SCN neuronal excitability, a highly energy-demanding process, also oscillates over ∼24 h. The nature of the relationship of cellular metabolism and excitability had been unknown. Recent Advances: Global SCN redox state was found to undergo an autonomous circadian rhythm. Redox state is relatively reduced in daytime, when neuronal activity is high, and oxidized during nighttime, when neurons are relatively inactive. Redox modulates neuronal excitability via tight coupling: imposed reducing or oxidizing shifts immediately alter membrane excitability. Whereas an intact transcription–translation oscillator is necessary for the redox oscillation, metabolic modulation of excitability is too rapid to be under clockwork control. Critical Issues: Our observations lead to the hypothesis that redox state and neuronal activity are coupled nontranscriptional circadian oscillators in SCN neurons. Critical issues include discovering molecular and cellular substrates and functional consequences of this redox oscillator. Future Directions: Understanding interdependencies between cellular energy metabolism, neuronal activity, and circadian rhythms is critical to developing therapeutic strategies for treating neurodegenerative diseases and brain metabolic syndromes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2955–2965

  13. Ontogeny of Circadian Organization in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Shin; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Biscoe, Elizabeth W.; Numano, Rika; Gallaspy, Lauren M.; Soulsby, Stacy; Papadimas, Evagelia; Pezuk, Pinar; Doyle, Susan E.; Tei, Hajime; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Block, Gene D.; Menaker, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is orchestrated by a master pacemaker in the brain but many peripheral tissues also contain independent or quasi-independent circadian oscillators. The adaptive significance of clocks in these structures must lie, in large part, in the phase relationships between the constituent oscillators and their micro- and macro-environments. To examine the relationship between postnatal development, which is dependent on endogenous programs and maternal/environmental influences, and the phase of circadian oscillators, we assessed the circadian phase of pineal, liver, lung, adrenal, and thyroid tissues cultured from Period 1-luciferase (Per1-luc) rat pups of various postnatal ages. The liver, thyroid, and pineal were rhythmic at birth, but the phases of their Per1-luc expression rhythms shifted remarkably during development. To determine if the timing of the phase shift in each tissue could be the result of changing environmental conditions, we monitored the behavior of pups and their mothers. We found that the circadian phase of the liver shifted from the day to night around postnatal day (P) 22 as the pups nursed less during the light and instead ate solid food during the dark. Furthermore, the phase of Per1-luc expression in liver cultures from nursing neonates could be shifted experimentally from the day to the night by allowing pups access to the dam only during the dark. Peak Per1-luc expression also shifted from mid-day to early night in thyroid cultures at about P20, concurrent with the shift in eating times. The phase of Per1-luc expression in the pineal gland shifted from day to night coincident with its sympathetic innervation at around P5. Per1-luc expression was rhythmic in adrenal cultures and peaked around the time of lights-off throughout development, however, the amplitude of the rhythm increased at P25. Lung cultures were completely arrhythmic until P12 when the pups began to leave the nest. Taken together, our data suggest that

  14. Biomedical effects associated with energy-transmission systems: effects of 60-Hz electric fields on circadian and ultradian physiological and behavioral functions in small rodents. Period covered: January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ehret, C.F.; Rosenberg, R.S.; Sacher, G.A.; Duffy, P.H.; Groh, K.R.; Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields on transient patterns of circadian rhythms of physiological and behavioral end points are being investigated. This project is developing a data base to determine the exposure conditions that disturb the highly characteristic waveforms of ultradian, circadian, and infradian rhythms. The project has taken the following approach: (1) small rodents are exposed to well-defined ELF horizontal or vertical electric fields at nominal field strengths as high as 100 kV/m in individual residential facilities; (2) exposures follow a variety of schedules ranging from brief (one minute) to continuous, and including variations of circadian periodicities; (3) end points such as metabolism, activity, core body temperature, operant performance, and weight gain are continuously recorded for long intervals by microprocessor-controlled data acquisition systems; (4) the characteristic waveforms are analyzed by several statistical procedures for deviations from their unperturbed ultradian and circadian patterns; and (5) when and if exposures induce distrubances of the patterns, a search for concomitant neurochemical changes will begin. The following conclusions were reached: under a variety of exposure conditions the circadian regulatory system of the rat remained intact; brief ELF exposures at field strengths above 35 kV/m, presented during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle, produced a transient arousal in mice, characterized by increases in motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption; the transient arousal habituated rapidly; no significant effects were seen in the second, third, or fourth exposure of mice using a one hour on, one hour off protocol; and there were no circadian aftereffects of the intermittent ELF stimulus in mice, based on measuresof rhythms of activity and gas metabolism.

  15. E74-like factor inhibition induces reacquisition of hormone sensitiveness decreasing period circadian protein homolog 1 expression in prostate cancer cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Kohei; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Inamoto, Teruo; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Komura, Kazumasa; Nishida, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Initiating as an androgen-dependent adenocarcinoma, prostate cancer (PCa) gradually progresses to a castrate-resistant disease following androgen deprivation therapy with a propensity to metastasize. Methods In order to resolve the mechanism of castrate-resistant PCa, we performed a cDNA-microarray assay of two PCa cell lines, LNCaP (androgen dependent) and C4-2 (androgen independent). Among them, we focused on a novel Ets transcription factor, E74-like factor 5 (ELF5), the expression level of which was extremely high in C4-2 in comparison with LNCaP both in the microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, and investigated the biological role in acquisition of androgen-refractory PCa growth. Results Western blot analysis and morphological analysis using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that ELF5 was expressed mainly in cytosol both in LNCaP and C4-2. Inhibition of ELF5 expression using ELF5-small interfering RNA in C4-2 induced decreased expression of androgen receptor corepressor, period circadian protein homolog 1, and MTT assay of C4-2 after ELF5 small interfering RNA transfection showed the same cell growth pattern of LNCaP. Conclusions Our in vitro experiments of cell growth and microarray analysis have demonstrated for the first time that decreased expression of period circadian protein homolog 1 due to ELF5 inhibition may induce the possibility of reacquisition of hormone sensitiveness of PCa cells. We suggest that ELF5 could be a novel potential target for the treatment of hormone-refractory PCa patients. PMID:26288799

  16. Preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight: Neurospora as a model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the Spacelab environment on the circadian rhythms in microorganisms are investigated. Neurospora is chosen because of its well characterized circadian rhythm of growth. Growth rate, banding patterns, and circadian period and phase information are studied.

  17. Disruption of circadian clocks has ramifications for metabolism, brain, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; Bhagat, Sarah; Bloss, Erik B.; Morrison, John H.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Circadian (daily) rhythms are present in almost all plants and animals. In mammals, a brain clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus maintains synchrony between environmental light/dark cycles and physiology and behavior. Over the past 100 y, especially with the advent of electric lighting, modern society has resulted in a round-the-clock lifestyle, in which natural connections between rest/activity cycles and environmental light/dark cycles have been degraded or even broken. Instances in which rapid changes to sleep patterns are necessary, such as transmeridian air travel, demonstrate negative effects of acute circadian disruption on physiology and behavior. However, the ramifications of chronic disruption of the circadian clock for mental and physical health are not yet fully understood. By housing mice in 20-h light/dark cycles, incongruous with their endogenous ∼24-h circadian period, we were able to model the effects of chronic circadian disruption noninvasively. Housing in these conditions results in accelerated weight gain and obesity, as well as changes in metabolic hormones. In the brain, circadian-disrupted mice exhibit a loss of dendritic length and decreased complexity of neurons in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex, a brain region important in executive function and emotional control. Disrupted animals show decreases in cognitive flexibility and changes in emotionality consistent with the changes seen in neural architecture. How our findings translate to humans living and working in chronic circadian disruption is unknown, but we believe that this model can provide a foundation to understand how environmental disruption of circadian rhythms impacts the brain, behavior, and physiology. PMID:21220317

  18. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p < 0.0001). Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 1.4 mmHg and 0.8 mmHg, respectively (both p ≤ 0.038). The misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h SBP was primarily explained by an increase in SBP during the wake period (+1.7 mmHg; p = 0.017), whereas the misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h DBP was primarily explained by an increase in DBP during the sleep opportunity (+1.8 mmHg; p = 0.005). Circadian misalignment per se increases hs-CRP and blood pressure in shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  19. A circadian rhythm of conidiation in Neurospora crassa (L-12)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Yashuhiro

    1993-01-01

    Two fungi growth chambers containing six growth tubes each are used in this experiment. One chamber is for the space experiment; the other is for the simultaneous ground control experiment. The hyphae of Neurospora crassa band A mutant are inoculated at one end of each tube. Both the chambers are kept at 3 C plus or minus 1.5 C to stop hyphae growth until the Spacelab is activated. After the activation, each chamber is transferred simultaneously to the Spacelab and a phytotron in KSC and kept in continuous light at the same temperature. After about 24 hours of light exposure, each chamber is inserted into a growth chamber bag to keep it in constant darkness. The circadian rhythm of conidiation is initiated by this light to dark transition. After the dark incubation for 5 days at room temperature, both the growth chambers are kept at 3 C plus or minus 1.5 C to stop growth of the hyphae. After the space shuttle lands, both conidiation patterns are compared and analyzed. It has been known that numerous physiological phenomena show circadian rhythms. They are characterized by the fact that the oscillation can persist under constant conditions of light and temperature. Therefore, it has been accepted by most investigators that the generation mechanism of the circadian rhythm is endogeneous. However, one cannot reject the possibility that these rhythms are caused by some geophysical exogeneous factor having a 24-hour period, such as atmospheric pressure, gravity, or electromagnetic radiation. We use Neurospora crassa band A mutual which shows an obvious circadian rhythm in its spore-forming (conidiation) on the ground, and we intend to attempt the conidation of this mutant in the Spacelab where 24-hour periodicity is severely attenuated and to elucidate the effect of the geophysical exogeneous factor in the generation mechanism of the circadian rhythm.

  20. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  1. Circadian Integration of Metabolism and Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Joseph; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks align behavioral and biochemical processes with the day/night cycle. Nearly all vertebrate cells possess self-sustained clocks that couple endogenous rhythms with changes in cellular environment. Genetic disruption of clock genes in mice perturbs metabolic functions of specific tissues at distinct phases of the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian desynchrony, a characteristic of shift work and sleep disruption in humans, also leads to metabolic pathologies. Here we review advances in understanding the interrelationship among circadian disruption, sleep deprivation, obesity and diabetes, and implications for rational therapeutics for these conditions. PMID:21127246

  2. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  3. Synchrony and desynchrony in circadian clocks: impacts on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harini C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks evolved under conditions of environmental variation, primarily alternating light dark cycles, to enable organisms to anticipate daily environmental events and coordinate metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities. However, modern lifestyle and advances in technology have increased the percentage of individuals working in phases misaligned with natural circadian activity rhythms. Endogenous circadian oscillators modulate alertness, the acquisition of learning, memory formation, and the recall of memory with examples of circadian modulation of memory observed across phyla from invertebrates to humans. Cognitive performance and memory are significantly diminished when occurring out of phase with natural circadian rhythms. Disruptions in circadian regulation can lead to impairment in the formation of memories and manifestation of other cognitive deficits. This review explores the types of interactions through which the circadian clock modulates cognition, highlights recent progress in identifying mechanistic interactions between the circadian system and the processes involved in memory formation, and outlines methods used to remediate circadian perturbations and reinforce circadian adaptation. PMID:26286653

  4. Circadian rhythms and molecular noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Goldbeter, Albert

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms, characterized by a period of about 24h, are the most widespread biological rhythms generated autonomously at the molecular level. The core molecular mechanism responsible for circadian oscillations relies on the negative regulation exerted by a protein on the expression of its own gene. Deterministic models account for the occurrence of autonomous circadian oscillations, for their entrainment by light-dark cycles, and for their phase shifting by light pulses. Stochastic versions of these models take into consideration the molecular fluctuations that arise when the number of molecules involved in the regulatory mechanism is low. Numerical simulations of the stochastic models show that robust circadian oscillations can already occur with a limited number of mRNA and protein molecules, in the range of a few tens and hundreds, respectively. Various factors affect the robustness of circadian oscillations with respect to molecular noise. Besides an increase in the number of molecules, entrainment by light-dark cycles, and cooperativity in repression enhance robustness, whereas the proximity of a bifurcation point leads to less robust oscillations. Another parameter that appears to be crucial for the coherence of circadian rhythms is the binding/unbinding rate of the inhibitory protein to the promoter of the clock gene. Intercellular coupling further increases the robustness of circadian oscillations.

  5. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  6. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  7. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  8. Circadian Modulation of Short-Term Memory in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Roman, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks are widespread regulators of behavior and physiology, allowing for a more efficient allocation of efforts and resources over the course of a day. The extent that different processes are regulated by circadian oscillators, however, is not fully understood. We investigated the role of the circadian clock on short-term…

  9. Exercise influences circadian gene expression in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B A; Wagner, A L; McGlynn, O F; Kharazyan, F; Browne, J A; Elliott, J A

    2014-07-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated 24-h oscillations that coordinate numerous aspects of mammalian physiology, metabolism and behaviour. The existence of a molecular circadian clock in equine skeletal muscle has previously been demonstrated. This study investigates how the circadian 24-h expression of exercise-relevant genes in skeletal muscle is influenced by a regular exercise regime. Mid-gluteal, percutaneous muscle biopsies were obtained over a 24-h period from six Thoroughbred mares before and after an 8-week exercise programme. Real-time qPCR assays were used to assess the expression patterns of core clock genes ARNTL, PER2, NR1D1, clock-controlled gene DBP, and muscle genes MYF6, UCP3, VEGFA, FOXO1, MYOD1, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, FBXO32 and PDK4. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between circadian time and exercise for muscle genes MYF6, UCP3, MYOD1 and PDK4. A significant effect of time was observed for all genes with the exception of VEGFA, where a main effect of exercise was observed. By cosinor analysis, the core clock genes, ARNTL (P <0.01) and NR1D1 (P <0.05), showed 24-h rhythmicity both pre- and post-exercise, while PER2 expression was rhythmic post-exercise (P <0.05) but not pre-exercise. The expression profiles of muscle genes MYOD1 and MYF6 showed significant fits to a 24-h cosine waveform indicative of circadian rhythmicity post-exercise only (P <0.01). This study suggests that the metabolic capacity of muscle is influenced by scheduled exercise and that optimal athletic performance may be achieved when exercise times and competition times coincide.

  10. Entrainment of circadian clocks in mammals by arousal and food.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E; Antle, Michael C

    2011-06-30

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are regulated by a system of endogenous circadian oscillators (clock cells) in the brain and in most peripheral organs and tissues. One group of clock cells in the hypothalamic SCN (suprachiasmatic nuclei) functions as a pacemaker for co-ordinating the timing of oscillators elsewhere in the brain and body. This master clock can be reset and entrained by daily LD (light-dark) cycles and thereby also serves to interface internal with external time, ensuring an appropriate alignment of behavioural and physiological rhythms with the solar day. Two features of the mammalian circadian system provide flexibility in circadian programming to exploit temporal regularities of social stimuli or food availability. One feature is the sensitivity of the SCN pacemaker to behavioural arousal stimulated during the usual sleep period, which can reset its phase and modulate its response to LD stimuli. Neural pathways from the brainstem and thalamus mediate these effects by releasing neurochemicals that inhibit retinal inputs to the SCN clock or that alter clock-gene expression in SCN clock cells. A second feature is the sensitivity of circadian oscillators outside of the SCN to stimuli associated with food intake, which enables animals to uncouple rhythms of behaviour and physiology from LD cycles and align these with predictable daily mealtimes. The location of oscillators necessary for food-entrained behavioural rhythms is not yet certain. Persistence of these rhythms in mice with clock-gene mutations that disable the SCN pacemaker suggests diversity in the molecular basis of light- and food-entrainable clocks.

  11. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  12. [Circadian clocks and energy metabolism in rodents].

    PubMed

    Challet, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is an important component of physiological processes which provides them with a 24-hour temporal organization and adjustment to cyclical changes in the environment. Circadian rhythms are controlled by a network of endogenous clocks, comprising the main clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral tissues. All aspects of energy metabolism, from food intake to intracellular signaling pathways, are strongly influenced by circadian rhythmicity. In turn, meal timing is an efficient synchronizer (time-giver) to set the phase of the peripheral clocks, while the suprachiasmatic clock is synchronized by ambient light. In certain nutritional conditions (i.e., low- or high-calory diets), metabolic factors remaining to be identified modulate the functioning of the suprachiasmatic clock. Animal models of obesity and diabetes show circadian alterations. Conversely, when circadian rhythmicity is disturbed, either due to genetically defective circadian clocks, or to circadian desynchronization (chronic light exposure or repeated meals at odd times of the cycle), lipid and glucose metabolism is deregulated. The metabolic impact of circadian desynchronization justifies the development of preventive or therapeutic strategies that could rely, among others, on dietary interventions combining timed meals and specific composition.

  13. Comparison of arbitrary definitions of circadian time periods with those determined by wrist actigraphy in analysis of ABPM data.

    PubMed

    Eissa, M A; Yetman, R J; Poffenbarger, T; Portman, R J

    1999-11-01

    Determining blood pressure (BP) values at different daily time periods is a well recognised measure to assess the risk of end-organ damage. However, the use of various definitions of these periods, eg, day vs night, sleep vs wake or arbitrary definitions, makes clinical decisions based on available data difficult. In the present study, we compared BP loads in actual sleep-wake periods to default day-night definition provided by the ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) software (day 06.00 to 22.00; night 22.00 to 06.00) as well as to an arbitrary definition of sleep-wake periods in children published in Soergel et al (J Pediatr 1997; 130: 178-184)1 (awake 08.00 to 20.00 and sleep 00.00 to 06.00. We used an actigraphy, an accelerometer, to define the actual sleep-wake periods in 46 patients with essential hypertension who are on various treatment regimens. BP data was obtained by using Spacelabs 90207 monitors for a full 24 h. There were significant differences between actual sleep-wake and default definition for BP load. No similar finding was noted when arbitrary definition was used. The proportion of hypertensives was not significantly different when default and arbitrary definitions were used. Classification of dippers and non-dippers is greatly affected by the definition of sleep interval using the default method. Although some of the misclassifications were not statistically significant, their clinical importance must be considered. Determination of sleep and wake periods for analysis of ABPM data should be based on careful determination of actual periods. Using other definitions may not provide complete information or accommodate for individual variation.

  14. Comparison of arbitrary definitions of circadian time periods with those determined by wrist actigraphy in analysis of ABPM data.

    PubMed

    Eissa, M A; Yetman, R J; Poffenbarger, T; Portman, R J

    1999-07-01

    Determining blood pressure (BP) values at different daily time periods is a well recognised measure to assess the risk of end-organ damage. However, the use of various definitions of these periods, eg, day vs night, sleep vs wake or arbitrary definitions, makes clinical decisions based on available data difficult. In the present study, we compared BP loads in actual sleep-wake periods to default day-night definition provided by the ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) software (day 06.00-22.00; night 22.00-06.00) as well as to an arbitrary definition of sleep-wake periods in children published in Journal of Pediatrics (Soergel et al, 1997) (awake 08.00-20:00 and sleep 00.00-06.00). We used an actigraph, an accelerometer, to define the actual sleep-wake periods in 46 patients with essential hypertension who are on various treatment regimens. BP data were obtained by using Spacelabs 90207 monitors for a full 24 hours. There were significant differences between actual sleep-wake and default definition for BP load. No similar findings were noted when arbitrary definition was used. The proportion of hypertensives was not significantly different when default and arbitrary definitions were used. Classification of dippers and non-dippers is greatly affected by the definition of sleep interval using the default method. Although some of the misclassifications were not statistically significant, their clinical importance must be considered. Determination of sleep and wake periods for analysis of ABPM data should be based on careful determination of actual periods. Using other definitions may not provide complete information or accommodate for individual variation.

  15. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  16. A conserved DNA damage response pathway responsible for coupling the cell division cycle to the circadian and metabolic cycles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-12-01

    The circadian clock drives endogenous oscillations of cellular and physiological processes with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. Progression of the cell division cycle (CDC) has been found to be coupled to the circadian clock, and it has been postulated that gating of the CDC by the circadian cycle may have evolved to protect DNA from the mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light. When grown under nutrient-limiting conditions in a chemostat, prototrophic strains of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adopt a robust metabolic cycle of ultradian dimensions that temporally compartmentalizes essential cellular events. The CDC is gated by this yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), with DNA replication strictly segregated away from the oxidative phase when cells are actively respiring. Mutants impaired in such gating allow DNA replication to take place during the respiratory phase of the YMC and have been found to suffer significantly elevated rates of spontaneous mutation. Analogous to the circadian cycle, the YMC also employs the conserved DNA checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk2 to facilitate coupling with the CDC. These studies highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that seems to confine cell division to particular temporal windows to prevent DNA damage. We hypothesize that DNA damage itself might constitute a "zeitgeber", or time giver, for both the circadian cycle and the metabolic cycle. We discuss these findings in the context of a unifying theme underlying the circadian and metabolic cycles, and explore the relevance of cell cycle gating to human diseases including cancer.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  18. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-01-01

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species. PMID:27577611

  19. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-08-31

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species.

  20. Clocks for the city: circadian differences between forest and city songbirds.

    PubMed

    Dominoni, D M; Helm, B; Lehmann, M; Dowse, H B; Partecke, J

    2013-07-22

    To keep pace with progressing urbanization organisms must cope with extensive habitat change. Anthropogenic light and noise have modified differences between day and night, and may thereby interfere with circadian clocks. Urbanized species, such as birds, are known to advance their activity to early morning and night hours. We hypothesized that such modified activity patterns are reflected by properties of the endogenous circadian clock. Using automatic radio-telemetry, we tested this idea by comparing activity patterns of free-living forest and city European blackbirds (Turdus merula). We then recaptured the same individuals and recorded their activity under constant conditions. City birds started their activity earlier and had faster but less robust circadian oscillation of locomotor activity than forest conspecifics. Circadian period length predicted start of activity in the field, and this relationship was mainly explained by fast-paced and early-rising city birds. Although based on only two populations, our findings point to links between city life, chronotype and circadian phenotype in songbirds, and potentially in other organisms that colonize urban habitats, and highlight that urban environments can significantly modify biologically important rhythms in wild organisms.

  1. Differential resetting process of circadian gene expression in rat pineal glands after the reversal of the light/dark cycle via a 24 h light or dark period transition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Dong, Yue; Yang, Zhiqiu; Kato, Hisanori; Ni, Yinhua; Fu, Zhengwei

    2009-07-01

    Although studies involving the circadian response to time-zone transitions indicate that the circadian clock usually takes much longer to phase advance than delay, the discrepancy between the circadian resetting induced by photoperiod alteration via a dark or light period transition has yet to be investigated. In mammals, the pineal gland is an important component in the photoneuroendocrine axis, regulating biological rhythms. However, few studies have systematically examined the resetting process of pineal clock-gene expression to date. We investigated the resetting processes of four clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Per1, Dec1) and AANAT in the rat pineal gland after the light-dark (LD) reversal via a 24 h light or dark period transition. The resynchronization of the SCN-driven gene AANAT was nearly complete in three days in both situations, displaying similar resetting rates and processes after the differential LD reversals. The resetting processes of the clock genes were characterized by gene-specific, phase-shift modes and differential phase-shift rates between the two different LD reversal modes. The resetting processes of these clock genes were noticeably lengthened after the LD reversal via the light period transition in comparison to via the dark period transition. In addition, among the four examined clock genes, Per1 adjusted most rapidly after the differential LD reversals, while the rhythmic Cry1 expression adjusted most slowly.

  2. Circadian Regulation of Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Peek, C.B; Ramsey, K.M; Levine, D.C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light–dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest–activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and activity of NAD+-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models. PMID:25707277

  3. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  4. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  5. Effects of Gravity on Insect Circadian Rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms - endogenous daily rhythmic fluctuations in virtually all characteristics of life - are generated and coordinated by the circadian timing system (CTS). The CTS is synchronized to the external 24-hour day by time cues such as the light/dark cycle. In an environment without time cues, the length of an animal's day is determined by the period of its internal pacemaker (tau) and the animal is said to be free-running. All life on earth evolved under the solar day; the CTS exists as an adaptation that allows organisms to anticipate and to prepare for rhythmic environmental fluctuations. All life on earth also evolved under the force of earth's gravitational environment. While it is therefore not surprising that changes in the lighting environment affect the CTS, it is surprising that changes in the gravitational environment would do so. However, recent data from one of our laboratories using the brn-3.1 knockout mouse revealed that this model, which lacks the sensory receptor hair cells within the neurovestibular system, does not respond to exposure to a hyperdynamic environment in the same fashion as normal mice. The brn-3.1 mice did not show the expected suppression of circadian rhythmicity shown by control mice exposed to 2G. Exposure to altered ambient force environments affects the amplitude, mean and timing of circadian rhythms in species from unicellular organisms to man. In addition, there is a circadian influence on the homeostatic response to acute 2G acceleration and pulses of 2G can act as a time cue, synchronizing the CTS. This is of significance because maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination is critical for normal physiological and psychological function. Typically, during adaptation to an increased gravitational environment (+G), an initial acute reaction is followed by adaptation and, eventually, a new steady state (14-16), which can take weeks to months to establish. Until the development of space stations, exposure

  6. Molecular orchestration of the hepatic circadian symphony.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock determines the rhythmic expression of many different genes throughout a 24-hour period. A recent study investigating the circadian regulation of liver proteins reveals multiple levels of regulation, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms.

  7. A circadian clock in Neurospora: how genes and proteins cooperate to produce a sustained, entrainable, and compensated biological oscillator with a period of about a day.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, J C; Loros, J J; Colot, H V; Mehra, A; Belden, W J; Shi, M; Hong, C I; Larrondo, L F; Baker, C L; Chen, C-H; Schwerdtfeger, C; Collopy, P D; Gamsby, J J; Lambreghts, R

    2007-01-01

    Neurospora has proven to be a tractable model system for understanding the molecular bases of circadian rhythms in eukaryotes. At the core of the circadian oscillatory system is a negative feedback loop in which two transcription factors, WC-1 and WC-2, act together to drive expression of the frq gene. WC-2 enters the promoter region of frq coincident with increases in frq expression and then exits when the cycle of transcription is over, whereas WC-1 can always be found there. FRQ promotes the phosphorylation of the WCs, thereby decreasing their activity, and phosphorylation of FRQ then leads to its turnover, allowing the cycle to reinitiate. By understanding the action of light and temperature on frq and FRQ expression, the molecular basis of circadian entrainment to environmental light and temperature cues can be understood, and recently a specific role for casein kinase 2 has been found in the mechanism underlying circadian temperature-compensation. These data promise molecular explanations for all of the canonical circadian properties of this model system, providing biochemical answers and regulatory logic that may be extended to more complex eukaryotes including humans.

  8. The circadian body temperature rhythm of Djungarian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) revealing different circadian phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schöttner, Konrad; Waterhouse, Jim; Weinert, Dietmar

    2011-06-01

    Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) of our breeding stock show three rhythmic phenotypes: wild type (WT) animals which start their activity shortly after "lights-off" and are active until "lights-on"; delayed activity onset (DAO) hamsters whose activity onset is delayed after "lights-off" but activity offset coincides with "lights-on"; and arrhythmic hamsters (AR) that are episodically active throughout the 24-h day. The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether the observed phenotypic differences are caused by an altered output from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). As a marker of the circadian clock, the body temperature rhythm purified from masking effects due to motor activity was used. Hamsters were kept singly under standardized laboratory conditions (L:D=14:10h, T: 22°C±2°C, food and water ad libitum). Body temperature and motor activity were monitored by means of implanted G2-E-Mitters and the VitalView(®) System (MiniMitter). Each phenotype showed distinctive rhythms of overt activity and body temperature, these two rhythms being very similar for each phenotype. Correcting body temperatures for the effects of activity produced purified temperature rhythms which retained profiles that were distinctive for the phenotype. These results show that the body temperature rhythm is not simply a consequence of the activity pattern but is caused by the endogenous circadian system. The purification method also allowed estimation of thermoregulatory efficiency using the gradients as a measure for the sensitivity of body temperature to activity changes. In WT and DAO hamsters, the gradients were low during activity period and showed two peaks. The first one occurred after "lights-on", the second one preceded the activity onset. In AR hamsters, the gradients did not reveal circadian changes. The results provide good evidence that the different phenotypes result from differences in the circadian clock. In AR hamsters, the SCN do not produce an

  9. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Mayo, Sara A; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D; Fu, Loning

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per and Cry mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  10. Klf15 orchestrates circadian nitrogen homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaraj, Darwin; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Haldar, Saptarsi M.; Lu, Yuan; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Eapen, Sam J.; Eapen, Betty L.; Cui, Yingjie; Mahabeleshwar, Ganapathi H.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Smith, Mark A.; Casadesus, Gemma; Mintz, Eric M.; Sun, Haipeng; Wang, Yibin; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Bass, Joseph; Shea, Steven A.; Albrecht, Urs; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Diurnal variation in nitrogen homeostasis is observed across phylogeny. But whether these are endogenous rhythms, and if so, molecular mechanisms that link nitrogen homeostasis to the circadian clock remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that a clock-dependent peripheral oscillator, Krüppel-like factor15 transcriptionally coordinates rhythmic expression of multiple enzymes involved in mammalian nitrogen homeostasis. In particular, Krüppel-like factor15-deficient mice exhibit no discernable amino acid rhythm, and the rhythmicity of ammonia to urea detoxification is impaired. Of the external cues, feeding plays a dominant role in modulating Krüppel-like factor15 rhythm and nitrogen homeostasis. Further, when all behavioral, environmental and dietary cues were controlled in humans, nitrogen homeostasis still expressed endogenous circadian rhythmicity. Thus, in mammals, nitrogen homeostasis exhibits circadian rhythmicity, and is orchestrated by Krüppel-like factor15. PMID:22405069

  11. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  12. Peripheral circadian oscillators and their rhythmic regulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2003-05-01

    Most of the organisms living on earth show 24 hour (circadian) rhythms that are endogenously controlled by biological clocks. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by the circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. However, recent studies have demonstrated that circadian oscillators can be found in many organs and tissues, and it appears that the circadian oscillators in the periphery are not self-sustained, since, in vitro, the oscillation disappears after a few cycles. Although analysis of the clockwork mechanism indicates that the molecular composition of the clock in the SCN and in the peripheral tissues is very similar, the mechanism responsible for the damping of the circadian oscillation in the periphery is unknown. Recent studies have also indicated that the mammalian circadian system is hierarchically organized in that the SCN (i.e., the master circadian pacemaker) controls the peripheral oscillators in order to coordinate the physiological events in an entire body. The mechanisms by which the SCN controls peripheral oscillators are just starting to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on functioning of these extra-SCN oscillators and the mechanisms the SCN controls peripheral oscillators.

  13. Circadian regulation of the hepatic endobiotic and xenobitoic detoxification pathways: the time matters.

    PubMed

    Zmrzljak, Ursula Prosenc; Rozman, Damjana

    2012-04-16

    Metabolic processes have to be regulated tightly to prevent waste of energy and to ensure sufficient detoxification. Most anabolic processes operate in a timely manner when energy intake is the highest, while catabolism takes place in energy spending periods. Endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism are therefore under circadian control. Circadian regulation is mediated through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a master autonomous oscillator of the brain. Although many peripheral organs have their own oscillators, the SCN is important in orchestrating and entraining organs according to the environmental light cues. However, light is not the only signal for entrainment of internal clocks. For endobiotic and xenobitoic detoxification pathways, the food composition and intake regime are equally important. The rhythm of the liver as an organ where the major metabolic pathways intersect depends on SCN signals, signals from endocrine tissues, and, importantly, the type and time of feeding or xenobiotics ingestion. Several enzymes are involved in detoxification processes. Phase I is composed mainly of cytochromes P450, which are regulated by nuclear receptors. Phase II enzymes modify the phase I metabolites, while phase III includes membrane transporters responsible for the elimination of modified xenobiotics. Phases I-III of drug metabolism are under strong circadian regulation, starting with the drug-sensing nuclear receptors and ending with drug transporters. Disturbed circadian regualtion (jet-lag, shift work, and dysfunction of core clock genes) leads to changed periods of activity, sleep disorders, disturbed glucose homeostasis, breast or colon cancer, and metabolic syndrome. As many xenobiotics influence the circadian rhythm of the liver, bad drug administration timing can worsen the above listed effects. This review will cover the major hepatic circadian regulation of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic pathways and will provide examples of how good timing of drug

  14. Circadian rhythms constrain leaf and canopy gas exchange in an Amazonian forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Goulden, Michael L.; Miller, Scott D.; da Rocha, Humberto R.

    2006-08-01

    We used a controlled-environment leaf gas-exchange system and the micrometeorological technique eddy covariance to determine whether circadian rhythms constrain the rates of leaf and canopy gas exchange in an Amazonian forest over a day. When exposed to continuous and constant light for 20 to 48 hours leaves of eleven of seventeen species reduced their photosynthetic rates and closed their stomata during the normally dark period and resumed active gas exchange during the normally light period. Similarly, the rate of whole-forest CO2 uptake at a predetermined irradiance declined during the late afternoon and early morning and increased during the middle of the day. We attribute these cycles to circadian rhythms that are analogous to ones that have been reported for herbaceous plants in the laboratory. The importance of endogenous gas exchange rhythms presents a previously unrecognized challenge for efforts to both interpret and model land-atmosphere energy and mass exchange.

  15. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang; Wu, Huijian

    2013-08-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer.

  16. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock.

  17. Circadian disc shedding in Xenopus retina in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, J.G.; Fisher, S.K.

    1984-02-01

    To further examine the endogenous rhythm of disc shedding and phagocytosis observed in several species, adult Xenopus were entrained to a 12 hr light/12 hr dark cycle and then placed in constant darkness. At various times during a 3-day period of constant darkness, eyes were explanted and placed into culture medium, then processed for light and electron microscopy. A clear rhythmicity of disc shedding was observed, with pronounced peaks at the times light onset occurred in the original entrainment cycle. Modification of the HCO/sub 3/- ion concentration in the medium was found to raise the amplitude of the peak of endogenous disc shedding. Explants maintained in culture medium containing deuterium oxide (a compound known to perturb circadian oscillators) were found to shed with a longer interval between peaks. The addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, to this preparation suppressed the shedding rhythm. The action of anisomycin was investigated by autoradiographic examination of the pattern of /sup 3/H-leucine uptake and protein synthesis by the explant. The findings suggest the presence of a circadian oscillator for rhythmic disc shedding within the amphibian eye.

  18. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension.

  19. A low salt diet and circadian dysfunction synergize to induce angiotensin II-dependent hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J.R.; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A.; Stepp, David W.; Rudic, R. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in nighttime blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and Period isoform knockout mice (Per2-KO, Per2,3-KO and Per1,2,3-KO/PerTKO mice). On a normal diet, administration of Ang II caused caused non-dipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform knockout mice. To study the endogenous effects of Ang II stimulation, we then administered a low salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous Ang II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low salt diet decreased blood pressure in WT mice. In contrast, Period isoform knockout mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low salt diet, due to an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform knockout mice which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered AT1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. PMID:26781276

  20. Two mechanisms of rephasal of circadian rhythms in response to a 180 deg phase shift /simulated 12-hr time zone change/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroshia, C. W.; Winget, C. M.; Bond, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A model developed by Wever (1966) is considered. The model describes the behavior of circadian rhythms in response to photoperiod phase shifts simulating time zone changes, as a function of endogenous periodicity, light intensity, and direction of phase shift. A description is given of an investigation conducted to test the model upon the deep body temperature rhythm in unrestrained subhuman primates. An evaluation is conducted regarding the applicability of the model in predicting the type and duration of desynchronization induced by simulated time zone changes as a function of endogenous periodicity.

  1. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  2. Light and Gravity Effects on Circadian Rhythms of Rhesus Macaques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Temporal integration of a biological organism's physiological, behavioral and biochemical systems depends upon its circadian timing system. The endogenous period of this timing system is typically synchronized to the 24- hour day by environmental cues. The daily alternation of light and dark has long been known as one of the most potent environmental synchronizers influencing the circadian timing system. Alterations in the lighting environment (length or intensity of light exposure) can also affect the homeostatic state of the organism. A series of experiments was performed using rhesus monkeys with the objective of defining the fundamental properties of the circadian rhythm of body temperature. Three major experiments were performed in addition to several preliminary studies. These experiments explored 1.) the response of the rhesus body temperature rhythm to varying day length and light intensity; 2.) the response of the body temperature rhythm to light exposure as a function of time of day; and 3.) the characteristics of the metabolic heat production rhythm which is responsible for the daily cycle in body temperature. Results of these three completed experiments will be reported here. In addition, preliminary experiments were also performed in social entrainment of rhesus circadian rhythms and the properties of rhesus body temperature rhythms in constant conditions, where no external time cues were provided. Four adult male rhesus monkeys served as subjects in all experiments. All experiments were performed at the California Regional Primate Research Center. Each animal was implanted with a biotelemetry unit that measured deep body temperature. All surgeries were performed by a board certified veterinary surgeon under sterile conditions. The biotelemetry implants also provided an index of activity level in each animal. For metabolic heat production measurements, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured and the caloric equivalent of these

  3. [Research advances in circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Qi; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The time phase of epileptic seizures has attracted more and more attention. Epileptic seizures have their own circadian rhythm. The same type of epilepsy has different seizure frequencies in different time periods and states (such as sleeping/awakening state and natural day/night cycle). The circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures has complex molecular and endocrine mechanisms, and currently there are several hypotheses. Clarification of the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures and prevention and administration according to such circadian rhythm can effectively control seizures and reduce the adverse effects of drugs. The research on the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures provides a new idea for the treatment of epilepsy.

  4. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  5. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases.

  6. Caffeine does not entrain the circadian clock but improves daytime alertness in blind patients with non-24-hour rhythms

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background Totally blind individuals are highly likely to suffer from Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder due to a failure of light to reset the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. In this outpatient case series, we investigated whether daily caffeine administration could entrain the circadian pacemaker in non-entrained blind patients to alleviate symptoms of non-24-hour sleep–wake disorder. Patients/Methods Three totally blind males (63.0 ± 7.5 years old) were studied at home over ~4 months. Urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) rhythms were measured for 48 h every 1–2 weeks. Participants completed daily sleep–wake logs, and rated their alertness and mood using nine-point scales every ~2–4 h while awake on urine sampling days. Caffeine capsules (150 mg per os) were self-administered daily at 10 a.m. for approximately one circadian beat cycle based on each participant's endogenous circadian period τ and compared to placebo (n = 2) or no treatment (n = 1) in a single-masked manner. Results Non-24-h aMT6s rhythms were confirmed in all three participants (τ range = 24.32–24.57 h). Daily administration of 150 mg caffeine did not entrain the circadian clock. Caffeine treatment significantly improved daytime alertness at adverse circadian phases (p < 0.0001) but did not decrease the occurrence of daytime naps compared with placebo. Conclusions Although caffeine was able to improve daytime alertness acutely and may therefore provide temporary symptomatic relief, the inability of caffeine to correct the underlying circadian disorder means that an entraining agent is required to treat Non-24-Hour Sleep–Wake Disorder in the blind appropriately. PMID:25891543

  7. Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Charli; Zhou, Xuan; Matthews, Raymond W; Darwent, David; Roach, Gregory D

    2016-01-29

    The impact of sleep restriction on the endogenous circadian rhythms of hunger and satiety were examined in 28 healthy young men. Participants were scheduled to 2 × 24-h days of baseline followed by 8 × 28-h days of forced desynchrony during which sleep was either moderately restricted (equivalent to 6 h in bed/24 h; n = 14) or severely restricted (equivalent to 4 h in bed/24 h; n = 14). Self-reported hunger and satisfaction were assessed every 2.5 h during wake periods using visual analogue scales. Participants were served standardised meals and snacks at regular intervals and were not permitted to eat ad libitum. Core body temperature was continuously recorded with rectal thermistors to determine circadian phase. Both hunger and satiety exhibited a marked endogenous circadian rhythm. Hunger was highest, and satiety was lowest, in the biological evening (i.e., ~17:00-21:00 h) whereas hunger was lowest, and satiety was highest in the biological night (i.e., 01:00-05:00 h). The results are consistent with expectations based on previous reports and may explain in some part the decrease in appetite that is commonly reported by individuals who are required to work at night. Interestingly, the endogenous rhythms of hunger and satiety do not appear to be altered by severe--as compared to moderate--sleep restriction.

  8. Circadian genes, the stress axis, and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    The body's internal system to control the daily rhythm of the body's functions (i.e., the circadian system), the body's stress response, and the body's neurobiology are highly interconnected. Thus, the rhythm of the circadian system impacts alcohol use patterns; at the same time, alcohol drinking also can alter circadian functions. The sensitivity of the circadian system to alcohol may result from alcohol's effects on the expression of several of the clock genes that regulate circadian function. The stress response system involves the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the brain and the adrenal glands, as well as the hormones they secrete, including corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and glucocorticoids. It is controlled by brain-signaling molecules, including endogenous opioids such as β-endorphin. Alcohol consumption influences the activity of this system and vice versa. Finally, interactions exist between the circadian system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and alcohol consumption. Thus, it seems that certain clock genes may control functions of the stress response system and that these interactions are affected by alcohol.

  9. Circadian period lengths of lipid synthesis mutants (cel, chol-1) of Neurospora show defective temperature, but intact pH-compensation.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Peter; Slewa, Ieda

    2002-05-01

    The influence of extracellular pH on the circadian sporulation rhythm of Neurospora crassa has been investigated for the mutants chol-1 and cel. Both mutants have a defect in the lipid synthesis pathway and require either choline or palmitate, respectively, as supplements for normal growth. The chol-1 and cel mutants also show an impaired temperature-compensation when growing on minimal medium. We investigated the possible correlation between loss of temperature- and pH-compensation in cel and chol-1 similar to the correlation found earlier for the frq7 mutant. Our results show that the cel and the chol-1 mutants, although defective in temperature-compensation have an intact pH-compensation of their circadian rhythms. At present, the products of the frq-locus are the only components of the clock that affect the sporulation rhythm of Neurospora both through pH- and temperature-compensation.

  10. Circadian clocks, brain function, and development.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ellen; Sidor, Michelle M; Gamble, Karen L; Cirelli, Chiara; Sharkey, Katherine M; Hoyle, Nathaniel; Tikotzky, Liat; Talbot, Lisa S; McCarthy, Michael J; Hasler, Brant P

    2013-12-01

    Circadian clocks are temporal interfaces that organize biological systems and behavior to dynamic external environments. Components of the molecular clock are expressed throughout the brain and are centrally poised to play an important role in brain function. This paper focuses on key issues concerning the relationship among circadian clocks, brain function, and development, and discusses three topic areas: (1) sleep and its relationship to the circadian system; (2) systems development and psychopathology (spanning the prenatal period through late life); and (3) circadian factors and their application to neuropsychiatric disorders. We also explore circadian genetics and psychopathology and the selective pressures on the evolution of clocks. Last, a lively debate is presented on whether circadian factors are central to mood disorders. Emerging from research on circadian rhythms is a model of the interaction among genes, sleep, and the environment that converges on the circadian clock to influence susceptibility to developing psychopathology. This model may lend insight into effective treatments for mood disorders and inform development of new interventions.

  11. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  12. Measuring synchrony in the mammalian central circadian circuit

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Erik D.; Kiss, István Z.; Mazuski, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks control daily rhythms in physiology and behavior across all phyla. These rhythms are intrinsic to individual cells that must synchronize to their environment and to each other to anticipate daily events. Recent advances in recording from large numbers of cells for many circadian cycles have enabled researchers to begin to evaluate the mechanisms and consequences of intercellular circadian synchrony. Consequently, methods have been adapted to estimate the period, phase and amplitude of individual circadian cells and calculate synchrony between cells. Stable synchronization requires that the cells share a common period. As a result, synchronized cells maintain constant phase relationships to each (e.g. with cell 1 peaking an hour before cell 2 each cycle). This chapter reviews how circadian rhythms are recorded from single mammalian cells and details methods for measuring their period and phase synchrony. These methods have been useful, for example, in showing that specific neuropeptides are essential to maintain synchrony among circadian cells. PMID:25707270

  13. Sex Differences in Circadian Timing Systems: Implications for Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Matthew; Silver, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Virtually every eukaryotic cell has an endogenous circadian clock and a biological sex. These cell-based clocks have been conceptualized as oscillators whose phase can be reset by internal signals such as hormones, and external cues such as light. The present review highlights the inter-relationship between circadian clocks and sex differences. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) serves as a master clock synchronizing the phase of clocks throughout the body. Gonadal steroid receptors are expressed in almost every site that receives direct SCN input. Here we review sex differences in the circadian timing system in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), the hypothalamicadrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis, and sleep-arousal systems. We also point to ways in which disruption of circadian rhythms within these systems differs in the sexes and is associated with dysfunction and disease. Understanding sex differentiated circadian timing systems can lead to improved treatment strategies for these conditions. PMID:24287074

  14. Cloning of circadian rhythmic pathway genes and perturbation of oscillation patterns in endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-exposed mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-08-01

    -associated genes showed a regular oscillation pattern over a period of approximately 24h during a 12L:12D cycle. However, the circadian rhythm of BPA-exposed juvenile K. marmoratus liver tissue was perturbed over a 12L:12D period. This study will aid in our understanding of how EDCs perturb endogenous circadian rhythms, particularly in BPA-exposed fish liver tissue.

  15. Long-Lasting Effects of Sepsis on Circadian Rhythms in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, Emma K.; Anderson, Sean T.; Moynagh, Paul N.; Coogan, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Daily patterns of activity and physiology are termed circadian rhythms and are driven primarily by an endogenous biological timekeeping system, with the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Previous studies have indicated reciprocal relationships between the circadian and the immune systems, although to date there have been only limited explorations of the long-term modulation of the circadian system by immune challenge, and it is to this question that we addressed ourselves in the current study. Sepsis was induced by peripheral treatment with lipopolysaccharide (5 mg/kg) and circadian rhythms were monitored following recovery. The basic parameters of circadian rhythmicity (free-running period and rhythm amplitude, entrainment to a light/dark cycle) were unaltered in post-septic animals compared to controls. Animals previously treated with LPS showed accelerated re-entrainment to a 6 hour advance of the light/dark cycle, and showed larger phase advances induced by photic stimulation in the late night phase. Photic induction of the immediate early genes c-FOS, EGR-1 and ARC was not altered, and neither was phase-shifting in response to treatment with the 5-HT-1a/7 agonist 8-OH-DPAT. Circadian expression of the clock gene product PER2 was altered in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of post-septic animals, and PER1 and PER2 expression patterns were altered also in the hippocampus. Examination of the suprachiasmatic nucleus 3 months after treatment with LPS showed persistent upregulation of the microglial markers CD-11b and F4/80, but no changes in the expression of various neuropeptides, cytokines, and intracellular signallers. The effects of sepsis on circadian rhythms does not seem to be driven by cell death, as 24 hours after LPS treatment there was no evidence for apoptosis in the suprachiasmatic nucleus as judged by TUNEL and cleaved-caspase 3 staining. Overall these data provide novel insight into how septic shock exerts chronic effects on the

  16. The Nonlinear Phase Response Curve of the Human Circadian Pacemaker and How Complex Behaviors Might Arise in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Ron S.

    2002-08-01

    Our example from nature is two groups of about 10,000 cells in the brain called Suprachiasmatic Nuclei (SCN) and how light can entrain free running endogenous periodic behavior via the retina's connection to the SCN. Our major question is how a complex behavior like this can arise in nature. Finally presented is a mathematical model and simulation showing how simple periodic signals can be coupled to produce spatio-temporal chaotic behavior and how two complex signals can combine to produce simple coherent behavior with a hypothetical analogy to phase resetting in biological circadian pacemakers.

  17. Interplay between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes.

    PubMed

    Isorna, Esther; de Pedro, Nuria; Valenciano, Ana I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J

    2017-03-01

    The circadian system is responsible for the temporal organisation of physiological functions which, in part, involves daily cycles of hormonal activity. In this review, we analyse the interplay between the circadian and endocrine systems in fishes. We first describe the current model of fish circadian system organisation and the basis of the molecular clockwork that enables different tissues to act as internal pacemakers. This system consists of a net of central and peripherally located oscillators and can be synchronised by the light-darkness and feeding-fasting cycles. We then focus on two central neuroendocrine transducers (melatonin and orexin) and three peripheral hormones (leptin, ghrelin and cortisol), which are involved in the synchronisation of the circadian system in mammals and/or energy status signalling. We review the role of each of these as overt rhythms (i.e. outputs of the circadian system) and, for the first time, as key internal temporal messengers that act as inputs for other endogenous oscillators. Based on acute changes in clock gene expression, we describe the currently accepted model of endogenous oscillator entrainment by the light-darkness cycle and propose a new model for non-photic (endocrine) entrainment, highlighting the importance of the bidirectional cross-talking between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes. The flexibility of the fish circadian system combined with the absence of a master clock makes these vertebrates a very attractive model for studying communication among oscillators to drive functionally coordinated outputs.

  18. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-03-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock.

  19. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    PubMed Central

    Fuhr, Luise; Abreu, Mónica; Pett, Patrick; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a powerful endogenous timing system, which allows organisms to fine-tune their physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. The interplay of a distinct set of core-clock genes and proteins generates oscillations in expression of output target genes which temporally regulate numerous molecular and cellular processes. The study of the circadian timing at the organismal as well as at the cellular level outlines the field of chronobiology, which has been highly interdisciplinary ever since its origins. The development of high-throughput approaches enables the study of the clock at a systems level. In addition to experimental approaches, computational clock models exist which allow the analysis of rhythmic properties of the clock network. Such mathematical models aid mechanistic understanding and can be used to predict outcomes of distinct perturbations in clock components, thereby generating new hypotheses regarding the putative function of particular clock genes. Perturbations in the circadian timing system are linked to numerous molecular dysfunctions and may result in severe pathologies including cancer. A comprehensive knowledge regarding the mechanistic of the circadian system is crucial to develop new procedures to investigate pathologies associated with a deregulated clock. In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases. PMID:26288701

  20. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Oosterman, Johanneke E.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock. PMID:25519730

  1. Circadian Variation in Suicide Attempts in Tokyo from 1978 to 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motohashi, Yutaka

    1990-01-01

    Analyzed circadian variations in suicide attempts in Tokyo from 1978 to 1985 from records of Ambulance Service of Tokyo. Findings showed significant circadian variation in suicide attempts which seemed to be associated with endogenous rhythms, such as mood, and daily variation in social activities. Established peak time for suicide attempts as…

  2. Circadian control of photoreceptor outer segment membrane turnover in mice genetically incapable of melatonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Chiba, A; Menaker, M

    1999-01-01

    Vertebrate retinal photoreceptors periodically shed membrane from their outer segment distal tips; this material is phagocytosed and degraded by the retinal pigmented epithelium. Both a circadian oscillator and the daily light-dark cycle affect disk shedding, and the effects of both may be mediated by melatonin. To clarify melatonin's role in this process, we asked whether endogenous melatonin is required for rhythmic disk shedding in mouse retina. We analyzed disk shedding in two mouse strains: C3H, which produce melatonin in retina and pineal under the control of circadian oscillators, and C57BL/6, which do not produce melatonin. In cyclic light, both strains exhibited a robust cycle of disk phagosome content in the pigmented epithelium. Peak shedding occurred just after dawn, and trough levels occurred during the middle of the dark phase. In constant darkness, mice exhibited circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, the characteristics of which were similar between strains. Both strains also exhibited rhythmic disk shedding in constant darkness, although amplitudes of the rhythms were damped. Exogenous melatonin delivered once per day failed to reestablish high-amplitude cyclic shedding in mice held in constant darkness. Our results show that, while disk shedding in cyclic light is robustly rhythmic, neither rhythmic production of melatonin nor the circadian oscillator responsible for rhythmic locomotor activity is sufficient to drive high-amplitude rhythmic shedding in constant darkness. More importantly, melatonin is required neither for cyclic changes in the rate of disk shedding in cyclic light, nor for the circadian rhythm of disk shedding in constant darkness.

  3. Disorders of the circadian clock: etiology and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Wisor, J P

    2002-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-hr rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, temperature, locomotor activity and virtually all other behavioral and physiological processes. In order for these cycles to be adaptive, they must be synchronized, or entrained, to the 24-hr light/dark cycle produced by the rotation of the Earth. The timing of circadian variables relative to the light/dark cycle, i.e., the phase angle of entrainment, is influenced by intrinsic circadian clock properties that are to an extent genetically determined, and thus varies between individuals. In extreme cases (advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome) or during shift work or jet lag, the phase angle of entrainment may be incompatible with work requirements or other social demands, resulting in negative consequences to health and productivity. This review describes the etiology of circadian disorders within the context of formal circadian clock properties and summarizes studies in humans and in other species which link specific genetic loci to circadian clock function and malfunction. The proteins encoded by these genetic loci play key roles in the intracellular feedback loop that generates circadian rhythms, and thus represent therapeutic targets for the treatment of both endogenous and exogenous circadian disorders.

  4. Circadian rhythms and fractal fluctuations in forearm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the circadian pacemaker --- an internal body clock located in the brain which is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake behavioral cycles --- influences key physiologic functions such as the body temperature, hormone secretion and heart rate. Surprisingly, no previous studies have investigated whether the circadian pacemaker impacts human motor activity --- a fundamental physiologic function. We investigate high-frequency actigraph recordings of forearm motion from a group of young and healthy subjects during a forced desynchrony protocol which allows to decouple the sleep/wake cycles from the endogenous circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We investigate both static properties (mean value, standard deviation), dynamical characteristics (long-range correlations), and nonlinear features (magnitude and Fourier-phase correlations) in the fluctuations of forearm acceleration across different circadian phases. We demonstrate that while the static properties exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a broad peak in the afternoon, the dynamical and nonlinear characteristics remain invariant with circadian phase. This finding suggests an intrinsic multi-scale dynamic regulation of forearm motion the mechanism of which is not influenced by the circadian pacemaker, thus suggesting that increased cardiac risk in the early morning hours is not related to circadian-mediated influences on motor activity.

  5. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  6. Persistence, entrainment, and function of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cory T; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2015-03-01

    Polar organisms must cope with an environment that periodically lacks the strongest time-giver, or zeitgeber, of circadian organization-robust, cyclical oscillations between light and darkness. We review the factors influencing the persistence of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates when the light-dark cycle is absent, the likely mechanisms of entrainment that allow some polar vertebrates to remain synchronized with geophysical time, and the adaptive function of maintaining circadian rhythms in such environments.

  7. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  8. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  9. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds.

  10. Opening the Debate: How to Fulfill the Need for Physicians’ Training in Circadian-Related Topics in a Full Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Selfridge, Julia M; Moyer, Kurtis; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Circadian rhythms are daily changes in our physiology and behavior that are manifested as patterns of brain wave activity, periodic hormone production, recurring cell regeneration, and other oscillatory biological activities. Their importance to human health is becoming apparent; they are deranged by shift work and jet-lag and in disparate conditions such as insomnia, sleep syndromes, coronary heart attacks, and depression, and are endogenous factors that contribute to cancer development and progression. Discussion: As evidence of the circadian connection to human health has grown, so has the number of Americans experiencing disruption of circadian rhythms due to the demands of an industrialized society. Today, there is a growing work force that experiences night shift work and time-zone shifts shaping the demands on physicians to best meet the needs of patients exposed to chronic circadian disruptions. The diverse range of illness associated with altered rhythms suggests that physicians in various fields will see its impact in their patients. However, medical education, with an already full curriculum, struggles to address this issue. Summary: Here, we emphasize the need for incorporating the topic of circadian rhythms in the medical curriculum and propose strategies to accomplish this goal. PMID:27103933

  11. Effects of Withdrawal from Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Vapor on the Level and Circadian Periodicity of Running-Wheel Activity in C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; McCulley, Walter D.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol withdrawal is associated with behavioral and chronobiological disturbances that may persist during protracted abstinence. We previously reported that C57BL/6J (B6) mice show marked but temporary reductions in running-wheel activity, and normal free-running circadian rhythms, following a 4-day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor (CIE) exposure (16 hours of ethanol vapor exposure alternating with 8 hours of withdrawal). In the present experiments, we extend these observations in two ways: (1) by examining post-CIE locomotor activity in C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice, an inbred strain characterized by high sensitivity to ethanol withdrawal, and (2) by directly comparing the responses of B6 and C3H mice to a longer-duration CIE protocol. Methods In Experiment 1, C3H mice were exposed to the same 4-day CIE protocol used in our previous study with B6 mice (referred to here as the 1-cycle CIE protocol). In Experiment 2, C3H and B6 mice were exposed to three successive 4-day CIE cycles, each separated by 2 days of withdrawal (the 3-cycle CIE protocol). Running-wheel activity was monitored prior to and following CIE, and post-CIE activity was recorded in constant darkness to allow assessment of free-running circadian period and phase. Results C3H mice displayed pronounced reductions in running-wheel activity that persisted for the duration of the recording period (up to 30 days) following both 1-cycle (Experiment 1) and 3-cycle (Experiment 2) CIE protocols. In contrast, B6 mice showed reductions in locomotor activity that persisted for about one week following the 3-cycle CIE protocol, similar to the results of our previous study using a 1-cycle protocol in this strain. Additionally, C3H mice showed significant shortening of free-running period following the 3-cycle, but not the 1-cycle, CIE protocol, while B6 mice showed normal free-running rhythms. Conclusions These results reveal genetic differences in the persistence of ethanol withdrawal-induced hypo

  12. Circadian Misalignment, Reward-Related Brain Function, and Adolescent Alcohol Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Brant P.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Developmental changes in sleep and circadian rhythms that occur during adolescence may contribute to reward-related brain dysfunction, and consequently increase the risk of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Methods This review (a) describes marked changes in circadian rhythms, reward-related behavior and brain function, and alcohol involvement that occur during adolescence, (b) offers evidence that these parallel developmental changes are associated, and (c) posits a conceptual model by which misalignment between sleep-wake timing and endogenous circadian timing may increase the risk of adolescent AUDs by altering reward-related brain function. Results The timing of sleep shifts later throughout adolescence, in part due to developmental changes in endogenous circadian rhythms, which tend to become more delayed. This tendency for delayed sleep and circadian rhythms is at odds with early school start times during secondary education, leading to misalignment between many adolescents’ sleep-wake schedules and their internal circadian timing. Circadian misalignment is associated with increased alcohol use and other risk-taking behaviors, as well as sleep loss and sleep disturbance. Growing evidence indicates that circadian rhythms modulate the reward system, suggesting that circadian misalignment may impact adolescent alcohol involvement by altering reward-related brain function. Neurocognitive function is also subject to sleep and circadian influence, and thus circadian misalignment may also impair inhibitory control and other cognitive processes relevant to alcohol use. Specifically, circadian misalignment may further exacerbate the cortical-subcortical imbalance within the reward circuit, an imbalance thought to explain increased risk-taking and sensation-seeking during adolescence. Adolescent alcohol use is highly contexualized, however, and thus studies testing this model will also need to consider factors that may influence both circadian misalignment and

  13. Characterization of neurospora circadian rhythms in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, James S.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether the circadian rhythm of conidiation in neurospora crassa is endogenously derived or is driven by some geophysical time cue, an experiment was conducted on space shuttle flight STS-9, where inoculated race tubes were exposed to the microgravity environment of space. The results demonstated that the rhythm can persist in space. However, there were several minor alterations noted; an increase in the period of the oscillation and the variability of the growth rate and a diminished rhythm amplitude, which eventually damped out in 25% of the flight tubes. On day seven of the flight, the tubes were exposed to light while their growth fronts were marked. It appears that some aspects of this marking process reinstated a robust rhythm in all the tubes which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. It was hypothesized that the damping found prior to the marking procedure on STS-9 may have been a result of the hypergravity pulse of launch and not due to the microgravity of the orbital lab; furthermore, that the marking procedure, by exposing the samples to light, had reinstated rhythmicity. To test this, an investigation was conducted into the effects of acute and chronic exposure to hypergravity.

  14. [Peculiarities of circadian rhythms in plants from different geographical latitudes].

    PubMed

    Mayer, W

    1966-09-01

    1 Two species of plants (Taraxacum arcticum and Arnica angustifolia), collected in Spitsbergen (geogr. latitude 76-80 degrees) exhibit endogenous circadian leaf movements but also movements with shorter periods. Astragalus frigidus, A. alpinus and Hedysarum hedysaroides, collected in arctic regions of continental Europe, also show endogenous diurnal leaf movements. 2. In most of the species tested, there was no difference in the length of the free running periods of plants from arctic and Central-European regions. This is also the case when individuals of the same species collected in different regions are compared. However, in Taraxacum arcticum the period is shorter than in T. officinale In general, under constant conditions the circadian oscillations of arctic plants persist for a shorter period than those of other plants. 3. The free running periods of several of the investigated species from tropical regions are much longer than 24 hours, i.e., much longer than those of species from Central-European and arctic regions. 4. The free running periods of several tropical species are temperature-independent (Erythrina senegalensis, Albizzia lophanta, Rhynchosia memmonia, Vigna catjang, Phaseolus multiflorus). In other tropical species, however, the periods decrease rather strongly with increasing temperature (Phaseolus mungo, Canavalia obtusifolia, Clitoria ternatea, Dolichos lablab, Vigna sesquipedalis, Dolichos zebra). The temperature does not influence the amplitudes in Phaseolus mungo and Vigna sesquipedalis, but it strongly influences the amplitudes in Erythrina senegalensis, in LD-cycles as well as in continuous light. 5. The arctic plant Astragalus frigidus still shows free running oscillations at 12°C, whereas several tropical species oscillate only at temperatures above 17°C. 6. The differences in the periods of tropical and non-tropical species (see under [3]) disappear if the plants are compared not at the same temperature but at temperatures which are

  15. Calmodulin modulates the delay period between release of calcium from internal stores and activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Luis; Sampieri, Alicia

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we have explored the role of calmodulin (CaM) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) in the communication process activated after the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels from Chinese hamster ovary cells. Experiments using combined rapid confocal calcium and electrophysiology measurements uncovered a consistent delay of around 900 ms between the first detectable calcium released from the ER and the activation of the calcium current. This delay was evident with two different methods used to release calcium from the ER: either the blockade of the microsomal calcium ATPase with thapsigargin or activation of bradykinin receptors linked to the IP(3) cascade. Direct application of IP(3) or a peptide from the NH(2)-terminal region of the IP(3)R activated store operated calcium, reducing the delay period. Introduction of CaM into the cell via the patch pipette increased the delay period from 900 +/- 100 ms to 10 +/- 2.1 s (n = 18). Furthermore, the use of selective CaM antagonists W7 and trifluoperazine maleate resulted in a substantial reduction of the delay period to 200 +/- 100 ms with 5 microm trifluoperazine maleate (n = 16) and 150 +/- 50 ms with 500 nm W7 (n = 22). CaM reduced also the current density activated by thapsigargin or brandykinin to about 60% from control. The CaM antagonists did not affect significantly the current density. The results presented here are consistent with an antagonistic effect of IP(3)R and CaM for the activation of store operated calcium after depletion of the ER. The functional competition between the activating effect of IP(3)R and the inhibiting effect of CaM may modulate the delay period between the release of calcium from the ER and the activation of calcium influx observed in different cells, as well as the amount of current activated after depletion of the ER.

  16. Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    water intake was not con oiled; meals were taken at about 07.00, 13.00 and 20.00. The subjects’ circadian periodicity was synchronized with light-on at...individuals on earth , at all times, cycles must run with precisely the length of 23, 28 and 33 days; deviations of only minutes or ’ven fractions of...regarded as stress hormones; the other adrenocortical hormones include aldosterone (the hormone that regulates electrolyte and water balance) and several

  17. Entrainment of the Circadian Rhythm in Egg Hatching of the Crab Dyspanopeus sayi by Chemical Cues from Ovigerous Females.

    PubMed

    Forward, Richard B; Sanchez, Kevin G; Riley, Paul P

    2016-02-01

    The subtidal crab Dyspanopeus sayi has a circadian rhythm in larval release with a free-running period of 24.1 h. Under constant conditions, eggs hatch primarily in the 4-h interval after the time of sunset. The study tested the new model for entrainment in subtidal crabs, which proposes that the female perceives the environmental cycles and entrains the endogenous rhythm in the embryos. Results verified the model for D. sayi. Hatching by embryos collected from the field when they had not yet developed eye pigments, and were kept in constant conditions attached to their mother, exhibited the circadian hatching rhythm. Attached embryos could also be entrained to a new photoperiod in the laboratory before they developed eye pigments. Further, mature embryos removed from the female hatched rhythmically, indicating that a circadian rhythm resides in the embryos. However, if mature embryos with eye pigments were removed from the female and exposed to a new light-dark cycle, they could not be entrained to the new cycle; rather, they hatched according to the timing of the original light-dark cycle. Nevertheless, detached, mature embryos would entrain to a new light-dark cycle if they were in chemical, but not physical, contact with the female. Thus, the female perceives the light-dark cycle, and uses chemical cues to entrain the circadian rhythm of hatching by the embryos.

  18. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Sakiko

    2013-01-01

    Since Bünning's observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Photoperiod sets peaks of period (per) or timeless (tim) mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length. PMID:23986711

  19. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Lee, Choogon

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators. PMID:26617050

  20. Aging and Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Zitting, Kirsi-Marja; Chinoy, Evan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with numerous changes, including changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality. The circadian timing system interacts with a sleep-wake homeostatic system to regulate human sleep, including sleep timing and structure. Here, we review key features of the human circadian timing system, age-related changes in the circadian timing system, and how those changes may contribute to the observed alterations in sleep. PMID:26568120

  1. Recording and analysis of circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-24

    When rodents have free access to a running wheel in their home cage, voluntary use of this wheel will depend on the time of day. Nocturnal rodents, including rats, hamsters, and mice, are active during the night and relatively inactive during the day. Many other behavioral and physiological measures also exhibit daily rhythms, but in rodents, running-wheel activity serves as a particularly reliable and convenient measure of the output of the master circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In general, through a process called entrainment, the daily pattern of running-wheel activity will naturally align with the environmental light-dark cycle (LD cycle; e.g. 12 hr-light:12 hr-dark). However circadian rhythms are endogenously generated patterns in behavior that exhibit a ~24 hr period, and persist in constant darkness. Thus, in the absence of an LD cycle, the recording and analysis of running-wheel activity can be used to determine the subjective time-of-day. Because these rhythms are directed by the circadian clock the subjective time-of-day is referred to as the circadian time (CT). In contrast, when an LD cycle is present, the time-of-day that is determined by the environmental LD cycle is called the zeitgeber time (ZT). Although circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity are typically linked to the SCN clock, circadian oscillators in many other regions of the brain and body could also be involved in the regulation of daily activity rhythms. For instance, daily rhythms in food-anticipatory activity do not require the SCN and instead, are correlated with changes in the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Thus, running-wheel activity recordings can provide important behavioral information not only about the output of the master SCN clock, but also on the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Below we describe the equipment and methods used to record, analyze and display circadian locomotor activity rhythms in laboratory rodents.

  2. Recording and Analysis of Circadian Rhythms in Running-wheel Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    When rodents have free access to a running wheel in their home cage, voluntary use of this wheel will depend on the time of day1-5. Nocturnal rodents, including rats, hamsters, and mice, are active during the night and relatively inactive during the day. Many other behavioral and physiological measures also exhibit daily rhythms, but in rodents, running-wheel activity serves as a particularly reliable and convenient measure of the output of the master circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In general, through a process called entrainment, the daily pattern of running-wheel activity will naturally align with the environmental light-dark cycle (LD cycle; e.g. 12 hr-light:12 hr-dark). However circadian rhythms are endogenously generated patterns in behavior that exhibit a ~24 hr period, and persist in constant darkness. Thus, in the absence of an LD cycle, the recording and analysis of running-wheel activity can be used to determine the subjective time-of-day. Because these rhythms are directed by the circadian clock the subjective time-of-day is referred to as the circadian time (CT). In contrast, when an LD cycle is present, the time-of-day that is determined by the environmental LD cycle is called the zeitgeber time (ZT). Although circadian rhythms in running-wheel activity are typically linked to the SCN clock6-8, circadian oscillators in many other regions of the brain and body9-14 could also be involved in the regulation of daily activity rhythms. For instance, daily rhythms in food-anticipatory activity do not require the SCN15,16 and instead, are correlated with changes in the activity of extra-SCN oscillators17-20. Thus, running-wheel activity recordings can provide important behavioral information not only about the output of the master SCN clock, but also on the activity of extra-SCN oscillators. Below we describe the equipment and methods used to record, analyze and display circadian locomotor activity rhythms in laboratory

  3. [The kidney and circadian rhythms: a whole new world?].

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Pala, Marco; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Chronobiology is a branch of biomedical sciences devoted to the study of biological rhythms. Biological rhythms exist at any level of living organisms and, according to their cycle length, may be divided into three main types: circadian, ultradian, and infradian rhythms. Circadian rhythms are the most commonly and widely studied. The principal circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and is supposed to regulate peripheral clocks via neurohumoral modulation. Circadian clocks have been identified within almost all mammalian cell types, and circadian clock genes seem to be essential for cardiovascular health. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids regulated by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock, comprising a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have also been found in the kidney.

  4. Circadian disruption and health: Shift work as a harbinger of the toll taken by electric lighting.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard G

    Electric light is one of the signature inventions of human beings. A problem, however, is that electric light can confuse our endogenous circadian rhythmicity. It has now become apparent that circadian biology is fundamental to the functioning and adaptation of almost all life forms. In the modern world, everyone is exposed to electric light during the day and night, and thereby can experience some level of circadian disruption. Perhaps as a canary in the coal mine, study of people whose work hours include nighttime (shift workers) is beginning to yield insights on the adverse health effects of circadian disruption from electric light.

  5. A Circadian Rhythm Regulating Hyphal Melanization in Cercospora Kikuchii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms, biochemical or developmental processes with a period length of approximately 24 hours, are thoroughly documented in plants and animals. However, virtually all of what is currently known about circadian rhythms in fungi is derived from the model fungus, Neurospora crassa, including...

  6. Intersubunit communications within KaiC hexamers contribute the robust rhythmicity of the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Yohko; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, endogenous oscillations with periods of ~24 h, are found in many organisms, and they enhance fitness in alternating day/night environments. In cyanobacteria, three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, control the timekeeping mechanism. KaiC, the central component of the system, is a hexameric ATPase that also has autokinase and autophosphatase activities. It has been assumed that KaiC’s hexameric structure was critical for regulation of the circadian clock; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of such regulation has remained unclear. Recently, we elucidated the regulation of KaiC’s activities by its phosphorylation state, in the context of its hexameric structure. We found that local interactions at subunit interfaces regulate KaiC’s activities by coupling the nucleotide-binding states. We also discovered the mechanism of regulation by intersubunit communication in KaiC hexamers. Our observations suggest that intersubunit communication precisely synchronizes KaiC subunits to avoid dephasing, and contributes to the robustness of circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria [Kitayama, Y. et al. Nat. Commun. 4:2897 doi: 10.1038/ncomms3897 (2013)].

  7. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  8. Effects of Different PER Translational Kinetics on the Dynamics of a Core Circadian Clock Model

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Paula S.; Revelli, Jorge A.; Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Condat, Carlos A.; Guido, Mario E.; Tamarit, Francisco A.

    2015-01-01

    Living beings display self-sustained daily rhythms in multiple biological processes, which persist in the absence of external cues since they are generated by endogenous circadian clocks. The period (per) gene is a central player within the core molecular mechanism for keeping circadian time in most animals. Recently, the modulation PER translation has been reported, both in mammals and flies, suggesting that translational regulation of clock components is important for the proper clock gene expression and molecular clock performance. Because translational regulation ultimately implies changes in the kinetics of translation and, therefore, in the circadian clock dynamics, we sought to study how and to what extent the molecular clock dynamics is affected by the kinetics of PER translation. With this objective, we used a minimal mathematical model of the molecular circadian clock to qualitatively characterize the dynamical changes derived from kinetically different PER translational mechanisms. We found that the emergence of self-sustained oscillations with characteristic period, amplitude, and phase lag (time delays) between per mRNA and protein expression depends on the kinetic parameters related to PER translation. Interestingly, under certain conditions, a PER translation mechanism with saturable kinetics introduces longer time delays than a mechanism ruled by a first-order kinetics. In addition, the kinetic laws of PER translation significantly changed the sensitivity of our model to parameters related to the synthesis and degradation of per mRNA and PER degradation. Lastly, we found a set of parameters, with realistic values, for which our model reproduces some experimental results reported recently for Drosophila melanogaster and we present some predictions derived from our analysis. PMID:25607544

  9. Introduction: circadian rhythm and its disruption: impact on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F; Gladanac, Bojana

    2014-08-01

    Almost all forms of life have predictable daily or circadian rhythms in molecular, endocrine, and behavioral functions. In mammals, a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei coordinates the timing of these rhythms. Daily light exposure that affects the retina of the eye directly influences this area, which is required to align endogenous processes to the appropriate time of day. The present "Views and Reviews" articles discuss the influence of circadian rhythms, especially nightly secretion of melatonin, on reproductive function and parturition. In addition, an examination is made of problems that arise from recurrent circadian rhythm disruption associated with changes in light exposure patterns common to modern day society. Finally, a possible solution to prevent disruptions in circadian phase markers by filtering out short wavelengths from nocturnal light is reviewed.

  10. Influence of the Circadian System on Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Litinski, Mikhail; Scheer, Frank AJL; Shea, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The severity of many diseases varies across the day and night. For example, adverse cardiovascular incidents peak in the morning, asthma is often worse at night and temporal lobe epileptic seizures are most prevalent in the afternoon. These patterns may be due to the day/night rhythm in environment and behavior, and/or endogenous circadian rhythms in physiology. Furthermore, chronic misalignment between the endogenous circadian timing system and the behavioral cycles could be a cause of increased risk of diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in shift workers. Here we describe the magnitude, relevance and potential biological basis of such daily changes in disease severity and of circadian/behavioral misalignment, and present how these insights may help in the development of appropriate chronotherapy. PMID:20161149

  11. Interactions between metabolism and circadian clocks: reciprocal disturbances.

    PubMed

    Delezie, Julien; Challet, Etienne

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is a medical condition of excess body fat, recognized as a global epidemic. Besides genetic factors, overconsumption of high-energy food and a sedentary lifestyle are major obesogenic causes. A newly identified determinant is altered circadian rhythmicity. To anticipate and adapt to daily changes in the environment, organisms have developed an endogenous circadian timing system, comprising a main circadian clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, principally synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Secondary peripheral clocks are found in various tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, and adipose tissue. These clocks control the rhythmic patterns of myriad metabolic processes. We will review the evidence that metabolic dysfunction is associated with circadian disturbances at both central and peripheral levels and, conversely, that disruption of circadian clock functioning can lead to obesity. The roots of these reciprocal interactions will be illustrated by transcriptional crosstalk between metabolic and circadian systems. Chronotherapeutic approaches of dieting to maintain or restore a proper circadian alignment could be useful to limit the magnitude of metabolic risks.

  12. Sleep, circadian rhythm and body weight: parallel developments.

    PubMed

    Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2016-11-01

    Circadian alignment is crucial for body-weight management, and for metabolic health. In this context, circadian alignment consists of alignment of sleep, meal patterns and physical activity. During puberty a significant reduction in sleep duration occurs, and pubertal status is inversely associated with sleep duration. A consistent inverse association between habitual sleep duration and body-weight development occurs, independent of possible confounders. Research on misalignment reveals that circadian misalignment affects sleep-architecture and subsequently disturbs glucose-insulin metabolism, substrate oxidation, leptin- and ghrelin concentrations, appetite, food reward, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis activity and gut-peptide concentrations enhancing positive energy balance and metabolic disturbance. Not only aligning meals and sleep in a circadian way is crucial, also regular physical activity during the day strongly promotes the stability and amplitude of circadian rhythm, and thus may serve as an instrument to restore poor circadian rhythms. Endogenicity may play a role in interaction of these environmental variables with a genetic predisposition. In conclusion, notwithstanding the separate favourable effects of sufficient daily physical activity, regular meal patterns, sufficient sleep duration and quality sleep on energy balance, the overall effect of the amplitude and stability of the circadian rhythm, perhaps including genetic predisposition, may integrate the separate effects in an additive way.

  13. Circadian Entrainment, Sleep-Wake Regulation and Neurobehavioral Performance During Extended Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Long-duration manned space flight requires crew members to maintain a high level of cognitive performance and vigilance while operating and monitoring sophisticated instrumentation. However, the reduction in the strength of environmental synchronizers in the space environment leads to misalignment of circadian phase among crew members, coupled with restricted time available to sleep, results in sleep deprivation and consequent deterioration of neurobehavioral function. Crew members are provided, and presently use, long-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics on board the current, relatively brief space shuttle missions to counteract such sleep disruption, a situation that is only likely to worsen during extended duration missions. Given the known carry-over effects of such compounds on daytime performance, together with the reduction in emergency readiness associated with their use at night, NASA has recognized the need to develop effective but safe countermeasures to allow crew members to obtain an adequate amount of sleep. Over the past eight years, we have successfully implemented a new technology for shuttle crew members involving bright light exposure during the pre-launch period to facilitate adaptation of the circadian timing system to the inversions of the sleep-wake schedule often required during dual shift missions. However for long duration space station missions it will be necessary to develop effective and attainable countermeasures that can be used chronically to optimize circadian entrainment. Our current research effort is to study the effects of light-dark cycles with reduced zeitgeber strength, such as are anticipated during long-duration space flight, on the entrainment of the endogenous circadian timing system and to study the effects of a countermeasure that consists of scheduled brief exposures to bright light on the human circadian timing system. The proposed studies are designed to address the following Specific Aims: (1) test the hypothesis that

  14. Revealing a circadian clock in captive arctic-breeding songbirds, lapland longspurs (Calcarius lapponicus), under constant illumination.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Noah T; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Schwabl, Ingrid; Goymann, Wolfgang; Salli, Brady M; Bentley, George E; Buck, C Loren

    2014-12-01

    Most organisms in temperate or tropic regions employ the light-dark (LD) cycle as the primary Zeitgeber to synchronize circadian rhythms. At higher latitudes (>66°33'), continuous illumination during the summer presents a significant time-keeping dilemma for polar-adapted species. Lapland longspurs (Calcarius lapponicus), arctic-breeding migratory songbirds, are one of the few recorded species maintaining an intact diel rhythm in activity and plasma melatonin titers during polar summer. However, it is unknown whether rhythms are endogenous and entrain to low-amplitude polar Zeitgeber signals, such as daily variations in light intensity and the spectral composition of the sun (as measured by color temperature). Wild-caught male and female longspurs were brought into captivity, and locomotor activity was assessed using infrared detection. To examine if rhythms were endogenous, birds were exposed to constant bright light (LL; 1300 lux) or constant darkness (DD; 0.1 lux). All birds exhibited free-running activity rhythms in LL and DD, suggesting the presence of a functional circadian clock. Mean periods in LL (22.86 h) were significantly shorter than those in DD (23.5 h), in accordance with Aschoff's rule. No birds entrained to diel changes in light intensity, color temperature, or both. To examine endogenous molecular clock function, the Per2 gene was partially cloned in longspurs (llPer2) and transcripts were measured in hypothalamic tissue punches, eye, and liver using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Ocular llPer2 gene expression was periodic in LL and elevated at ZT24 (CT24) for LD or constant conditions (LL and DD), but llPer2 rhythmicity was not detected in hypothalamus or liver. Plasma melatonin was significantly lower in LL compared with LD or DD. In conclusion, rhythmic ocular Per2 expression and melatonin secretion may maintain the circadian activity rhythm across the polar day.

  15. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yusi; Pati, Paramita; Xu, Yiming; Chen, Feng; Stepp, David W; Huo, Yuqing; Rudic, R Daniel; Fulton, David J R

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1) was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS) whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration. These results

  16. Circadian rhythms in insect disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio Carlos Alves; Kyriacou, Charalambos Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Organisms from bacteria to humans have evolved under predictable daily environmental cycles owing to the Earth’s rotation. This strong selection pressure has generated endogenous circadian clocks that regulate many aspects of behaviour, physiology and metabolism, anticipating and synchronising internal time-keeping to changes in the cyclical environment. In haematophagous insect vectors the circadian clock coordinates feeding activity, which is important for the dynamics of pathogen transmission. We have recently witnessed a substantial advance in molecular studies of circadian clocks in insect vector species that has consolidated behavioural data collected over many years, which provided insights into the regulation of the clock in the wild. Next generation sequencing technologies will facilitate the study of vector genomes/transcriptomes both among and within species and illuminate some of the species-specific patterns of adaptive circadian phenotypes that are observed in the field and in the laboratory. In this review we will explore these recent findings and attempt to identify potential areas for further investigation. PMID:24473802

  17. The effect of hatching time on the bioenergetics of northern pike (Esox lucius) larvae from a single egg batch during the endogenous feeding period.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Awatef; Jaworski, Andrzej; Kamler, Ewa; Gardeur, Jean-Noël; Teletchea, Fabrice; Ayadi, Habib; Fontaine, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Size, caloric value and chemical composition were measured separately in the progeny of two northern pike (Esox lucius) females at 3-day intervals during the endogenous feeding period from hatching to final yolk resorption. Tissue, yolk and entire larvae were analysed separately in three groups of larvae that hatched at different times (between 88 and 106 degree-days post-fertilization). An integrated approach with the Gompertz model was used to compute the yolk conversion efficiency and time to maximum tissue size in early, mid and late hatched larvae. At hatching, unresorbed yolk of early hatched larvae contained more energy (39.20 J) and more protein (0.99 mg) compared to the yolk of larvae that hatched later (38.13 J and 0.92 mg protein for late hatched larvae, p < 0.05). In contrast, a significant reduction in tissue weight (-0.7 mg DW) and protein content (-0.5 mg) was found in early hatched larvae compared to those which hatched later (p < 0.05). Between days 9 and 12 post-hatching (108 and 144 degree-days post-hatching), close to the final yolk resorption, late hatched larvae stopped growing and their tissue began to be resorbed. This tissue resorption time was delayed in early hatched larvae which presented at the end of the experiment a greater tissue weight than late hatched ones. Yolk conversion efficiency in term of energy from hatching to complete yolk resorption stage was significantly higher for early and mid hatched larvae (51%) compared to late hatched ones (44%) (p = 0.004). Furthermore, the time to maximum tissue size was found to be negatively related to hatching time which implies that early hatched larvae take longer time to switch from one developmental stage to the next. The maximum tissue dry weight and energy content were found to be reached at approximately the same age post-fertilization for both early hatched and late hatched larvae, suggesting that the principal steps in a fish's lifespan are better correlated with time of

  18. Effect of circadian rhythm disturbance on morphine preference and addiction in male rats: Involvement of period genes and dopamine D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Garmabi, B; Vousooghi, N; Vosough, M; Yoonessi, A; Bakhtazad, A; Zarrindast, M R

    2016-05-13

    It is claimed that a correlation exists between disturbance of circadian rhythms by factors such as alteration of normal light-dark cycle and the development of addiction. However, the exact mechanisms involved in this relationship are not much understood. Here we have studied the effect of constant light on morphine voluntary consumption and withdrawal symptoms and also investigated the involvement of Per1, Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in these processes. Male wistar rats were kept under standard (LD) or constant light (LL) conditions for one month. The plasma concentration of melatonin was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of Per1, Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Morphine preference (50mg/L) was evaluated in a two-bottle-choice paradigm for 10 weeks and withdrawal symptoms were recorded after administration of naloxone (3mg/kg). One month exposure to constant light resulted in a significant decrease of melatonin concentration in the LL group. In addition, mRNA levels of Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor were up-regulated in both the striatum and prefrontal cortex of the LL group. However, expression of Per1 gene was only up-regulated in the striatum of LL rats in comparison to LD animals. Furthermore, after one month exposure to constant light, morphine consumption and preference ratio and also severity of naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome were significantly greater in LL animals. It is concluded that exposure to constant light by up-regulation of Per2 and dopamine D1 receptor in the striatum and prefrontal cortex and up-regulation of Per1 in the striatum and the possible involvement of melatonin makes animals vulnerable to morphine preference and addiction.

  19. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  20. Neuroendocrine underpinnings of sex differences in circadian timing systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lily; Silver, Rae

    2016-06-01

    There are compelling reasons to study the role of steroids and sex differences in the circadian timing system. A solid history of research demonstrates the ubiquity of circadian changes that impact virtually all behavioral and biological responses. Furthermore, steroid hormones can modulate every attribute of circadian responses including the period, amplitude and phase. Finally, desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity, and either enhancing or damping amplitude of various circadian responses can produce different effects in the sexes. Studies of the neuroendocrine underpinnings of circadian timing systems and underlying sex differences have paralleled the overall development of the field as a whole. Early experimental studies established the ubiquity of circadian rhythms by cataloging daily and seasonal changes in whole organism responses. The next generation of experiments demonstrated that daily changes are not a result of environmental synchronizing cues, and are internally orchestrated, and that these differ in the sexes. This work was followed by the revelation of molecular circadian rhythms within individual cells. At present, there is a proliferation of work on the consequences of these daily oscillations in health and in disease, and awareness that these may differ in the sexes. In the present discourse we describe the paradigms used to examine circadian oscillation, to characterize how these internal timing signals are synchronized to local environmental conditions, and how hormones of gonadal and/or adrenal origin modulate circadian responses. Evidence pointing to endocrinologically and genetically mediated sex differences in circadian timing systems can be seen at many levels of the neuroendocrine and endocrine systems, from the cell, the gland and organ, and to whole animal behavior, including sleep/wake or rest/activity cycles, responses to external stimuli, and responses to drugs. We review evidence indicating that the analysis of the circadian

  1. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  2. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  3. A novel role of microRNA 17-5p in the modulation of circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qian; Zhou, Lan; Yang, Su-Yu; Cao, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps living organisms to adjust their physiology and behaviour to adapt environmental day-night cycles. The period length of circadian rhythm reflects the endogenous cycle transition rate and is modulated by environmental cues or internal molecules, and the latter are of substantial importance but remain poorly revealed. Here, we demonstrated that microRNA 17-5p (miR-17-5p), which has been associated with tumours, was an important factor in controlling the circadian period. MiR-17-5p was rhythmically expressed in synchronised fibroblasts and mouse master clock suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). MiR-17-5p and the gene Clock exhibited a reciprocal regulation: miR-17-5p inhibited the translation of Clock by targeting the 3′UTR (untranslated region) of Clock mRNA, whereas the CLOCK protein directly bound to the promoter of miR-17 and enhanced its transcription and production of miR-17-5p. In addition, miR-17-5p suppressed the expression of Npas2. At the cellular level, bidirectional changes in miR-17-5p or CLOCK resulted in CRY1 elevation. Accordingly, in vivo, both increase and decrease of miR-17-5p in the mouse SCN led to an increase in CRY1 level and shortening of the free-running period. We conclude that miR-17-5p has an important role in the inspection and stabilisation of the circadian-clock period by interacting with Clock and Npas2 and potentially via the output of CRY1. PMID:27440219

  4. Environmental disruption of the circadian clock leads to altered sleep and immune responses in mouse.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Derrick J; Savenkova, Marina I; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, one of the most salient outputs of the circadian (daily) clock is the timing of the sleep-wake cycle. Modern industrialized society has led to a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between our endogenous timekeeping systems and the solar day, disrupting normal circadian rhythms. We have argued that disrupted circadian rhythms could lead to changes in allostatic load, and the capacity of organisms to respond to other environmental challenges. In this set of studies, we apply a model of circadian disruption characterized in our lab in which mice are housed in a 20h long day, with 10h of light and 10h of darkness. We explored the effects of this environmental disruption on sleep patterns, to establish if this model results in marked sleep deprivation. Given the interaction between circadian, sleep, and immune systems, we further probed if our model of circadian disruption also alters the innate immune response to peripheral bacterial endotoxin challenge. Our results demonstrate that this model of circadian disruption does not lead to marked sleep deprivation, but instead affects the timing and quality of sleep. We also show that while circadian disruption does not lead to basal changes in the immune markers we explored, the immune response is affected, both in the brain and the periphery. Together, our findings further strengthen the important role of the circadian timing system in sleep regulation and immune responses, and provide evidence that disrupting the circadian clock increases vulnerability to further environmental stressors, including immunological challenges.

  5. Circadian Role in Daily Pattern of Cardiovascular Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael F.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven A.

    2004-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies demonstrate that sudden cardiac death, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke have a 24-hour daily pattern with a broad peak between 9-11am. Such a daily pattern in cardiovascular risk could be attributable to external factors, such as the daily behavior patterns, including sleep-wake cycles and activity levels, or internal factors, such as the endogenous circadian pacemaker. Findings of significant alternations in the temporal organization and nonlinear properties of heartbeat fluctuations with disease and with sleep-wake transitions raise the intriguing possibility that changes in the mechanism of control associated with behavioral sleep-wake transition may be responsible for the increased cardiac instability observed in particular circadian phases. Alternatively, we hypothesize that there is a circadian clock, independent of the sleep-wake cycle, which affects the cardiac dynamics leading to increased cardiovascular risk. We analyzed continuous recordings from healthy subjects during 7 cycles of forced desynchrony routine wherein subjects' sleep-wake cycles are adjusted to 28 hours so that their behaviors occur across all circadian phases. Heartbeat data were divided into one-hour segments. For each segment, we estimated the correlations and the nonlinear properties of the heartbeat fluctuations at the corresponding circadian phase. Since the sleep and wake contributions are equally weighted in our experiment, a change of the properties of the heartbeat dynamics with circadian phase suggest a circadian rhythm. We show significant circadian-mediated alterations in the correlation and nonlinear properties of the heartbeat resembling those observed in patients with heart failure. Remarkably, these dynamical alterations are centered at 60 degrees circadian phase, coinciding with the 9-11am window of cardiac risk.

  6. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  7. Decreased human circadian pacemaker influence after 100 days in space: a case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Kennedy, K. S.; Rose, L. R.; Linenger, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the circadian rhythms and sleep of a healthy, 42-year-old male astronaut experiencing microgravity (weightlessness) for nearly 5 months while living aboard Space Station Mir as it orbited Earth and (2) to determine the effects of prolonged space flight on the endogenous circadian pacemaker, as indicated by oral temperature and subjective alertness rhythms, and their ramifications for sleep, alertness, and performance. METHODS: For three 12- to 14-day blocks of time (spread throughout the mission), oral temperatures were taken and subjective alertness was self-rated five times per day. Sleep diaries and performance tests were also completed daily during each block. RESULTS: Examination of the subject's circadian alertness and oral temperature rhythms suggested that the endogenous circadian pacemaker seemed to function quite well up to 90 days in space. Thereafter (on days 110-122), the influence of the endogenous circadian pacemaker on oral temperature and subjective alertness circadian rhythms was considerably weakened, with consequent disruptions in sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Space missions lasting more than 3 months might result in diminished circadian pacemaker influence in astronauts, leading to eventual sleep problems.

  8. Geographic Variation of Plant Circadian Clock Function in Natural and Agricultural Settings.

    PubMed

    Greenham, Kathleen; Lou, Ping; Puzey, Joshua R; Kumar, Ganesh; Arnevik, Cindy; Farid, Hany; Willis, John H; McClung, C Robertson

    2017-02-01

    The increasing demand for improved agricultural production will require more efficient breeding for traits that maintain yield under heterogeneous environments. The internal circadian oscillator is essential for perceiving and coordinating environmental cues such as day length, temperature, and abiotic stress responses within physiological processes. To investigate the contribution of the circadian clock to local adaptability, we have analyzed circadian period by leaf movement in natural populations of Mimulus guttatus and domesticated cultivars of Glycine max. We detected consistent variation in circadian period along a latitudinal gradient in annual populations of the wild plant and the selectively bred crop, and this provides novel evidence of natural and artificial selection for circadian performance. These findings provide new support that the circadian clock acts as a central regulator of plant adaptability and further highlight the potential of applying circadian clock gene variation to marker-assisted breeding programs in crops.

  9. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  10. Circadian molecular clocks tick along ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sumová, A; Bendová, Z; Sládek, M; El-Hennamy, R; Matejů, K; Polidarová, L; Sosniyenko, S; Illnerová, H

    2008-01-01

    The circadian system controls the timing of behavioral and physiological functions in most organisms studied. The review addresses the question of when and how the molecular clockwork underlying circadian oscillations within the central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and the peripheral circadian clocks develops during ontogenesis. The current model of the molecular clockwork is summarized. The central SCN clock is viewed as a complex structure composed of a web of mutually synchronized individual oscillators. The importance of development of both the intracellular molecular clockwork as well as intercellular coupling for development of the formal properties of the circadian SCN clock is also highlighted. Recently, data has accumulated to demonstrate that synchronized molecular oscillations in the central and peripheral clocks develop gradually during ontogenesis and development extends into postnatal period. Synchronized molecular oscillations develop earlier in the SCN than in the peripheral clocks. A hypothesis is suggested that the immature clocks might be first driven by external entraining cues, and therefore, serve as "slave" oscillators. During ontogenesis, the clocks may gradually develop a complete set of molecular interlocked oscillations, i.e., the molecular clockwork, and become self-sustained clocks.

  11. Circadian clock control of endocrine factors.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Karen L; Berry, Ryan; Frank, Stuart J; Young, Martin E

    2014-08-01

    Organisms experience dramatic fluctuations in demands and stresses over the course of the day. In order to maintain biological processes within physiological boundaries, mechanisms have evolved for anticipation of, and adaptation to, these daily fluctuations. Endocrine factors have an integral role in homeostasis. Not only do circulating levels of various endocrine factors oscillate over the 24 h period, but so too does responsiveness of target tissues to these signals or stimuli. Emerging evidence suggests that these daily endocrine oscillations do not occur solely in response to behavioural fluctuations associated with sleep-wake and feeding-fasting cycles, but are orchestrated by an intrinsic timekeeping mechanism known as the circadian clock. Disruption of circadian clocks by genetic and/or environmental factors seems to precipitate numerous common disorders, including the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Collectively, these observations suggest that strategies designed to realign normal circadian rhythmicities hold potential for the treatment of various endocrine-related disorders.

  12. The circadian coordination of cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinpar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cell-autonomous timing mechanisms that organize cell functions in a 24-h periodicity. In mammals, the main circadian oscillator consists of transcription–translation feedback loops composed of transcriptional regulators, enzymes, and scaffolds that generate and sustain daily oscillations of their own transcript and protein levels. The clock components and their targets impart rhythmic functions to many gene products through transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational mechanisms. This, in turn, temporally coordinates many signaling pathways, metabolic activity, organelles’ structure and functions, as well as the cell cycle and the tissue-specific functions of differentiated cells. When the functions of these circadian oscillators are disrupted by age, environment, or genetic mutation, the temporal coordination of cellular functions is lost, reducing organismal health and fitness. PMID:27738003

  13. Circadian pattern in cerebro vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, A; Singh, R; Sachdev, A; D'Cruz, S; Duseja, A

    2002-12-01

    Over the last decade, various studies have been reported to evaluate the circadian pattern of cardiovascular and cerebro-vascular diseases. The data from Indian population is lacking. We undertook this prospective observational study to evaluate the circadian variation in disorders like cerebro-vascular accidents and transient ischemic attacks. Total of 146 patients (events) were studied. Only 10 patients had TIA's. 55% had hemorrhage and 45% had infarction. The 24 hours period was divided into 6 equal portions of 4 hours each. The maximum events were seen between 4 am to 8 am and 12 noon to 4 pm (23.28%) each. Minimum events were seen between 12 midnight to 4 am 14/146 - 9.58%). The circadian variation in occurrence of cerebro-vascular disorders was present with two equal peaks.

  14. Optimal Implementations for Reliable Circadian Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution.

  15. Extraordinary behavioral entrainment following circadian rhythm bifurcation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth M.; Walbeek, Thijs J.; Sun, Jonathan; Johnson, Jeremy; Poonawala, Qays; Gorman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system uses light to synchronize endogenously generated rhythms with the environmental day. Entrainment to schedules that deviate significantly from 24 h (T24) has been viewed as unlikely because the circadian pacemaker appears capable only of small, incremental responses to brief light exposures. Challenging this view, we demonstrate that simple manipulations of light alone induce extreme plasticity in the circadian system of mice. Firstly, exposure to dim nocturnal illumination (<0.1 lux), rather than completely dark nights, permits expression of an altered circadian waveform wherein mice in light/dark/light/dark (LDLD) cycles “bifurcate” their rhythms into two rest and activity intervals per 24 h. Secondly, this bifurcated state enables mice to adopt stable activity rhythms under 15 or 30 h days (LDLD T15/T30), well beyond conventional limits of entrainment. Continuation of dim light is unnecessary for T15/30 behavioral entrainment following bifurcation. Finally, neither dim light alone nor a shortened night is sufficient for the extraordinary entrainment observed under bifurcation. Thus, we demonstrate in a non-pharmacological, non-genetic manipulation that the circadian system is far more flexible than previously thought. These findings challenge the current conception of entrainment and its underlying principles, and reveal new potential targets for circadian interventions. PMID:27929128

  16. Sleep and Circadian Contributions to Adolescent Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Brant P.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of marked changes across sleep, circadian rhythms, brain function, and alcohol use. Starting at puberty, adolescents’ endogenous circadian rhythms and preferred sleep times shift later, often leading to a mismatch with the schedules imposed by secondary education. This mismatch induces circadian misalignment and sleep loss, which have been associated with affect dysregulation, increased drug and alcohol use, and other risk-taking behaviors in adolescents and adults. In parallel to developmental changes in sleep, adolescent brains are undergoing structural and functional changes in the circuits subserving the pursuit and processing of rewards. These developmental changes in reward processing likely contribute to the initiation of alcohol use during adolescence. Abundant evidence indicates that sleep and circadian rhythms modulate reward function, suggesting that adolescent sleep and circadian disturbance may contribute to altered reward function, and in turn, alcohol involvement. In this review, we summarize the relevant evidence and propose that these parallel developmental changes in sleep, circadian rhythms, and neural processing of reward interact to increase risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD). PMID:25442171

  17. Circadian clocks and inflammation: reciprocal regulation and shared mediators.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, Nicolas; Westfall, Susan; Kiessling, Silke

    2014-08-01

    The immune system is deeply interconnected with the endogenous 24-h oscillators of the circadian system. Indeed, the connection between these two physiological systems occurs at multiple levels and in both directions. On one hand, various aspects of the immune system show daily rhythms, which appear to be essential for healthy immune maintenance and proper immune response. On the other hand, immune responses cause changes in circadian rhythms, disrupting their delicate balance and manifesting in disease. Indeed, immune challenges cause various time-, gene-, and tissue-specific effects on circadian-regulated factors. This article reviews the possible mediators of the cross talk between the circadian clock and the immune system, in particular the inflammatory pathways. The rhythmic expression of cytokines and their receptors, as well as other rhythmically regulated humoral factors such as glucocorticoids, melatonin, leptin, or prostaglandins, could gate the effects of the immune response on the circadian system. In addition, systemic cues such as body temperature and neuronal connections between the brain and peripheral tissues may underlie the immune-circadian communication.

  18. The circadian clock and defence signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayank; Bhatt, Deepesh

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock is the internal time-keeping machinery in higher organisms. Cross-talk between the circadian clock and a diverse range of physiological processes in plants, including stress acclimatization, hormone signalling, photomorphogenesis and defence signalling, is currently being explored. Recent studies on circadian clock genes and genes involved in defence signalling have indicated a possible reciprocal interaction between the two. It has been proposed that the circadian clock shapes the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions. In this review, we highlight the studies carried out so far on two model plant pathogens, namely Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and the involvement of the circadian clock in gating effector-triggered immunity and pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. We focus on how the circadian clock gates the expression of various stress-related transcripts in a prolific manner to enhance plant fitness. An understanding of this dynamic relationship between clock and stress will open up new avenues in the understanding of endogenous mechanisms of defence signalling in plants.

  19. Sleep and circadian contributions to adolescent alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Brant P; Soehner, Adriane M; Clark, Duncan B

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence is a time of marked changes across sleep, circadian rhythms, brain function, and alcohol use. Starting at puberty, adolescents' endogenous circadian rhythms and preferred sleep times shift later, often leading to a mismatch with the schedules imposed by secondary education. This mismatch induces circadian misalignment and sleep loss, which have been associated with affect dysregulation, increased drug and alcohol use, and other risk-taking behaviors in adolescents and adults. In parallel to developmental changes in sleep, adolescent brains are undergoing structural and functional changes in the circuits subserving the pursuit and processing of rewards. These developmental changes in reward processing likely contribute to the initiation of alcohol use during adolescence. Abundant evidence indicates that sleep and circadian rhythms modulate reward function, suggesting that adolescent sleep and circadian disturbance may contribute to altered reward function, and in turn, alcohol involvement. In this review, we summarize the relevant evidence and propose that these parallel developmental changes in sleep, circadian rhythms, and neural processing of reward interact to increase risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD).

  20. Extraordinary behavioral entrainment following circadian rhythm bifurcation in mice.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Walbeek, Thijs J; Sun, Jonathan; Johnson, Jeremy; Poonawala, Qays; Gorman, Michael R

    2016-12-08

    The mammalian circadian timing system uses light to synchronize endogenously generated rhythms with the environmental day. Entrainment to schedules that deviate significantly from 24 h (T24) has been viewed as unlikely because the circadian pacemaker appears capable only of small, incremental responses to brief light exposures. Challenging this view, we demonstrate that simple manipulations of light alone induce extreme plasticity in the circadian system of mice. Firstly, exposure to dim nocturnal illumination (<0.1 lux), rather than completely dark nights, permits expression of an altered circadian waveform wherein mice in light/dark/light/dark (LDLD) cycles "bifurcate" their rhythms into two rest and activity intervals per 24 h. Secondly, this bifurcated state enables mice to adopt stable activity rhythms under 15 or 30 h days (LDLD T15/T30), well beyond conventional limits of entrainment. Continuation of dim light is unnecessary for T15/30 behavioral entrainment following bifurcation. Finally, neither dim light alone nor a shortened night is sufficient for the extraordinary entrainment observed under bifurcation. Thus, we demonstrate in a non-pharmacological, non-genetic manipulation that the circadian system is far more flexible than previously thought. These findings challenge the current conception of entrainment and its underlying principles, and reveal new potential targets for circadian interventions.

  1. Ageing and Circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.; Long, Dani M.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cell-autonomous molecular feedback loops that generate daily rhythms in gene expression, cellular functions, physiological processes and behavior. The mechanisms of circadian clocks are well understood in young fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, but less is known about how circadian system changes during organismal aging. Similar as in humans, rest/activity rhythms tend to weaken with age in fruit flies, suggesting conservation of aging-related changes in the circadian system. It has been shown that aging is associated with reduced expression of core clock genes in peripheral head clocks while similar reduction may not occur in central clock neurons regulating behavioral rhythms. Arrhythmic flies with mutations in core clock genes display accelerated aging and shortened lifespan suggesting that weakened circadian rhythms may contribute to aging phenotypes. To understand whether strong circadian clocks support organism’s healthspan and lifespan, future research needs to focus on age-related changes in clock genes as well as clock-controlled genes in specific organs and tissues. PMID:26000238

  2. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  3. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  4. p38 MAP kinase regulates circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D; Ryan, Sarah M; Avey, Matthew J; Mortimer, Nathan T; Dowse, Harold; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2014-12-01

    The large repertoire of circadian rhythms in diverse organisms depends on oscillating central clock genes, input pathways for entrainment, and output pathways for controlling rhythmic behaviors. Stress-activated p38 MAP Kinases (p38K), although sparsely investigated in this context, show circadian rhythmicity in mammalian brains and are considered part of the circadian output machinery in Neurospora. We find that Drosophila p38Kb is expressed in clock neurons, and mutants in p38Kb either are arrhythmic or have a longer free-running periodicity, especially as they age. Paradoxically, similar phenotypes are observed through either transgenic inhibition or activation of p38Kb in clock neurons, suggesting a requirement for optimal p38Kb function for normal free-running circadian rhythms. We also find that p38Kb genetically interacts with multiple downstream targets to regulate circadian locomotor rhythms. More specifically, p38Kb interacts with the period gene to regulate period length and the strength of rhythmicity. In addition, we show that p38Kb suppresses the arrhythmic behavior associated with inhibition of a second p38Kb target, the transcription factor Mef2. Finally, we find that manipulating p38K signaling in free-running conditions alters the expression of another downstream target, MNK/Lk6, which has been shown to cycle with the clock and to play a role in regulating circadian rhythms. These data suggest that p38Kb may affect circadian locomotor rhythms through the regulation of multiple downstream pathways.

  5. A circadian and an ultradian rhythm are both evident in root growth of rice.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Morio; Matsushita, Naofumi

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents evidence for the existence of both a circadian and an ultradian rhythm in the elongation growth of rice roots. Root elongation of rice (Oryza sativa) was recorded under dim green light by using a CCD camera connected to a computer. Four treatment conditions were set-up to investigate the existence of endogenous rhythms: 28°C constant temperature and continuous dark (28 DD); 28°C constant temperature and alternating light and dark (28 LD); 33°C constant temperature and continuous dark (33 DD); and diurnal temperature change and alternating light and dark (DT-LD). The resulting spectral densities suggested the existence of periodicities of 20.4-25.2 h (circadian cycles) and 2.0-6.0 h (ultradian cycles) in each of the 4 treatments. The shorter ultradian cycles can be attributed to circumnutational growth of roots and/or to mucilage exudation. The average values across all the replicate data showed that the highest power spectral densities (PSDs) corresponded to root growth rhythms with periods of 22.9, 23.7, and 2.1 h for the 28 DD, 28 LD, and 33 DD treatments, respectively. Accumulation of PSD for each data set indicated that the periodicity was similar in both the 28 DD and 33 DD treatments. We conclude that a 23-h circadian and a 2-h ultradian rhythmicity exist in rice root elongation. Moreover, root elongation rates during the day were 1.08 and 1.44 times faster than those during the night for the 28 LD and DT-LD treatments, respectively.

  6. Circadian regulation of teleost retinal cone movements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the retinas of many species of lower vertebrates, retinal photoreceptors and pigment epithelium pigment granules undergo daily movements in response to both diurnal, and in the case of teleost cone photoreceptors, endogenous circadian signals. Typically, these cone movements take place at dawn and at dusk when teleosts are maintained on a cyclic light (LD) regime, and at expected dawn and expected dusk when animals are maintained in continuous darkness (DD). Because these movements are so strictly controlled, they provide an overt indicator of the stage of the underlying clock mechanism. In this study we report that both light-induced and circadian-driven cone myoid movements in the Midas cichlid (Cichlasoma citrinellum), occur normally in vitro. Many of the features of retinomotor movements found in vivo also occur in our culture conditions, including responses to light and circadian stimuli and dopamine. Circadian induced predawn contraction and maintenance of expected day position in response to circadian modulation, are also normal. Our studies suggest that circadian regulation of cone myoid movement in vitro is mediated locally by dopamine, acting via a D2 receptor. Cone myoid contraction can be induced at midnight and expected mid-day by dark culture with dopamine or the D2 receptor agonist LY171555. Further, circadian induced predawn contraction can be increased with either dopamine or LY171555, or may be reversed with the dopamine D2 antagonist, sulpiride. Sulpiride will also induce cone myoid elongation in retinal cultures at expected mid- day, but will not induce cone myoid elongation at dusk. In contrast, circadian cone myoid movements in vitro were unaffected by the D1 receptor agonist SCH23390, or the D1 receptor antagonist SKF38393. Our short-term culture experiments indicate that circadian regulation of immediate cone myoid movement does not require humoral control but is regulated locally within the retina. The inclusion of dopamine, or dopamine

  7. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  8. Speed control: cogs and gears that drive the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sehgal, Amita

    2012-09-01

    In most organisms, an intrinsic circadian (~24-h) timekeeping system drives rhythms of physiology and behavior. Within cells that contain a circadian clock, specific transcriptional activators and repressors reciprocally regulate each other to generate a basic molecular oscillator. A mismatch of the period generated by this oscillator with the external environment creates circadian disruption, which can have adverse effects on neural function. Although several clock genes have been extensively characterized, a fundamental question remains: how do these genes work together to generate a ~24-h period? Period-altering mutations in clock genes can affect any of multiple regulated steps in the molecular oscillator. In this review, we examine the regulatory mechanisms that contribute to setting the pace of the circadian oscillator.

  9. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

    PubMed

    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  10. Gene-dependent effect of lithium on circadian rhythms in mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Possidente, B; Exner, R H

    1986-01-01

    Lithium has been shown to lengthen free-running circadian periods in a variety of species. Here we show that lithium carbonate differentially lengthens the free-running period of a circadian wheel running rhythm in BALB/CByJ and C57BL/10Sn inbred mouse strains. This result supports previous evidence that lithium lengthens mammalian circadian rhythms, and also demonstrates that gene differences can mediate individual differences in response to lithium treatment.

  11. ‘The clocks that time us’—circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Lazar, Alpar S.; Barker, Roger A.; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep–wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and circadian dysfunction might exacerbate the disease process. The pathophysiology of sleep–wake disturbances in these disorders remains largely unknown, and is presumably multifactorial. Circadian rhythm dysfunction is often observed in patients with Alzheimer disease, in whom it has a major impact on quality of life and represents one of the most important factors leading to institutionalization of patients. Similarly, sleep and circadian problems represent common nonmotor features of Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. Clinical studies and experiments in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have revealed the progressive nature of circadian dysfunction throughout the course of neurodegeneration, and suggest strategies for the restoration of circadian rhythmicity involving behavioural and pharmacological interventions that target the sleep–wake cycle. In this Review, we discuss the role of the circadian system in the regulation of the sleep–wake cycle, and outline the implications of disrupted circadian timekeeping in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25385339

  12. Central Control of Circadian Phase in Arousal-Promoting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Carrie E.; McKinley Brewer, Judy; Bittman, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the dorsomedial/lateral hypothalamus (DMH/LH) that produce hypocretin (HCRT) promote arousal in part by activation of cells of the locus coeruleus (LC) which express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives endogenous daily rhythms, including those of sleep and wakefulness. These circadian oscillations are generated by a transcriptional-translational feedback loop in which the Period (Per) genes constitute critical components. This cell-autonomous molecular clock operates not only within the SCN but also in neurons of other brain regions. However, the phenotype of such neurons and the nature of the phase controlling signal from the pacemaker are largely unknown. We used dual fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess clock function in vasopressin, HCRT and TH cells of the SCN, DMH/LH and LC, respectively, of male Syrian hamsters. In the first experiment, we found that Per1 expression in HCRT and TH oscillated in animals held in constant darkness with a peak phase that lagged that in AVP cells of the SCN by several hours. In the second experiment, hamsters induced to split their locomotor rhythms by exposure to constant light had asymmetric Per1 expression within cells of the middle SCN at 6 h before activity onset (AO) and in HCRT cells 9 h before and at AO. We did not observe evidence of lateralization of Per1 expression in the LC. We conclude that the SCN communicates circadian phase to HCRT cells via lateralized neural projections, and suggests that Per1 expression in the LC may be regulated by signals of a global or bilateral nature. PMID:23826226

  13. The statistical analysis of circadian phase and amplitude in constant-routine core-temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. N.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the phases and amplitude of the endogenous circadian pacemaker from constant-routine core-temperature series is crucial for making inferences about the properties of the human biological clock from data collected under this protocol. This paper presents a set of statistical methods based on a harmonic-regression-plus-correlated-noise model for estimating the phases and the amplitude of the endogenous circadian pacemaker from constant-routine core-temperature data. The methods include a Bayesian Monte Carlo procedure for computing the uncertainty in these circadian functions. We illustrate the techniques with a detailed study of a single subject's core-temperature series and describe their relationship to other statistical methods for circadian data analysis. In our laboratory, these methods have been successfully used to analyze more than 300 constant routines and provide a highly reliable means of extracting phase and amplitude information from core-temperature data.

  14. Identification and temporal expression of putative circadian clock transcripts in the amphipod crustacean Talitrus saltator

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Joseph F.; Hoelters, Laura S.; Swain, Martin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Talitrus saltator is an amphipod crustacean that inhabits the supralittoral zone on sandy beaches in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. T. saltator exhibits endogenous locomotor activity rhythms and time-compensated sun and moon orientation, both of which necessitate at least one chronometric mechanism. Whilst their behaviour is well studied, currently there are no descriptions of the underlying molecular components of a biological clock in this animal, and very few in other crustacean species. Methods We harvested brain tissue from animals expressing robust circadian activity rhythms and used homology cloning and Illumina RNAseq approaches to sequence and identify the core circadian clock and clock-related genes in these samples. We assessed the temporal expression of these genes in time-course samples from rhythmic animals using RNAseq. Results We identified a comprehensive suite of circadian clock gene homologues in T. saltator including the ‘core’ clock genes period (Talper), cryptochrome 2 (Talcry2), timeless (Taltim), clock (Talclk), and bmal1 (Talbmal1). In addition we describe the sequence and putative structures of 23 clock-associated genes including two unusual, extended isoforms of pigment dispersing hormone (Talpdh). We examined time-course RNAseq expression data, derived from tissues harvested from behaviourally rhythmic animals, to reveal rhythmic expression of these genes with approximately circadian period in Talper and Talbmal1. Of the clock-related genes, casein kinase IIβ (TalckIIβ), ebony (Talebony), jetlag (Taljetlag), pigment dispensing hormone (Talpdh), protein phosphatase 1 (Talpp1), shaggy (Talshaggy), sirt1 (Talsirt1), sirt7 (Talsirt7) and supernumerary limbs (Talslimb) show temporal changes in expression. Discussion We report the sequences of principle genes that comprise the circadian clock of T. saltator and highlight the conserved structural and functional domains of their deduced cognate proteins. Our

  15. Mutation at the circadian clock gene EARLY MATURITY 8 adapts domesticated barley (Hordeum vulgare) to short growing seasons.

    PubMed

    Faure, Sebastien; Turner, Adrian S; Gruszka, Damian; Christodoulou, Vangelis; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria; Laurie, David A

    2012-05-22

    The circadian clock is an autonomous oscillator that produces endogenous biological rhythms with a period of about 24 h. This clock allows organisms to coordinate their metabolism and development with predicted daily and seasonal changes of the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both evolutionary fitness and agricultural productivity. Nevertheless, we show that commercial barley varieties bred for short growing seasons by use of early maturity 8 (eam8) mutations, also termed mat-a, are severely compromised in clock gene expression and clock outputs. We identified EAM8 as a barley ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) and demonstrate that eam8 accelerates the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth and inflorescence development. We propose that eam8 was selected as barley cultivation moved to high-latitude short-season environments in Europe because it allowed rapid flowering in genetic backgrounds that contained a previously selected late-flowering mutation of the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1. We show that eam8 mutants have increased expression of the floral activator HvFT1, which is independent of allelic variation at Ppd-H1. The selection of independent eam8 mutations shows that this strategy facilitates short growth-season adaptation and expansion of the geographic range of barley, despite the pronounced clock defect.

  16. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  17. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  18. Circadian Rhythms in Adipose Tissue Physiology.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Jana-Thabea; Tsang, Anthony H; Heyde, Isabel; Leinweber, Brinja; Kolbe, Isa; Leliavski, Alexei; Oster, Henrik

    2017-03-16

    The different types of adipose tissues fulfill a wide range of biological functions-from energy storage to hormone secretion and thermogenesis-many of which show pronounced variations over the course of the day. Such 24-h rhythms in physiology and behavior are coordinated by endogenous circadian clocks found in all tissues and cells, including adipocytes. At the molecular level, these clocks are based on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of a set of clock genes/proteins. Tissue-specific clock-controlled transcriptional programs translate time-of-day information into physiologically relevant signals. In adipose tissues, clock gene control has been documented for adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, lipid metabolism as well as endocrine function and other adipose oscillations are under control of systemic signals tied to endocrine, neuronal, or behavioral rhythms. Circadian rhythm disruption, for example, by night shift work or through genetic alterations, is associated with changes in adipocyte metabolism and hormone secretion. At the same time, adipose metabolic state feeds back to central and peripheral clocks, adjusting behavioral and physiological rhythms. In this overview article, we summarize our current knowledge about the crosstalk between circadian clocks and energy metabolism with a focus on adipose physiology. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:383-427, 2017.

  19. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light–dark cycles (‘entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN—the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system. PMID:21119632

  20. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-11-30

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light-dark cycles ('entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system.

  1. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie; Rachalski, Adeline; Baquiran, Gerardo; Na, Chan Hyun; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Storch, Kai-Florian; Peng, Junmin; Wing, Simon S.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2) in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO) display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1). USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues. PMID:23213472

  2. The circadian clock rephases during lateral root organ initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Voß, Ute; Wilson, Michael H.; Kenobi, Kim; Gould, Peter D.; Robertson, Fiona C.; Peer, Wendy A.; Lucas, Mikaël; Swarup, Kamal; Casimiro, Ilda; Holman, Tara J.; Wells, Darren M.; Péret, Benjamin; Goh, Tatsuaki; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Hodgman, T. Charlie; Laplaze, Laurent; Halliday, Karen J.; Ljung, Karin; Murphy, Angus S.; Hall, Anthony J.; Webb, Alex A. R.; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous circadian clock enables organisms to adapt their growth and development to environmental changes. Here we describe how the circadian clock is employed to coordinate responses to the key signal auxin during lateral root (LR) emergence. In the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, LRs originate from a group of stem cells deep within the root, necessitating that new organs emerge through overlying root tissues. We report that the circadian clock is rephased during LR development. Metabolite and transcript profiling revealed that the circadian clock controls the levels of auxin and auxin-related genes including the auxin response repressor IAA14 and auxin oxidase AtDAO2. Plants lacking or overexpressing core clock components exhibit LR emergence defects. We conclude that the circadian clock acts to gate auxin signalling during LR development to facilitate organ emergence. PMID:26144255

  3. Circadian control of bile acid synthesis by a KLF15-Fgf15 axis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sean (Shuxin); Zhang, Rongli; Jain, Rajan; Shi, Hong; Zhang, Lilei; Zhou, Guangjin; Sangwung, Panjamaporn; Tugal, Derin; Atkins, G. Brandon; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Lu, Yuan; Han, Xiaonan; Tso, Patrick; Liao, Xudong; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian control of nutrient availability is critical to efficiently meet the energetic demands of an organism. Production of bile acids (BAs), which facilitate digestion and absorption of nutrients, is a major regulator of this process. Here we identify a KLF15-Fgf15 signalling axis that regulates circadian BA production. Systemic Klf15 deficiency disrupted circadian expression of key BA synthetic enzymes, tissue BA levels and triglyceride/cholesterol absorption. Studies in liver-specific Klf15-knockout mice suggested a non-hepatic basis for regulation of BA production. Ileal Fgf15 is a potent inhibitor of BA synthesis. Using a combination of biochemical, molecular and functional assays (including ileectomy and bile duct catheterization), we identify KLF15 as the first endogenous negative regulator of circadian Fgf15 expression. Elucidation of this novel pathway controlling circadian BA production has important implications for physiologic control of nutrient availability and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26040986

  4. Circadian rhythms in depression and recovery: evidence for blunted amplitude as the main chronobiological abnormality.

    PubMed

    Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Belugou, J L; Pringuey, D; Candito, M; Krebs, B; Ardisson, J L; Darcourt, G

    1989-06-01

    Circadian rhythms of body temperature, plasma cortisol, norepinephrine (NE), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and melatonin were compared in 16 endogenously depressed, 15 recovered (after 3 weeks of anti-depressant treatment), and 16 normal subjects. The depressed patients showed clear circadian rhythm abnormalities, consisting mainly in amplitude reduction. This amplitude reduction was significantly correlated with the patients' Hamilton depression scores. Normal circadian profiles were restored after recovery when amplitude, in particular, was increased. Features of the circadian rhythms observed in remission may be associated with antidepressant drug effects, whereas those observed in depression resemble the circadian rhythms observed in normal subjects living under conditions of temporal isolation and those of blind subjects. Our findings suggest that depression may be related both to a weakening of the coupling processes between internal pacemakers and to an abnormal sensitivity to environmental information.

  5. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  6. Circadian activity rhythms in the spiny mouse, Acomys cahirinus.

    PubMed

    Weber, E T; Hohn, V M

    2005-11-15

    Circadian locomotor rhythms were examined in adult common spiny mice, Acomys cahirinus. Spiny mice demonstrated nocturnal activity, with onset of activity coinciding promptly with onset of darkness. Re-entrainment to 6-h delays of the light-dark cycle was accomplished faster than to 6-h advances. Access to running wheels yielded significant changes in period and duration of daily activity. Novelty-induced wheel running had no effect on phase of activity rhythms. Circadian responses to light at various times of the circadian cycle were temporally similar to those observed in other nocturnal rodent species. No gender differences were observed in any of the parameters measured.

  7. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    PubMed

    Atamian, Hagop S; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptive advantage by synchronizing plant physiological and metabolic processes to the external environment. The circadian clock regulates phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways to generate daily rhythms in hormone activity that fine-tune a range of plant processes, enhancing adaptation to local conditions. This review explores our current understanding of the interplay between the circadian clock and hormone signaling pathways.

  8. Circadian Dysrhythmias, Physiological Aberrations, and the Link to Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Arbesman, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are core regulators of a variety of mammalian physiologic processes and oscillate in a 24-h pattern. Many peripheral organs possess endogenous rhythmicity that is then modulated by a master clock; the skin is one of these peripheral organs. The dysregulation of rhythms is associated with decreased ability to ameliorate cellular stressors at a local and global level, which then increases the propensity for the development of neoplastic growths. In this article, we review the implications of altered circadian rhythms on DNA repair as well as modified gene expression of core clock proteins with particular focus on skin models. These findings are then correlated with epidemiologic data regarding skin cancer to showcase the effects of circadian disruption on this phenomenon. PMID:27128901

  9. Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Circadian Rhythms, and AMD

    PubMed Central

    Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews concepts regarding oxidative stress and the mechanisms by which endogenous and exogenous factors produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also surveys the relationships between oxidative stress, circadian rhythms, and retinal damage in humans, particularly those related to light and photodamage. In the first section, the production of ROS by different cell organelles and biomolecules and the antioxidant mechanisms that antagonize this damage are reviewed. The second section includes a brief review of circadian clocks and their relationship with the cellular redox state. In the third part of this work, the relationship between retinal damage and ROS is described. The last part of this work focuses on retinal degenerative pathology, age-related macular degeneration, and the relationships between this pathology, ROS, and light. Finally, the possible interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), circadian rhythms, and this pathology are discussed. PMID:26885250

  10. Circadian Rhythms, Metabolism, and Chrononutrition in Rodents and Humans123

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Scheer, Frank A; Turek, Fred W

    2016-01-01

    Chrononutrition is an emerging discipline that builds on the intimate relation between endogenous circadian (24-h) rhythms and metabolism. Circadian regulation of metabolic function can be observed from the level of intracellular biochemistry to whole-organism physiology and even postprandial responses. Recent work has elucidated the metabolic roles of circadian clocks in key metabolic tissues, including liver, pancreas, white adipose, and skeletal muscle. For example, tissue-specific clock disruption in a single peripheral organ can cause obesity or disruption of whole-organism glucose homeostasis. This review explains mechanistic insights gained from transgenic animal studies and how these data are being translated into the study of human genetics and physiology. The principles of chrononutrition have already been demonstrated to improve human weight loss and are likely to benefit the health of individuals with metabolic disease, as well as of the general population. PMID:26980824

  11. Circadian Rhythms, Metabolism, and Chrononutrition in Rodents and Humans.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Ordovás, José M; Scheer, Frank A; Turek, Fred W

    2016-03-01

    Chrononutrition is an emerging discipline that builds on the intimate relation between endogenous circadian (24-h) rhythms and metabolism. Circadian regulation of metabolic function can be observed from the level of intracellular biochemistry to whole-organism physiology and even postprandial responses. Recent work has elucidated the metabolic roles of circadian clocks in key metabolic tissues, including liver, pancreas, white adipose, and skeletal muscle. For example, tissue-specific clock disruption in a single peripheral organ can cause obesity or disruption of whole-organism glucose homeostasis. This review explains mechanistic insights gained from transgenic animal studies and how these data are being translated into the study of human genetics and physiology. The principles of chrononutrition have already been demonstrated to improve human weight loss and are likely to benefit the health of individuals with metabolic disease, as well as of the general population.

  12. Circadian rhythms in biologically closed electrical circuits of plants.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander; Waite, Astian J; Wooten, Joseph D; Markin, Vladislav S

    2012-02-01

    The circadian clock regulates a wide range of electrophysiological and developmental processes in plants. Here, we discuss the direct influence of a circadian clock on biologically closed electrochemical circuits in vivo. The biologically closed electrochemical circuits in the leaves of C. miniata (Kaffir lily), Aloe vera and Mimosa pudica, which regulate their physiology, were analyzed using the charge stimulation method. Plants are able to memorize daytime and nighttime. Even at continuous light or darkness, plants recognize nighttime or daytime and change the input resistance. The circadian clock can be maintained endogenously and has electrochemical oscillators, which can activate ion channels in biologically closed electrochemical circuits. The activation of voltage gated channels depends on the applied voltage, electrical charge, and the speed of transmission of electrical energy from the electrostimulator to plants.

  13. Ultradian and circadian rhythms of sleep-wake and food-intake behavior during early infancy.

    PubMed

    Löhr, B; Siegmund, R

    1999-03-01

    The early development of sleep-wake and food-intake rhythms in human infants is reviewed. The development of a 24 h day-night rhythm contains two observable developmental processes: the alterations in the periodic structure of behavior (decreased ultradian, increased circadian components) and the process of synchronization to external time (entrainment). The authors present the results of their studies involving 26 German children and compare them with previous investigations. In their research, it became evident that, during the first weeks of life, the time pattern of sleep-wake and food-intake behavior is characterized by different ultradian periodicities, ranging from 2 h to 8 h. In the course of further ontogenesis, the share of ultradian rhythms in the sleep-wake behavior decreases, while it remains dominant for food-intake behavior. The circadian component is established as early as the first weeks of life and increases in the months that follow. Besides, the authors' study supports the notion of broad interindividual variation in ultradian rhythms and in the development of a day-night rhythm. Examples of free-running rhythms of sleep-wake and food-intake behavior by various authors are strong indicators of the endogenous nature of the circadian rhythms in infants and show that the internal clock is already functioning at birth. It is still uncertain when the process of synchronization to external and social time cues begins and how differences in the maturation of perceptive organs affect the importance of time cues for the entrainment. Prepartally, the physiological maternal entrainment factors and mother-fetus interactions may be most important; during the first weeks of life, the social time cues gain importance, while light acts as a dominant "zeitgeber" at a later time only.

  14. Resetting of circadian melatonin and cortisol rhythms in humans by ordinary room light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boivin, D. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a weak photic stimulus can reset the endogenous circadian rhythms of plasma melatonin and plasma cortisol in human subjects. A stimulus consisting of three cycles of 5 h exposures to ordinary room light (approximately 180 lux), centered 1.5 h after the endogenous temperature nadir, significantly phase-advanced the plasma melatonin rhythm in eight healthy young men compared with the phase delays observed in eight control subjects who underwent the same protocol but were exposed to darkness (p < or = 0.003). After light-induced phase advances, the circadian rhythms of plasma melatonin and plasma cortisol maintained stable temporal relationships with the endogenous core body temperature cycle, consistent with the conclusion that exposure to ordinary indoor room light had shifted a master circadian pacemaker.

  15. Absence of Circadian Rhythms of Gonadotropin Secretion in Women

    PubMed Central

    Klingman, Kara M.; Marsh, Erica E.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Anderson, Ellen J.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Diurnal rhythms of LH and FSH have been reported in normal women, but it is unclear whether these reflect underlying circadian control from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external influences. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether endogenous circadian rhythms of LH, FSH, and the glycoprotein free α-subunit (FAS) are present in reproductive-aged women. Design and Setting: Subjects were studied in the early follicular phase using a constant routine protocol in a Clinical Research Center at an academic medical center. Subjects: Subjects were healthy, normal-cycling women aged 23–29 yr (n = 11). Main Outcome Measures: Temperature data were collected, and blood samples were assayed for LH, FSH, FAS, and TSH. Results: Core body temperature and TSH were best fit by a sinusoid model, indicating that known circadian rhythms were present in this population. However, the patterns of FSH, LH, and FAS over 24 h were best fit by a linear model. Furthermore, there were no differences in LH and FAS interpulse intervals or pulse amplitudes between evening, night, and morning. Conclusions: Under conditions that control for sleep/wake, light/dark, activity, position, and nutritional cues, there is no circadian rhythm of LH, FSH, or FAS in women during the early follicular phase despite the presence of endogenous rhythms of TSH and core body temperature. These studies indicate that endogenous circadian control does not contribute to previously reported diurnal rhythms in reproductive-aged women and emphasizes the importance of environmental cues in controlling normal reproductive function. PMID:21346063

  16. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  17. Influence of the Quantity and Quality of Light on Photosynthetic Periodicity in Coral Endosymbiotic Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Michal; Levy, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic corals, which are benthic organisms intimately linked with their environment, have evolved many ways to deal with fluctuations in the local marine environment. One possible coping mechanism is the endogenous circadian clock, which is characterized as free running, maintaining a ∼24 h periodicity of circuits under constant stimuli or in the absence of external cues. The quantity and quality of light were found to be the most influential factors governing the endogenous clock for plants and algae. Unicellular dinoflagellate algae are among the best examples of organisms that exhibit circadian clocks using light as the dominant signal. This study is the first to examine the effects of light intensity and quality on the rhythmicity of photosynthesis in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., both as a free-living organism and in symbiosis with the coral Stylophora pistillata. Oxygen production measurements in Symbiodinium cultures exhibited rhythmicity with a periodicity of approximately 24 h under constant high light (LL), whereas under medium and low light, the cycle time increased. Exposing Symbiodinium cultures and corals to spectral light revealed different effects of blue and red light on the photosynthetic rhythm, specifically shortening or increasing the cycle time respectively. These findings suggest that the photosynthetic rhythm is entrained by different light cues, which are wired to an endogenous circadian clock. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mRNA expression was higher under blue light for two potential cryptochrome genes and higher under red light for a phytochrome gene isolated from Symbiodinium. These results offer the first evidence of the impact of the intensity and quality of light on the photosynthetic rhythm in algal cells living freely or as part of a symbiotic association. Our results indicate the presence of a circadian oscillator in Symbiodinium governing the photosynthetic apparatus through a light-induced signaling

  18. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  19. Endogenous circadian regulation of carbon dioxide exchange in terrestrial ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypothesis that diurnal changes in terrestrial CO2 exchange are driven exclusively by the direct effect of the physical environment on plant physiology. We failed to corroborate this assumption, finding instead large diurnal fluctuations in whole ecosystem carbon assimilation across a ...

  20. Correlations between Circadian Rhythms and Growth in Challenging Environments.

    PubMed

    Dakhiya, Yuri; Hussien, Duaa; Fridman, Eyal; Kiflawi, Moshe; Green, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    In plants, the circadian system controls a plethora of processes, many with agronomic importance, such as photosynthesis, photoprotection, stomatal opening, and photoperiodic development, as well as molecular processes, such as gene expression. It has been suggested that modifying circadian rhythms may be a means to manipulate crops to develop improved plants for agriculture. However, there is very little information on how the clock influences the performance of crop plants. We used a noninvasive, high-throughput technique, based on prompt chlorophyll fluorescence, to measure circadian rhythms and demonstrated that the technique works in a range of plants. Using fluorescence, we analyzed circadian rhythms in populations of wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) from widely different ecogeographical locations in the Southern Levant part of the Fertile Crescent, an area with a high proportion of the total genetic variation of wild barley. Our results show that there is variability for circadian traits in the wild barley lines. We observed that circadian period lengths were correlated with temperature and aspect at the sites of origin of the plants, while the amplitudes of the rhythms were correlated with soil composition. Thus, different environmental parameters may exert selection on circadian rhythms.

  1. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  2. Novel functions for Period 3 and Exo-rhodopsin in rhythmic transcription and melatonin biosynthesis within the zebrafish pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Lain X; Noche, Ramil R; Ponomareva, Olga; Chang, Christopher; Liang, Jennifer O

    2008-08-05

    Entrainment of circadian clocks to environmental cues such as photoperiod ensures that daily biological rhythms stay in synchronization with the Earth's rotation. The vertebrate pineal organ has a conserved role in circadian regulation as the primary source of the nocturnal hormone melatonin. In lower vertebrates, the pineal has an endogenous circadian clock as well as photoreceptive cells that regulate this clock. The zebrafish opsin protein Exo-rhodopsin (Exorh) is expressed in pineal photoreceptors and is a candidate to mediate the effects of environmental light on pineal rhythms and melatonin synthesis. We demonstrate that Exorh has an important role in regulating gene transcription within the pineal. In developing embryos that lack Exorh, expression of the exorh gene itself and of the melatonin synthesis gene serotonin N-acetyl transferase 2 (aanat2) are significantly reduced. This suggests that the Exorh protein at the cell membrane is part of a signaling pathway that positively regulates transcription of these genes, and ultimately melatonin production, in the pineal. Like many other opsin genes, exorh is expressed with a daily rhythm: mRNA levels are higher at night than during the day. We found that the transcription factor Orthodenticle homeobox 5 (Otx5) activates exorh transcription, while the putative circadian clock component Period 3 (Per3) represses expression during the day, thereby contributing to the rhythm of transcription. This work identifies novel roles for Exorh and Per3, and gives insight into potential interactions between the sensory and circadian systems within the pineal.

  3. Independence of genetic variation between circadian rhythm and development time in the seed beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Harano, Tomohiro; Miyatake, Takahisa

    2011-03-01

    A positive genetic correlation between periods of circadian rhythm and developmental time supports the hypothesis that circadian clocks are implicated in the timing of development. Empirical evidence for this genetic correlation in insects has been documented in two fly species. In contrast, here we show that there is no evidence of genetic correlation between circadian rhythm and development time in the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis. This species has variation that is explained by a major gene in the expression and period length of circadian rhythm between strains. In this study, we found genetic variation in development time between the strains. The development time was not covaried with either the incidence or the period length of circadian rhythm among the strains. Crosses between strains suggest that development time is controlled by a polygene. In the F(2) individuals from the crosses, the circadian rhythm is attributable to allelic variation in the major gene. Across the F(2) individuals, development time was not correlated with either the expression or the period length of circadian rhythm. Thus, we found no effects of major genes responsible for variation in the circadian rhythm on development time in C. chinensis. Our findings collectively give no support to the hypothesis that the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of development time in this species.

  4. Regulation of Mammalian Physiology by Interconnected Circadian and Feeding Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Mauvoisin, Daniel; Weger, Benjamin; Gobet, Cédric; Gachon, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timekeeping systems that adapt in an anticipatory fashion the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. In mammals, the master pacemaker resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and entrains peripheral clocks using a wide range of signals that differentially schedule physiology and gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. The peripheral clocks, such as those found in the liver, are particularly sensitive to rhythmic external cues like feeding behavior, which modulate the phase and amplitude of rhythmic gene expression. Consequently, the liver clock temporally tunes the expression of many genes involved in metabolism and physiology. However, the circadian modulation of cellular functions also relies on multiple layers of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. Strikingly, these additional regulatory events may happen independently of any transcriptional oscillations, showing that complex regulatory networks ultimately drive circadian output functions. These rhythmic events also integrate feeding-related cues and adapt various metabolic processes to food availability schedules. The importance of such temporal regulation of metabolism is illustrated by metabolic dysfunctions and diseases resulting from circadian clock disruption or inappropriate feeding patterns. Therefore, the study of circadian clocks and rhythmic feeding behavior should be of interest to further advance our understanding of the prevention and therapy of metabolic diseases. PMID:28337174

  5. Analysis of circadian rhythms in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Jiffin K; Rucker, Edmund B; Cassone, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Recent attention on the early development of circadian rhythms has yielded several avenues of potential study regarding molecular and physiological rhythms in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their derivatives. While general guidelines of experimental design are-as always-applicable, there are certain idiosyncrasies with respect to experiments involving circadian rhythms that will be addressed. ESCs provide a number of challenges to the circadian biologist: growth rates are normally much higher than in established cell culture systems, the cells' innate drive towards differentiation and the lack of known synchronizing input pathways are a few examples. Some of these challenges can be addressed post hoc, such as normalization to total RNA or protein for transcript abundance studies. Most others, as outlined here, require special handling of the samples before and during experimentation in order to preserve any potential circadian oscillation that is present. Failure to do so may result in a disruption of endogenous oscillation(s) or, potentially worse, generation of an artificial oscillation that has no biological basis. This chapter begins with cultured ESCs, derived from primary blastocysts or in the form of cell lines, and outlines two methods of measuring circadian rhythms: the 2DG method of measuring glucose uptake (Sokoloff et al. J Neurochem 28:897-916, 1977) and real-time measurement of molecular rhythms using transgenic bioluminescence (Yoo et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:5339-5346, 2004).

  6. The diversity and evolution of circadian clock proteins in fungi.

    PubMed

    Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous cellular patterns that associate multiple physiological and molecular functions with time. The Neurospora circadian system contains at least three oscillators: the FRQ/WC-dependent circadian oscillator (FWO), whose core components are the FRQ, WC-1, WC-2, FRH, and FWD-1 proteins; the WC-dependent circadian oscillator (WC-FLO); and one or more FRQ/ WC-independent oscillators (FLO). Little is known about the distribution of homologs of the Neurospora clock proteins or about the molecular foundations of circadian rhythms across fungi. Here, we examined 64 diverse fungal proteomes for homologs of all five Neurospora clock proteins and retraced their evolutionary history. The FRH and FWD-1 proteins were likely present in the fungal ancestor. WC-1 and WC-2 homologs are absent from the early diverging chytrids and Microsporidia but are present in all other major clades. In contrast to the deep origins of these four clock proteins FRQ homologs are taxonomically restricted within Sordariomycetes, Leotiomycetes and Dothideomycetes. The large number of FRH and FWD-1 homologs identified and their lack of concordance with the fungal species phylogeny indicate that they likely underwent multiple rounds of duplications and losses. In contrast, the FRQ, WC-1 and WC-2 proteins exhibit relatively few duplications and losses. A notable exception is the 10 FRQ-like proteins in Fusarium oxysporum, which resulted from nine duplication events. Our results suggest that the machinery required for FWO oscillator function is taxonomically restricted within Ascomycetes. Although the WC proteins are widely distributed, the functional diversity of the few non-Neurospora circadian oscillators suggests that a WC-FLO oscillator is unlikely to fully explain the observed rhythms. The contrast between the diversity of circadian oscillators and the conservation of most of their machinery is likely best explained by considering the centrality of noncircadian functions

  7. Peripheral circadian clocks--a conserved phenotype?

    PubMed

    Weigl, Yuval; Harbour, Valerie L; Robinson, Barry; Dufresne, Line; Amir, Shimon

    2013-05-01

    The circadian system of mammals regulates the timing of occurrence of behavioral and physiological events, thereby optimizing adaptation to their surroundings. This system is composed of a single master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a population of peripheral clocks. The SCN integrates time information from exogenous sources and, in turn, synchronizes the downstream peripheral clocks. It is assumed that under normal conditions, the circadian phenotype of different peripheral clocks would be conserved with respect to its period and robustness. To study this idea, we measured the daily wheel-running activity (WRA; a marker of the SCN output) in 84 male inbred LEW/Crl rats housed under a 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. In addition, we assessed the mRNA expression of two clock genes, rPer2 and rBmal1, and one clock-controlled gene, rDbp, in four tissues that have the access to time cues other than those emanating from the SCN: olfactory bulbs (OBs), liver, tail skin, and white blood cells (WBCs). In contrast with the assumption stated above, we found that circadian clocks in peripheral tissues differ in the temporal pattern of the expression of circadian clock genes, in the robustness of the rhythms, and possibly in the number of functional ~24-h-clock cells. Based on the tissue diversity in the robustness of the clock output, the hepatic clock is likely to house the highest number of functional ~24-h-clock cells, and the OBs, the fewest number. Thus, the phenotype of the circadian clock in the periphery is tissue specific and may depend not only on the SCN but also on the sensitivity of the tissue to non-SCN-derived time cues. In the OBs and liver, the circadian clock phenotypes seem to be dominantly shaped by the SCN output. However, in the tail skin and WBC, other time cues participate in the phenotype design. Finally, our study suggests that the basic phenotype of the circadian clock is constructed at the transcript level of the core clock

  8. Circadian and homeostatic variation in sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Pablo; Ramírez, Candelaria; García, Aída; Talamantes, Javier; Cortez, Juventino

    2010-01-01

    Human performance is modulated by circadian rhythms and homeostatic changes. Changes in efficiency in the performance of many tasks might be produced by variation in a basic cognitive process, such as sustained attention. This cognitive process is the capacity to respond efficiently to the environment during prolonged periods (from minutes to hours). There are three indices of sustained attention: general stability of efficiency, time on task stability, and short-term stability. The objective of this work was to analyze circadian and homeostatic influences on the indices of sustained attention. Participants were nine undergraduate female student volunteers (mean age 17.67 yrs, SD = 1.00, range 16-19 yrs) who attended school from 07:00-13:30 h, Monday to Friday. They were assessed while adhering to a modified 28 h constant-routine protocol during which feeding, room temperature, motor activity, and room illumination were controlled. Rectal temperature was recorded each minute, and indices of sustained attention were assessed hourly through a continuous performance task (CPT). General stability was measured as standard deviation of correct responses and reaction time, time on task stability was measured as the linear regression of correct responses and reaction time throughout the task, and short-term stability was measured as hit runs and error runs. Rectal temperature showed circadian variation; subjective somnolence and tiredness increased, while general performance and all indices of sustained attention declined throughout the 28 h recording session. General stability exhibited circadian variation, whereas time on task did not. Short-term stability showed circadian variations in short-error runs, long-error runs, and short-hit runs, but long-hit runs did not. There was a 26 sec short interval at the beginning of the task, characterized by a very high efficiency level of performance. Execution during this safe period was not affected by time awake and did not show

  9. Dual origins of the intracellular circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Ono, Daisuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, the master circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where most neurons show circadian rhythms of intracellular Ca2+ levels. However, the origin of these Ca2+ rhythms remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully monitored the intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms together with the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms in a single SCN slice ex vivo, which enabled us to explore the origins. The phase relation between the circadian PER2 and Ca2+ rhythms, but not between the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms, was significantly altered in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, which display a loss of intercellular synchronization in the SCN. In addition, in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, circadian Ca2+ rhythms were abolished in the dorsolateral SCN, but were maintained in the majority of the ventromedial SCN. These findings indicate that intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms are composed of an exogenous and endogenous component involving PER2 expression. PMID:28155916

  10. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  11. Facilitated physiological adaptation to prolonged circadian disruption through dietary supplementation with essence of chicken.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Tsang, Fai; Huang, Liangfeng; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Mao, Youxiang; Shao, Yujian; Kong, Boda; Singh, Paramjeet; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Synchrony between circadian and metabolic processes is critical to the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies on essence of chicken (EC), a chicken meat extract rich in proteins, amino acids and peptides, showed its effectiveness in alleviating fatigue and promoting metabolism. A recent study revealed that it facilitated the re-entrainment of clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Dec1, Per1 and Per2) in the pineal gland and liver in a rat model of circadian disruption. Here, we investigated the role of EC-facilitated circadian synchrony in the maintenance of the energy homeostasis using a mouse model of prolonged circadian disruption. Prolonged circadian disruption (12 weeks) resulted in hepatic maladaptation, manifested by a mild but significant (p < 0.05) hepatomegaly, accompanied by disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and liver injury (indicated by increased circulating hepatic enzymes). Evidently, there was marked elevations of hepatic inflammatory mediators (interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6), suggesting an underlying inflammation leading to the hepatic injury and functional impairment. Importantly, the disruption paradigm caused the decoupling between key metabolic regulators (e.g. mTOR and AMPK) and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1). Further, we showed that the loss of circadian synchrony between the master and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) could be the underlying cause of the maladaptation. When supplemented with EC, the functional impairment and inflammation were abolished. The protective effects could be linked to its effectiveness in maintaining the synchrony between the master and hepatic clocks, and the resultant improved coupling of the circadian oscillators (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) and metabolic regulators (mTOR, AMPK). Overall, EC supplementation promoted the physiological adaptation to the prolonged circadian disruption through facilitation of endogenous circadian synchrony and the coupling of circadian oscillators and

  12. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  13. Organization of Circadian Behavior Relies on Glycinergic Transmission.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Muraro, Nara I; Beltrán González, Andrea N; Marcora, María S; Bernabó, Guillermo; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Romero, Juan I; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Castaño, Eduardo M; Marino-Busjle, Cristina; Calvo, Daniel J; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2017-04-04

    The small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) constitute a central circadian pacemaker in the Drosophila brain. They organize daily locomotor activity, partly through the release of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), coordinating the action of the remaining clusters required for network synchronization. Despite extensive efforts, the basic principles underlying communication among circadian clusters remain obscure. We identified classical neurotransmitters released by sLNvs through disruption of specific transporters. Adult-specific RNAi-mediated downregulation of the glycine transporter or impairment of glycine synthesis in LNv neurons increased period length by nearly an hour without affecting rhythmicity of locomotor activity. Electrophysiological recordings showed that glycine reduces spiking frequency in circadian neurons. Interestingly, downregulation of glycine receptor subunits in specific sLNv targets impaired rhythmicity, revealing involvement of glycine in information processing within the network. These data identify glycinergic inhibition of specific targets as a cue that contributes to the synchronization of the circadian network.

  14. Circadian Phase Resetting via Single and Multiple Control Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Neda; Stelling, Jörg; Doyle, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    Circadian entrainment is necessary for rhythmic physiological functions to be appropriately timed over the 24-hour day. Disruption of circadian rhythms has been associated with sleep and neuro-behavioral impairments as well as cancer. To date, light is widely accepted to be the most powerful circadian synchronizer, motivating its use as a key control input for phase resetting. Through sensitivity analysis, we identify additional control targets whose individual and simultaneous manipulation (via a model predictive control algorithm) out-perform the open-loop light-based phase recovery dynamics by nearly 3-fold. We further demonstrate the robustness of phase resetting by synchronizing short- and long-period mutant phenotypes to the 24-hour environment; the control algorithm is robust in the presence of model mismatch. These studies prove the efficacy and immediate application of model predictive control in experimental studies and medicine. In particular, maintaining proper circadian regulation may significantly decrease the chance of acquiring chronic illness. PMID:18795146

  15. Modulation of circadian clocks by nutrients and food factors.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Daily activity rhythms that are dominated by internal clocks are called circadian rhythms. A central clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and peripheral clocks are located in most mammalian peripheral cells. The central clock is entrained by light/dark cycles, whereas peripheral clocks are entrained by feeding cycles. The effects of nutrients on the central and peripheral clocks have been investigated during the past decade and much interaction between them has come to light. For example, a high-fat diet prolongs the period of circadian behavior, a ketogenic diet advances the onset of locomotor activity rhythms, and a high-salt diet advances the phase of peripheral molecular clocks. Moreover, some food factors such as caffeine, nobiletin, and resveratrol, alter molecular and/or behavioral circadian rhythms. Here, we review nutrients and food factors that modulate mammalian circadian clocks from the cellular to the behavioral level.

  16. Thermoregulation is impaired in an environment without circadian time cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Sulzman, F. M.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Thirteen adult male squirrel monkeys were restrained to a metabolism chair for periods of two or more weeks within an isolation chamber having controlled environmental lighting and ambient temperature. The monkeys were subjected to mild 6-hour cold exposures at all circadian phases of the day. It was found that a prominent circadian rhythm in body temperature, regulated against mild cold exposure, was present in those monkeys synchronized in a 24-hour light-dark cycle. Cold exposures were found to produce decreased core body temperatures when the circadian rhythms were free running or when environmental time indicators were not present. It is concluded that the thermoregulating system depends on the internal synchronization of the circadian time-keeping system.

  17. Circadian regulation of bird song, call, and locomotor behavior by pineal melatonin in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Harpole, Clifford E; Trivedi, Amit K; Cassone, Vincent M

    2012-04-01

    As both a photoreceptor and pacemaker in the avian circadian clock system, the pineal gland is crucial for maintaining and synchronizing overt circadian rhythms in processes such as locomotor activity and body temperature through its circadian secretion of the pineal hormone melatonin. In addition to receptor presence in circadian and visual system structures, high-affinity melatonin binding and receptor mRNA are present in the song control system of male oscine passeriform birds. The present study explores the role of pineal melatonin in circadian organization of singing and calling behavior in comparison to locomotor activity under different lighting conditions. Similar to locomotor activity, both singing and calling behavior were regulated on a circadian basis by the central clock system through pineal melatonin, since these behaviors free-ran with a circadian period and since pinealectomy abolished them in constant environmental conditions. Further, rhythmic melatonin administration restored their rhythmicity. However, the rates by which these behaviors became arrhythmic and the rates of their entrainment to rhythmic melatonin administration differed among locomotor activity, singing and calling under constant dim light and constant bright light. Overall, the study demonstrates a role for pineal melatonin in regulating circadian oscillations of avian vocalizations in addition to locomotor activity. It is suggested that these behaviors might be controlled by separable circadian clockworks and that pineal melatonin entrains them all through a circadian clock.

  18. Adaptive Temperature Compensation in Circadian Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    François, Paul; Despierre, Nicolas; Siggia, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    A temperature independent period and temperature entrainment are two defining features of circadian oscillators. A default model of distributed temperature compensation satisfies these basic facts yet is not easily reconciled with other properties of circadian clocks, such as many mutants with altered but temperature compensated periods. The default model also suggests that the shape of the circadian limit cycle and the associated phase response curves (PRC) will vary since the average concentrations of clock proteins change with temperature. We propose an alternative class of models where the twin properties of a fixed period and entrainment are structural and arise from an underlying adaptive system that buffers temperature changes. These models are distinguished by a PRC whose shape is temperature independent and orbits whose extrema are temperature independent. They are readily evolved by local, hill climbing, optimization of gene networks for a common quality measure of biological clocks, phase anticipation. Interestingly a standard realization of the Goodwin model for temperature compensation displays properties of adaptive rather than distributed temperature compensation. PMID:22807663

  19. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  20. Circadian Rhythms and Psychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Lauren D.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review provides a conceptual introduction to sleep and circadian research in psychiatric illness, and discusses recent experimental and intervention findings in this area. Recent Findings In this review, studies published since January 2011 on circadian disturbance and psychiatric illness have been summarized. Summary Exciting new results have increasingly utilized objective and validated instruments to measure the circadian system in experimental studies. Since 2011, treatment research has still predominantly utilized self-report measures as outcome variables. However, research in the treatment domain for sleep/circadian disturbances comorbid with psychiatric illness has advanced the field in its work to broaden the validation of existing sleep treatments to additional patient populations with comorbid sleep/circadian disruptions, address how to increase access to and affordability of treatment for sleep and circadian dysfunction for patients with psychiatric disorders, and how to combine psychosocial treatments with psychopharmacology to optimize treatment outcomes. PMID:24060916

  1. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intriguingly, genome topology appears to coordinate cyclic transcription at circadian interactomes, in which circadian genes are in physical contact within the cell nucleus in a time-specific manner. Moreover, the clock machinery shows functional interplays with key metabolic regulators, thereby connecting the circadian epigenome to cellular metabolism. Unraveling the molecular aspects of such interplays is likely to reveal new therapeutic strategies towards the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27014564

  2. Lack of evidence for a marked endogenous component determining food intake in humans during forced desynchrony.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Jim; Jones, Kay; Edwards, Ben; Harrison, Yvonne; Nevill, Alan; Reilly, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    In an attempt to investigate the relative importance of endogenous and exogenous factors in determining food intake, 14 healthy subjects were studied while living in an Isolation Unit (where external time cues were absent) for eighteen 28 h "days" (equal to 21 solar days). The subjects were free to spend their waking time as they chose, and they had a free choice of what they ate and when they ate it. The only restrictions were that no naps were allowed in the "daytime," that some time was required to perform a variety of tests at regular intervals throughout the 18.67 h waking periods, and that any food preparation had to be performed by the subjects themselves. Core (rectal) temperature and activity were monitored throughout, and the subjects answered a questionnaire on their eating habits at 3 h intervals during the waking periods. The questionnaire investigated reasons for eating or not eating a meal during the previous 3 h and, if a meal had been eaten, its type, the factors influencing that choice, and the subjects' subjective responses (hunger before, enjoyment during, and satiety after) to it. The results were analyzed (two-way ANOVA) in terms of both the imposed day length (the exogenous component) and the free-running period of the temperature rhythm (the endogenous component). Results indicated that by far the main reason for eating/not eating was hunger/lack of hunger rather than factors such as food availability and time-pressure. There were statistically significant effects of time within the imposed waking periods upon the type of meal eaten--"breakfast" tending to be a snack, "lunch" a small hot meal, and the "evening meal" a large hot meal. Hot meals (whether small or large) were associated with more hunger before the meal, more enjoyment of the meal, and a greater degree of satiety afterward than were cold meals. These effects suggest that the individuals adjusted their eating habits to fit in with the imposed wake times. By contrast, the effect

  3. Do Circadian Rhythms Draw the Patterns of Sustained Mental Vigor and Ailment?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Goyal, Rohit

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical Research Circadian rhythms are fundamental processes in all cells that coordinate a variety of cellular functions related to a specific time of the day. Disruption of circadian rhythms markedly impacts homeostasis. In this Commentary, we present data that disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative states. In this context, we further argue that there is an urgent need of developing new generations of compounds, chronobiotics, to modulate the molecular substrates of circadian timing system. Chronobiotics conceptually offer an effective way for restoration and protection from the consequences of the circadian disruption. We also briefly discuss whether dysfunctional circadian rhythms are a major driver of aging. Drug Dev Res 77 : 469-473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Disconnected circadian and cell cycles in a tumor-driven cell line.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Julie S; Yeom, Mijung; Reyes, Bryan A; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-11-01

    Cell division occurs at a specific time of day in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian and cell cycles are coupled in vivo. By measuring the cell cycle rhythm in real-time, we recently showed that the circadian and cell cycles are not coupled in immortalized fibroblasts, resulting in a rapid rate of cell division even though the circadian rhythm is normal in these cells. Here we report that tumor-driven Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells have perfectly temperature compensated circadian clocks, but the periods of their cell cycle gene expression rhythms are temperature-dependent, suggesting that their circadian and cell cycles are not connected. These data support our hypothesis that decoupling of the circadian and cell cycles may underlie aberrant cell division in tumor cells.

  5. Circadian Regulation Gene Polymorphisms are Associated with Sleep Disruption and Duration, and Circadian Phase and Rhythm in Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kathryn A.; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1], and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 hours on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO), and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-hour autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2, and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e., viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g., race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking, depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-hour autocorrelation, and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated

  6. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  7. Temperature effect on entrainment, phase shifting, and amplitude of circadian clocks and its molecular bases.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Ludger; Ruoff, Peter

    2002-09-01

    result in different circadian amplitudes, that usually show a species-specific optimum. In endothermic (homeothermic) organisms periodic temperature changes of about 24 h often cause entrainment, although with considerable individual differences, only if they are of rather high amplitudes (weak Zeitgeber effects). The same applies to the phase-shifting effects of temperature pulses. Isolated bird pineals and rat suprachiasmatic nuclei tissues on the other hand, respond to medium high temperature pulses and reveal PRCs similar to that of light signals. Therefore, one may speculate that the self-selected circadian rhythm of body temperature in reptiles or the endogenously controlled body temperature in homeotherms (some of which show temperature differences of more than 2 degrees C) may, in itself, serve as an internal entraining system. The so-called heterothermic mammals (undergoing low body temperature states in a daily or seasonal pattern) may be more sensitive to temperature changes. Effects of temperature elevation on the molecular clock mechanisms have been shown in Neurospora (induction of the frequency (FRQ) protein) and in Drosophila (degradation of the period (PER) and timeless (TIM) protein) and can explain observed phase shifts of rhythms in conidiation and locomotor activity, respectively. Temperature changes probably act directly on all processes of the clock mechanism some being more sensitive than the others. Temperature changes affect membrane properties, ion homeostasis, calcium influx, and other signal cascades (cAMP, cGMP, and the protein kinases A and C) (indirect effects) and may thus influence, in particular, protein phosphorylation processes of the clock mechanism. The temperature effects resemble to some degree those induced by light or by light-transducing neurons and their transmitters. In ectothermic vertebrates temperature changes significantly affect the melatonin rhythm, which in turn exerts entraining (phase shifting) functions.

  8. Electric light, particularly at night, disrupts human circadian rhythmicity: is that a problem?

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Richard G.; Zhu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 3 billion years, an endogenous circadian rhythmicity has developed in almost all life forms in which daily oscillations in physiology occur. This allows for anticipation of sunrise and sunset. This physiological rhythmicity is kept at precisely 24 h by the daily cycle of sunlight and dark. However, since the introduction of electric lighting, there has been inadequate light during the day inside buildings for a robust resetting of the human endogenous circadian rhythmicity, and too much light at night for a true dark to be detected; this results in circadian disruption and alters sleep/wake cycle, core body temperature, hormone regulation and release, and patterns of gene expression throughout the body. The question is the extent to which circadian disruption compromises human health, and can account for a portion of the modern pandemics of breast and prostate cancers, obesity, diabetes and depression. As societies modernize (i.e. electrify) these conditions increase in prevalence. There are a number of promising leads on putative mechanisms, and epidemiological findings supporting an aetiologic role for electric lighting in disease causation. These include melatonin suppression, circadian gene expression, and connection of circadian rhythmicity to metabolism in part affected by haem iron intake and distribution. PMID:25780233

  9. Electric light, particularly at night, disrupts human circadian rhythmicity: is that a problem?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard G; Zhu, Yong

    2015-05-05

    Over the past 3 billion years, an endogenous circadian rhythmicity has developed in almost all life forms in which daily oscillations in physiology occur. This allows for anticipation of sunrise and sunset. This physiological rhythmicity is kept at precisely 24 h by the daily cycle of sunlight and dark. However, since the introduction of electric lighting, there has been inadequate light during the day inside buildings for a robust resetting of the human endogenous circadian rhythmicity, and too much light at night for a true dark to be detected; this results in circadian disruption and alters sleep/wake cycle, core body temperature, hormone regulation and release, and patterns of gene expression throughout the body. The question is the extent to which circadian disruption compromises human health, and can account for a portion of the modern pandemics of breast and prostate cancers, obesity, diabetes and depression. As societies modernize (i.e. electrify) these conditions increase in prevalence. There are a number of promising leads on putative mechanisms, and epidemiological findings supporting an aetiologic role for electric lighting in disease causation. These include melatonin suppression, circadian gene expression, and connection of circadian rhythmicity to metabolism in part affected by haem iron intake and distribution.

  10. The Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition that the coordinated timing of behavioral, physiologic, and metabolic circadian rhythms is a requirement for a healthy body and mind. In mammals, the primary circadian oscillator is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is responsible for circadian coordination throughout the organism. Temporal homeostasis is recognized as a complex interplay between rhythmic clock gene expression in brain regions outside the SCN and in peripheral organs. Abnormalities in this intricate circadian orchestration may alter sleep patterns and contribute to the pathophysiology of affective disorders.

  11. Daily Rhythms of PERIOD protein in the eyestalk of the American lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Grabek, Katharine R; Chabot, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    The daily rhythm of PERIOD protein (PER) expression is an integral component of the circadian clock, which is found among a broad range of animal species including fruit flies, marine mollusks and even humans. The use of antibodies directed against PER has provided a helpful tool in the discovery of PER homologues and the labeling of putative pacemaker cells, especially in animals for which an annotated genome is not readily available. In this study, DrosophilaPER antibodies were used to probe for PER in the American lobster, Homarus americanus. This species exhibits robust endogenous circadian rhythms but the circadian clock has yet to be located or characterized. PER was detected in the eyestalks of the lobster but not in the brain. Furthermore, a significant effect of the LD cycle on daily PER abundance was identified, and PER was significantly more abundant at mid dark than in early light or mid light hours. Our results suggest that PER is a part of the molecular machinery of the circadian clock located in the eyestalk of the lobster.

  12. Circadian Rhythm of Osteocalcin in the Maxillomandibular Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gafni, Y.; Ptitsyn, A.A.; Zilberman, Y.; Pelled, G.; Gimble, J.M.; Gazit, D.

    2009-01-01

    The human body displays central circadian rhythms of activity. Recent findings suggest that peripheral tissues, such as bone, possess their own circadian clocks. Studies have shown that osteocalcin protein levels oscillate over a 24-hour period, yet the specific skeletal sites involved and its transcriptional profile remain unknown. The current study aimed to test the hypothesis that peripheral circadian mechanisms regulate transcription driven by the osteocalcin promoter. Transgenic mice harboring the human osteocalcin promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene were used. Mice of both genders and various ages were analyzed non-invasively at sequential times throughout 24-hour periods. Statistical analyses of luminescent signal intensity of osteogenic activity from multiple skeletal sites indicated a periodicity of ~ 24 hrs. The maxillomandibular complex displayed the most robust oscillatory pattern. These findings have implications for dental treatments in orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery, as well as for the mechanisms underlying bone remodeling in the maxillomandibular complex. PMID:19131316

  13. Circadian changes of T lymphocyte subsets in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, T; Taga, K; Nagaoki, T; Seki, H; Suzuki, Y; Taniguchi, N

    1984-01-01

    The circadian variations in circulating T cell subsets defined by monoclonal antibodies in eight healthy male volunteers were evaluated in whole blood using a flow cytometry. In all subjects, the number of lymphocytes showed a clear rhythmicity with high values at night and low values during the day. This circadian variation in circulating lymphocytes appeared to reflect largely a change in the number of T cells rather than B cells. The percentage of OKT3+ and OKT11+ cells showed a similar fluctuation with a peak at night and a depression during the day. It was found that the percentage of OKT4+ cells varied in parallel with that of T cells, particularly of OKT3+ cells, but the OKT8+ subset was not appreciably altered over a 24 h period. Thus, a circadian variation of T cells could be largely accounted for by a circadian change of OKT4+ cells. Plasma cortisol levels showed an expected circadian variation. It was also shown that there might be an intimate relationship between these circadian changes of T cell subsets and plasma cortisol levels. PMID:6608426

  14. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  15. Small molecule modifiers of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-08-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate 24-h oscillations of essential physiological and behavioral processes in response to daily environmental changes. These clocks are remarkably precise under constant conditions yet highly responsive to resetting signals. With the molecular composition of the core oscillator largely established, recent research has increasingly focused on clock-modifying mechanisms/molecules. In particular, small molecule modifiers, intrinsic or extrinsic, are emerging as powerful tools for understanding basic clock biology as well as developing putative therapeutic agents for clock-associated diseases. In this review, we will focus on synthetic compounds capable of modifying the period, phase, or amplitude of circadian clocks, with particular emphasis on the mammalian clock. We will discuss the potential of exploiting these small molecule modifiers in both basic and translational research.

  16. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:24764658

  17. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  18. Tissue-intrinsic dysfunction of circadian clock confers transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Anea, Ciprian B; Yao, Lin; Chen, Feng; Patel, Vijay; Merloiu, Ana; Pati, Paramita; Caldwell, R William; Fulton, David J; Rudic, R Daniel

    2011-10-11

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain is the circadian center, relaying rhythmic environmental and behavioral information to peripheral tissues to control circadian physiology. As such, central clock dysfunction can alter systemic homeostasis to consequently impair peripheral physiology in a manner that is secondary to circadian malfunction. To determine the impact of circadian clock function in organ transplantation and dissect the influence of intrinsic tissue clocks versus extrinsic clocks, we implemented a blood vessel grafting approach to surgically assemble a chimeric mouse that was part wild-type (WT) and part circadian clock mutant. Arterial isografts from donor WT mice that had been anastamosed to common carotid arteries of recipient WT mice (WT:WT) exhibited no pathology in this syngeneic transplant strategy. Similarly, when WT grafts were anastamosed to mice with disrupted circadian clocks, the structural features of the WT grafts immersed in the milieu of circadian malfunction were normal and absent of lesions, comparable to WT:WT grafts. In contrast, aortic grafts from Bmal1 knockout (KO) or Period-2,3 double-KO mice transplanted into littermate control WT mice developed robust arteriosclerotic disease. These lesions observed in donor grafts of Bmal1-KO were associated with up-regulation in T-cell receptors, macrophages, and infiltrating cells in the vascular grafts, but were independent of hemodynamics and B and T cell-mediated immunity. These data demonstrate the significance of intrinsic tissue clocks as an autonomous influence in experimental models of arteriosclerotic disease, which may have implications with regard to the influence of circadian clock function in organ transplantation.

  19. The Impact of Sleep and Circadian Disturbance on Hormones and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The levels of several hormones fluctuate according to the light and dark cycle and are also affected by sleep, feeding, and general behavior. The regulation and metabolism of several hormones are influenced by interactions between the effects of sleep and the intrinsic circadian system; growth hormone, melatonin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin levels are highly correlated with sleep and circadian rhythmicity. There are also endogenous circadian mechanisms that serve to regulate glucose metabolism and similar rhythms pertaining to lipid metabolism, regulated through the actions of various clock genes. Sleep disturbance, which negatively impacts hormonal rhythms and metabolism, is also associated with obesity, insulin insensitivity, diabetes, hormonal imbalance, and appetite dysregulation. Circadian disruption, typically induced by shift work, may negatively impact health due to impaired glucose and lipid homeostasis, reversed melatonin and cortisol rhythms, and loss of clock gene rhythmicity. PMID:25861266

  20. Dynamic resetting of the human circadian pacemaker by intermittent bright light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rimmer, D. W.; Boivin, D. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Kronauer, R. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    In humans, experimental studies of circadian resetting typically have been limited to lengthy episodes of exposure to continuous bright light. To evaluate the time course of the human endogenous circadian pacemaker's resetting response to brief episodes of intermittent bright light, we studied 16 subjects assigned to one of two intermittent lighting conditions in which the subjects were presented with intermittent episodes of bright-light exposure at 25- or 90-min intervals. The effective duration of bright-light exposure was 31% or 63% compared with a continuous 5-h bright-light stimulus. Exposure to intermittent bright light elicited almost as great a resetting response compared with 5 h of continuous bright light. We conclude that exposure to intermittent bright light produces robust phase shifts of the endogenous circadian pacemaker. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that humans, like other species, exhibit an enhanced sensitivity to the initial minutes of bright-light exposure.

  1. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  2. Circadian organization of the rodent retina involves strongly coupled, layer-specific oscillators.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Catherine; Sandu, Cristina; Malan, André; Mellac, Katell; Hicks, David; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule

    2015-04-01

    Rhythmic physiology is central to retinal function and survival and adapts vision to daily light intensity changes. Mammalian retina rhythmically releases melatonin when cultured under constant conditions, and the occurrence of clock gene [e.g., Period (Per)] expression has been shown for most cellular layers. However, contribution of the distinct layers to genesis of circadian rhythms within the retina is still debated. To characterize their endogenous oscillatory capacity and their communication at the whole-tissue level, we used a vibratome-based method to isolate individual or paired retina cellular layers from the mPer2(Luc) mouse and Per1-luciferase (Per1-Luc) rat, and real-time recorded bioluminescence. We report that each layer of the mouse retina harbors a self-sustained oscillator whose period is significantly longer (∼ 26 hours) than in whole-retina explants (∼ 22.9 hours), indicating that the period is correlated with the degree of coupling. Accordingly, the maximal period (∼ 29 hours) is reached upon complete enzymatic dissociation of the retina. By using pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that connection between retina oscillators involves gap junctions but only minor contribution from the main retina neurochemicals. Taken together with results from Per1-Luc rats, these data show that mammalian retina consists of a network of layer-specific oscillators whose period is determined by their connectivity.

  3. Human skeletal myotubes display a cell-autonomous circadian clock implicated in basal myokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Laurent; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Pulimeno, Pamela; Chanon, Stephanie; Robert, Maud; Bouzakri, Karim; Modoux, Christine; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Circadian clocks are functional in all light-sensitive organisms, allowing an adaptation to the external world in anticipation of daily environmental changes. In view of the potential role of the skeletal muscle clock in the regulation of glucose metabolism, we aimed to characterize circadian rhythms in primary human skeletal myotubes and investigate their roles in myokine secretion. Methods We established a system for long-term bioluminescence recording in differentiated human myotubes, employing lentivector gene delivery of the Bmal1-luciferase and Per2-luciferase core clock reporters. Furthermore, we disrupted the circadian clock in skeletal muscle cells by transfecting siRNA targeting CLOCK. Next, we assessed the basal secretion of a large panel of myokines in a circadian manner in the presence or absence of a functional clock. Results Bioluminescence reporter assays revealed that human skeletal myotubes, synchronized in vitro, exhibit a self-sustained circadian rhythm, which was further confirmed by endogenous core clock transcript expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 by synchronized skeletal myotubes has a circadian profile. Importantly, the secretion of IL-6 and several additional myokines was strongly downregulated upon siClock-mediated clock disruption. Conclusions Our study provides for the first time evidence that primary human skeletal myotubes possess a high-amplitude cell-autonomous circadian clock, which could be attenuated. Furthermore, this oscillator plays an important role in the regulation of basal myokine secretion by skeletal myotubes. PMID:26629407

  4. Suppressing the Neurospora crassa circadian clock while maintaining light responsiveness in continuous stirred tank reactors

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Allison L.; Pirlo, Russell K.; Babson, David M.; Cusick, Kathleen D.; Soto, Carissa M.; Petersen, Emily R.; Davis, Miah J.; Hong, Christian I.; Lee, Kwangwon; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Biffinger, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been utilized as a model organism for studying biological, regulatory, and circadian rhythms for over 50 years. These circadian cycles are driven at the molecular level by gene transcription events to prepare for environmental changes. N. crassa is typically found on woody biomass and is commonly studied on agar-containing medium which mimics its natural environment. We report a novel method for disrupting circadian gene transcription while maintaining light responsiveness in N. crassa when held in a steady metabolic state using bioreactors. The arrhythmic transcription of core circadian genes and downstream clock-controlled genes was observed in constant darkness (DD) as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Nearly all core circadian clock genes were up-regulated upon exposure to light during 11hr light/dark cycle experiments under identical conditions. Our results demonstrate that the natural timing of the robust circadian clock in N. crassa can be disrupted in the dark when maintained in a consistent metabolic state. Thus, these data lead to a path for the production of industrial scale enzymes in the model system, N. crassa, by removing the endogenous negative feedback regulation by the circadian oscillator. PMID:26031221

  5. A circadian biosignature in the labeled release data from Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Miller, Joseph D.; Levin, Gilbert V.; Straat, Patricia A.

    2005-09-01

    Organisms on Earth commonly exhibit a circadian rhythm, which is synchronized to the 24-hour day-night (diurnal) cycle of the planet. However, if isolated from strong environmental time cues (e.g., light-dark, temperature, etc.), many organisms revert to a "free-running" rhythm that is close to, but significantly different from, the diurnal cycle. Such a free-running rhythm is a distinct biological feature, as it requires an endogenous pacemaker that is not just passively driven by rhythms in the environment. On Mars, a free-running rhythm (i.e., significantly different from the Martian diurnal cycle of 24.66 hours) would constitute independent proof of the presence of living organisms. Evidence for such a circadian biosignature from Mars has been sought in the data sent by the 1976 Viking Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment . In the search for circadian rhythmicity, oscillatory fluctuations in the amount of radiolabeled gas in the headspace of the LR test cell of Viking Lander 2, test cycle 3, were studied. The cycle duration of the LR oscillations examined did not differ significantly from that of the daily cell temperature oscillations controlled ultimately by the Martian diurnal cycle. Thus, these specific LR oscillations produced no independent evidence for an endogenous biological origin. However, it was found that the amplitudes of the oscillations in the gas (presumably CO2) were greater than could be accounted for by the most likely non-biological mechanism (i.e., temperature-induced changes in soil solubility of CO2). The possibility thus remained that biological activity, synchronized to the Martian diurnal cycle, could be responsible for at least part of the oscillatory activity in the LR signals. We now propose to consider all data from the nine active and control cycles of the Martian LR experiment. A comprehensive set of null and alternative hypotheses is proposed for statistical testing using the digitized data. Advanced, statistically

  6. The Circadian Clock Modulates Enamel Development

    PubMed Central

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Boyde, Alan; Lei, Yaping; Xu, Yucheng; Miller, Joseph D.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2012-01-01

    Fully mature enamel is about 98% mineral by weight. While mineral crystals appear very early during its formative phase, the newly secreted enamel is a soft gel-like matrix containing several enamel matrix proteins of which the most abundant is amelogenin (Amelx). Histological analysis of mineralized dental enamel reveals markings called cross-striations associated with daily increments of enamel formation, as evidenced by injections of labeling dyes at known time intervals. The daily incremental growth of enamel has led to the hypothesis that the circadian clock might be involved in the regulation of enamel development. To identify daily rhythms of clock genes and Amelx, we subjected murine ameloblast cells to serum synchronization to analyze the expression of the circadian transcription factors Per2 and Bmal1 by real-time PCR. Results indicate that these key genetic regulators of the circadian clock are expressed in synchronized murine ameloblast cell cultures and that their expression profile follows a circadian pattern with acrophase and bathyphase for both gene transcripts in antiphase. Immunohistological analysis confirms the protein expression of Bmal and Cry in enamel cells. Amelx expression in 2-day postnatal mouse molars dissected every 4 hours for a duration of 48 hours oscillated with an approximately 24-hour period, with a significant approximately 2-fold decrease in expression during the dark period compared to the light period. The expression of genes involved in bicarbonate production (Car2) and transport (Slc4a4), as well as in enamel matrix endocytosis (Lamp1), was greater during the dark period, indicating that ameloblasts express these proteins when Amelx expression is at the nadir. The human and mouse Amelx genes each contain a single nonconserved E-box element within 10 kb upstream of their respective transcription start sites. We also found that within 2 kb of the transcription start site of the human NFYA gene, which encodes a positive

  7. CREB influences timing and entrainment of the SCN circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Li, Aiqing; Hansen, Katelin F; Cao, Ruifeng; Yoon, Jae Hwa; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-12-01

    The transcriptional feedback circuit, which is at the core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian (i.e., 24 h) clock, is tightly coupled to both external entrainment cues, such as light, as well as rhythmic cues that arise on a system-wide level within the SCN. One potential signaling pathway by which these cues are conveyed to the molecular clock is the CREB/CRE transcriptional cascade. In this study, we employed a tetracycline-inducible CREB repressor mouse strain, in which approximately 60% of the SCN neurons express the transgene, to test CREB functionality in the clock and its effects on overt rhythmicity. We show that attenuated CREB signaling in the SCN led to a significant reduction in light-evoked clock entrainment. An examination of circadian timing revealed that CREB repressor mice exhibited normal free-running rhythms in the absence of external lighting cues. However, under conditions of constant light, which typically leads to a lengthening of the circadian period, CREB repressor mice exhibited a dramatic arrhythmic phenotype, which could be reversed with doxycycline. At a cellular level, the repression of CREB led to a significant reduction in both the expression of the circadian clock proteins PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 and the clock output hormones AVP and VIP. Together, these data support the idea that the CRE transcriptional pathway orchestrates transcriptional events that are essential for both the maintenance of SCN timing and light entrainment of the circadian clock.

  8. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  9. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination.

  10. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  11. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  12. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  13. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  14. Photosynthetic circadian rhythmicity patterns of Symbiodium, the coral endosymbiotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Michal; Yacobi, Yosef Z.; Roopin, Modi; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Levy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Biological clocks are self-sustained endogenous timers that enable organisms (from cyanobacteria to humans) to anticipate daily environmental rhythms, and adjust their physiology and behaviour accordingly. Symbiotic corals play a central role in the creation of biologically rich ecosystems based on mutualistic symbioses between the invertebrate coral and dinoflagellate protists from the genus Symbiodinium. In this study, we experimentally establish that Symbiodinium photosynthesis, both as a free-living unicellular algae and as part of the symbiotic association with the coral Stylophora pistillata, is ‘wired’ to the circadian clock mechanism with a ‘free-run’ cycle close to 24 h. Associated photosynthetic pigments also showed rhythmicity under light/dark conditions and under constant light conditions, while the expression of the oxygen-evolving enhancer 1 gene (within photosystem II) coincided with photosynthetically evolved oxygen in Symbiodinium cultures. Thus, circadian regulation of the Symbiodinium photosynthesis is, however, complicated as being linked to the coral/host that have probably profound physiochemical influence on the intracellular environment. The temporal patterns of photosynthesis demonstrated here highlight the physiological complexity and interdependence of the algae circadian clock associated in this symbiosis and the plasticity of algae regulatory mechanisms downstream of the circadian clock. PMID:23554392

  15. Diverse roles for MAPK signaling in circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Charles S; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family of genes aids cells in sensing both extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and emerging data indicate that MAPKs have fundamental, yet diverse, roles in the circadian biological clock. In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), MAPK pathways can function as inputs allowing the endogenous clock to entrain to 24h environmental cycles. MAPKs can also interact physically and/or genetically with components of the molecular circadian oscillator, implying that MAPKs can affect the cycling of the clock. Finally, circadian rhythms in MAPK pathway activation exist in many different tissue types and in model organisms, providing a mechanism to coordinately control the expression tissue-specific target genes at the proper time of day. As such, it should probably not come as a surprise that MAPK signaling pathways and circadian clocks affect similar biological processes and defects in either pathway lead to many of the same types of human diseases, highlighting the need to better define the mechanisms that link these two fundamental pathways together.

  16. Melatonin, Circadian Rhythms, and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Irina V.; Tucci, Valter

    2003-05-01

    Experimental data show a close relationship among melatonin, circadian rhythms, and sleep. Low-dose melatonin treatment, increasing circulating melatonin levels to those normally observed at night, promotes sleep onset and sleep maintenance without changing sleep architecture. Melatonin treatment can also advance or delay the phase of the circadian clock if administered in the evening or in the morning, respectively. If used in physiologic doses and at appropriate times, melatonin can be helpful for those suffering from insomnia or circadian rhythm disorders. This may be especially beneficial for individuals with low melatonin production, which is established by measuring individual blood or saliva melatonin levels. However, high melatonin doses (over 0.3 mg) may cause side effects and disrupt the delicate mechanism of the circadian system, dissociating mutually dependent circadian body rhythms. A misleading labeling of the hormone melatonin as a "food supplement" and lack of quality control over melatonin preparations on the market continue to be of serious concern.

  17. Circadian temperature variation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to summarize current knowledge concerning the daily body temperature rhythm and its age-dependent alterations. Homeostatic and circadian control mechanisms are considered. Special attention is paid to the circadian system, as the mechanisms of autonomic control are the topic of another contribution to this special issue. Also, the interactions of the core body temperature rhythm with other circadian functions are discussed in detail as they constitute an essential part of the internal temporal order of living systems and thus guarantee their optimal functioning. In the second part of the paper, age-dependent changes in the circadian body temperature rhythm and their putative causes, considering circadian and homeostatic components, are described. Consequences for health and fitness and some possibilities to prevent adverse effect are mentioned in the final section.

  18. Quantifying light-dependent circadian disruption in humans and animal models.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G

    2014-12-01

    Although circadian disruption is an accepted term, little has been done to develop methods to quantify the degree of disruption or entrainment individual organisms actually exhibit in the field. A variety of behavioral, physiological and hormonal responses vary in amplitude over a 24-h period and the degree to which these circadian rhythms are synchronized to the daily light-dark cycle can be quantified with a technique known as phasor analysis. Several studies have been carried out using phasor analysis in an attempt to measure circadian disruption exhibited by animals and by humans. To perform these studies, species-specific light measurement and light delivery technologies had to be developed based upon a fundamental understanding of circadian phototransduction mechanisms in the different species. When both nocturnal rodents and diurnal humans, experienced different species-specific light-dark shift schedules, they showed, based upon phasor analysis of the light-dark and activity-rest patterns, similar levels of light-dependent circadian disruption. Indeed, both rodents and humans show monotonically increasing and quantitatively similar levels of light-dependent circadian disruption with increasing shift-nights per week. Thus, phasor analysis provides a method for quantifying circadian disruption in the field and in the laboratory as well as a bridge between ecological measurements of circadian entrainment in humans and parametric studies of circadian disruption in animal models, including nocturnal rodents.

  19. Absence of Circadian Rhythms of Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes and Preterm Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Ananth, Cande V.; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Qiu, Chun-fang; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data regarding circadian rhythm in the onset of spontaneous preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM) and placental abruption (PA) cases are conflicting. We modeled the time of onset of preterm PROM and PA cases and examined if the circadian profiles varied based on the gestational age at delivery. Methods We used parametric and nonparametric methods, including trigonometric regression in the framework of generalized linear models, to test the presence of circadian rhythms in the time of onset of preterm PROM and PA cases, among 395 women who delivered a singleton between 2009 and 2010 in Lima, Peru. Results We found a diurnal circadian pattern, with a morning peak at 07h:32’ (95%CI:05h:46’ – 09h:18’) among moderate preterm PROM cases (P-value<0.001), and some evidence of a diurnal circadian periodicity among PA cases in term infants (P-value=0.067). However, we did not find evidence of circadian rhythms in the time of onset of extremely or very preterm PROM (P-value=0.259) and preterm PA (P-value=0.224). Conclusions The circadian rhythms of the time of onset of preterm PROM and PA cases varied based on gestational weeks at delivery. While circadian rhythms were presented among moderate preterm PROM and term PA cases, there was no evidence of circadian rhythms among preterm PA and very or extremely preterm PROM cases, underlying other mechanisms associated with the time of onset. PMID:25453346

  20. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  1. Lithium effects on circadian rhythms in fibroblasts and suprachiasmatic nucleus slices from Cry knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Lo, Kevin; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K

    2016-04-21

    Lithium is widely used as a treatment of bipolar disorder, a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. Lithium is known to lengthen period and increase amplitude of circadian rhythms. One possible pathway for these effects involves inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), which regulates degradation of CRY2, a canonical clock protein determining circadian period. CRY1 is also known to play important roles in regulating circadian period and phase, although there is no evidence that it is similarly phosphorylated by GSK-3β. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lithium affects circadian rhythms through CRYs. We cultured fibroblasts and slices of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker of the brain, from Cry1-/-, Cry2-/-, or wild-type (WT) mice bearing the PER2:LUC circadian reporter. Lithium was applied in the culture medium, and circadian rhythms of PER2 expression were measured. In WT and Cry2-/- fibroblasts, 10mM lithium increased PER2 expression and rhythm amplitude but not period, and 1mM lithium did not affect either period or amplitude. In non-rhythmic Cry1-/- fibroblasts, 10mM lithium increased PER2 expression. In SCN slices, 1mM lithium lengthened period ∼1h in all genotypes, but did not affect amplitude except in Cry2-/- SCN. Thus, the amplitude-enhancing effect of lithium in WT fibroblasts was unaffected by Cry2 knockout and occurred in the absence of period-lengthening, whereas the period-lengthening effect of lithium in WT SCN was unaffected by Cry1 or Cry2 knockout and occurred in the absence of rhythm amplification, suggesting that these two effects of lithium on circadian rhythms are independent of CRYs and of each other.

  2. The melatonin-sensitive circadian clock of the enteric bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Jiffin K; Cassone, Vincent M

    2016-09-02

    Circadian clocks are fundamental properties of all eukaryotic organisms and at least some prokaryotic organisms. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the gastrointestinal system contains a circadian clock that controls many, if not all, aspects of gastrointestinal function. We now report that at least one species of intestinal bacteria, Enterobacter aerogenes, responds to the pineal and gastrointestinal hormone melatonin by an increase in swarming activity. This swarming behavior is expressed rhythmically, with a period of approximately 24 hrs. Transformation of E. aerogenes to express luciferase with a MotA promoter reveals circadian patterns of bioluminescence that are synchronized by melatonin and whose periods are temperature compensated from 26°C to 40°C. Bioinformatics suggest similarities between the E. aerogenes and cyanobacterial clocks, suggesting the circadian clock may have evolved very early in the evolution of life. They also point to a coordination of host circadian clocks with those residing in the microbiota themselves.

  3. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  4. Increased Anxiety in Offspring Reared by Circadian Clock Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hiroko; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Yuto; Sanada, Kamon

    2013-01-01

    The maternal care that offspring receive from their mothers early in life influences the offspring’s development of emotional behavior in adulthood. Here we found that offspring reared by circadian clock-impaired mice show elevated anxiety-related behavior. Clock mutant mice harboring a mutation in Clock, a key component of the molecular circadian clock, display altered daily patterns of nursing behavior that is fragmented during the light period, instead of long bouts of nursing behavior in wild-type mice. Adult wild-type offspring fostered by Clock mutant mice exhibit increased anxiety-related behavior. This is coupled with reduced levels of brain serotonin at postnatal day 14, whose homeostasis during the early postnatal period is critical for normal emotional behavior in adulthood. Together, disruption of the circadian clock in mothers has an adverse impact on establishing normal anxiety levels in offspring, which may increase their risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:23776596

  5. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  6. [Synchronization and genetic redundancy in circadian clocks].

    PubMed

    Dardente, Hugues

    2008-03-01

    A network of feedback loops constitutes the basis for circadian timing in mammals. Complex transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational events are also involved in the ticking of circadian clocks, allowing them to run autonomously with their characteristic, near-24h period. Central to the molecular mechanism is the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer of transcription factors. Recent data using Clock knock-out mice however suggest that CLOCK may not be as mandatory as initially suggested from data gathered in the Clock mutant mouse model. Indeed, it appears that the Clock homolog Npas2 is able to functionally compensate for Clock genetic ablation. Furthermore, real-time imaging techniques using different clock genes knock-out lines established on a PER2 ::Luc knock-in background now demonstrate that persistent rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nuclei likely arises as a consequence of combined genetic redundancy and strong intercellular coupling, the latter characteristic being likely weakened in peripheral tissues such as liver or lung. The present review aims at summarizing current knowledge of the molecular basis of circadian clocks and possible differences between central and peripheral clocks in light of recent findings in Clock knock-out mice.

  7. Clocks on top: the role of the circadian clock in the hypothalamic and pituitary regulation of endocrine physiology.

    PubMed

    Tonsfeldt, Karen J; Chappell, Patrick E

    2012-02-05

    Recent strides in circadian biology over the last several decades have allowed researchers new insight into how molecular circadian clocks influence the broader physiology of mammals. Elucidation of transcriptional feedback loops at the heart of endogenous circadian clocks has allowed for a deeper analysis of how timed cellular programs exert effects on multiple endocrine axes. While the full understanding of endogenous clocks is currently incomplete, recent work has re-evaluated prior findings with a new understanding of the involvement of these cellular oscillators, and how they may play a role in constructing rhythmic hormone synthesis, secretion, reception, and metabolism. This review addresses current research into how multiple circadian clocks in the hypothalamus and pituitary receive photic information from oscillators within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and how resultant hypophysiotropic and pituitary hormone release is then temporally gated to produce an optimal result at the cognate target tissue. Special emphasis is placed not only on neural communication among the SCN and other hypothalamic nuclei, but also how endogenous clocks within the endocrine hypothalamus and pituitary may modulate local hormone synthesis and secretion in response to SCN cues. Through evaluation of a larger body of research into the impact of circadian biology on endocrinology, we can develop a greater appreciation into the importance of timing in endocrine systems, and how understanding of these endogenous rhythms can aid in constructing appropriate therapeutic treatments for a variety of endocrinopathies.

  8. Entrainment of the master circadian clock by scheduled feeding.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Marina R; Hochstetler, Kelly J; Tavernier, Ronald J; Greene, Dana M; Bult-Ito, Abel

    2004-09-01

    The master circadian clock, located in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), generates and coordinates circadian rhythmicity, i.e., internal organization of physiological and behavioral rhythms that cycle with a near 24-h period. Light is the most powerful synchronizer of the SCN. Although other nonphotic cues also have the potential to influence the circadian clock, their effects can be masked by photic cues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of scheduled feeding to entrain the SCN in the absence of photic cues in four lines of house mouse (Mus domesticus). Mice were initially housed in 12:12-h light/dark cycle with ad libitum access to food for 6 h during the light period followed by 4-6 mo of constant dark under the same feeding schedule. Wheel running behavior suggested and circadian PER2 protein expression profiles in the SCN confirmed entrainment of the master circadian clock to the onset of food availability in 100% (49/49) of the line 2 mice in contrast to only 4% (1/24) in line 3 mice. Mice from line 1 and line 4 showed intermediate levels of entrainment, 57% (8/14) and 39% (7/18), respectively. The predictability of entrainment vs. nonentrainment in line 2 and line 3 and the novel entrainment process provide a powerful tool with which to further elucidate mechanisms involved in entrainment of the SCN by scheduled feeding.

  9. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  10. Emergence of coherent oscillations in stochastic models for circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Halloy, José; Goldbeter, Albert

    2004-10-01

    Most living organisms have developed the capability of generating autonomously sustained oscillations with a period close to 24 h. The mechanism responsible for these circadian rhythms relies on the negative regulation exerted by a protein on the expression of its own gene. Deterministic models for circadian rhythms account for the occurrence of autonomous oscillations of the limit cycle type, for their entrainment by light-dark cycles, and for their phase shifting by light pulses. Such models, however, do not take into consideration the molecular fluctuations which arise when the number of molecules involved in the regulatory mechanism is low. Here we resort to a stochastic description of a core model for circadian rhythms to study the emergence of coherent oscillations in gene expression in the presence of molecular noise. We show that despite the “bar code” pattern of gene activation, robust circadian oscillations can be observed. Simulations of the deterministic, fully developed version of the circadian model indicate, however, that sustained oscillations only emerge above a critical value of the rate constants characterizing the reversible binding of repressor to the gene, while below this value the system evolves towards an excitable steady state. This explains why, depending on whether or not the critical value of these rate constants is exceeded, stochastic simulations of the model produce coherent oscillations or very noisy oscillations with a highly variable period.

  11. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y L; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription-translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  12. Environmental Perturbation of the Circadian Clock Disrupts Pregnancy in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Keith C.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Background The circadian clock has been linked to reproduction at many levels in mammals. Epidemiological studies of female shift workers have reported increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although whether the cause is circadian disruption or another factor associated with shift work is unknown. Here we test whether environmental disruption of circadian rhythms, using repeated shifts of the light:dark (LD) cycle, adversely affects reproductive success in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Young adult female C57BL/6J (B6) mice were paired with B6 males until copulation was verified by visual identification of vaginal plug formation. Females were then randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, phase-delay or phase-advance. Controls remained on a constant 12-hr light:12-hr dark cycle, whereas phase-delayed and phase-advanced mice were subjected to 6-hr delays or advances in the LD cycle every 5–6 days, respectively. The number of copulations resulting in term pregnancies was determined. Control females had a full-term pregnancy success rate of 90% (11/12), which fell to 50% (9/18; p<0.1) in the phase-delay group and 22% (4/18; p<0.01) in the phase-advance group. Conclusions/Significance Repeated shifting of the LD cycle, which disrupts endogenous circadian timekeeping, dramatically reduces pregnancy success in mice. Advances of the LD cycle have a greater negative impact on pregnancy outcomes and, in non-pregnant female mice, require longer for circadian re-entrainment, suggesting that the magnitude or duration of circadian misalignment may be related to the severity of the adverse impact on pregnancy. These results explicitly link disruptions of circadian entrainment to adverse pregnancy outcomes in mammals, which may have important implications for the reproductive health of female shift workers, women with circadian rhythm sleep disorders and/or women with disturbed circadian rhythms for other reasons. PMID

  13. Dim light at night disrupts molecular circadian rhythms and increases body weight.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Meléndez-Fernández, O Hecmarie; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-08-01

    With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms that are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electric lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to dim light at night and investigated changes in the circadian system and metabolism. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night altered core circadian clock rhythms in the hypothalamus at both the gene and protein level. Circadian rhythms in clock expression persisted during light at night; however, the amplitude of Per1 and Per2 rhythms was attenuated in the hypothalamus. Circadian oscillations were also altered in peripheral tissues critical for metabolic regulation. Exposure to dimly illuminated, as compared to dark, nights decreased the rhythmic expression in all but one of the core circadian clock genes assessed in the liver. Additionally, mice exposed to dim light at night attenuated Rev-Erb expression in the liver and adipose tissue. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide evidence that mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. Detailed analysis of temporal changes induced by nighttime light exposure may provide insight into the onset and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other disorders involving sleep and circadian rhythm disruption.

  14. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  15. Alertness, mood and performance rhythm disturbances associated with circadian sleep disorders in the blind.

    PubMed

    Lockley, Steven W; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Kosti, Ourania; Skene, Debra J; Arendt, Josephine

    2008-06-01

    Blind people report disturbances in alertness, mood and performance. In laboratory studies, these waking functions can only be maintained when the wake-dependent deterioration is opposed by appropriately-timed endogenous circadian rhythms. We aimed to quantify whether variations in waking function experienced by blind people living in society were dependent on the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and the circadian pacemaker. The time course of alertness, mood and performance was assessed in 52 blind subjects with and without circadian rhythm disorders every 2 h for 2 days per week for 4 weeks. Sleep-wake timing and circadian phase were assessed from diaries and weekly measurements of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythms, respectively. In those subjects who woke at either a normal circadian phase (n = 26) or abnormally early (n = 5), alertness, mood and performance deteriorated significantly with increased time awake (P < 0.05). In 17 non-entrained ('free-running') subjects, waking function varied significantly with circadian phase such that subjects rated themselves most sleepy (P = 0.03) and most miserable (P = 0.02) when they were awake during the time of peak melatonin production. The internal phase relationship between sleep-wake behaviour and the circadian melatonin rhythm in entrained subjects contributed to predictable differences in the daily profile of alertness, mood and performance. Disruption of this phase relationship in non-entrained blind individuals with circadian rhythm sleep disorders resulted in impaired waking function during the day equivalent to that usually only experienced when awake during the night. Treatment for circadian rhythm disorders should be targeted in normalizing these phase relationships.

  16. Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Emily N C; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-12-23

    Circadian rhythms optimize physiology and health by temporally coordinating cellular function, tissue function, and behavior. These endogenous rhythms dampen with age and thus compromise temporal coordination. Feeding-fasting patterns are an external cue that profoundly influence the robustness of daily biological rhythms. Erratic eating patterns can disrupt the temporal coordination of metabolism and physiology leading to chronic diseases that are also characteristic of aging. However, sustaining a robust feeding-fasting cycle, even without altering nutrition quality or quantity, can prevent or reverse these chronic diseases in experimental models. In humans, epidemiological studies have shown erratic eating patterns increase the risk of disease, whereas sustained feeding-fasting cycles, or prolonged overnight fasting, is correlated with protection from breast cancer. Therefore, optimizing the timing of external cues with defined eating patterns can sustain a robust circadian clock, which may prevent disease and improve prognosis.

  17. Glucocorticosteroid injection is a circadian zeitgeber in the laboratory rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horseman, N.D.; Ehret, C.F.

    1982-09-01

    Intraperitoneal temperatures were monitored by radiotelemetry to observe the thermoregulatory rhythm of male laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus). Rats received single injections of dexamethasone (as dexamethasone sodium phosphate) during constant darkness (0.1 lx) with food freely available or no food available. No phase shifts occurred following saline injection or dexamethasone at 1 mg/kg body wt. Depending on the phase of injection relative to the circadian cycle, dexamethasone at 10 mg/kg caused thermoregulatory peaks to be either delayed or advanced on the 4th and 5th days after injection. There was an insensitive interval which corresponded to subjective day. Phase shifts induced by dexamethasone during ad libitum feeding were of less magnitude than those induced during starvation. The determination of phase-shifting parameters (i.e., a phase-response curve) for hormonal substances represents a rigorous and broadly applicable technique for determining endogenous mechanisms for circadian phase control and entrainment.

  18. Genetic architecture underlying morning and evening circadian phenotypes in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Vaze, K M; Nikhil, K L; Sharma, V K

    2013-10-01

    Circadian rhythms are perhaps among the genetically best characterized behaviours. Several mutations with drastic effects on circadian processes have been identified and models developed to explain how clock genes and their products generate self-sustained oscillations. Although natural variations in circadian phenotypes have been studied extensively, the genetic basis of such adaptive variations remains largely unknown. Here we report the results of a preliminary genetic analysis of adaptive divergence of circadian phenotypes in populations of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Two sets of populations, 'early' and 'late', were created in a long-term laboratory selection for morning and evening emergence, with four independent replicates each. Over the course of ∼55 generations, the early flies evolved increased morning emergence and a shorter circadian period, whereas late flies evolved increased evening emergence and longer period. To examine the genetic basis of circadian phenotypes, we set up crosses between early and late flies, and monitored emergence and activity/rest rhythms in the F1, backcrossed and F2 progeny. Our analysis suggests that the genetic basis of divergent circadian phenotypes in early and late stocks is primarily autosomal. Line-cross analysis revealed that additive and non-additive genetic effects contribute to the divergence of circadian phenotypes in early and late flies.

  19. Genetic architecture underlying morning and evening circadian phenotypes in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vaze, K M; Nikhil, K L; Sharma, V K

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are perhaps among the genetically best characterized behaviours. Several mutations with drastic effects on circadian processes have been identified and models developed to explain how clock genes and their products generate self-sustained oscillations. Although natural variations in circadian phenotypes have been studied extensively, the genetic basis of such adaptive variations remains largely unknown. Here we report the results of a preliminary genetic analysis of adaptive divergence of circadian phenotypes in populations of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. Two sets of populations, ‘early' and ‘late', were created in a long-term laboratory selection for morning and evening emergence, with four independent replicates each. Over the course of ∼55 generations, the early flies evolved increased morning emergence and a shorter circadian period, whereas late flies evolved increased evening emergence and longer period. To examine the genetic basis of circadian phenotypes, we set up crosses between early and late flies, and monitored emergence and activity/rest rhythms in the F1, backcrossed and F2 progeny. Our analysis suggests that the genetic basis of divergent circadian phenotypes in early and late stocks is primarily autosomal. Line-cross analysis revealed that additive and non-additive genetic effects contribute to the divergence of circadian phenotypes in early and late flies. PMID:23612693

  20. Circadian Rhythms and Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dubowy, Christine; Sehgal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    The advantages of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, including low genetic redundancy, functional simplicity, and the ability to conduct large-scale genetic screens, have been essential for understanding the molecular nature of circadian (∼24 hr) rhythms, and continue to be valuable in discovering novel regulators of circadian rhythms and sleep. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of these interrelated biological processes in Drosophila and the wider implications of this research. Clock genes period and timeless were first discovered in large-scale Drosophila genetic screens developed in the 1970s. Feedback of period and timeless on their own transcription forms the core of the molecular clock, and accurately timed expression, localization, post-transcriptional modification, and function of these genes is thought to be critical for maintaining the circadian cycle. Regulators, including several phosphatases and kinases, act on different steps of this feedback loop to ensure strong and accurately timed rhythms. Approximately 150 neurons in the fly brain that contain the core components of the molecular clock act together to translate this intracellular cycling into rhythmic behavior. We discuss how different groups of clock neurons serve different functions in allowing clocks to entrain to environmental cues, driving behavioral outputs at different times of day, and allowing flexible behavioral responses in different environmental conditions. The neuropeptide PDF provides an important signal thought to synchronize clock neurons, although the details of how PDF accomplishes this function are still being explored. Secreted signals from clock neurons also influence rhythms in other tissues. SLEEP is, in part, regulated by the circadian clock, which ensures appropriate timing of sleep, but the amount and quality of sleep are also determined by other mechanisms that ensure a homeostatic balance between sleep and wake. Flies have been useful

  1. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  2. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  3. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-01-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  4. Testing for associations between candidate genes for circadian rhythms and individual variation in sleep behaviour in blue tits.

    PubMed

    Steinmeyer, C; Kempenaers, B; Mueller, J C

    2012-06-01

    The regulation of sleep in animals is controlled by environmental factors, homeostatic mechanisms and endogenous circadian oscillators. The molecular mechanisms underlying such circadian oscillators have been described in detail and a variety of genes that are components of these molecular clocks have been reported. In addition to inter-specific variation in the temporal organization of sleep, there is significant intra-specific variation in different organisms. From numerous studies in humans it is known that polymorphisms in the regulatory clock genes are causing such variation but knowledge about associations between naturally occurring polymorphisms and sleep patterns in wild animals is scarce. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic sleep correlates of eleven previously described polymorphisms in seven candidate genes within a free-living blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus population. We detected associations between four single nucleotide polymorphisms and three of the nine tested sleep parameters representing temporal organization. Awakening time was associated with polymorphisms in AANAT and PERIOD2, morning latency with a polymorphism in CKIε and the duration of the longest sleep bout with a second polymorphism in AANAT. However, by a permutation procedure we showed that the number of significant results and the most significant association has a study-wide likelihood of 46.7 and 5.9 % respectively. Further replication studies are needed to evaluate the potential associations.

  5. Comparative Review of Approved Melatonin Agonists for the Treatment of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilbur P Trey; McLin, Dewey E; Dressman, Marlene A; Neubauer, David N

    2016-09-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) are characterized by persistent or recurrent patterns of sleep disturbance related primarily to alterations of the circadian rhythm system or the misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm and exogenous factors that affect the timing or duration of sleep. These disorders collectively represent a significant unmet medical need, with a total prevalence in the millions, a substantial negative impact on quality of life, and a lack of studied treatments for most of these disorders. Activation of the endogenous melatonin receptors appears to play an important role in setting the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Therefore, melatonin agonists, which may be able to shift and/or stabilize the circadian phase, have been identified as potential therapeutic candidates for the treatment of CRSWDs. Currently, only one melatonin receptor agonist, tasimelteon, is approved for the treatment of a CRSWD: non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (or non-24). However, three additional commercially available melatonin receptor agonists-agomelatine, prolonged-release melatonin, and ramelteon-have been investigated for potential use for treatment of CRSWDs. Data indicate that these melatonin receptor agonists have distinct pharmacologic profiles that may help clarify their clinical use in CRSWDs. We review the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these melatonin agonists and summarize their efficacy profiles when used for the treatment of CRSWDs. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic potential of these melatonin agonists for most CRSWDs.

  6. A Long Noncoding RNA Perturbs the Circadian Rhythm of Hepatoma Cells to Facilitate Hepatocarcinogenesis12

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ming; Zheng, Minying; Sun, Baodi; Wang, Yue; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Clock circadian regulator (CLOCK)/brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) complex governs the regulation of circadian rhythm through triggering periodic alterations of gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian clock disruption in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC), contributes to the perturbations in circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells. Our observations showed that HULC was able to heighten the expression levels of CLOCK and its downstream circadian oscillators, such as period circadian clock 1 and cryptochrome circadian clock 1, in hepatoma cells. Strikingly, HULC altered the expression pattern and prolonged the periodic expression of CLOCK in hepatoma cells. Mechanistically, the complementary base pairing between HULC and the 5' untranslated region of CLOCK mRNA underlay the HULC-modulated expression of CLOCK, and the mutants in the complementary region failed to achieve the event. Moreover, immunohistochemistry staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated that the levels of CLOCK were elevated in HCC tissues, and the expression levels of HULC were positively associated with those of CLOCK in clinical HCC samples. In functional experiments, our data exhibited that CLOCK was implicated in the HULC-accelerated proliferation of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that an lncRNA, HULC, is responsible for the perturbations in circadian rhythm through upregulating circadian oscillator CLOCK in hepatoma cells, resulting in the promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which lncRNA accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis through disturbing circadian rhythm of HCC. PMID:25622901

  7. A long noncoding RNA perturbs the circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells to facilitate hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; Zheng, Minying; Sun, Baodi; Wang, Yue; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Clock circadian regulator (CLOCK)/brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) complex governs the regulation of circadian rhythm through triggering periodic alterations of gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian clock disruption in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC), contributes to the perturbations in circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells. Our observations showed that HULC was able to heighten the expression levels of CLOCK and its downstream circadian oscillators, such as period circadian clock 1 and cryptochrome circadian clock 1, in hepatoma cells. Strikingly, HULC altered the expression pattern and prolonged the periodic expression of CLOCK in hepatoma cells. Mechanistically, the complementary base pairing between HULC and the 5' untranslated region of CLOCK mRNA underlay the HULC-modulated expression of CLOCK, and the mutants in the complementary region failed to achieve the event. Moreover, immunohistochemistry staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated that the levels of CLOCK were elevated in HCC tissues, and the expression levels of HULC were positively associated with those of CLOCK in clinical HCC samples. In functional experiments, our data exhibited that CLOCK was implicated in the HULC-accelerated proliferation of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that an lncRNA, HULC, is responsible for the perturbations in circadian rhythm through upregulating circadian oscillator CLOCK in hepatoma cells, resulting in the promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which lncRNA accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis through disturbing circadian rhythm of HCC.

  8. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  9. Development of a Configurable Growth Chamber with a Computer Vision System to Study Circadian Rhythm in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pedro J.; Fernández, Carlos; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Plant development is the result of an endogenous morphogenetic program that integrates environmental signals. The so-called circadian clock is a set of genes that integrates environmental inputs into an internal pacing system that gates growth and other outputs. Study of circadian growth responses requires high sampling rates to detect changes in growth and avoid aliasing. We have developed a flexible configurable growth chamber comprising a computer vision system that allows sampling rates ranging between one image per 30 s to hours/days. The vision system has a controlled illumination system, which allows the user to set up different configurations. The illumination system used emits a combination of wavelengths ensuring the optimal growth of species under analysis. In order to obtain high contrast of captured images, the capture system is composed of two CCD cameras, for day and night periods. Depending on the sample type, a flexible image processing software calculates different parameters based on geometric calculations. As a proof of concept we tested the system in three different plant tissues, growth of petunia- and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) flowers and of cladodes from the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica. We found that petunia flowers grow at a steady pace and display a strong growth increase in the early morning, whereas Opuntia cladode growth turned out not to follow a circadian growth pattern under the growth conditions imposed. Furthermore we were able to identify a decoupling of increase in area and length indicating that two independent growth processes are responsible for the final size and shape of the cladode. PMID:23202214

  10. Development of a configurable growth chamber with a computer vision system to study circadian rhythm in plants.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pedro J; Fernández, Carlos; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2012-11-09

    Plant development is the result of an endogenous morphogenetic program that integrates environmental signals. The so-called circadian clock is a set of genes that integrates environmental inputs into an internal pacing system that gates growth and other outputs. Study of circadian growth responses requires high sampling rates to detect changes in growth and avoid aliasing. We have developed a flexible configurable growth chamber comprising a computer vision system that allows sampling rates ranging between one image per 30 s to hours/days. The vision system has a controlled illumination system, which allows the user to set up different configurations. The illumination system used emits a combination of wavelengths ensuring the optimal growth of species under analysis. In order to obtain high contrast of captured images, the capture system is composed of two CCD cameras, for day and night periods. Depending on the sample type, a flexible image processing software calculates different parameters based on geometric calculations. As a proof of concept we tested the system in three different plant tissues, growth of petunia- and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) flowers and of cladodes from the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica. We found that petunia flowers grow at a steady pace and display a strong growth increase in the early morning, whereas Opuntia cladode growth turned out not to follow a circadian growth pattern under the growth conditions imposed. Furthermore we were able to identify a decoupling of increase in area and length indicating that two independent growth processes are responsible for the final size and shape of the cladode.

  11. Circadian Modulation of Alcohol-Induced Sedation and Recovery in Male and Female Drosophila.

    PubMed

    De Nobrega, Aliza K; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-04-01

    Delineating the factors that affect behavioral and neurological responses to alcohol is critical to facilitate measures for preventing or treating alcohol abuse. The high degree of conserved molecular and physiological processes makes Drosophila melanogaster a valuable model for investigating circadian interactions with alcohol-induced behaviors and examining sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We found that wild-type Drosophila exhibited rhythms in alcohol-induced sedation under light-dark and constant dark conditions with considerably greater alcohol exposure necessary to induce sedation during the late (subjective) day and peak sensitivity to alcohol occurring during the late (subjective) night. The circadian clock also modulated the recovery from alcohol-induced sedation with flies regaining motor control significantly faster during the late (subjective) day. As predicted, the circadian rhythms in sedation and recovery were absent in flies with a mutation in the circadian gene period or arrhythmic flies housed in constant light conditions. Flies lacking a functional circadian clock were more sensitive to the effects of alcohol with significantly longer recovery times. Similar to other animals and humans, Drosophila exhibit sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We investigated whether the circadian clock modulated the rhythms in the loss-of-righting reflex, alcohol-induced sedation, and recovery differently in males and females. We found that both sexes demonstrated circadian rhythms in the loss-of-righting reflex and sedation with the differences in alcohol sensitivity between males and females most pronounced during the late subjective day. Recovery of motor reflexes following alcohol sedation also exhibited circadian modulation in male and female flies, although the circadian clock did not modulate the difference in recovery times between the sexes. These studies provide a framework outlining how the circadian clock modulates alcohol

  12. Circadian modulation of alcohol-induced sedation and recovery in male and female Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    De Nobrega, Aliza K.; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Delineating the factors that affect behavioral and neurological responses to alcohol is critical to facilitate measures for preventing or treating alcohol abuse. The high degree of conserved molecular and physiological processes make Drosophila melanogaster a valuable model for investigating circadian interactions with alcohol-induced behaviors and examining sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We found that wild-type Drosophila exhibit rhythms in alcohol-induced sedation under light-dark and constant dark conditions with considerably greater alcohol exposure necessary to induce sedation during the late (subjective) day and peak sensitivity to alcohol occurring during the late (subjective) night. The circadian clock also modulated the recovery from alcohol-induced sedation with flies regaining motor control significantly faster during the late (subjective) day. As predicted, the circadian rhythms in sedation and recovery were absent in flies with a mutation in the circadian gene period or arrhythmic flies housed in constant light conditions. Flies lacking a functional circadian clock were more sensitive to the effects of alcohol with significantly longer recovery times. Similar to other animals and humans, Drosophila exhibit sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We investigated whether the circadian clock modulated the rhythms in the Loss-of-Righting Reflex, alcohol-induced sedation, and recovery differently in males and females. We found that both sexes demonstrate circadian rhythms in the Loss-of-Righting Reflex and sedation with the differences in alcohol sensitivity between males and females most pronounced during the late subjective day. Recovery of motor reflexes following alcohol sedation also exhibited circadian modulation in male and female flies, although the circadian clock did not modulate the difference in recovery times between the sexes. These studies provide a framework outlining how the circadian clock modulates alcohol

  13. Treatment of a Circadian Rhythm Disturbance in a 2-Year-Old Blind Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindell, J. A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The use of sleep scheduling and a daytime routine for the treatment of circadian rhythm disorder was found helpful in decreasing a blind 2-year old's nighttime wake periods and daytime sleepiness. (DB)

  14. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  15. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H. T.

    2016-02-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle.

  16. The circadian modulation of leptin-controlled bone formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice with circadian gene Period and Cryptochrome mutations develop high bone mass early in life. Such a phenotype is accompanied by an increase in osteoblast numbers in mutant bone and cannot be corrected by leptin intracerebroventricular infusion. Thus, the molecular clock plays a key role in lepti...

  17. Circadian rhythms in a long-term duration space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpatov, Alexey M.

    In order to maintain cosmonaut health and performance, it is important for the work-rest schedule to follow human circadian rhythms (CR). What happens with CR in space flight? Investigations of CR in mammals revealed, that the circadian phase in flight is less stable, probably due to a displacement of the range of entrainment, resulting from internal period change (the latter was confirmed on insects). The circadian period may be a gravity-dependent parameter. If so, the basic biological requirement for the day length might be different in weightlessness. On this basis, a higher risk of desynchronosis is expected in a long-duration space flight. As a countermeasure, a non-24-hr day length could be suggested, being close to the internal circadian period (in humans about 25 hr). Taking into account a possible displacement of period in weightlessness, it seems reasonable to establish a flexible work-rest schedule, capable to follow the body temperature CR by means of biofeedback.

  18. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system’s range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15–24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22–24 h, but not to that with T = 15–21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15–18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22–24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles. PMID:26395309

  19. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-09-23

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system's range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15-24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22-24 h, but not to that with T = 15-21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15-18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22-24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles.

  20. Aging human circadian rhythms: conventional wisdom may not always be right

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the ways in which the circadian rhythms of older people are different from those of younger adults. After a brief discussion of clinical issues, the review describes the conventional wisdom regarding age-related changes in circadian rhythms. These can be summarized as four assertions regarding what happens to people as they get older: 1) the amplitude of their circadian rhythms reduces, 2) the phase of their circadian rhythms becomes earlier, 3) their natural free-running period (tau) shortens, and 4) their ability to tolerate abrupt phase shifts (e.g., from jet travel or night work) worsens. The review then discusses the empirical evidence for and against these assertions and discusses some alternative explanations. The conclusions are that although older people undoubtedly have earlier circadian phases than younger adults, and have more trouble coping with shift work and jet lag, evidence for the assertions about rhythm amplitude and tau are, at best, mixed.

  1. Cross-talk between circadian clocks, sleep-wake cycles, and metabolic networks: Dispelling the darkness.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-04-01

    Integration of knowledge concerning circadian rhythms, metabolic networks, and sleep-wake cycles is imperative for unraveling the mysteries of biological cycles and their underlying mechanisms. During the last decade, enormous progress in circadian biology research has provided a plethora of new insights into the molecular architecture of circadian clocks. However, the recent identification of autonomous redox oscillations in cells has expanded our view of the clockwork beyond conventional transcription/translation feedback loop models, which have been dominant since the first circadian period mutants were identified in fruit fly. Consequently, non-transcriptional timekeeping mechanisms have been proposed, and the antioxidant peroxiredoxin proteins have been identified as conserved markers for 24-hour rhythms. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of interdependencies amongst circadian rhythms, sleep homeostasis, redox cycles, and other cellular metabolic networks. We speculate that systems-level investigations implementing integrated multi-omics approaches could provide novel mechanistic insights into the connectivity between daily cycles and metabolic systems.

  2. Circadian regulation of human sleep and age-related changes in its timing, consolidation and EEG characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, D. J.; Duffy, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates the timing and consolidation of sleep by generating a paradoxical rhythm of sleep propensity; the circadian drive for wakefulness peaks at the end of the day spent awake, ie close to the onset of melatonin secretion at 21.00-22.00 h and the circadian drive for sleep crests shortly before habitual waking-up time. With advancing age, ie after early adulthood, sleep consolidation declines, and time of awakening and the rhythms of body temperature, plasma melatonin and cortisol shift to an earlier clock hour. The variability of the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms increases, and in old age sleep is more susceptible to internal arousing stimuli associated with circadian misalignment. The propensity to awaken from sleep advances relative to the body temperature nadir in older people, a change that is opposite to the phase delay of awakening relative to internal circadian rhythms associated with morningness in young people. Age-related changes do not appear to be associated with a shortening of the circadian period or a reduction of the circadian drive for wake maintenance. These changes may be related to changes in the sleep process itself, such as reductions in slow-wave sleep and sleep spindles as well as a reduced strength of the circadian signal promoting sleep in the early morning hours. Putative mediators and modulators of circadian sleep regulation are discussed.

  3. AMPK at the crossroads of circadian clocks and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Sabine D; Lamia, Katja A

    2013-02-25

    Circadian clocks coordinate behavior and physiology with daily environmental cycles and thereby optimize the timing of metabolic processes such as glucose production and insulin secretion. Such circadian regulation of metabolism provides an adaptive advantage in diverse organisms. Mammalian clocks are primarily based on a transcription and translation feedback loop in which a heterodimeric complex of the transcription factors CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1) activates the expression of its own repressors, the period (PER1-3) and cryptochrome (CRY1 and CRY2) proteins. Posttranslational modification of these core clock components is critical for setting clock time or adjusting the speed of the clock. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is one of several metabolic sensors that have been reported to transmit energy-dependent signals to the mammalian clock. AMPK does so by driving the phosphorylation and destabilization of CRY and PER proteins. In addition, AMPK subunit composition, sub-cellular localization, and substrate phosphorylation are dependent on clock time. Given the well-established role of AMPK in diverse aspects of metabolic physiology, the reciprocal regulation of AMPK and circadian clocks likely plays an important role in circadian metabolic regulation.

  4. Sleep and Circadian Rhythms in Four Orbiting Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Billy, Bart D.; Kennedy, Kathy S.; Willrich, Linda M.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The study of human sleep and circadian rhythms in space has both operational and scientific significance. Operationally, U.S. Spaceflight is moving away from brief missions with durations of less than one week. Most space shuttle missions now last two weeks or more, and future plans involving space stations, lunar bases and interplanetary missions all presume that people will be living away from the gravity and time cues of earth for months at a time. Thus, missions are moving away from situations where astronauts can "tough it out" for comparatively brief durations, to situations where sleep and circadian disruptions are likely to become chronic, and thus resistant to short term pharmacological or behavioral manipulations. As well as the operational significance, there is a strong theoretical imperative for studying the sleep and circadian rhythms of people who are removed from the gravity and time cues of earth. Like other animals, in humans, the Circadian Timekeeping System (CTS) is entrained to the correct period (24h) and temporal orientation by various time cues ("zeitgebers"), the most powerful of which is the alternation of daylight and darkness. In leaving Earth, astronauts are removing themselves from the prime zeitgeber of their circadian system -- the 24h alternation of daylight and darkness.

  5. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide mediates circadian rhythms in mammalian olfactory bulb and olfaction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E; Herzog, Erik D

    2014-04-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system.

  6. Maternal-fetal communication of circadian phase in a precocious rodent, the spiny mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, D.R.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1987-10-01

    The development of circadian rhythms was examined in a precocious rodent species, the spiny mouse. Spiny mouse pups born and reared in constant darkness expressed robust circadian rhythms in locomotor activity as early as day 5 of live. Free-running activity rhythms of pups born and reared in constant darkness were coordinated with the dam on the day of birth. Postnatal maternal influences on pup rhythmicity are minimal in this species, as pups fostered on the day of birth to dams whose circadian phases were opposite to the pups' original dams were coordinated with their original dams on the day of birth. Studies using 2-deoxy-D-(1-{sup 14}C)-glucose authoradiography showed that there were synchronous (coordinated) rhythms in metabolic activity in the maternal and fetal suprachiasmatic nuclei, directly demonstrating prenatal coordination of maternal and fetal rhythmicity. Maternal-fetal coordination of circadian phase was not the result of direct entrainment of the fetuses to the environmental light-dark cycle. These results demonstrate that there is prenatal communication of circadian phase in this precocious species, without demonstrable postnatal maternal influences on pup circadian rhythmicity. Spiny mice therefore represent an important animal model in which circadian rhythms in the postnatal period can be used to precisely assess prenatal influences on circadian phase.

  7. Circadian rhythms of temperature and activity in obese and lean Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system is important in the regulation of feeding and metabolism, both of which are aberrant in the obese Zucker rat. This study tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities involve a deficit in circadian regulation by examining the circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in lean and obese Zucker rats exposed to normal light-dark cycles, constant light, and constant dark. Significant deficits in both daily mean and circadian amplitude of temperature and activity were found in obese Zucker female rats relative to lean controls in all lighting conditions. However, the circadian period of obese Zucker rats did not exhibit differences relative to lean controls in either of the constant lighting conditions. These results indicate that although the circadian regulation of temperature and activity in obese Zucker female rats is in fact depressed, obese rats do exhibit normal entrainment and pacemaker functions in the circadian timing system. The results suggest a deficit in the process that generates the amplitude of the circadian rhythm.

  8. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    PubMed

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  9. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiologic homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ-system, and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults shows circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system, is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also affect their progression. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiological homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ–system and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults exhibit circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also impact their progression. Emerging evidence suggest that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26568123

  11. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Causton, Helen C; Feeney, Kevin A; Ziegler, Christine A; O'Neill, John S

    2015-04-20

    Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock.

  12. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  13. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network 'purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  14. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network `purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  15. Cryptochromes Define a Novel Circadian Clock Mechanism in Monarch Butterflies That May Underlie Sun Compass Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haisun; Sauman, Ivo; Yuan, Quan; Casselman, Amy; Emery-Le, Myai; Emery, Patrick; Reppert, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry), designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL) in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cryb mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain—as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. PMID:18184036

  16. Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haisun; Sauman, Ivo; Yuan, Quan; Casselman, Amy; Emery-Le, Myai; Emery, Patrick; Reppert, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry), designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL) in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cry(b) mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain-as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass.

  17. Synchronization of the mammalian circadian timing system: Light can control peripheral clocks independently of the SCN clock: alternate routes of entrainment optimize the alignment of the body's circadian clock network with external time.

    PubMed

    Husse, Jana; Eichele, Gregor; Oster, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    A vast network of cellular circadian clocks regulates 24-hour rhythms of behavior and physiology in mammals. Complex environments are characterized by multiple, and often conflicting time signals demanding flexible mechanisms of adaptation of endogenous rhythms to external time. Traditionally this process of circadian entrainment has been conceptualized in a hierarchical scheme with a light-reset master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamus that subsequently aligns subordinate peripheral clocks with each other and with external time. Here we review new experiments using conditional mouse genetics suggesting that resetting of the circadian system occurs in a more "federated" and tissue-specific fashion, which allows for increased noise resistance and plasticity of circadian timekeeping under natural conditions.

  18. FTO modulates circadian rhythms and inhibits the CLOCK-BMAL1-induced transcription.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Shie, Shian-Sen; Hsieh, I-Chang; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2015-08-28

    Variations in the human fat mass and obesity-associated gene, which encodes FTO, an 2-oxoglutarate-dependent nucleic acid demethylase, are associated with increased risk of obesity. These FTO variations were recently shown to affect IRX3 and the exact function of FTO is still controversial. Obesity is closely linked to circadian rhythm. To understand the role of FTO in circadian rhythm, we analyzed the circadian rhythm of FTO deficient mice. FTO deficient mice had robust circadian locomotor activity rhythms with prolonged periods. The light-induced phase shifts of circadian rhythms were also significantly affected in FTO deficient mice. Tissue explants of FTO deficient mice maintained robust peripheral rhythms with prolonged period. Overexpress of FTO represses the transcriptional activation by CLOCK and BMAL1. Core clock genes expression of mRNA and protein were also altered in FTO deficient mice. Furthermore, FTO co-immunoprecipitated with CRY1/2 in a circadian manner. These results indicate a fundamental link between the circadian rhythm and FTO and extend the function of FTO to the core clockwork machinery.

  19. Evolution of photoperiodic time measurement is independent of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kevin J; Dake, Sabrina J; Bradshaw, William E; Holzapfel, Christina M

    2009-04-01

    For over 70 years, researchers have debated whether the ability to use day length as a cue for the timing of seasonal events (photoperiodism) is related to the endogenous circadian clock that regulates the timing of daily events. Models of photoperiodism include two components: (1) a photoperiodic timer that measures the length of the day, and (2) a photoperiodic counter that elicits the downstream photoperiodic response after a threshold number of days has been counted. Herein, we show that there is no geographical pattern of genetic association between the expression of the circadian clock and the photoperiodic timer or counter. We conclude that the photoperiodic timer and counter have evolved independently of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii and hence, the evolutionary modification of photoperiodism throughout the range of W. smithii has not been causally mediated by a corresponding evolution of the circadian clock.

  20. Synchronization of the mammalian circadian timing system: Light can control peripheral clocks independently of the SCN clock

    PubMed Central

    Husse, Jana; Eichele, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A vast network of cellular circadian clocks regulates 24‐hour rhythms of behavior and physiology in mammals. Complex environments are characterized by multiple, and often conflicting time signals demanding flexible mechanisms of adaptation of endogenous rhythms to external time. Traditionally this process of circadian entrainment has been conceptualized in a hierarchical scheme with a light‐reset master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamus that subsequently aligns subordinate peripheral clocks with each other and with external time. Here we review new experiments using conditional mouse genetics suggesting that resetting of the circadian system occurs in a more “federated” and tissue‐specific fashion, which allows for increased noise resistance and plasticity of circadian timekeeping under natural conditions. PMID:26252253

  1. Endogenous rhythm of absence epilepsy: relationship with general motor activity and sleep-wake states.

    PubMed

    Smyk, Magdalena K; Coenen, Anton M L; Lewandowski, Marian H; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    The rhythms of spontaneously occurring seizures (spike-wave discharges, SWD) and motor activity, as well as the relationship between SWD and sleep-wake states were investigated in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. In order to establish whether SWD are controlled by external (Zeitgebers) or by endogenous factors such as circadian influences or the state of vigilance, the study was performed in entrained and constant dim light conditions. EEG and motor activity were recorded in the 12:12 light-dark cycle and in constant dim light conditions. Circadian rhythmicity was found both for motor activity and the occurrence of SWD in conditions of entrainment. In constant dim light conditions also circadian rhythms emerged, however, the change in circadian parameters was opposite for the rhythm of SWD and motor activity. SWD were preceded mostly by passive wakefulness and by slow-wave sleep in both experimental conditions. It can be concluded that the rhythm of SWD seems to be generated and controlled by an endogenous mechanism distinct from that which controls the rhythm of motor activity. The relationship between SWD and sleep-wake states preceding their occurrences appeared to be unchanged, suggesting that the mechanism of generation of SWD is independent of the circadian timing system.

  2. Circadian rhythms in electrical circuits of Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Wooten, Joseph D; Waite, Astian J; Brown, Corydon R; Markin, Vladislav S

    2011-10-15

    The biological clock regulates a wide range of physiological processes in plants. Here we show circadian variation of the Clivia miniata responses to electrical stimulation. The biologically closed electrochemical circuits in the leaves of C. miniata (Kaffir lily), which regulate its physiology, were analyzed in vivo using the charge stimulation method. The electrostimulation was provided with different voltages and electrical charges. Resistance between Ag/AgCl electrodes in the leaf of C. miniata was higher at night than during the day or the following day in the darkness. The biologically closed electrical circuits with voltage gated ion channels in C. miniata are activated the next day, even in the darkness. C. miniata memorizes daytime and nighttime. At continuous light, C. miniata recognizes nighttime and increases the input resistance to the nighttime value even under light. These results show that the circadian clock can be maintained endogenously and has electrochemical oscillators, which can activate voltage gated ion channels in biologically closed electrochemical circuits. The activation of voltage gated channels depends on the applied voltage, electrical charge and speed of transmission of electrical energy from the electrostimulator to the C. miniata leaves. We present the equivalent electrical circuits in C. miniata and its circadian variation to explain the experimental data.

  3. Disrupting Circadian Homeostasis of Sympathetic Signaling Promotes Tumor Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susie; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Herron, Alan J.; Moore, David D.; Fu, Loning

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per) or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry) are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. Conclusions/Significance Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor. PMID:20539819

  4. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Park, Noheon; Kim, Hee-Dae; Cheon, Solmi; Row, Hansang; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Dong-Hee; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC) allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC) mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC) mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  5. Circadian rhythms identified in Caenorhabditis elegans by in vivo long-term monitoring of a bioluminescent reporter.

    PubMed

    Goya, María Eugenia; Romanowski, Andrés; Caldart, Carlos S; Bénard, Claire Y; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-11-29

    Circadian rhythms are based on endogenous clocks that allow organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior by entrainment to the solar day and, in turn, to select the optimal times for most biological variables. Diverse model systems-including mice, flies, fungi, plants, and bacteria-have provided important insights into the mechanisms of circadian rhythmicity. However, the general principles that govern the circadian clock of Caenorhabditis elegans have remained largely elusive. Here we report robust molecular circadian rhythms in C elegans recorded with a bioluminescence assay in vivo and demonstrate the main features of the circadian system of the nematode. By constructing a luciferase-based reporter coupled to the promoter of the suppressor of activated let-60 Ras (sur-5) gene, we show in both population and single-nematode assays that C elegans expresses ∼24-h rhythms that can be entrained by light/dark and temperature cycles. We provide evidence that these rhythms are temperature-compensated and can be re-entrained after phase changes of the synchronizing agents. In addition, we demonstrate that light and temperature sensing requires the photoreceptors LITE and GUR-3, and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit TAX-2. Our results shed light on C elegans circadian biology and demonstrate evolutionarily conserved features in the circadian system of the nematode.

  6. Dissonance between Parent-Selected Bedtimes and Young Children's Circadian Physiology Influences Nighttime Settling Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBourgeois, Monique K.; Wright, Kenneth P., Jr.; LeBourgeois, Hannah B.; Jenni, Oskar G.

    2013-01-01

    Nighttime settling difficulties (i.e., bedtime resistance, sleep-onset delay) occur in about 25% of young children and are associated with attentional, behavioral, and emotional problems. We examined whether the timing of internal (endogenous) circadian melatonin phase (i.e., dim light melatonin onset; DLMO) and its relationship with…

  7. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  8. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the physiology of endogenous pyrogen (EP), the fever-producing factor of cellular origin. Included are: its hormone-like role, its molecular nature, bioassay procedures, cellular production and mechanisms of EP action. (SA)

  9. Circadian rhythms in human salivary flow rate and composition

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, C.

    1972-01-01

    1. Unstimulated whole saliva and parotid saliva stimulated at a constant flow rate of 1·0 ml./min were collected from eight subjects at about 07.00, 11.00, 14.00, 17.00 and 22.00 hr and oral temperature was recorded several times daily for time spans of between 4 and 26 days. A least-squares cosine wave was fitted to the data to test for the presence and characteristics of circadian rhythms. 2. Estimates of mean level, amplitude, acrophase and period were obtained for different components and the results were subjected to cosinor analysis. 3. Unstimulated whole saliva showed significant circadian rhythms in flow rate and in the concentrations of sodium and chloride but not in protein, potassium, calcium, phosphate or urea. 4. Stimulated parotid saliva showed significant circadian rhythms in the concentrations of protein, sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride but not in phosphate or urea 5. Oral temperature showed a circadian rhythm which, like the salivary rhythms, was of a 24.0 hr periodicity. PMID:5016036

  10. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology.

  11. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology. PMID:26361874

  12. Circadian glucocorticoid oscillations promote learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Liston, Conor; Cichon, Joseph M; Jeanneteau, Freddy; Jia, Zhengping; Chao, Moses V; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2013-06-01

    Excessive glucocorticoid exposure during chronic stress causes synapse loss and learning impairment. Under normal physiological conditions, glucocorticoid activity oscillates in synchrony with the circadian rhythm. Whether and how endogenous glucocorticoid oscillations modulate synaptic plasticity and learning is unknown. Here we show that circadian glucocorticoid peaks promote postsynaptic dendritic spine formation in the mouse cortex after motor skill learning, whereas troughs are required for stabilizing newly formed spines that are important for long-term memory retention. Conversely, chronic and excessive exposure to glucocorticoids eliminates learning-associated new spines and disrupts previously acquired memories. Furthermore, we show that glucocorticoids promote rapid spine formation through a non-transcriptional mechanism by means of the LIM kinase-cofilin pathway and increase spine elimination through transcriptional mechanisms involving mineralocorticoid receptor activation. Together, these findings indicate that tightly regulated circadian glucocorticoid oscillations are important for learning-dependent synaptic formation and maintenance. They also delineate a new signaling mechanism underlying these effects.